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Sample records for acid oxidase aco

  1. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs)

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, Ronald M.; Carraro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus, we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and derived. PMID

  2. A fifth member of the tomato 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase gene family harbours a leucine zipper and is anaerobically induced.

    PubMed

    Sell, Simone; Hehl, Reinhard

    2005-02-01

    Using the leucine zipper domain of a small anaerobically induced bZIP transcription factor in a yeast two hybrid screen, anaerobically induced genes were identified. One peptide corresponds to an anaerobically induced IDS4-like protein that maybe involved in G-protein signaling. Surprisingly, another interacting peptide corresponds to a novel anaerobically induced 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase, designated ACO5. ACO5 harbours a leucine zipper and transcription is mainly induced in fruits and to a lesser extend in leaves. The role of ACO5 in the low oxygen response of tomato is discussed. PMID:16040352

  3. Characterization and expression profiles of MaACS and MaACO genes from mulberry (Morus alba L.)*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-ying; Lü, Rui-hua; Li, Jun; Zhao, Ai-chun; Wang, Xi-ling; Diane, Umuhoza; Wang, Xiao-hong; Wang, Chuan-hong; Yu, Ya-sheng; Han, Shu-mei; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Mao-de

    2014-01-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) are encoded by multigene families and are involved in fruit ripening by catalyzing the production of ethylene throughout the development of fruit. However, there are no reports on ACS or ACO genes in mulberry, partly because of the limited molecular research background. In this study, we have obtained five ACS gene sequences and two ACO gene sequences from Morus Genome Database. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of MaACO1 and MaACO2 showed that their amino acids are conserved compared with ACO proteins from other species. MaACS1 and MaACS2 are type I, MaACS3 and MaACS4 are type II, and MaACS5 is type III, with different C-terminal sequences. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) expression analysis showed that the transcripts of MaACS genes were strongly expressed in fruit, and more weakly in other tissues. The expression of MaACO1 and MaACO2 showed different patterns in various mulberry tissues. MaACS and MaACO genes demonstrated two patterns throughout the development of mulberry fruit, and both of them were strongly up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and ethephon. PMID:25001221

  4. Ascorbic acid and L-gulonolactone oxidase in lagomorphs.

    PubMed

    Jenness, R; Birney, E C; Ayaz, K L

    1978-01-01

    1. The activity of L-gulonolactone oxidase (EC 1.1.3.8) in the liver of eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) is about 10-fold greater in winter than in summer. 2. L-gulonolactone oxidase activity is low and tissue ascorbate high during all seasons in snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus). 3. Liver contents of ascorbate fall to low levels in L. americanus fed on rabbit chow in the laboratory. 4. The activity of L-gulonolactone oxidase in liver of Sylvilagus and Oryctolagus is depressed by feeding high levels of L-ascorbic acid. 5. The New Zealand White breed of domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) has considerably higher levels of L-gulonolactone oxidase and liver ascorbate than does the Dutch breed. 6. In a wild population of Oryctolagus sampled in Australia L-gulonolactone oxidase levels were intermediate between those of the two domestic breeds and more variable than either. PMID:318384

  5. Complementary DNA cloning of the pear 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase gene and agrobacterium-mediated anti-sense genetic transformation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically modify plantlets of the Chinese yali pear to reduce their expression of ripening-associated 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) and therefore increase the shelf-life of the fruit. Primers were designed with selectivity for the conserved regions of published ACO gene sequences, and yali complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning was performed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The obtained cDNA fragment contained 831 base pairs, encoding 276 amino acid residues, and shared no less than 94% nucleotide sequence identity with other published ACO genes. The cDNA fragment was inversely inserted into a pBI121 expression vector, between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase terminator, in order to construct the anti‑sense expression vector of the ACO gene; it was transfected into cultured yali plants using Agrobacterium LBA4404. Four independent transgenic lines of pear plantlets were obtained and validated by PCR analysis. A Southern blot assay revealed that there were three transgenic lines containing a single copy of exogenous gene and one line with double copies. The present study provided germplasm resources for the cultivation of novel storage varieties of pears, therefore providing a reference for further applications of anti‑sense RNA technology in the genetic improvement of pears and other fruit. PMID:26460204

  6. L-amino acid oxidases with specificity for basic L-amino acids in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gau, Achim E; Heindl, Achim; Nodop, Anke; Kahmann, Uwe; Pistorius, Elfriede K

    2007-01-01

    The two closely related fresh water cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 have previously been shown to constitutively express a FAD-containing L-amino acid oxidase with high specificity for basic L-amino acids (L-arginine being the best substrate). In this paper we show that such an enzyme is also present in the fresh water cyanobacterium Synechococcus cedrorum PCC 6908. In addition, an improved evaluation of the nucleotide/amino acid sequence of the L-amino acid oxidase of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 (encoded by the aoxA gene) with respect to the FAD-binding site and a translocation pathway signal sequence will be given. Moreover, the genome sequences of 24 cyanobacteria will be evaluated for the occurrence of an aoxA-similar gene. In the evaluated cyanobacteria 15 genes encoding an L-amino acid oxidase-similar protein will be found. PMID:17542496

  7. D-amino acid oxidase from the yeast Trigonopsis variabilis.

    PubMed

    Kubicek-Pranz, E M; Röhr, M

    1985-04-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (EC 1.4.3.3) has been purified from the yeast Trigonopsis variabilis by the application of ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, salt precipitation, gel filtration, and hydroxyapatite adsorption. Alternatively the last two steps can be substituted by a single fast protein liquid chromatographic ion-exchange step (Mono Q). The enzyme appeared homogeneous in PAGE, but small amounts of impurities (not exceeding 5% of total protein) appeared in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE. Its Mr in SDS-PAGE is 39,000; it exhibits an isoelectric point of 4.8 and contains 7% (w/v) covalently bound carbohydrate. Its absorption spectrum is similar to hog kidney D-amino acid oxidase, indicating the presence of bound FAD, which, however, could not be separated from the enzyme under non-denaturing conditions. The enzyme is inhibited by SH-oxidizing agents, but not by metal-chelate formers and not by benzoate or toluene. It uses O2 exclusively as the only H acceptor. Km and Vmax values were determined for 15 D-amino acids, which, among 23 tested, were substrates of the enzyme. The enzyme has highest affinity for D-phenylalanine and D-leucine, but maximal activity is obtained with D-citrulline and D-isoleucine. The specific activity of the purified preparation is even higher than that of the commercially available hog kidney enzyme (21.7 vs 16 U/mg). The yeast enzyme may be a useful analytical and preparative tool in view of the difference between its substrate specificity and that of the hog enzyme. PMID:2865242

  8. Expression of Ascorbic Acid Oxidase in Zucchini Squash (Cucurbita pepo L.).

    PubMed

    Lin, L S; Varner, J E

    1991-05-01

    The expression of ascorbic acid oxidase was studied in zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L.), one of the most abundant natural sources of the enzyme. In the developing fruit, specific activity of ascorbic acid oxidase was highest between 4 and 6 days after anthesis. Protein and mRNA levels followed the same trend as enzyme activity. Highest growth rate of the fruit occurred before 6 days after anthesis. Within a given fruit, ascorbic acid oxidase activity and mRNA level were highest in the epidermis, and lowest in the central placental region. In leaf tissue, ascorbic acid oxidase activity was higher in young leaves, and very low in old leaves. Within a given leaf, enzyme activity was highest in the fast-growing region (approximately the lower third of the blade), and lowest in the slow-growing region (near leaf apex). High expression of ascorbic acid oxidase at a stage when rapid growth is occurring (in both fruits and leaves), and localization of the enzyme in the fruit epidermis, where cells are under greatest tension during rapid growth in girth, suggest that ascorbic acid oxidase might be involved in reorganization of the cell wall to allow for expansion. Based on the known chemistry of dehydroascorbic acid, the end product of the ascorbic acid oxidase-catalyzed reaction, we have proposed several hypotheses to explain how dehydroascorbic acid might cause cell wall "loosening." PMID:16668145

  9. EXPRESSION OF TURKEY TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND ACYL COA OXIDASE IN DIFFERENT TISSUES AND GENETIC POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several transcription factors are involved in regulating lipid metabolism in various animal tissues. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma and PPAR alpha regulate both lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Gene fragments for PPAR gamma, PPAR alpha, and acyl CoA oxidase (ACO) have b...

  10. Postharvest Analysis of Lowland Transgenic Tomato Fruits Harboring hpRNAi-ACO1 Construct

    PubMed Central

    Behboodian, Bita; Mohd Ali, Zainon; Ismail, Ismanizan; Zainal, Zamri

    2012-01-01

    The plant hormone, ethylene, is an important regulator which involved in regulating fruit ripening and flower senescence. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was employed to silence the genes involved in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. This was achieved by blocking the expression of specific gene encoding the ACC oxidase. Initially, cDNA corresponding to ACO1 of lowland tomato cultivar (MT1), which has high identity with ACO1 of Solanum lycopersicum in GenBank, was cloned through RT-PCR. Using a partial coding region of ACO1, one hpRNAi transformation vector was constructed and expressed ectopically under the 35S promoter. Results showed that transgenic lines harboring the hpRNA-ACO1 construct had lower ethylene production and a longer shelf life of 32 days as compared to 10 days for wild-type fruits. Changes in cell wall degrading enzyme activities were also investigated in cases where the transgenic fruits exhibited reduced rates of firmness loss, which can be associated with a decrease in pectin methylesterase (PME) and polygalacturonase (PG) activities. However, no significant change was detected in both transgenic and wild-type fruits in terms of β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity and levels of total soluble solid, titratable acid and ascorbic acid. PMID:22919320

  11. Replacement of a terminal cytochrome c oxidase by ubiquinol oxidase during the evolution of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Minenosuke; Fukushima, Kota; Kayama, Chiho; Arimitsu, Misato; Hirakawa, Hideki; Toyama, Hirohide; Adachi, Osao; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial aerobic respiratory chain has a terminal oxidase of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily, comprised of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and ubiquinol oxidase (UOX); UOX evolved from COX. Acetobacter pasteurianus, an α-Proteobacterial acetic acid bacterium (AAB), produces UOX but not COX, although it has a partial COX gene cluster, ctaBD and ctaA, in addition to the UOX operon cyaBACD. We expressed ctaB and ctaA genes of A. pasteurianus in Escherichia coli and demonstrated their function as heme O and heme A synthases. We also found that the absence of ctaD function is likely due to accumulated mutations. These COX genes are closely related to other α-Proteobacterial COX proteins. However, the UOX operons of AAB are closely related to those of the β/γ-Proteobacteria (γ-type UOX), distinct from the α/β-Proteobacterial proteins (α-type UOX), but different from the other γ-type UOX proteins by the absence of the cyoE heme O synthase. Thus, we suggest that A. pasteurianus has a functional γ-type UOX but has lost the COX genes, with the exception of ctaB and ctaA, which supply the heme O and A moieties for UOX. Our results suggest that, in AAB, COX was replaced by β/γ-Proteobacterial UOX via horizontal gene transfer, while the COX genes, except for the heme O/A synthase genes, were lost. PMID:24862920

  12. Spatiotemporal Localization of d-Amino Acid Oxidase and d-Aspartate Oxidases during Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Yasuaki; Katane, Masumi; Kawata, Tomonori; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Kobuna, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Taro; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasuhito

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations have shown that a variety of d-amino acids are present in living organisms and that they possibly play important roles in physiological functions in the body. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) and d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) are degradative enzymes stereospecific for d-amino acids. They have been identified in various organisms, including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, although the significance of these enzymes and the relevant functions of d-amino acids remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal localization of C. elegans DAO and DDOs (DDO-1, DDO-2, and DDO-3) and measured the levels of several d- and l-amino acids in wild-type C. elegans and four mutants in which each gene for DAO and the DDOs was partially deleted and thereby inactivated. Furthermore, several phenotypes of these mutant strains were characterized. The results reported in this study indicate that C. elegans DAO and DDOs are involved in egg-laying events and the early development of C. elegans. In particular, DDOs appear to play important roles in the development and maturation of germ cells. This work provides novel and useful insights into the physiological functions of these enzymes and d-amino acids in multicellular organisms. PMID:22393259

  13. Spatiotemporal localization of D-amino acid oxidase and D-aspartate oxidases during development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Yasuaki; Katane, Masumi; Kawata, Tomonori; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Kobuna, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Taro; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasuhito; Homma, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Recent investigations have shown that a variety of D-amino acids are present in living organisms and that they possibly play important roles in physiological functions in the body. D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) and D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) are degradative enzymes stereospecific for D-amino acids. They have been identified in various organisms, including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, although the significance of these enzymes and the relevant functions of D-amino acids remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal localization of C. elegans DAO and DDOs (DDO-1, DDO-2, and DDO-3) and measured the levels of several D- and L-amino acids in wild-type C. elegans and four mutants in which each gene for DAO and the DDOs was partially deleted and thereby inactivated. Furthermore, several phenotypes of these mutant strains were characterized. The results reported in this study indicate that C. elegans DAO and DDOs are involved in egg-laying events and the early development of C. elegans. In particular, DDOs appear to play important roles in the development and maturation of germ cells. This work provides novel and useful insights into the physiological functions of these enzymes and D-amino acids in multicellular organisms. PMID:22393259

  14. Expression of ascorbic acid oxidase in zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. )

    1991-05-01

    The expression of ascorbic acid oxidase was studied in zuchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L.), one of the most abundant natural sources of the enzyme. In the developing fruit, specific activity of ascorbic acid oxidase was highest between 4 and 6 days after anthesis. Protein and mRNA levels followed the same trend as enzyme activity. Highest growth rate of the fruit occurred before 6 days after anthesis. Within a given fruit, ascorbic acid oxidase activity was higher in young leaves, and very low in old leaves. Within a given leaf, enzyme activity was highest in the fast-growing region (approximately the lower third of the blade), and lowest in the central placental region. In leaf tissue, ascorbic acid oxidase activity was higher in young leaves, and very low in old leaves. Within a given leaf, enzyme activity was highest in the fast-growing region (approximately the lower third of the blade), and lowest in the slow-growing region (near leaf apex). High expression of ascorbic acid oxidase at a stage when rapid growth is occurring (in both fruits and leaves), and localization of the enzyme in the fruit epidermis, where cells are under greatest tension during rapid growth in girth, suggest that ascorbic acid oxidase might be involved in reorganization of the cell wall to allow for expansion. Based on the known chemistry of dehydroascorbic acid, the end product of the ascorbic acid oxidase-catalyzed reaction, the authors have proposed several hypotheses to explain how dehydroascorbic acid might cause cell wall loosening.

  15. Oxidase-peroxidase enzymes of Datura innoxia. Oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, V S; Mahadevan, S; Kumar, S A

    1975-01-01

    An enzyme system from Datura innoxia roots oxidizing formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was purified 38-fold by conventional methods such as (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, negative adsorption on alumina Cy gel and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The purified enzyme was shown to catalyse the stoicheiometric oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester to benzoylformic acid ethyl ester and formic acid, utilizing molecular O2. Substrate analogues such as phenylacetaldehyde and phenylpyruvate were oxidized at a very low rate, and formylphenylacetonitrile was an inhilating agents, cyanide, thiol compounds and ascorbic acid. This enzyme was identical with an oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme. Another oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme which separated on DEAE-chromatography also showed formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester oxidase activity, albeit to a lesser extent. The properties of the two isoenzymes of the oxidase were compared and shown to differ in their oxidation and peroxidation properties. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was also catalysed by horseradish peroxidase. The Datura isoenzymes exhibited typical haemoprotein spectra. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was different from other peroxidase-catalysed reactions in not being activated by either Mn2+ or monophenols. The oxidation was inhibited by several mono- and poly-phenols and by catalase. A reaction mechanism for the oxidation is proposed. PMID:997

  16. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  17. Snake Venom L-Amino Acid Oxidases: Trends in Pharmacology and Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Izidoro, Luiz Fernando M.; Sobrinho, Juliana C.; Mendes, Mirian M.; Costa, Tássia R.; Grabner, Amy N.; Rodrigues, Veridiana M.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Zanchi, Fernando B.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.; Soares, Andreimar M.

    2014-01-01

    L-amino acid oxidases are enzymes found in several organisms, including venoms of snakes, where they contribute to the toxicity of ophidian envenomation. Their toxicity is primarily due to enzymatic activity, but other mechanisms have been proposed recently which require further investigation. L-amino acid oxidases exert biological and pharmacological effects, including actions on platelet aggregation and the induction of apoptosis, hemorrhage, and cytotoxicity. These proteins present a high biotechnological potential for the development of antimicrobial, antitumor, and antiprotozoan agents. This review provides an overview of the biochemical properties and pharmacological effects of snake venom L-amino acid oxidases, their structure/activity relationship, and supposed mechanisms of action described so far. PMID:24738050

  18. Oxidation of lactose to lactobionic acid by a Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase: kinetics and operational stability.

    PubMed

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Nielsen, Per Munk; Villadsen, John

    2007-07-01

    Oxidation of lactose to lactobionic acid by a Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was studied. The K(m)-value for lactose, obtained by a traditional enzymatic assay, was 0.066 mM at pH 6.4 and 38 degrees C. The effect of oxygen on the enzymatic rate of reaction as well as the operational stability of the enzyme was studied by performing reactions at constant pH and temperature in a stirred tank reactor. Catalase was included in all reactions to avoid inhibition and deactivation of the oxidase by hydrogen peroxide. At pH 6.4 and 38 degrees C, K(m) for oxygen was 0.97 mM, while the catalytical rate constant, k(cat), was 94 s(-1). Furthermore, we found that the operational stability of the oxidase was dependent on the type of base used for neutralization of the acid produced. Thus, when 2 M NaOH was used for neutralization of a reaction medium containing 50 mM phosphate buffer, significant deactivation of the oxidase was observed. Also, we found that the oxidase was protected against deactivation by base at high lactose concentrations. A simple model is proposed to explain the obtained results. PMID:17154316

  19. Comparative characterization of three D-aspartate oxidases and one D-amino acid oxidase from Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Katane, Masumi; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Seida, Yousuke; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Homma, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Previously, we cloned cDNAs for four Caenorhabditis elegans genes (F20 Hp, C47Ap, F18Ep, and Y69Ap genes) that were annotated in the database as encoding D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) or D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) proteins. These genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant C47Ap and F18Ep were shown to have functional DDO activities, while Y69Ap had functional DAO activity. In this study, we improved the E. coli culture conditions for the production of recombinant F20 Hp and, following purification of the protein, revealed that it has functional DDO activity. The kinetic properties of recombinant C47Ap (DDO-1), F18Ep (DDO-2), F20 Hp (DDO-3), and Y69Ap (DAO) were also determined and compared with recombinant human DDO and DAO. In contrast to the low catalytic efficiency of human DDO for D-Glu, all three C. elegans DDOs showed higher catalytic efficiencies for D-Glu than D-Asp or N-methyl-D-Asp. The catalytic efficiency of C. elegans DAO for D-Ser was substantially lower than that of human DAO, while the C. elegans DAO was more efficient at deamination of basic D-amino acids (D-Arg and D-His) than human DAO. Collectively, our results indicate that C. elegans contains at least three genes that encode functional DDOs, and one gene encoding a functional DAO, and that these enzymes have different and distinctive properties. PMID:20564561

  20. Effect of high pressure on peanut allergens in the presence of polyphenol oxidase and caffeic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High pressure (HP) enhances enzymatic reactions. Because polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an enzyme, and reduces IgE binding of peanut allergens in presence of caffeic acid (CA), we postulated that a further reduction in IgE binding can be achieved, using HP together with PPO and CA. Peanut extracts cont...

  1. Electrochemical L-lactic acid sensor based on immobilized ZnO nanorods with lactate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Shah, Syed Muhammad Usman Ali; Khun, Kimleang; Willander, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    In this work, fabrication of gold coated glass substrate, growth of ZnO nanorods and potentiometric response of lactic acid are explained. The biosensor was developed by immobilizing the lactate oxidase on the ZnO nanorods in combination with glutaraldehyde as a cross linker for lactate oxidase enzyme. The potentiometric technique was applied for the measuring the output (EMF) response of l-lactic acid biosensor. We noticed that the present biosensor has wide linear detection range of concentration from 1 × 10(-4)-1 × 10(0) mM with acceptable sensitivity about 41.33 ± 1.58 mV/decade. In addition, the proposed biosensor showed fast response time less than 10 s, a good selectivity towards l-lactic acid in presence of common interfering substances such as ascorbic acid, urea, glucose, galactose, magnesium ions and calcium ions. The present biosensor based on immobilized ZnO nanorods with lactate oxidase sustained its stability for more than three weeks. PMID:22736960

  2. Better Rooting Procedure to Enhance Survival Rate of Field Grown Malaysian Eksotika Papaya Transformed with 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid Oxidase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sekeli, Rogayah; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Muda, Pauziah; Abu Bakar, Umi Kalsom

    2013-01-01

    A high survival rate for transformed papaya plants when transferred to the field is useful in the quest for improving the commercial quality traits. We report in this paper an improved rooting method for the production of transformed Malaysian Eksotika papaya with high survival rate when transferred to the field. Shoots were regenerated from embryogenic calli transformed with antisense and RNAi constructs of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) genes using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Regenerated transformed shoots, each measuring approximately 3-4 cm in height, were cultured in liquid half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium or sterile distilled water, and with either perlite or vermiculite supplementation. All the culturing processes were conducted either under sterile or nonsterile condition. The results showed that rooting under sterile condition was better. Shoots cultured in half-strength MS medium supplemented with vermiculite exhibited a 92.5% rooting efficiency while perlite showed 77.5%. The survival rate of the vermiculite-grown transformed papaya plantlets after transfer into soil, contained in polybags, was 94%, and the rate after transfer into the ground was 92%. Morpho-histological analyses revealed that the tap roots were more compact, which might have contributed to the high survival rates of the plantlets. PMID:25969786

  3. Better rooting procedure to enhance survival rate of field grown malaysian eksotika papaya transformed with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid oxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Sekeli, Rogayah; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Muda, Pauziah; Abu Bakar, Umi Kalsom

    2013-01-01

    A high survival rate for transformed papaya plants when transferred to the field is useful in the quest for improving the commercial quality traits. We report in this paper an improved rooting method for the production of transformed Malaysian Eksotika papaya with high survival rate when transferred to the field. Shoots were regenerated from embryogenic calli transformed with antisense and RNAi constructs of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) genes using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Regenerated transformed shoots, each measuring approximately 3-4 cm in height, were cultured in liquid half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium or sterile distilled water, and with either perlite or vermiculite supplementation. All the culturing processes were conducted either under sterile or nonsterile condition. The results showed that rooting under sterile condition was better. Shoots cultured in half-strength MS medium supplemented with vermiculite exhibited a 92.5% rooting efficiency while perlite showed 77.5%. The survival rate of the vermiculite-grown transformed papaya plantlets after transfer into soil, contained in polybags, was 94%, and the rate after transfer into the ground was 92%. Morpho-histological analyses revealed that the tap roots were more compact, which might have contributed to the high survival rates of the plantlets. PMID:25969786

  4. Mutation spectrum of homogentisic acid oxidase (HGD) in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Vilboux, Thierry; Kayser, Michael; Introne, Wendy; Suwannarat, Pim; Bernardini, Isa; Fischer, Roxanne; O’Brien, Kevin; Kleta, Robert; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid, leading to darkened urine, pigmentation of connective tissue (ochronosis), joint and spine arthritis, and destruction of cardiac valves. AKU is due to mutations in the homogentisate dioxygenase gene, HGD, that converts homogentisic acid to maleylacetoacetic acid in the tyrosine catabolic pathway. Here we report a comprehensive mutation analysis of 93 patients enrolled in our study, as well as an extensive update of all previously published HGD mutations associated with AKU. Within our patient cohort, we identified 52 HGD variants, of which 22 were novel. This yields a total of 91 identified HGD variations associated with AKU to date, including 62 missense, 13 splice site, 10 frameshift, 5 nonsense and 1 no-stop mutation. Most HGD variants reside in exons 3, 6, 8 and 13. We assessed the potential effect of all missense variations on protein function, using 5 bioinformatic tools specifically designed for interpretation of missense variants (SIFT, POLYPHEN, PANTHER, PMUT and SNAP). We also analyzed the potential effect of splice site variants using two different tools (BDGP and NetGene2). This study provides valuable resources for molecular analysis of alkaptonuria and expands our knowledge of the molecular basis of this disease. PMID:19862842

  5. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Curcumin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Dharmendra Kumar; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcumin and ellagic are the natural polyphenols having a wide range of pharmacological actions. They have been reported to have their use in various neurological disorders. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin and ellagic acid on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters which are pivotal for neuronal development and function. Materials and Methods: The in vitro effects of these selected polyphenols on MAO activities in mitochondria isolated from rat brains were examined. Brain mitochondria were assayed for MAO type-B (MAO-B) using benzylamine as substrates. Rat brain mitochondrial MAO preparation was used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plot. Results: MAO activity was inhibited by curcumin and ellagic acid; however, higher half maximal inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (500.46 nM) and ellagic acid (412.24 nM) were required compared to the known MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. It is observed that the curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the MAO activity with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Conclusions: Curcumin and ellagic acid can be considered a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders. SUMMARY Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is involved in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD)Curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the monoamine oxidase activityEllagic acid revealed more potent MAO type-B (MAO-B) inhibitory activity than curcuminKinetic studies of MAO inhibition using different concentrations of curcumin and ellagic acid were plotted as double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plotThe mode of inhibition of both compounds toward MAO-B is mixed (competitive and uncompetitive) type of inhibition with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Abbreviations used: MAO: Monoamine oxidase

  6. A Highly Stable D-Amino Acid Oxidase of the Thermophilic Bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shouji; Furukawara, Makoto; Omae, Keishi; Tadokoro, Namiho; Saito, Yayoi; Abe, Katsumasa; Kera, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a biotechnologically attractive enzyme that can be used in a variety of applications, but its utility is limited by its relatively poor stability. A search of a bacterial genome database revealed a gene encoding a protein homologous to DAO in the thermophilic bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus (RxDAO). The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was a monomeric protein containing noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor. This protein exhibited oxidase activity against neutral and basic d-amino acids and was significantly inhibited by a DAO inhibitor, benzoate, but not by any of the tested d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) inhibitors, thus indicating that the protein is DAO. RxDAO exhibited higher activities and affinities toward branched-chain d-amino acids, with the highest specific activity toward d-valine and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward d-leucine. Substrate inhibition was observed in the case of d-tyrosine. The enzyme had an optimum pH range and temperature of pH 7.5 to 10 and 65°C, respectively, and was stable between pH 5.0 and pH 8.0, with a T50 (the temperature at which 50% of the initial enzymatic activity is lost) of 64°C. No loss of enzyme activity was observed after a 1-week incubation period at 30°C. This enzyme was markedly inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by thiol-modifying reagents and diethyl pyrocarbonate, which are known to inhibit certain DAOs. These results demonstrated that RxDAO is a highly stable DAO and suggested that this enzyme may be valuable for practical applications, such as the determination and quantification of branched-chain d-amino acids, and as a scaffold to generate a novel DAO via protein engineering. PMID:25217016

  7. A Highly Stable d-Amino Acid Oxidase of the Thermophilic Bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus

    PubMed Central

    Furukawara, Makoto; Omae, Keishi; Tadokoro, Namiho; Saito, Yayoi; Abe, Katsumasa; Kera, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a biotechnologically attractive enzyme that can be used in a variety of applications, but its utility is limited by its relatively poor stability. A search of a bacterial genome database revealed a gene encoding a protein homologous to DAO in the thermophilic bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus (RxDAO). The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was a monomeric protein containing noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor. This protein exhibited oxidase activity against neutral and basic d-amino acids and was significantly inhibited by a DAO inhibitor, benzoate, but not by any of the tested d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) inhibitors, thus indicating that the protein is DAO. RxDAO exhibited higher activities and affinities toward branched-chain d-amino acids, with the highest specific activity toward d-valine and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward d-leucine. Substrate inhibition was observed in the case of d-tyrosine. The enzyme had an optimum pH range and temperature of pH 7.5 to 10 and 65°C, respectively, and was stable between pH 5.0 and pH 8.0, with a T50 (the temperature at which 50% of the initial enzymatic activity is lost) of 64°C. No loss of enzyme activity was observed after a 1-week incubation period at 30°C. This enzyme was markedly inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by thiol-modifying reagents and diethyl pyrocarbonate, which are known to inhibit certain DAOs. These results demonstrated that RxDAO is a highly stable DAO and suggested that this enzyme may be valuable for practical applications, such as the determination and quantification of branched-chain d-amino acids, and as a scaffold to generate a novel DAO via protein engineering. PMID:25217016

  8. Bacterial d-amino acid oxidases: Recent findings and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shouji; Abe, Katsumasa; Kera, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a flavin enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of d-amino acids. This enzyme has been studied extensively both biochemically and structurally as a model for the oxidase-dehydrogenase class of flavoproteins. This enzyme also has various applications, such as the determination of d-amino acids and production of building blocks for a number of pharmaceuticals. DAO has been found mainly in eukaryotic organisms and has been suggested to play a significant role in various cellular processes, one of which includes neurotransmission in the human brain. In contrast, this enzyme has not been identified in prokaryotic organisms. Some studies have recently identified and characterized DAO enzyme in some actinobacteria. In addition, a genome database search reveals a wide distribution of DAO homologous genes in this bacterial group. The bacterial DAOs characterized so far have certain distinct properties in comparison to eukaryotic DAOs. These enzymes also exhibit some important applicable properties, suggesting that bacteria could be used as a source for obtaining novel and useful DAOs. The physiological function of bacterial DAO have been proposed to include the degradation of non-canonical d-amino acids released from cell wall, but is still largely unknown and need to be studied in depth. PMID:25996186

  9. Screening of Bothrops snake venoms for L-amino acid oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Pessatti, M; Fontana, J D; Furtado, M F; Guimãraes, M F; Zanette, L R; Costa, W T; Baron, M

    1995-01-01

    Toxins, enzymes, and biologically active peptides are the main components of snake venoms from the genus Bothrops. Following the venom inoculation, the local effects are hemorrhage, edema, and myonecrosis. Nineteen different species of Brazilian Bothrops were screened for protein content and L-amino acid oxidase activity. B. cotiara, formerly found in the South of Brazil, is now threatened with extinction. Its venom contains a highly hemorrhagic fraction and, as expected from the deep yellow color of the corresponding lyophilized powder, a high L-amino acid oxidase (LAO) activity was also characterized. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is its associate coenzyme. B. cotiara venom LAO catalyzed the oxidative deamination of several L-amino acids, and the best substrates were methionine, leucine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine, hence, its potential application for the use of biosensors for aspartame determination and for the removal of amino acids from plasma. High levels for LAO were also found in other species than B. cotiara. In addition, the technique of isoelectric focusing (IEF) was employed as a powerful tool to study the iso- or multi-enzyme distribution for LAO activity in the B. cotiara snake venom. PMID:7668847

  10. Screening of Bothrops snake venoms for L-amino acid oxidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pessati, M.L.; Fontana, J.D.; Guimaraes, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    Toxins, enzymes, and biologically active peptides are the main components of snake venoms from the genus Bothrops. Following the venom inoculation, the local effects are hemorrhage, edema, and myonecrosis. Nineteen different species of Brazilian Bothrops were screened for protein content and L-amino acid oxidase activity. B. cotiara, formerly found in the South of Brazil, is now threatened with extinction. Its venom contains a highly hemorrhagic fraction and, as expected from the deep yellow color of the corresponding lyophilized powder, a high L-amino acid oxidase (LAO) activity was also characterized. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is its associate coenzyme. B. cotiara venom LAO catalyzed the oxidative deamination of several L-amino acids, and the best substrates were methionine, leucine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine, hence, its potential application for the use in biosensors for aspartame determination and for the removal of amino acids from plasma. High levels for LAO were also found in other species than B. cotiara. In addition, the technique of isoelectric focusing (IEF) was employed as a powerful tool to study the iso- or multi-enzyme distribution for LAO activity in the B. cotiara snake venom.

  11. Exogenously induced expression of ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene perception, phospholipase D, and Rboh-oxidase genes in broccoli seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowicz, Małgorzata; Gałgańska, Hanna; Nowak, Witold; Sadowski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In higher plants, copper ions, hydrogen peroxide, and cycloheximide have been recognized as very effective inducers of the transcriptional activity of genes encoding the enzymes of the ethylene biosynthesis pathway. In this report, the transcriptional patterns of genes encoding the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases (ACSs), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidases (ACOs), ETR1, ETR2, and ERS1 ethylene receptors, phospholipase D (PLD)-α1, -α2, -γ1, and -δ, and respiratory burst oxidase homologue (Rboh)-NADPH oxidase-D and -F in response to these inducers in Brassica oleracea etiolated seedlings are shown. ACS1, ACO1, ETR2, PLD-γ1, and RbohD represent genes whose expression was considerably affected by all of the inducers used. The investigations were performed on the seedlings with (i) ethylene insensitivity and (ii) a reduced level of the PLD-derived phosphatidic acid (PA). The general conclusion is that the expression of ACS1, -3, -4, -5, -7, and -11, ACO1, ETR1, ERS1, and ETR2, PLD-γ 1, and RbohD and F genes is undoubtedly under the reciprocal cross-talk of the ethylene and PAPLD signalling routes; both signals affect it in concerted or opposite ways depending on the gene or the type of stimuli. The results of these studies on broccoli seedlings are in agreement with the hypothesis that PA may directly affect the ethylene signal transduction pathway via an inhibitory effect on CTR1 (constitutive triple response 1) activity. PMID:20581125

  12. Stabilization of D-amino acid oxidase from Rhodosporidium toruloides by immobilization onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hao-Chieh; Kuan, I-Ching; Lee, Shiow-Ling; Tien, Gee-Yeng; Wang, Yi-Jen; Yu, Chi-Yang

    2009-04-01

    D-amino acid oxidase from Rhodosporidium toruloides was immobilized onto glutaraldehyde-activated magnetic nanoparticles. Approximately four enzyme molecules were attached to one magnetic nanoparticle when the weight ratio of the enzyme to the support was 0.12. After immobilization, the T(m) was increased from 45 degrees C of the free form to 55 degrees C. In the presence of 20 mM H2O2, the immobilized form retained 93% of its activity after 5 h while the free form was completely inactivated after 3.5 h. PMID:19066733

  13. Oxalic acid degradation by a novel fungal oxalate oxidase from Abortiporus biennis.

    PubMed

    Grąz, Marcin; Rachwał, Kamila; Zan, Radosław; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase was identified in mycelial extracts of a basidiomycete Abortiporus biennis strain. Intracellular enzyme activity was detected only after prior lowering of the pH value of the fungal cultures by using oxalic or hydrochloric acids. This enzyme was purified using size exclusion chromatography (Sephadex G-25) and ion-exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose). This enzyme exhibited optimum activity at pH 2 when incubated at 40°C, and the optimum temperature was established at 60°C. Among the tested organic acids, this enzyme exhibited specificity only towards oxalic acid. Molecular mass was calculated as 58 kDa. The values of Km for oxalate and Vmax for the enzyme reaction were 0.015 M and 30 mmol min(-1), respectively. PMID:27337220

  14. In vitro and in vivo studies on adlay-derived seed extracts: phenolic profiles, antioxidant activities, serum uric acid suppression, and xanthine oxidase inhibitory effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mouming; Zhu, Dashuai; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Su, Guowan; Lin, Lianzhu; Wang, Xiao; Dong, Yi

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polished adlay, brown adlay, adlay bran, and adlay hull to prevent and treat hyperuricemia. Brown adlay extract effectively decreased the serum uric acid levels of oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. Free and bound phenolic extracts from these materials contained significant amounts of phenolics, with free phenolics dominated by chlorogenic acid and p-coumaric acid while bound phenolics dominated by p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Free and bound phenolics of adlay bran exhibited significant xanthine oxidase inhibition activities, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities, oxygen radical absorbance capacities, and superoxide radical scavenging activities. Adlay bran phenolics could be effective xanthine oxidase inhibitors and radical scavengers. p-Coumaric acid is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with strong superoxide radical scavenging activity. However, ferulic acid is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with weak superoxide radical scavenging activity. Chlorogenic acid is a superoxide radical scavenger with weak xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. PMID:25029106

  15. Use of Glucose Oxidase in a Membrane Reactor for Gluconic Acid Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Neves, Luiz Carlos Martins; Vitolo, Michele

    This article aims at the evaluation of the catalytic performance of glucose oxidase (GO) (EC.1.1.3.4) for the glucose/gluconic acid conversion in the ultrafiltration cell type membrane reactor (MB-CSTR). The reactor was coupled with a Millipore ultrafiltration-membrane (cutoff of 100 kDa) and operated for 24 h under agitation of 100 rpm, pH 5.5, and 30°C. The experimental conditions varied were the glucose concentration (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0, and 40.0 mM), the feeding rate (0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0/h), dissolved oxygen (8.0 and 16.0 mg/L), GO concentration (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 UGO/mL), and the glucose oxidase/catalase activity ratio (UGO/UCAT)(1∶0, 1∶10, 1∶20, and 1∶30). A conversion yield of 80% and specific reaction rate of 40×10-4 mmol/h·UGO were attained when the process was carried out under the following conditions: D=3.0/h, dissolved oxygen=16.0 mg/L, [G]=40 mM, and (UGO/UCAT)=1∶20. A simplified model for explaining the inhibition of GO activity by hydrogen peroxide, formed during the glucose/gluconic acid conversion, was presented.

  16. Identification and molecular characterization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetase gene (acoE) of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Priefert, H; Steinbüchel, A

    1992-01-01

    The gene locus acoE, which is involved in the utilization of acetoin in Alcaligenes eutrophus, was identified as the structural gene of an acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (acetate:coenzyme A ligase [AMP forming]; EC 6.2.1.1). This gene was localized on a 3.8-kbp SmaI-EcoRI subfragment of an 8.1-kbp EcoRI restriction fragment (fragment E) that was cloned recently (C. Fründ, H. Priefert, A. Steinbüchel, and H. G. Schlegel, J. Bacteriol. 171:6539-6548, 1989). The 1,983 bp acoE gene encoded a protein with a relative molecular weight of 72,519, and it was preceded by a putative Shine-Dalgarno sequence. A comparison analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from acoE revealed a high degree of homology to primary structures of acetyl coenzyme A synthetases from other sources (amounting to up to 50.5% identical amino acids). Tn5 insertions in two transposon-induced mutants of A. eutrophus, that were impaired in the catabolism of acetoin were mapped 481 and 1,159 bp downstream from the translational start codon of acoE. The expression of acoE in Escherichia coli led to the formation of an acyl coenzyme A synthetase that accepted acetate as the preferred substrate (100% relative activity) but also reacted with propionate (46%) and hydroxypropionate (87%); fatty acids consisting of four or more carbon atoms were not accepted. In addition, evidence for the presence of a second acyl coenzyme A synthetase was obtained; this enzyme exhibited a different substrate specificity. The latter enzyme is obviously required for the activation of propionate, e.g., during the formation of the storage compound poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) when propionate is provided as the sole carbon source. An analysis of mutants provided evidence that the expression of the uptake protein for propionate depends on the presence of alternate sigma factor sigma 54. Images PMID:1356967

  17. Substrate specificity of duckling hepatic and renal D-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Elkin, R G; Lyons, M L

    1988-05-01

    The substrate specificity of duckling hepatic and renal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO; D-amino acid: O2 oxidoreductase [deaminating], E.C. 1.4.3.3) was determined using a method based on the combination of coupled enzyme reactions and a colorimetric procedure. When activities were averaged across tissues, D-proline was the most reactive substrate, followed by (in order) D-phenylalanine, D-alanine, D-methionine, D-leucine, D-isoleucine, D-valine, D-tryptophan, D-arginine, and D-lysine. Compared with D-alanine, duckling DAAO had minimal or no reactivity with D-asparagine, D-glutamine, D-histidine, D-threonine, D-cysteine, glycine, or D-serine. These results were in general agreement with data from other vertebrate species. PMID:2900508

  18. Oleic, Linoleic and Linolenic Acids Increase ROS Production by Fibroblasts via NADPH Oxidase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Elaine; Dermargos, Alexandre; Hirata, Aparecida Emiko; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael; Newsholme, Philip; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Curi, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The effect of oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids on ROS production by 3T3 Swiss and Rat 1 fibroblasts was investigated. Using lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence, a dose-dependent increase in extracellular superoxide levels was observed during the treatment of fibroblasts with oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids. ROS production was dependent on the addition of β-NADH or NADPH to the medium. Diphenyleneiodonium inhibited the effect of oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids on fibroblast superoxide release by 79%, 92% and 82%, respectively. Increased levels of p47phox phosphorylation due to fatty acid treatment were detected by Western blotting analyses of fibroblast proteins. Increased p47phox mRNA expression was observed using real-time PCR. The rank order for the fatty acid stimulation of the fibroblast oxidative burst was as follows: γ-linolenic > linoleic > oleic. In conclusion, oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids stimulated ROS production via activation of the NADPH oxidase enzyme complex in fibroblasts. PMID:23579616

  19. Oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids increase ros production by fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase activation.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Elaine; Dermargos, Alexandre; Hirata, Aparecida Emiko; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael; Newsholme, Philip; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Curi, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The effect of oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids on ROS production by 3T3 Swiss and Rat 1 fibroblasts was investigated. Using lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence, a dose-dependent increase in extracellular superoxide levels was observed during the treatment of fibroblasts with oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids. ROS production was dependent on the addition of β-NADH or NADPH to the medium. Diphenyleneiodonium inhibited the effect of oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids on fibroblast superoxide release by 79%, 92% and 82%, respectively. Increased levels of p47 (phox) phosphorylation due to fatty acid treatment were detected by Western blotting analyses of fibroblast proteins. Increased p47 (phox) mRNA expression was observed using real-time PCR. The rank order for the fatty acid stimulation of the fibroblast oxidative burst was as follows: γ-linolenic > linoleic > oleic. In conclusion, oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids stimulated ROS production via activation of the NADPH oxidase enzyme complex in fibroblasts. PMID:23579616

  20. Plant and animal glycolate oxidases have a common eukaryotic ancestor and convergently duplicated to evolve long-chain 2-hydroxy acid oxidases.

    PubMed

    Esser, Christian; Kuhn, Anke; Groth, Georg; Lercher, Martin J; Maurino, Veronica G

    2014-05-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GOX) is a crucial enzyme of plant photorespiration. The encoding gene is thought to have originated from endosymbiotic gene transfer between the eukaryotic host and the cyanobacterial endosymbiont at the base of plantae. However, animals also possess GOX activities. Plant and animal GOX belong to the gene family of (L)-2-hydroxyacid-oxidases ((L)-2-HAOX). We find that all (L)-2-HAOX proteins in animals and archaeplastida go back to one ancestral eukaryotic sequence; the sole exceptions are green algae of the chlorophyta lineage. Chlorophyta replaced the ancestral eukaryotic (L)-2-HAOX with a bacterial ortholog, a lactate oxidase that may have been obtained through the primary endosymbiosis at the base of plantae; independent losses of this gene may explain its absence in other algal lineages (glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and charophyta). We also show that in addition to GOX, plants possess (L)-2-HAOX proteins with different specificities for medium- and long-chain hydroxyacids (lHAOX), likely involved in fatty acid and protein catabolism. Vertebrates possess lHAOX proteins acting on similar substrates as plant lHAOX; however, the existence of GOX and lHAOX subfamilies in both plants and animals is not due to shared ancestry but is the result of convergent evolution in the two most complex eukaryotic lineages. On the basis of targeting sequences and predicted substrate specificities, we conclude that the biological role of plantae (L)-2-HAOX in photorespiration evolved by co-opting an existing peroxisomal protein. PMID:24408912

  1. Role of renal D-amino-acid oxidase in pharmacokinetics of D-leucine.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Shinohara, Yoshihiko; Konno, Ryuichi; Hashimoto, Takao

    2004-07-01

    d-Amino acids are now recognized to be widely present in mammals. Renal d-amino-acid oxidase (DAO) is associated with conversion of d-amino acids to the corresponding alpha-keto acids, but its contribution in vivo is poorly understood because the alpha-keto acids and/or l-amino acids formed are indistinguishable from endogenous compounds. First, we examined whether DAO is indispensable for conversion of d-amino acids to their alpha-keto acids by using the stable isotope tracer technique. After a bolus intravenous administration of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine to mutant mice lacking DAO activity (ddY/DAO(-)) and normal mice (ddY/DAO(+)), elimination of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine and formation of alpha-[(2)H(7)]ketoisocaproic acid ([(2)H(7)]KIC) and l-[(2)H(7)]leucine in plasma were determined. The ddY/DAO(-) mice, in contrast to ddY/DAO(+) mice, failed to convert d-[(2)H(7)]leucine to [(2)H(7)]KIC and l-[(2)H(7)]leucine. This result clearly revealed that DAO was indispensable for the process of chiral inversion of d-leucine. We further investigated the effect of renal mass reduction by partial nephrectomy on elimination of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine and formation of [(2)H(7)]KIC and l-[(2)H(7)]leucine. Renal mass reduction slowed down the elimination of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine. The fraction of conversion of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine to [(2)H(7)]KIC in sham-operated rats was 0.77, whereas that in five-sixths-nephrectomized rats was 0.25. The elimination behavior of d-[(2)H(7)]leucine observed in rats suggested that kidney was the principal organ responsible for converting d-leucine to KIC. PMID:15026304

  2. In vitro oxidation of indoleacetic acid by soluble auxin-oxidases and peroxidases from maize roots. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Beffa, R.; Martin, H.V.; Pilet, P.E. )

    1990-10-01

    Soluble auxin-oxidases were extracted from Zea mays L. cv LG11 apical root segments and partially separated from peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) by size-exclusion chromatography. Auxin-oxidases were resolved into one main peak corresponding to a molecular mass of 32.5 kilodaltons and a minor peak at 54.5 kilodaltons. Peroxidases were separated into at least four peaks, with molecular masses from 32.5 to 78 kilodaltons. In vitro activity of indoleacetic acid-oxidases was dependent on the presence of MnCl{sub 2} and p-coumaric acid. Compound(s) present in the crude extract and several synthetic auxin transport inhibitors (including 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid) inhibited auxin-oxidase activity, but had no effect on peroxidases. The products resulting from the in vitro enzymatic oxidation of ({sup 3}H)indoleacetic acid were separated by HPLC and the major metabolite was found to cochromatograph with indol-3yl-methanol.

  3. Salmonella Evades d-Amino Acid Oxidase To Promote Infection in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Tuinema, Brian R.; Reid-Yu, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neutrophils engulf and kill bacteria using oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms. Despite robust antimicrobial activity, neutrophils are impaired in directing Salmonella clearance and harbor viable intracellular bacteria during early stages of infection that can subsequently escape to more-permissive cell types. The mechanisms accounting for this immune impairment are not understood. We report that Salmonella limits exposure to oxidative damage elicited by d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) in neutrophils by expressing an ABC importer specific for d-alanine, a DAO substrate found in peptidoglycan stem peptides. A Salmonella dalS mutant defective for d-alanine import was more susceptible to killing by DAO through exposure to greater oxidative stress during infection. This fitness defect was reversed by selective depletion of neutrophils or by inhibition of DAO in vivo with a small-molecule inhibitor. DalS-mediated subversion of neutrophil DAO is a novel host-pathogen interaction that enhances Salmonella survival during systemic infection. PMID:25425233

  4. Involvement of Peroxidase and Indole-3-acetic Acid Oxidase Isozymes from Pear, Tomato, and Blueberry Fruit in Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Chaim

    1972-01-01

    Protein extracts were obtained from climacteric fruits (pear, tomato) and nonclimacteric fruits (blueberry) during various stages of ripening. The use of a gel electrophoresis technique revealed a consistent reinforcement in indoleacetic acid oxidase but not in peroxidase isozymes during ripening. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to the resistance of fruits to ripening and ethylene action. Images PMID:16658043

  5. Sensitive determination of D-amino acids in mammals and the effect of D-amino-acid oxidase activity on their amounts.

    PubMed

    Hamase, Kenji; Konno, Ryuichi; Morikawa, Akiko; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi

    2005-09-01

    The determination of small amounts of D-amino acids in mammalian tissues is still a challenging theme in the separation sciences. In this review, various gas-chromatographic and high-performance liquid chromatographic methods are discussed including highly selective and sensitive column-switching procedures. Based on these methods, the distributions of D-aspartic acid, D-serine, D-alanine, D-leucine and D-proline have been clarified in the mouse brain. As the regulation mechanisms of D-amino acid amounts in mammals, we focused on the D-amino-acid oxidase, which catalyzes the degradation of D-amino acids. Using the mutant mouse strain lacking D-amino-acid oxidase activity, the effects of the enzymatic activity on the amounts and distributions of various D-amino acids have been investigated. PMID:16141519

  6. D-amino acid oxidase generates agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor from D-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linh P; Hsu, Erin L; Chowdhury, Goutam; Dostalek, Miroslav; Guengerich, F Peter; Bradfield, Christopher A

    2009-12-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well-known for its role in mediating the toxic and adaptive responses to xenobiotic compounds. Recent studies also indicate that AHR ligands are endogenously produced and may be essential for normal development. Previously, we showed that the endogenous enzyme, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), generates the AHR proagonist, indole-3-pyruvic acid (I3P), by deamination of its substrate L-tryptophan. We hypothesized that other enzymatic pathways capable of producing I3P may generate AHR agonists in vivo. We now demonstrate that the enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) catalyzes the production of AHR agonists through the enzymatic conversion of D-tryptophan to I3P. Moreover, we provide evidence that the nonenzymatic oxidation and condensation of I3P is a critical step in the generation of receptor agonists by DAAO and AST. Products of this process include two novel agonists, 1,3-di(1H-indol-3-yl)propan-2-one and 1-(1H-indol-3-yl)-3-(3H-indol-3-ylidene) propan-2-one [characterized in the accompanying paper, Chowdhury et al. ( 2009 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. , DOI: 10.1021/tx9000418 ], both of which can potently activate the AHR at concentrations in the nanomolar range. These results show that endogenous AHR activity can be modulated by I3P production from amino acid precursors through multiple enzymatic pathways, including those catalyzed by DAAO and AST. PMID:19860415

  7. Molecular characterization of L-amino acid oxidase from king cobra venom.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yang; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yun

    2007-09-15

    An L-amino acid oxidase from Ophiophagus hannah snake venom (Oh-LAAO) was purified by successive gel filtration, ion-exchange and heparin chromatography. Oh-LAAO did not induce platelet aggregation; however, it had potent inhibitory activity on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and U46619, but showed no effect on platelet aggregation induced by thrombin, mucetin, ristocetin and stejnulxin. By RT-PCR and 5'-RACE methods, the complete Oh-LAAO cDNA was cloned from the venom gland total RNA preparations. The cDNA sequence contains an open-reading frame (ORF) of 1476-bp, which encodes a protein of 491 amino acids comprising a signal peptide of 25 amino acids and 466-residue mature protein. The predicted protein sequence of Oh-LAAO was confirmed by N-terminal and trypsin-digested internal peptides sequencing together with peptide mass fingerprinting. cDNAs encoding for ORF of LAAOs from Bungarus fasciatus and B. multicinctus were cloned and reported in this study. In addition, partial cDNA encoding for Naja atra LAAO was also reported. Oh-LAAO shared approximately 50% protein sequence identity with other known snake venom LAAOs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Oh-LAAO is evolutionary distant to other snake venom LAAOs. PMID:17543361

  8. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of Ferulic Acid Amides: Curcumin-Based Design and Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Badavath, Vishnu N; Baysal, İpek; Uçar, Gülberk; Mondal, Susanta K; Sinha, Barij N; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid has structural similarity with curcumin which is being reported for its monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory activity. Based on this similarity, we designed a series of ferulic acid amides 6a-m and tested for their inhibitory activity on human MAO (hMAO) isoforms. All the compounds were found to inhibit the hMAO isoforms either selectively or non-selectively. Nine compounds (6a, 6b, 6g-m) were found to inhibit hMAO-B selectively, whereas the other four (6c-f) were found to be non-selective. There is a gradual shift from hMAO-B selectivity (6a,b) to non-selectivity (6c-f) as there is an increase in chain length at the amino terminus. In case of compounds having an aromatic nucleus at the amino terminus, increasing the carbon number between N and the aromatic ring increases the potency as well as selectivity toward hMAO-B. Compounds 6f, 6j, and 6k were subjected to membrane permeability and metabolic stability studies by in vitro assay methods. They were found to have a better pharmacokinetic profile than curcumin, ferulic acid, and selegiline. In order to understand the structural features responsible for the potency and selectivity of 6k, we carried out a molecular docking simulation study. PMID:26592858

  9. The stabilizing effects of immobilization in D-amino acid oxidase from Trigonopsis variabilis

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Iskandar; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Background Immobilization of Trigonopsis variabilis D-amino acid oxidase (TvDAO) on solid support is the key to a reasonably stable performance of this enzyme in the industrial process for the conversion of cephalosporin C as well as in other biocatalytic applications. Results To provide a mechanistic basis for the stabilization of the carrier-bound oxidase we analyzed the stabilizing effects of immobilization in TvDAO exposed to the stress of elevated temperature and operational conditions. Two different strategies of immobilization were used: multi-point covalent binding to epoxy-activated Sepabeads EC-EP; and non-covalent oriented immobilization of the enzyme through affinity of its N-terminal Strep-tag to Strep-Tactin coated on insoluble particles. At 50°C, the oriented immobilizate was not stabilized as compared to the free enzyme. The structure of TvDAO was stabilized via covalent attachment to Sepabeads EC-EP but concomitantly, binding of the FAD cofactor was weakened. FAD release from the enzyme into solution markedly reduced the positive effect of immobilization on the overall stability of TvDAO. Under conditions of substrate conversion in a bubble-aerated stirred tank reactor, both immobilization techniques as well as the addition of the surfactant Pluronic F-68 stabilized TvDAO by protecting the enzyme from the deleterious effect of gas-liquid interfaces. Immobilization of TvDAO on Sepabeads EC-EP however stabilized the enzyme beyond this effect and led to a biocatalyst that could be re-used in multiple cycles of substrate conversion. Conclusion Multi-point covalent attachment of TvDAO on an isoluble porous carrier provides stabilization against the denaturing effects of high temperature and exposure to a gas-liquid interface. Improvement of binding of the FAD cofactor, probably by using methods of protein engineering, would further enhance the stability of the immobilized enzyme. PMID:18798979

  10. Identification of Crucial Amino Acids in Mouse Aldehyde Oxidase 3 That Determine Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mahro, Martin; Brás, Natércia F.; Cerqueira, Nuno M. F. S. A.; Teutloff, Christian; Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João; Leimkühler, Silke

    2013-01-01

    In order to elucidate factors that determine substrate specificity and activity of mammalian molybdo-flavoproteins we performed site directed mutagenesis of mouse aldehyde oxidase 3 (mAOX3). The sequence alignment of different aldehyde oxidase (AOX) isoforms identified variations in the active site of mAOX3 in comparison to other AOX proteins and xanthine oxidoreductases (XOR). Based on the structural alignment of mAOX3 and bovine XOR, differences in amino acid residues involved in substrate binding in XORs in comparison to AOXs were identified. We exchanged several residues in the active site to the ones found in other AOX homologues in mouse or to residues present in bovine XOR in order to examine their influence on substrate selectivity and catalytic activity. Additionally we analyzed the influence of the [2Fe-2S] domains of mAOX3 on its kinetic properties and cofactor saturation. We applied UV-VIS and EPR monitored redox-titrations to determine the redox potentials of wild type mAOX3 and mAOX3 variants containing the iron-sulfur centers of mAOX1. In addition, a combination of molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations (MD) was used to investigate factors that modulate the substrate specificity and activity of wild type and AOX variants. The successful conversion of an AOX enzyme to an XOR enzyme was achieved exchanging eight residues in the active site of mAOX3. It was observed that the absence of the K889H exchange substantially decreased the activity of the enzyme towards all substrates analyzed, revealing that this residue has an important role in catalysis. PMID:24358164

  11. Fermentation and alternative oxidase contribute to the action of amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Zabalza, Ana; van Dongen, Joost T; Royuela, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Acetolactate synthase inhibitors (ALS-inhibitors) and glyphosate (GLP) are two classes of herbicide that act by the specific inhibition of an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of branched-chain or aromatic amino acids, respectively. The physiological effects that are detected after application of these two classes of herbicides are not fully understood in relation to the primary biochemical target inhibition, although they have been well documented. Interestingly, the two herbicides' toxicity includes some common physiological effects suggesting that they kill the treated plants by a similar pattern despite targeting different enzymes. The induction of aerobic ethanol fermentation and alternative oxidase (AOX) are two examples of these common effects. The objective of this work was to gain further insight into the role of fermentation and AOX induction in the toxic consequences of ALS-inhibitors and GLP. For this, Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout mutants of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 1 and AOX1a were used. The results found in wild-type indicate that both GLP and ALS-inhibitors reduce ATP production by inducing fermentation and alternative respiration. The main physiological effects in the process of herbicide activity upon treated plants were accumulation of carbohydrates and total free amino acids. The effects of the herbicides on these parameters were less pronounced in mutants compared to wild-type plants. The role of fermentation and AOX regarding pyruvate availability is also discussed. PMID:25544587

  12. Differential expression of two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase genes in broccoli after harvest.

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, B J; Downs, C G; Davies, K M

    1995-01-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.) floral tissues rapidly differentiate and grow before harvest and then senesce rapidly after harvest. Associated with this postharvest deterioration is an increase in ethylene production by florets. Two cDNA clones having high nucleotide identity to sequences encoding 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase were isolated from senescing florets. The cDNAs, ACC Ox1 and ACC Ox2, apparently encode mRNAs from different genes. ACC Ox1 transcripts were found at low levels in whole florets at the time of harvest and increased markedly in abundance after harvest. ACC Ox1 transcript abundance also increased in sepals after harvest and in excised yellowing leaves. Transcripts corresponding to ACC Ox2 were found exclusively within the reproductive structures. These ACC Ox2 transcripts were absent at harvest but started to increase in abundance within 2 h of harvest and then accumulated to high levels. Hormone treatment did not alter the abundance of ACC Ox1 transcripts, whereas ACC Ox2 transcripts increased in abundance after treatment with abscisic acid and propylene. Wounding did not affect the levels of ACC Ox1 or Ox2 transcripts after harvest. At harvest, individual broccoli florets were closed and remained unpollinated. We propose a model whereby the rapid increase in ACC Ox1 and Ox2 transcript abundance after harvest contributes to increased ethylene production by florets. This ethylene may regulate aspects of postharvest senescence, in particular chlorophyll loss. PMID:7610162

  13. Low expression of the antibacterial factor L-amino acid oxidase in bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Zhang, Haolin; Arakuni, Masahiro; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Gen

    2014-12-01

    In the mouse, L-amino acid oxidase (LAO) produces hydrogen peroxide by utilizing free amino acids and is a proven antibacterial factor in mammary glands. Mastitis, a bacterial infection of the mammary gland, is the most frequent disease in dairy cattle. Here, we investigate whether LAO is expressed in the mammary gland of dairy cattle and is antibacterial. In dairy cattle, the expression level of LAO mRNA in the mammary gland was considerably lower than that in mice, and LAO activity was not observed in cattle milk that produced hydrogen peroxide. The expression of LAO mRNA was also low in Japanese Black cattle, the same as in Holstein cattle. A higher LAO mRNA expression was observed in the mastitis glands than in the lactating glands. Furthermore, spleen and lymph nodes expressed high levels of LAO mRNA in dairy cattle. We conclude that mammary glands in dairy cattle have lower ability to express the LAO gene compared to that in mice, which may result in a high incidence of mastitis. PMID:24961772

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Oral d-Serine in d-Amino Acid Oxidase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Thomas, Ajit G.; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Sawa, Akira; Strick, Christine A.; Engle, Sandra J.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2012-01-01

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of d-amino acids including d-serine, a full agonist at the glycine modulatory site of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. To evaluate the significance of DAAO-mediated metabolism in the pharmacokinetics of oral d-serine, plasma d-serine levels were measured in both wild-type mice and transgenic mice lacking DAAO. Although d-serine levels were rapidly diminished in wild-type mice (t½ = 1.2 h), sustained drug levels over the course of 4 h (t½ > 10 h) were observed in mice lacking DAAO. Coadministration of d-serine with 6-chlorobenzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a small-molecule DAAO inhibitor, in wild-type mice resulted in the enhancement of plasma d-serine levels, although CBIO seems to have only temporary effects on the plasma d-serine levels due to glucuronidation of the key hydroxyl group. These findings highlight the predominant role of DAAO in the clearance of d-serine from the systemic circulation. Thus, a potent DAAO inhibitor with a longer half-life should be capable of maintaining high plasma d-serine levels over a sustained period of time and might have therapeutic implications for the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:22837388

  15. D-amino acid oxidase is expressed in the ventral tegmental area and modulates cortical dopamine.

    PubMed

    Betts, Jill F; Schweimer, Judith V; Burnham, Katherine E; Burnet, Philip W J; Sharp, Trevor; Harrison, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO, DAAO) degrades the NMDA receptor co-agonist D-serine, modulating D-serine levels and thence NMDA receptor function. DAO inhibitors are under development as a therapy for schizophrenia, a disorder involving both NMDA receptor and dopaminergic dysfunction. However, a direct role for DAO in dopamine regulation has not been demonstrated. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we show that DAO mRNA and immunoreactivity are present in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the rat, in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive and -negative neurons, and in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive astrocytes. Second, we show that injection into the VTA of sodium benzoate, a DAO inhibitor, increases frontal cortex extracellular dopamine, as measured by in vivo microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography. Combining sodium benzoate and D-serine did not enhance this effect, and injection of D-serine alone affected dopamine metabolites but not dopamine. These data show that DAO is expressed in the VTA, and suggest that it impacts on the mesocortical dopamine system. The mechanism by which the observed effects occur, and the implications of these findings for schizophrenia therapy, require further study. PMID:24822045

  16. Synthesis and bioevaluation of 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acids as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qi; Cheng, Zengjin; Ma, Xiaoxue; Wang, Lijie; Feng, Dongjie; Cui, Yuanhang; Bao, Kai; Wu, Lan; Zhang, Weige

    2014-10-01

    A series of 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives (8a-f, 9a-m) were synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase in vitro. Structure-activity relationship analyses have also been presented. Most of the target compounds exhibited potency levels in the nanomolar range. Compound 9e emerged as the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor (IC50 = 5.5 nM) in comparison to febuxostat (IC50 = 18.6 nM). Steady-state kinetics measurements with the bovine milk enzyme indicated a mixed type inhibition with Ki and Ki' values of 0.9 and 2.3 nM, respectively. A molecular modeling study on compounds 9e was performed to gain an insight into its binding mode with xanthine oxidase, and to provide the basis for further structure-guided design of new non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors related with 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acid scaffold. PMID:25113879

  17. A simple purification procedure of D-amino-acid oxidase from Candida guilliermondii H(see symbol)-4.

    PubMed

    Gevorgyan, G K; Davtyan, M A; Hambardzumyan, A A

    2012-01-01

    D-amino-acid oxidase (EC 1.4.3.3) was purified about 1480-fold from the yeast Candida guilliermondii H(see symbol)-4 using chromatofocusing method. The purification procedure gave an enzyme preparation which is greater than 90% homogenous on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with a specific activity of 11.54 U/mg at 30 degrees C with D-proline as substrate with the yield of total activity 9.3%. The molecular weights of subunit and native enzyme were determined to be 38.4 and 78.6 kDa by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration, respectively, suggesting that the native enzyme exists as a homodimer. A single molecular form with an isoelectric point of 6.85 was detected in analytical isoelectrofocusing. The optimum pH and temperature were 8.0 and 33 degrees C. An enzyme shows stability in the pH range from 7.4 to 9.0 and at the temperature no higher than 38 degrees C. Activation energy for D-amino-acid oxidase reaction was calculated to be 60 kJ/mol at 30 degrees C. The strict D-isomer specificity of the enzyme is confirmed, since no reaction could be detected with L-amino acids, and a large number of D-amino acids could be substrates for this enzyme. K(m) and V(max) values were determined for D-proline and D-alanine, which, among 22 tested, were the best substrates of the enzyme. D-amino-acid oxidase from the yeast C. guilliermondii is a flavoprotein oxidase in which the prosthetic group is tightly, but not covalently, bound FAD. The enzyme is completely inhibited by sodium benzoate, SH-oxidizing agents, but not by sodium azide, toluene or chloroform. PMID:23156699

  18. Structure and characterization of the glycan moiety of L-amino-acid oxidase from the Malayan pit viper Calloselasma rhodostoma.

    PubMed

    Geyer, A; Fitzpatrick, T B; Pawelek, P D; Kitzing, K; Vrielink, A; Ghisla, S; Macheroux, P

    2001-07-01

    Ophidian L-amino-acid oxidase (L-amino-acid oxygen:oxidoreductase, deaminating, EC 1.4.3.2) is found in the venom of many poisonous snakes (crotalids, elapids and viperids). This FAD-dependent glycoprotein has been studied from several snake species (e.g. Crotalus adamanteus, Crotalus atrox and Calloselasma rhodostoma) in detail with regard to the biochemical and enzymatic properties. The nature of glycosylation, however, as well as the chemical structure(s) of the attached oligosaccharide(s) are unknown. In view of the putative involvement of the glycan moiety in the biological effects of ophidian L-amino-acid oxidase, notably the apoptotic activity of the enzyme, structural knowledge is needed to evaluate its exact function. In this study we report on the glycosylation of L-amino-acid oxidase from the venom of the Malayan pit viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma). Its glycosylation is remarkably homogeneous with the major oligosaccharide accounting for approximately 90% of the total sugar content. Based on detailed analysis of the isolated oligosaccharide by 2D NMR spectroscopies and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry the glycan is identified as a bis-sialylated, biantennary, core-fucosylated dodecasaccharide. The biological significance of this finding is discussed in light of the biological activities of the enzyme. PMID:11453999

  19. Effect of smoking on serum xanthine oxidase, malondialdehyde, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol levels in healthy male subjects

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ali Akbar; Khand, Fatehuddin; Khand, Tayyab Uddin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of smoking on serum xanthine oxidase, malondialdehyde, α- tocopherol and ascorbic acid levels in healthy adult male subjects. Methods: This cross-sectional comparative study was carried out at Isra University Hyderabad from July 2012 to December 2012. One hundred and twenty apparently healthy adult male subjects (60 smokers and 60 non-smokers) included in present study, were recruited from Jaindal kot, a small village located midway between Hyderabad and Matiari. Serum samples from smokers and non-smokers were analyzed for xanthine oxidase and malondialdehyde levels by standard kit methods, while for ascorbic acid and alpha- tocopherol by spectrophotometric methods. Results: The mean xanthine oxidase and malondialdehyde levels measured in healthy smokers were 0.30±0.05 mg/dl and 37.50±4.05 µmoles/l respectively as against 0.25±0.04 mg/dl and 19.86±2.21µmoles/l in non-smokers. Both xanthine oxidase and malondialdehyde levels were significantly (p<0.001) raised in healthy smokers than in non-smokers. Likewise, mean vitamin E and vitamin C levels were respectively 0.69±0.37 mg/dl and 0.80±0.16 mg/dl in healthy smokers compared to 1.14±0.43 mg/dl and 1.22±0.29 mg/dl in non-smokers. The concentrations of both these vitamins were significantly (p<0.001) lower in smokers than in non-smokers. Conclusion: The results of present study demonstrate that smoking had significantly increased xanthine oxidase and malondialdehyde levels and decreased vitamins C and E (antioxidants) levels. These findings suggest that smokers have to take additional amounts of vitamins C and E in order to avoid deleterious effects of smoking on their health. PMID:25878632

  20. Lysyl oxidase-like 4 involvement in retinoic acid epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Comptour, Aurélie; Rouzaire, Marion; Belville, Corinne; Bonnin, Nicolas; Daniel, Estelle; Chiambaretta, Frédéric; Blanchon, Loïc; Sapin, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A and its active forms (retinoic acids/RAs) are known to have pro-healing properties, but their mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. This work aimed to identify the cellular and molecular processes by which atRA (all-trans RA) improves wound healing, using an in vivo model of mouse corneal alkali burns and an in vitro cellular human corneal epithelial injury model. Regulation by atRA has been studied on most of the cellular events that occur in wound healing. We investigated the direct influence of atRA on a specific target gene known to be involved in the extracellular matrix (ECM) dynamics, one of the pathways contributing to epithelial repair. Our results demonstrate that atRA promotes corneal epithelial wound healing by acting preferentially on migration. The induction of lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4) expression by atRA in the corneal epithelium environment was established as essential in the mechanism of atRA-dependent wound healing. Our study describes for the first time a direct link between a retinoic-induced gene and protein, LOXL4, and its general clinical pro-healing properties in ECM dynamics. PMID:27597564

  1. Uric acid induces NADPH oxidase-independent neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Nishinaka, Yoko; Arai, Toshiyuki; Morita, Makiko; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Adachi, Souichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Kouhei

    2014-01-10

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are composed of extracellular DNA fibers with antimicrobial peptides that capture and kill microbes. NETs play a critical role in innate host defense and in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. While the mechanism of NET formation remains unclear, reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced via activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox) are known to be an important requirement. In this study, we investigated the effect of uric acid (UA) on NET formation. UA, a well-known ROS scavenger, was found to suppress Nox-dependent ROS release in a dose-dependent manner. Low concentrations of UA significantly inhibited Nox-dependent NET formation. However, high concentrations of UA unexpectedly induced, rather than inhibited, NET formation. NETs were directly induced by UA alone in a Nox-independent manner, as revealed by experiments using control neutrophils treated with ROS inhibitors or neutrophils of patients with chronic granulomatous disease who have a congenital defect in ROS production. Furthermore, we found that UA-induced NET formation was partially mediated by NF-κB activation. Our study is the first to demonstrate the novel function of UA in NET formation and may provide insight into the management of patients with hyperuricemia. PMID:24326071

  2. Manageable cytotoxicity of nanocapsules immobilizing D-amino acid oxidase via exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Yingchun; Fu, Jingke

    2014-02-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO), which could catalyze generation of hydrogen peroxide with strong oxidbility and cytotoxicity, has become of interest as a biocatalyst for therapeutic treatments. Herein we report that amino-functional hollow mesoporous silica with large pore size (10.27 nm) and positively charged surface effectively immobilize DAO with negative charge. The adsorption, activity and stability of DAO are demonstrated to depend mainly on the amino-functionalization of surface. Significant cancer cell killing effect is observed when the cells are treated by the nanocapsules entrapping DAO together with D-alanine, showing distinct dose-dependency on concentration of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine. Nevertheless, the toxicity is completely neutralized by the addition of catalase, and anti-tumor effect is not observed when either the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine is applied alone. The results indicate that cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO could be managed by exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug to tumor tissue, due to the stereoselectivity of DAO and the scarcity of its substrates in mammalian organisms. Thus, the method might be exploited as a potential treatment for cancer therapy.

  3. NAD(+)-independent aldehyde oxidase catalyzes cofactor balanced 3-hydroxypropionic acid production in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Luo; Tian, Pingfang

    2014-11-01

    The limiting step for biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) in Klebsiella pneumoniae is the conversion of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) to 3-HP. This reaction is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Although NAD(+)-dependent ALDH overexpression facilitates 3-HP biosynthesis, ALDH activity decreases and 3-HP stops accumulation when NAD(+) is exhausted. Here, we show that an NAD(+)-independent aldehyde oxidase (AOX) from Pseudomonas sp. AIU 362 holds promise for cofactor-balanced 3-HP production in K. pneumoniae. The AOX coding gene, alod, was heterologously expressed in E. coli and K. pneumoniae, and their respective crude cell extracts showed 38.1 U/mg and 16.6 U/mg activities toward propionaldehyde. The recombinant K. pneumoniae expressing alod showed 13.7 U/mg activity toward 3-HPA; K m and V max were 6.7 mM and 42 μM/min/mg, respectively. In shake-flask cultures, the recombinant K. pneumoniae strain produced 0.89 g 3-HP/l, twice that of the control. Moreover, it produced 3 g 3-HP/l during 24 h fed-batch cultivation in a 5 l bioreactor. The results indicate that AOX can efficiently convert 3-HPA into 3-HP. PMID:24980850

  4. Lysyl oxidase-like 4 involvement in retinoic acid epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Comptour, Aurélie; Rouzaire, Marion; Belville, Corinne; Bonnin, Nicolas; Daniel, Estelle; Chiambaretta, Frédéric; Blanchon, Loïc; Sapin, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A and its active forms (retinoic acids/RAs) are known to have pro-healing properties, but their mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. This work aimed to identify the cellular and molecular processes by which atRA (all-trans RA) improves wound healing, using an in vivo model of mouse corneal alkali burns and an in vitro cellular human corneal epithelial injury model. Regulation by atRA has been studied on most of the cellular events that occur in wound healing. We investigated the direct influence of atRA on a specific target gene known to be involved in the extracellular matrix (ECM) dynamics, one of the pathways contributing to epithelial repair. Our results demonstrate that atRA promotes corneal epithelial wound healing by acting preferentially on migration. The induction of lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4) expression by atRA in the corneal epithelium environment was established as essential in the mechanism of atRA-dependent wound healing. Our study describes for the first time a direct link between a retinoic-induced gene and protein, LOXL4, and its general clinical pro-healing properties in ECM dynamics. PMID:27597564

  5. Cardiolipin linoleic acid content and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity are associated in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Val Andrew; McMeekin, Lauren; Saint, Caitlin; LeBlanc, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an inner-mitochondrial membrane phospholipid that is important for optimal mitochondrial function. Specifically, CL and CL linoleic (18:2ω6) content are known to be positively associated with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity. However, this association has not been examined in skeletal muscle. In this study, rats were fed high-fat diets with a naturally occurring gradient in linoleic acid (coconut oil [CO], 5.8%; flaxseed oil [FO], 13.2%; safflower oil [SO], 75.1%) in an attempt to alter both mitochondrial CL fatty acyl composition and COX activity in rat mixed hind-limb muscle. In general, mitochondrial membrane lipid composition was fairly resistant to dietary treatments as only modest changes in fatty acyl composition were detected in CL and other major mitochondrial phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). As a result of this resistance, CL 18:2ω6 content was not different between the dietary groups. Consistent with the lack of changes in CL 18:2ω6 content, mitochondrial COX activity was also not different between the dietary groups. However, correlational analysis using data obtained from rats across the dietary groups showed a significant relationship (p = 0.009, R(2) = 0.21). Specifically, our results suggest that CL 18:2ω6 content may positively influence mitochondrial COX activity thereby making this lipid molecule a potential factor related to mitochondrial health and function in skeletal muscle. PMID:25727371

  6. Activation of Membrane NADPH Oxidase Associated with Lysosome-Targeted Acid Sphingomyelinase in Coronary Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jun-Xiang; Jin, Si; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Zheng-Chao; Li, Ningjun

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study explored the mechanism mediating the aggregation of membrane NADPH oxidase (NOX) subunits and subsequent activation of this enzyme in bovine coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). With confocal microscopy, we found that FasL stimulated lipid rafts (LRs) clustering with NOX subunit aggregation and acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) gathering, which was blocked by the siRNA of sortilin, an intracellular protein responsible for the binding and targeting of ASM to lysosomes. Correspondingly, FasL-induced O2·− production through NOX in LRs fractions was abolished by sortilin siRNA. Further, with flow-cytometry and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis, we surprisingly demonstrated that after FasL stimulation, sortilin was exposed to cell membranes from lysosomes together with Lamp-1 and ASM, and these lysosomal components were aggregated and form a signaling complex in cell membranes. With co-immunoprecipitation, lysosomal sortilin and ASM were found to interact more strongly when CAECs were stimulated by FasL. Functionally, inhibition of either sortilin expression, lysosome function, LRs clustering, or NOX activity significantly attenuated FasL-induced decrease in nitric oxide (NO) levels. It is concluded that lysosome-targeted ASM, through sortilin, is able to traffic to and expose to cell-membrane surface, which may lead to LRs clustering and NOX activation in CAECs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 703–712. PMID:19761405

  7. Uric acid and xanthine oxidase in heart failure - Emerging data and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Doehner, Wolfram; Jankowska, Ewa A; Springer, Jochen; Lainscak, Mitja; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-06-15

    The role of hyperuricaemia as cardiovascular risk factor has exhaustingly been debated for decades. While the association of elevated uric acid (UA) levels with increased mortality risk as convincingly been shown, the question whether UA is independently predictive of just a related effect within a more complex risk factor profile (including metabolic, inflammatory and haemodynamic risk factors) is still a matter of dispute. In heart failure the independent prognostic and functional impact of elevated UA has not only been shown but also the pathophysiologic mechanism(s) and the potential of targeted therapeutic interventions have been investigated in some detail. The emerging picture suggests the increased activity of the enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) with corresponding increased production of free oxygen radical (ROS) as a main underlying principle with the resulting increase in UA levels being mostly a marker of this up-regulated pathway. While this concept will not diminish the value of UA as a prognostic marker, it provides the basis for a novel metabolic treatment option and the means to identify those patients most eligible for this tailored therapy. This review will summarize the recent evidence on XO as a novel and promising therapeutic target in heart failure. PMID:26318388

  8. Uric Acid Promotes Apoptosis in Human Proximal Tubule Cells by Oxidative Stress and the Activation of NADPH Oxidase NOX 4

    PubMed Central

    Verzola, Daniela; Ratto, Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Parodi, Emanuele Luigi; Pontremoli, Roberto; Garibotto, Giacomo; Viazzi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Mild hyperuricemia has been linked to the development and progression of tubulointerstitial renal damage. However the mechanisms by which uric acid may cause these effects are poorly explored. We investigated the effect of uric acid on apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK-2). Increased uric acid concentration decreased tubule cell viability and increased apoptotic cells in a dose dependent manner (up to a 7-fold increase, p<0.0001). Uric acid up-regulated Bax (+60% with respect to Ctrl; p<0.05) and down regulated X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein. Apoptosis was blunted by Caspase-9 but not Caspase-8 inhibition. Uric acid induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane, elevations in reactive oxygen species and a pronounced up-regulation of NOX 4 mRNA and protein (p<0.05). In addition, both reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis was prevented by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI as well as by Nox 4 knockdown. URAT 1 transport inhibition by probenecid and losartan and its knock down by specific siRNA, blunted apoptosis, suggesting a URAT 1 dependent cell death. In summary, our data show that uric acid increases the permissiveness of proximal tubule kidney cells to apoptosis by triggering a pathway involving NADPH oxidase signalling and URAT 1 transport. These results might explain the chronic tubulointerstitial damage observed in hyperuricaemic states and suggest that uric acid transport in tubular cells is necessary for urate-induced effects. PMID:25514209

  9. Activity of D-amino acid oxidase is widespread in the human central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Masataka; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) plays an essential role in degrading D-serine, an endogenous coagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. DAO shows genetic association with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and schizophrenia, in whose pathophysiology aberrant metabolism of D-serine is implicated. Although the pathology of both essentially involves the forebrain, in rodents, enzymatic activity of DAO is hindbrain-shifted and absent in the region. Here, we show activity-based distribution of DAO in the central nervous system (CNS) of humans compared with that of mice. DAO activity in humans was generally higher than that in mice. In the human forebrain, DAO activity was distributed in the subcortical white matter and the posterior limb of internal capsule, while it was almost undetectable in those areas in mice. In the lower brain centers, DAO activity was detected in the gray and white matters in a coordinated fashion in both humans and mice. In humans, DAO activity was prominent along the corticospinal tract, rubrospinal tract, nigrostriatal system, ponto-/olivo-cerebellar fibers, and in the anterolateral system. In contrast, in mice, the reticulospinal tract and ponto-/olivo-cerebellar fibers were the major pathways showing strong DAO activity. In the human corticospinal tract, activity-based staining of DAO did not merge with a motoneuronal marker, but colocalized mostly with excitatory amino acid transporter 2 and in part with GFAP, suggesting that DAO activity-positive cells are astrocytes seen mainly in the motor pathway. These findings establish the distribution of DAO activity in cerebral white matter and the motor system in humans, providing evidence to support the involvement of DAO in schizophrenia and ALS. Our results raise further questions about the regulation of D-serine in DAO-rich regions as well as the physiological/pathological roles of DAO in white matter astrocytes. PMID:24959138

  10. Characterization and cDNA sequence of Bothriechis schlegeliil-amino acid oxidase with antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Vargas Muñoz, Leidy Johana; Estrada-Gomez, Sebastian; Núñez, Vitelbina; Sanz, Libia; Calvete, Juan J

    2014-08-01

    Snake venoms are complex mixtures of proteins including l-amino acid oxidase (lAAO). A lAAO (named BslAAO) with a mass of 56kDa and a theoretical Ip of 5.79, was purified from Bothriechis schlegelii venom through size-exclusion, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. The entire protein sequence of 498 amino acids, was determined from cDNA using reverse-transcribed mRNA isolated from venom gland. The enzyme showed dose-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth. BslAAO showed inhibitory effect against S. aureus with a MIC of 4μg/mL and a MBC of 8μg/mL. Against Acinetobacter baumannii, showed a MIC of 2μg/mL and MBC of 4μg/mL, No effect was observed in Escherichia coli. This antibacterial activity was inhibited by catalase, indicating that antimicrobial activity was due to H2O2 production. BslAAO did not show any cytotoxic activity toward mouse myoblast cell line C2C12 or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The enzyme oxidated l-Leu, with a Km of 16.37μM and a Vmax of 0.39μM/min. Snake venoms lAAOs, are potential frames of different therapeutics molecules since these enzymes exhibit low MICs and MBCs and show to be harmless to human cells due to microorganisms being generally several fold more sensitive to reactive oxygen species than human tissues. PMID:24875315

  11. Thermal stability of ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid oxidase in african cowpea leaves ( Vigna unguiculata ) of different maturities.

    PubMed

    Wawire, Michael; Oey, Indrawati; Mathooko, Francis; Njoroge, Charles; Shitanda, Douglas; Hendrickx, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Cowpea, an African leafy vegetable ( Vigna unguiculata ), contains a high level of vitamin C. The leaves harvested at 4-9 weeks are highly prone to vitamin C losses during handling and processing. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to study the effect of thermal treatment on the stability of ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO), total vitamin C content (l-ascorbic acid, l-AA), and dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) and l-AA/DHAA ratio in cowpea leaves harvested at different maturities (4, 6, and 8 weeks old). The results showed that AAO activity, total vitamin C content, and l-AA/DHAA ratio in cowpea leaves increased with increasing maturity (up to 8 weeks). Eight-week-old leaves were the best source of total vitamin C and showed a high ratio of l-AA/DHAA (4:1). Thermal inactivation of AAO followed first-order reaction kinetics. Heating at temperatures above 90 °C for short times resulted in a complete AAO inactivation, resulting in a protective effect of l-AA toward enzyme-catalyzed oxidation. Total vitamin C in young leaves (harvested at 4 and 6 weeks) was predominantly in the form of DHAA, and therefore temperature treatment at 30-90 °C for 10 min decreased the total vitamin C content, whereas total vitamin C in 8-week-old cowpea leaves was more than 80% in the form of l-AA, so that a high retention of the total vitamin C can be obtained even after heating and/or reheating (30-90 °C for 10 min) before consumption. The results indicated that the stability of total vitamin C in situ was strongly dependent on the plant maturity stage and the processing conditions applied. PMID:21309563

  12. An ACC Oxidase Gene Essential for Cucumber Carpel Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Sun, Jinjing; Li, Shuai; Cui, Qingzhi; Zhang, Huimin; Xin, Fengjiao; Wang, Huaisong; Lin, Tao; Gao, Dongli; Wang, Shenhao; Li, Xia; Wang, Donghui; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xu, Zhihong; Huang, Sanwen

    2016-09-01

    Sex determination in plants gives rise to unisexual flowers that facilitate outcrossing and enhance genetic diversity. In cucumber and melon, ethylene promotes carpel development and arrests stamen development. Five sex-determination genes have been identified, including four encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and a transcription factor gene CmWIP1 that corresponds to the Mendelian locus gynoecious in melon and is a negative regulator of femaleness. ACC oxidase (ACO) converts ACC into ethylene; however, it remains elusive which ACO gene in the cucumber genome is critical for sex determination and how CmWIP1 represses development of female flowers. In this study, we discovered that mutation in an ACO gene, CsACO2, confers androecy in cucumber that bears only male flowers. The mutation disrupts the enzymatic activity of CsACO2, resulting in 50% less ethylene emission from shoot tips. CsACO2 was expressed in the carpel primordia and its expression overlapped with that of CsACS11 in female flowers at key stages for sex determination, presumably providing sufficient ethylene required for proper CsACS2 expression. CmACO3, the ortholog of CsACO2, showed a similar expression pattern in the carpel region, suggesting a conserved function of CsACO2/CmACO3. We demonstrated that CsWIP1, the ortholog of CmWIP1, could directly bind the promoter of CsACO2 and repress its expression. Taken together, we propose a presumably conserved regulatory module consisting of WIP1 transcription factor and ACO controls unisexual flower development in cucumber and melon. PMID:27403533

  13. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Strick, Christine A; Li, Cheryl; Scott, Liam; Harvey, Brian; Hajós, Mihály; Steyn, Stefanus J; Piotrowski, Mary A; James, Larry C; Downs, James T; Rago, Brian; Becker, Stacey L; El-Kattan, Ayman; Xu, Youfen; Ganong, Alan H; Tingley, F David; Ramirez, Andres D; Seymour, Patricia A; Guanowsky, Victor; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fox, Carol B; Schmidt, Christopher J; Duplantier, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Observations that N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) antagonists produce symptoms in humans that are similar to those seen in schizophrenia have led to the current hypothesis that schizophrenia might result from NMDA receptor hypofunction. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), the enzyme responsible for degradation of D-serine, should lead to increased levels of this co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, and thereby provide a therapeutic approach to schizophrenia. We have profiled some of the preclinical biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral consequences of administering potent and selective inhibitors of DAAO to rodents to begin to test this hypothesis. Inhibition of DAAO activity resulted in a significant dose and time dependent increase in D-serine only in the cerebellum, although a time delay was observed between peak plasma or brain drug concentration and cerebellum D-serine response. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling employing a mechanism-based indirect response model was used to characterize the correlation between free brain drug concentration and D-serine accumulation. DAAO inhibitors had little or no activity in rodent models considered predictive for antipsychotic activity. The inhibitors did, however, affect cortical activity in the Mescaline-Induced Scratching model, produced a modest but significant increase in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, and resulted in a significant increase in evoked hippocampal theta rhythm, an in vivo electrophysiological model of hippocampal activity. These findings demonstrate that although DAAO inhibition did not cause a measurable increase in D-serine in forebrain, it did affect hippocampal and cortical activity, possibly through augmentation of NMDA receptor-mediated currents. PMID:21763704

  14. Antiproliferative activity of king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Li Lee, Mui; Chung, Ivy; Yee Fung, Shin; Kanthimathi, M S; Hong Tan, Nget

    2014-04-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a heat-stable enzyme, is an extremely potent antiproliferative agent against cancer cells when compared with LAAO isolated from other snake venoms. King cobra venom LAAO was shown to exhibit very strong antiproliferative activities against MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) and A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells, with an IC50 value of 0.04±0.00 and 0.05±0.00 μg/mL, respectively, after 72-hr treatment. In comparison, its cytotoxicity was about 3-4 times lower when tested against human non-tumourigenic breast (184B5) and lung (NL 20) cells, suggesting selective antitumour activity. Furthermore, its potency in MCF-7 and A549 cell lines was greater than the effects of doxorubicin, a clinically established cancer chemotherapeutic agent, which showed an IC50 value of 0.18±0.03 and 0.63±0.21 μg/mL, respectively, against the two cell lines. The selective cytotoxic action of the LAAO was confirmed by phycoerythrin (PE) annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin (AAD) apoptotic assay, in which a significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed in LAAO-treated tumour cells than in their non-tumourigenic counterparts. The ability of LAAO to induce apoptosis in tumour cells was further demonstrated using caspase-3/7 and DNA fragmentation assays. We also determined that this enzyme may target oxidative stress in its killing of tumour cells, as its cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the presence of catalase (a H2O2 scavenger). In view of its heat stability and selective and potent cytotoxic action on cancer cells, king cobra venom LAAO can be potentially developed for treating solid tumours. PMID:24118879

  15. Revisitation of the βCl-Elimination Reaction of d-Amino Acid Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Ghisla, Sandro; Pollegioni, Loredano; Molla, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) from pig has been reported to catalyze the β-elimination of Cl− from βCl-d-alanine via abstraction of the substrate α-H as H+ (“carbanion mechanism”) (Walsh, C. T., Schonbrunn, A., and Abeles, R. H. (1971) J. Biol. Chem. 246, 6855–6866). In view of the fundamental mechanistic importance of this reaction and of the recent reinterpretation of the DAAO dehydrogenation step as occurring via a hydride mechanism, we reinvestigated the elimination reaction using yeast DAAO. That enzyme catalyzes the same reactions as the pig enzyme but with a much higher efficiency and a substantially different kinetic behavior. The reaction is initiated by a very rapid and fully reversible dehydrogenation step. This leads to an equilibrium (kon ≈ kreverse) between the complexes of oxidized enzyme-βCl-d-alanine and reduced enzyme-βCl-iminopyruvate. In the presence of O2 the latter complex can partition between an oxidative half-reaction and elimination of Cl−, which proceeds at a rate of ≈50 s−1. This step forms a complex between oxidized enzyme and enamine that is characterized by a charge transfer absorption (which describes its rates of formation and decay). A minimal scheme that lists relevant steps of the reductive and oxidative half-reactions and elimination pathways along with the estimate of the corresponding rate constants is presented. β-Elimination of Cl− is proposed to originate at the locus of the enzyme-βCl-iminopyruvate complex. A chemical mechanism that can account for elimination is discussed in detail. PMID:21949129

  16. Enhanced fatty acid accumulation in Isochrysis galbana by inhibition of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway under nitrogen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Litao; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the interrelation between the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway and fatty acid accumulation in marine microalga Isochrysis galbana. Under normal conditions, the activity of the AOX pathway was maintained at a low level in I. galbana. Compared with the normal condition, nitrogen deprivation significantly increased the AOX pathway activity and fatty acid accumulation. Under nitrogen deprivation, the inhibition of the AOX pathway by salicylhydroxamic acid caused the accumulation of reducing equivalents and the over-reduction of chloroplasts in I. galbana cells, leading to a decrease in the photosynthetic O2 evolution rate. The over-production of reducing equivalents due to the inhibition of the AOX pathway under nitrogen deprivation further enhanced the accumulation of fatty acids in I. galbana cells. PMID:27068057

  17. Novel human D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors stabilize an active-site lid-open conformation

    PubMed Central

    Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T.; Chun, Lawrence E.; Brown, Scott P.; Heffernan, Michele L. R.; Fang, Q. Kevin; Orsini, Michael A.; Pollegioni, Loredano; Hardy, Larry W.; Spear, Kerry L.; Large, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) is a central regulator of synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. hDAAO (human D-amino acid oxidase) indirectly reduces NMDAR activity by degrading the NMDAR co-agonist D-serine. Since NMDAR hypofunction is thought to be a foundational defect in schizophrenia, hDAAO inhibitors have potential as treatments for schizophrenia and other nervous system disorders. Here, we sought to identify novel chemicals that inhibit hDAAO activity. We used computational tools to design a focused, purchasable library of compounds. After screening this library for hDAAO inhibition, we identified the structurally novel compound, ‘compound 2’ [3-(7-hydroxy-2-oxo-4-phenyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)propanoic acid], which displayed low nM hDAAO inhibitory potency (Ki=7 nM). Although the library was expected to enrich for compounds that were competitive for both D-serine and FAD, compound 2 actually was FAD uncompetitive, much like canonical hDAAO inhibitors such as benzoic acid. Compound 2 and an analog were independently co-crystalized with hDAAO. These compounds stabilized a novel conformation of hDAAO in which the active-site lid was in an open position. These results confirm previous hypotheses regarding active-site lid flexibility of mammalian D-amino acid oxidases and could assist in the design of the next generation of hDAAO inhibitors. PMID:25001371

  18. Body pool and synthesis of ascorbic acid in adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus): An agnathan fish with gulonolactone oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Régis; Dabrowski, Konrad

    1998-01-01

    Although many vertebrates can synthesize ascorbic acid (vitamin C), it is still unclear from the evolutionary perspective when the ability to synthesize the vitamin first appeared in the animal kingdom and how frequently the trait has been lost. We report here ascorbic acid biosynthesis ability in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) which represent the most ancient vertebrate lineage examined thus far for presence of gulonolactone oxidase, the enzyme catalyzing the terminal step in biosynthesis of vitamin C. This finding supports the view that the ancestors of living vertebrates were not scurvy prone and that the loss of gulonolactone oxidase activity subsequently occurred several times in vertebrate phylogeny. Adult sea lamprey allocate significant amounts of ascorbic acid to the gonads to guaranty high-quality gametes. Tissue stores of ascorbate were maintained by de novo synthesis (1.2–1.3 mg of ascorbic acid/300-g sea lamprey per day at 15°C) while sea lamprey fast during spawning migration. We estimate that the in vivo daily renewal rate of ascorbate is 4–5% of the whole-body ascorbate pool based on measurement of its biosynthesis and concentration in the whole animal. PMID:9707638

  19. Cost of a naturally occurring two-amino acid deletion in cytochrome c oxidase subunit 7A in Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Ballard, J William O; Melvin, Richard G; Lazarou, Michael; Clissold, Fiona J; Simpson, Stephen J

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether a naturally occurring (DeltaTrp85, DeltaVal86) deletion from a protein subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) influenced cytochrome c oxidase activity, mRNA expression levels of electron transport chain genes, and aspects of adult female fitness in the fly Drosophila simulans. We modeled the tertiary structure of D. simulans cox7A containing the deletion by homology to the bovine cox7A structure and predicted that it would decrease the function of complex IV. This prediction led to the hypothesis that flies with the deletion would have lower cytochrome c oxidase activity and higher levels of mRNA expression from cox7A. This result was observed, but unexpectedly, elevated levels of mRNA expression were also observed in genes encoding subunits of complexes I, III, and IV. Together these data suggest that the deletion causes a high bioenergetic cost to the organism. To investigate the predicted cost at a physiological level, we assayed aspects of adult female fitness. Starvation sensitivity but not feeding rate was significantly influenced by the two-amino acid deletion. Further, we observed that carbohydrate and protein levels but not lipid levels were higher in the mutant flies. Together, these data show that quaternary structure modeling and biochemistry can be used to link the genotype with the organismal phenotype. PMID:20698788

  20. beta-aminobutyric acid primes an NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species production during grapevine-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil-Maurizi, Carole; Trouvelot, Sophie; Frettinger, Patrick; Pugin, Alain; Wendehenne, David; Poinssot, Benoît

    2010-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the process of priming are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the early signaling events triggered by beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA), a well-known priming-mediated plant resistance inducer. Our results indicate that, in contrast to oligogalacturonides (OG), BABA does not elicit typical defense-related early signaling events nor defense-gene expression in grapevine. However, in OG-elicited cells pretreated with BABA, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expression of the respiratory-burst oxidase homolog RbohD gene were primed. In response to the causal agent of downy mildew Plasmopara viticola, a stronger ROS production was specifically observed in BABA-treated leaves. This process was correlated with an increased resistance. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) abolished this primed ROS production and reduced the BABA-induced resistance (BABA-IR). These results suggest that priming of an NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production contributes to BABA-IR in the Vitis-Plasmopara pathosystem. PMID:20615112

  1. Antibacterial efficacy of recombinant Siganus oramin L-amino acid oxidase expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruijun; Li, Anxing

    2014-12-01

    Siganus oraminl-amino acid oxidase is a novel natural protein (named SR-LAAO) isolated from serum of the rabbitfish (S. oramin), which showed antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and had a lethal effect on the parasites Cryptocaryon irritans, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. In order to test whether recombinant SR-LAAO (rSR-LAAO) produced by the eukaryotic expression system also has antimicrobial activity, the yeast Pichia pastoris was used as the expression host to obtain rSR-LAAO in vitro. Crude rSR-LAAO produced by P. pastoris integrated with the SR-LAAO gene had antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as shown by inhibition zone assay of the antibacterial spectrum on agar plates. The average diameter of the inhibition zone of crude rSR-LAAO against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae was 1.040 ± 0.045 cm and 1.209 ± 0.085 cm, respectively. For the Gram-negative bacteria Aeromonas sobria, Escherichia coli, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio cholera and Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida, the average diameter of inhibition zone was 1.291 ± 0.089 cm, 0.943 ± 0.061 cm, 0.756 ± 0.057 cm, 0.834 ± 0.023 cm and 1.211 ± 0.026 cm, respectively. These results were obtained at the logarithmic growth phase of S. agalactiae and A. sobria cell suspensions after incubation with 0.5 mg/mL crude rSR-LAAO for 24 h. The final bacterial growth rate was decreased significantly. The relative inhibition rate can reach 50% compared to crude products from P. pastoris integrated with an empty vector at the same concentration of protein. The antimicrobial activity of crude rSR-LAAO was likely associated with H2O2 formation, because its inhibition zones were disturbed significantly by catalase. Scanning electron microscopy results showed crude rSR-LAAO-treated bacterial surfaces became rough and particles were attached, cell walls were

  2. Fabricating an Amperometric Cholesterol Biosensor by a Covalent Linkage between Poly(3-thiopheneacetic acid) and Cholesterol Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Po-Chin; Chen, Po-Yen; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    In this study, use of the covalent enzyme immobilization method was proposed to attach cholesterol oxidase (ChO) on a conducting polymer, poly(3-thiopheneacetic acid), [poly(3-TPAA)]. Three red-orange poly(3-TPAA) films, named electrodes A, B and C, were electropolymerized on a platinum electrode by applying a constant current of 1.5 mA, for 5, 20 and 100 s, respectively. Further, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylamiopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC · HCl) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) were used to activate the free carboxylic groups of the conducting polymer. Afterwards, the amino groups of the cholesterol oxidase were linked on the activated groups to form peptide bonds. The best sensitivity obtained for electrode B is 4.49 mA M−1 cm−2, with a linear concentration ranging from 0 to 8 mM, which is suitable for the analysis of cholesterol in humans. The response time (t95) is between 70 and 90 s and the limit of detection is 0.42 mM, based on the signal to noise ratio equal to 3. The interference of species such as ascorbic acid and uric acid increased to 5.2 and 10.3% of the original current response, respectively, based on the current response of cholesterol (100%). With respect to the long-term stability, the sensing response retains 88% of the original current after 13 days. PMID:22573987

  3. Characteristics of Rural Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) – A Survey of Medicare ACOs with Rural Presence.

    PubMed

    Salako, Abiodun; Zhu, Xi; MacKinney, A Clinton; Ullrich, Fred; Mueller, Keith

    2015-05-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are groups of health care providers, principally physicians and hospitals, who develop a new entity that contracts to provide coordinated care to assigned patients with the goal of improving quality of care while controlling costs. Section 3022 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 created the Medicare Shared Savings Program (SSP). The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) implements this program and has approved SSP contracts in five cycles since 2011, including some that participated in a special demonstration project that provided advance payment (as a forgivable loan). A new ACO Investment Model (AIM) program starts in 2015 that provides initial investment capital and variable monthly payments to ACO participants in rural and underserved areas who may not have access to the capital needed for successful ACO formation and operation. CMS also contracted with 32 organizations under a special demonstration project, "Pioneer ACOs" (as of November 16, 2014, there were 19 remaining).8 At the time of the research reported in this brief, there were 455 Medicare ACOs (Pioneer and SSP). While there is growing literature about ACOs, much remains to be learned about ACO development in rural areas. A previous RUPRI Center policy brief 2 examined the formation of four rural ACOs. The authors found that prior experience with risk sharing and provider integration facilitated ACO formation. This brief expands on the earlier brief by describing the findings of a survey of 27 rural ACOs, focusing on characteristics important to their formation and operation. Prospective rural ACO participants can draw from the experiences of predecessors, and the survey findings can inform policy discussions about ACO formation and operation. Key Findings from 27 Respondents. (1) Sixteen rural ACOs were formed by pre-existing integrated delivery networks. (2) Physician groups played a more prominent role than other participant

  4. Distribution in Different Organisms of Amino Acid Oxidases with FAD or a Quinone As Cofactor and Their Role as Antimicrobial Proteins in Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Campillo-Brocal, Jonatan C.; Lucas-Elío, Patricia; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid oxidases (AAOs) catalyze the oxidative deamination of amino acids releasing ammonium and hydrogen peroxide. Several kinds of these enzymes have been reported. Depending on the amino acid isomer used as a substrate, it is possible to differentiate between l-amino acid oxidases and d-amino acid oxidases. Both use FAD as cofactor and oxidize the amino acid in the alpha position releasing the corresponding keto acid. Recently, a novel class of AAOs has been described that does not contain FAD as cofactor, but a quinone generated by post-translational modification of residues in the same protein. These proteins are named as LodA-like proteins, after the first member of this group described, LodA, a lysine epsilon oxidase synthesized by the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea. In this review, a phylogenetic analysis of all the enzymes described with AAO activity has been performed. It is shown that it is possible to recognize different groups of these enzymes and those containing the quinone cofactor are clearly differentiated. In marine bacteria, particularly in the genus Pseudoalteromonas, most of the proteins described as antimicrobial because of their capacity to generate hydrogen peroxide belong to the group of LodA-like proteins. PMID:26694422

  5. A newly identified fatty alcohol oxidase gene is mainly responsible for the oxidation of long-chain ω-hydroxy fatty acids in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Gatter, Michael; Förster, André; Bär, Kati; Winter, Miriam; Otto, Christina; Petzsch, Patrick; Ježková, Michaela; Bahr, Katrin; Pfeiffer, Melanie; Matthäus, Falk; Barth, Gerold

    2014-09-01

    Nine potential (fatty) alcohol dehydrogenase genes and one alcohol oxidase gene were identified in Yarrowia lipolytica by comparative sequence analysis. All relevant genes were deleted in Y. lipolytica H222ΔP which is lacking β-oxidation. Resulting transformants were tested for their ability to accumulate ω-hydroxy fatty acids and dicarboxylic acids in the culture medium. The deletion of eight alcohol dehydrogenase genes (FADH, ADH1-7), which may be involved in ω-oxidation, led only to a slightly increased accumulation of ω-hydroxy fatty acids, whereas the deletion of the fatty alcohol oxidase gene (FAO1), which has not been described yet in Y. lipolytica, exhibited a considerably higher effect. The combined deletion of the eight (fatty) alcohol dehydrogenase genes and the alcohol oxidase gene further reduced the formation of dicarboxylic acids. These results indicate that both (fatty) alcohol dehydrogenases and an alcohol oxidase are involved in ω-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids whereby latter plays the major role. This insight marks the first step toward the biotechnological production of long-chain ω-hydroxy fatty acids with the help of the nonconventional yeast Y. lipolytica. The overexpression of FAO1 can be further used to improve existing strains for the production of dicarboxylic acids. PMID:24931727

  6. Including Language Access into Medicaid ACO Design.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Rachel; Morris, Lisa; Ferguson, Warren

    2016-09-01

    Quality health care relies upon communication in a patient's preferred language. Language access in health care occurs when individuals are: (1) Welcomed by providers regardless of language ability; and (2) Offered quality language services as part of their care. Federal law generally requires access to health care and quality language services for deaf and Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients in health care settings, but these patients still find it hard to access health care and quality language services.Meanwhile, several states are implementing Medicaid Accountable Care Organization (ACO) initiatives to reduce health care costs and improve health care quality. Alternative payment methods used in these initiatives can give Accountable Care Organizations more flexibility to design linguistically accessible care, but they can also put ACOs at increased financial risk for the cost of care. If these new payment methods do not account for differences in patient language needs, ACO initiatives could have the unintended consequence of rewarding ACOs who do not reach out to deaf and LEP communities or offer quality language services.We reviewed public documents related to Medicaid ACO initiatives in six states. Some of these documents address language access. More could be done, however, to pay for language access efforts. This article describes Medicaid ACO initiatives and explores how different payment tools could be leveraged to reward ACOs for increased access to care and quality language services. We find that a combination of payment tools might be helpful to encourage both access and quality. PMID:27587453

  7. Expression, purification, and immobilization of His-tagged D-amino acid oxidase of Trigonopsis variabilis in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huabao; Wang, Xiaolan; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Ke; Zhao, Yuhua; Yang, Yunliu; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong

    2006-05-01

    High-level expression of D: -amino acid oxidase (DAO) has been reported in Pichia pastoris by integrating the DAO gene under the control of the alcohol oxidase promoter (PAOX1). However, the time taken to reach peak product concentration is usually long (approximately 43 h), and cultivation requires tight regulation of methanol feeding. In this paper, we describe the expression of His-tagged DAO (HDAO) in P. pastoris using the glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (PGAP). The maximal level of HDAO expression using the PGAP integrant is attained in 13 h and is equal to that obtained using the PAOX1 integrant in 43 h. We also explored the possibility of secreting HDAO in P. pastoris. In-frame fusion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor secretion signal under a PGAP or PAOX1 resulted in low-level secretion of active HDAO, which was not of practical use. The intracellularly expressed HDAO under PGAP was purified by agar-based affinity support and then immobilized on Amberzyme oxirane resin. The immobilized HDAO, with specific activity of 75 U g-1 (wet weight), could be recycled more than 14 times without significant loss of activity. The data suggest that intracellular production of HDAO under PGAP, followed by affinity purification and immobilization on oxirane resin, may serve as an effective process for the manufacture of immobilized DAO for industrial application. PMID:16217653

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of 1-hydroxy/methoxy-4-methyl-2-phenyl-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives as non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaolei; Zhang, Tingjian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Fangyang; Niu, Handong; Wu, Chunfu; Wang, Shaojie

    2015-10-20

    Xanthine oxidase is a key enzyme that catalyses hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid, whose overproduction leads to the gout-causing hyperuricemia. In this study, a series of 1-hydroxy/methoxy-4-methyl-2-phenyl-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives (4a-4k and 6a-6k) was synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory potency against xanthine oxidase. The 1-hydroxyl substituted derivatives 4a-4k showed excellent inhibitory potency with IC50 values ranging from 0.003 μM to 1.2 μM, with compounds 4d (IC₅₀ = 0.003 μM), 4e (IC₅₀ = 0.003 μM), and 4f (IC₅₀ = 0.006 μM) manifesting the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitory potency that were comparable with that of Febuxostat (IC₅₀ = 0.01 μM). Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis revealed that representative compound 4f acted as a mixed-type inhibitor for xanthine oxidase. The basis of significant inhibition of xanthine oxidase by 4f was rationalized by its molecular docking into the active site of xanthine dehydrogenase. PMID:26363870

  9. Molecular cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of an active fused Zea mays L. D-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, A; Kohnehrouz, B B

    2009-02-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is an FAD-dependent enzyme that metabolizes D-amino acids in microbes and animals. However, such ability has not been identified in plants so far. We predicted a complete DAAO coding sequence consisting of 1158 bp and encoding a protein of 386 amino acids. We cloned this sequence from the leaf cDNA population of maize plants that could utilize D-alanine as a nitrogen source and grow normally on media containing D-Ala at the concentrations of 100 and 1000 ppm. For more understanding of DAAO ability in maize plant, we produced a recombinant plasmid by the insertion of isolated cDNA into the pMALc2X Escherichia coli expression vector, downstream of the maltose-binding protein coding sequence. The pMALc2X-DAAO vector was used to transform the TB1 strain of E. coli cells. Under normal growth conditions, fused DAAO (with molecular weight of about 78 kDa) was expressed up to 5 mg/liter of bacterial cells. The expressed product was purified by affinity chromatography and subjected to in vitro DAAO activity assay in the presence of five different D-amino acids. Fused DAAO could oxidize D-alanine and D-aspartate, but not D-leucine, D-isoleucine, and D-serine. The cDNA sequence reported in this paper has been submitted to EMBL databases under accession number AM407717. PMID:19267668

  10. p38 MAPK is involved in human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodosthoma.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Adriana S; Setúbal, Sulamita da S; Nery, Neriane Monteiro; da Silva, Francisquinha Souza; da Silva, Silvana D; Fernandes, Carla F C; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2016-09-01

    The action of LAAO, an L-amino acid oxidase isolated from Calloselasma rhodosthoma snake venom, on isolated human neutrophil function was investigated. Cr-LAAO showed no toxicity on neutrophils. Cr-LAAO in its native form induced the neutrophil chemotaxis, suggesting that its primary structure is essential for stimulation the cell. p38 MAPK and PI3K have a role as signaling pathways of CR-LAAO induced chemotaxis. This toxin also induced the production of hydrogen peroxide and stimulated phagocytosis in neutrophils. Furthermore, Cr-LAAO was able to stimulate neutrophils to release IL-6, IL-8, MPO, LTB4 and PGE2. Together, the data showed that the Cr-LAAO triggers relevant proinflammatory events. PMID:27242041

  11. Interfacial electron transfer of glucose oxidase on poly(glutamic acid)-modified glassy carbon electrode and glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuechou; Tan, Bingcan; Zheng, Xinyu; Kong, Dexian; Li, Qinglu

    2015-11-15

    The interfacial electron transfer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on a poly(glutamic acid)-modified glassy carbon electrode (PGA/GCE) was investigated. The redox peaks measured for GOx and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are similar, and the anodic peak of GOx does not increase in the presence of glucose in a mediator-free solution. These indicate that the electroactivity of GOx is not the direct electron transfer (DET) between GOx and PGA/GCE and that the observed electroactivity of GOx is ascribed to free FAD that is released from GOx. However, efficient electron transfer occurred if an appropriate mediator was placed in solution, suggesting that GOx is active. The PGA/GCE-based biosensor showed wide linear response in the range of 0.5-5.5 mM with a low detection limit of 0.12 mM and high sensitivity and selectivity for measuring glucose. PMID:26278169

  12. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  13. Development of 2-(Substituted Benzylamino)-4-Methyl-1, 3-Thiazole-5-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitors and Free Radical Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Rahmat; Kumar, Suresh; Afzal, Obaid; Shalmali, Nishtha; Sharma, Manju; Bawa, Sandhya

    2016-04-01

    A series of 2-(substituted benzylamino)-4-methylthiazole-5-carboxylic acid was designed and synthesized as structural analogue of febuxostat. A methylene amine spacer was incorporated between the phenyl ring and thiazole ring in contrast to febuxostat in which the phenyl ring was directly linked with the thiazole moiety. The purpose of incorporating methylene amine was to provide a heteroatom which is expected to favour hydrogen bonding within the active site residues of the enzyme xanthine oxidase. The structure of all the compounds was established by the combined use of FT-IR, NMR and MS spectral data. All the compounds were screened in vitro for their ability to inhibit the enzyme xanthine oxidase as per the reported procedure along with DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Compounds 5j, 5k and 5l demonstrated satisfactory potent xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values, 3.6, 8.1 and 9.9 μm, respectively, whereas compounds 5k, 5n and 5p demonstrated moderate antioxidant activities having IC50 15.3, 17.6 and 19.6 μm, respectively, along with xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. Compound 5k showed moderate xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity as compared with febuxostat along with antioxidant activity. All the compounds were also studied for their binding affinity in active site of enzyme (PDB ID-1N5X). PMID:26575582

  14. Gluconic acid production in bioreactor with immobilized glucose oxidase plus catalase on polymer membrane adjacent to anion-exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Godjevargova, Tzonka; Dayal, Rajeshwar; Turmanova, Sevdalina

    2004-10-20

    Gluconic acid was obtained in the permeate side of the bioreactor with glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized onto anion-exchange membrane (AEM) of low-density polyethylene grafted with 4-vinylpiridine. The electric resistance of the anion-exchange membranes was increased after the enzyme immobilization on the membrane. The gluconic acid productions were relatively low with the GOD immobilized by any method on the AEM. To increase the enzyme reaction efficiency, GOD was immobilized on membrane of AN copolymer (PAN) adjacent to an anion-exchange membrane in bioreactor. Uses of anion-exchange membrane led to selective removal of the gluconic acid from the glucose solution and reduce the gluconic acid inhibition. The amount of gluconic acid obtained in the permeate side of the bioreactor with the GOD immobilized on the PAN membrane adjacent to the AEM under electrodialysis was about 30 times higher than that obtained with enzyme directly bound to the AEM. The optimal substrate concentration in the feed side was found to be about 1 g/l. Further experiments were carried out with the co-immobilized GOD plus Catalase (CAT) on the PAN membrane adjacent to the AEM to improve the efficiency of the immobilize system. The yield of this process was at least 95%. The storage stability of the co-immobilized GOD and CAT was studied (lost 20% of initial activity for 90 d). The results obtained clearly showed the higher potential of the dual membrane bioreactor with GOD plus CAT bound to ultrafiltration polymer membrane adjacent to the AEM. Storage stability of GOD activity in GOD plus CAT immobilized on PAN//AEM membranes and on AEM. PMID:15497133

  15. Polyacrylic acid-coated cerium oxide nanoparticles: An oxidase mimic applied for colorimetric assay to organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Xiang; Xue, Shi-Fan; Deng, Jingjing; Zhang, Min; Shi, Guoyue; Zhou, Tianshu

    2016-11-15

    It is important and urgent to develop reliable and highly sensitive methods that can provide on-site and rapid detection of extensively used organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) for their neurotoxicity. In this study, we developed a novel colorimetric assay for the detection of OPs based on polyacrylic acid-coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (PAA-CeO2) as an oxidase mimic and OPs as inhibitors to suppress the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Firstly, highly dispersed PAA-CeO2 was prepared in aqueous solution, which could catalyze the oxidation of TMB to produce a color reaction from colorless to blue. And the enzyme of AChE was used to catalyze the substrate of acetylthiocholine (ATCh) to produce thiocholine (TCh). As a thiol-containing compound with reducibility, TCh can decrease the oxidation of TMB catalyzed by PAA-CeO2. Upon incubated with OPs, the enzymatic activity of AChE was inhibited to produce less TCh, resulting in more TMB catalytically oxidized by PAA-CeO2 to show an increasing blue color. The two representative OPs, dichlorvos and methyl-paraoxon, were tested using our proposed assay. The novel assay showed notable color change in a concentration-dependent manner, and as low as 8.62 ppb dichlorvos and 26.73 ppb methyl-paraoxon can be readily detected. Therefore, taking advantage of such oxidase-like activity of PAA-CeO2, our proposed colorimetric assay can potentially be a screening tool for the precise and rapid evaluation of the neurotoxicity of a wealth of OPs. PMID:27208478

  16. Structural characterization of CalO2: A putative orsellinic acid P450 oxidase in the calicheamicin biosynthetic

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Jason G.; Johnson, Heather D.; Singh, Shanteri; Bingman, Craig A.; Lei, In-Kyoung; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2009-08-13

    Although bacterial iterative Type I polyketide synthases are now known to participate in the biosynthesis of a small set of diverse natural products, the subsequent downstream modification of the resulting polyketide products remains poorly understood. Toward this goal, we report the X-ray structure determination at 2.5 A resolution and preliminary characterization of the putative orsellenic acid P450 oxidase (CalO2) involved in calicheamicin biosynthesis. These studies represent the first crystal structure for a P450 involved in modifying a bacterial iterative Type I polyketide product and suggest the CalO2-catalyzed step may occur after CalO3-catalyzed iodination and may also require a coenzyme A- (CoA) or acyl carrier protein- (ACP) bound substrate. Docking studies also reveal a putative docking site within CalO2 for the CLM orsellinic acid synthase (CalO5) ACP domain which involves a well-ordered helix along the CalO2 active site cavity that is unique compared with other P450 structures.

  17. A facile and effective immobilization of glucose oxidase on tannic acid modified CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Altun, Seher; Çakıroğlu, Bekir; Özacar, Münteha; Özacar, Mahmut

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a study of glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization by employing tannic acid (TA) modified-CoFe2O4 (CFO) magnetic nanoparticles which demonstrates novel aspect for enzyme immobilization. By using the strong protein and tannic acid binding, GOx immobilization was carried out via physical adsorption in a simpler way compared with the other immobilization methods which require various chemicals and complicated procedures which is difficult, expensive, time-consuming, and destructive to the enzyme structure. CFO was synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis and modified with TA to immobilize GOx. The immobilized GOx demonstrated maximum catalytic activity at pH 6.5 and 45 °C. The samples were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), all of which confirm the surface modification of CFO and GOx immobilization. Also, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed to demonstrate the surface morphology and chemical structure of samples. According to the Lineweaver-Burk plot, GOx possessed lower affinity to glucose after immobilization, and the Michelis-Menten constant (KM) of immobilized and free GOx were found to be 50.05 mM and 28.00 mM, respectively. The immobilized GOx showed excellent reusability, and even after 8 consecutive activity assay runs, the immobilized GOx maintained ca. 60% of its initial activity. PMID:26562188

  18. Exploring Regulation Genes Involved in the Expression of L-Amino Acid Oxidase in Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ju; Lin, Jianxun; Zhao, Minyan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) is believed to play important biological and ecological roles in marine niches, thus attracting increasing attention to understand the regulation mechanisms underlying its production. In this study, we investigated genes involved in LAAO production in marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1 using transposon mutagenesis. Of more than 4,000 mutants screened, 15 mutants showed significant changes in LAAO activity. Desired transposon insertion was confirmed in 12 mutants, in which disrupted genes and corresponding functionswere identified. Analysis of LAAO activity and lao gene expression revealed that GntR family transcriptional regulator, methylase, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, TonB-dependent heme-receptor family, Na+/H+ antiporter and related arsenite permease, N-acetyltransferase GCN5, Ketol-acid reductoisomerase and SAM-dependent methytransferase, and their coding genes may be involved in either upregulation or downregulation pathway at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational and/or posttranslational level. The nhaD and sdmT genes were separately complemented into the corresponding mutants with abolished LAAO-activity. The complementation of either gene can restore LAAO activity and lao gene expression, demonstrating their regulatory role in LAAO biosynthesis. This study provides, for the first time, insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating LAAO production in Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1, which is important to better understand biological and ecological roles of LAAO. PMID:25815733

  19. D-Amino acid oxidase-induced oxidative stress, 3-bromopyruvate and citrate inhibit angiogenesis, exhibiting potent anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, S M; El-Magd, R M Abou; Shishido, Y; Yorita, K; Chung, S P; Tran, D H; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-10-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for cancer growth and metastasis. Steps of angiogenesis are energy consuming, while vascular endothelial cells are highly glycolytic. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor and this enhances its aggressiveness. D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a promising therapeutic protein that induces oxidative stress upon acting on its substrates. Oxidative stress-energy depletion (OSED) therapy was recently reported (El Sayed et al., Cancer Gene Ther, 19, 1-18, 2012). OSED combines DAO-induced oxidative stress with energy depletion caused by glycolytic inhibitors such as 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a hexokinase II inhibitor that depleted ATP in cancer cells and induced production of hydrogen peroxide. 3BP disturbs the Warburg effect and antagonizes effects of lactate and pyruvate (El Sayed et al., J Bioenerg Biomembr, 44, 61-79, 2012). Citrate is a natural organic acid capable of inhibiting glycolysis by targeting phosphofructokinase. Here, we report that DAO, 3BP and citrate significantly inhibited angiogenesis, decreased the number of vascular branching points and shortened the length of vascular tubules. OSED delayed the growth of C6/DAO glioma cells. 3BP combined with citrate delayed the growth of C6 glioma cells and decreased significantly the number and size of C6 glioma colonies in soft agar. Human GBM cells (U373MG) were resistant to chemotherapy e.g. cisplatin and cytosine arabinoside, while 3BP was effective in decreasing the viability and disturbing the morphology of U373MG cells. PMID:22802136

  20. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation.

    PubMed

    Kanade, Santosh R; Paul, Beena; Rao, A G Appu; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2006-05-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase)--a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen--and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.1+/-2 to 75.9+/-0.6 A (1 A=0.1 nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack. PMID:16393141

  1. Irreversible inactivation of snake venom l-amino acid oxidase by covalent modification during catalysis of l-propargylglycine.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Jyotirmoy; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2013-01-01

    Snake venom l-amino acid oxidase (SV-LAAO, a flavor-enzyme) has attracted considerable attention due to its multifunctional nature, which is manifest in diverse clinical and biological effects such as inhibition of platelet aggregation, induction of cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity against various cells. The majority of these effects are mediated by H2O2 generated during the catalytic conversion of l-amino acids. The substrate analog l-propargylglycine (LPG) irreversibly inhibited the enzyme from Crotalus adamanteus and Crotalus atrox in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Inactivation was irreversible which was significantly protected by the substrate l-phenylalanine. A Kitz-Wilson replot of the inhibition kinetics suggested formation of reversible enzyme-LPG complex, which occurred prior to modification and inactivation of the enzyme. UV-visible and fluorescence spectra of the enzyme and the cofactor strongly suggested formation of covalent adduct between LPG and an active site residue of the enzyme. A molecular modeling study revealed that the FAD-binding, substrate-binding and the helical domains are conserved in SV-LAAOs and both His223 and Arg322 are the important active site residues that are likely to get modified by LPG. Chymotrypsin digest of the LPG inactivated enzyme followed by RP-HPLC and MALDI mass analysis identified His223 as the site of modification. The findings reported here contribute towards complete inactivation of SV-LAAO as a part of snake envenomation management. PMID:23772385

  2. Effects of hydrogen bonds in association with flavin and substrate in flavoenzyme d-amino acid oxidase. The catalytic and structural roles of Gly313 and Thr317.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, Chiaki; Nishina, Yasuzo; Tamaoki, Haruhiko; Mizutani, Hisashi; Miyahara, Ikuko; Hirotsu, Ken; Shiga, Kiyoshi; Miura, Retsu

    2002-01-01

    According to the three-dimensional structure of a porcine kidney D-amino acid oxidase-substrate (D-leucine) complex model, the G313 backbone carbonyl recognizes the substrate amino group by hydrogen bonding and the side-chain hydroxyl of T317 forms a hydrogen bond with C(2)=O of the flavin moiety of FAD [Miura et al. (1997) J. Biochem. 122, 825-833]. We have designed and expressed the G313A and T317A mutants and compared their enzymatic and spectroscopic properties with those of the wild type. The G313A mutant shows decreased activities to various D-amino acids, but the pattern of substrate specificity is different from that of the wild type. The results imply that the hydrogen bond between the G313 backbone carbonyl and the substrate amino group plays important roles in substrate recognition and in defining the substrate specificity of D-amino acid oxidase. The T317A mutant shows a decreased affinity for FAD. The steady-state kinetic measurements indicate diminished activities of T317A to substrate D-amino acids. The transient kinetic parameters measured by stopped-flow spectroscopy revealed that T317 plays key roles in stabilizing the purple intermediate, a requisite intermediate in the oxidative half-reaction, and in enhancing the release of the product from the active site, thereby optimizing the overall catalytic process of D-amino acid oxidase. PMID:11754736

  3. Role of intracellular calcium and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in acid-induced DNA damage in Barrett's cells and Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms whereby acid reflux may accelerate the progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. Acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to cause DNA damage in Barrett's cells. We have previously shown that NADPH oxidase NOX5-S is responsible for acid-induced H2O2 production in Barrett's cells and in EA cells. In this study we examined the role of intracellular calcium and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in acid-induced DNA damage in a Barrett's EA cell line FLO and a Barrett's cell line CP-A. We found that pulsed acid treatment significantly increased tail moment in FLO and CP-A cells and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased intracellular Ca2+ in FLO cells, an increase that is blocked by Ca2+-free medium with EGTA and thapsigargin. Acid-induced increase in tail moment was significantly decreased by NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium in FLO cells, and by blockade of intracellular Ca2+ increase or knockdown of NOX5-S with NOX5 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in FLO and CP-A cells. Acid-induced increase in histone H2AX phosphorylation was significantly decreased by NOX5 siRNA in FLO cells. Conversely, overexpression of NOX5-S significantly increased tail moment and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO cells. We conclude that pulsed acid treatment causes DNA damage via increase of intracellular calcium and activation of NOX5-S. It is possible that in BE acid reflux increases intracellular calcium, activates NOX5-S, and increases ROS production, which causes DNA damage, thereby contributing to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:24699332

  4. Super ACO FEL oscillation at 300 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Renault, E.; Nahon, L.; Couprie, M. E.

    2000-05-01

    Some recent improvements, involving both the optical cavity mirrors and the positron beam dynamics in the storage ring, have allowed us to achieve a laser oscillation at 300 nm on the Super ACO Storage Ring FEL. The Super ACO storage ring is operated at 800 MeV which is the nominal energy for the usual synchrotron radiation users, and the highest energy for a storage ring FEL. The lasing at 300 nm could be kept during 2 h per injection, with a stored current ranging between 30 and 60 mA. The FEL characteristics are presented here. The longitudinal stability and the FEL optics behaviour are also discussed.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of microparticles based on poly-methacrylic acid with glucose oxidase for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Hervás Pérez, J P; López-Ruiz, B; López-Cabarcos, E

    2016-03-01

    In the line of the applicability of biocompatible monomers pH and temperature dependent, we assayed poly-methacrylic acid (p-MAA) microparticles as immobilization system in the design of enzymatic biosensors. Glucose oxidase was used as enzyme model for the study of microparticles as immobilization matrices and as biological material in the performance of glucose biosensors. The enzyme immobilization method was optimized by investigating the influence of monomer concentration and cross-linker content (N',N'-methylenebisacrylamide), used in the preparation of the microparticles in the response of the biosensors. The kinetics of the polymerization and the effects of the temperature were studied, also the conversion of the polymerization was determinates by a weight method. The structure of the obtained p-MAA microparticles were studied through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning microscopy (DSC). The particle size measurements were performed with a Galai-Cis 1 particle analyzer system. Furthermore, the influence of the swelling behavior of hydrogel matrix as a function of pH and temperature were studied. Analytical properties such as sensitivity, linear range, response time and detection limit were studied for the glucose biosensors. The sensitivity for glucose detection obtained with poly-methacrylic acid (p-MAA) microparticles was 11.98mAM(-1)cm(-2) and 10μM of detection limit. A Nafion® layer was used to eliminate common interferents of the human serum such as uric and ascorbic acids. The biosensors were used to determine glucose in human serum samples with satisfactory results. When stored in a frozen phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) at -4°C, the useful lifetime of all biosensors was at least 550 days. PMID:26717846

  6. Factors influencing diamine oxidase activity and γ-aminobutyric acid content of fava bean (Vicia faba L.) during germination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Chen, Hui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2011-11-01

    Factors (germination time, spectra, temperature, pH, and chemical inhibitors) influencing diamine oxidase (DAO, EC 1.4.3.6) activity and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content of fava bean (Vicia faba L.) during germination were investigated in this study. DAO activity significantly increased in germinating seeds but varied with different organs. The enzyme activity was higher in shoot than that in cotyledon, hypocotyl, and radicle. When seeds were germinated in the dark, DAO activity was 2.35-, 2.00-, 2.36-, 4.40-, and 1.67-fold of that under white, red, blue, green, and yellow spectra, respectively. The optimum germination temperature and pH value for increasing DAO activity were 30 °C and 3.0, respectively. The DAO activity was inhibited significantly by aminoguanidine and sodium ethylenediamine tetracetate, while it was activated by CuCl(2) and CaCl(2). Germinating at an appropriate temperature and pH, 30% of GABA formation was supplied by DAO. Calcium was related to the regulation of DAO activity and GABA accumulation. PMID:21942768

  7. Lactogenic hormone stimulation and epigenetic control of L-amino acid oxidase expression in lactating mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kazuki; Zhang, Haolin; Usuda, Kento; Watanabe, Gen; Nagaoka, Kentaro

    2015-11-01

    L-amino acid oxidase (LAO), a classic flavoprotein, shows antibacterial activity by producing hydrogen peroxide. LAO exists in many tissues such as salivary gland, thymus, spleen, small intestine and testis. In particular, LAO was highly expressed in mice milk and plays an important factor in innate immunity of mammary glands. However, the mechanism which LAO expression is regulated spatially and temporally in lactating mammary glands has been unclear. In this study, we showed the contribution of lactogenic hormone and epigenetic control on LAO gene expression. In monolayer of mammary epithelial cells, treatment of lactogenic hormone mixture, dexamethasone, insulin and prolactin, did not induce LAO mRNA expression and its promoter activity, even though one of milk protein β-casein expression was stimulated. However, increase of LAO expression was observed when the cells were treated with lactogenic hormones in a 3-dimensional culture. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that histone H3K18 acetylation increased and histone H3K27 tri-methylation decreased with lactation, which is associated with a period of high LAO expression. Moreover, the treatment of histone methylation inhibitor (DZNep) as well as histone deacetylation inhibitor (Trichostatine A) induced LAO expression in monolayer of mammary cells. Taken together, this is the first demonstration showing that LAO expression is induced in cell culture, and stimulation of lactogenic hormone and change of histone modification are promising signals to show highly expression of LAO in lactating mammary glands. PMID:25820447

  8. D-amino acid oxidase gene therapy sensitizes glioma cells to the antiglycolytic effect of 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, S M; Abou El-Magd, R M; Shishido, Y; Chung, S P; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-01-01

    Glioma tumors are refractory to conventional treatment. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive type of primary brain tumors in humans. In this study, we introduce oxidative stress-energy depletion (OSED) therapy as a new suggested treatment for glioblastoma. OSED utilizes D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), which is a promising therapeutic protein that induces oxidative stress and apoptosis through generating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). OSED combines DAO with 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a hexokinase II (HK II) inhibitor that interferes with Warburg effect, a metabolic alteration of most tumor cells that is characterized by enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Our data revealed that 3BP induced depletion of energetic capabilities of glioma cells. 3BP induced H2O2 production as a novel mechanism of its action. C6 glioma transfected with DAO and treated with D-serine together with 3BP-sensitized glioma cells to 3BP and decreased markedly proliferation, clonogenic power and viability in a three-dimensional tumor model with lesser effect on normal astrocytes. DAO gene therapy using atelocollagen as an in vivo transfection agent proved effective in a glioma tumor model in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, especially after combination with 3BP. OSED treatment was safe and tolerable in SD rats. OSED therapy may be a promising therapeutic modality for glioma. PMID:21921941

  9. Microwave assisted synthesis of naphthopyrans catalysed by silica supported fluoroboric acid as a new class of non purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sahil; Sharma, Kirti; Ojha, Ritu; Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Gagandip; Nepali, Kunal; Bedi, P M S

    2014-01-15

    A series of naphthopyrans was synthesized employing silica supported fluoroboric acid under solvent free conditions in a microwave reactor. The catalytic influence of HBF4-SiO2 was investigated in detail to optimize the reaction conditions. The synthesised compounds were evaluated for in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity for the first time. Structure-activity relationship analyses have also been presented. Among the synthesised compounds, NP-17, NP-19, NP-20, NP-23, NP-24, NP-25 and NP-26 were the active inhibitors with an IC50 ranging from 4 to 17 μM. Compound NP-19 with a thiophenyl ring at position 1 emerged as the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor (IC50=4 μM) in comparison to allopurinol (IC50=11.10 μM) and febuxostat (IC50=0.025 μM). The basis of significant inhibition of xanthine oxidase by NP-19 was rationalized by its molecular docking at MTE binding site of xanthine oxidase. PMID:24388807

  10. Development of new chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis system with amino acid ionic liquids ligands and its application in studying the kinetics of L-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingbing; Mu, Xiaoyu; Qi, Li

    2014-04-22

    New kinds of amino acid ionic liquids (AAILs) with pyridinium as cations and L-lysine (L-Lys) as anion have been developed as the available chiral ligands coordinated with Zn(II) in chiral ligand-exchange capillary electrophoresis (CLE-CE). Four kinds of AAILs, including [1-ethylpyridinium][L-lysine], 1-butylpyridinium][L-lysine], [1-hexylpyridinium][L-lysine] and 1-[octylpyridinium][L-lysine], were successfully synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Compared with other AAILs, the best chiral separation of Dns-D, L-amino acids could be achieved when [1-ethylpyridinium][L-lysine] was chosen as the chiral ligand. It has been found that after investigating the influence of key factors on the separation efficiency, such as pH of buffer solution, the ratio of Zn(II) to ligand and complex concentration, eight pairs of Dns-D, L-AAs enantiomers could be baseline separated and three pairs were partly separated under the optimum conditions. The proposed CLE-CE method also exhibited favorable quantitative analysis property of Dns-D, L-Met with good linearity (r(2)=0.998) and favorable repeatability (RSD≤1.5%). Furthermore, the CLE-CE system was applied in investigating the kinetic contents of L-amino acid oxidase, which implied that the proposed system has the potential in studying the enzymatic reaction mechanism. PMID:24703219

  11. A chiral ligand exchange CE essay with zinc(II)-L-valine complex for determining enzyme kinetic constant of L-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Yang, Gengliang; Zhang, Haizhi; Qiao, Juan

    2010-06-15

    A new strategy for the enantioseparation of D,L-amino acids employing the principle of ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis with Zn(II)-L-valine complex as a chiral selecting system in the presence of beta-cyclodextrin has been designed. Successful enantioseparation of label free and labeled amino acids have been achieved with a buffer of 100.0mM boric acid, 5.0mM ammonium acetate, 4.0mM beta-cyclodextrin, 4.0mM ZnSO(4) and 8.0mM L-valine at pH 8.1. This new method was shown to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of label free D- and L-aromatic amino acids. Furthermore, the expanding enzymatic use of L-amino acid oxidase to incubate with different L-amino acids has allowed understanding of the substrate's specificity. An on-column incubation assay has been developed to study the L-amino acid oxidase's catalytic efficiency. It was demonstrated that the enzyme kinetic constant could be determined by using this new method. PMID:20441938

  12. Human spermatozoa possess an IL4I1 l-amino acid oxidase with a potential role in sperm function.

    PubMed

    Houston, B; Curry, B; Aitken, R J

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to play an important role in the regulation of human sperm function. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that human spermatozoa possess interleukin-induced gene 1 (IL4I1), an l-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) which is capable of generating ROS on exposure to aromatic amino acids in the presence of oxygen. The preferred substrates were found to be phenylalanine and tryptophan while the enzyme was located in the acrosomal region and midpiece of these cells. In contrast to equine and bovine spermatozoa, enzyme activity was lost as soon as the spermatozoa became non-viable. On a cell-to-cell basis human spermatozoa were also shown to generate lower levels of hydrogen peroxide than their equine counterparts on exposure to phenylalanine. Stimulation of LAAO activity resulted in the induction of several hallmarks of capacitation including tyrosine phosphorylation of the sperm flagellum and concomitant activation of phospho-SRC expression. In addition, stimulation of LAAO resulted in an increase in the levels of acrosomal exocytosis in both the presence and absence of progesterone stimulation, via mechanisms that could be significantly reversed by the presence of catalase. As is often the case with free radical-mediated phenomena, prolonged exposure of human spermatozoa to phenylalanine resulted in the stimulation of apoptosis as indicated by significant increases in mitochondrial superoxide generation and the activation of intracellular caspases. These results confirm the existence of an LAAO in human spermatozoa with a potential role in driving the redox regulation of sperm capacitation and acrosomal exocytosis. PMID:25767141

  13. Cloning, characterization and mutagenesis of Russell's viper venom L-amino acid oxidase: Insights into its catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Sen; Wang, Ying-Ming; Huang, Wan-Ting; Huang, Kai-Fa; Tsai, Inn-Ho

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the structure-function relationships and geographic variations of L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) from Daboia venoms, a single LAAO (designated as DrLAO) was purified from eastern Indian Daboia russelii venom and characterized. The purified DrLAO showed subunit molecular mass of 60-64kDa; its N-terminal sequence (1-20) was identical to those of several true viper LAAOs. Its preferred substrates were hydrophobic l-amino acids and the kinetic specificities were ordered as follows: Phe, Tyr, Met, Leu, and Trp. Enzyme assay and Western blotting showed that the venom LAAO contents of D. russelii were higher than those of Daboia siamensis. DrLAO dose-dependently inhibited ADP- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation with IC(50) values of 0.27 and 0.82μM, respectively. Apparently, DrLAO may synergize with other venom components to prolong and enhance bleeding symptoms after Daboia envenoming. The full sequence of DrLAO was deduced from its cDNA sequence and then confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that SV-LAAO family members could be differentiated not only by snake taxonomy but also by the variations at position 223, and they divided into H223, S223, N223, and D223 subclasses. We have further prepared recombinant DrLAO and mutants by the Pichia expression system. Mutagenic analyses of DrLAO His223 revealed that this residue bound substrates instead of serving as an essential base in the catalytic steps. Our results suggest a direct hydride transfer from substrate to FAD as the mechanism for SV-LAAOs. PMID:21802487

  14. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation

    PubMed Central

    Kanade, Santosh R.; Paul, Beena; Rao, A. G. Appu; Gowda, Lalitha R.

    2006-01-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase) – a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen – and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.1±2 to 75.9±0.6 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack. PMID:16393141

  15. Hypohalous acid-modified human serum albumin induces neutrophil NADPH oxidase activation, degranulation, and shape change.

    PubMed

    Gorudko, Irina V; Grigorieva, Daria V; Shamova, Ekaterina V; Kostevich, Valeria A; Sokolov, Alexey V; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Arnhold, Jürgen; Panasenko, Oleg M

    2014-03-01

    Halogenated lipids, proteins, and lipoproteins formed in reactions with myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypobromous acid (HOBr) can contribute to the regulation of functional activity of cells and serve as mediators of inflammation. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the major plasma protein target of hypohalous acids. This study was performed to assess the potency of HSA modified by HOCl (HSA-Cl) and HOBr (HSA-Br) to elicit selected neutrophil responses. HSA-Cl/Br were found to induce neutrophil degranulation, generation of reactive oxygen intermediates, shape change, and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Thus HSA-Cl/Br can initially act as a switch and then as a feeder of the "inflammatory loop" under oxidative stress. In HSA-Cl/Br-treated neutrophils, monoclonal antibodies against CD18, the β subunit of β2 integrins, reduced the production of superoxide anion radicals and hydrogen peroxide as well as MPO exocytosis, suggesting that CD18 contributed to neutrophil activation. HSA-Cl/Br-induced neutrophil responses were also inhibited by genistein, a broad-specificity tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, supporting the notion that activation of both tyrosine kinase and PI3K may play a role in neutrophil activation by HSA modified in MPO-dependent reactions. These results confirm the hypothesis that halogenated molecules formed in vivo via MPO-dependent reactions can be considered as a new class of biologically active substances potentially able to contribute to activation of myeloid cells in sites of inflammation and serve as inflammatory response modulators. PMID:24384524

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.1) catalyzes the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones. Highly reactive o-quinones couple with phenolics and specific amino acids on proteins to form the characteristic browning products in many wounded fruits, vegetables, and leaf tissues of plant...

  17. Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS): A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Tho, Nguyen Van; Park, Hye Yun; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-04-01

    Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation with several features usually associated with asthma and several features usually associated with COPD. ACOS may be a special phenotype of a spectrum of chronic obstructive airway diseases, in which asthma and COPD are at the two opposite ends. The prevalence of ACOS varies considerably due to differing criteria being applied for diagnosis. Patients with ACOS utilize a large proportion of medical resources. They are associated with more frequent adverse outcomes than those with asthma or COPD alone. ACOS is currently a diagnostic challenge for physicians because there are no specific biomarkers to differentiate ACOS from asthma or COPD. The approach to diagnosing ACOS depends on the population from which the patient originated. The management of ACOS should be individualized to ensure the most effective treatment with minimal side effects. In this paper, we review the diagnostic criteria of ACOS used in previous studies, propose practical approaches to diagnosing and managing ACOS and raise some research questions related to ACOS. PMID:26450153

  18. Bile acid receptor TGR5, NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S and CREB Mediate Bile Acid-Induced DNA Damage In Barrett’s Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby bile acid reflux may accelerate the progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. In this study we found that bile acid taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) significantly increased the tail moment (TM) and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO-1 EA cells, an increase which was significantly decreased by knockdown of TGR5. Overexpression of TGR5 significantly increased TDCA-induced TM increase and H2AX phosphorylation. In addition, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium significantly inhibited the TDCA-induced increase in TM and H2AX phosphorylation. TDCA-induced increase in TM and H2AX phosphorylation was significantly decreased by knockdown of NOX5-S and overexpression of NOX5-S significantly increased TDCA-induced increase in the tail moment and H2AX phosphorylation. Furthermore, TDCA significantly increased cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in FLO-1 cells. Knockdown of CREB significantly decreased TDCA-induced increase in NOX5-S mRNA and the tail moment. Conversely, overexpression of CREB significantly increased TDCA-induced TM increase. We conclude that TDCA-induced DNA damage may depend on the activation of TGR5, CREB and NOX5-S. It is possible that in Barrett’s patients bile acids may activate NOX5-S and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via activation of TGR5 and CREB. NOX5-S-derived ROS may cause DNA damage, thereby contributing to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:27511066

  19. Bile acid receptor TGR5, NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S and CREB Mediate Bile Acid-Induced DNA Damage In Barrett's Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby bile acid reflux may accelerate the progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. In this study we found that bile acid taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) significantly increased the tail moment (TM) and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO-1 EA cells, an increase which was significantly decreased by knockdown of TGR5. Overexpression of TGR5 significantly increased TDCA-induced TM increase and H2AX phosphorylation. In addition, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium significantly inhibited the TDCA-induced increase in TM and H2AX phosphorylation. TDCA-induced increase in TM and H2AX phosphorylation was significantly decreased by knockdown of NOX5-S and overexpression of NOX5-S significantly increased TDCA-induced increase in the tail moment and H2AX phosphorylation. Furthermore, TDCA significantly increased cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in FLO-1 cells. Knockdown of CREB significantly decreased TDCA-induced increase in NOX5-S mRNA and the tail moment. Conversely, overexpression of CREB significantly increased TDCA-induced TM increase. We conclude that TDCA-induced DNA damage may depend on the activation of TGR5, CREB and NOX5-S. It is possible that in Barrett's patients bile acids may activate NOX5-S and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via activation of TGR5 and CREB. NOX5-S-derived ROS may cause DNA damage, thereby contributing to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:27511066

  20. A mitochondrial DNA variant, identified in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients, which extends the amino acid sequence of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M D; Yang, C C; Trounce, I; Torroni, A; Lott, M T; Wallace, D C

    1992-01-01

    A G-to-A transition at nucleotide pair (np) 7444 in the mtDNA was found to correlate with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The mutation eliminates the termination codon of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, extending the COI polypeptide by three amino acids. The mutation was discovered as an XbaI restriction-endonuclease-site loss present in 2 (9.1%) of 22 LHON patients who lacked the np 11778 LHON mutation and in 6 (1.1%) of 545 unaffected controls. The mutant polypeptide has an altered mobility on SDS-PAGE, suggesting a structural alteration, and the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity of patient lymphocytes is reduced approximately 40% relative to that in controls. These data suggest that the np 7444 mutation results in partial respiratory deficiency and thus contributes to the onset of LHON. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:1322638

  1. Molecular mechanism of cell death induced by king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom l-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Fung, Shin Yee; Lee, Mui Li; Tan, Nget Hong

    2015-03-01

    Snake venom LAAOs have been reported to exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities, including cytotoxic, edema-inducing, platelet aggregation-inducing/platelet aggregation-inhibiting, bactericidal and antiviral activities. A heat-stable form of l-amino acid oxidase isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom (OH-LAAO) has been shown to exhibit very potent cytotoxicity against human tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts, and the cytotoxicity was due to the apoptosis-inducing effect of the enzyme. In this work, the molecular mechanism of cell death induced by OH-LAAO was investigated. The enzyme exerts its apoptosis-inducing effect presumably via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways as suggested by the increase in caspase-8 and -9 activities. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed that the expression of a total of 178 genes was significantly altered as a result of oxidative stress induced by the hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme. Of the 178 genes, at least 27 genes are involved in apoptosis and cell death. These alterations of gene expression was presumably caused by the direct cytotoxic effect of H2O2 generated during the enzymatic reaction, as well as the non-specific oxidative modifications of signaling molecules that eventually lead to apoptosis and cell death. The very substantial up-regulation of cytochrome P450 genes may also contribute to the potent cytotoxic action of OH-LAAO by producing excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, the potent apoptosis inducing activity of OH-LAAO was likely due to the direct cytotoxic effect of H2O2 generated during the enzymatic reaction, as well as the non-specific oxidation of signalling molecules. PMID:25615711

  2. Cytotoxic L-amino-acid oxidases from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa induce caspase-dependent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pišlar, A; Sabotič, J; Šlenc, J; Brzin, J; Kos, J

    2016-01-01

    L-amino-acid oxidases (LAO) purified from fungi induce cell death in various mammalian cells including human tumor cell lines. The mechanism, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to define a precise mechanism of cell death induced in Jurkat and MCF7 cancer cell lines by ApLAO and CgLAO, LAOs isolated from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa, respectively. Cell death induced by both LAOs is shown to be concentration- and time-dependent, with higher toxic effects in Jurkat cells. LAO activity is required for the cytotoxicity. Detailed study on Jurkat cells further demonstrated that ApLAO and CgLAO both induce the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a time-dependent depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Treatment with the LAOs resulted in an increased ratio of the expression of proapoptotic Bax to that of antiapoptotic Bcl-2, subsequently leading to the activation of caspase-9 and -3. However, the pancaspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, did not completely abolish the cell death induced by either ApLAO or CgLAO, suggesting an alternative pathway for LAO-induced apoptosis. Indeed, caspase-8 activity in ApLAO- and CgLAO-treated cells was increased. Further, Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) antagonist caused a slight reduction in toxin-induced cell death, supporting the involvement of ApLAO and CgLAO in death-receptor-mediated apoptosis. These results thus provide new evidence that ApLAO and CgLAO induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, although the significantly higher increase of caspase-9 over caspase-8 activity suggests that it is the intrinsic pathway that is the predominant mode of ApLAO- and CgLAO-induced apoptosis. PMID:27551514

  3. Haplotypes of the D-Amino Acid Oxidase Gene Are Significantly Associated with Schizophrenia and Its Neurocognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Yang, Wei-Chih; Hsu, Pei-Chun; Chang, Chien-Ching; Wen, Chun-Chiang; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Hsieh, Ming H.; Liu, Chen-Chung; Chien, Yi-Ling; Fang, Chiu-Ping; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Chen, Wei J.; Liu, Chih-Min

    2016-01-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) has been reported to be associated with schizophrenia. This study aimed to search for genetic variants associated with this gene. The genomic regions of all exons, highly conserved regions of introns, and promoters of this gene were sequenced. Potentially meaningful single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained from direct sequencing were selected for genotyping in 600 controls and 912 patients with schizophrenia and in a replicated sample consisting of 388 patients with schizophrenia. Genetic associations were examined using single-locus and haplotype association analyses. In single-locus analyses, the frequency of the C allele of a novel SNP rs55944529 located at intron 8 was found to be significantly higher in the original large patient sample (p = 0.016). This allele was associated with a higher level of DAO mRNA expression in the Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes. The haplotype distribution of a haplotype block composed of rs11114083-rs2070586-rs2070587-rs55944529 across intron 1 and intron 8 was significantly different between the patients and controls and the haplotype frequencies of AAGC were significantly higher in patients, in both the original (corrected p < 0.0001) and replicated samples (corrected p = 0.0003). The CGTC haplotype was specifically associated with the subgroup with deficits in sustained attention and executive function and the AAGC haplotype was associated with the subgroup without such deficits. The DAO gene was a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia and the genomic region between intron 1 and intron 8 may harbor functional genetic variants, which may influence the mRNA expression of DAO and neurocognitive functions in schizophrenia. PMID:26986737

  4. Cytotoxic L-amino-acid oxidases from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa induce caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pišlar, A; Sabotič, J; Šlenc, J; Brzin, J; Kos, J

    2016-01-01

    L-amino-acid oxidases (LAO) purified from fungi induce cell death in various mammalian cells including human tumor cell lines. The mechanism, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to define a precise mechanism of cell death induced in Jurkat and MCF7 cancer cell lines by ApLAO and CgLAO, LAOs isolated from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa, respectively. Cell death induced by both LAOs is shown to be concentration- and time-dependent, with higher toxic effects in Jurkat cells. LAO activity is required for the cytotoxicity. Detailed study on Jurkat cells further demonstrated that ApLAO and CgLAO both induce the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a time-dependent depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Treatment with the LAOs resulted in an increased ratio of the expression of proapoptotic Bax to that of antiapoptotic Bcl-2, subsequently leading to the activation of caspase-9 and -3. However, the pancaspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, did not completely abolish the cell death induced by either ApLAO or CgLAO, suggesting an alternative pathway for LAO-induced apoptosis. Indeed, caspase-8 activity in ApLAO- and CgLAO-treated cells was increased. Further, Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) antagonist caused a slight reduction in toxin-induced cell death, supporting the involvement of ApLAO and CgLAO in death-receptor-mediated apoptosis. These results thus provide new evidence that ApLAO and CgLAO induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, although the significantly higher increase of caspase-9 over caspase-8 activity suggests that it is the intrinsic pathway that is the predominant mode of ApLAO- and CgLAO-induced apoptosis. PMID:27551514

  5. The xanthine oxidase inhibitor Febuxostat reduces tissue uric acid content and inhibits injury-induced inflammation in the liver and lung.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Yang, Ke; Rock, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    Necrotic cell death in vivo induces a robust neutrophilic inflammatory response and the resulting inflammation can cause further tissue damage and disease. Dying cells induce this inflammation by releasing pro-inflammatory intracellular components, one of which is uric acid. Cells contain high levels of intracellular uric acid, which is produced when purines are oxidized by the enzyme xanthine oxidase. Here we test whether a non-nucleoside xanthine oxidase inhibitor, Febuxostat (FBX), can reduce intracellular uric acid levels and inhibit cell death-induced inflammation in two different murine tissue injury models; acid-induced acute lung injury and acetaminophen liver injury. Infiltration of inflammatory cells induced by acid injection into lungs or peritoneal administration of acetaminophen was evaluated by quantification with flow cytometry and tissue myeloperoxidase activity in the presence or absence of FBX treatment. Uric acid levels in serum and tissue were measured before giving the stimuli and during inflammation. The impact of FBX treatment on the peritoneal inflammation caused by the microbial stimulus, zymosan, was also analyzed to see whether FBX had a broad anti-inflammatory effect. We found that FBX reduced uric acid levels in acid-injured lung tissue and inhibited acute pulmonary inflammation triggered by lung injury. Similarly, FBX reduced uric acid levels in the liver and inhibited inflammation in response to acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury. In contrast, FBX did not reduce inflammation to zymosan, and therefore is not acting as a general anti-inflammatory agent. These results point to the potential of using agents like FBX to treat cell death-induced inflammation. PMID:25449036

  6. Exploring the arachidonic acid-induced structural changes in phagocyte NADPH oxidase p47(phox) and p67(phox) via thiol accessibility and SRCD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bizouarn, Tania; Karimi, Gilda; Masoud, Rawand; Souabni, Hager; Machillot, Paul; Serfaty, Xavier; Wien, Frank; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Baciou, Laura

    2016-08-01

    The NADPH oxidase is the sole enzymatic complex that produces, in a controlled way, superoxide anions. In phagocytes, it is constituted by the assembly of four cytosolic (p67(phox) , p47(phox) , p40(phox) and Rac) and two membrane (p22(phox) and Nox2) proteins. In response to pro-inflammatory mediators, the NADPH oxidase is activated. In cells, arachidonic acid (cis-AA), released by activated phospholipase A2, also plays a role in activation of the NADPH oxidase complex, but the mechanism of action of cis-AA is still a matter for debate. In cell-free systems, cis-AA is commonly used for activation. We have shown previously that trans-AA isomers were unable to activate the NADPH oxidase complex. Here, we aim to evaluate the structural changes in p47(phox) and p67(phox) induced by AA. The structural impact of both AA isomers on both cytosolic proteins was investigated by the accessibility of the thiol group and by circular dichroism in the far-UV for global folds. cis-AA induces secondary structure changes of p47(phox) and p67(phox) , while the trans isomer does not, suggesting that the changes observed are of importance for the activation process of these proteins. While five of the nine thiol groups in p67(phox) and all of them in p47(phox) have low access to the solvent when proteins are alone in solution, all of them become fully accessible when proteins are together. In conclusion, the secondary structures of p47(phox) and p67(phox) are both dependent on the presence of the partner protein in solution and on the presence of the activator molecule cis-AA. PMID:27284000

  7. Urate oxidase: primary structure and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X W; Lee, C C; Muzny, D M; Caskey, C T

    1989-01-01

    Urate oxidase, or uricase (EC 1.7.3.3), is a peroxisomal enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of uric acid to allantoin in most mammals. In humans and certain other primates, however, the enzyme has been lost by some unknown mechanism. To identify the molecular basis for this loss, urate oxidase cDNA clones were isolated from pig, mouse, and baboon, and their DNA sequences were determined. The mouse urate oxidase open reading frame encodes a 303-amino acid polypeptide, while the pig and baboon urate oxidase cDNAs encode a 304-amino acid polypeptide due to a single codon deletion/insertion event. The authenticity of this single additional codon was confirmed by sequencing the mouse and pig genomic copies of the gene. The urate oxidase sequence contains a domain similar to the type 2 copper binding motif found in other copper binding proteins, suggesting that the copper ion in urate oxidase is coordinated as a type 2 structure. Based upon a comparison of the NH2-terminal peptide and deduced sequences, we propose that the maturation of pig urate oxidase involves the posttranslational cleavage of a six-amino acid peptide. Two nonsense mutations were found in the human urate oxidase gene, which confirms, at the molecular level, that the urate oxidase gene in humans is nonfunctional. The sequence comparisons favor the hypothesis that the loss of urate oxidase in humans is due to a sudden mutational event rather than a progressive mutational process. Images PMID:2594778

  8. Identification and Structural Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions that Increase the Stability and Activity of Aspergillus niger Glucose Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Navarro, Julia; Roupain, Nicole; Talens-Perales, David; Polaina, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Glucose oxidase is one of the most conspicuous commercial enzymes due to its many different applications in diverse industries such as food, chemical, energy and textile. Among these applications, the most remarkable is the manufacture of glucose biosensors and in particular sensor strips used to measure glucose levels in serum. The generation of ameliorated versions of glucose oxidase is therefore a significant biotechnological objective. We have used a strategy that combined random and rational approaches to isolate uncharacterized mutations of Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase with improved properties. As a result, we have identified two changes that increase significantly the enzyme's thermal stability. One (T554M) generates a sulfur-pi interaction and the other (Q90R/Y509E) introduces a new salt bridge near the interphase of the dimeric protein structure. An additional double substitution (Q124R/L569E) has no significant effect on stability but causes a twofold increase of the enzyme's specific activity. Our results disclose structural motifs of the protein which are critical for its stability. The combination of mutations in the Q90R/Y509E/T554M triple mutant yielded a version of A. niger glucose oxidase with higher stability than those previously described. PMID:26642312

  9. Glutathione and cinnamic acid: natural dietary components used in preventing the process of browning by inhibition of Polyphenol Oxidase in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Gacche, R N; Warangkar, S C; Ghole, V S

    2004-04-01

    Consumer demands for 'freshness' in processed foods has been given increasing attention by food processing industries by searching for minimally processed products. Polyphenol Oxidase (PPO) mediated browning is a major cause of undesirable flavors and nutritional losses in fruit juices. Here the anti-browning efficiency of glutathione (GSH, reduced form) and cinnamic acid (CA) in apple juice is evaluated. It was observed that the rate of the browning reaction could be efficiently delayed using GSH and CA, which act as inhibitors of PPO. Kinetic studies confirm that GSH and CA are non-competitive and competitive inhibitors of PPO respectively. PMID:15449733

  10. A Compilation of Redshifts and Velocity Dispersions for ACO Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, Mitchell F.; Rood, Herbert J.

    1999-11-01

    We present a compilation of redshifts for 1572 Abell, Corwin, & Olowin (ACO) clusters, referenced to both the heliocentric and cosmic background radiation reference frames, and 395 velocity dispersions corrected to the reference frame of the cluster, available from the literature as of 1998 December. We present an additional list of 81 ACO clusters with published redshifts which are probably those of galaxies or groups superimposed on, or near, the ACO cluster position.

  11. Activation of human neutrophil nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced (triphosphopyridine nucleotide, reduced) oxidase by arachidonic acid in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Curnutte, J T

    1985-01-01

    Sonicates from unstimulated human neutrophils produce no measurable superoxide since the superoxide-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase, is inactive in these preparations. Previous attempts to activate the oxidase in disrupted cells with conventional neutrophil stimuli have been unsuccessful. This report describes a cell-free system in which arachidonic acid (82 microM) was able to activate superoxide generation that was dependent upon the presence of NADPH and the sonicate. For activation to occur, both the particulate and supernatant fractions of the sonicate must be present. Calcium ions, which are required for activation of intact neutrophils by arachidonate, were not necessary in the cell-free system. In quantitative terms, the superoxide-generating activity in the cell-free system could account for at least 20-50% of the superoxide rate observed in intact neutrophils stimulated with arachidonate. Sonicates from patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) could not be activated by arachidonic acid in the cell-free system. In three patients representing both genetic forms of CGD, the defect appeared to reside in the particulate fraction. The soluble cofactor was normal in all three patients and could be used to activate normal neutrophil pellets in the presence of arachidonic acid. Thus, at least a portion of the activation mechanism in the neutrophil, that residing in the soluble phase, appeared to be normal in patients with CGD. PMID:2987311

  12. Amperometric glucose biosensor with remarkable acid stability based on glucose oxidase entrapped in colloidal gold-modified carbon ionic liquid electrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoying; Zeng, Xiandong; Mai, Nannan; Liu, Yong; Kong, Bo; Li, Yonghong; Wei, Wanzhi; Luo, Shenglian

    2010-08-15

    A colloidal gold-modified carbon ionic liquid electrode was constructed by mixing colloidal gold-modified graphite powder with a solid room temperature ionic liquid n-octyl-pyridinium hexafluorophosphate (OPPF(6)). Glucose oxidase (GOD) was entrapped in this composite matrix and maintained its bioactivity well and displayed excellent stability. The effect conditions of pH, applied potential and GOD loading were examined. Especially, the glucose oxidase entrapped in this carbon ionic liquid electrode fully retained its activity upon stressing in strongly acidic conditions (pH 2.0) for over one hour. The proposed biosensor responds to glucose linearly over concentration range of 5.0x10(-6) to 1.2x10(-3) and 2.6x10(-3) to 1.3x10(-2) M, and the detection limit is 3.5x10(-6) M. The response time of the biosensor is fast (within 10s), and the life time is over two months. The effects of electroactive interferents, such as ascorbic acid, uric acid, can be significantly reduced by a Nafion film casting on the surface of resulting biosensor. PMID:20510599

  13. Apoxin I, a novel apoptosis-inducing factor with L-amino acid oxidase activity purified from Western diamondback rattlesnake venom.

    PubMed

    Torii, S; Naito, M; Tsuruo, T

    1997-04-01

    Venom of the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) induces apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, which could result in hemorrhage in tissues bitten by the snake. To identify the hemorrhagic factor, we purified a novel protein, apoxin I, from rattlesnake venom. Apoxin I induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial, human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60, human ovarian carcinoma A2780, and mouse endothelial KN-3 cells. Amino acid sequence analysis of the apoxin I showed close similarity to L-amino acid oxidase from the Malayan pit viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma). The purified apoxin I oxidized L-leucine but not D-leucine to produce H2O2. The apoxin I-induced apoptosis was inhibited by catalase, a H2O2 scavenger. These results indicate that the H2O2 produced by L-amino acid oxidation by apoxin I is involved in the apoxin I-induced apoptosis and in hemorrhage caused by rattlesnake venom. PMID:9083096

  14. SO-LAAO, a novel L-amino acid oxidase that enables Streptococcus oligofermentans to outcompete Streptococcus mutans by generating H2O2 from peptone.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huichun; Chen, Wei; Shi, Wenyuan; Qi, Fengxia; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2008-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that Streptococcus oligofermentans suppressed the growth of Streptococcus mutans, the primary cariogenic pathogen, by producing hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) through lactate oxidase activity. In this study, we found that the lox mutant of S. oligofermentans regained the inhibition while growing on peptone-rich plates. Further studies demonstrated that the H(2)O(2) produced on peptone by S. oligofermentans was mainly derived from seven L-amino acids, i.e., L-aspartic acid, L-tryptophan, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, L-arginine, L-asparagine, and L-glutamine, indicating the possible existence of L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) that can produce H(2)O(2) from L-amino acids. Through searching the S. oligofermentans genome for open reading frames with a conserved flavin adenine dinucleotide binding motif that exists in the known LAAOs, including those of snake venom, fungi, and bacteria, a putative LAAO gene, assigned as aao(So), was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, SO-LAAO, showed a molecular mass of 43 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and catalyzed H(2)O(2) formation from the seven L-amino acids determined above, thus confirming its LAAO activity. The SO-LAAO identified in S. oligofermentans differed evidently from the known LAAOs in both substrate profile and sequence, suggesting that it could represent a novel LAAO. An aao(So) mutant of S. oligofermentans did lose H(2)O(2) formation from the seven L-amino acids, further verifying its function as an LAAO. Furthermore, the inhibition by S. oligofermentans of S. mutans in a peptone-rich mixed-species biofilm was greatly reduced for the aao(So) mutant, indicating the gene's importance in interspecies competition. PMID:18469105

  15. Predicting protein-ligand interactions based on chemical preference features with its application to new D-amino acid oxidase inhibitor discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingzhu; Chang, Hao-Teng; Zhou, Qiang; Zeng, Tao; Shih, Chung-Shiuan; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Luonan; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In silico prediction of the new drug-target interactions from existing databases is of important value for the drug discovery process. Currently, the amount of protein targets that have been identified experimentally is still very small compared with the entire human proteins. In order to predict protein-ligand interactions in an accurate manner, we have developed a support vector machine (SVM) model based on the chemical-protein interactions from STITCH. New features from ligand chemical space and interaction networks have been selected and encoded as the feature vectors for SVM analysis. Both the 5-fold cross validation and independent test show high predictive accuracy that outperforms the state-of-the-art method based on ligand similarity. Moreover, 91 distinct pairs of features have been selected to rebuild a simplifier model, which still maintains the same performance as that based on all 332 features. Then, this refined model is used to search for the potential D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors from STITCH database and the predicted results are finally validated by our wet experiments. Out of 10 candidates obtained, seven D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors have been verified, in which four are newly found in the present study, and one may have a new application in therapy of psychiatric disorders other than being an antineoplastic agent. Clearly, our model is capable of predicting potential new drugs or targets on a large scale with high efficiency. PMID:24410568

  16. Cr(VI) reduction by gluconolactone and hydrogen peroxide, the reaction products of fungal glucose oxidase: Cooperative interaction with organic acids in the biotransformation of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Romo-Rodríguez, Pamela; Acevedo-Aguilar, Francisco Javier; Lopez-Torres, Adolfo; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Gutiérrez-Corona, J Félix

    2015-09-01

    The Cr(VI) reducing capability of growing cells of the environmental A. tubingensis Ed8 strain is remarkably efficient compared to reference strains A. niger FGSC322 and A. tubingensis NRRL593. Extracellular glucose oxidase (GOX) activity levels were clearly higher in colonies developed in solid medium and in concentrated extracts of the spent medium of liquid cultures of the Ed8 strain in comparison with the reference strains. In addition, concentrated extracts of the spent medium of A. tubingensis Ed8, but not those of the reference strains, exhibited the ability to reduce Cr(VI). In line with this observation, it was found that A. niger purified GOX is capable of mediating the conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in a reaction dependent on the presence of glucose that is stimulated by organic acids. Furthermore, it was found that a decrease in Cr(VI) may occur in the absence of the GOX enzyme, as long as the reaction products gluconolactone and hydrogen peroxide are present; this conversion of Cr(VI) is stimulated by organic acids in a reaction that generates hydroxyl radicals, which may involve the formation of an intermediate peroxichromate(V) complex. These findings indicated that fungal glucose oxidase acts an indirect chromate reductase through the formation of Cr(VI) reducing molecules, which interact cooperatively with other fungal metabolites in the biotransformation of Cr(VI). PMID:25577697

  17. Spatio-Temporal Detection of the Thiomonas Population and the Thiomonas Arsenite Oxidase Involved in Natural Arsenite Attenuation Processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage.

    PubMed

    Hovasse, Agnès; Bruneel, Odile; Casiot, Corinne; Desoeuvre, Angélique; Farasin, Julien; Hery, Marina; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carapito, Christine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France) is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron) attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based proteomic approach was developed for detecting and quantifying the two subunits of the arsenite oxidase and RpoA of two different Thiomonas groups. Using this approach combined with FISH and pyrosequencing-based 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, it was established here for the first time that these Thiomonas strains are ubiquitously present in minor proportions in this AMD and that they express the key enzymes involved in natural remediation processes at various locations and time points. In addition to these findings, this study also confirms that targeted proteomics applied at the community level can be used to detect weakly abundant proteins in situ. PMID:26870729

  18. Spatio-Temporal Detection of the Thiomonas Population and the Thiomonas Arsenite Oxidase Involved in Natural Arsenite Attenuation Processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Hovasse, Agnès; Bruneel, Odile; Casiot, Corinne; Desoeuvre, Angélique; Farasin, Julien; Hery, Marina; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carapito, Christine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France) is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron) attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based proteomic approach was developed for detecting and quantifying the two subunits of the arsenite oxidase and RpoA of two different Thiomonas groups. Using this approach combined with FISH and pyrosequencing-based 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, it was established here for the first time that these Thiomonas strains are ubiquitously present in minor proportions in this AMD and that they express the key enzymes involved in natural remediation processes at various locations and time points. In addition to these findings, this study also confirms that targeted proteomics applied at the community level can be used to detect weakly abundant proteins in situ. PMID:26870729

  19. Effect of Cheonggukjang supplementation upon hepatic acyl-CoA synthase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, acyl-CoA oxidase and uncoupling protein 2 mRNA levels in C57BL/6J mice fed with high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Ju-Ryoun; Shin, Dong-Hwa; Kwon, Dae Young

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of Cheonggukjang on mRNA levels of hepatic acyl-CoA synthase (ACS), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I), acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and on serum lipid profiles in C57BL/6J mice. Thirty male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups; normal diet (ND), high fat diet (HD) and high fat diet with 40% Cheonggukjang (HDC). Energy intake was significantly higher in the HDC group than in the ND and HD groups. The HDC group normalized in weight gain, epididymal and back fat (g/100 g) accumulation which are increased by high fat diet. Serum concentrations of triglyceride and total cholesterol in the HDC were significantly lower than those in the HD group. These results were confirmed by hepatic mRNA expression of enzymes and protein (ACS, CPT-1, ACO, UCP2) which is related with lipid metabolism by RT-PCR. Hepatic CPT-I, ACO and UCP2 mRNA expression was increased by Cheonggukjang supplementation. We demonstrated that Cheonggukjang supplement leads to increased mRNA expressions of enzymes and protein involved in fatty acid oxidation in liver, reduced accumulation of body fat and improvement of serum lipids in high fat diet fed mice. PMID:18850232

  20. Organochlorine insecticides induce NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species in human monocytic cells via phospholipase A2/arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mangum, Lee C; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Stokes, John V; Matthews, Anberitha T; Lee, Jung Hwa; Chambers, Janice E; Ross, Matthew K

    2015-04-20

    Bioaccumulative organohalogen chemicals, such as organochlorine (OC) insecticides, have been increasingly associated with disease etiology; however, the mechanistic link between chemical exposure and diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and diabetes, is complex and poorly defined. Systemic oxidative stress stemming from OC exposure might play a vital role in the development of these pathologies. Monocytes are important surveillance cells of the innate immune system that respond to extracellular signals possessing danger-associated molecular patterns by synthesizing oxyradicals, such as superoxide, for the purpose of combating infectious pathogens. We hypothesized that OC chemicals can be toxic to monocytes because of an inappropriate elevation in superoxide-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing cellular oxidative damage. Reactive oxyradicals are generated in monocytes in large part by NADPH oxidase (Nox). The present study was conducted to examine the ability of two chlorinated cyclodiene compounds, trans-nonachlor and dieldrin, as well as p,p'-DDE, a chlorinated alicyclic metabolite of DDT, to stimulate Nox activity in a human monocytic cell line and to elucidate the mechanisms for this activation. Human THP-1 monocytes treated with either trans-nonachlor or dieldrin (0.1-10 μM in the culture medium) exhibited elevated levels of intracellular ROS, as evidenced by complementary methods, including flow cytometry analysis using the probe DCFH-DA and hydroethidine-based fluorometric and UPLC-MS assays. In addition, the induced reactive oxygen flux caused by trans-nonachlor was also observed in two other cell lines, murine J774 macrophages and human HL-60 cells. The central role of Nox in OC-mediated oxidative stress was demonstrated by the attenuated superoxide production in OC-exposed monocytes treated with the Nox inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium and VAS-2870. Moreover, monocytes challenged with OCs exhibited increased phospho-p47(phox

  1. The Apoplastic Copper AMINE OXIDASE1 Mediates Jasmonic Acid-Induced Protoxylem Differentiation in Arabidopsis Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Ghuge, Sandip A.; Carucci, Andrea; Rodrigues-Pousada, Renato A.; Tisi, Alessandra; Franchi, Stefano; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Cona, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines are involved in key developmental processes and stress responses. Copper amine oxidases oxidize the polyamine putrescine (Put), producing an aldehyde, ammonia, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) amine oxidase gene At4g14940 (AtAO1) encodes an apoplastic copper amine oxidase expressed at the early stages of vascular tissue differentiation in roots. Here, its role in root development and xylem differentiation was explored by pharmacological and forward/reverse genetic approaches. Analysis of the AtAO1 expression pattern in roots by a promoter::green fluorescent protein-β-glucuronidase fusion revealed strong gene expression in the protoxylem at the transition, elongation, and maturation zones. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) induced AtAO1 gene expression in vascular tissues, especially at the transition and elongation zones. Early protoxylem differentiation was observed upon MeJA treatment along with Put level decrease and H2O2 accumulation in wild-type roots, whereas Atao1 loss-of-function mutants were unresponsive to the hormone. The H2O2 scavenger N,N1-dimethylthiourea reversed the MeJA-induced early protoxylem differentiation in wild-type seedlings. Likewise, Put, which had no effect on Atao1 mutants, induced early protoxylem differentiation in the wild type, this event being counteracted by N,N1-dimethylthiourea treatment. Consistently, AtAO1-overexpressing plants showed lower Put levels and early protoxylem differentiation concurrent with H2O2 accumulation in the root zone where the first protoxylem cells with fully developed secondary wall thickenings are found. These results show that the H2O2 produced via AtAO1-driven Put oxidation plays a role in MeJA signaling leading to early protoxylem differentiation in root. PMID:25883242

  2. Expression of Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Chaperone Gene (COX20) Improves Tolerance to Weak Acid and Oxidative Stress during Yeast Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Hart, Andrew J.; Keerthiraju, Ethiraju R.; Waldron, Paul R.; Tucker, Gregory A.; Greetham, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the micro-organism of choice for the conversion of fermentable sugars released by the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material into bioethanol. Pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material releases acetic acid and previous work identified a cytochrome oxidase chaperone gene (COX20) which was significantly up-regulated in yeast cells in the presence of acetic acid. Results A Δcox20 strain was sensitive to the presence of acetic acid compared with the background strain. Overexpressing COX20 using a tetracycline-regulatable expression vector system in a Δcox20 strain, resulted in tolerance to the presence of acetic acid and tolerance could be ablated with addition of tetracycline. Assays also revealed that overexpression improved tolerance to the presence of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Conclusion This is a study which has utilised tetracycline-regulated protein expression in a fermentation system, which was characterised by improved (or enhanced) tolerance to acetic acid and oxidative stress. PMID:26427054

  3. Effect of Soy Sauce on Serum Uric Acid Levels in Hyperuricemic Rats and Identification of Flazin as a Potent Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Huipin; Zhao, Mouming; Su, Guowan; Lin, Lianzhu; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-15

    This is the first report on the ability of soy sauce to effectively reduce the serum uric acid levels and xanthine oxidase (XOD) activities of hyperuricemic rats. Soy sauce was partitioned sequentially into ethyl acetate and water fractions. The ethyl acetate fraction with strong XOD inhibition effect was purified further. On the basis of xanthine oxidase inhibitory (XOI) activity-guided purification, nine compounds including 3,4-dihydroxy ethyl cinnamate, diisobutyl terephthalate, harman, daidzein, flazin, catechol, thymine, genistein, and uracil were obtained. It was the first time that 3,4-dihydroxy ethyl cinnamate and diisobutyl terephthalate had been identified from soy sauce. Flazin with hydroxymethyl furan ketone group at C-1 and carboxyl at C-3 exhibited the strongest XOI activity (IC50 = 0.51 ± 0.05 mM). According to fluorescence quenching and molecular docking experiments, flazin could enter into the catalytic center of XOD to interact with Lys1045, Gln1194, and Arg912 mainly by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. Flazin, catechol, and genistein not only were potent XOD inhibitors but also held certain antioxidant activities. According to ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) simulation in silico, flazin had good oral bioavailability in vivo. PMID:27181598

  4. Orsay free electron laser activities on the storage rings ACO and super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Bergher, M.; Billardon, M.; Elleaume, P.; Ortega, J. M.; Petroff, Y.; Prazeres, R.; Velghe, M.

    1989-10-01

    The main results obtained on the free electron laser and on optical harmonic generation with the storage ring ACO at Orsay in France are reviewed. A specific magnetic device, generally called an undulator, allows one to collect coherent light. In the free electron laser case, the undulator radiation is stored and amplified in an optical cavity. Tunable light was obtained in the visible range. For optical harmonic generation, external laser light is emitted in the undulator area, generating coherent harmonic radiation. Experimentally, 350, 177 and 107 nm wavelengths were obtained with a Nd-YAG laser. New experiments are planned with the Super-ACO storage ring, and preliminary experiments with the optical klystron are given.

  5. Synergistic effect of Aspergillus tubingensis CTM 507 glucose oxidase in presence of ascorbic acid and alpha amylase on dough properties, baking quality and shelf life of bread.

    PubMed

    Kriaa, Mouna; Ouhibi, Rabeb; Graba, Héla; Besbes, Souhail; Jardak, Mohamed; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2016-02-01

    The impact of Aspergillus tubingensis glucose oxidase (GOD) in combination with α-amylase and ascorbic acid on dough properties, qualities and shelf life of bread was investigated. Regression models of alveograph and texture parameters of dough and bread were adjusted. Indeed, the mixture of GOD (44 %) and ascorbic acid (56 %) on flour containing basal improver showed its potential as a corrective action to get better functional and rheological properties of dough and bread texture. Furthermore, wheat flour containing basal additives and enriched with GOD (63.8 %), ascorbic acid (32 %) and α- amylase (4.2 %) led to high technological bread making parameters, to decrease the crumb firmness and chewiness and to improve elasticity, adhesion, cohesion and specific volume of bread. In addition to that, the optimized formulation addition significantly reduced water activity and therefore decreased bread susceptibility to microbial spoilage. These findings demonstrated that GOD could partially substitute not only ascorbic acid but also α-amylase. The generated models allowed to predict the behavior of wheat flour containing additives in the range of values tested and to define the additives formula that led to desired rheological and baking qualities of dough. This fact provides new perspectives to compensate flour quality deficiencies at the moment of selecting raw materials and technological parameters reducing the production costs and facilitating gluten free products development. Graphical abstractᅟ. PMID:27162406

  6. The L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodostoma snake venom modulates apoptomiRs expression in Bcr-Abl-positive cell lines.

    PubMed

    Burin, Sandra Mara; Berzoti-Coelho, Maria Gabriela; Cominal, Juçara Gastaldi; Ambrosio, Luciana; Torqueti, Maria Regina; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; de Castro, Fabíola Attié

    2016-09-15

    Anti-apoptotic genes and apoptomiRs deregulated expression contribute to apoptosis resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) Bcr-Abl(+) cells. Here, the L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodostoma (CR-LAAO) venom altered the apoptotic machinery regulation by modulating the expression of the miR-145, miR-26a, miR-142-3p, miR-21, miR-130a, and miR-146a, and of the apoptosis-related proteins Bid, Bim, Bcl-2, Ciap-2, c-Flip, and Mcl-1 in Bcr-Abl(+) cells. CR-LAAO is a potential tool to instigate apoptomiRs regulation that contributes to drive CML therapy. PMID:27421670

  7. Identification of L-amino acid oxidase (Mb-LAAO) with antibacterial activity in the venom of Montivipera bornmuelleri, a viper from Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Rima, Mohamad; Accary, Claudine; Haddad, Katia; Sadek, Riyad; Hraoui-Bloquet, Souad; Desfontis, Jean C; Fajloun, Ziad

    2013-10-01

    The L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) is a multifunctional enzyme, able to partake in different activities including antibacterial activity. In this study, a novel LAAO (Mb-LAAO) was isolated from the venom of M. bornmuelleri snake using size exclusion chromatography followed by RP-HPLC and partially characterized. However, the molecular weight of the Mb-LAAO determined by ESI-MS and SDS-PAGE was 59 960.4 Da. Once the enzymatic activity test confirming the enzyme's identity (transformation of L-leucine) was done, the Mb-LAAO was evaluated for its antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. It showed a remarkable effect against M. morganii and K. pneumoniae. Moreover, no cytotoxic activity was observed for Mb-LAAO against human erythrocytes arguing for an exploration of its pharmaceutical interest. PMID:24712674

  8. Cost-outcomes focus is essential for ACO success.

    PubMed

    Greenspun, Harry; Bercik, William

    2013-02-01

    To succeed under value-based payment, accountable care organizations (ACOs) must be able to link, analyze, and compare clinical and administrative data from across their constituent organizations. ACOs require a precise costing methodology, such as activity-based costing, to be able to manage costs effectively and gain critical insight into which service lines are delivering value from a clinical and financial standpoint. To support informed strategic decision-making, ACOs also require ready access to integrated patient encounter data to be able to perform the sophisticated modeling of predictive analytics. PMID:23413676

  9. Bile acid reflux contributes to development of esophageal adenocarcinoma via activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cgamma2 and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Behar, Jose; Wands, Jack; Resnick, Murray; Wang, Li Juan; Delellis, Ronald A; Lambeth, David; Cao, Weibiao

    2010-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the mechanisms of the progression from BE to EA are not fully understood. Besides acid reflux, bile acid reflux may also play an important role in the progression from BE to EA. In this study, we examined the role of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and a novel NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in bile acid-induced increase in cell proliferation. We found that taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) significantly increased NOX5-S expression, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production, and cell proliferation in EA cells. The TDCA-induced increase in cell proliferation was significantly reduced by U73122, an inhibitor of PI-PLC. PI-PLCbeta1, PI-PLCbeta3, PI-PLCbeta4, PI-PLCgamma1, and PI-PLCgamma2, but not PI-PLCbeta2 and PI-PLCdelta1, were detectable in FLO cells by Western blot analysis. Knockdown of PI-PLCgamma2 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) significantly decreased TDCA-induced NOX5-S expression, H(2)O(2) production, and cell proliferation. In contrast, knockdown of PI-PLCbeta1, PI-PLCbeta3, PI-PLCbeta4, PI-PLCgamma1, or ERK1 MAP kinase had no significant effect. TDCA significantly increased ERK2 phosphorylation, an increase that was reduced by U73122 or PI-PLCgamma2 siRNA. We conclude that TDCA-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and cell proliferation may depend on sequential activation of PI-PLCgamma2 and ERK2 MAP kinase in EA cells. It is possible that bile acid reflux present in patients with BE may increase reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation via activation of PI-PLCgamma2, ERK2 MAP kinase, and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S, thereby contributing to the development of EA. PMID:20086178

  10. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS): structured literature review and physician insights

    PubMed Central

    Ding, B.; Enstone, A

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To understand the key characteristics of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome (ACOS) and to identify evidence gaps relating to the identification, treatment and management of ACOS patients. Methods: A structured literature review and 1-hour telephone interviews with specialist respiratory physicians were conducted (n=10; China, France, Germany, Japan and the USA). Results: All 10 physicians used the term ACOS in clinical practice. ACOS was not clearly defined in the literature. Prevalence of ACOS among adult patients with COPD or asthma ranged from 12–55%. ACOS patients had severe disease, with increased exacerbations and hospitalisations compared to some asthma and COPD patients. ACOS represented a clinical challenge due to a lack of evidence-based guidelines distinguishing between asthma, COPD and ACOS. Published data quantifying ACOS costs were limited. Conclusions: There is a need for consensus evidence-based guidance to facilitate earlier diagnosis and to optimise the management of ACOS patients. PMID:26789845

  11. Coupling in cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R. J.; Blondin, G. A.; Zande, H. Vande; Haworth, R. A.; Green, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c: oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.9.3.1) can be resolved into an electron transfer complex (ETC) and an ionophore transfer complex (ITC). Coupling requires an interaction between the moving electron in the ETC and a moving, positively charged ionophore-cation adduct in the ITC. The duplex character of cytochrome oxidase facilitates this interaction. The ITC mediates cyclical cation transport. It can be replaced as the coupling partner by the combination of valinomycin and nigericin in the presence of K+ when cytochrome oxidase is incorporated into liposomes containing acidic phospholipids or by the combination of lipid cytochrome c and bile acids in an ITC-resolved preparation of the ETC. Respiratory control can be induced by incorporating cytochrome oxidase into vesicles of unfractionated whole mitochondrial lipid. The activity of the ITC is suppressed by such incorporation and this suppression leads to the emergence of respiratory control. The ionophoroproteins of the ITC can be extracted into organic solvents; some 50% of the total protein of cytochrome oxidase is extractable. The release of free ionophore is achieved by tryptic digestion of the ionophoroprotein. Preliminary to this release the ionophoroprotein is degraded to an ionophoropeptide. Electrogenic ionophores, as well as uncoupler, are liberated by such proteolysis. The ITC contains a set of ionophoroproteins imbedded in a matrix of phospholipid. Images PMID:198794

  12. Structural and functional properties of Bp-LAAO, a new L-amino acid oxidase isolated from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Renata S; da Silva, Juliana F; Boldrini França, Johara; Fonseca, Fernando P P; Otaviano, Antônio R; Henrique Silva, Flávio; Hamaguchi, Amélia; Magro, Angelo J; Braz, Antônio Sérgio K; dos Santos, Juliana I; Homsi-Brandeburgo, Maria Inês; Fontes, Marcos R M; Fuly, André L; Soares, Andreimar M; Rodrigues, Veridiana M

    2009-04-01

    An L-amino acid oxidase (Bp-LAAO) from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom was highly purified using sequential chromatography steps on CM-Sepharose, Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, Benzamidine Sepharose and C18 reverse-phase HPLC. Purified Bp-LAAO showed to be a homodimeric acidic glycoprotein with molecular weight around 65kDa under reducing conditions in SDS-PAGE. The best substrates for Bp-LAAO were L-Met, L-Leu, L-Phe and L-Ile and the enzyme showed a strong reduction of its catalytic activity upon L-Met and L-Phe substrates at extreme temperatures. Bp-LAAO showed leishmanicidal, antitumoral and bactericidal activities dose dependently. Bp-LAAO induced platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma and this activity was inhibited by catalase. Bp-LAAO-cDNA of 1548bp codified a mature protein with 516 amino acid residues corresponding to a theoretical isoelectric point and molecular weight of 6.3 and 58kDa, respectively. Additionally, structural and phylogenetic studies identified residues under positive selection and their probable location in Bp-LAAO and other snake venom LAAOs (svLAAOs). Structural and functional investigations of these enzymes can contribute to the advancement of toxinology and to the elaboration of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:19135502

  13. Essential oil from leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum acts as a xanthine oxidase inhibitor and reduces the serum uric acid levels in oxonate-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, S Y; Yang, C W; Liao, J W; Zhen, W W; Chu, F H; Chang, S T

    2008-11-01

    The xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibitory activity and anti-hyperuricemia effect in mice of Cinnamomum osmophloeum, which is an endemic tree in Taiwan, were evaluated in this study. The results demonstrated that the essential oil of C. osmophloeum leaves presented the strongest XOD inhibition activity (IC(50)=16.3 μg/ml); however, no significant XOD inhibition activities were found in ethanolic and hot water extracts. Furthermore, among the main compounds of essential oil, the cinnamaldehyde exhibited the potent XOD inhibition activity with an IC(50)=8.4 μg/ml. Besides, the reducing serum uric acid levels in oxonate-induced mice by cinnamaldehyde were further investigated. The hyperuricemic mice were oral administrated cinnamaldehyde at a dosage of 150 mg/kg, the uric acid value in serum was reduced from 5.25±0.63 to 2.10±0.04 mg/dl, the levels of serum uric acid in mice was lowered down by 84.48% as compared to the hyperuricemic control group. Based on the results obtained in this study, cinnamaldehyde may be a potential lead compound for developing the pharmaceutic for anti-hyperuricemia agent. PMID:18693097

  14. Study of a reagent- and mediator-less biosensor for D-amino acids based on co-immobilized D-amino acid oxidase and peroxidase in carbon paste electrodes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, E; Marko-Varga, G; Gorton, L

    1993-10-01

    A biosensor for the analysis of D-amino acids is described. Carbon paste (graphite/paraffin oil) was chemically modified with immobilized D-amino acid oxidase and either horse-radish peroxidase or fungal peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus. The two enzymes dissolved in buffer, together with an amine containing oligomer or polymer, were adsorbed on dry graphite. Prior to immobilization, the graphite was heat treated at 700 degrees C for 15 s to promote an efficient electron transfer between graphite and the peroxidase. The mixture was dried before addition of the pasting liquid. The sensor is based on the fact that the hydrogen peroxide produced by the action of D-amino acid oxidase is electrocatalytically reduced through the action of the peroxidase. The amine containing compound acted as a stabilizer and activator of the enzymes in the paste. The enzyme electrode was investigated as a sensor for D-phenylalanine and hydrogen peroxide in a flow through electrochemical cell connected to a single line flow injection system. The influences on the response by different additives to the paste and pH are reported. Linear calibration curves were obtained between 0.1 and 1.4 mM for D-phenylalanine and 5 and 1000 microM for hydrogen peroxide at an applied potential of -50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. The sensor was also active for the following D-amino acids: D-alanine, D-valine, D-leucine, D-isoleucine, D-serine, D-aspartic acid, D-glutamic acid, D-lysine, D-histidine, D-arginine, D-tryptophan, D-methionine, and D-proline. PMID:7902430

  15. Aldehyde oxidase 1 is highly abundant in hepatic steatosis and is downregulated by adiponectin and fenofibric acid in hepatocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeier, Markus; Weigert, Johanna; Schaeffler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas S.; Schmidl, Christian; Buettner, Roland; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Buechler, Christa . E-mail: christa.buechler@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2006-11-24

    Adiponectin protects the liver from steatosis caused by obesity or alcohol and therefore the influence of adiponectin on human hepatocytes was analyzed. GeneChip experiments indicated that recombinant adiponectin downregulates aldehyde oxidase 1 (AOX1) expression and this was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot. AOX1 is a xenobiotic metabolizing protein and produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), that promote cell damage and fibrogenesis. Adiponectin and fenofibric acid activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR-{alpha}) and both suppress AOX1 protein and this is blocked by the PPAR-{alpha} antagonist RU486. Obesity is associated with low adiponectin, reduced hepatic PPAR-{alpha} activity and fatty liver, and AOX1 was found induced in the liver of rats on a high-fat diet when compared to controls. Free fatty acids and leptin, that are elevated in obesity, failed to upregulate AOX1 in vitro. The current data indicate that adiponectin reduces AOX1 by activating PPAR-{alpha} whereas fatty liver disease is associated with elevated hepatic AOX1. High AOX1 may be associated with higher ROS well described to induce fibrogenesis in liver tissue but may also influence drug metabolism and activity.

  16. Rho Kinase ROCK2 Mediates Acid-Induced NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S Expression in Human Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. We have shown that NOX5-S may be involved in this progression. However, how acid upregulates NOX5-S is not well known. We found that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression was significantly decreased by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 in BE mucosal biopsies and FLO-1 EA cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased the Rho kinase activity in FLO-1 cells. The acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production was significantly decreased by knockdown of Rho kinase ROCK2, but not by knockdown of ROCK1. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active ROCK2, but not the constitutively active ROCK1, significantly enhanced the NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production. Moreover, the acid-induced increase in Rho kinase activity and in NOX5-S mRNA expression was blocked by the removal of calcium in both FLO-1 and OE33 cells. The calcium ionophore A23187 significantly increased the Rho kinase activity and NOX5-S mRNA expression. We conclude that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production may depend on the activation of ROCK2, but not ROCK1, in EA cells. The acid-induced activation of Rho kinase may be mediated by the intracellular calcium increase. It is possible that persistent acid reflux present in BE patients may increase the intracellular calcium, activate ROCK2 and thereby upregulate NOX5-S. High levels of reactive oxygen species derived from NOX5-S may cause DNA damage and thereby contribute to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:26901778

  17. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay with a triazole-bonded column for evaluation of d-amino acid oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Megumi; Kashiwaguma, Yoshiyuki; Nagashima, Chihiro; Izumi, Mao; Uekusa, Ayano; Iwasa, Sumiko; Onozato, Mayu; Ichiba, Hideaki; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Elution profiles of kynurenic acid (KYNA) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (Cl-KYNA) were examined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a triazole-bonded stationary phase column (Cosmosil® HILIC) under isocratic elution of a mobile phase consisting of CH3 CN-aqueous 10 mm ammonium formate between pH 3.0 and 6.0. The capacity factors of KYNA and Cl-KYNA varied with both the CH3 CN content and the pH of the mobile phase. The elution order of KYNA and Cl-KYNA was reversed between the CH3 CN- and H2 O-rich mobile phases, suggesting that hydrophilic interactions and anion-exchange interactions caused retention of KYNA and Cl-KYNA in the CH3 CN- and H2 O-rich mobile phases, respectively. The present HPLC method using a triazole-bonded column and fluorescence detection (excitation 250 nm, emission 398 nm) was applied to monitor in vitro production of KYNA from d-kynurenine (d-KYN) by d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) using Cl-KYNA as an internal standard. A single KYNA peak was clearly observed after enzymatic reaction of d-KYN with DAO. Production of KYNA from d-KYN was suppressed by the addition of commercial DAO inhibitors. The present HPLC method can be used to evaluate DAO activity and DAO inhibitory effects in candidate drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:26174062

  18. Production of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) of Trigonopsis variabilis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the characterization of biocatalysts prepared with recombinant cells.

    PubMed

    Isoai, Atsushi; Kimura, Hidetoshi; Reichert, Arno; Schörgendorfer, Kurt; Nikaido, Kiyokazu; Tohda, Hideki; Giga-Hama, Yuko; Mutoh, Norihiro; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2002-10-01

    The cDNA of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) gene isolated from Trigonopsis variabilis was expressed in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A clone, ASP327-10, transformed with plasmid vector, pTL2M5DAO, expressed catalytically active DAO in the presence of G418, and converted Cephalosprin C to alpha-ketoadipyl-7-cephalosporanic acid (KA-7-ACA) and glutaryl-7-aminocephalosporanic acid (GL-7-ACA). Biocatalysts were prepared using ASP327-10 and T. variabilis, and evaluated to demonstrate the feasibility of recombinant S. pombe for industrial application. The cells were immobilized by crosslinking polyethylene imine after glutardialdehyde (GDA) fixation and permeabilization by alkaline treatment. Although the biocatalyst prepared from ASP327-10 exhibited DAO activity, catalase activity still remained fully even after permeabilization, under which condition, the catalase activity of T. variabilis decreased to 20-30%. Heat treatment was required before cell fixation by GDA to inactivate the catalase in S. pombe. This improved the efficiency of bioconversion to GL-7-ACA, but caused poor mechanical strength in the biocatalyst of S. pombe. To overcome this weakness, a catalase-deficient host strain was obtained by ethylmethansulfate mutagenesis. Moreover, taking economics into consideration, the integrative vector, pTL2M5DAO-8XL, with multi-copies of expression cassette was constructed to express DAO in S. pombe even in the absence of G418. The newly established integrant, ASP417-7, did not exhibit any catalase activity so that heat treatment was not required. The obtained integrant and its biocatalyst were significantly improved in GL-7ACA conversion ability and mechanical strength. This study demonstrates that the established integrant is a potential candidate as an alternative source of DAO enzyme. PMID:12209783

  19. Characterizing the population of Asteroids in Cometary Orbits (ACOs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; Licandro, Javier; Alí-Lagoa, Victor; Martino, Silvia; Vieira Monteiro, Filipe; Silva, Jose Sergio; Lazzaro, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    The classification criterion between asteroids and comets has evolved in recent decades, but the main phenomenological distinction remains unchanged: comets are active objects as they present gas and dust ejection from the surface at some point of their orbits, while asteroids are inert objects as they do not show any kind of large scale gas and dust ejection.To identify the transitional objects several classification schemes based on the orbital elements have been used. They are usually based on the Tisserand’s parameter (TJ). Tancredi (2014) presents a much more restrictive criterion to identify ACOs that ensured that the objects have a dynamical evolution similar to the population of periodic comets. After applying the criteriaa to the sample of over half a million asteroids already discovered, we obtain 316 ACOs that are further classified in subclasses similar to the cometary classification: 203 objects belong to the Jupiter Family group; 72 objects are classified as Centaurs; and 56 objects have Halley Type Orbits (also known as Damocloids). These are the best-known extinct/dormant comets candidates from a dynamical point of view.We study the physical properties of this sample of ACOs. Two results will be presented:- We look for the ACOs detected by the NASA’s WISE and by fitting a thermal model to their observations, we derive: the effective diameter, beaming parameter and the visible geometric albedo, using the method described in Al-Lagoa et al (2013). We obtain these parameters for 37 of 203 ACOs in JFC orbits and 13 of 56 Damocloids. We also compute the Cumulative Size Distribution (CSDs) of these populations and compare them with the CSDs of JF Comets and Centaurs.- We have been monitoring the observable ACOs since 12/2014 up to 06/2015. Every other month we select all the ACOs with elongations >90deg and estimated magnitudes V<21. We try to observe them with the 1m IMPACTON telescope of the Observatório Astronômico do Sertão de Itaparica (OASI

  20. 6-Hydroxy-1,2,4-triazine-3,5(2H,4H)-dione Derivatives as Novel d-Amino Acid Oxidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of 2-substituted 6-hydroxy-1,2,4-triazine-3,5(2H,4H)-dione derivatives were synthesized as inhibitors of d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO). Many compounds in this series were found to be potent DAAO inhibitors, with IC50 values in the double-digit nanomolar range. The 6-hydroxy-1,2,4-triazine-3,5(2H,4H)-dione pharmacophore appears metabolically resistant to O-glucuronidation unlike other structurally related DAAO inhibitors. Among them, 6-hydroxy-2-(naphthalen-1-ylmethyl)-1,2,4-triazine-3,5(2H,4H)-dione 11h was found to be selective over a number of targets and orally available in mice. Furthermore, oral coadministration of d-serine with 11h enhanced the plasma levels of d-serine in mice compared to the oral administration of d-serine alone, demonstrating its ability to serve as a pharmacoenhancer of d-serine. PMID:26309148

  1. Overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana gibberellic acid 20 oxidase (AtGA20ox) gene enhance the vegetative growth and fiber quality in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Withanage, Samanthi Priyanka; Hossain, Md Aktar; Kumar M, Sures; Roslan, Hairul Azman B; Abdullah, Mohammad Puad; Napis, Suhaimi B; Shukor, Nor Aini Ab

    2015-06-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.; Family: Malvaceae), is multipurpose crop, one of the potential alternatives of natural fiber for biocomposite materials. Longer fiber and higher cellulose contents are required for good quality biocomposite materials. However, average length of kenaf fiber (2.6 mm in bast and 1.28 mm in whole plant) is below the critical length (4 mm) for biocomposite production. Present study describes whether fiber length and cellulose content of kenaf plants could be enhanced by increasing GA biosynthesis in plants by overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana Gibberellic Acid 20 oxidase (AtGA20ox) gene. AtGA20ox gene with intron was overexpressed in kenaf plants under the control of double CaMV 35S promoter, followed by in planta transformation into V36 and G4 varieties of kenaf. The lines with higher levels of bioactive GA (0.3-1.52 ng g(-1) fresh weight) were further characterized for their morphological and biochemical traits including vegetative and reproductive growth, fiber dimension and chemical composition. Positive impact of increased gibberellins on biochemical composition, fiber dimension and their derivative values were demonstrated in some lines of transgenic kenaf including increased cellulose content (91%), fiber length and quality but it still requires further study to confirm the critical level of this particular bioactive GA in transgenic plants. PMID:26175614

  2. The relationship between hypertension and plasma allantoin, uric acid, xanthine oxidase activity and nitrite, and their predictive capacity in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Oguz; Elmas, Onur; Aliciguzel, Yakup; Simsek, Tayyup

    2016-01-01

    It is controversial that uric acid (UA) levels are related to the severity of hypertension in preeclampsia (PE). Our aim in this study was to determine whether UA, xanthine oxidase activity (XOA), allantoin and nitrite levels are related to arterial blood pressure (BP) in PE. We formed a control group (n = 20) and a PE group (n = 20) for the study. Their BPs and plasma UA, XOA, allantoin and nitrite levels were measured. The values from the control and PE pregnant women were assessed via a Wilcoxon matched-pairs test. A Pearson correlation test was also performed. In addition, the diagnostic value of these tests was evaluated via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The BP, UA, XOA and allantoin levels in the PE patients were found to be higher when compared with those of the pregnant controls. The UA, XOA and allantoin levels showed high correlations with BP in cases of PE. However, there was no superiority among the correlations. No differences were observed between the groups in terms of nitrite levels and the relationship between nitrite and BP. UA, XOA and allantoin levels may be high due to placental cell death because of abnormal trophoblastic activity observed in PE. Moreover, the reactive oxygen products that are created during the genetic material degradation may explain how UA, XOA and allantoin levels are related to BP. According to ROC analysis, UA, XOA and allantoin assays are reliable predictors for the determination of PE. PMID:26366935

  3. Structural and mechanistic studies on D-amino acid oxidase x substrate complex: implications of the crystal structure of enzyme x substrate analog complex.

    PubMed

    Miura, R; Setoyama, C; Nishina, Y; Shiga, K; Mizutani, H; Miyahara, I; Hirotsu, K

    1997-10-01

    As an extension of our recent X-ray crystallographic determination of the tertiary structure of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) [Mizutani, H. et al. (1996) J. Biochem. 120, 14-17], we solved the crystal structure of the complex of DAO with a substrate analog, o-aminobenzoate (OAB). The alignment between flavin and OAB in the crystal structure of the complex is consistent with charge-transfer interaction through the overlap between the highest occupied molecular orbital of OAB and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of flavin. Starting with the atomic coordinates of this complex as the initial model, we carried out molecular mechanics simulation for the DAO-D-leucine complex and thus obtained a model for the enzyme-substrate complex. According to the enzyme-substrate complex model, the alpha-proton is pointed toward N(5) of flavin while the lone-pair of the substrate amino group can approach C(4a) of flavin within an interacting distance. This model as well as DAO-OAB complex enables the evaluation of the substrate-flavin interaction prior to electron transfer from the substrate to flavin and provides two possible mechanisms for the reductive-half reaction of DAO, i.e., the electron-proton-electron transfer mechanism and the ionic mechanism. PMID:9399588

  4. Gold electrode modified with a self-assembled glucose oxidase and 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as novel glucose bioanode for biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammam, Malika; Fransaer, Jan

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we have constructed a gold electrode modified with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane/2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid/glucose oxidase (abbreviated as, Au/ATS/PDA/GOx) by sequential chemical adsorption. Au/ATS/PDA/GOx electrode was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The data from FT-IR illustrated deposition of ATS, PDA and GOx on the surface of gold electrode. The latter has been confirmed by EIS which showed that the electron transfer resistance of the electrode increases after adsorption of each supplementary layer. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) in phosphate buffer solution containing 5 mM glucose displayed that compared to Au/ATS/GOx, oxidation of glucose at Au/ATS/PDA/GOx electrode starts 461 mV earlier. This gain in potential is attributed to presence of PDA in the constructed Au/ATS/PDA/GOx electrode, which plays some sort of electron mediator for glucose oxidation. The Au/ATS/PDA/GOx electrode was stabilized by an outer layer of polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and was connected to a Pt electrode as cathode and the non-compartmentalized cell was studied under air in phosphate buffer solution pH 7.4 containing 10 mM glucose. Under these conditions, the maximum power density reaches 0.25 μW mm-2 (25 μW cm-2) for the deposited GOx layer that has an estimated surface coverage of ˜70% of a monolayer.

  5. d-amino acid oxidase knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mice show enhanced short-term memory performance and heightened anxiety, but no sleep or circadian rhythm disruption.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, David; Hasan, Sibah; Tam, Shu K E; Engle, Sandra J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Sharp, Trevor; Foster, Russell G; Harrison, Paul J; Bannerman, David M; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-05-01

    d-amino acid oxidase (DAO, DAAO) is an enzyme that degrades d-serine, the primary endogenous co-agonist of the synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Convergent evidence implicates DAO in the pathophysiology and potential treatment of schizophrenia. To better understand the functional role of DAO, we characterized the behaviour of the first genetically engineered Dao knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mouse. Our primary objective was to assess both spatial and non-spatial short-term memory performance. Relative to wildtype (Dao(+/+) ) littermate controls, Dao(-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced spatial recognition memory performance, improved odour recognition memory performance, and enhanced spontaneous alternation in the T-maze. In addition, Dao(-/-) mice displayed increased anxiety-like behaviour in five tests of approach/avoidance conflict: the open field test, elevated plus maze, successive alleys, light/dark box and novelty-suppressed feeding. Despite evidence of a reciprocal relationship between anxiety and sleep and circadian function in rodents, we found no evidence of sleep or circadian rhythm disruption in Dao(-/-) mice. Overall, our observations are consistent with, and extend, findings in the natural mutant ddY/Dao(-) line. These data add to a growing body of preclinical evidence linking the inhibition, inactivation or deletion of DAO with enhanced cognitive performance. Our results have implications for the development of DAO inhibitors as therapeutic agents. PMID:25816902

  6. Overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana gibberellic acid 20 oxidase (AtGA20ox) gene enhance the vegetative growth and fiber quality in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) plants

    PubMed Central

    Withanage, Samanthi Priyanka; Hossain, Md Aktar; Kumar M., Sures; Roslan, Hairul Azman B; Abdullah, Mohammad Puad; Napis, Suhaimi B.; Shukor, Nor Aini Ab.

    2015-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.; Family: Malvaceae), is multipurpose crop, one of the potential alternatives of natural fiber for biocomposite materials. Longer fiber and higher cellulose contents are required for good quality biocomposite materials. However, average length of kenaf fiber (2.6 mm in bast and 1.28 mm in whole plant) is below the critical length (4 mm) for biocomposite production. Present study describes whether fiber length and cellulose content of kenaf plants could be enhanced by increasing GA biosynthesis in plants by overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana Gibberellic Acid 20 oxidase (AtGA20ox) gene. AtGA20ox gene with intron was overexpressed in kenaf plants under the control of double CaMV 35S promoter, followed by in planta transformation into V36 and G4 varieties of kenaf. The lines with higher levels of bioactive GA (0.3–1.52 ng g−1 fresh weight) were further characterized for their morphological and biochemical traits including vegetative and reproductive growth, fiber dimension and chemical composition. Positive impact of increased gibberellins on biochemical composition, fiber dimension and their derivative values were demonstrated in some lines of transgenic kenaf including increased cellulose content (91%), fiber length and quality but it still requires further study to confirm the critical level of this particular bioactive GA in transgenic plants. PMID:26175614

  7. Identification of two promoters for human D-amino acid oxidase gene: implication for the differential promoter regulation mediated by PAX5/PAX2.

    PubMed

    Tran, Diem Hong; Shishido, Yuji; Chung, Seong Pil; Trinh, Huong Thi Thanh; Yorita, Kazuko; Sakai, Takashi; Fukui, Kiyoshi

    2015-05-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a flavoenzyme that metabolizes d-amino acids. Until now, the DAO expression mechanism is still unclear. Our assessment of human DAO (hDAO) promoter activity using luciferase reporter system indicated the proximal upstream region of exon1 (-237/+1) has promoter activity (P1). Interestingly, we identified an alternative promoter in the proximal upstream region of exon2 (+4,126/+4,929) (P2). This alternative promoter has stronger activity than that of P1. Our results also revealed a negative regulatory segment (+1,163/+1,940) in intron1; that would act in concert with P1 and P2. Bioinformatics analyses elucidated the conservation of transcription factor PAX5 family binding sites among species. These sites (-60/-31) and (+4,464/+4,493), locate in P1 and P2 of hDAO, respectively. Gel shift assays demonstrated P1 contains a site (-60/-31) for PAX5 binding while P2 has three sites for both paired box gene 2 (PAX2) and paired box gene 5 (PAX5) binding. The dual roles of PAX5 family in regulating hDAO transcription by modulating promoter activity of P1 and activating promoter activity of P2 were implicated based on the site-directed mutagenesis experiment. Altogether, our data suggested the differential regulation of hDAO expression by two promoters whose activities may be modulated by the binding of PAX2 and PAX5. PMID:25500505

  8. Oral administration of D-alanine in monkeys robustly increases plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels but experimental D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors had minimal effect.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Ator, Nancy A; Wilmoth, Heather; Rais, Rana; Hin, Niyada; DeVivo, Michael; Popiolek, Michael; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-09-01

    Hypofunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is thought to exacerbate psychosis in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Consistent with this hypothesis, D-alanine, a co-agonist at the glycine site of the NMDA receptor, was shown to improve positive and cognitive symptoms when used as add-on therapy for schizophrenia treatment. However, D-alanine had to be administered at high doses (~7 g) to observe clinical effects. One possible reason for the high dose is that D-alanine could be undergoing oxidation by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) before it reaches the brain. If this is the case, the dose could be reduced by co-administration of D-alanine with a DAAO inhibitor (DAAOi). Early studies with rodents showed that co-administration of D-alanine with 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a prototype DAAOi, significantly enhanced the levels of extracellular D-alanine in the frontal cortex compared with D-alanine alone. Further, the use of CBIO reduced the dose of D-alanine needed to attenuate prepulse inhibition deficits induced by dizocilpine. The objective of the work reported herein was to confirm the hypothesis that DAAO inhibition can enhance D-alanine exposure in a species closer to humans: non-human primates. We report that while oral D-alanine administration to baboons (10 mg/kg) enhanced D-alanine plasma and CSF levels over 20-fold versus endogenous levels, addition of experimental DAAOi to the regimen exhibited a 2.2-fold enhancement in plasma and no measurable effect on CSF levels. The results provide caution regarding the utility of DAAO inhibition to increase D-amino acid levels as treatment for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27287825

  9. d-Amino acid oxidase-mediated increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide is mainly responsible for formalin-induced tonic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Miao; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Spinal reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in chronic pain. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) oxidizes d-amino acids such as d-serine to form the byproduct hydrogen peroxide without producing other ROS. DAAO inhibitors are specifically analgesic in tonic pain, neuropathic pain and cancer pain. This study examined the role of spinal hydrogen peroxide in pain and the mechanism of the analgesic effects of DAAO inhibitors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Formalin-induced pain behaviours and spinal hydrogen peroxide levels were measured in rodents. KEY RESULTS Formalin injected into the paw increased spinal hydrogen peroxide synchronously with enhanced tonic pain; both were effectively prevented by i.t. fluorocitrate, a selective astrocyte metabolic inhibitor. Given systemically, the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) blocked spinal DAAO enzymatic activity and specifically prevented formalin-induced tonic pain in a dose-dependent manner. Although CBIO maximally inhibited tonic pain by 62%, it completely prevented the increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. I.t. catalase, an enzyme specific for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, completely depleted spinal hydrogen peroxide and prevented formalin-induced tonic pain by 65%. Given systemically, the ROS scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) also inhibited formalin-induced tonic pain and increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. Formalin-induced tonic pain was potentiated by i.t. exogenous hydrogen peroxide. CBIO did not increase spinal d-serine level, and i.t. d-serine did not alter either formalin-induced tonic pain or CBIO's analgesic effect. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Spinal hydrogen peroxide is specifically and largely responsible for formalin-induced pain, and DAAO inhibitors produce analgesia by blocking spinal hydrogen peroxide production rather than interacting with spinal d-serine. PMID:21950354

  10. An amperometric enzyme electrode and its biofuel cell based on a glucose oxidase-poly(3-anilineboronic acid)-Pd nanoparticles bionanocomposite for glucose biosensing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingen; Ma, Yixuan; Zhang, Pei; Chao, Long; Huang, Ting; Xie, Qingji; Chen, Chao; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-06-01

    A new amperometric enzyme electrode and its biofuel cell were fabricated based on a glucose oxidase (GOx)-poly(3-anilineboronic acid) (PABA)-Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs) bionanocomposite for biosensing of glucose. Briefly, Pd was electroplated on a multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-modified Au electrode, and the GOx-PABA-PdNPs bionanocomposite was prepared on the Pd(plate)/MWCNTs/Au electrode through the chemical oxidation of a GOx-3-anilineboronic acid adduct by Na2PdCl4, followed by electrode-modification with an outer-layer chitosan (CS) film. The thus-prepared CS/GOx-PABA-PdNPs/Pd(plate)/MWCNTs/Au electrode exhibited a linear amperometric response to glucose concentration from 2.0 μM to 4.5 mM with a sensitivity of 160 μA/mM/cm(2), sub-μM detection limit, and excellent operation/storage stability in the first-generation biosensing mode, as well as excellent analytical performance in the second-generation biosensing mode. The good recoveries of glucose obtained from spiked urine samples revealed the application potential of our amperometric enzyme electrode. In addition, a glucose/O2 biofuel cell was constructed using this enzyme electrode as the anode and a Pt/MWCNTs/Au electrode as the cathode, and this biofuel cell as a self-powered biosensing device showed a linear voltage response to glucose concentration from 100 μM to 13.5 mM with a sensitivity of 43.5 mV/mM/cm(2) and excellent operation/storage stability. PMID:25863377

  11. Searching for cognitive enhancement in the Morris water maze: better and worse performance in D-amino acid oxidase knockout (Dao(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, David; Taylor, Amy M; Barkus, Christopher; Engle, Sandra J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Sharp, Trevor; Foster, Russell G; Harrison, Paul J; Peirson, Stuart N; Bannerman, David M

    2016-04-01

    A common strategy when searching for cognitive-enhancing drugs has been to target the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), given its putative role in synaptic plasticity and learning. Evidence in favour of this approach has come primarily from studies with rodents using behavioural assays like the Morris water maze. D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) degrades neutral D-amino acids such as D-serine, the primary endogenous co-agonist acting at the glycine site of the synaptic NMDAR. Inhibiting DAO could therefore provide an effective and viable means of enhancing cognition, particularly in disorders like schizophrenia, in which NMDAR hypofunction is implicated. Indirect support for this notion comes from the enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation and facilitated water maze acquisition of ddY/Dao(-) mice, which lack DAO activity due to a point mutation in the gene. Here, in Dao knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mice, we report both better and worse water maze performance, depending on the radial distance of the hidden platform from the side wall of the pool. Dao(-/-) mice displayed an increased innate preference for swimming in the periphery of the maze (possibly due to heightened anxiety), which facilitated the discovery of a peripherally located platform, but delayed the discovery of a centrally located platform. By contrast, Dao(-/-) mice exhibited normal performance in two alternative assays of long-term spatial memory: the appetitive and aversive Y-maze reference memory tasks. Taken together, these results question the proposed relationship between DAO inactivation and enhanced long-term associative spatial memory. They also have generic implications for how Morris water maze studies are performed and interpreted. PMID:26833794

  12. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase Activity Limits Ethylene Biosynthesis in Rumex palustris during Submergence

    PubMed Central

    Vriezen, Wim H.; Hulzink, Raymond; Mariani, Celestina; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Submergence strongly stimulates petiole elongation in Rumex palustris, and ethylene accumulation initiates and maintains this response in submerged tissues. cDNAs from R. palustris corresponding to a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase gene (RP-ACO1) were isolated from elongating petioles and used to study the expression of the corresponding gene. An increase in RP-ACO1 messenger was observed in the petioles and lamina of elongating leaves 2 h after the start of submergence. ACC oxidase enzyme activity was measured in homogenates of R. palustris shoots, and a relevant increase was observed within 12 h under water with a maximum after 24 h. We have shown previously that the ethylene production rate of submerged shoots does not increase significantly during the first 24 h of submergence (L.A.C.J. Voesenek, M. Banga, R.H. Thier, C.M. Mudde, F.M. Harren, G.W.M. Barendse, C.W.P.M. Blom [1993] Plant Physiol 103: 783–791), suggesting that under these conditions ACC oxidase activity is inhibited in vivo. We found evidence that this inhibition is caused by a reduction of oxygen levels. We hypothesize that an increased ACC oxidase enzyme concentration counterbalances the reduced enzyme activity caused by low oxygen concentration during submergence, thus sustaining ethylene production under these conditions. Therefore, ethylene biosynthesis seems to be limited at the level of ACC oxidase activity rather than by ACC synthase in R. palustris during submergence. PMID:10482674

  13. NADPH Oxidase and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G

    2012-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox) is a unique, multi-protein, electron transport system that produces large amounts of superoxide via the reduction of molecular oxygen. Nox-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in a variety of physiological processes, including host defense and signal transduction. However, over the past decade, the involvement of (Nox)-dependent oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases has been increasingly recognized. ROS produced by Nox proteins contribute to neurodegenerative diseases through distinct mechanisms, such as oxidation of DNA, proteins, lipids, amino acids and metals, in addition to activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on Nox involvement in neurodegeneration, focusing on Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. PMID:23730256

  14. Isolation and biochemical, functional and structural characterization of a novel L-amino acid oxidase from Lachesis muta snake venom.

    PubMed

    Bregge-Silva, Cristiane; Nonato, Maria Cristina; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Ho, Paulo Lee; Junqueira de Azevedo, Inácio L M; Vasconcelos Diniz, Marcelo Ribeiro; Lomonte, Bruno; Rucavado, Alexandra; Díaz, Cecilia; Gutiérrez, José María; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was the isolation of the LAAO from Lachesis muta venom (LmLAAO) and its biochemical, functional and structural characterization. Two different purification protocols were developed and both provided highly homogeneous and active LmLAAO. It is a homodimeric enzyme with molar mass around 120 kDa under non-reducing conditions, 60 kDa under reducing conditions in SDS-PAGE and 60852 Da by mass spectrometry. Forty amino acid residues were directly sequenced from LmLAAO and its complete cDNA was identified and characterized from an Expressed Sequence Tags data bank obtained from a venom gland. A model based on sequence homology was manually built in order to predict its three-dimensional structure. LmLAAO showed a catalytic preference for hydrophobic amino acids (K(m) of 0.97 mmol/L with Leu). A mild myonecrosis was observed histologically in mice after injection of 100 μg of LmLAAO and confirmed by a 15-fold increase in CK activity. LmLAAO induced cytotoxicity on AGS cell line (gastric adenocarcinoma, IC₅₀: 22.7 μg/mL) and on MCF-7 cell line (breast adenocarcinoma, IC₅₀:1.41 μg/mL). It presents antiparasitic activity on Leishmania brasiliensis (IC₅₀: 2.22 μg/mL), but Trypanosoma cruzi was resistant to LmLAAO. In conclusion, LmLAAO showed low systemic toxicity but important in vitro pharmacological actions. PMID:22963728

  15. The effect of high polyphenol oxidase grass silage on metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids and nitrogen across the rumen of beef steers.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R F; Theobald, V J; Gordon, N; Leyland, M; Tweed, J K S; Fychan, R; Scollan, N D

    2014-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in red clover (Trifolium pratense) has been reported to reduce both proteolysis and lipolysis, resulting in greater N use efficiency and protection of PUFA across the rumen. Although high levels of PPO have been reported in grasses such as cocksfoot (orchard grass; Dactylis glomerata), no in vivo research has determined whether grass PPO elicits the same response as red clover PPO. To test the hypothesis that silage ensiled from grass with high levels of PPO protects N and PUFA across the rumen, 6 steers with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were offered cocksfoot silage (CO; high-PPO grass), perennial ryegrass silage (PR; Lolium perenne; low-PPO grass), or red clover silage (RC; high-PPO control) at 16 g DM/kg BW daily with the experiment consisting of two 3 × 3 Latin squares with 21-d periods, consisting of 12 d of diet adaptation, 6 d of duodenal marker infusion, 2 d of duodenal sampling, and 1 d of ruminal sampling. All silages were well preserved, with DM of 34.4, 55.3, and 45.4% for CO, PR, and RC. Activity of PPO in silages was low due to deactivation but was greater in CO than either PR or RC (0.15 vs. 0.05 and 0.08 μkatal/g DM). Protein-bound phenol (mg/g DM) as a measure of the degree of oxidation and an indication of PPO protection was greatest for RC (15.9) but comparable for PR (10.1) and CO (12.2). Biohydrogenation of C18 PUFA was significantly lower on RC compared to the 2 grass silages with CO greater than PR. Despite lower levels of total fatty acid intake and subsequent duodenal flow, CO resulted in greater levels of phytanic acid and total branched and odd chain fatty acids in duodenal digesta than RC or PR. Ruminal ammonia concentration was greatest for RC, with no difference between the grasses. Duodenal flow of microbial N and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis were lowest for CO and comparable for RC and PR. The CO (high-grass PPO) did not result in elevated levels of C18 PUFA escaping the rumen or

  16. An amperometric hemoglobin A1c biosensor based on immobilization of fructosyl amino acid oxidase onto zinc oxide nanoparticles-polypyrrole film.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sheetal; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2012-11-15

    Measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin) level in blood provides the long-term glucose level in diabetic patients without the influence of short-term fluctuations. The existing methods for HbA1c determination, including biosensors, suffer from insufficient sensitivity, detection limit, response time, and storage stability. These problems were overcome in the current biosensor. A method is described for construction of an amperometric HbA1c biosensor by immobilizing a fructosyl amino acid oxidase (FAO) onto zinc oxide nanoparticles/polypyrrole (ZnONPs/PPy) hybrid film deposited onto gold (Au) electrode and using it as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as reference electrode, and platinum (Pt) as auxiliary electrode. The whole blood samples were hemolyzed and digested by protease before measuring their HbA1c level by the biosensor. The enzyme electrode detected fructosyl valine (FV) as low as 50μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 within 2s at +0.27V versus Ag/AgCl, pH7.0, and 35°C with a linear working range of 0.1 to 3.0mM for FV and sensitivity of 38.42μAmM(-1). The electrode showed only a 30% loss of its initial response over a period of 160days when stored at 4°C. The biosensor measured HbA1c in whole blood of apparently healthy individuals and diabetic patients and found it to be in the ranges of 4.0% to 5.6% and 5.7% to 12.0%, respectively. PMID:22906687

  17. Activation of microglia with zymosan promotes excitatory amino acid release via volume-regulated anion channels: the role of NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, Timothy J.; Abdullaev, Iskandar F.; Jourd'heuil, David; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the CNS, which are important for preserving neural tissue functions, but may also contribute to neurodegeneration. Activation of these cells in infection, inflammation, or trauma leads to the release of various toxic molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the excitatory amino acid glutamate. In this study we used an electrophysiological approach and a D-[3H]aspartate (glutamate) release assay to explore the ROS-dependent regulation of glutamate-permeable volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs). Exposure of rat microglia to hypoosmotic media stimulated Cl− currents and D-[3H]aspartate release, both of which were inhibited by the selective VRAC blocker DCPIB. Exogenously applied H2O2 potently increased swelling-activated glutamate release. Stimulation of microglia with zymosan triggered production of endogenous ROS and strongly enhanced glutamate release via VRAC in swollen cells. The effects of zymosan were attenuated by the ROS scavenger MnTMPyP, and by two inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (NOX) diphenyliodonium and thioridazine. However, zymosan-stimulated glutamate release was insensitive to other NOX blockers, apocynin and AEBSF. This pharmacological profile pointed to the potential involvement of apocynin-insensitive NOX4. Using RT-PCR we confirmed that NOX4 is expressed in rat microglial cells, along with NOX1 and NOX2. To check for potential involvement of phagocytic NOX2 we stimulated this isoform using protein kinase C (PKC) activator PMA, or inhibited it with the broad spectrum PKC blocker Gö6983. Both agents potently modulated endogenous ROS production by NOX2, but not VRAC activity. Taken together, these data suggest that the anion channel VRAC may contribute to microglial glutamate release, and that its activity is regulated by endogenous ROS originating from NOX4. PMID:18624925

  18. Antibacterial action of a heat-stable form of L-amino acid oxidase isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mui Li; Tan, Nget Hong; Fung, Shin Yee; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2011-03-01

    The major l-amino acid oxidase (LAAO, EC 1.4.3.2) of king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom is known to be an unusual form of snake venom LAAO as it possesses unique structural features and unusual thermal stability. The antibacterial effects of king cobra venom LAAO were tested against several strains of clinical isolates including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli using broth microdilution assay. For comparison, the antibacterial effects of several antibiotics (cefotaxime, kanamycin, tetracycline, vancomycin and penicillin) were also examined using the same conditions. King cobra venom LAAO was very effective in inhibiting the two Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.78μg/mL (0.006μM) and 1.56μg/mL (0.012μM) against S. aureus and S. epidermidis, respectively. The MICs are comparable to the MICs of the antibiotics tested, on a weight basis. However, the LAAO was only moderately effective against three Gram-negative bacteria tested (P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and E. coli), with MIC ranges from 25 to 50μg/mL (0.2-0.4μM). Catalase at the concentration of 1mg/mL abolished the antibacterial effect of LAAO, indicating that the antibacterial effect of the enzyme involves generation of hydrogen peroxide. Binding studies indicated that king cobra venom LAAO binds strongly to the Gram-positive S. aureus and S. epidermidis, but less strongly to the Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa, indicating that specific binding to bacteria is important for the potent antibacterial activity of the enzyme. PMID:21059402

  19. Revisitation of the βCl-elimination reaction of D-amino acid oxidase: new interpretation of the reaction that sparked flavoprotein dehydrogenation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghisla, Sandro; Pollegioni, Loredano; Molla, Gianluca

    2011-11-25

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) from pig has been reported to catalyze the β-elimination of Cl(-) from βCl-D-alanine via abstraction of the substrate α-H as H(+) ("carbanion mechanism") (Walsh, C. T., Schonbrunn, A., and Abeles, R. H. (1971) J. Biol. Chem. 246, 6855-6866). In view of the fundamental mechanistic importance of this reaction and of the recent reinterpretation of the DAAO dehydrogenation step as occurring via a hydride mechanism, we reinvestigated the elimination reaction using yeast DAAO. That enzyme catalyzes the same reactions as the pig enzyme but with a much higher efficiency and a substantially different kinetic behavior. The reaction is initiated by a very rapid and fully reversible dehydrogenation step. This leads to an equilibrium (k(on) ≈ k(reverse)) between the complexes of oxidized enzyme-βCl-D-alanine and reduced enzyme-βCl-iminopyruvate. In the presence of O(2) the latter complex can partition between an oxidative half-reaction and elimination of Cl(-), which proceeds at a rate of ≈50 s(-1). This step forms a complex between oxidized enzyme and enamine that is characterized by a charge transfer absorption (which describes its rates of formation and decay). A minimal scheme that lists relevant steps of the reductive and oxidative half-reactions and elimination pathways along with the estimate of the corresponding rate constants is presented. β-Elimination of Cl(-) is proposed to originate at the locus of the enzyme-βCl-iminopyruvate complex. A chemical mechanism that can account for elimination is discussed in detail. PMID:21949129

  20. Binding geometry, stoichiometry, and thermodynamics of cyclomalto-oligosaccharide (cyclodextrin) inclusion complex formation with chlorogenic acid, the major substrate of apple polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Irwin, P L; Pfeffer, P E; Doner, L W; Sapers, G M; Brewster, J D; Nagahashi, G; Hicks, K B

    1994-03-18

    The inclusion complexes of cyclomaltohexaose (alpha-CD), cyclomaltoheptaose (beta-CD), cyclomaltooctaose (gamma-CD), and polymerized beta-CD (beta-CDn) with chlorogenic acid (CA), the major substrate of apple fruit polyphenol oxidase (PPO), were studied with regard to pH, ionic strength, and temperature in model buffer systems and apple juice. The thermodynamics of CD.CA inclusion complex formation, which were studied in solution using UV spectrophotometry, displayed enthalpy-entropy compensation typical of processes driven by solvation phenomena. We also found that the apparent association constants (K) of the CD.CA equilibrium were relatively insensitive to pH for beta-CD, compared to alpha- and gamma-CDs, but were subject to substantial enhancement at low ionic strengths. The beta-CD.CA inclusion complex was also characterized for binding geometry and stoichiometry at 9.4 T and 25 degrees C in 0.05 M Na phosphate buffer by 1H NMR spectroscopy. A 1:1 stoichiometric ratio for the complex was found using the method of continuous variations. 1H Spin-lattice relaxation and chemical-shift data indicate that the phenolic ring of CA docks within the cavity of beta-CD. The Ks for beta-, alpha-, and gamma-CD determined in apple juice, which contains a mixture of PPO substrates, were found to correlate with PPO activity-related data. Apple juice, treated with beta-CDn, did not brown until CA was added back. These latter findings strongly argue that the mechanism for inhibition of juice browning with cyclodextrins was mainly due to the binding of PPO substrates and not some other means such as enzyme inactivation via sequestration of Cu2+ by CDs. PMID:8194069

  1. INCREASED XANTHINE OXIDASE IN THE SKIN OF PREECLAMPTIC WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Bainbridge, Shannon A.; Deng, Jau-Shyong; Roberts, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Xanthine oxioreductase is the holoenzyme responsible for terminal purine catabolism. Under conditions of metabolic stress or heightened pro-inflammatory cytokine production this enzyme is preferentially in it’s oxidized form, xanthine oxidase, with catalytic action that generates uric acid and the free radical superoxide. As preeclampsia is characterized by heightened inflammation, oxidative stress and hyperuricemia it has been proposed that xanthine oxidase plays a pivotal role in this hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. We sought to determine whether xanthine oxidase protein content was higher in maternal tissue of preeclamptic mothers, compared to healthy pregnant controls, using immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsies. We further compared xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity in skin biopsies from preeclamptic women and patients with several inflammatory conditions. In preeclamptic women, intense xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity was present within the epidermis. By contrast, only very faint xanthine oxidase staining was observed in skin biopsies from healthy pregnant controls. Further, a role for inflammation in the increase of xanthine oxidase was suggested by similar findings of heightened xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity in the skin biopsies from non-pregnant individuals diagnosed with conditions of systemic inflammation. The finding of increased xanthine oxidase in maternal tissue, most likely as the result of heightened maternal inflammation, suggest maternal xanthine oxidase as a source of free radical and uric acid generation in preeclampsia. PMID:19196876

  2. Determination of free D-proline and D-leucine in the brains of mutant mice lacking D-amino acid oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Hamase, K; Inoue, T; Morikawa, A; Konno, R; Zaitsu, K

    2001-11-15

    A new procedure to accurately measure a trace amount of d-proline in biological samples has been developed. This D-amino acid was derivatized with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole and was determined by a column-switching HPLC system, a combination of a micro-ODS column and a chiral column. The detection limit for D-proline spiked in a mouse cerebrum sample is 1 fmol (injection amount, S/N = 3). Within-day precision and day-to-day precision obtained for spiked d-proline (10 fmol) are 2.14 and 5.35% (RSD), respectively. Using the new method, the amount of free D-proline in eight brain regions and sera of mutant ddY/DAO- mice, lacking D-amino acid oxidase activity, and control ddY/DAO+ mice was determined. The amount of free D-leucine was also investigated. The amount and distribution of D-proline in the brains of ddY/DAO+ mice and ddY/DAO- mice are almost the same, and relatively high amounts of D-proline have been observed in the pituitary gland and in the pineal gland. On the other hand, the amount of D-leucine is different between the two strains. In the brains of ddY/DAO+ mice, a relatively high amount of D-leucine has been observed in the pineal gland compared with other regions. In the brains of ddY/DAO- mice, D-leucine amounts are approximately 10 times higher than those obtained in ddY/DAO+ mice and regional difference has not been observed, while the amounts of L-proline and L-leucine are not significantly different between the two strains. In the serum, the amounts of both free D-proline and d-leucine are significantly higher in the ddY/DAO- mice than those obtained in ddY/DAO+ mice. PMID:11700980

  3. Structural Insights into Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Wilson, H.; Graf, T.; Xiang, S.; Jaramillo-Busquets, S.; Rajagopalan, K.; Kisker, C.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is a lethal genetic disease that results from defects either in the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis or in the sulfite oxidase gene itself. Several point mutations in the sulfite oxidase gene have been identified from patients suffering from this disease worldwide. Although detailed biochemical analyses have been carried out on these mutations, no structural data could be obtained because of problems in crystallizing recombinant human and rat sulfite oxidases and the failure to clone the chicken sulfite oxidase gene. We synthesized the gene for chicken sulfite oxidase de novo, working backward from the amino acid sequence of the native chicken liver enzyme by PCR amplification of a series of 72 overlapping primers. The recombinant protein displayed the characteristic absorption spectrum of sulfite oxidase and exhibited steady state and rapid kinetic parameters comparable with those of the tissue-derived enzyme. We solved the crystal structures of the wild type and the sulfite oxidase deficiency-causing R138Q (R160Q in humans) variant of recombinant chicken sulfite oxidase in the resting and sulfate-bound forms. Significant alterations in the substrate-binding pocket were detected in the structure of the mutant, and a comparison between the wild type and mutant protein revealed that the active site residue Arg-450 adopts different conformations in the presence and absence of bound sulfate. The size of the binding pocket is thereby considerably reduced, and its position relative to the cofactor is shifted, causing an increase in the distance of the sulfur atom of the bound sulfate to the molybdenum.

  4. Characterization of transcriptional profiles of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding, cold and different photoperiods during ripening in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2008-12-01

    The ripening-specific genes MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata ACC synthase1) and MA-ACO1 (M. acuminata ACC oxidase 1) are regulated in response to a wide variety of factors. Here, we have studied the differential transcript accumulation pattern and protein levels of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding and low temperature in preclimacteric banana fruit. We have shown that exogenous application of ethylene and auxin induced the expression of MA-ACS1, while MA-ACO1 showed marginal expression following ethylene treatment in preclimacteric stage. Auxin did not induce MA-ACO1 expression. Thus, auxin-treated banana fruits showed lower ethylene production rate as compared to ethylene-treated fruits. Conversely, wounding and cold treatment down-regulated the expression of both the genes and thus inhibited ethylene production. Furthermore, we have detected a GCC-box putative ethylene-responsive element (ERE)- and an auxin-responsive element (ARE)-specific DNA-binding activity in the banana pulp and studied the ethylene and auxin responsive characteristics of the GCC-box and ARE (TGTCTC) containing synthetic promoter fragments. In addition, we have detected an enhanced ethylene production rate and expression level of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes along with a strong GCC-box-specific DNA-binding activity following exposure to constant dark period for 8d at the preclimacteric stage. Together, our study provides interesting information about the regulation of expression of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to various factors during ripening in banana fruit, which may have physiological relevance concerning ethylene biosynthesis during post-harvest conditions. PMID:18554749

  5. Hospitals Participating In ACOs Tend To Be Large And Urban, Allowing Access To Capital And Data

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Valerie A.; Tierney, Emily; Muhlestein, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between physicians and hospitals have changed considerably over the past decade as hospitals and physician groups integrate and new public and private payment policies create financial interdependence. The extent to which accountable care organizations (ACOs) involve hospitals in their operations may prove to be vitally important because managing hospital care is a key part of improving quality and lowering cost growth. Using primary data on ACO composition and capabilities paired with hospital characteristics, we found that 20 percent of US hospitals were part of an ACO in 2015, and hospitals that were in urban areas, non-profit, or had a smaller share of Medicare patients were more likely to participate in ACOs compared to other ACOs. Qualitative data identified several advantages of including a hospital in an ACO: the availability of start-up capital, advanced data sharing, and engagement of providers across the care continuum. Although ACOs that include hospitals (63 percent of ACOs) offered more comprehensive services compared to ACOs without hospitals, we found no differences among ACOs in their ability to manage hospital-related aspects of patient care. PMID:26953297

  6. A new oxygen-regulated operon in Escherichia coli comprises the genes for a putative third cytochrome oxidase and for pH 2.5 acid phosphatase (appA)

    PubMed

    Dassa, J; Fsihi, H; Marck, C; Dion, M; Kieffer-Bontemps, M; Boquet, P L

    1991-10-01

    The Escherichia coli acid phosphatase gene appA is expressed in response to oxygen deprivation and is positively controlled by the product of appR (katF) which encodes a putative new sigma transcription-initiation factor. However, transcription of appA from its nearest promoter (P1) did not account for total pH 2.5 acid phosphatase expression and was not subject to regulation. The cloned region upstream of appA was extended and analyzed by insertions of transposon TnphoA and by fusions with lacZ. It contains two new genes, appC and appB, which both encode extracytoplasmic proteins. appC and appB are expressed from a promoter (P2) lying just upstream of appC. Both genes are regulated by oxygen, as is appA, and by appR gene product exactly as previously shown for appA. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence and of the origins of transcription have confirmed that the P2-appC-appB- (ORFX)-P1-appA region is organized on the chromosome as an operon transcribed clockwise from P2 and that P1 is a minor promoter for appA alone. Genes appC and appB encode proteins of Mr 58,133 and 42,377, respectively, which have the characteristics of integral membrane proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of appC and appB show 60% and 57% homology, respectively, with subunits I and II of the E. coli cytochrome d oxidase (encoded by genes cydA and cydB). The notion that the AppC and AppB proteins constitute a new cytochrome oxidase or a new oxygen-detoxifying system is supported by the observation of enhanced sensitivity to oxygen of mutants lacking all three genes, cyo (cytochrome o oxidase), cyd (cytochrome d oxidase) and appB, compared to that of cyo cyd double mutants. PMID:1658595

  7. Activation of Polyphenol Oxidase of Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or —18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density. Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles × mg−1 chlorophyll × hr−1. Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes. Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30

  8. First national survey of ACOs finds that physicians are playing strong leadership and ownership roles.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Shortell, Stephen M; Fisher, Elliott S

    2014-06-01

    The extent to which physicians lead, own, and govern accountable care organizations (ACOs) is unknown. However, physicians' involvement in ACOs will influence how clinicians and patients perceive the ACO model, how effective these organizations are at improving quality and costs, and how future ACOs will be organized. From October 2012 to May 2013 we fielded the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations, the first such survey of public and private ACOs. We found that 51 percent of ACOs were physician-led, with another 33 percent jointly led by physicians and hospitals. In 78 percent of ACOs, physicians constituted a majority of the governing board, and physicians owned 40 percent of ACOs. The broad reach of physician leadership has important implications for the future evolution of ACOs. It seems likely that the challenge of fundamentally changing care delivery as the country moves away from fee-for-service payment will not be accomplished without strong, effective leadership from physicians. PMID:24889945

  9. SamACO: variable sampling ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous optimization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Jun; Chung, Henry Shu-Hung; Li, Yun; Liu, Ou

    2010-12-01

    An ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm offers algorithmic techniques for optimization by simulating the foraging behavior of a group of ants to perform incremental solution constructions and to realize a pheromone laying-and-following mechanism. Although ACO is first designed for solving discrete (combinatorial) optimization problems, the ACO procedure is also applicable to continuous optimization. This paper presents a new way of extending ACO to solving continuous optimization problems by focusing on continuous variable sampling as a key to transforming ACO from discrete optimization to continuous optimization. The proposed SamACO algorithm consists of three major steps, i.e., the generation of candidate variable values for selection, the ants' solution construction, and the pheromone update process. The distinct characteristics of SamACO are the cooperation of a novel sampling method for discretizing the continuous search space and an efficient incremental solution construction method based on the sampled values. The performance of SamACO is tested using continuous numerical functions with unimodal and multimodal features. Compared with some state-of-the-art algorithms, including traditional ant-based algorithms and representative computational intelligence algorithms for continuous optimization, the performance of SamACO is seen competitive and promising. PMID:20371409

  10. On the molecular relationships between high-zinc tolerance and aconitase (Aco1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guirola, Maria; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Atrian, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    Zinc is an essential metal for all organisms, as it participates in the structure and/or function of many proteins. However, zinc excess is as deleterious to cells as zinc deficiency. A genome-wide study of the transcriptomic response to high zinc in S. cerevisiae performed in our laboratory allowed the identification of a zinc hyper-tolerant deletion mutant (pif1Δ), which lacks the Pif1 DNA helicase. Further molecular characterization of this strain phenotype revealed that the lack of Pif1 leads to increased iron accumulation, redistribution of the aconitase protein to mitochondria, and also a loss of aconitase activity, despite normal Aco1 protein levels being present, probably due to the epistasis in protecting mtDNA between PIF1 and ACO1. The results presented in this work focus now on the characterization of different features related to the Aco1 protein and activity in yeast and the tolerance to high zinc. Hence, multiple phenotypic traits related to metal metabolism, namely Aco1 protein content and activity levels, succinate dehydrogenase activity, citrate levels, metal content, BPS influence in cultures, and the range of transcription of some iron metabolism related genes, have been analyzed for several strains, some of them constructed to this end, including BY4741, the deletants pif1Δ and aco1Δ, and the aco1 mutants aco1Δ-d4, aco1-C448S, aco1-R476S and aco1-R668S. Overall, lack of Aco1 enzymatic activity in mitochondria, citrate accumulation and lack of activity of [Fe-S] enzymes, e.g. succinate dehydrogenase, appear to be direct molecular indicators of increased zinc tolerance in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24503898

  11. Energy spread measurements on the ACO storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Elleaume, P.; Billardon, M.; Deacon, D.; Girard, B.; Lapierre, Y.

    1985-06-01

    Absolute and relative energy spread measurements have been made on the ACO storage ring using two different methods. The first one consists of a spectral analysis of the electron bunch length based on the proportionality of the longitudinal bunch length versus energy spread. The second one constitutes a direct measurement using the on axis synchrotron radiation emitted by an optical klystron. The two measurement techniques present a very high signal/noise ratio allowing time resolved records. Examples are presented of the energy spread time evolution in the FEL oscillator and of harmonic generation experiments.

  12. Arsenite Oxidase Also Functions as an Antimonite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Warelow, Thomas P.; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Romano, Christine; Osborne, Thomas H.; Lehr, Corinne R.; Bothner, Brian; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony are toxic metalloids and are considered priority environmental pollutants by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Significant advances have been made in understanding microbe-arsenic interactions and how they influence arsenic redox speciation in the environment. However, even the most basic features of how and why a microorganism detects and reacts to antimony remain poorly understood. Previous work with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain 5A concluded that oxidation of antimonite [Sb(III)] and arsenite [As(III)] required different biochemical pathways. Here, we show with in vivo experiments that a mutation in aioA [encoding the large subunit of As(III) oxidase] reduces the ability to oxidize Sb(III) by approximately one-third relative to the ability of the wild type. Further, in vitro studies with the purified As(III) oxidase from Rhizobium sp. strain NT-26 (AioA shares 94% amino acid sequence identity with AioA of A. tumefaciens) provide direct evidence of Sb(III) oxidation but also show a significantly decreased Vmax compared to that of As(III) oxidation. The aioBA genes encoding As(III) oxidase are induced by As(III) but not by Sb(III), whereas arsR gene expression is induced by both As(III) and Sb(III), suggesting that detection and transcriptional responses for As(III) and Sb(III) differ. While Sb(III) and As(III) are similar with respect to cellular extrusion (ArsB or Acr3) and interaction with ArsR, they differ in the regulatory mechanisms that control the expression of genes encoding the different Ars or Aio activities. In summary, this study documents an enzymatic basis for microbial Sb(III) oxidation, although additional Sb(III) oxidation activity also is apparent in this bacterium. PMID:25576601

  13. 42 CFR 425.214 - Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement. 425.214 Section 425.214 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Application Procedures and Participation Agreement § 425.214 Managing changes to the ACO during the...

  14. 42 CFR 425.214 - Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement. 425.214 Section 425.214 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Application Procedures and Participation Agreement § 425.214 Managing changes to the ACO during the...

  15. 42 CFR 425.214 - Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Managing changes to the ACO during the agreement. 425.214 Section 425.214 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Application Procedures and Participation Agreement § 425.214 Managing changes to the ACO during the...

  16. 42 CFR 425.220 - Termination of an agreement by the ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination of an agreement by the ACO. 425.220 Section 425.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) Payment consequences of early termination. The ACO will not share in any savings for the performance...

  17. Evaluation of oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cassland, Pierre; Sjöde, Anders; Winestrand, Sandra; Jönsson, Leif J; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof

    2010-05-01

    Increased recirculation of process water has given rise to problems with formation of calcium oxalate incrusts (scaling) in the pulp and paper industry and in forest biorefineries. The potential in using oxalate decarboxylase from Aspergillus niger for oxalic acid removal in industrial bleaching plant filtrates containing oxalic acid was examined and compared with barley oxalate oxidase. Ten different filtrates from chemical pulping were selected for the evaluation. Oxalate decarboxylase degraded oxalic acid faster than oxalate oxidase in eight of the filtrates, while oxalate oxidase performed better in one filtrate. One of the filtrates inhibited both enzymes. The potential inhibitory effect of selected compounds on the enzymatic activity was tested. Oxalate decarboxylase was more sensitive than oxalate oxidase to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate decarboxylase was not as sensitive to chlorate and chlorite as oxalate oxidase. Up to 4 mM chlorate ions, the highest concentration tested, had no inhibitory effect on oxalate decarboxylase. Analysis of the filtrates suggests that high concentrations of chlorate present in some of the filtrates were responsible for the higher sensitivity of oxalate oxidase in these filtrates. Oxalate decarboxylase was thus a better choice than oxalate oxidase for treatment of filtrates from chlorine dioxide bleaching. PMID:19763895

  18. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  19. ACOs: time for ED managers to get involved, shape how their departments will add value.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    Even with a proposed rule outlining how accountable care organizations (ACO) will be structured under fee-for-service Medicare, emergency medicine experts are concerned about how ACOs will impact patient access to the ED. Further, some see a clear need to beef-up case management staff, while others say ED managers need to get involved with ACO-development now so their interests and concerns are represented. Under a proposed rule unveiled by the Department of Health and Human Services, a handful of quality indicators will require the tracking of ED visits related to certain ambulatory care-sensitive conditions; experts say it could be a challenge for ED staff to differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate use of the ED. EDs that figure out how to contribute value under the ACO mission will be better positioned to prosper under the new model. The ACO model is likely to add considerable complexity to billing and reimbursement. PMID:21675150

  20. The composition of milk xanthine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Hart, L. I.; McGartoll, Mary A.; Chapman, Helen R.; Bray, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    The composition of milk xanthine oxidase has been reinvestigated. When the enzyme is prepared by methods that include a selective denaturation step in the presence of sodium salicylate the product is obtained very conveniently and in high yield, and is homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge and in recycling gel filtration. It has specific activity higher than previously reported preparations of the enzyme and its composition approximates closely to 2mol of FAD, 2g-atoms of Mo and 8g-atoms of Fe/mol of protein (molecular weight about 275000). In contrast, when purely conventional preparative methods are used the product is also homogeneous by the above criteria but has a lower specific activity and is generally comparable to the crystallized enzyme described previously. Such samples also contain 2mol of FAD/mol of protein but they have lower contents of Mo (e.g. 1.2g-atom/mol). Amino acid compositions for the two types of preparation are indistinguishable. These results confirm the previous conclusion that conventional methods give mixtures of xanthine oxidase with an inactive modification of the enzyme now termed `de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase', and show that salicylate can selectively denature the latter. The origin of de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase was investigated. FAD/Mo ratios show that it is present not only in enzyme purified by conventional methods but also in `milk microsomes' (Bailie & Morton, 1958) and in enzyme samples prepared without proteolytic digestion. We conclude that it is secreted by cows together with the active enzyme and we discuss its occurrence in the preparations of other workers. Studies on the milks of individual cows show that nutritional rather than genetic factors determine the relative amounts of xanthine oxidase and de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase. A second inactive modification of the enzyme, now termed `inactivated xanthine oxidase', causes variability in activity relative to E450 or to Mo content and formation of it decreases these ratios

  1. Regulation of Ascorbate Oxidase Expression in Pumpkin by Auxin and Copper 1

    PubMed Central

    Esaka, Muneharu; Fujisawa, Kouichi; Goto, Miwa; Kisu, Yasutomo

    1992-01-01

    Ascorbate oxidase expression in pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) tissues was studied. Specific ascorbate oxidase activities in pumpkin leaf and stem tissues were about 2 and 1.5 times that in the fruit tissues, respectively. In seeds, little ascorbate oxidase activity was detected. Northern blot analyses showed an abundant ascorbate oxidase mRNA in leaf and stem tissues. Fruit tissues had lower levels of ascorbate oxidase mRNA than leaf and stem tissues. Ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not detected in seeds. Specific ascorbate oxidase activity gradually increased during early seedling growth of pumpkin seeds. The increase was accompanied by an increase in ascorbate oxidase mRNA. When ascorbate oxidase activity in developing pumpkin fruits was investigated, the activities in immature fruits that are rapidly growing at 0, 2, 4, and 7 d after anthesis were much higher than those in mature fruits at 14 and 30 d after anthesis. The specific activity and mRNA of ascorbate oxidase markedly increased after inoculation of pumpkin fruit tissues into Murashige and Skoog's culture medium in the presence of an auxin such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) but not in the absence of 2,4-D. In the presence of 10 mg/L of 2,4-D, ascorbate oxidase mRNA was the most abundant. Thus, ascorbate oxidase is induced by 2,4-D. These results indicate that ascorbate oxidase is involved in cell growth. In pumpkin callus, ascorbate oxidase activity could be markedly increased by adding copper. Furthermore, immunological blotting showed that the amount of ascorbate oxidase protein was also increased by adding copper. However, northern blot analyses showed that ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not increased by adding copper. We suggest that copper may control ascorbate oxidase expression at translation or at a site after translation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:16652952

  2. Regulation of ascorbate oxidase expression in pumpkin by auxin and copper.

    PubMed

    Esaka, M; Fujisawa, K; Goto, M; Kisu, Y

    1992-09-01

    Ascorbate oxidase expression in pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) tissues was studied. Specific ascorbate oxidase activities in pumpkin leaf and stem tissues were about 2 and 1.5 times that in the fruit tissues, respectively. In seeds, little ascorbate oxidase activity was detected. Northern blot analyses showed an abundant ascorbate oxidase mRNA in leaf and stem tissues. Fruit tissues had lower levels of ascorbate oxidase mRNA than leaf and stem tissues. Ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not detected in seeds. Specific ascorbate oxidase activity gradually increased during early seedling growth of pumpkin seeds. The increase was accompanied by an increase in ascorbate oxidase mRNA. When ascorbate oxidase activity in developing pumpkin fruits was investigated, the activities in immature fruits that are rapidly growing at 0, 2, 4, and 7 d after anthesis were much higher than those in mature fruits at 14 and 30 d after anthesis. The specific activity and mRNA of ascorbate oxidase markedly increased after inoculation of pumpkin fruit tissues into Murashige and Skoog's culture medium in the presence of an auxin such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) but not in the absence of 2,4-D. In the presence of 10 mg/L of 2,4-D, ascorbate oxidase mRNA was the most abundant. Thus, ascorbate oxidase is induced by 2,4-D. These results indicate that ascorbate oxidase is involved in cell growth. In pumpkin callus, ascorbate oxidase activity could be markedly increased by adding copper. Furthermore, immunological blotting showed that the amount of ascorbate oxidase protein was also increased by adding copper. However, northern blot analyses showed that ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not increased by adding copper. We suggest that copper may control ascorbate oxidase expression at translation or at a site after translation. PMID:16652952

  3. Development of tailor-made glycidyl methacrylate-divinyl benzene copolymer for immobilization of D-amino acid oxidase from Aspergillus species strain 020 and its application in the bioconversion of cephalosporin C.

    PubMed

    Mujawar; Kotha; Rajan; Ponrathnam; Shewale

    1999-09-24

    A tailor-made glycidyl methacrylate-divinyl benzene (GMA-DVB) copolymer PC-3 was evolved by studying the effect of synthesis variables on binding and expression of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) from Aspergillus species strain 020. Almost quantitative binding (100%) and a high yield of immobilization per unit of enzyme loaded was achieved. Optimum pH, optimum temperature and K(m)95% was achieved by using 3% (w/v) solution of ceph C, 48 U of DAAO per g of ceph C, keeping dissolved oxygen level above 50%, maintaining the pH between 7.6 and 7.8 and temperature at 24 degrees C. The immobilized DAAO was used for 60 cycles in a stirred tank reactor. PMID:10704992

  4. Discovery and analgesic evaluation of 8-chloro-1,4-dihydropyrido[2,3-b]pyrazine-2,3-dione as a novel potent d-amino acid oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dongsheng; Lu, Jun; Xie, Jin; Cui, Junjun; Li, Teng-Fei; Wang, Yan-Chao; Chen, Yuan; Gong, Nian; Li, Xin-Yan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2016-07-19

    A series of 5-azaquinoxaline-2,3-dione derivatives were synthesized and evaluated on d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) inhibition as potential α-hydroxylactam-based inhibitors. The potent inhibitory activities in vitro suggested that 5-nitrogen could significantly enhance the binding affinity by strengthening relevant hydrogen bond interactions. The analgesic effects of intrathecal and systemic injection of 8-chloro-1,4-dihydropyrido[2,3-b]pyrazine-2,3-dione, a representative molecule of 5-azaquinoxaline-2,3-dione, were investigated in rodents. This research not only confirmed the analgesic effect of the DAAO inhibitors but provided a new class of chemical entities with oral application potential for the treatment of chronic pain and morphine analgesic tolerance. PMID:27089209

  5. The substrate tolerance of alcohol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Pickl, Mathias; Fuchs, Michael; Glueck, Silvia M; Faber, Kurt

    2015-08-01

    Alcohols are a rich source of compounds from renewable sources, but they have to be activated in order to allow the modification of their carbon backbone. The latter can be achieved via oxidation to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. As an alternative to (thermodynamically disfavoured) nicotinamide-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases, alcohol oxidases make use of molecular oxygen but their application is under-represented in synthetic biotransformations. In this review, the mechanism of copper-containing and flavoprotein alcohol oxidases is discussed in view of their ability to accept electronically activated or non-activated alcohols and their propensity towards over-oxidation of aldehydes yielding carboxylic acids. In order to facilitate the selection of the optimal enzyme for a given biocatalytic application, the substrate tolerance of alcohol oxidases is compiled and discussed: Substrates are classified into groups (non-activated prim- and sec-alcohols; activated allylic, cinnamic and benzylic alcohols; hydroxy acids; sugar alcohols; nucleotide alcohols; sterols) together with suitable alcohol oxidases, their microbial source, relative activities and (stereo)selectivities. PMID:26153139

  6. High resolution crystal structure of rat long chain hydroxy acid oxidase in complex with the inhibitor 4-carboxy-5-[(4-chlorophenyl)sulfanyl]-1, 2, 3-thiadiazole. Implications for inhibitor specificity and drug design

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Vignaud, Caroline; Jaafar, Adil; Lévy, Bernard; Guéritte, Françoise; Guénard, Daniel; Lederer, Florence; Mathews, F. Scott

    2012-05-24

    Long chain hydroxy acid oxidase (LCHAO) is responsible for the formation of methylguanidine, a toxic compound with elevated serum levels in patients with chronic renal failure. Its isozyme glycolate oxidase (GOX), has a role in the formation of oxalate, which can lead to pathological deposits of calcium oxalate, in particular in the disease primary hyperoxaluria. Inhibitors of these two enzymes may have therapeutic value. These enzymes are the only human members of the family of FMN-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid-oxidizing enzymes, with yeast flavocytochrome b{sub 2} (Fcb2) among its well studied members. We screened a chemical library for inhibitors, using in parallel rat LCHAO, human GOX and the Fcb2 flavodehydrogenase domain (FDH). Among the hits was an inhibitor, CCPST, with an IC{sub 50} in the micromolar range for all three enzymes. We report here the crystal structure of a complex between this compound and LCHAO at 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. In comparison with a lower resolution structure of this enzyme, binding of the inhibitor induces a conformational change in part of the TIM barrel loop 4, as well as protonation of the active site histidine. The CCPST interactions are compared with those it forms with human GOX and those formed by two other inhibitors with human GOX and spinach GOX. These compounds differ from CCPST in having the sulfur replaced with a nitrogen in the five-membered ring as well as different hydrophobic substituents. The possible reason for the {approx}100-fold difference in affinity between these two series of inhibitors is discussed. The present results indicate that specificity is an issue in the quest for therapeutic inhibitors of either LCHAO or GOX, but they may give leads for this quest.

  7. Acyl-coenzyme A oxidases 1 and 3 in brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario): Can peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation be regulated by estrogen signaling?

    PubMed

    Madureira, Tânia Vieira; Castro, L Filipe C; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A oxidases 1 (Acox1) and 3 (Acox3) are key enzymes in the regulation of lipid homeostasis. Endogenous and exogenous factors can disrupt their normal expression/activity. This study presents for the first time the isolation and characterization of Acox1 and Acox3 in brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario). Additionally, as previous data point to the existence of a cross-talk between two nuclear receptors, namely peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and estrogen receptors, it was here evaluated after in vitro exposures of trout hepatocytes the interference caused by ethynylestradiol in the mRNA levels of an inducible (by peroxisome proliferators) and a non-inducible oxidase. The isolated Acox1 and Acox3 show high levels of sequence conservation compared to those of other teleosts. Additionally, it was found that Acox1 has two alternative splicing isoforms, corresponding to 3I and 3II isoforms of exon 3 splicing variants. Both isoforms display tissue specificity, with Acox1-3II presenting a more ubiquitous expression in comparison with Acox1-3I. Acox3 was expressed in almost all brown trout tissues. According to real-time PCR data, the highest estrogenic stimulus was able to cause a down-regulation of Acox1 and an up-regulation of Acox3. So, for Acox1 we found a negative association between an estrogenic input and a directly activated PPARα target gene. In conclusion, changes in hormonal estrogenic stimulus may impact the mobilization of hepatic lipids to the gonads, with ultimate consequences in reproduction. Further studies using in vivo assays will be fundamental to clarify these issues. PMID:26508171

  8. Microdialysis with radiometric monitoring of L-[β-11C]DOPA to assess dopaminergic metabolism: effect of inhibitors of L-amino acid decarboxylase, monoamine oxidase, and catechol-O-methyltransferase on rat striatal dialysate.

    PubMed

    Okada, Maki; Nakao, Ryuji; Hosoi, Rie; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Inoue, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The catecholamine, dopamine (DA), is synthesized from 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) by aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). Dopamine metabolism is regulated by monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). To measure dopaminergic metabolism, we used microdialysis with radiometric detection to monitor L-[β-(11)C]DOPA metabolites in the extracellular space of the rat striatum. We also evaluated the effects of AADC, MAO, and COMT inhibitors on metabolite profiles. The major early species measured after administration of L-[β-(11)C]DOPA were [(11)C]3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid ([(11)C]DOPAC) and [(11)C]homovanillic acid ([(11)C]HVA) in a 1:1 ratio, which shifted toward [(11)C]HVA with time. An AADC inhibitor increased the uptake of L-[β-(11)C]DOPA and L-3-O-methyl-[(11)C]DOPA and delayed the accumulation of [(11)C]DOPAC and [(11)C]HVA. The MAO and COMT inhibitors increased the production of [(11)C]3-methoxytyramine and [(11)C]DOPAC, respectively. These results reflect the L-DOPA metabolic pathway, suggesting that this method may be useful for assessing dopaminergic metabolism. PMID:20407462

  9. Physicians' Participation In ACOs Is Lower In Places With Vulnerable Populations Than In More Affluent Communities.

    PubMed

    Yasaitis, Laura C; Pajerowski, William; Polsky, Daniel; Werner, Rachel M

    2016-08-01

    Early evidence suggested that accountable care organizations (ACOs) could improve health care quality while constraining costs, and ACOs are expanding throughout the United States. However, if disadvantaged patients have unequal access to physicians who participate in ACOs, that expansion may exacerbate health care disparities. We examined the relationship between physicians' participation in both Medicare and commercial ACOs across the country and the sociodemographic characteristics of their likely patient populations. Physicians' participation in ACOs varied widely across hospital referral regions, from nearly 0 percent to over 85 percent. After we adjusted for individual physician and practice characteristics, we found that physicians who practiced in ZIP Code Tabulation Areas where a higher percentage of the population was black, living in poverty, uninsured, or disabled or had less than a high school education-compared to other areas-had significantly lower rates of ACO participation than other physicians. Our findings suggest that vulnerable populations' access to physicians participating in ACOs may not be as great as access for other groups, which could exacerbate existing disparities in health care quality. PMID:27503961

  10. Hospitals Participating In ACOs Tend To Be Large And Urban, Allowing Access To Capital And Data.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Tierney, Emily; Muhlestein, David B

    2016-03-01

    Relationships between physicians and hospitals have changed considerably over the past decade, as hospitals and physician groups have integrated and new public and private payment policies have created financial interdependence. The extent to which accountable care organizations (ACOs) involve hospitals in their operations may prove to be vitally important, because managing hospital care is a key part of improving health care quality and lowering cost growth. Using primary data on ACO composition and capabilities paired with hospital characteristics, we found that 20 percent of US hospitals were part of an ACO in 2014. Hospitals that were in urban areas, were nonprofit, or had a smaller share of Medicare patients were more likely to participate in ACOs, compared to hospitals that were in more rural areas, were for-profit or government owned, or had a larger share of Medicare patients, respectively. Qualitative data identified the following advantages of including a hospital in an ACO: the availability of start-up capital, advanced data sharing, and engagement of providers across the care continuum. Although the 63 percent of ACOs that included hospitals offered more comprehensive services compared to ACOs without hospitals, we found no differences between the two groups in their ability to manage hospital-related aspects of patient care. PMID:26953297

  11. Layered ACO-OFDM for intensity-modulated direct-detection optical wireless transmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Chen; Guo, Xuhan; Wang, Zhaocheng; Cunningham, David G; White, Ian H

    2015-05-01

    Layered asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) with high spectral efficiency is proposed in this paper for optical wireless transmission employing intensity modulation with direct detection. In contrast to the conventional ACO-OFDM, which only utilizes odd subcarriers for modulation, leading to an obvious spectral efficiency loss, in layered ACO-OFDM, the subcarriers are divided into different layers and modulated by different kinds of ACO-OFDM, which are combined for simultaneous transmission. In this way, more subcarriers are used for data transmission and the spectral efficiency is improved. An iterative receiver is also proposed for layered ACO-OFDM, where the negative clipping distortion of each layer is subtracted once it is detected so that the signals from different layers can be recovered. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed scheme can improve the spectral efficiency by up to 2 times compared with conventional ACO-OFDM approaches with the same modulation order. Meanwhile, simulation results confirm a considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain over ACO-OFDM at the same spectral efficiency. PMID:25969323

  12. RRM analysis of protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sauren, M; Pirogova, E; Cosic, I

    2004-12-01

    Enzymes are crucial in accelerating metabolic reactions in living organisms. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PpOI) is an enzyme that catalyses the production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a protein used in a cancer treatment known as photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study, a structure-function analysis of PpOI was carried out using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM), a physico-mathematical approach for analysis of proteins interactions. This method is based on the finding that the distribution of delocalised electron energies along the protein plays a crucial role in determining the protein's biological activity. Two digital signal processing (DSP) methods were used: Fourier Transform (FT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). Here we have determined the characteristic frequencies and the "hot spot" amino acids, and predicted the location of proteins' active site(s). Several proteins that potentially belong to the PpOI functional group were also analysed to distinguish their viability in this role. PMID:15712584

  13. Isolation, characterization and screening of the in vitro cytotoxic activity of a novel L-amino acid oxidase (LAAOcdt) from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom on human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Tuila Leveghim; Oliveira Silva, Viviane Aline; da Cunha, Daniel Batista; Polettini, Flávia Lino; Thomaz, Camila Daniele; Pianca, Ariana Aparecida; Zambom, Fabiana Letícia; da Silva Leitão Mazzi, Denise Pimenta; Reis, Rui Manuel; Mazzi, Maurício Ventura

    2016-09-01

    An L-amino acid oxidase (LAAOcdt) from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure using molecular exclusion on Sephadex G-75, followed by Phenyl Sepharose FF chromatography. The molecular mass of the purified enzyme was 113 kDa, as determined by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. LAAOcdt showed amino acid homology to other L-amino acid oxidases isolated from different snake venoms. The comparative analysis of the internal peptide sequences of the NNPGILEYPVKPSEEGK fragments by LC-MS/MS spectrometry revealed 100% identity with C. durissus cumanensis LAAO. The purified protein catalyzed the oxidative deamination of L-amino acids, and the most specific substrates were L-Tyr and L-Phe. The enzyme presented optimum activity at pH 7.4 and at 44 °C. LAAOcdt also showed hemolytic activity (0.6-20 μg/μL) and induced both the formation plasma clots (5-100 μg/μL) and platelet aggregation (2.5 × 10(-3), 5.0 × 10(-3) and 10 × 10(-3) μg/mL), as well as bactericidal activity (2.5-10 μg/μL) against Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, LAAOcdt exhibited cytotoxicity in distinct cancer cell lines, which presented a heterogeneous response profile. The mean IC50 value was 10.5 μg/mL. Glioma and pancreatic carcinoma cells were the most sensitive cell lines; they showed mean IC50 values of 7.2 μg/mL and 7.4 μg/mL, respectively. The exposure of the drug-sensitive cells to LAAOcdt for 24 h upregulated activated p-H2AX and efficiently decreased P42/P44 (ERK) activation in glioma cells (HCB151), which suggested an anti-proliferative effect. In addition, increased p21 expression was observed in SiHa cells, which showed a resistant phenotype. On the other hand, the flow cytometry and immunoblotting analyses showed that the enzyme did not induce cancer cell apoptosis. These results suggest that another cell death mechanism might contribute to the LAAOcdt-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, this work may help to elucidate

  14. MOEA/D-ACO: a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm using decomposition and AntColony.

    PubMed

    Ke, Liangjun; Zhang, Qingfu; Battiti, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Combining ant colony optimization (ACO) and the multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (EA) based on decomposition (MOEA/D), this paper proposes a multiobjective EA, i.e., MOEA/D-ACO. Following other MOEA/D-like algorithms, MOEA/D-ACO decomposes a multiobjective optimization problem into a number of single-objective optimization problems. Each ant (i.e., agent) is responsible for solving one subproblem. All the ants are divided into a few groups, and each ant has several neighboring ants. An ant group maintains a pheromone matrix, and an individual ant has a heuristic information matrix. During the search, each ant also records the best solution found so far for its subproblem. To construct a new solution, an ant combines information from its group's pheromone matrix, its own heuristic information matrix, and its current solution. An ant checks the new solutions constructed by itself and its neighbors, and updates its current solution if it has found a better one in terms of its own objective. Extensive experiments have been conducted in this paper to study and compare MOEA/D-ACO with other algorithms on two sets of test problems. On the multiobjective 0-1 knapsack problem,MOEA/D-ACO outperforms the MOEA/D with conventional genetic operators and local search on all the nine test instances. We also demonstrate that the heuristic information matrices in MOEA/D-ACO are crucial to the good performance of MOEA/D-ACO for the knapsack problem. On the biobjective traveling salesman problem, MOEA/D-ACO performs much better than the BicriterionAnt on all the 12 test instances. We also evaluate the effects of grouping, neighborhood, and the location information of current solutions on the performance of MOEA/D-ACO. The work in this paper shows that reactive search optimization scheme, i.e., the "learning while optimizing" principle, is effective in improving multiobjective optimization algorithms. PMID:23757576

  15. ACOs in real life: a reflection on the Medicare Shared Savings Program.

    PubMed

    Behm, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    The Medicare Shared Savings Program introduced Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) as one potential method for meeting the often-cited triple aim of better individual care, improved population health, and lower cost. Built on concepts originating from HMOs and then Medicare Advantage plans, ACOs provide incentives based on total cost of care rather than any individual provider's cost. Early quality and cost results are mixed, and, more importantly, so is physician response. The ACO program still has potential to be a bright spot for the future of healthcare, but until there is widespread physician engagement, achieving the triple aim is likely to remain elusive. PMID:26062323

  16. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-01

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1. PMID:27110861

  17. Identification of DNA-binding proteins that interact with the 5'-flanking region of the human D-amino acid oxidase gene by pull-down assay coupled with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tran, Diem Hong; Shishido, Yuji; Chung, Seong Pil; Trinh, Huong Thi Thanh; Yorita, Kazuko; Sakai, Takashi; Fukui, Kiyoshi

    2015-12-10

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a flavoenzyme that metabolizes D-amino acids and is expected to be a promising therapeutic target of schizophrenia and glioblastoma. The study of DNA-binding proteins has yielded much information in the regulation of transcription and other biological processes. However, proteins interacting with DAO gene have not been elucidated. Our assessment of human DAO promoter activity using luciferase reporter system indicated the 5'-flanking region of this gene (-4289 bp from transcription initiation site) has a regulatory sequence for gene expression, which is regulated by multi-protein complexes interacting with this region. By using pull-down assay coupled with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we identified six proteins binding to the 5'-flanking region of the human DAO gene (zinc finger C2HC domain-containing protein 1A; histidine-tRNA ligase, cytoplasmic; molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein; 60S ribosomal protein L37; calponin-1; calmodulin binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1). These preliminary results will contribute to the advance in the understanding of the potential factors associated with the regulatory mechanism of DAO expression. PMID:25749303

  18. The Postnatal Development of d-Serine in the Retinas of Two Mouse Strains, Including a Mutant Mouse with a Deficiency in d-Amino Acid Oxidase and a Serine Racemase Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    d-Serine, an N-methyl d-aspartate receptor coagonist, and its regulatory enzymes, d-amino acid oxidase (DAO; degradation) and serine racemase (SR; synthesis), have been implicated in crucial roles of the developing central nervous system, yet the functional position that they play in regulating the availability of d-serine throughout development of the mammalian retina is not well-known. Using capillary electrophoresis and a sensitive method of enantiomeric amino acid separation, we were able to determine total levels of d-serine at specific ages during postnatal development of the mouse retina in two different strains of mice, one of which contained a loss-of-function point mutation for DAO while the other was a SR knockout line. Each mouse line was tested against conspecific wild type (WT) mice for each genetic strain. The universal trend in all WT and transgenic mice was a large amount of total retinal d-serine at postnatal age 2 (P2), followed by a dramatic decrease as the mice matured into adulthood (P70–80). SR knockout mice retinas had 41% less d-serine than WT retinas at P2, and 10 times less as an adult. DAO mutant mice retinas had significantly elevated levels of d-serine when compared to WT retinas at P2 (217%), P4 (223%), P8 (194%), and adulthood (227%). PMID:25083578

  19. Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS): Single disease entity or not? Could exhaled nitric oxide be a useful biomarker for the differentiation of ACOS, asthma and COPD?

    PubMed

    Karampitsakos, Theodoros; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2016-06-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represent two major public health problems. However, there is a significant proportion of patients with a mixed asthma-COPD phenotype. This condition is defined as asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Since there are no internationally accepted criteria for the diagnosis of that syndrome, its management remains difficult. Given the fact that patients with ACOS have an increased risk of exacerbation and hospitalization, there is a pressing need for a more targeted approach and better management. We propose that fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), a marker of eosinophilic inflammation, could help clinicians differentiate ACOS from asthma and COPD. We evaluate this hypothesis, using data derived from the existing literature. PMID:27142135

  20. The Impact Of Medicare ACOs On Improving Integration And Coordination Of Physical And Behavioral Health Care.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Catherine A; Henke, Rachel M; Crable, Erica; Hohlbauch, Andriana; Cummings, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) model holds the promise of reducing costs and improving the quality of care by realigning payment incentives to focus on health outcomes instead of service volume. One key to managing the total cost of care is improving care coordination for and treatment of people with behavioral health disorders. We examined qualitative data from ninety organizations participating in Medicare ACO demonstration programs from 2012 through 2015 to determine whether and how they focused on behavioral health care. These ACOs had mixed degrees of engagement in improving behavioral health care for their populations. The biggest challenges included a lack of behavioral health care providers, data availability, and sustainable financing models. Nonetheless, we found substantial interest in integrating behavioral health care into primary care across a majority of the ACOs. PMID:27385242

  1. A Preliminary Validation of the ACOS/GOSAT Xco2 Product Using TCCON Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Connor, B. J.; Fisher, B.; Osterman, G. B.; Thompson, D. R.; Oyafuso, F. A.; Toon, G. C.; Roehl, C. M.; Miller, C. E.; O'Dell, C.; Salawitch, R. J.; Crisp, D.; Castano, R.; Mandrake, L.; Sherlock, V.; Deutscher, N. M.; Griffith, D. W.; Macatangay, R.; Rettinger, M.; Sussmann, R.; Messerschmidt, J.; Notholt, J.; Warneke, T.

    2010-12-01

    The JAXA/NIES/MOE Greenhouse gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT) was launched in 2009, carrying its main instrument, the TANSO-FTS (Fourier transform spectrometer), to measure total columns of CO2 (Xco2). The Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS) group, which was formed out of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) science team, has worked with the GOSAT Research Announcement (RA) office to retrieve Xco2 values from the GOSAT spectra. We describe a validation technique for the ACOS/GOSAT Xco2 data product with the spatially sparse but precise and accurate Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). To account for non-coincidence of the GOSAT and TCCON observations, we exploit the strong correlation between free-tropospheric temperature and Xco2. Systematic errors and biases in the ACOS/GOSAT product are described. After correcting for these biases, a more precise and accurate global picture of Xco2 is derived from the ACOS/GOSAT data.

  2. Presenting Provenance Based on User Roles - Experiences from the ACOS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, P.; Michaelis, J.; Fox, P. A.; Zednik, S.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    One goal of provenance is to provide users an understanding of the steps a system took to generate data products. Here, the level of detail captured by provenance becomes an important consideration. As detail is added, more questions can be hypothetically addressed. However, presenting significant provenance detail may also overwhelm end users, for one of two reasons: (i) the detail presented is irrelevant to the objectives, or (ii) the detail requires background knowledge a user lacks. Both of these challenges are present for data generated by the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory’s (MLSO) Advanced Coronal Observing System (ACOS). In ACOS, photometer-based readings are taken of solar activity and subsequently processed into data products consumable by end users. To fully understand these sequences of steps, background knowledge corresponding to various areas (e.g., astronomy, digital imaging, and ACOS specific techniques) is required by end users. This makes reviewing provenance difficult for users outside the ACOS development team, where varying degrees of background may be expected (ranging from outside domain experts in Solar Physics to citizen scientists). Likewise, even when steps taken by ACOS are understandable, they may provide undesired detail to an end user if presented. The work with ACOS involved the development of a Semantic Web based framework to selectively present provenance detail for data products in ACOS. Here, provenance is captured according to two sets of ontologies, the Proof Markup Language, which is an ontology based domain-independent provenance model, and a step ontology, designed to capture hierarchies of provenance steps. Used in combination, these ontology sets enable the creation of multiple levels of provenance, ranging from coarse to fine grained detail. In this setting, users may choose to expand/collapse provenance steps to view desired details. However, the specific provenance details a user initially sees is defined through

  3. Selective monoamine oxidase B inhibition by an Aphanizomenon flos-aquae extract and by its constitutive active principles phycocyanin and mycosporine-like amino acids.

    PubMed

    Scoglio, Stefano; Benedetti, Yanina; Benvenuti, Francesca; Battistelli, Serafina; Canestrari, Franco; Benedetti, Serena

    2014-06-15

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) is a fresh water unicellular blue-green alga that has been traditionally used for over 25 years for its health-enhancing properties. Recent studies have shown the ability of a proprietary AFA extract (Klamin(®)) to improve mood, counteract anxiety, and enhance attention and learning. Aim of this study was to test the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activity of the same AFA extract and of its constituents phycocyanin (AFA-PC) and mycosporine-like aminoacids (AFA-MAAs). All compounds showed a dose-dependent selective inhibition of MAO-B activity as compared to MAO-A. The IC50 values of the AFA extract (concentration 10 mg/ml), AFA-PC and AFA-MAAs were 6.4 μl/ml, 1.33 μM and 1.98 μM, respectively, evidencing a mixed-type of inhibition for the AFA extract (Ki 0.99 μl/ml), a non-competitive inhibition for AFA-PC (Ki 1.06 μM) and a competitive inhibition for AFA-MAAs (Ki 0.585 μM). These results are important to explain the neuromodulating properties of the AFA extract Klamin(®), which is rich in phenylethylamine, a general neuromodulator, that would nevertheless rapidly destroyed by MAO-B enzymes without the inhibitory activity of the synergic active principles AFA-PC and AFA-MAAs. The present investigation thus proposes the extract as potentially relevant in clinical areas such as mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24690316

  4. HypC, the anthrone oxidase involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on gene disruption and enzyme activity, hypC, an open reading frame in the pksA (aflC)/nor-1 (aflD) intergenic region in the aflatoxin biosynthesis cluster, encodes a 17 kDa oxidase that catalyzes the conversion of norsolorinic acid anthrone to norsolorinic acid....

  5. A pheromone-rate-based analysis on the convergence time of ACO algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han; Wu, Chun-Guo; Hao, Zhi-Feng

    2009-08-01

    Ant colony optimization (ACO) has widely been applied to solve combinatorial optimization problems in recent years. There are few studies, however, on its convergence time, which reflects how many iteration times ACO algorithms spend in converging to the optimal solution. Based on the absorbing Markov chain model, we analyze the ACO convergence time in this paper. First, we present a general result for the estimation of convergence time to reveal the relationship between convergence time and pheromone rate. This general result is then extended to a two-step analysis of the convergence time, which includes the following: 1) the iteration time that the pheromone rate spends on reaching the objective value and 2) the convergence time that is calculated with the objective pheromone rate in expectation. Furthermore, four brief ACO algorithms are investigated by using the proposed theoretical results as case studies. Finally, the conclusions of the case studies that the pheromone rate and its deviation determine the expected convergence time are numerically verified with the experiment results of four one-ant ACO algorithms and four ten-ant ACO algorithms. PMID:19380276

  6. CACONET: Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) Based Clustering Algorithm for VANET

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Khalid Bashir; Khan, Salabat; Chaudary, Nadeem Majeed; Akram, Adeel

    2016-01-01

    A vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) is a wirelessly connected network of vehicular nodes. A number of techniques, such as message ferrying, data aggregation, and vehicular node clustering aim to improve communication efficiency in VANETs. Cluster heads (CHs), selected in the process of clustering, manage inter-cluster and intra-cluster communication. The lifetime of clusters and number of CHs determines the efficiency of network. In this paper a Clustering algorithm based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) for VANETs (CACONET) is proposed. CACONET forms optimized clusters for robust communication. CACONET is compared empirically with state-of-the-art baseline techniques like Multi-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization (MOPSO) and Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization (CLPSO). Experiments varying the grid size of the network, the transmission range of nodes, and number of nodes in the network were performed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of these algorithms. For optimized clustering, the parameters considered are the transmission range, direction and speed of the nodes. The results indicate that CACONET significantly outperforms MOPSO and CLPSO. PMID:27149517

  7. CACONET: Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) Based Clustering Algorithm for VANET.

    PubMed

    Aadil, Farhan; Bajwa, Khalid Bashir; Khan, Salabat; Chaudary, Nadeem Majeed; Akram, Adeel

    2016-01-01

    A vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) is a wirelessly connected network of vehicular nodes. A number of techniques, such as message ferrying, data aggregation, and vehicular node clustering aim to improve communication efficiency in VANETs. Cluster heads (CHs), selected in the process of clustering, manage inter-cluster and intra-cluster communication. The lifetime of clusters and number of CHs determines the efficiency of network. In this paper a Clustering algorithm based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) for VANETs (CACONET) is proposed. CACONET forms optimized clusters for robust communication. CACONET is compared empirically with state-of-the-art baseline techniques like Multi-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization (MOPSO) and Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization (CLPSO). Experiments varying the grid size of the network, the transmission range of nodes, and number of nodes in the network were performed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of these algorithms. For optimized clustering, the parameters considered are the transmission range, direction and speed of the nodes. The results indicate that CACONET significantly outperforms MOPSO and CLPSO. PMID:27149517

  8. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Wakabayashi, Takashi

    1982-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1) was purified from beef heart mitochondria. By washing the oxidase with detergent on a hydrophobic interaction column, phospholipids were depleted to the level of 1 mol of cardiolipin per mol of heme a. Hydrophobic impurities and partially denatured oxidase were separated from the intact oxidase on an affinity column with cytochrome c as the specific ligand. The final preparation of the oxidase contained seven distinct polypeptides. The molecular weight of the oxidase was estimated to be 130,000 from its specific heme a and copper content and from the subunit composition. Crystals of the oxidase were obtained by slow removal of the detergent from the buffer in which the oxidase was dissolved. The needle-shaped crystals were 100 μ m in average length and 5 μ m in width, and they strongly polarized visible light. Electron diffraction patterns were obtained with an unstained glutaraldehyde-fixed single crystal by electron microscopy using 1,000-kV electrons. From electron micrographs and the diffraction patterns of the crystal, it was concluded that the crystal is monoclinic in the space group P21, with unit cell dimensions a = 92 angstrom, b = 84 angstrom, and c = 103 angstrom, and α =β 90 degrees, γ = 126 degrees.

  9. MGA trajectory planning with an ACO-inspired algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Matteo; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2010-11-01

    Given a set of celestial bodies, the problem of finding an optimal sequence of swing-bys, deep space manoeuvres (DSM) and transfer arcs connecting the elements of the set is combinatorial in nature. The number of possible paths grows exponentially with the number of celestial bodies. Therefore, the design of an optimal multiple gravity assist (MGA) trajectory is a NP-hard mixed combinatorial-continuous problem. Its automated solution would greatly improve the design of future space missions, allowing the assessment of a large number of alternative mission options in a short time. This work proposes to formulate the complete automated design of a multiple gravity assist trajectory as an autonomous planning and scheduling problem. The resulting scheduled plan will provide the optimal planetary sequence and a good estimation of the set of associated optimal trajectories. The trajectory model consists of a sequence of celestial bodies connected by two-dimensional transfer arcs containing one DSM. For each transfer arc, the position of the planet and the spacecraft, at the time of arrival, are matched by varying the pericentre of the preceding swing-by, or the magnitude of the launch excess velocity, for the first arc. For each departure date, this model generates a full tree of possible transfers from the departure to the destination planet. Each leaf of the tree represents a planetary encounter and a possible way to reach that planet. An algorithm inspired by ant colony optimization (ACO) is devised to explore the space of possible plans. The ants explore the tree from departure to destination adding one node at the time: every time an ant is at a node, a probability function is used to select a feasible direction. This approach to automatic trajectory planning is applied to the design of optimal transfers to Saturn and among the Galilean moons of Jupiter. Solutions are compared to those found through more traditional genetic-algorithm techniques.

  10. Effectiveness analysis of ACOS-Xco2 bias correction method with GEOS-Chem model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Lei, Liping; Liu, Min; Guo, Lijie; Wang, Qian; Bie, Nian

    2015-08-01

    Satellite observations and model simulations are of two important data sources to study atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. For analyzing and evaluating the bias correction method of ACOS dry-air column averaged CO2 (Xco2) product, the GEOS-Chem Xco2 simulations are selected according to observing time and locations of the ACOS product. The GEOS-Chem simulations of CO2 profiles are transformed to Xco2 data by convolving with satellite averaging kernels and pressure weighting functions. The GEOS-Chem Xco2 data are then compared with both bias uncorrected and bias corrected satellite retrievals of ACOS. The comparisons show that the bias uncorrected ACOS retrievals are on average 1.12ppm higher than the model Xco2 data, while the corrected ACOS retrievals are only on average 0.06ppm lower than the model Xco2 data. By assuming consistency between model Xco2 simulations and true atmospheric Xco2, this study indicates that the bias can be obvious decreased through the bias correction method, and the correction is effective and necessary for satellite Xco2 retrievals.

  11. Effects of anthocyanins from purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. cultivar Eshu No. 8) on the serum uric acid level and xanthine oxidase activity in hyperuricemic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Cheng; Su, Guan-Hua; Luo, Chun-Li; Pang, Ya-Lu; Wang, Lin; Li, Xing; Wen, Jia-Hao; Zhang, Jiu-Liang

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the hypouricemic effect of the anthocyanin-rich purple sweet potato extract (APSPE). In vitro, APSPE has been proved to significantly inhibit XO activity in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, APSPE could not only inhibit the XO activity in mouse liver, but also reduce the serum uric acid level in hyperuricemic mice and affect the expression of mRNA levels of related renal transporters, such as mURAT1, mGLUT9, mOAT1 and mOCTN2. Moreover, APSPE could effectively regulate BUN and Cr levels to normal and decrease the inflammatory cellular influx in the tubule of the hyperuricemic mice. This study indicates the potential clinical utility of APSPE as a safe and effective anti-hyperuricemia bioactive agent or functional food. PMID:26201407

  12. Production of VUV coherent light by harmonic generation with the optical klystron of super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prazeres, R.; Guyot-Sionnest, P.; Ortega, J. M.; Billardon, M.; Jaroszynski, D.

    1991-04-01

    The aim of the experiment presented was to develop a usable source of coherent light in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) range (200-50 nm) using the Super-ACO storage ring. A presentation is made of the most recent results where coherent photons have been produced at the 3rd (177 nm) and 5th (106 nm) harmonics of the incident laser. The better performance of the new machine and the laser, compared to the older ACO, is largely offset by experimental difficulties. The number of photons is, however. larger than that obtained with the ACO, but it is approximately one order of magnitude below the expected rate. This seems to be due to positron beam instabilities. The authors believe that the extremely critical alignment of the whole experiment, from the injection laser to the monochromator, does not appear to be compatible with a user facility.

  13. Asthma and COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS): A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alshabanat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The combination of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or ACOS is a recently defined syndrome. The epidemiology of the condition is poorly described and previous research has suggested ACOS is associated with worse outcomes than either condition alone. We therefore decided to complete a systematic review of the published literature. Methods This review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta- Analyses guidelines. A structured search was performed in the PubMed, Embase, and Medline databases up to Feb 2015 to identify studies reporting incidence, prevalence, health care utilization, morbidity, or mortality in COPD and asthma. Results A total of 19 studies were included in the present study. The pooled prevalence of overlap among COPD was 27% (95% CI: 0.16–0.38, p<0.0001) and 28% (95% CI: 0.09–0.47, p = 0.0032) in the population and hospital-based studies, respectively. We found no significant difference between ACOS and COPD in terms of gender, smoking status, lung function and 6mWD. However, in comparison to subject with only COPD, ACOS subjects were significantly younger, had higher BMI, healthcare utilization, and lower HRQoL. Conclusion ACOS is a common condition that exists in a substantial proportion of subjects with COPD. ACOS represents a distinct clinical phenotype with more frequent exacerbations, hospitalization, worse health-related quality of life, and higher healthcare costs than either disease alone. There is a critical need to better define the management and treatment of this syndrome. PMID:26336076

  14. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses PC-3 solid tumor growth in a tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mui Li; Fung, Shin Yee; Chung, Ivy; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Cheah, Swee Hung; Tan, Nget Hong

    2014-01-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (OH-LAAO), a heat stable enzyme, has been shown to exhibit very potent anti-proliferative activity against human breast and lung tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts. We further examine its in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity in a human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) model. OH-LAAO demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells with IC50 of 0.05 µg/mL after 72 h incubation in vitro. It induced apoptosis as evidenced with an increase in caspase-3/7 cleavages and an increase in annexin V-stained cells. To examine its in vivo anti-tumor activity, we treated PC-3 tumor xenograft implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient NU/NU (nude) mice with 1 µg/g OH-LAAO given intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 8 weeks of treatment, OH-LAAO treated PC-3 tumors were markedly inhibited, when compared to the control group (P <0.05). TUNEL staining analysis on the tumor sections showed a significantly increase of apoptotic cells in the LAAO-treated animals. Histological examinations of the vital organs in these two groups showed no significant differences with normal tissues, indicating no obvious tissue damage. The treatment also did not cause any significant changes on the body weight of the mice during the duration of the study. These observations suggest that OH-LAAO cytotoxic effects may be specific to tumor xenografts and less to normal organs. Given its potent anti-tumor activities shown in vitro as well as in vivo, the king cobra venom LAAO can potentially be developed to treat prostate cancer and other solid tumors. PMID:24782648

  15. Abscisic acid and aldehyde oxidase activity in maize ear leaf and grain relative to post-flowering photosynthetic capacity and grain-filling rate under different water/nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shujun; Zhang, Zongzheng; Ning, Tangyuan; Ren, Shizhong; Su, Licheng; Li, Zengjia

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated changes in leaf abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations and grain ABA concentrations in two maize cultivars and analyzed the following relationships under different water/nitrogen treatments: leaf ABA concentrations and photosynthetic parameters; leaf ABA concentrations and grain ABA concentrations; leaf/grain ABA concentrations and grain-filling parameters; and aldehyde oxidase (AO, EC 1.2.3.1) activities and ABA concentrations. The ear leaf average AO activities and ABA concentrations were lower in the controlled release urea treatments compared with the conventional urea treatments. The average AO activities in the grains were higher in the controlled release urea treatments, and the ABA concentrations were significantly increased at 11-30 DAF. The Pn and ABA concentrations in ear leaves were negatively correlated. And the Gmean were positively correlated with the grain ABA concentrations at 11-30 DAF and negatively correlated with the leaf ABA concentrations at 20 and 40-50 DAF. The grain ABA concentrations and leaf ABA concentrations were positively correlated. Thus, the Gmean were closely related to the AO activities and to the ear leaf and grain ABA concentrations. As compared to other treatments, the subsoiling and controlled release urea treatment promoted the uptake of water and nitrogen by maize, increased the photosynthetic capacity of the ear leaves, increased the grain-filling rate, and improved the movement of photosynthetic assimilates toward the developing grains. In the cultivar Z958, higher ABA concentrations in grains at 11-30 DAF and lower ABA concentrations in ear leaves during the late grain-filling stage, resulted in higher grain-filling rate and increased accumulation of photosynthetic products (relative to the cultivar D3). PMID:23770596

  16. Few ACOs pursue innovative models that integrate care for mental illness and substance abuse with primary care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Valerie A; Colla, Carrie H; Tierney, Katherine; Van Citters, Arica D; Fisher, Elliott S; Meara, Ellen

    2014-10-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) may be well positioned to increase the focus on managing behavioral health conditions (mental health and substance abuse) through the integration of behavioral health treatment and primary care. We used a mixed-methods research design to examine the extent to which ACOs are clinically, organizationally, and financially integrating behavioral health care and primary care. We used data from 257 respondents to the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations, a nationally representative survey of ACOs. The data were supplemented with semistructured, in-depth interviews with clinical leaders at sixteen ACOs purposively sampled to represent the spectrum of behavioral health integration. We found that most ACOs hold responsibility for some behavioral health care costs, and 42 percent include behavioral health specialists among their providers. However, integration of behavioral health care and primary care remains low, with most ACOs pursuing traditional fragmented approaches to physical and behavioral health care and only a minority implementing innovative models. Contract design and contextual factors appear to influence the extent to which ACOs integrate behavioral health care. Nevertheless, the ACO model has the potential to create opportunities for improving behavioral health care and integrating it with primary care. PMID:25288427

  17. Protoporphyrin IX fluorescence kinetics in C6 glioblastoma cells after delta-aminolevulinic acid incubation: effect of a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Carre, J; Eleouet, S; Rousset, N; Vonarx, V; Heyman, D; Lajat, Y; Patrice, T

    1999-06-01

    PpIX synthesis after incubation with delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is highly variable from one cell to another within a single cell population and in human glioblastomas in vivo. To improve PpIX synthesis, we attempted to modify the PpIX synthesis pathway in a C6 glioma cell model. To perform this experiment we used confocal microspectrofluorometry to analyse the effects of a highly purified form of sulfentrazone (FP846) on the kinetics of PpIX synthesis after ALA administration to living C6 cells. Our results show that PpIX fluorescence was maximal (seven-fold higher than basal values) 3 to 4 hrs. after the beginning of incubation with ALA. FP846 depressed this increase in fluorescence nearly to basal levels not only in C6 cells but also in HT29 and HepG2 cells. Fluorescence spectra shape were not affected by FP846, except for intensity. ALA/PpIX-induced photocytoxicity was perfectly correlated with fluorescence intensity recorded in cell cytoplasm. ALA alone (100 microg/ml) did not induce a significant decrease in cell survival, but irradiation of 25 J/cm2 leading to an overall cell death of 60%. FP846 added together with ALA suppressed ALA/PpIX-induced phototoxicity. The fact that the FP846-induced decrease in PpIX synthesis was not the same in animal and plant cells suggests that the porphyrin metabolic pathway differs due to the relative amounts of substrate or the effect of inhibitor and that another chemical would be needed alone or in combination with FP846 to improve PpIX synthesis. PMID:10432190

  18. An improved adaptive ACO meta heuristic for scheduling multimedia traffic across the 802.11e EDCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditze, Michael; Becker, Markus

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive near-optimal scheduler for multimedia traffic for the 802.11e Enhanced Distributed Channel Access (EDCA) medium access control scheme. The scheduler exploits the ant colony optimization (ACO) meta heuristic to tackle the challenge of packet scheduling. ACO is a biologically inspired algorithm that is known to find near-optimal solutions for combinatorial optimization problems. Thus, we expect that ACO scheduling produces more efficient schedules than comparable deterministic scheduling approaches at the expenses of a computational overhead it introduces. We compare ACO scheduling relevant deterministic scheduling approaches, and in particular the MLLF scheduler that is specifically designed for the needs of compressed multimedia applications. The purpose of the evaluation is twofold. It allows to draw conclusions on the feasibility of ACO scheduling for multimedia traffic while it serves as a benchmark to determine to what extent deterministic schedulers fall short of a near-optimal solution.

  19. In Situ Enzymatically Generated Photoswitchable Oxidase Mimetics and Their Application for Colorimetric Detection of Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gen-Xia; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Dong, Yu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun; Wang, Guang-Li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a simple and amplified colorimetric assay is developed for the detection of the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase (GOx) based on in situ formation of a photoswitchable oxidase mimetic of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS quantum dots (QDs). GOx catalyzes the oxidation of 1-thio-β-d-glucose to give 1-thio-β-d-gluconic acid which spontaneously hydrolyzes to β-d-gluconic acid and H₂S; the generated H₂S instantly reacts with Cd(2+) in the presence of Na₃PO₄ to give PO₄(3-)-stabilized CdS QDs in situ. Under visible-light (λ ≥ 400 nm) stimulation, the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs are a new style of oxidase mimic derived by producing some active species, such as h⁺, (•)OH, O₂(•-) and a little H₂O₂, which can oxidize the typical substrate (3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzydine (TMB)) with a color change. Based on the GOx-triggered growth of the oxidase mimetics of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs in situ, we developed a simple and amplified colorimetric assay to probe the enzymatic activity of GOx. The proposed method allowed the detection of the enzymatic activity of GOx over the range from 25 μg/L to 50 mg/L with a low detection limit of 6.6 μg/L. We believe the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs generated in situ with photo-stimulated enzyme-mimicking activity may find wide potential applications in biosensors. PMID:27409598

  20. Glycosides and xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Conyza bonariensis.

    PubMed

    Kong, L D; Abliz, Z; Zhou, C X; Li, L J; Cheng, C H; Tan, R X

    2001-10-01

    Fractionation of the xanthine oxidase inhibitory methanol extract of Conyza bonariensis afforded three glycosides, in addition to nine known compounds including amyrin, beta-sitostero1 daucosterol, syringic acid 3-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzoic acid, eugenol 4-O-glucopyranoside, and luteolin, apigenin and takakin 8-O-glucuronide. The structures of the glycosides were established by a combination of spectroscopic methods (IR, MS, 1H and 13C NMR, DEPT, COSY, HMQC and HMBC) as 4-hydroxypyridin-3-carboxylic acid 4-O-glucopyranoside, 8-hydroxy-6,7-dihydrolinalool 8-O-glucopyranoside and bonaroside [viz. 1,3,4,12-tetrahydroxy-2-(9-hexadecenoylamino)octadecane 1-O-glucopyranoside]. The in vitro enzyme assay showed that syringic acid and takakin 8-O-glucuronide displayed weak inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase with IC50 values of 500+/-41 microM and 170+/-12 microM, respectively. PMID:11576616

  1. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiuchun; Shi, Xiaoli; Shi, Limei; Liu, Jinlin; Stone, Victoria; Kong, Fanxiang; Kitten, Todd; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation. PMID:26950587

  2. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    PubMed

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  3. Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Phang, James M

    2012-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase, PRODH/POX), the first enzyme in the proline degradative pathway, plays a special role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Proline metabolism catalyzed by PRODH/POX is closely linked with the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and urea cycle. The proline cycle formed by the interconversion of proline and Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) between mitochondria and cytosol interlocks with pentose phosphate pathway. Importantly, by catalyzing proline to P5C, PRODH/POX donates electrons into the electron transport chain to generate ROS or ATP. In earlier studies, we found that PRODH/POX functions as a tumor suppressor to initiate apoptosis, inhibit tumor growth, and block the cell cycle, all by ROS signaling. It also suppresses hypoxia inducible factor signaling by increasing α-ketoglutarate. During tumor progression, PRODH/POX is under the control of various tumor-associated factors, such as tumor suppressor p53, inflammatory factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), onco-miRNA miR-23b*, and oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC. Recent studies revealed the two-sided features of PRODH/POX-mediated regulation. Under metabolic stress such as oxygen and glucose deprivation, PRODH/POX can be induced to serve as a tumor survival factor through ATP production or ROS-induced autophagy. The paradoxical roles of PRODH/POX can be understood considering the temporal and spatial context of the tumor. Further studies will provide additional insights into this protein and on its metabolic effects in tumors, which may lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22886911

  4. Analysis of Carotenoid Isomerase Activity in a Prototypical Carotenoid Cleavage Enzyme, Apocarotenoid Oxygenase (ACO)*

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Xuewu; Kiser, Philip D.; Che, Tao; Carey, Paul R.; Golczak, Marcin; Shi, Wuxian; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage enzymes (CCEs) constitute a group of evolutionarily related proteins that metabolize a variety of carotenoid and non-carotenoid substrates. Typically, these enzymes utilize a non-heme iron center to oxidatively cleave a carbon-carbon double bond of a carotenoid substrate. Some members also isomerize specific double bonds in their substrates to yield cis-apocarotenoid products. The apocarotenoid oxygenase from Synechocystis has been hypothesized to represent one such member of this latter category of CCEs. Here, we developed a novel expression and purification protocol that enabled production of soluble, native ACO in quantities sufficient for high resolution structural and spectroscopic investigation of its catalytic mechanism. High performance liquid chromatography and Raman spectroscopy revealed that ACO exclusively formed all-trans products. We also found that linear polyoxyethylene detergents previously used for ACO crystallization strongly inhibited the apocarotenoid oxygenase activity of the enzyme. We crystallized the native enzyme in the absence of apocarotenoid substrate and found electron density in the active site that was similar in appearance to the density previously attributed to a di-cis-apocarotenoid intermediate. Our results clearly demonstrated that ACO is in fact a non-isomerizing member of the CCE family. These results indicate that careful selection of detergent is critical for the success of structural studies aimed at elucidating structures of CCE-carotenoid/retinoid complexes. PMID:24648526

  5. Results of the first phase of the ACO storage ring laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, C.; Velghe, M.; Billardon, M.; Ortega, J. M.; Deacon, D. A. G.; Madey, J. M. J.; Robinson, K. E.; Elleaume, P.; Farge, Y.; Petroff, Y.

    A Superconducting undulator has been installed on the ACO storage ring and operated as a synchrotron radiation source, and as a free electron amplifier. Measurements of spontaneous emission spectrum, the gain as a function of the electron energy, and the laser induced lengthening of the electron bunch are reported.

  6. 42 CFR 425.500 - Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO. 425.500 Section 425.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting...

  7. 42 CFR 425.500 - Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO. 425.500 Section 425.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting...

  8. 42 CFR 425.502 - Calculating the ACO quality performance score.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... four domains: (i) Patient/care giver experience. (ii) Care coordination/Patient safety. (iii) Preventative health. (iv) At-risk population. (2) To satisfy quality performance requirements for a domain: (i... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculating the ACO quality performance score....

  9. 42 CFR 425.502 - Calculating the ACO quality performance score.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Patient/care giver experience. (ii) Care coordination/Patient safety. (iii) Preventative health. (iv) At... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculating the ACO quality performance score. 425... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM...

  10. 42 CFR 425.500 - Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO. 425.500 Section 425.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting...

  11. Gene structure and quinol oxidase activity of a cytochrome bd-type oxidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, J; Koga, E; Mizuta, T; Sato, C; Noguchi, S; Sone, N

    1999-04-21

    Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus species contain cytochrome caa3-type cytochrome c oxidase as their main terminal oxidase in the respiratory chain. We previously identified and purified an alternative oxidase, cytochrome bd-type quinol oxidase, from a mutant of Bacillus stearothermophilus defective in the caa3-type oxidase activity (J. Sakamoto et al., FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 143 (1996) 151-158). Compared with proteobacterial counterparts, B. stearothermophilus cytochrome bd showed lower molecular weights of the two subunits, shorter wavelength of alpha-band absorption maximum due to heme D, and lower quinol oxidase activity. Preincubation with menaquinone-2 enhanced the enzyme activity up to 40 times, suggesting that, besides the catalytic site, there is another quinone-binding site which largely affects the enzyme activity. In order to clarify the molecular basis of the differences of cytochromes bd between B. stearothermophilus and proteobacteria, the genes encoding for the B. stearothermophilus bd was cloned based on its partial peptide sequences. The gene for subunit I (cbdA) encodes 448 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 50195 Da, which is 14 and 17% shorter than those of Escherichia coli and Azotobacter vinelandii, respectively, and CbdA lacks the C-terminal half of the long hydrophilic loop between the putative transmembrane segments V and VI (Q loop), which has been suggested to include the substrate quinone-binding site for the E. coli enzyme. The gene for subunit II (cbdB) encodes 342 residues with a molecular weight of 38992 Da. Homology search indicated that the B. stearothermophilus cbdAB has the highest sequence similarity to ythAB in B. subtilis genome rather than to cydAB, the first set of cytochrome bd genes identified in the genome. Sequence comparison of cytochromes bd and their homologs from various organisms demonstrates that the proteins can be classified into two subfamilies, a proteobacterial type including E. coli bd and a

  12. POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 from rice (Oryza sativa) is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taibo; Wook Kim, Dong; Niitsu, Masaru; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-01-01

    POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 (OsPAO1), from rice (Oryza sativa), and POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5 (AtPAO5), from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are enzymes sharing high identity at the amino acid level and with similar characteristics, such as polyamine specificity and pH preference; furthermore, both proteins localize to the cytosol. A loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, Atpao5–2, was hypersensitive to low doses of exogenous thermospermine but this phenotype could be rescued by introduction of the wild-type AtPAO5 gene. Introduction of OsPAO1, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into Atpao5–2 mutants also restored normal thermospermine sensitivity, allowing growth in the presence of low levels of thermospermine, along with a concomitant decrease in thermospermine content in plants. By contrast, introduction of OsPAO3, which encodes a peroxisome-localized polyamine oxidase, into Atpao5–2 plants could not rescue any of the mutant phenotypes in the presence of thermospermine. These results suggest that OsPAO1 is the functional ortholog of AtPAO5. PMID:25763711

  13. POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 from rice (Oryza sativa) is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taibo; Wook Kim, Dong; Niitsu, Masaru; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-07-25

    POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 (OsPAO1), from rice (Oryza sativa), and POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5 (AtPAO5), from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are enzymes sharing high identity at the amino acid level and with similar characteristics, such as polyamine specificity and pH preference; furthermore, both proteins localize to the cytosol. A loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, Atpao5-2, was hypersensitive to low doses of exogenous thermospermine but this phenotype could be rescued by introduction of the wild-type AtPAO5 gene. Introduction of OsPAO1, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into Atpao5-2 mutants also restored normal thermospermine sensitivity, allowing growth in the presence of low levels of thermospermine, along with a concomitant decrease in thermospermine content in plants. By contrast, introduction of OsPAO3, which encodes a peroxisome-localized polyamine oxidase, into Atpao5-2 plants could not rescue any of the mutant phenotypes in the presence of thermospermine. These results suggest that OsPAO1 is the functional ortholog of AtPAO5. PMID:25061821

  14. Purification, characterization, and identification of a novel bifunctional catalase-phenol oxidase from Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Sutay Kocabas, Didem; Bakir, Ufuk; Phillips, Simon E V; McPherson, Michael J; Ogel, Zumrut B

    2008-06-01

    A novel bifunctional catalase with an additional phenol oxidase activity was isolated from a thermophilic fungus, Scytalidium thermophilum. This extracellular enzyme was purified ca. 10-fold with 46% yield and was biochemically characterized. The enzyme contains heme and has a molecular weight of 320 kDa with four 80 kDa subunits and an isoelectric point of 5.0. Catalase and phenol oxidase activities were most stable at pH 7.0. The activation energies of catalase and phenol oxidase activities of the enzyme were found to be 2.7 +/- 0.2 and 10.1 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol, respectively. The pure enzyme can oxidize o-diphenols such as catechol, caffeic acid, and L-DOPA in the absence of hydrogen peroxide and the highest oxidase activity is observed against catechol. No activity is detected against tyrosine and common laccase substrates such as ABTS and syringaldazine with the exception of weak activity with p-hydroquinone. Common catechol oxidase inhibitors, salicylhydroxamic acid and p-coumaric acid, inhibit the oxidase activity. Catechol oxidation activity was also detected in three other catalases tested, from Aspergillus niger, human erythrocyte, and bovine liver, suggesting that this dual catalase-phenol oxidase activity may be a common feature of catalases. PMID:18369615

  15. [Molecular docking analysis of xanthine oxidase inhibition by constituents of cichory].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jie; Lin, Zhi-jian; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Chun-sheng; Niu, Hong-juan; Zhou, Yue; Nie, An-zheng; Wang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Human xanthine oxidase is considered to be a target for therapy of hyperuricemia. Cichorium intybus is a Chinese plant medicine which widely used in Xinjiang against various diseases. In order to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from C. intybus and to explore main pharmacological actions of cichory a compound collection of C. intybus was built via consulting related references about chemical research on cichory. The three-dimensional crystal structure of xanthine oxidase (PDB code: 1N5X) from Protein Data Bank was downloaded.. Autodock 4.2 was employed to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from cichory 70 compounds were found to possess quite low binding free energy comparing with TEI (febuxostat). C. intybus contains constituents possessing potential inhibitive activity against xanthine oxidase. It can explain the main pharmacological actions of cichory which can significantly lower the level of serum uric acid. PMID:26975108

  16. Expression of alternative oxidase in tomato

    SciTech Connect

    Kakefuda, M.; McIntosh, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is characterized by an increase in ethylene biosynthesis, a burst in respiration (i.e. the climacteric), fruit softening and pigmentation. As whole tomatoes ripened from mature green to red, there was an increase in the alternative oxidase capacity. Aging pink tomato slices for 24 and 48 hrs also showed an increase of alternative oxidase and cytochrome oxidase capacities. Monoclonal antibodies prepared to the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase were used to follow the appearance of alternative oxidase in tomato fruits. There is a corresponding increase in a 36kDa protein with an increase in alternative oxidase capacity. Effects of ethylene and norbornadiene on alternative oxidase capacity were also studied. We are using an alternative oxidase cDNA clone from potato to study the expression of mRNA in ripening and wounded tomatoes to determine if the gene is transcriptionally regulated.

  17. Urate oxidase knockdown decreases oxidative stress in a murine hepatic cell line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humans, birds, and some primates do not express the uric acid degrading enzyme urate oxidase (UOX) and, as a result, have plasma uric acid concentrations higher than UOX expressing animals. Although high uric acid concentrations are suggested to increase the antioxidant defense system and provide a...

  18. Polyphenol oxidase from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius).

    PubMed

    Neves, Valdir Augusto; da Silva, Maraiza Aparecida

    2007-03-21

    Polyphenol oxidase (E.C. 1.14.18.1) (PPO) extracted from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius) was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and separation on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 45 490+/-3500 Da and Km values of 0.23, 1.14, 1.34, and 5.0 mM for the substrates caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-methylcatechol, and catechol, respectively. When assayed with resorcinol, DL-DOPA, pyrogallol, protocatechuic, p-coumaric, ferulic, and cinnamic acids, catechin, and quercetin, the PPO showed no activity. The optimum pH varied from 5.0 to 6.6, depending on substrate. PPO activity was inhibited by various phenolic and nonphenolic compounds. p-Coumaric and cinnamic acids showed competitive inhibition, with Ki values of 0.017 and 0.011 mM, respectively, using chlorogenic acid as substrate. Heat inactivation from 60 to 90 degrees C showed the enzyme to be relatively stable at 60-70 degrees C, with progressive inactivation when incubated at 80 and 90 degrees C. The Ea (apparent activation energy) for inactivation was 93.69 kJ mol-1. Sucrose, maltose, glucose, fructose, and trehalose at high concentrations appeared to protect yacon PPO against thermal inactivation at 75 and 80 degrees C. PMID:17316020

  19. Generation of protonic potential by the bd-type quinol oxidase of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Bertsova, Y V; Bogachev, A V; Skulachev, V P

    1997-09-01

    Inside-out subcellular vesicles of Azotobacter vinelandii are found to produce delta pH and delta psi (interior acidic and positive) when oxidising malate or menadiol. These effects are inherent in both Cyd+ Cyo- (lacking the o-type oxidase) and Cyd- Cyo+ (lacking the bd-type oxidase) strains. They appear to be myxothiazol-sensitive in the Cyd- Cyo+ strain but not in the Cyd+ Cyo- strain. The H+/e- ratio for the terminal part of respiratory chain of a bd-type oxidase overproducing strain is established as being close to 1. It is also shown that NADH oxidation by the vesicles from the Cyd- Cyo+ strain is sensitive to low concentrations of myxothiazol and antimycin A whereas that of the Cyd+ Cyo- strain is resistant to these Q-cycle inhibitors. It is concluded that (i) the bd-type oxidase of A. vinelandii is competent in generating a protonic potential but its efficiency is lower than that of the o-type oxidase and (ii) Q-cycle does operate in the o-type cytochrome oxidase terminated branch of the A. vinelandii respiratory chain and does not in the bd-type quinol oxidase terminated branch. These relationships are discussed in the context of the respiratory protection function of the bd-type oxidase in A. vinelandii. PMID:9315721

  20. Hyper-responsive Toll-like receptor 7 and 9 activation in NADPH oxidase-deficient B lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    McLetchie, Shawna; Volpp, Bryan D; Dinauer, Mary C; Blum, Janice S

    2015-12-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency linked with mutations in the multi-subunit leucocyte NADPH oxidase. Myeloid-derived phagocytic cells deficient in NADPH oxidase fail to produce sufficient levels of reactive oxygen species to clear engulfed pathogens. In this study we show that oxidase also influences B-cell functions, including responses to single-stranded RNA or unmethylated DNA by endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 9. In response to TLR7/9 ligands, B-cell lines derived from patients with CGD with mutations in either the NADPH oxidase p40(phox) or p47(phox) subunits produced only low levels of reactive oxygen species. Remarkably, cytokine secretion and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by these oxidase-deficient B cells was significantly increased upon TLR7/9 activation when compared with oxidase-sufficient B cells. Increased TLR responsiveness was also detected in B cells from oxidase-deficient mice. NADPH oxidase-deficient patient-derived B cells also expressed enhanced levels of TLR7 and TLR9 mRNA and protein compared with the same cells reconstituted to restore oxidase activity. These data demonstrate that the loss of oxidase function associated with CGD can significantly impact B-cell TLR signalling in response to nucleic acids with potential repercussions for auto-reactivity in patients. PMID:26340429

  1. A Role for Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by NADPH Oxidases in the Embryo and Aleurone Cells in Barley Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Kai, Kyohei; Yuasa, Takashi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote the germination of several seeds, and antioxidants suppress it. However, questions remain regarding the role and production mechanism of ROS in seed germination. Here, we focused on NADPH oxidases, which produce ROS. After imbibition, NADPH oxidase mRNAs were expressed in the embryo and in aleurone cells of barley seed; these expression sites were consistent with the sites of ROS production in the seed after imbibition. To clarify the role of NADPH oxidases in barley seed germination, we examined gibberellic acid (GA) / abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and signaling in barley seeds treated with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. DPI significantly suppressed germination, and suppressed GA biosynthesis and ABA catabolism in embryos. GA, but not ABA, induced NADPH oxidase activity in aleurone cells. Additionally, DPI suppressed the early induction of α-amylase by GA in aleurone cells. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases promote GA biosynthesis in embryos, that GA induces and activates NADPH oxidases in aleurone cells, and that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases induce α-amylase in aleurone cells. We conclude that the ROS generated by NADPH oxidases regulate barley seed germination through GA / ABA metabolism and signaling in embryo and aleurone cells. PMID:26579718

  2. A Role for Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by NADPH Oxidases in the Embryo and Aleurone Cells in Barley Seed Germination.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Kai, Kyohei; Yuasa, Takashi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote the germination of several seeds, and antioxidants suppress it. However, questions remain regarding the role and production mechanism of ROS in seed germination. Here, we focused on NADPH oxidases, which produce ROS. After imbibition, NADPH oxidase mRNAs were expressed in the embryo and in aleurone cells of barley seed; these expression sites were consistent with the sites of ROS production in the seed after imbibition. To clarify the role of NADPH oxidases in barley seed germination, we examined gibberellic acid (GA) / abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and signaling in barley seeds treated with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. DPI significantly suppressed germination, and suppressed GA biosynthesis and ABA catabolism in embryos. GA, but not ABA, induced NADPH oxidase activity in aleurone cells. Additionally, DPI suppressed the early induction of α-amylase by GA in aleurone cells. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases promote GA biosynthesis in embryos, that GA induces and activates NADPH oxidases in aleurone cells, and that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases induce α-amylase in aleurone cells. We conclude that the ROS generated by NADPH oxidases regulate barley seed germination through GA / ABA metabolism and signaling in embryo and aleurone cells. PMID:26579718

  3. Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicides (also referred to as Protox- or PPO-inhibiting herbicides) were commercialized in the 1960s and their market share reached approximately 10% (total herbicide active ingredient output) in the late 1990’s. The wide-spread adoption of glyphosate-resista...

  4. Betting on change: Tenet deal with Vanguard shows it's primed to try ACO effort, new payment model.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-07-01

    Tenet Healthcare Corp.'s acquisition of Vanguard Health Systems is a sign the investor-owned chain is willing to take a chance on alternative payment models such as accountable care organizations. There's no certainty that ACOs will deliver the improvements on quality or cost savings, but Vanguard Vice Chairman Keith Pitts, left, says his system's Pioneer ACO in Detroit has already achieved some cost savings. PMID:23882720

  5. Super-ACO: Results on a positron low emittance ring (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, J. C.; Certain, P.; Dael, A.; Damany, A.; Juan, P.; Labeque, A.; Level, M. P.; Marin, P. C.; Michaut, J.; Monet-Descombey, C.; Nghiem, P.; Sommer, M.; Souchet, R.; Zyngier, H.

    1989-07-01

    The dedicated VUV radiation source Super-ACO is part of the Orsay synchrotron radiation complex. The construction of this 800-MeV positron storage ring was started in 1982, and the first beam was stored on March 18, 1987. Super-ACO is expected to accommodate up to six undulators. The first, a 3.2-m-long optical klystron has already been operated between 500 and 800 MeV. A 1.3-m-long undulator has been recently installed. The experience gained during the three periods of operation is presented. From March to October 1987 measurements were taken of the machine properties in the low emittance regime, as well as performances in single and multibunch operation. In March 1988 the optical klystron was tested together with the commissioning of two beamlines out of a bending magnet. Starting from May 1988 two undulators and six beamlines progressively operated.

  6. Spontaneous emission of the Super-ACO fel optical klystron domino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Billardon, M.; Velghe, M.

    1989-12-01

    New free electron laser experiments are planned on the Orsay storage ring Super-ACO, which has been commisioned in 1987 at LURE (Laboratoire d'Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnétique). For this purpose, a new insertion device, DOMINO, was set up on Super-ACO in January 1988; it consists of a permanent magnet optical klystron composed of two undulators separated by a dispersive section; the magnetic gaps can be changed independently. Here, the parameters of the optical klystron are specified, and the main steps of the optimization are described. Then, the effect of the insertion device on the stored beam is discussed. The spontaneous emission of the optical klystron has been observed and analysed. Consequently, with the ring parameters measurements, the free electron laser gain versus the current can be evaluated.

  7. Applications of UV-storage ring free electron lasers: the case of super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahon, L.; Renault, E.; Couprie, M. E.; Mérola, F.; Dumas, P.; Marsi, M.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Nutarelli, D.; Roux, R.; Billardon, M.

    1999-06-01

    The potential of UV-storage ring free electron lasers (SRFELs) for the performance of original application experiments is shown with a special emphasis concerning their combination with the naturally synchronized synchrotron radiation (SR). The first two-color FEL+SR experiment, performed in surface science at Super-ACO is reported. The experimental parameters found to be the most important as gathered from the acquired experience, are underlined and discussed. Finally, future prospects for the scientific program of the Super-ACO FEL are presented with two-color experiments combining the FEL with SR undulator-based XUV and VUV beamlines as well as with a SR white light bending magnet beamline emiting in the IR-UV ( 20 μm- 0.25 μm) .

  8. Chromate reduction by rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, R.B.; Cooke, R.T. Jr.

    1986-05-29

    Chromate was reduced during the oxidation of 1-methylnicotinamide chlorine by partially purified rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase. In addition to l-methylnicotinamide, several other electron donor substrates for aldehyde oxidase were able to support the enzymatic chromate reduction. The reduction required the presence of both enzyme and the electron donor substrate. The rate of the chromate reduction was retarded by inhibitors or aldehyde oxidase but was not affected by substrates or inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. These results are consistent with the involvement of aldehyde oxidase in the reduction of chromate by rabbit liver cytosolic enzyme preparations.

  9. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mei-Fang; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wei-De; Liao, Lin; Wan, Hong-Fu

    2011-11-01

    In this study, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted from commercial potatoes. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO was investigated. The experimental results show that potato PPO is more active in weak acid than in basic condition and that the optimum pH for the reaction is 5.0. The degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO reaches a maximum at 298 K. After reaction for 1 h, the removal of both pentachlorophenol and total organic carbon is >70% with 6.0 units/mL potato PPO at pH 5.0 and 298 K. Pentachlorophenol can be degraded through dechlorination and ring-opening by potato PPO. The work demonstrates that pentachlorophenol can be effectively eliminated by crude potato PPO. PMID:21967325

  10. Acetate utilization is inhibited by benzoate in Alcaligenes eutrophus: evidence for transcriptional control of the expression of acoE coding for acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Ampe, F; Lindley, N D

    1995-01-01

    During batch growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus on benzoate-acetate mixtures, benzoate was the preferred substrate, with acetate consumption being delayed until the rate of benzoate consumption had diminished. This effect was attributed to a transcriptional control of the synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthetase, an enzyme necessary for the entry of acetate into the central metabolic pathways, rather than to a biochemical modulation of the activity of this enzyme. Analysis of a 2.4-kb mRNA transcript hybridizing with the A. eutrophus acoE gene confirmed this repression effect. In a benzoate-limited chemostat culture, derepression was observed, with no increase in the level of expression following an acetate pulse. Benzoate itself was not the signal triggering the repression of acetyl-CoA synthetase. This role was played by catechol, which transiently accumulated in the medium when high specific rates of benzoate consumption were reached. The lack of rapid inactivation of the functional acetyl-CoA synthetase after synthesis has been stopped enables A. eutrophus to retain the capacity to metabolize acetate for prolonged periods while conserving minimal protein expenditure. PMID:7592330

  11. Dynamic filling factor in the Super-ACO free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Couprie, M.-E.; Billardon, M.

    1997-02-01

    Here, the Free Electron Laser evolution before the start-up from the spontaneous radiation of an undulator, is considered. This analysis is carried on through the dynamical behaviour of the Filling-factor, representing the transverse overlap between the light pulse and the electron bunch. In such a framework, the gain optimization before the laser start-up is presented and more generally applied to low-gain storage-ring free electron lasers, such as on Super-ACO.

  12. Tailoring Systems Engineering Processes in a Conceptual Design Environment: A Case Study at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center's ACO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, John; Maples, C. Dauphne; Fabisinski, Leo, III

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Systems Engineering as it is applied in a conceptual design space systems department at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO). Engineering work performed in the NASA MFSC's ACO is targeted toward the Exploratory Research and Concepts Development life cycle stages, as defined in the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) System Engineering Handbook. This paper addresses three ACO Systems Engineering tools that correspond to three INCOSE Technical Processes: Stakeholder Requirements Definition, Requirements Analysis, and Integration, as well as one Project Process Risk Management. These processes are used to facilitate, streamline, and manage systems engineering processes tailored for the earliest two life cycle stages, which is the environment in which ACO engineers work. The role of systems engineers and systems engineering as performed in ACO is explored in this paper. The need for tailoring Systems Engineering processes, tools, and products in the ever-changing engineering services ACO provides to its customers is addressed.

  13. Structures and Mechanism of the Monoamine Oxidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Gaweska, Helena; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the monoamine oxidase family of flavoproteins catalyze the oxidation of primary and secondary amines, polyamines, amino acids, and methylated lysine side chains in proteins. The enzymes have similar overall structures, with conserved FAD-binding domains and varied substrate-binding sites. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for the catalytic reactions of these enzymes. The present review compares the structures of different members of the family and the various mechanistic proposals. PMID:22022344

  14. Phosphoproteins and the activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, N.; Curnutte, J.T.; Babior, B.M.

    1987-05-01

    The respiratory burst oxidase is a neutrophil enzyme that converts oxygen to O/sub 2//sup -/. It is dormant in resting cells but is activated when the cells are exposed to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA also induces the incorporation of /sup 32/P into certain neutrophil proteins. To determine whether phosphorylation of these proteins is related to oxidase activation, protein phosphorylation was studied in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (GCD), a group of inherited conditions in which oxidase activity is missing. In normals, neutrophil activation by PMA is associated with the phosphorylation inter alia of 48K proteins at pI 7.3 and 7.8. There is also inconstant phosphorylation of a 48K protein at pI 6.8. In 4 patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), phosphorylation of pp48/6.8 and pp48/7.3 was absent, while in autosomal recessive CGD, phosphorylation of all 3 of these proteins was absent in 3 patients and significantly diminished in a fourth. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of these proteins is related to the activation of the respiratory burst oxidase. By peptide mapping, these 3 proteins appear to consist of a single peptide species whose pI variability may be due to post-translational modification. The only phosphoamino acid found in pp48/7.3 was phosphoserine.

  15. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Hazra, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  16. Incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kosonen, T; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Clegg, M S; Keen, C L; Rucker, R B

    1997-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase is a copper-dependent enzyme involved in extracellular processing of collagens and elastin. Although it is known that copper is essential for the functional activity of the enzyme, there is little information on the incorporation of copper. In the present study we examined the insertion of copper into lysyl oxidase using 67Cu in cell-free transcription/translation assays and in normal skin fibroblast culture systems. When a full-length lysyl oxidase cDNA was used as a template for transcription/translation reactions in vitro, unprocessed prolysyl oxidase appeared to bind copper. To examine further the post-translational incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase, confluent skin fibroblasts were incubated with inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide, 10 microg/ml), glycosylation (tunicamycin, 10 microg/ml), protein secretion (brefeldin A, 10 microg/ml) and prolysyl oxidase processing (procollagen C-peptidase inhibitor, 2.5 microg/ml) together with 300 microCi of carrier-free 67Cu. It was observed that protein synthesis was a prerequisite for copper incorporation, but inhibition of glycosylation by tunicamycin did not affect the secretion of 67Cu as lysyl oxidase. Brefeldin A inhibited the secretion of 67Ci-labelled lysyl oxidase by 46%, but the intracellular incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase was not affected. In addition, the inhibition of the extracellular proteolytic processing of prolysyl oxidase to lysyl oxidase had minimal effects on the secretion of protein-bound 67Cu. Our results indicate that, similar to caeruloplasmin processing [Sato and Gitlin (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5128-5134], copper is inserted into prolysyl oxidase independently of glycosylation. PMID:9355764

  17. An alcohol oxidase of Phanerochaete chrysosporium with a distinct glycerol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Linke, Diana; Lehnert, Nicole; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2014-01-01

    An intracellular alcohol oxidase (AOX) was isolated from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Pch), grown on l-lactate induction medium, and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The dimeric protein consisted of two identical 75kDa subunits. The open reading frame of 1,956bp resulted in a monomer consisting of 651 amino acids. The enzyme showed a pI at 5.4, a pH optimum of 9, a temperature optimum at 50°C, possessed putative conserved domains of the GMC superfamily, a FAD binding domain, and showed up to 86% homology to alcohol oxidase sequences of Gloeophyllum trabeum and Coprinopsis cinerea. As was shown for the first time for an AOX from a basidiomycete, not only methanol, but also lower primary alcohols and glycerol were accepted as substrates. An assay based on aldehyde dehydrogenase confirmed d-glyceraldehyde as the product of the reaction. A bioprocess based on this enzyme could alleviate the problems associated with the huge side-stream of glycerol occurring during the manufacture of biodiesel, yielding the green oxidant hydrogen peroxide. PMID:24910330

  18. Urate Oxidase Purification by Salting-in Crystallization: Towards an Alternative to Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Giffard, Marion; Ferté, Natalie; Ragot, François; El Hajji, Mohamed; Castro, Bertrand; Bonneté, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Background Rasburicase (Fasturtec® or Elitek®, Sanofi-Aventis), the recombinant form of urate oxidase from Aspergillus flavus, is a therapeutic enzyme used to prevent or decrease the high levels of uric acid in blood that can occur as a result of chemotherapy. It is produced by Sanofi-Aventis and currently purified via several standard steps of chromatography. This work explores the feasibility of replacing one or more chromatography steps in the downstream process by a crystallization step. It compares the efficacy of two crystallization techniques that have proven successful on pure urate oxidase, testing them on impure urate oxidase solutions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigate the possibility of purifying urate oxidase directly by crystallization from the fermentation broth. Based on attractive interaction potentials which are known to drive urate oxidase crystallization, two crystallization routes are compared: a) by increased polymer concentration, which induces a depletion attraction and b) by decreased salt concentration, which induces attractive interactions via a salting-in effect. We observe that adding polymer, a very efficient way to crystallize pure urate oxidase through the depletion effect, is not an efficient way to grow crystals from impure solution. On the other hand, we show that dialysis, which decreases salt concentration through its strong salting-in effect, makes purification of urate oxidase from the fermentation broth possible. Conclusions The aim of this study is to compare purification efficacy of two crystallization methods. Our findings show that crystallization of urate oxidase from the fermentation broth provides purity comparable to what can be achieved with one chromatography step. This suggests that, in the case of urate oxidase, crystallization could be implemented not only for polishing or concentration during the last steps of purification, but also as an initial capture step, with minimal changes to the

  19. Characterization of free-electron laser bunch lengthening on the ACO storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, K. E.; Deacon, D. A. G.; Madey, J. M. J.; Velghe, M. F.; Bazin, C.; Bergher, M.; Petroff, Y.; Billardon, M.; Ortega, J. M.; Elleaume, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the basic low-current, laser-induced bunch-lengthening measurements that have been made on the ACO Storage-Ring Free-Electron Laser (SRFEL). The measurements provide verification of both the functional dependence and absolute magnitude of SRFEL theoretical models. The method of measurement, which is explained, exploits frequency-domain techiques and is capable of accuracies comparable to those of a streak camera. The measurements are in good agreement with existing SRFEL theory and provide an important base for future work.

  20. Applications in biology with the super-ACO FEL and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle; Renault, Eric; Garzella, David; Nutarelli, Daniele; de Ninno, G.; Merola, F.; Nahon, Laurent

    2002-04-01

    The first applications of a storage ring Free Electron Laser started in 1993 on the Super-ACO FEL with the study of the anisotropy decay of a coenzyme, NADH, allowing to understand the thermodynamical equilibrium of the different conformational states of the molecule and their hydrodynamical volume in solution. After this first one- color experiment using the time-resolved fluorescence technique, a transient absorption experiment was developed in which the system is excited with the UV FEL and is probed by Visible-UV absorption using synchrotron radiation. First results on the dynamical behavior were obtained for the acrinide molecule.

  1. Storage ring free electrons laser on super-ACO, ELETTRA and SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Brunie, C.; Garzella, D.; Nahon, L.; de Ninno, G.; Nutarelli, D.; Marsi, M.

    2002-06-01

    We present here the state of the art of Storage Ring Free Electron Lasers under operation in Europe. Free electrons Lasers (FELs) are coherent, high power and tuneable radiation sources, obtained by the interaction of an optical wave with a bunch of ultrarelavistic electrons wiggling in a periodical permanent magnetic structure. The developments and the results obtained recently in the UV domain by the FELs operating in Europe on Synchrotron Facilities, Super ACO and ELETTRA, offer new opportunities for using these sources in several scientific domains, and foresee uniques performances for the proposed FEL on the third generation french Synchrotron SOLEIL.

  2. A Comparison of Aerosol Parameterizations in the ACOS XCO2 Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. R.; O'Dell, C.; Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; Frankenberg, C.; Gunson, M. R.; Natraj, V.; Fu, D.

    2014-12-01

    An effective parameterization of clouds and aerosols in retrieval algorithms is essential for reducing measurement errors and biases in estimates of the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) from space-based measurements of near-infrared reflected sunlight. The NASA Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS) XCO2 retrieval algorithm has evolved significantly over the past several years in an effort to more accurately represent the impact of clouds and aerosols on XCO2. Recent ACOS algorithm versions up to build 3.4 used a water cloud type, ice cloud type, and two generic aerosol types for each sounding. ACOS build 3.5 uses the same cloud parameterization, but was modified to replace the "one-size-fits-all" aerosol scheme. Build 3.5 uses a monthly aerosol climatology based on the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis to choose the two most likely aerosol types for a given measurement location, along with typical optical depths. The five MERRA types available for selection are sulfate, dust, sea salt, organic carbon, and black carbon. The algorithm then uses a pre-assigned Gaussian width and height and fits for the aerosol amount and peak height based on information from the 760 nm O2 A-band and the CO2 bands centered near 1610 and 2060 nm. Here we compare ACOS builds 3.4 and build 3.5 to quantify the impact of the aerosol scheme update. Two types of tests were performed. Simulated Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) retrievals and their associated aerosol and cloud profiles were compared to the "true" aerosol and cloud profiles used to create the simulated environment for a given measurement. The retrieval algorithms were also run on Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) observations and compared to AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) aerosol optical depth measurements in order to quantify the ability of the algorithms to retrieve information about aerosol optical depths. XCO2 errors

  3. Studies on the Mechanism of Aldehyde Oxidase and Xanthine Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Joshua F.

    2009-01-01

    DFT calculations support a concerted mechanism for xanthine oxidase and aldehyde oxidase hydride displacement from the sp2 carbon of 6-substituted 4-quinazolinones. The variations in transition state structure show that C-O bond formation is nearly complete in the transition state and the transition state changes are anti-Hammond with the C-H and C-O bond lengths being more product-like for the faster reactions. The C-O bond length in the transition state is around 90% formed. However, the C-H bond is only about 80% broken. This leads to a very tetrahedral transition state with an O-C-N angle of 109 degrees. Thus, while the mechanism is concerted, the anti-bonding orbital of the C-H bond that is broken is not directly attacked by the nucleophile and instead hydride displacement occurs after almost complete tetrahedral transition state formation. In support of this the C=N bond is lengthened in the transition state indicating that attack on the electrophilic carbon occurs by addition to the C=N bond with negative charge increasing on the nitrogen. Differences in experimental reaction rates are accurately reproduced by these calculations, and tend to support this mechanism. PMID:18998731

  4. Studies on the mechanism of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Joshua F; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2008-12-01

    DFT calculations support a concerted mechanism for xanthine oxidase and aldehyde oxidase hydride displacement from the sp(2) carbon of 6-substituted 4-quinazolinones. The variations in transition state structure show that C-O bond formation is nearly complete in the transition state and the transition state changes are anti-Hammond with the C-H and C-O bond lengths being more product-like for the faster reactions. The C-O bond length in the transition state is around 90% formed. However, the C-H bond is only about 80% broken. This leads to a very tetrahedral transition state with an O-C-N angle of 109 degrees. Thus, while the mechanism is concerted, the antibonding orbital of the C-H bond that is broken is not directly attacked by the nucleophile and instead hydride displacement occurs after almost complete tetrahedral transition state formation. In support of this the C=N bond is lengthened in the transition state indicating that attack on the electrophilic carbon occurs by addition to the C=N bond with negative charge increasing on the nitrogen. Differences in experimental reaction rates are accurately reproduced by these calculations and tend to support this mechanism. PMID:18998731

  5. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  6. Immunological comparison of sulfite oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, V.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Polyclonal antibodies (rabbit), elicited against FPLC-purified chicken and rat liver sulfite oxidase (SO), have been examined for inhibition and binding to purified chicken (C), rat (R), bovine (B), alligator (A) and shark (S) liver enzymes. Anti-CSO IgG cross-reacted with all five enzymes, with varying affinities, in the order CSO=ASO{gt}RSO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-ROS IgG also cross-reacted with all five enzymes in the order RSO{gt}CSO=ASO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited sulfite:cyt. c reductase (S:CR), sulfite:ferricyanide reductase (S:FR) and sulfite:dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (S:DR) activities of CSO to different extents (S:CR{gt}S:FR=S:DR). Similar differential inhibition was found for anti-ROS IgG and RSO S:CR, S:FR and S:DR activities. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited S:CR activities in the order CSO=ASO{much gt}SSO{gt}BSO. RSO was uninhibited. For anti-RSO IgG the inhibition order was RSO{gt}SSO{gt}BSO{gt}ASO. CSO was uninhibited. Anti-CSO and RSO IgGs partially inhibited Chlorella nitrate reductase (NR). Minor cross-reactivity was found for xanthine oxidase. Common antigenic determinants for all five SO's and NR are indicated.

  7. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance to study different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  8. Spinach thylakoid polyphenol oxidase isolation, activation, and properties of the native chloroplast enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, J.H.; Cammarata, K.V.

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14,18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time. Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K/sub m/. A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  9. Implementing storage rings free electron lasers for users on synchrotron radiation facilities: from Super-ACO to SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Nutarelli, D.; Billardon, M.

    1998-09-01

    Storage Ring Free Electron Laser (SRFEL) sources can be implemented on synchrotron radiation facilities. Although in the beginning an additional experiment on the accelerator requires specific operating conditions as on Super-ACO at Orsay (France), they can now be conceived as an integral part of the project, providing coherent picosecond tunable light in the UV-VUV range, synchronized with synchrotron radiation for the scientific community, as on the SOLEIL project. Third generation storage ring beam characteristics are discussed in terms of synchrotron radiation and FEL optimization. FEL performances are presented, showing the improvement between the Super-ACO and the SOLEIL cases, including stability issues.

  10. Transient absorption spectroscopy using the super-ACO storage ring FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Eric; Nahon, Laurent; Nutarelli, Daniele; Garzella, David; Merola, F.; Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle

    2000-04-01

    The Super-ACO storage ring FEL is operating with a high average power in the UV range (300 mW at 350 nm), and recently at wavelengths down to 300 nm. In addition this source exhibits high stability and long lifetime which makes it a unique tool for user applications. The coupling of the FEL with other synchrotron based sources (bending magnet and undulator) opens many unexplored possibilities for various types of two-color time-resolved spectroscopies. Presently, we are developing a two-color experiment where we study the sub-nanosecond time-resolved absorption of different chromophoric compounds. In this type of pump-probe experiments, the intense UV pulse of the Super-ACO FEL is used to prepare a high initial concentration of chromophores in their first singlet electronic excited state. The nearby bending magnet synchrotron radiation provides on the other hand a pulsed, white light continuum ranging from UV to IR, which is naturally synchronized with the FEL pulses and can be used to probe the photochemical subsequent events and the transient species. With a dye molecule (POPOP), we have obtained a two-color effect which demonstrates the feasibility of the experiment in terms of flux. Applications on various chromophores of biological interest are planned.

  11. The super-ACO free electron laser source in the UV and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ninno, G.; Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Nahon, L.; Hirsch, M.; Renault, E.; Couprie, M. E.

    2001-06-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are new sources of tuneable coherent radiation, based on the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a permanent magnetic field. The Super-ACO FEL operates in the UV (down to 300 nm) at 800 MeV, the nominal energy of the electron beam, with a high repetition rate (8 MHz) . It presents a high average extracted power (up to 300 mW), short pulses (15-50 ps FWHM) and small bandwidth (3×10 -2 nm) . Taking advantage of these characteristics, we demonstrated for the first time the possibility of using a storage ring FEL as a coherent source of radiation for scientific applications. In particular, the tuneable Super-ACO FEL source, combined with synchrotron radiation covering the X-ray to infra-red range, is a unique tool for the time-dependent studies of excited states. Such analysis benefits from the natural synchronisation of both sources at a high repetition rate, their mutual tunability, high intensity and coherence. Several experimental set-ups are now under operation.

  12. Evolution of the primate cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene.

    PubMed

    Adkins, R M; Honeycutt, R L

    1994-03-01

    We examined the nucleotide and amino acid sequence variation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene from 25 primates (4 hominoids, 8 Old World monkeys, 2 New World monkeys, 2 tarsiers, 7 lemuriforms, 2 lorisiforms). Marginal support was found for three phylogenetic conclusions: (1) sister-group relationship between tarsiers and a monkey/ape clade, (2) placement of the aye-aye (Daubentonia) sister to all other strepsirhine primates, and (3) rejection of a sister-group relationship of dwarf lemurs (i.e., Cheirogaleus) with lorisiform primates. Stronger support was found for a sister-group relationship between the ring-tail lemur (Lemur catta) and the gentle lemurs (Hapalemur). In congruence with previous studies on COII, we found that the monkeys and apes have undergone a nearly two-fold increase in the rate of amino acid replacement relative to other primates. Although functionally important amino acids are generally conserved among all primates, the acceleration in amino acid replacements in higher primates is associated with increased variation in the amino terminal end of the protein. Additionally, the replacement of two carboxyl-bearing residues (glutamate and aspartate) at positions 114 and 115 may provide a partial explanation for the poor enzyme kinetics in cross-reactions between the cytochromes c and cytochrome c oxidases of higher primates and other mammals. PMID:8006990

  13. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styła, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at λmax=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci

  14. Construction of Mutant Glucose Oxidases with Increased Dye-Mediated Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Horaguchi, Yohei; Saito, Shoko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Tsugawa, Wakako; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies on glucose oxidases (GOxs) were conducted to construct GOxs with reduced oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity. We focused on two representative GOxs, of which crystal structures have already been reported—Penicillium amagasakiense GOx (PDB ID; 1gpe) and Aspergillus niger GOx (PDB ID; 1cf3). We constructed oxygen-interacting structural models for GOxs, and predicted the residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen on the basis of the crystal structure of cholesterol oxidase as well as on the fact that both enzymes are members of the glucose/methanol/choline (GMC) oxidoreductase family. Rational amino acid substitution resulted in the construction of an engineered GOx with drastically decreased oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity, which was higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. As a result, the dehydrogenase/oxidase ratio of the engineered enzyme was more than 11-fold greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results indicate that alteration of the dehydrogenase/oxidase activity ratio of GOxs is possible by introducing a mutation into the putative functional residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen of these enzymes, resulting in a further increased dehydrogenase activity. This is the first study reporting the alteration of GOx electron acceptor preference from oxygen to an artificial electron acceptor. PMID:23203056

  15. Identification in Marinomonas mediterranea of a novel quinoprotein with glycine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Campillo-Brocal, Jonatan Cristian; Lucas-Elio, Patricia; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A novel enzyme with lysine-epsilon oxidase activity was previously described in the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea. This enzyme differs from other l-amino acid oxidases in not being a flavoprotein but containing a quinone cofactor. It is encoded by an operon with two genes lodA and lodB. The first one codes for the oxidase, while the second one encodes a protein required for the expression of the former. Genome sequencing of M. mediterranea has revealed that it contains two additional operons encoding proteins with sequence similarity to LodA. In this study, it is shown that the product of one of such genes, Marme_1655, encodes a protein with glycine oxidase activity. This activity shows important differences in terms of substrate range and sensitivity to inhibitors to other glycine oxidases previously described which are flavoproteins synthesized by Bacillus. The results presented in this study indicate that the products of the genes with different degrees of similarity to lodA detected in bacterial genomes could constitute a reservoir of different oxidases. PMID:23873697

  16. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase: a multicomponent enzyme essential for host defenses.

    PubMed

    El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Elbim, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Phagocytes such as neutrophils and monocytes play an essential role in host defenses against microbial pathogens. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical, and hypochlorous acid, together with microbicidal peptides and proteases, constitute their antimicrobial arsenal. The enzyme responsible for superoxide anion production and, consequently, ROS generation, is called NADPH oxidase or respiratory burst oxidase. This multicomponent enzyme system is composed of cytosolic proteins (p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and rac1/2) and membrane proteins (p22phox and gp91phox, which form cytochrome b558) which assemble at membrane sites upon cell activation. The importance of this enzyme in host defenses is illustrated by a life-threatening genetic disorder called chronic granulomatous disease in which the phagocyte enzyme is dysfunctional, leading to life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Also, because ROS can damage surrounding tissues, their production, and thus NADPH oxidase activation, must be tightly regulated. This review describes the structure and activation of the neutrophil NADPH enzyme complex. PMID:15995580

  17. Purification and characterization of the oxidase from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, S; Malatesta, F; Guigliarelli, B; Gayda, J P; Bertrand, P; Miraglio, R; Denis, M

    1991-06-01

    The aerobic respiratory system of the hydrocarbonoclastic marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617 ends with a single terminal oxidase. It is a heme-containing membranous protein which has been demonstrated only to reduce molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide [Denis, M., Arnaud S. & Malatesta, F. (1989) FEBS Lett. 247, 475-479]. The purification of this oxidase was achieved in a single step through by DEAE-Trisacryl chromatography. SDS/PAGE showed the presence of four subunits. The pI was found to be 4.45 and a Mr of 130,000 was determined by gel filtration. The amino acid composition of the purified terminal oxidase has been determined. About 52% of the residues are hydrophobic, strengthening the membranous nature of this bacterial oxidase. Room temperature optical spectra are typical of heme b with a 560-nm band for the reduced form in the alpha range. The prosthetic group is made of two hemes b, one high-spin (S = 5/2, gl = 5.9, g parallel approximately 2.0), the other low-spin (S = 1/2, gz = 2.94, gy = 2.27). No other metal centre was detected by EPR. The two hemes remained unresolved in optical spectra, even at low temperature, and throughout redox titration. They behaved potentiometrically like a one-electron, single redox couple, with Em = 87 +/- 10 mV at pH 7.2 and 293 K. The purified oxidase did not oxidize ferrocytochrome c, but displayed quinol oxidase activity both with the native quinone (2419 nmol O2.min-1.mg protein-1 and commercially available coenzyme (101.74 nmol O2.min-1.mg protein-1). Exposure of the reduced enzyme to CO induced the collapse of alpha and beta bands as occurred during reoxidation. In contrast, NaCN and NaN3 fully inhibited the oxidase activity. Results are discussed with respect to other purified quinol oxidases. PMID:1645655

  18. Crystal structures of intermediates in the nitroalkane oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Annie; Bozinovski, Dragana M; Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Orville, Allen M

    2009-04-21

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 A resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes [Valley, M. P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2003) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 8738-8739]. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped [Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066]. The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle. PMID:19265437

  19. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Nitroalkane Oxidase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, A.; Bozinovski, D; Valley, M; Fitzpatrick, P; Orville, A

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped (Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066). The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle.

  20. Photodynamic therapy using a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fingar, V H; Wieman, T J; McMahon, K S; Haydon, P S; Halling, B P; Yuhas, D A; Winkelman, J W

    1997-10-15

    The use of endogenously created porphyrins as an alternative to photosensitizer injection for photodynamic therapy is a rapidly evolving area of study. One common method to induce porphyrin synthesis and accumulation in cells is the topical, oral, or parenteral administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid, a precursor for heme biosynthesis. Porphyrin accumulation may also be elicited by the use of enzyme inhibitors of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Groups of DBA/2 mice bearing SMT-F mammary tumors were placed on a diet containing 0-4000 ppm of a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor, FP-846. This agent blocks a critical step in porphyrin metabolism and results in elevated intracellular levels of protoporphyrin IX. Light treatment of tumors produced both initial and long-term regression that was dependent on the amount of inhibitor, the duration of inhibitor exposure to animals, and the amount of light used in PDT. Tumor regression occurred without significant destruction of normal tissues in the treatment field and without initial vascular constriction or blood flow stasis. Tumor cure in animals given 4000 ppm FP-846 in feed for 3 days and 300 J/cm2 602-670 nm light (23% cure) was similar to the response in animals given 10 mg/kg Photofrin and the same light dose (20%). PMID:9377568

  1. Crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Dikalov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in physiological and pathological processes. In recent years, a feed-forward regulation of the ROS sources has been reported. The interaction between main cellular sources of ROS, such as mitochondria and NADPH oxidases, however, remain obscure. This work summarizes the latest findings on the role of crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases in pathophysiological processes. Mitochondria have the highest levels of antioxidants in the cell and play an important role in the maintenance of cellular redox status, thereby acting as an ROS and redox sink and limiting NADPH oxidase activity. Mitochondria, however, are not only a target for ROS produced by NADPH oxidase but also a significant source of ROS, which under certain condition may stimulate NADPH oxidases. This crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases, therefore, may represent a feed-forward vicious cycle of ROS production which can be pharmacologically targeted under conditions of oxidative stress. It has been demonstrated that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants break this vicious cycle, inhibiting ROS production by mitochondria and reducing NADPH oxidase activity. This may provide a novel strategy for treatment of many pathological conditions including aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension and degenerative neurological disorders in which mitochondrial oxidative stress seems to play a role. It is conceivable that the use of mitochondria-targeted treatments would be effective in these conditions. PMID:21777669

  2. Optimization of the permanent magnet optical klystron for the SUPER-ACO storage ring free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Billardon, M.

    1989-06-01

    A permanent magnet optical klystron has been optimized for free electron laser experiments and optical harmonic generation on the new storage ring SUPER-ACO at Orsay. The conditions of the optimization and the different steps of the field characterization measurements of this insertion device are discussed. Its effects on the stored beam and the undulator radiation measurements are described.

  3. 42 CFR 425.608 - Determining first year performance for ACOs beginning April 1 or July 1, 2012.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determining first year performance for ACOs beginning April 1 or July 1, 2012. 425.608 Section 425.608 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... April 1 or July 1, 2012. (a) For April 1 and July 1, 2012 starters, first year (defined as 21 and...

  4. Cholesterol: A modulator of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase activity - A cell-free study

    PubMed Central

    Masoud, Rawand; Bizouarn, Tania; Houée-Levin, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase Nox2, a multi-subunit enzyme complex comprising membrane and cytosolic proteins, catalyzes a very intense production of superoxide ions O2•−, which are transformed into other reactive oxygen species (ROS). In vitro, it has to be activated by addition of amphiphiles like arachidonic acid (AA). It has been shown that the membrane part of phagocyte NADPH oxidase is present in lipid rafts rich in cholesterol. Cholesterol plays a significant role in the development of cardio-vascular diseases that are always accompanied by oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate the influence of cholesterol on the activation process of NADPH oxidase. Our results clearly show that, in a cell-free system, cholesterol is not an efficient activator of NADPH oxidase like arachidonic acid (AA), however it triggers a basal low superoxide production at concentrations similar to what found in neutrophile. A higher concentration, if present during the assembly process of the enzyme, has an inhibitory role on the production of O2•−. Added cholesterol acts on both cytosolic and membrane components, leading to imperfect assembly and decreasing the affinity of cytosolic subunits to the membrane ones. Added to the cytosolic proteins, it retains their conformations but still allows some conformational change induced by AA addition, indispensable to activation of NADPH oxidase. PMID:25462061

  5. Human lysyl oxidase-like 2.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Finney, Joel; Ronnebaum, Trey; Mure, Minae

    2014-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase like-2 (LOXL2) belongs to the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family, which comprises Cu(2+)- and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ)-dependent amine oxidases. LOXL2 is proposed to function similarly to LOX in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by promoting crosslinking of collagen and elastin. LOXL2 has also been proposed to regulate extracellular and intracellular cell signaling pathways. Dysregulation of LOXL2 has been linked to many diseases, including cancer, pro-oncogenic angiogenesis, fibrosis and heart diseases. In this review, we will give an overview of the current understandings and hypotheses regarding the molecular functions of LOXL2. PMID:25146937

  6. NADPH Oxidases and Angiotensin II Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Abel Martin; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade many studies have demonstrated the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by NADPH oxidases in angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling, as well as a role for ROS in the development of different diseases in which Ang II is a central component. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of activation of NADPH oxidases by Ang II and describe the molecular targets of ROS in Ang II signaling in the vasculature, kidney and brain. We also discuss the effects of genetic manipulation of NADPH oxidase function on the physiology and pathophysiology of the renin angiotensin system. PMID:19059306

  7. Contributions to GOSAT Data Analysis by the NASA Atmospheric Carbon Observations from Space (ACOS) Team (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, D.; Atmospheric Carbon Observations From Space (Acos) Team

    2010-12-01

    Ground-based greenhouse gas measurements provide the accuracy and coverage needed to quantify the abundance and rate of change of CO2 on global scales, but still lack the resolution and spatial extent needed to identify and quantify CO2 fluxes on regional scales. One way to address this need is to collect precise, spatially-resolved, global measurements of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, from space. High precision is essential because CO2 sources and sinks must be inferred from spatial and temporal variations in XCO2, and this quantity typically varies by no more than 1% on regional scales. The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) were the first two satellites designed specifically to measure of XCO2. The OCO and GOSAT science teams formed a close collaboration prior to the launch of these two missions to cross calibrate their instruments and cross validate their CO2 retrievals against common standards. Immediately after the loss of the OCO spacecraft, the GOSAT team invited the OCO science team to join their efforts to analyze GOSAT data. NASA responded by reformulating the OCO science team as the Atmospheric Carbon Observations from Space (ACOS) team to (i) meet the NASA’s obligations to its GOSAT partners, (ii) recover some of the science knowledge expected from OCO, and (iii) validate the OCO retrieval algorithms in a realistic environment. The third goal has taken on greater significance since the U.S. Congress authorized a restart of the OCO project, and the President’s 2010 budget proposal included funding to produce a “carbon copy” of OCO that could be ready for launch by February 2013. To address these objectives, the ACOS team has hosted a series of GOSAT vicarious calibration campaigns over Railroad Valley, NV, retrieved global estimates of XCO2 from GOSAT soundings, and validated these XCO2 retrievals against ground-based remote sensing observations by Fourier

  8. Changes in Health Care Spending and Quality for Medicare Beneficiaries Associated with a Commercial ACO Contract

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, J. Michael; Landon, Bruce E.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Importance In a multi-payer system, new payment incentives implemented by one insurer for an accountable care organization (ACO) may affect spending and quality of care for another insurer’s enrollees served by the ACO. Such “spillover” effects reflect the extent of organizational efforts to reform care delivery and can contribute to the total impact of ACOs. Objective We examined whether the Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) of Massachusetts’ Alternative Quality Contract (AQC), an early commercial ACO initiative associated with reduced spending and improved quality for BCBS enrollees, was also associated with changes in spending and quality for Medicare beneficiaries, who were not covered by the AQC. Design and Exposure Quasi-experimental comparisons from 2007–2010 of Medicare beneficiaries served by 11 provider organizations entering the AQC in 2009 or 2010 (intervention group) vs. beneficiaries served by other providers (control group). Using a difference-in-differences approach, we estimated changes in spending and quality for the intervention group in the first and second years of exposure to the AQC relative to concurrent changes for the control group. Regression and propensity-score methods were used to adjust for differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Participants and Setting Elderly fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries in Massachusetts (1,761,325 person-years). Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was total quarterly medical spending per beneficiary. Secondary outcomes included spending by setting and type of service, 5 process measures of quality, potentially avoidable hospitalizations, and 30-day readmissions. Results Before entering the AQC, total quarterly spending for the intervention group was $150 (95% CI, $25–$274) higher than for the control group and rose at a similar rate. In year 2 of the intervention group’s exposure to the AQC, this difference was reduced to $51 (95% CI, −$109–$210; P=0

  9. Identification of IAA-oxidase in peroxidase isozymes from cotton plant leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the functions of plant peroxidase is to regulate the indole acetic acid (IAA) hormonal level by oxidizing it to inactive 3-methyleneoxyindole. IAA-binding proteins and plant peroxidase revealed five structurally similar fragments. We have isolated peroxidase isozymes with IAA-oxidase activit...

  10. DELINEATING THE ROLE OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASE IN THE DARKENING OF ALKALINE WHEAT NOODLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of inhibitors on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, the effect of the PPO inhibitor tropolone on noodle darkening, and the correlation of PPO activity with darkening of alkaline noodles. The PPO inhibitors tropolone and salicylhydroxamic acid (each at 1 'M) reduced k...

  11. Regulation of NADPH oxidases in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo F; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    The only known function of NAD(P)H oxidases is to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Skeletal muscles express three isoforms of NAD(P)H oxidases (Nox1, Nox2, and Nox4) that have been identified as critical modulators of redox homeostasis. Nox2 acts as the main source of skeletal muscle ROS during contractions, participates in insulin signaling and glucose transport, and mediates the myocyte response to osmotic stress. Nox2 and Nox4 contribute to skeletal muscle abnormalities elicited by angiotensin II, muscular dystrophy, heart failure, and high fat diet. Our review addresses the expression and regulation of NAD(P)H oxidases with emphasis on aspects that are relevant to skeletal muscle. We also summarize: i) the most widely used NAD(P)H oxidases activity assays and inhibitors, and ii) studies that have defined Nox enzymes as protagonists of skeletal muscle redox homeostasis in a variety of health and disease conditions. PMID:27184955

  12. Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) exhibit NADH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Wiseman, Ben; Deemagarn, Taweewat; Donald, Lynda J; Duckworth, Harry W; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2004-10-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyze the oxidation of NADH to form NAD+ and either H2O2 or superoxide radical depending on pH. The NADH oxidase reaction requires molecular oxygen, does not require hydrogen peroxide, is not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase, and has a pH optimum of 8.75, clearly differentiating it from the peroxidase and catalase reactions with pH optima of 5.5 and 6.5, respectively, and from the NADH peroxidase-oxidase reaction of horseradish peroxidase. B. pseudomallei KatG has a relatively high affinity for NADH (Km=12 microm), but the oxidase reaction is slow (kcat=0.54 min(-1)) compared with the peroxidase and catalase reactions. The catalase-peroxidases also catalyze the hydrazinolysis of isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) in an oxygen- and H2O2-independent reaction, and KatG-dependent radical generation from a mixture of NADH and INH is two to three times faster than the combined rates of separate reactions with NADH and INH alone. The major products from the coupled reaction, identified by high pressure liquid chromatography fractionation and mass spectrometry, are NAD+ and isonicotinoyl-NAD, the activated form of isoniazid that inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Isonicotinoyl-NAD synthesis from a mixture of NAD+ and INH is KatG-dependent and is activated by manganese ion. M. tuberculosis KatG catalyzes isonicotinoyl-NAD formation from NAD+ and INH more efficiently than B. pseudomallei KatG. PMID:15280362

  13. Excitotoxic increase of xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase in the rat olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Abbondanza, A; Virgili, M; Contestabile, A; Stirpe, F

    1995-05-26

    Excitotoxic lesions induced by systemic injection of kainic acid, resulted in 2-3-fold increase of xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase activities in the rat olfactory cortex 48-72 h after drug administration. A significant increase of the xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase ratio was also observed at 4 and 48 h post-injection. No similar changes were noticed in the hippocampus. The enhancement of enzyme activity seems to be primarily a consequence of the altered cell composition in damaged area. Free radicals produced by the increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could in turn aggravate the excitotoxic brain injury. PMID:7656426

  14. Heme/copper terminal oxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson-Miller, S.; Babcock, G.T.

    1996-11-01

    Spatially well-organized electron-transfer reactions in a series of membrane-bound redox proteins form the basis for energy conservation in both photosynthesis and respiration. The membrane-bound nature of the electron-transfer processes is critical, as the free energy made available in exergonic redox chemistry is used to generate transmembrane proton concentration and electrostatic potential gradients. These gradients are subsequently used to drive ATP formation, which provides the immediate energy source for constructive cellular processes. The terminal heme/copper oxidases in respiratory electron-transfer chains illustrate a number of the thermodynamic and structural principles that have driven the development of respiration. This class of enzyme reduces dioxygen to water, thus clearing the respiratory system of low-energy electrons so that sustained electron transfer and free-energy transduction can occur. By using dioxygen as the oxidizing substrate, free-energy production per electron through the chain is substantial, owing to the high reduction potential of O{sub 2} (0.815 V at pH 7). 122 refs.

  15. Effects of ascorbic acid on carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel subsulfide, and on tumor transplants growth in gulonolactone oxidase knock-out mice and wild-type C57BL mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kasprzak, Kazimierz S.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Kaczmarek, Monika Z.; Logsdon, Daniel L.; Fivash, Mathew J.; Salnikow, Konstantin

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to test a hypothesis that ascorbate depletion could enhance carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Homozygous L-gulono- < gamma > -lactone oxidase gene knock-out mice (Gulo-/- mice) unable to produce ascorbate and wild-type C57BL mice (WT mice) were injected intramuscularly with carcinogenic nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}), and observed for the development of injection site tumors for 57 weeks. Small pieces of one of the induced tumors were transplanted subcutaneously into separate groups of Gulo-/- and WT mice and the growth of these tumors was measured for up to 3 months. The two strains of mice differed significantly with regard to (1) Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis: Gulo-/- mice were 40% more susceptible than WT mice; and (2) transplanted tumors development: Gulo-/- mice were more receptive to tumor growth than WT mice, but only in terms of a much shorter tumor latency; later in the exponential phase of growth, the growth rates were the same. And, with adequate ascorbate supplementation, the two strains were equally susceptible to acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}. Statistically significant effects of dietary ascorbate dosing levels were the following: (1) reduction in ascorbate supplementation increased acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} in Gulo-/- mice; (2) ascorbate supplementation extended the latency of transplanted tumors in WT mice. In conclusion, the lack of endogenous ascorbate synthesis makes Gulo-/- mice more susceptible to Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis. Dietary ascorbate tends to attenuate acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} and to extend the latency of transplanted tumors. The latter effects may be of practical importance to humans and thus deserve further studies. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascorbate depletion enhances carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gulo-/- mice unable to synthesize ascorbate were used in this study. Black

  16. Crystal structure and site-directed mutagenesis of a nitroalkane oxidase from Streptomyces ansochromogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhua; Gao, Zengqiang; Hou, Haifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Jihui; Yang, Haihua; Dong, Yuhui; Tan, Huarong

    2011-02-18

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) catalyzes neutral nitroalkanes to their corresponding aldehydes or ketones, hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. The crystal structure of NAO from Streptomyces ansochromogenes was determined; it consists of two domains, a TIM barrel domain bound to FMN and C-terminal domain with a novel folding pattern. Site-directed mutagenesis of His179, which is spatially adjacent to FMN, resulted in the loss of enzyme activity, demonstrating that this amino acid residue is important for catalysis. The crystal structure of mutant H179D-nitroethane was also analyzed. Interestingly, Sa-NAO shows the typical function as nitroalkane oxidase but its structure is similar to that of 2-nitropropane dioxygenase. Overall, these results suggest that Sa-NAO is a novel nitroalkane oxidase with TIM barrel structure. PMID:21147069

  17. Cloning and characterization of polyphenol oxidase cDNAs of Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed Central

    Joy, R W; Sugiyama, M; Fukuda, H; Komamine, A

    1995-01-01

    Two cDNA clones encoding polyphenol oxidases were isolated from a cDNA library constructed from a log-phase suspension culture of Phytolacca americana (pokeweed) producing betalains. The clones exhibit 93 and 86% sequence identity at the nucleotide and deduced amino acid levels, respectively. Both clones contain two copper-binding domains characterized by histidine-rich regions, which are found ubiquitously in all polyphenol oxidases/tyrosinases, and a putative third histidine-rich, copper-binding region, which is common to all plant polyphenol oxidases. One of the Phytolacca cDNA deduced amino acid sequences contains the ubiquitous transit peptide for all proteins targeted to the internal lumen of thylakoid membranes of plastids and is considered to be 98 residues in length based on a proposed sequence cleavage site motif. This would produce a processed peptide of approximately 54 kD. In addition to common features of transit peptides, it was found that an additional conserved region for polyphenol oxidases was located between the hydroxy amino acid-rich region and the thylakoid transfer domain. Spatial and temporal expression was investigated by northern blot analysis of total RNA from various organs of Phytolacca plants. Transcripts of the two clones were found to be 2.1 and 2.3 kb, respectively. Both transcripts were present only at substantial levels in ripening, betalain-containing fruit. PMID:7539531

  18. Structure and function of mammalian aldehyde oxidases.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mineko; Romão, Maria João; Leimkühler, Silke; Bolis, Marco; Fratelli, Maddalena; Coelho, Catarina; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Garattini, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian aldehyde oxidases (AOXs; EC1.2.3.1) are a group of conserved proteins belonging to the family of molybdo-flavoenzymes along with the structurally related xanthine dehydrogenase enzyme. AOXs are characterized by broad substrate specificity, oxidizing not only aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into the corresponding carboxylic acids, but also hydroxylating a series of heteroaromatic rings. The number of AOX isoenzymes expressed in different vertebrate species is variable. The two extremes are represented by humans, which express a single enzyme (AOX1) in many organs and mice or rats which are characterized by tissue-specific expression of four isoforms (AOX1, AOX2, AOX3, and AOX4). In vertebrates each AOX isoenzyme is the product of a distinct gene consisting of 35 highly conserved exons. The extant species-specific complement of AOX isoenzymes is the result of a complex evolutionary process consisting of a first phase characterized by a series of asynchronous gene duplications and a second phase where the pseudogenization and gene deletion events prevail. In the last few years remarkable advances in the elucidation of the structural characteristics and the catalytic mechanisms of mammalian AOXs have been made thanks to the successful crystallization of human AOX1 and mouse AOX3. Much less is known about the physiological function and physiological substrates of human AOX1 and other mammalian AOX isoenzymes, although the importance of these proteins in xenobiotic metabolism is fairly well established and their relevance in drug development is increasing. This review article provides an overview and a discussion of the current knowledge on mammalian AOX. PMID:26920149

  19. Role of NADPH Oxidases in Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Yong-Han; Kim, Jonghwa; Aoyama, Tomonori; De Minicis, Samuele; Bataller, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hepatic fibrosis is the common pathophysiologic process resulting from chronic liver injury, characterized by the accumulation of an excessive extracellular matrix. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) is a multicomponent enzyme complex that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to a wide range of stimuli. In addition to phagocytic NOX2, there are six nonphagocytic NOX proteins. Recent Advances: In the liver, NOX is functionally expressed both in the phagocytic form and in the nonphagocytic form. NOX-derived ROS contributes to various kinds of liver disease caused by alcohol, hepatitis C virus, and toxic bile acids. Recent evidence indicates that both phagocytic NOX2 and nonphagocytic NOX isoforms, including NOX1 and NOX4, mediate distinct profibrogenic actions in hepatic stellate cells, the main fibrogenic cell type in the liver. The critical role of NOX in hepatic fibrogenesis provides a rationale to assess pharmacological NOX inhibitors that treat hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. Critical Issues: Although there is compelling evidence indicating a crucial role for NOX-mediated ROS generation in hepatic fibrogenesis, little is known about the expression, subcellular localization, regulation, and redox signaling of NOX isoforms in specific cell types in the liver. Moreover, the exact mechanism of NOX-mediated fibrogenic signaling is still largely unknown. Future Directions: A better understanding through further research about NOX-mediated fibrogenic signaling may enable the development of novel anti-fibrotic therapy using NOX inhibition strategy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2854–2872. PMID:24040957

  20. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  1. Three-dimensional organization of three-domain copper oxidases: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Zhukova, Yu. N.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Zaĭtsev, V. N.; Mikhaĭlov, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    “Blue” copper-containing proteins are multidomain proteins that utilize a unique redox property of copper ions. Among other blue multicopper oxidases, three-domain oxidases belong to the group of proteins that exhibit a wide variety of compositions in amino acid sequences, functions, and occurrences in organisms. This paper presents a review of the data obtained from X-ray diffraction investigations of the three-dimensional structures of three-domain multicopper oxidases, such as the ascorbate oxidase catalyzing oxidation of ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and its three derivatives; the multicopper oxidase CueO (the laccase homologue); the laccases isolated from the basidiomycetes Coprinus cinereus, Trametes versicolor, Coriolus zonatus, Cerrena maxima, and Rigidoporus lignosus and the ascomycete Melanocarpus albomyces; and the bacterial laccases CotA from the endospore coats of Bacillus subtilis. A comparison of the molecular structures of the laccases of different origins demonstrates that, structurally, these objects are highly conservative. This obviously indicates that the catalytic activity of the enzymes under consideration is characterized by similar mechanisms.

  2. Single mutations that redirect internal proton transfer in the ba3 oxidase from Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Irina; Chang, Hsin-Yang; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Ädelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B.; Brzezinski, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The ba3-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus is a membrane-bound proton pump. Results from earlier studies have shown that with the aa3-type oxidases proton uptake to the catalytic site and “pump site” occur simultaneously. However, with the ba3 oxidase the pump site is loaded before proton transfer to the catalytic site because the proton transfer to the latter is slower than with the aa3 oxidases. In addition, the timing of formation and decay of catalytic intermediates is different in the two types of oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated two mutant ba3 CytcOs in which residues of the proton pathway leading to the catalytic site as well as the pump site were exchanged, Thr312Val and Tyr244Phe. Even though the ba3 CytcO uses only a single proton pathway for transfer of the substrate and “pumped” protons, the amino-acid residue substitutions had distinctly different effects on the kinetics of proton transfer to the catalytic site and the pump site, respectively. The results indicate that the rates of these reactions can be modified independently by replacement of single residues within the proton pathway. Furthermore, the data suggest that the Thr312Val and Tyr244Phe mutations interfere with a structural rearrangement in the proton pathway that is rate limiting for proton transfer to the catalytic site. PMID:24004023

  3. Three-dimensional organization of three-domain copper oxidases: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistova, N. E. Zhukova, Yu. N.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Zaitsev, V. N.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2008-01-15

    'Blue' copper-containing proteins are multidomain proteins that utilize a unique redox property of copper ions. Among other blue multicopper oxidases, three-domain oxidases belong to the group of proteins that exhibit a wide variety of compositions in amino acid sequences, functions, and occurrences in organisms. This paper presents a review of the data obtained from X-ray diffraction investigations of the three-dimensional structures of three-domain multicopper oxidases, such as the ascorbate oxidase catalyzing oxidation of ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and its three derivatives; the multicopper oxidase CueO (the laccase homologue); the laccases isolated from the basidiomycetes Coprinus cinereus, Trametes versicolor, Coriolus zonatus, Cerrena maxima, and Rigidoporus lignosus and the ascomycete Melanocarpus albomyces; and the bacterial laccases CotA from the endospore coats of Bacillus subtilis. A comparison of the molecular structures of the laccases of different origins demonstrates that, structurally, these objects are highly conservative. This obviously indicates that the catalytic activity of the enzymes under consideration is characterized by similar mechanisms.

  4. Amyloid-β Peptide Binds to Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit 1

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1–42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1–42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1–42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD. PMID:22927926

  5. Chemical Evidence for Potent Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of Ethyl Acetate Extract of Citrus aurantium L. Dried Immature Fruits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Wei; Guo, Bing-Hua; Gao, Hua; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Yao, Hui-Li; Cheng, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase is a key enzyme which can catalyze hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid causing hyperuricemia in humans. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of 24 organic extracts of four species belonging to Citrus genus of the family Rutaceae were assayed in vitro. Since the ethyl acetate extract of C. aurantium dried immature fruits showed the highest xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity, chemical evidence for the potent inhibitory activity was clarified on the basis of structure identification of the active constituents. Five flavanones and two polymethoxyflavones were isolated and evaluated for inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase in vitro. Of the compounds, hesperetin showed more potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 16.48 μM. For the first time, this study provides a rational basis for the use of C. aurantium dried immature fruits against hyperuricemia. PMID:26950105

  6. NADPH oxidases: new actors in thyroid cancer?

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a crucial substrate for thyroid peroxidase, a key enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. However, as a potent oxidant, H2O2 might also be responsible for the high level of oxidative DNA damage observed in thyroid tissues, such as DNA base lesions and strand breakages, which promote chromosomal instability and contribute to the development of tumours. Although the role of H2O2 in thyroid hormone synthesis is well established, its precise mechanisms of action in pathological processes are still under investigation. The NADPH oxidase/dual oxidase family are the only oxidoreductases whose primary function is to produce reactive oxygen species. As such, the function and expression of these enzymes are tightly regulated. Thyrocytes express dual oxidase 2, which produces most of the H2O2 for thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyrocytes also express dual oxidase 1 and NADPH oxidase 4, but the roles of these enzymes are still unknown. Here, we review the structure, expression, localization and function of these enzymes. We focus on their potential role in thyroid cancer, which is characterized by increased expression of these enzymes. PMID:27174022

  7. No ROI in ACO. Risk, expense of Medicare program has most for-profit groups shying away.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2012-04-23

    For-profit healthcare companies aren't beating down the door to get in on Medicare ACOs. Several of the big chains say there is too much uncertainty about the experiment, and they're waiting to see how the program evolves. One company on the sideline is Capella Healthcare. Chairman and CEO Daniel Slipkovich, left, says there is a potential for high patient dropout rates and risks in population management. PMID:22571000

  8. Eight reasons payer interoperability and data sharing are essential in ACOs. Interoperability standards could be a prerequisite to measuring care.

    PubMed

    Mookencherry, Shefali

    2012-01-01

    It makes strategic and business sense for payers and providers to collaborate on how to take substantial cost out of the healthcare delivery system. Acting independently, neither medical groups, hospitals nor health plans have the optimal mix of resources and incentives to significantly reduce costs. Payers have core assets such as marketing, claims data, claims processing, reimbursement systems and capital. It would be cost prohibitive for all but the largest providers to develop these capabilities in order to compete directly with insurers. Likewise, medical groups and hospitals are positioned to foster financial interdependence among providers and coordinate the continuum of patient illnesses and care settings. Payers and providers should commit to reasonable clinical and cost goals, and share resources to minimize expenses and financial risks. It is in the interest of payers to work closely with providers on risk-management strategies because insurers need synergy with ACOs to remain cost competitive. It is in the interest of ACOs to work collaboratively with payers early on to develop reasonable and effective performance benchmarks. Hence, it is essential to have payer interoperability and data sharing integrated in an ACO model. PMID:22352172

  9. The GA5 locus of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a multifunctional gibberellin 20-oxidase: Molecular cloning and functional expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yun-Ling; Li, Li; Wu, Keqiang

    1995-07-03

    The biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs) after GA{sub 12}-aldehyde involves a series of oxidative steps that lead to the formation of bioactive GAs. Previously, a cDNA clone encoding a GA 20-oxidase [gibberellin, 2-oxoglutarate:oxygen oxidoreductase (20-hydroxylating, oxidizing), EC 1.14.11-] was isolated by immunoscreening a cDNA library from liquid endosperm of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L.) with antibodies against partially purified GA 20-oxidase. Here, we report isolation of a genomic clone for GA 20-oxidase from a genomic library of the long-day species Arabidopsis thaliana Heynh., strain Columbia, by using the pumpkin cDNA clone as a heterologous probe. This genomic clone contains a GA 20-oxidase gene that consists of three exons and two introns. The three exons are 1131-bp long and encode 377 amino acid residues. A cDNA clone corresponding to the putative GA 20-oxidase genomic sequence was constructed with the reverse transcription-PCR method, and the identity of the cDNA clone was confirmed by analyzing the capability of the fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli to convert GA{sub 53} to GA{sub 44} and GA{sub 19} to GA{sub 20}. The Arabidopsis GA 20-oxidase shares 55% identity and >80% similarity with the pumpkin GA 20-oxidase at the derived amino acid level. Both GA 20-oxidases share high homology with other 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-ODDs), but the highest homology was found between the two GA 20-oxidases. Mapping results indicated tight linkage between the cloned GA 20-oxidase and the GA locus of Arabidopsis. The ga5 semidwarf mutant contains a G {yields} A point mutation that inserts a translational stop codon in the protein-coding sequence, thus confirming that the GA5 locus encodes GA 20-oxidase. Expression of the GA5 gene in Arabidopsis leaves was enhanced after plants were transferred from short to long days; it was reduced by GA{sub 4} treatment, suggesting end-product repression in the GA biosynthetic pathway. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  10. CYTOCHROME OXIDASE IN NORMAL AND REGENERATING NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Howard A.; Mellors, Robert C.

    1945-01-01

    Manometric determinations of cytochrome oxidase activity were carried out on grey matter from the thalamus and anterior horn of cats and monkeys under various experimental conditions. The thalamus of the cat was studied following the degeneration of virtually all the thalamic neurons secondary to decortication. In comparing the deneuronated thalamus with the normal one, it was found that approximately 34 per cent of the cytochrome oxidase activity was contributed by the neurons and the balance by neuroglia and mesodermal tissues which on the operated side remained comparable to that of the normal side. Total activity of the normal thalamus averaged 5.52 units per mg. of dry weight where I unit is defined as the amount of cytochrome oxidase required to produce a net oxygen consumption of 10 c.mm. per hour under the specified conditions of the experiment. The grey matter of the anterior horns of the spinal cord was isolated by a special technique and its cytochrome oxidase activity was compared with anterior horns in which motoneurons had been stimulated to regenerative activity by section of peripheral nerves. Each animal was studied in relation to an anterior horn which was normal and one in which only the functional state of the motoneurons had been changed. Average normal levels of 2.23 units were found for cat anterior horn and 0.69 units for the monkey. Reductions of cytochrome oxidase activity in the range of 22 to 23 per cent were observed for both cat and monkey following nerve section. In the latter the time sequence was carefully studied in relation to the cytological cycle known as chromatolysis and a virus refractory state previously described by us. It was found that maximal reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity coincided with maximal refractoriness of the cells to poliomyelitis virus (30 to 70 days following nerve section). Neither of these states could be correlated in time with maximal chromatolysis (10 to 15 days). PMID:19871471

  11. NASA GES DISC support of CO2 Data from OCO-2, ACOS, and AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer C; Vollmer, Bruce E.; Savtchenko, Andrey K.; Hearty, Thomas J; Albayrak, Rustem Arif; Deshong, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Centers (GES DISC) is the data center assigned to archive and distribute current AIRS, ACOS data and data from the upcoming OCO-2 mission. The GES DISC archives and supports data containing information on CO2 as well as other atmospheric composition, atmospheric dynamics, modeling and precipitation. Along with the data stewardship, an important mission of GES DISC is to facilitate access to and enhance the usability of data as well as to broaden the user base. GES DISC strives to promote the awareness of science content and novelty of the data by working with Science Team members and releasing news articles as appropriate. Analysis of events that are of interest to the general public, and that help in understanding the goals of NASA Earth Observing missions, have been among most popular practices.Users have unrestricted access to a user-friendly search interface, Mirador, that allows temporal, spatial, keyword and event searches, as well as an ontology-driven drill down. Variable subsetting, format conversion, quality screening, and quick browse, are among the services available in Mirador. The majority of the GES DISC data are also accessible through OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol) and WMS (Web Map Service). These services add more options for specialized subsetting, format conversion, image viewing and contributing to data interoperability.

  12. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Superoxide Anion Production by Acting on NADPH Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Rawand; Bizouarn, Tania; Trepout, Sylvain; Wien, Frank; Baciou, Laura; Marco, Sergio; Houée Levin, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase nanoparticles (NPs) are metal oxide NPs commercialized for several uses of everyday life. However their toxicity has been poorly investigated. Cellular internalization of NPs has been shown to activate macrophages and neutrophils that contribute to superoxide anion production by the NADPH oxidase complex. Transmission electron micrososcopy images showed that the membrane fractions were close to the NPs while fluorescence indicated an interaction between NPs and cytosolic proteins. Using a cell-free system, we have investigated the influence of TiO2 NPs on the behavior of the NADPH oxidase. In the absence of the classical activator molecules of the enzyme (arachidonic acid) but in the presence of TiO2 NPs, no production of superoxide ions could be detected indicating that TiO2 NPs were unable to activate by themselves the complex. However once the NADPH oxidase was activated (i.e., by arachidonic acid), the rate of superoxide anion production went up to 140% of its value without NPs, this effect being dependent on their concentration. In the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, the NADPH oxidase produces more superoxide ions, hence induces higher oxidative stress. This hyper-activation and the subsequent increase in ROS production by TiO2 NPs could participate to the oxidative stress development. PMID:26714308

  13. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Superoxide Anion Production by Acting on NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Trepout, Sylvain; Wien, Frank; Marco, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase nanoparticles (NPs) are metal oxide NPs commercialized for several uses of everyday life. However their toxicity has been poorly investigated. Cellular internalization of NPs has been shown to activate macrophages and neutrophils that contribute to superoxide anion production by the NADPH oxidase complex. Transmission electron micrososcopy images showed that the membrane fractions were close to the NPs while fluorescence indicated an interaction between NPs and cytosolic proteins. Using a cell-free system, we have investigated the influence of TiO2 NPs on the behavior of the NADPH oxidase. In the absence of the classical activator molecules of the enzyme (arachidonic acid) but in the presence of TiO2 NPs, no production of superoxide ions could be detected indicating that TiO2 NPs were unable to activate by themselves the complex. However once the NADPH oxidase was activated (i.e., by arachidonic acid), the rate of superoxide anion production went up to 140% of its value without NPs, this effect being dependent on their concentration. In the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, the NADPH oxidase produces more superoxide ions, hence induces higher oxidative stress. This hyper-activation and the subsequent increase in ROS production by TiO2 NPs could participate to the oxidative stress development. PMID:26714308

  14. Copper-dependent inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by Abeta(1-42) requires reduced methionine at residue 35 of the Abeta peptide.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Peter J; Barnham, Kevin J; Duce, James A; Blake, Rachel E; Masters, Colin L; Trounce, Ian A

    2006-10-01

    By altering key amino acid residues of the Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid-beta peptide, we investigated the mechanism through which amyloid-beta inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1). Native amyloid-beta inhibited cytochrome oxidase by up to 65%, and the level of inhibition was determined by the period of amyloid-beta ageing before the cytochrome oxidase assay. Substituting tyrosine-10 with alanine did not affect maximal enzyme inhibition, but the altered peptide required a longer period of ageing. By contrast, oxidizing the sulfur of methionine-35 to a sulfoxide, or substituting methionine-35 with valine, completely abrogated the peptide's inhibitory potential towards cytochrome oxidase. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the loss of inhibitory potential towards cytochrome oxidase with the methionine-35-altered peptides did not correlate with a substantially different distribution of amyloid-beta oligomeric species. Although the amyloid-beta-mediated inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was completely dependent on the presence of divalent Cu2+, it was not supported by monovalent Cu+, and experiments with catalase and H2O2 indicated that the mechanism of cytochrome oxidase inhibition does not involve amyloid-beta-mediated H2O2 production. We propose that amyloid-beta-mediated inhibition of cytochrome oxidase is dependent on the peptide's capacity to bind, then reduce Cu2+, and that it may involve the formation of a redox active amyloid-beta-methionine radical. PMID:16987248

  15. Alternative oxidase in animals: unique characteristics and taxonomic distribution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Allison E; Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Staples, James F

    2009-08-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX), a ubiquinol oxidase, introduces a branch point into the respiratory electron transport chain, bypassing complexes III and IV and resulting in cyanide-resistant respiration. Previously, AOX was thought to be limited to plants and some fungi and protists but recent work has demonstrated the presence of AOX in most kingdoms of life, including animals. In the present study we identified AOX in 28 animal species representing nine phyla. This expands the known taxonomic distribution of AOX in animals by 10 species and two phyla. Using bioinformatics we found AOX gene sequences in members of the animal phyla Porifera, Placozoa, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Annelida, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Chordata. Using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with degenerate primers designed to recognize conserved regions of animal AOX, we demonstrated that AOX genes are transcribed in several animals from different phyla. An analysis of full-length AOX sequences revealed an amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of the protein that is unique to animal AOXs. Animal AOX also lacks an N-terminal cysteine residue that is known to be important for AOX enzyme regulation in plants. We conclude that the presence of AOX is the ancestral state in animals and hypothesize that its absence in some lineages, including vertebrates, is due to gene loss events. PMID:19648408

  16. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Collard, François; Zhang, Jianye; Nemet, Ina; Qanungo, Kaustubha R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Yee, Vivien C.

    2009-01-12

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6{angstrom} resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12{angstrom} deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase ll)

    SciTech Connect

    Collard, F.; Zhang, J; Nemet, I; Qanungo, K; Monnier, V; Yee, V

    2008-01-01

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6{angstrom} resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12{angstrom} deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Deglycating Enzyme Fructosamine Oxidase (Amadoriase II)*

    PubMed Central

    Collard, François; Zhang, Jianye; Nemet, Ina; Qanungo, Kaustubha R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Yee, Vivien C.

    2008-01-01

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOX) catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines (Amadori products). These proteins are of interest in developing an enzyme to deglycate proteins implicated in diabetic complications. We report here the crystal structures of FAOX-II from the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, in free form and in complex with the inhibitor fructosyl-thioacetate, at 1.75 and 1.6Å resolution, respectively. FAOX-II is a two domain FAD-enzyme with an overall topology that is most similar to that of monomeric sarcosine oxidase. Active site residues Tyr-60, Arg-112 and Lys-368 bind the carboxylic portion of the fructosamine, whereas Glu-280 and Arg-411 bind the fructosyl portion. From structure-guided sequence comparison, Glu-280 was identified as a signature residue for FAOX activity. Two flexible surface loops become ordered upon binding of the inhibitor in a catalytic site that is about 12Å deep, providing an explanation for the very low activity of FAOX enzymes toward protein-bound fructosamines, which would have difficulty accessing the active site. Structure-based mutagenesis showed that substitution of Glu-280 and Arg-411 eliminates enzyme activity. In contrast, modification of other active site residues or of amino acids in the flexible active site loops has little effect, highlighting these regions as potential targets in designing an enzyme that will accept larger substrates. PMID:18667417

  19. Renalase Prevents AKI Independent of Amine Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Velazquez, Heino; Moeckel, Gilbert; Chang, John; Ham, Ahrom; Lee, H. Thomas; Safirstein, Robert

    2014-01-01

    AKI is characterized by increased catecholamine levels and hypertension. Renalase, a secretory flavoprotein that oxidizes catecholamines, attenuates ischemic injury and the associated increase in catecholamine levels in mice. However, whether the amine oxidase activity of renalase is involved in preventing ischemic injury is debated. In this study, recombinant renalase protected human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells against cisplatin- and hydrogen peroxide–induced necrosis. Similarly, genetic depletion of renalase in mice (renalase knockout) exacerbated kidney injury in animals subjected to cisplatin-induced AKI. Interestingly, compared with the intact renalase protein, a 20–amino acid peptide (RP-220), which is conserved in all known renalase isoforms, but lacks detectable oxidase activity, was equally effective at protecting HK-2 cells against toxic injury and preventing ischemic injury in wild-type mice. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with RP-220 or recombinant renalase rapidly activated Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and downregulated c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In summary, renalase promotes cell survival and protects against renal injury in mice through the activation of intracellular signaling cascades, independent of its ability to metabolize catecholamines, and we have identified the region of renalase required for these effects. Renalase and related peptides show potential as therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of AKI. PMID:24511138

  20. Function and structure of rat hepatic coproporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sorianello, E M; Mazzetti, M B

    2000-10-01

    Rat hepatic coproporphyrinogen oxidase, the sixth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, was purified 1340-fold with a yield of 39.7%. To obtain the soluble enzyme, different methods were applied to disrupt mitochondria, with sonication giving the highest yield (85%). The minimum catalytic form of enzyme was a dimer with a molecular mass of 77 +/- 4 kDa. The existence of aggregated forms was possible since in fractions of gel filtration elution activity was observed with higher molecular mass. We determined a Stokes radius of 36.3 A, a sedimentation coefficient (S20,w) of 5.06 S, and frictional ratio of 1.29, suggesting a nearly globular shape of the protein. Regardless of the type of salt, high ionic strength inhibits the enzyme, probably modifying its native structure. Experiments with amino acid modifiers showed that histidine, arginine, and tryptophan are involved in the catalytic process. Non-ionic detergents and phospholipids activated the enzyme, probably because they reproduce its natural hydrophobic environment. The present study describes a simple method for the purification of rat liver coproporphyrinogen oxidase, introducing for the first time data on the structure and function of the protein in a tissue often used as a laboratory model in biological studies, and contributing to the study of human hereditary coproporphyria. PMID:11079369

  1. Apocynin: chemical and biophysical properties of a NADPH oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petrônio, Maicon S; Zeraik, Maria Luiza; Fonseca, Luiz Marcos da; Ximenes, Valdecir F

    2013-01-01

    Apocynin is the most employed inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX), a multienzymatic complex capable of catalyzing the one-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to the superoxide anion. Despite controversies about its selectivity, apocynin has been used as one of the most promising drugs in experimental models of inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we aimed to study the chemical and biophysical properties of apocynin. The oxidation potential was determined by cyclic voltammetry (Epa = 0.76V), the hydrophobicity index was calculated (logP = 0.83) and the molar absorption coefficient was determined (e275nm = 1.1 × 104 M-1 cm-1). Apocynin was a weak free radical scavenger (as measured using the DPPH, peroxyl radical and nitric oxide assays) when compared to protocatechuic acid, used here as a reference antioxidant. On the other hand, apocynin was more effective than protocatechuic acid as scavenger of the non-radical species hypochlorous acid. Apocynin reacted promptly with the non-radical reactive species H2O2 only in the presence of peroxidase. This finding is relevant, since it represents a new pathway for depleting H2O2 in cellular experimental models, besides the direct inhibition of NADPH oxidase. This could be relevant for its application as an inhibitor of NOX4, since this isoform produces H2O2 and not superoxide anion. The binding parameters calculated by fluorescence quenching showed that apocynin binds to human serum albumin (HSA) with a binding affinity of 2.19 × 104 M-1. The association did not alter the secondary and tertiary structure of HSA, as verified by synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism. The displacement of fluorescent probes suggested that apocynin binds to site I and site II of HSA. Considering the current biomedical applications of this phytochemical, the dissemination of these chemical and biophysical properties can be very helpful for scientists and physicians interested in the use of apocynin. PMID:23455672

  2. Isoprenoid metabolism is required for stimulation of the respiratory burst oxidase of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bokoch, G M; Prossnitz, V

    1992-01-01

    The formation of oxygen radicals by phagocytic cells occurs through the activation of a multiple-component NADPH oxidase system. An unidentified low molecular weight GTP-binding protein has been proposed to modulate the activity of the NADPH oxidase. The low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins undergo posttranslational processing, including an initial covalent incorporation of an isoprenyl group. To test whether such an isoprenylation reaction might be required for the activity of the oxidase, we utilized compactin and lovastatin as inhibitors of the isoprenylation pathway. Treatment of DMSO-differentiated HL-60 cells with compactin produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of O2- formation in response to FMLP or phorbol myristate acetate. Cell viability was not affected nor was normal differentiation of the HL-60 cells into a neutrophil-like cell. The inhibitory effect of compactin was specifically prevented by addition of exogenous mevalonic acid to the HL-60 cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of the drug were due to blockade of the pathway leading to isoprenoid synthesis. Addition of cholesterol, ubiquinone, or dolichol, which are also downstream products of the isoprenoid pathway, did not override the inhibitory effects of the drug. Subcellular fractions were prepared from compactin-treated cells, and the location of the compactin-sensitive factor was determined by complementation analysis in a cell-free NADPH oxidase system. The inhibited factor was localized to the HL-60 cytosol. These data suggest that an isoprenoid pathway intermediate is necessary for activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This is likely to represent the requirement for an isoprenoid moiety in the posttranslational modification of a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein. Our studies provide support for the involvement of such a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein in NADPH oxidase activation. Images PMID:1310693

  3. Forage polyphenol oxidase and ruminant livestock nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is predominately associated with the detrimental effect of browning fruit and vegetables, however, interest within PPO containing forage crops (crops to be fed to animals) has grown since the browning reaction was associated with reduced nitrogen (N) losses in silo and the rumen. The reduction in protein breakdown in silo of red clover (high PPO forage) increased the quality of protein, improving N-use efficiency [feed N into product N (e.g., Milk): NUE] when fed to ruminants. A further benefit of red clover silage feeding is a significant reduction in lipolysis (cleaving of glycerol-based lipid) in silo and an increase in the deposition of beneficial C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in animal products, which has also been linked to PPO activity. PPOs protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in silo is related to the deactivation of plant proteases and lipases. This deactivation occurs through PPO catalyzing the conversion of diphenols to quinones which bind with cellular nucleophiles such as protein reforming a protein-bound phenol (PBP). If the protein is an enzyme (e.g., protease or lipase) the complexing denatures the enzyme. However, PPO is inactive in the anaerobic rumen and therefore any subsequent protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen must be as a result of events that occurred to the forage pre-ingestion. Reduced activity of plant proteases and lipases would have little effect on NUE and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen due to the greater concentration of rumen microbial proteases and lipases. The mechanism for PPOs protection of plant protein in the rumen is a consequence of complexing plant protein, rather than protease deactivation per se. These complexed proteins reduce protein digestibility in the rumen and subsequently increase undegraded dietary protein flow to the small intestine. The mechanism for protecting glycerol-based PUFA has yet to be fully elucidated but may be associated

  4. The First Mammalian Aldehyde Oxidase Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Catarina; Mahro, Martin; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Ramos, Maria João; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Leimkühler, Silke; Romão, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) are homodimeric proteins belonging to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum-containing enzymes. Each 150-kDa monomer contains a FAD redox cofactor, two spectroscopically distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and a molybdenum cofactor located within the protein active site. AOXs are characterized by broad range substrate specificity, oxidizing different aldehydes and aromatic N-heterocycles. Despite increasing recognition of its role in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, the physiological function of the protein is still largely unknown. We have crystallized and solved the crystal structure of mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 to 2.9 Å. This is the first mammalian AOX whose structure has been solved. The structure provides important insights into the protein active center and further evidence on the catalytic differences characterizing AOX and xanthine oxidoreductase. The mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 three-dimensional structure combined with kinetic, mutagenesis data, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics studies make a decisive contribution to understand the molecular basis of its rather broad substrate specificity. PMID:23019336

  5. Oxidative stress, NADPH oxidases, and arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Runge, Marschall S; Madamanchi, Nageswara R

    2016-05-10

    Atherosclerosis and its major complications - myocardial infarction and stroke - remain major causes of death and disability in the United States and world-wide. Indeed, with dramatic increases in obesity and diabetes mellitus, the prevalence and public health impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) will likely remain high. Major advances have been made in development of new therapies to reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis and CVD, in particular for treatment of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Oxidative stress is the common mechanistic link for many CVD risk factors. However, only recently have the tools existed to study the interface between oxidative stress and CVD in animal models. The most important source of reactive oxygen species (and hence oxidative stress) in vascular cells are the multiple forms of enzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). Recently published and emerging studies now clearly establish that: 1) NADPH oxidases are of critical importance in atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal models; 2) given the tissue-specific expression of key components of NADPH oxidase, it may be possible to target vascular oxidative stress for prevention of CVD. PMID:25649240

  6. Inactivation of monoamine oxidase by allylamine does not result in flavin attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, R.B.; Hiebert, C.K.; Vazquez, M.L.

    1985-11-25

    (1-TH)Allylamine was synthesized by sodium boro(TH)hydride reduction of acrolein followed by direct conversion of the (1-TH)allyl alcohol to N-allylphthalimide with triphenylphosphine, diethylazodicarboxylate, and phthalimide. The protecting group was removed with hydrazine. Inactivation of beef liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase with (1-TH)allylamine led to incorporation of 1-6 eq of inactivator/active site depending upon the length of incubation time. Inactivation and radioactivity incorporation coincided; however, after 1 eq of tritium was incorporated and 5% enzyme activity remained, additional radioactivity continued to become incorporated into the enzyme. The optical spectrum of the FAD coenzyme changed during inactivation from that of oxidized to reduced flavin. Following dialysis of the inactivated enzyme, the spectrum remained reduced, but denaturation in urea rapidly resulted in reoxidation of the flavin. Under these same denaturing conditions, 96% of the radioactivity associated with the enzyme remained bound, therefore indicating that allylamine attachment is not to the flavin coenzyme but rather to an active site amino acid residue. The adduct also was stable to base and, to a lesser degree, acid treatment. Although allylamine and N-cyclopropylbenzylamine appear to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase to give 3-(amino acid residue) propanal adducts, two different amino acids seem to be involved because of a difference in stability of the adducts. The mechanisms for inactivation of monoamine oxidase by allylamine and reactivation by benzylamine are discussed in relation to previously reported results.

  7. Structure-function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure-function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  8. Structure–function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M.; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure–function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  9. Potential role of NADPH oxidase in pathogenesis of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wei-Li; Xiang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Kai; Xu, Wei; Xia, Shi-Hai

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to inflammatory disorders. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX), originally found in phagocytes, is the main source of ROS in nonphagocytic cells. Besides directly producing the detrimental highly reactive ROS to act on biomolecules (lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids), NOX can also activate multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis by producing ROS. Recently, research on pancreatic NOX is no longer limited to inflammatory cells, but extends to the aspect of pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatic stellate cells, which are considered to be potentially associated with pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize the literature on NOX protein structure, activation, function and its role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. PMID:25133019

  10. Changes in oxidative stress in transgenic RNAi ACO1 tomato fruit during ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglous, Najat Mohamed; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Hassan, Maizom; Zainal, Zamri

    2013-11-01

    Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum L.) is the second most cultivated vegetable in the world and widely used as a system for studying the role of ethylene during fruit ripening. Our objective was to study the oxidative stress and antioxidative metabolism during ripening of non transgenic tomato and transgenic line-21 tomato which reduced ethylene. The line-21 of transgenic tomato plants (RNAi ACO1) had lower ethylene production and longer shelf-life more than 32 days as compared to the wild-type fruits which have very short shelf-life. In this study, tomato fruit were divided into five different stages (MG: mature green 5%, B: breaker 25%, T: turning 50%, O: orange75%, RR: red ripe100%). The activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) and lipid peroxidation (MDA) were measured to assess changes in oxidative stress. The LOX activity and MDA content decreased significantly obtaining 2.6-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively, as compared to the wild type fruit. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were increased to 1.9 and 1.2 folds from the mature green to the fully ripe stage in transgenic tomatoes. Furthermore, the wild type tomato increases 1.3 in SOD and 1.6 in CAT activities. The overall results indicate that the wild type tomato fruit showed a faster rate of ripening, parallel to decline in the rate of enzymatic antioxidative systems as compared to the transgenic line-21 tomato fruit. In addition, the results show that the antioxidant capacity is improved during the ripening process and is accompanied by an increase in the oxidative stress.

  11. Correlation between electrical properties and thermodynamic stability of ACoO{sub 3-{delta}} perovskites (A= La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Barbara; Harvey, Ashley S.; Martynczuk, Julia; Gauckler, Ludwig J.; Tanasescu, Speranta; Teodorescu, Florina; Botea, Alina; Conder, Kazimierz; Grundy, A. Nicholas

    2011-08-15

    For perovskites with the general formula ACoO{sub 3-{delta}} (A = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, and Gd) the influence of the A-site cation on the electrical conductivity, electronic structure, thermodynamic stability, and oxygen stoichiometry was studied. The perovskite oxide powders were produced by a combined citric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid complexing method. Ceramic specimens sintered at 1100 deg. C in air were single-phase perovskites. With increasing temperature, the electrical conductivity shows three discrete regimes. All compositions show semiconductivity up to a transition temperature of {approx}300 deg. C-450 deg. C and then behave like metallic conductors. The activation energies for the semiconductivity, as well as the transition temperatures to the metallic-like conduction, decrease monotonically with increasing pseudocubic lattice parameters, i.e., with increasing ionic radii of the A cation. This behavior correlates with decreasing oxygen nonstoichiometry and increased thermodynamic stability. The highest conductivity and the lowest activation energy of 0.66 eV were found for LaCoO{sub 3-{delta},} which also had the lowest semiconductor-metal transition temperature at 269 deg. C, the lowest oxygen nonstoichiometry of {delta}= 0.008, and the highest Gibbs free energy change for the decomposition reaction of 42.37 kJ/mol at 850 deg. C. GdCoO{sub 3-{delta}} had the highest oxygen nonstoichiometry with {delta}0.032, a high activation energy of 1.19 eV for the semiconductivity with a high transition temperature at 452 deg. C, and the lowest Gibbs free energy change of 26.54 kJ/mol at 850 deg. C. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data imply an increasing Co low-spin character with decreasing cation radius from La to Gd, while an increase in temperature increases the number of holes or Co 3d bandwidth. This correlates well with the electrical conductivity data.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to the alternative oxidase of higher plant mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Elthon, T.E.; Nickels, R.L.; McIntosh, L. )

    1989-04-01

    The higher plant mitochondrial electron transport chain contains, in addition to the cytochrome chain which terminates with cytochrome oxidase, an alternative pathway that terminates with an alternative oxidase. The alternative oxidase of Sauromatum guttatum Schott has recently been identified as a cluster of proteins with apparent M{sub r} of 37, 36, and 35 kilodaltons (kD). Monoclonal antibodies have now been prepared to these proteins and designated as AOA (binding all three proteins of the alternative oxidase cluster), AOU (binding the upper or 37 kD protein), and AOL (binding the lower or 36 and 35 kD proteins). All three antibodies bind to their respective alternative oxidase proteins whether the proteins are in their native or denatured states. AOA and AOU inhibit alternative oxidase activity around 49%, whereas AOL inhibits activity only 14%. When coupled individually to Sepharose 4B, all three monoclonal resins were capable of retaining the entire cluster of alternative oxidase proteins, suggesting that these proteins are physically associated in some manner. The monoclonals were capable of binding similar mitochondrial proteins in a number of thermogenic and nonthermogenic species, indicating that they will be useful in characterizing and purifying the alternative oxidase of different systems. The ability of the monoclonal-Sepharose 4B resins to retain the cluster of previously identified alternative oxidase proteins, along with the inhibition of alternative oxidase activity by these monoclonals, supports the role of these proteins in constituting the alternative oxidase.

  13. Crystal structure of heterotetrameric sarcosine oxidase from Corynebacterium sp. U-96

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, Koh; E-mail: idakoh@sci.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Moriguchi, Tomotaka; Suzuki, Haruo; E-mail: suzuki@sci.kitasato-u.ac.jp

    2005-07-29

    Sarcosine oxidase from Corynebacterium sp. U-96 is a heterotetrameric enzyme. Here we report the crystal structures of the enzyme in complex with dimethylglycine and folinic acid. The {alpha} subunit is composed of two domains, contains NAD{sup +}, and binds folinic acid. The {beta} subunit contains dimethylglycine, FAD, and FMN, and these flavins are approximately 10 A apart. The {gamma} subunit is in contact with two domains of {alpha} subunit and has possibly a folate-binding structure. The {delta} subunit contains a single atom of zinc and has a Cys{sub 3}His zinc finger structure. Based on the structures determined and on the previous works, the structure-function relationship on the heterotetrameric sarcosine oxidase is discussed.

  14. Reengineered glucose oxidase for amperometric glucose determination in diabetes analytics.

    PubMed

    Arango Gutierrez, Erik; Mundhada, Hemanshu; Meier, Thomas; Duefel, Hartmut; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-12-15

    Glucose oxidase is an oxidoreductase exhibiting a high β-D-glucose specificity and high stability which renders glucose oxidase well-suited for applications in diabetes care. Nevertheless, GOx activity is highly oxygen dependent which can lead to inaccuracies in amperometric β-D-glucose determinations. Therefore a directed evolution campaign with two rounds of random mutagenesis (SeSaM followed by epPCR), site saturation mutagenesis studies on individual positions, and one simultaneous site saturation library (OmniChange; 4 positions) was performed. A diabetes care well suited mediator (quinone diimine) was selected and the GOx variant (T30V I94V) served as starting point. For directed GOx evolution a microtiter plate detection system based on the quinone diimine mediator was developed and the well-known ABTS-assay was applied in microtiter plate format to validate oxygen independency of improved GOx variants. Two iterative rounds of random diversity generation and screening yielded to two subsets of amino acid positions which mainly improved activity (A173, A332) and oxygen independency (F414, V560). Simultaneous site saturation of all four positions with a reduced subset of amino acids using the OmniChange method yielded finally variant V7 with a 37-fold decreased oxygen dependency (mediator activity: 7.4 U/mg WT, 47.5 U/mg V7; oxygen activity: 172.3 U/mg WT, 30.1 U/mg V7). V7 is still highly β-D-glucose specific, highly active with the quinone diimine mediator and thermal resistance is retained (prerequisite for GOx coating of diabetes test stripes). The latter properties and V7's oxygen insensitivity make V7 a very promising candidate to replace standard GOx in diabetes care applications. PMID:23835222

  15. Engineering Pyranose 2-Oxidase for Modified Oxygen Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Shelswell, Christopher; Huber-Dittes, Benjamin; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K.

    2014-01-01

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (POx), a member of the GMC family of flavoproteins, catalyzes the regioselective oxidation of aldopyranoses at position C2 to the corresponding 2-ketoaldoses. During the first half-reaction, FAD is reduced to FADH2 and reoxidized in the second half-reaction by reducing molecular oxygen to H2O2. Alternative electron acceptors including quinones, radicals or chelated metal ions show significant and in some cases even higher activity. While oxygen as cheap and abundantly available electron acceptor is favored for many processes, reduced oxygen reactivity is desirable for some applications such as in biosensors/biofuel cells because of reduced oxidative damages to the biocatalyst from concomitant H2O2 production as well as reduced electron “leakage” to oxygen. The reactivity of flavoproteins with oxygen is of considerable scientific interest, and the determinants of oxygen activation and reactivity are the subject of numerous studies. We applied site-saturation mutagenesis on a set of eleven amino acids around the active site based on the crystal structure of the enzyme. Using microtiter plate screening assays with peroxidase/2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, variants of POx with decreased oxidase activity and maintained dehydrogenase activity were identified. Variants T166R, Q448H, L545C, L547R and N593C were characterized with respect to their apparent steady-state constants with oxygen and the alternative electron acceptors DCPIP, 1,4-benzoquinone and ferricenium ion, and the effect of the mutations was rationalized based on structural properties. PMID:25296188

  16. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by the aldehyde oxidase inhibitor raloxifene: implications for identifying molybdopterin nitrite reductases.

    PubMed

    Weidert, E R; Schoenborn, S O; Cantu-Medellin, N; Choughule, K V; Jones, J P; Kelley, E E

    2014-02-15

    Sources of nitric oxide alternative to nitric oxide synthases are gaining significant traction as crucial mediators of vessel function under hypoxic inflammatory conditions. For example, capacity to catalyze the one electron reduction of nitrite (NO2-) to ·NO has been reported for hemoglobin, myoglobin and molybdopterin-containing enzymes including xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and aldehyde oxidase (AO). For XOR and AO, use of selective inhibition strategies is therefore crucial when attempting to assign relative contributions to nitrite-mediated ·NO formation in cells and tissue. To this end, XOR inhibition has been accomplished with application of classic pyrazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors allo/oxypurinol or the newly FDA-approved XOR-specific inhibitor, Uloric® (febuxostat). Likewise, raloxifene, an estrogen receptor antagonist, has been identified as a potent (Ki=1.0 nM) inhibitor of AO. Herein, we characterize the inhibition kinetics of raloxifene for XOR and describe the resultant effects on inhibiting XO-catalyzed ·NO formation. Exposure of purified XO to raloxifene (PBS, pH 7.4) resulted in a dose-dependent (12.5-100 μM) inhibition of xanthine oxidation to uric acid. Dixon plot analysis revealed a competitive inhibition process with a Ki=13 μM. This inhibitory process was more effective under acidic pH; similar to values encountered under hypoxic/inflammatory conditions. In addition, raloxifene also inhibited anoxic XO-catalyzed reduction of NO2- to NO (EC50=64 μM). In contrast to having no effect on XO-catalyzed uric acid production, the AO inhibitor menadione demonstrated potent inhibition of XO-catalyzed NO2- reduction (EC50=60 nM); somewhat similar to the XO-specific inhibitor, febuxostat (EC50=4 nM). Importantly, febuxostat was found to be a very poor inhibitor of human AO (EC50=613 μM) suggesting its usefulness for validating XO-dependent contributions to NO2- reduction in biological systems. Combined, these data indicate care should be taken

  17. Disruption, but not overexpression of urate oxidase alters susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole- and pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Portelli, Jeanelle; Raedt, Robrecht; Glorieux, Griet; Larsen, Lars E; Sprengers, Mathieu; Van Lysebettens, Wouter; Carrette, Evelien; Delbeke, Jean; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-07-01

    There is a continuous drive to find new, improved therapies that have a different mechanism of action in order to help diminish the sizable percentage of persons with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Uric acid is increasingly recognized as contributing to the pathophysiology of multiple disorders, and there are indications that uric acid might play a role in epileptic mechanisms. Nevertheless, studies that directly investigate its involvement are lacking. In this study we assessed the susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole- and pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice with genetically altered uric acid levels by targeting urate oxidase, which is the enzyme responsible for uric acid breakdown. We found that although disruption of urate oxidase resulted in a decreased susceptibility to all behavioral end points in both seizure models, overexpression did not result in any alterations when compared to their wild-type littermates. Our results suggest that a chronic increase in uric acid levels may result in decreased brain excitability. PMID:27158916

  18. Molecular Interface of S100A8 with Cytochrome b558 and NADPH Oxidase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Sylvie; Hograindleur, Marc-André; Paclet, Marie-Hélène; Polack, Benoît; Morel, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    S100A8 and S100A9 are two calcium binding Myeloid Related Proteins, and important mediators of inflammatory diseases. They were recently introduced as partners for phagocyte NADPH oxidase regulation. However, the precise mechanism of their interaction remains elusive. We had for aim (i) to evaluate the impact of S100 proteins on NADPH oxidase activity; (ii) to characterize molecular interaction of either S100A8, S100A9, or S100A8/S100A9 heterocomplex with cytochrome b558; and (iii) to determine the S100A8 consensus site involved in cytochrome b558/S100 interface. Recombinant full length or S100A9-A8 truncated chimera proteins and ExoS-S100 fusion proteins were expressed in E. coli and in P. aeruginosa respectively. Our results showed that S100A8 is the functional partner for NADPH oxidase activation contrary to S100A9, however, the loading with calcium and a combination with phosphorylated S100A9 are essential in vivo. Endogenous S100A9 and S100A8 colocalize in differentiated and PMA stimulated PLB985 cells, with Nox2/gp91phox and p22phox. Recombinant S100A8, loaded with calcium and fused with the first 129 or 54 N-terminal amino acid residues of the P. aeruginosa ExoS toxin, induced a similar oxidase activation in vitro, to the one observed with S100A8 in the presence of S100A9 in vivo. This suggests that S100A8 is the essential component of the S100A9/S100A8 heterocomplex for oxidase activation. In this context, recombinant full-length rS100A9-A8 and rS100A9-A8 truncated 90 chimera proteins as opposed to rS100A9-A8 truncated 86 and rS100A9-A8 truncated 57 chimeras, activate the NADPH oxidase function of purified cytochrome b558 suggesting that the C-terminal region of S100A8 is directly involved in the molecular interface with the hemoprotein. The data point to four strategic 87HEES90 amino acid residues of the S100A8 C-terminal sequence that are involved directly in the molecular interaction with cytochrome b558 and then in the phagocyte NADPH oxidase activation

  19. Diphenol activation of the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of field bean (Dolichos lablab) polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Lalitha R; Paul, Beena

    2002-03-13

    This paper reports a study on the hydroxylation of ferulic acid and tyrosine by field bean (Dolichos lablab) polyphenol oxidase, a reaction that does not take place without the addition of catechol. A lag period similar to the characteristic lag of tyrosinase activity was observed, the length of which decreased with increasing catechol concentration and increased with increasing ferulic acid concentration. The activation constant K(a) of catechol for ferulic acid hydroxylation reaction was 5 mM. The kinetic parameters of field bean polyphenol oxidase toward ferulic acid and tyrosine were evaluated in the presence of catechol. 4-Methyl catechol, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, pyrogallol, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoic acid, substrates with high binding affinity to field bean polyphenol oxidase, could stimulate this hydroxylation reaction. In contrast, diphenols such as protocatechuic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid, which were not substrates for the oxidation reaction, were unable to bring about this activation. It is most likely that only o-diphenols that are substrates for the diphenolase serve as cosubstrates by donating electrons at the active site for the monophenolase activity. The reaction mechanism for this activation is consistent with that proposed for tyrosinase (Sanchez-Ferrer, A.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. N.; Garcia-Canovas, F.; Garcia-Carmona, F. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1995, 1247, 1-11). The presence of o-diphenols, viz. catechol, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and 4-methyl catechol, is also necessary for the oxidation of the diphenols, caffeic acid, and catechin to their quinones by the field bean polyphenol oxidase. This oxidation reaction occurs immediately with no lag period and does not occur without the addition of diphenol. The kinetic parameters for caffeic acid (K(m) = 0.08 mM, V(max) = 32440 u/mg) in the presence of catechol and the activation constant K(a) of catechol (4.6 mM) for this reaction were enumerated. The absence of a lag

  20. Isozymes of Ipomoea batatas catechol oxidase differ in catalase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, C; Eicken, C; Magrini, A; Meyer, H E; Rompel, A; Spener, F; Krebs, B

    2001-07-01

    The amino acid sequences of two isozymes of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) were determined by Edman degradation of BrCN cleavage fragments of the native protein and by sequencing of amplified cDNA fragments. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of plant catechol oxidases revealed about 80% equidistance between the two I. batatas catechol oxidases and approximately 40--60% to catechol oxidases of other plants. When H(2)O(2) was applied as substrate the 39 kDa isozyme, but not the 40 kDa isozyme, showed catalase-like activity. The structure of the 40 kDa isozyme was modeled on the basis of the published crystal structure of the 39 kDa isozyme [T. Klabunde et al., Nat. Struct. Biol. 5 (1998) 1084]. The active site model closely resembled that of the 39 kDa isozyme determined by crystallography, except for a mutation of Thr243 (40 kDa isozyme) to Ile241 (39 kDa isozyme) close to the dimetal center. This residue difference affects the orientation of the Glu238/236 residue, which is thought to be responsible for the catalase-like activity of the 39 kDa isozyme for which a catalytic mechanism is proposed. PMID:11451442

  1. Biocatalytic potential of laccase-like multicopper oxidases from Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laccase-like multicopper oxidases have been reported in several Aspergillus species but they remain uncharacterized. The biocatalytic potential of the Aspergillus niger fungal pigment multicopper oxidases McoA and McoB and ascomycete laccase McoG was investigated. Results The laccase-like multicopper oxidases McoA, McoB and McoG from the commonly used cell factory Aspergillus niger were homologously expressed, purified and analyzed for their biocatalytic potential. All three recombinant enzymes were monomers with apparent molecular masses ranging from 80 to 110 kDa. McoA and McoG resulted to be blue, whereas McoB was yellow. The newly obtained oxidases displayed strongly different activities towards aromatic compounds and synthetic dyes. McoB exhibited high catalytic efficiency with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPPDA) and 2,2-azino-di(3-ethylbenzthiazoline) sulfonic acid (ABTS), and appeared to be a promising biocatalyst. Besides oxidizing a variety of phenolic compounds, McoB catalyzed successfully the decolorization and detoxification of the widely used textile dye malachite green. Conclusions The A. niger McoA, McoB, and McoG enzymes showed clearly different catalytic properties. Yellow McoB showed broad substrate specificity, catalyzing the oxidation of several phenolic compounds commonly present in different industrial effluents. It also harbored high decolorization and detoxification activity with the synthetic dye malachite green, showing to have an interesting potential as a new industrial biocatalyst. PMID:23270588

  2. In vivo oxalate degradation by liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in rat model of hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Tulika; Pundir, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: High level of urinary oxalate substantially increases the risk of hyperoxaluria, a significant risk factor for urolithiasis. The primary goal of this study was to reduce urinary oxalate excretion employing liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in animal model. Methods: A membrane bound oxalate oxidase was purified from Bougainvillea leaves. The enzyme in its native form was less effective at the physiological pH of the recipient animal. To increase its functional viability, the enzyme was immobilized on to ethylene maleic anhydride (EMA). Rats were injected with liposome encapsulated EMA- oxalate oxidase and the effect was observed on degradation of oxalic acid. Results: The enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity with 60-fold purification and 31 per cent yield. The optimum pH of EMA-derivative enzyme was 6.0 and it showed 70 per cent of its optimal activity at pH 7.0. The EMA-bound enzyme encapsulated into liposome showed greater oxalate degradation in 15 per cent casein vitamin B6 deficient fed rats as compared with 30 per cent casein vitamin B6 deficient fed rats and control rats. Interpretation & conclusions: EMA-oxalate oxidase encapsulated liposome caused oxalate degradation in experimental hyperoxaluria indicating that the enzyme could be used as a therapeutic agent in hyperoxaluria leading to urinary stones. PMID:23481063

  3. Source challenges resulting from the first applications of a UV storage ring FEL on Super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bakker, R.; Garzella, D.; Nahn, L.; Marsi, M.; Mérola, F.; Hara, T.; Billardon, M.

    1996-02-01

    On the Super-ACO free electron laser were developed the first applications of a storage ring based FEL and of a UV FEL. The feasibility of use was demonstrated in 1993 with a time resolved polarised fluorescence experiment in biology. After these experiments, the stability of the laser source was significantly improved, with the installation of a longitudinal feedback. A particular advantage of a storage ring FEL source is to provide as well naturally synchronized synchrotron radiation. A first pump-probe time-resolved experiment coupling such two tunable, synchronized light sources was then performed in surface physics.

  4. Investigations into the uricolytic properties of urate oxidase in a granivorous (Columba livia domestica) and in a carnivorous (Buteo jamaicensis) avian species.

    PubMed

    Poffers, J; Lumeij, J T; Redig, P T

    2002-12-01

    To study the uricolytic properties of urate oxidase in granivorous and carnivorous birds, experiments were conducted in pigeons (Columba livia domestica) and Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). Plasma concentrations of allantoin and uric acid were determined at various times in experimental groups before and after receiving 100, 200, and 600 U/kg urate oxidase once daily and were compared with controls. All regimens caused a significant decrease in plasma uric acid concentrations within 2 days after the first administration, when compared with controls. Furthermore, both doses used in Red-tailed Hawks (200 and 100 U/kg) caused a significant postprandial suppression of plasma uric acid concentrations. Plasma allantoin concentrations were significantly higher when compared with controls. The ability of urate oxidase to prevent the physiological postprandial hyperuricaemia in Red-tailed Hawks and to reduce plasma uric acid concentrations to undetectable levels, shows the great potential of this drug for treating avian hyperuricaemia. PMID:12593740

  5. NADPH oxidases in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Belmondo, Simone; Calcagno, Cristina; Genre, Andrea; Puppo, Alain; Pauly, Nicolas; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases are the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that plays key roles as both signal and stressor in several plant processes, including defense responses against pathogens. ROS accumulation in root cells during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) development has raised the interest in understanding how ROS-mediated defense programs are modulated during the establishment of this mutualistic interaction. We have recently analyzed the expression pattern of 5 NADPH oxidase (also called RBOH) encoding genes in Medicago truncatula, showing that only one of them (MtRbohE) is specifically upregulated in arbuscule-containing cells. In line with this result, RNAi silencing of MtRbohE generated a strong alteration in root colonization, with a significant reduction in the number of arbusculated cells. On this basis, we propose that MtRBOHE-mediated ROS production plays a crucial role in the intracellular accommodation of arbuscules. PMID:27018627

  6. Human copper-dependent amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Finney, Joel; Moon, Hee-Jung; Ronnebaum, Trey; Lantz, Mason; Mure, Minae

    2014-03-15

    Copper amine oxidases (CAOs) are a class of enzymes that contain Cu(2+) and a tyrosine-derived quinone cofactor, catalyze the conversion of a primary amine functional group to an aldehyde, and generate hydrogen peroxide and ammonia as byproducts. These enzymes can be classified into two non-homologous families: 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone (TPQ)-dependent CAOs and the lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ)-dependent lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of proteins. In this review, we will focus on recent developments in the field of research concerning human CAOs and the LOX family of proteins. The aberrant expression of these enzymes is linked to inflammation, fibrosis, tumor metastasis/invasion and other diseases. Consequently, there is a critical need to understand the functions of these proteins at the molecular level, so that strategies targeting these enzymes can be developed to combat human diseases. PMID:24407025

  7. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase activity in Ataulfo mango.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Summervir; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2015-03-15

    Crude extracts of Ataulfo exhibited polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity with pyrogallol, 3-methylcatechol, catechol, gallic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The substrate dependent pH optima ranged from pH 5.4 to 6.4 with Michaelis-Menten constants between 0.84 ± 0.09 and 4.6 ± 0.7 mM measured in MES or phosphate buffers. The use of acetate buffers resulted in larger Michaelis-Menten constants, up to 14.62 ± 2.03 mM. Sodium ascorbate, glutathione, and kojic acid are promising inhibitors to prevent enzymatic browning in Ataulfo. PPO activity increased with ripeness and was always higher in the skin compared to the pulp. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) enhanced PPO activity, with pulp showing a stronger increase than skin. SDS-PAGE gels stained for catecholase activity showed multiple bands, with the most prominent bands at apparent molecular weights of 53, 112, and 144 kDa. PMID:25308684

  8. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  9. Comparison of glucose oxidases from Penicillium adametzii, Penicillium Funiculosum and Aspergillus Niger in the design of amperometric glucose biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ramanavicius, Arunas; Voronovic, Jaroslav; Semashko, Tatiana; Mikhailova, Raisa; Kausaite-Minkstimiene, Asta; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2014-01-01

    The properties of amperometric glucose biosensors based on three different glucose oxidases and various redox mediators were evaluated. Glucose oxidases (GOx) from Penicillium adametzii, Penicillium funiculosum and Aspergillus niger and artificial redox mediators, such as ferrocene, ferrocenecarboxaldehyde, α-methylferrocene methanol and ferrocenecarboxylic acid, were used for modifying the graphite rod electrode and amperometrical reagent-less glucose detection. The obtained results were compared using N-methylphenazonium methyl sulphate in the solution. Taking into account the experimental kinetic parameters and the stability of the tested enzymatic electrodes, GOx from Penicillium funiculosum proved to be more suitable for glucose biosensor design in comparison with other evaluated enzymes. PMID:25492463

  10. Dietary saponins of sea cucumber alleviate orotic acid-induced fatty liver in rats via PPARα and SREBP-1c signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common chronic liver disease in the world, and is becoming increasingly prevalent. Saponins of sea cucumber (SSC) are proven to exhibit various biological activities. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the effect of saponins extracted from sea cucumber (Pearsonothuria graeffei) on the preventive activity of fatty liver in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, including normal control group, fatty liver model group, SSC-treated group with SSC at levels of 0.01%, 0.03% and 0.05%. Model rats were established by administration with 1% orotic acid (OA). After the experiment period, serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and hepatic lipid concentrations were determined. To search for a possible mechanism, we examined the changes of key enzymes and transcriptional factors involved in hepatic lipids biosynthesis, fatty acid β-oxidation. Results Both 0.03% and 0.05% SSC treatment alleviated hepatic steatosis and reduced serum TG and TC concentration significantly in OA fed rats. Hepatic lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthase (FAS), malic enzyme (ME), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activities were inhibited by SSC treatment. SSC also decreased the gene expression of FAS, ME, G6PDH and sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1c). Otherwise, the rats feeding with SSC showed increased carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) activity in the liver. Hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα), together with its target gene CPT and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) mRNA expression were also upregulated by SSC. Conclusions According to our study, the lipids-lowering effect of dietary SSC may be partly associated with the enhancement of β-oxidation via PPARα activation. In addition, the inhibited SREBP-1c- mediated lipogenesis caused by SSC may also contribute to alleviating fatty liver. PMID:20211032

  11. Molecular, immunological, enzymatic and biochemical studies of coproporphyrinogen oxidase deficiency in a family with hereditary coproporphyria.

    PubMed

    Gross, U; Puy, H; Kühnel, A; Meissauer, U; Deybach, J C; Jacob, K; Martasek, P; Nordmann, Y; Doss, M O

    2002-02-01

    A 27-year-old woman who had recurrent pain in renal bed since 1998 with increasing character, was stationary admitted. The patient showed dark urine, complained of hair loss and took since 1994 a hormonal oral contraceptive. No photosensitivity was observed. Determinations of urinary porphyrin metabolites in 1998 revealed a porphyria cutanea tarda like excretion pattern with elevations of uro- (1767 nmol/24 hr, normal <29 nmol/24 hr) and heptacarboxyporphyrin (568 nmol/24 hr; normal <4 nmol/24 hr). Follow-up studies in feces showed the characteristics of a hereditary coproporphyria with dominance of coproporphyrin isomer III (total= 1470 nmol/g, isomer III= 93%), (normal: <37 nmol/g, isomer III = 25-35%). The excretion of porphyrin precursors (delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen) was increased by taking an ethinylestradiol-cyproteronacetate-preparation, but acute and/or chronic manifestations were not observed. Coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity was decreased to 35% in the patient (normal=138+/-21 pkat/g protein; x+/-s), whereas the activity of red cell uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase was normal. Her mother and both sisters could be verified as heterozygous gene carriers of hereditary coproporphyria by their urinary and fecal excretion parameters and because of reduced coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity up to 50%. The father was normal with respect to his genotype. Molecular analysis revealed a hitherto unknown mutation with the transversion of a cytosine to thymine at nucleotide position 854 in exon 4 of the coproporphyrinogen oxidase gene. The gene defect was confirmed by DGGE in the mother and her three daughters. The investigation of the immunological nature of the defective coproporphyrinogen oxidase gene from the whole family revealed decreased concentrations of coproporphyrinogen oxidase protein in the patient, her mother and her two sisters. PMID:11929047

  12. Comparison of kinetic properties of amine oxidases from sainfoin and lentil and immunochemical characterization of copper/quinoprotein amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Zajoncová, L; Frébort, I; Luhová, L; Sebela, M; Galuszka, P; Pec, P

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic properties of novel amine oxidase isolated from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) were compared to those of typical plant amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6) from lentil (Lens culinaris). The amine oxidase from sainfoin was active toward substrates, such as 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) with K(m) of 0.09 mM and 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) with K(m) of 0.24 mM. The maximum rate of oxidation for cadaverine at saturating concentration was 2.7 fold higher than that of putrescine. The amine oxidase from lentil had the maximum rate for putrescine comparable to the rate of sainfoin amine oxidase with the same substrate. Both amine oxidases, like other plant Cu-amine oxidases, were inhibited by substrate analogs (1,5-diamino-3-pentanone, 1,4-diamino-2-butanone and aminoguanidine), Cu2+ chelating agents (diethyltriamine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2,2'-bipyridyl, imidazole, sodium cyanide and sodium azide), some alkaloids (L-lobeline and cinchonine), some lathyrogens (beta-aminopropionitrile and aminoacetonitrile) and other inhibitors (benzamide oxime, acetone oxime, hydroxylamine and pargyline). Tested by Ouchterlony's double diffusion in agarose gel, polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from sainfoin, pea and grass pea cross-reacted with amine oxidases from several other Fabaceae and from barley (Hordeum vulgare) of Poaceae, while amine oxidase from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger did not cross-react at all. However, using Western blotting after SDS-PAGE with rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger, some degree of similarity of plant amine oxidases from sainfoin, pea, field pea, grass pea, fenugreek, common melilot, white sweetclover and Vicia panonica with the A. niger amine oxidase was confirmed. PMID:10092944

  13. Transient absorption spectroscopy in biology using the Super-ACO storage ring FEL and the synchrotron radiation combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Eric; Nahon, Laurent; Garzella, David; Nutarelli, Daniele; De Ninno, Giovanni; Hirsch, Matthias; Couprie, Marie Emmanuelle

    2001-12-01

    The Super-ACO storage ring FEL, covering the UV range down to 300 nm with a high average power (300 mW at 350 nm) together with a high stability and long lifetime, is a unique tool for the performance of users applications. We present here the first pump-probe two color experiments on biological species using a storage ring FEL coupled to the synchrotron radiation. The intense UV pulse of the Super-ACO FEL is used to prepare a high initial concentration of chromophores in their first singlet electronic excited state. The nearby bending magnet synchrotron radiation provides, on the other hand a pulsed, white light continuum (UV-IR), naturally synchronized with the FEL pulses and used to probe the photochemical subsequent events and the associated transient species. We have demonstrated the feasibility with a dye molecule (POPOP) observing a two-color effect, signature of excited state absorption and a temporal signature with Acridine. Applications on various chromophores of biological interest are carried out, such as the time-resolved absorption study of the first excited state of Acridine.

  14. Spatial Analyses of a Complete Sample of Rich Abell/ACO Clusters to z=0.14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    Galaxy clusters act as excellent mass tracers in our local Universe. They are bright, contain hundreds of galaxies, and are easy to observe. The most recognized galaxy cluster catalogs are those of Abell (1958) and Abell, Corwin and Olowin (1989-ACO). I will present the results of a new survey of Abell/ACO cluster redshifts that extends our knowledge of the large-scale mass distribution to a redshift of z = 0.14. The volume of the Universe traced by this survey is four times larger than any of its predecessors. The large number of clusters within the survey boundaries ( 560) as well as the large volume traced, allow for statistical analyses on scales never before probed. I will present the cluster power spectrum to scales approaching 1000h-1Mpc. I will also demonstrate the high-level of completeness for this survey, which allows one to study the effects of large-scale structure on internal cluster properties. I will then summarize some recent collaborative efforts which show that (1) Wide-Angle Tail radio jets are ``blown'' in the direction of the local large-scale axis; (2) High dM/dt cooling flow clusters reside in crowded environments; (3) Clusters with close near-neighbors are also close to the fundamental plane created from Lo, Lx and Ro. CM was funded in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Maine Science and Technology Foundation.

  15. Pathological changes in platelet histamine oxidases in atopic eczema

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Gruia

    1993-01-01

    Increased plasma histamine levels were associated with significantly lowered diamine and type B monoamine oxidase activities in platelet-rich plasma of atopic eczema (AE) patients. The diamine oxidase has almost normal cofactor levels (pyridoxal phosphate and Cu2+) but the cofactor levels for type B monoamine oxidase (flavin adenine dinucleotide and Fe2+) are lowered. The biogenic amines putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and serotonin in the sera, as well as dopamine and epinephrine in EDTA-plasma were found to be normal. It is unlikely, therefore, that these amines are responsible for the decreased activities of monoamine and diamine oxidase in these patients. The most likely causative factors for the inhibition of the diamine oxidase are nicotine, alcohol, food additives and other environmental chemicals, or perhaps a genetic defect of the diamine oxidase. PMID:18475554

  16. Following Glucose Oxidase Activity by Chemiluminescence and Chemiluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (CRET) Processes Involving Enzyme-DNAzyme Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Niazov, Angelica; Freeman, Ronit; Girsh, Julia; Willner, Itamar

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid consisting of glucose oxidase-functionalized with hemin/G-quadruplex units is used for the chemiluminescence detection of glucose. The glucose oxidase-mediated oxidation of glucose yields gluconic acid and H2O2. The latter in the presence of luminol acts as substrate for the hemin/G-quadruplex-catalyzed generation of chemiluminescence. The glucose oxidase/hemin G-quadruplex hybrid was immobilized on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The light generated by the hybrid, in the presence of glucose, activated a chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer process to the QDs, resulting in the luminescence of the QDs. The intensities of the luminescence of the QDs at different concentrations of glucose provided an optical means to detect glucose. PMID:22346648

  17. Following glucose oxidase activity by chemiluminescence and chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) processes involving enzyme-DNAzyme conjugates.

    PubMed

    Niazov, Angelica; Freeman, Ronit; Girsh, Julia; Willner, Itamar

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid consisting of glucose oxidase-functionalized with hemin/G-quadruplex units is used for the chemiluminescence detection of glucose. The glucose oxidase-mediated oxidation of glucose yields gluconic acid and H(2)O(2). The latter in the presence of luminol acts as substrate for the hemin/G-quadruplex-catalyzed generation of chemiluminescence. The glucose oxidase/hemin G-quadruplex hybrid was immobilized on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The light generated by the hybrid, in the presence of glucose, activated a chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer process to the QDs, resulting in the luminescence of the QDs. The intensities of the luminescence of the QDs at different concentrations of glucose provided an optical means to detect glucose. PMID:22346648

  18. 4-Coumaroyl coenzyme A 3-hydroxylase activity from cell cultures of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and its relationship to polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z X; Li, S M; Löscher, R; Heide, L

    1997-11-15

    A 4-coumaroyl-CoA 3-hydroxylase activity was purified 4600-fold from cell cultures of Lithospermum erythrorhizon. The enzyme showed a molecular mass of 42,400 +/- 1700 Da in gel chromatography and required ascorbate, NADH, or NADPH as cofactors. 4-Coumaroyl-CoA, 4-coumarate, p-cresol, and several other phenolic substances, but not tyrosine, were accepted as substrates for the hydroxylation. Besides hydroxylase activity, the enzyme showed diphenol oxidase activity. Both activities were inhibited by diethyldithiocarbamate or beta-mercaptoethanol, although at different concentrations. The enzyme showed striking similarity to a 4-coumaroyl-glucose 3-hydroxylase from sweet potato (Ipomoe batatas) roots, which has reportedly been purified to homogeneity and identified as a specific enzyme of chlorogenic acid biosynthesis. Close examination and comparison to a commercially available polyphenol oxidase, however, suggest that the enzyme activities purified from both Lithospermum and sweet potato are polyphenol oxidases rather than specific enzymes of secondary metabolism. PMID:9367532

  19. Gravity Responsive NADH Oxidase of the Plasma Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing gravity using an NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane which has been found to respond to unit gravity and low centrifugal g forces. The oxidation rate of NADH supplied to the NADH oxidase is measured and translated to represent the relative gravitational force exerted on the protein. The NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane may be obtained from plant or animal sources or may be produced recombinantly.

  20. Ascorbyl palmitate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles: characteristic and polyphenol oxidase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Ji-Soo; Kim, Kwang Yup; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to produce ascorbyl palmitate (AP)-loaded nanoparticles in order to inhibit polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in bananas. AP-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using acetic acid and citric acid (denoted as CS/AA and CS/CA nanoparticles, respectively). As the initial AP concentration increases, the particle size significantly decreases, and the zeta potential, entrapment and loading efficiency significantly increases. The PPO inhibitory activity of AP was effectively improved when AP was nano-encapsulated by chitosan compared to no encapsulation. These results suggest that chitosan nano-encapsulation can be used to enhance the PPO inhibitory activity of AP. PMID:23247266

  1. Glucose Biosensor Based on Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase in Platinum Nanoparticles/Graphene/Chitosan Nanocomposite Film

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Kang, Xinhuang; Wang, Chong M.; Wang, Donghai; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-09-01

    The bionanocomposite film consisting of glucose oxidase/Pt/functional graphene sheets/chitosan (GOD/Pt/FGS/chitosan) for glucose sensing was described. With the electrocatalytic synergy of FGS and Pt nanoparticles to hydrogen peroxide, a sensitive biosensor with detection limit of 0.6 µM glucose was achieved. The biosensor also had good reproducibility, long term stability and negligible interfering signals from ascorbic acid and uric acid comparing to the response to glucose. The large surface area and good conductivity of graphene suggests that graphene is a potential candidate for sensor material. The hybrid nanocomposite glucose sensor provides new opportunity for clinical diagnosis and point-of-care applications.

  2. The cyclope gene of Drosophila encodes a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog.

    PubMed

    Szuplewski, S; Terracol, R

    2001-08-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. In eukaryotes, the enzyme is composed of 3 mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits and 7-10 (in mammals) nuclear DNA-encoded subunits. This enzyme has been extensively studied in mammals and yeast but, in Drosophila, very little is known and no mutant has been described so far. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of mutations in cyclope (cype) and the cloning of the gene encoding a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog. cype is an essential gene whose mutations are lethal and show pleiotropic phenotypes. The 77-amino acid peptide encoded by cype is 46% identical and 59% similar to the human subunit (75 amino acids). The transcripts are expressed maternally and throughout development in localized regions. They are found predominantly in the central nervous system of the embryo; in the central region of imaginal discs; in the germarium, follicular, and nurse cells of the ovary; and in testis. A search in the Genome Annotation Database of Drosophila revealed the absence of subunit VIIb and the presence of 9 putative nuclear cytochrome c oxidase subunits with high identity scores when compared to the 10 human subunits. PMID:11514451

  3. The cyclope gene of Drosophila encodes a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Szuplewski, S; Terracol, R

    2001-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. In eukaryotes, the enzyme is composed of 3 mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits and 7-10 (in mammals) nuclear DNA-encoded subunits. This enzyme has been extensively studied in mammals and yeast but, in Drosophila, very little is known and no mutant has been described so far. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of mutations in cyclope (cype) and the cloning of the gene encoding a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog. cype is an essential gene whose mutations are lethal and show pleiotropic phenotypes. The 77-amino acid peptide encoded by cype is 46% identical and 59% similar to the human subunit (75 amino acids). The transcripts are expressed maternally and throughout development in localized regions. They are found predominantly in the central nervous system of the embryo; in the central region of imaginal discs; in the germarium, follicular, and nurse cells of the ovary; and in testis. A search in the Genome Annotation Database of Drosophila revealed the absence of subunit VIIb and the presence of 9 putative nuclear cytochrome c oxidase subunits with high identity scores when compared to the 10 human subunits. PMID:11514451

  4. An overview on alcohol oxidases and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Pranab; Chinnadayyala, Soma Sekhar R; Chakraborty, Mitun; Kumar, Adepu Kiran; Kakoti, Ankana

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol oxidases (Alcohol: O₂ Oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.3.x) are flavoenzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds with a concomitant release of hydrogen peroxide. Based on substrate specificity, alcohol oxidases may be categorized broadly into four different groups namely, (a) short chain alcohol oxidase (SCAO), (b) long chain alcohol oxidase (LCAO), (c) aromatic alcohol oxidase (AAO), and (d) secondary alcohol oxidase (SAO). The sources reported for these enzymes are mostly limited to bacteria, yeast, fungi, plant, insect, and mollusks. However, the quantum of reports for each category of enzymes considerably varies across these sources. The enzymes belonging to SCAO and LCAO are intracellular in nature, whereas AAO and SAO are mostly secreted to the medium. SCAO and LCAO are invariably reported as multimeric proteins with very high holoenzyme molecular masses, but the molecular characteristics of these enzymes are yet to be clearly elucidated. One of the striking features of the alcohol oxidases that make them distinct from the widely known alcohol dehydrogenase is the avidly bound cofactor to the redox center of these enzymes that obviate the need to supplement cofactor during the catalytic reaction. These flavin-based redox enzymes have gained enormous importance in the development of various industrial processes and products primarily for developing biosensors and production of various industrially useful carbonyl compounds. The present review provides an overview on alcohol oxidases from different categories focusing research on these oxidases during the last decade along with their potential industrial applications. PMID:23525937

  5. Xanthine oxidase status in ethanol-intoxicated rat liver.

    PubMed

    Abbondanza, A; Battelli, M G; Soffritti, M; Cessi, C

    1989-12-01

    The status of xanthine oxidase in ethanol-induced liver injury has been investigated in the rat, by acute and chronic ethanol treatments. A 38% increase of the enzyme O-form was observed after repeated ethanol administration. Chronic intoxication caused a significant decrease of total xanthine oxidase activity after both prolonged ethanol feeding and life span ethanol ingestion. The intermediate D/O-form of xanthine oxidase (that can act either as an oxidase or as a dehydrogenase, being able to react with O2 as well as with NAD+ as electron acceptor) increased 5.5-fold after prolonged ethanol feeding. PMID:2690670

  6. Cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene in mitochondria of Oenothera has no intron

    PubMed Central

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Brennicke, Axel

    1983-01-01

    The cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene has been localized in the mitochondrial genome of Oenothera berteriana and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The coding sequence contains 777 bp and, unlike the corresponding gene in Zea mays, is not interrupted by an intron. No TGA codon is found within the open reading frame. The codon CGG, as in the maize gene, is used in place of tryptophan codons of corresponding genes in other organisms. At position 742 in the Oenothera sequence the TGG of maize is changed into a CGG codon, where Trp is conserved as the amino acid in other organisms. Homologous sequences occur more than once in the mitochondrial genome as several mitochondrial DNA species hybridize with DNA probes of the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:16453484

  7. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Competition and Endocarditis Virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiuchun; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Min; Chen, Lei; Chen, Weihua; Elrami, Fadi; Kong, Fanxiang; Kitten, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report for the first time that the Streptococcus sanguinis nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in both competition with Streptococcus mutans and virulence for infective endocarditis. An S. sanguinis nox mutant was found to fail to inhibit the growth of Streptococcus mutans under microaerobic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, the recombinant Nox protein of S. sanguinis could reduce oxygen to water and oxidize NADH to NAD+. The oxidation of NADH to NAD+ was diminished in the nox mutant. The nox mutant exhibited decreased levels of extracellular H2O2; however, the intracellular level of H2O2 in the mutant was increased. Furthermore, the virulence of the nox mutant was attenuated in a rabbit endocarditis model. The nox mutant also was shown to be more sensitive to blood killing, oxidative and acid stresses, and reduced growth in serum. Thus, NADH oxidase contributes to multiple phenotypes related to competitiveness in the oral cavity and systemic virulence. PMID:26930704

  8. Inhibitory effects of cardols and related compounds on superoxide anion generation by xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Maeta, Ayami; Yamagiwa, Yoshiro; Kubo, Isao

    2015-01-01

    5-Pentadecatrienylresorcinol, isolated from cashew nuts and commonly known as cardol (C₁₅:₃), prevented the generation of superoxide radicals catalysed by xanthine oxidase without the inhibition of uric acid formation. The inhibition kinetics did not follow the Michelis-Menten equation, but instead followed the Hill equation. Cardol (C₁₀:₀) also inhibited superoxide anion generation, but resorcinol and cardol (C₅:₀) did not inhibit superoxide anion generation. The related compounds 3,5-dihydroxyphenyl alkanoates and alkyl 2,4-dihydroxybenzoates, had more than a C9 chain, cooperatively inhibited but alkyl 3,5-dihydroxybenzoates, regardless of their alkyl chain length, did not inhibit the superoxide anion generation. These results suggested that specific inhibitors for superoxide anion generation catalysed by xanthine oxidase consisted of an electron-rich resorcinol group and an alkyl chain having longer than C9 chain. PMID:25053055

  9. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Competition and Endocarditis Virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiuchun; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Min; Chen, Lei; Chen, Weihua; Elrami, Fadi; Kong, Fanxiang; Kitten, Todd; Xu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report for the first time that the Streptococcus sanguinis nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in both competition with Streptococcus mutans and virulence for infective endocarditis. An S. sanguinis nox mutant was found to fail to inhibit the growth of Streptococcus mutans under microaerobic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, the recombinant Nox protein of S. sanguinis could reduce oxygen to water and oxidize NADH to NAD(+) The oxidation of NADH to NAD(+) was diminished in the nox mutant. The nox mutant exhibited decreased levels of extracellular H2O2; however, the intracellular level of H2O2 in the mutant was increased. Furthermore, the virulence of the nox mutant was attenuated in a rabbit endocarditis model. The nox mutant also was shown to be more sensitive to blood killing, oxidative and acid stresses, and reduced growth in serum. Thus, NADH oxidase contributes to multiple phenotypes related to competitiveness in the oral cavity and systemic virulence. PMID:26930704

  10. Activity of carbohydrate oxidases as influenced by wheat flour dough components.

    PubMed

    Degrand, L; Rakotozafy, L; Nicolas, J

    2015-08-15

    The carbohydrate oxidase (COXMn) from Microdochium nivale may well have desired functionalities as a dough and bread improver, similarly to Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase (GOX). COXMn catalyses the oxidation of various monosaccharides as well as maltooligosaccharides for which the best activity is obtained towards the maltooligosaccharides of polymerisation degrees 3 and 4. For the same activity towards glucose under air saturation, we show that COXMn exhibits a similar efficiency towards maltose as GOX towards glucose whatever the oxygen supply. Assays with COXMn show that no competition exists between carbohydrates naturally present in the wheat flour. We show that reaction products (d-glucono-δ-lactone and hydrogen peroxide) and the wheat flour dough component, ferulic acid, have no noticeable specific effect on the COXMn activity. The demonstrated differences in kinetics between COXMn and GOX allow predicting of differences in the functional behaviours of those enzymes during wheat flour dough formation. PMID:25794758

  11. Surface enhanced Raman scattering as a probe of the cholesterol oxidase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, R.; Polit, J.; Broda, D.; Gonchar, M.; Sheregii, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we present a sensitive method for the determination of the enzyme concentration of cholesterol oxidase, which is one of the most important analytical enzymes. Although the method is affected by sensitivity limitations, recently the Raman scattering experimental data carried out on cholesterol oxidase conjugated via a 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid organic linker with gold nanoparticles due to the surface plasmon resonance confirmed the observation of surface enhanced Raman scattering, which enables us to detect the vibrational lines belonging to PO and C=C bonds assigned to the flavin prosthetic group. This means there is a stable binding of the enzyme with nanoparticles as well as the enzyme remaining active and substantiates the possibility that prepared bio-nanosystems can be used for analytical purposes as a sensing element.

  12. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Vietnamese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai Thanh Thi; Awale, Suresh; Tezuka, Yasuhiro; Tran, Quan Le; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kadota, Shigetoshi

    2004-09-01

    Among 288 extracts, prepared from 96 medicinal plants used in Vietnamese traditional medicine to treat gout and related symptoms, 188 demonstrated xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity at 100 microg/ml, with 46 having greater than 50% inhibition. At 50 microg/ml, 168 of the extracts were active, with 21 possessing more than 50% inhibition. At 25 microg/ml, 146 extracts exhibited inhibitory activity, with 8 showing over 50% inhibition, while 126 extracts presented activity at 10 microg/ml, with 2 having greater than 50% inhibition. The MeOH extracts of Artemisia vulgaris, Caesalpinia sappan (collected at the Seven-Mountain area), Blumea balsamifera (collected in Lam Dong province), Chrysanthemum sinense and MeOH-H(2)O extract of Tetracera scandens (Khanh Hoa province) exhibited strong XO inhibitory activity with IC(50) values less than 20 microg/ml. The most active extract was the MeOH extract of the flower of C. sinense with an IC(50) value of 5.1 microg/ml. Activity-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract led to the isolation of caffeic acid (1), luteolin (2), eriodictyol (3), and 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4). All these compounds showed significant XO inhibitory activity in a concentration-dependent manner, and the activity of 2 was more potent (IC(50) 1.3 microM) than the clinically used drug, allopurinol (IC(50) 2.5 microM). PMID:15340229

  13. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from fresh ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Woo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was purified from fresh ginseng roots using acetone precipitation, carboxymethyl (CM)-Sepharose chromatography, and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography. Two isoenzymes (PPO 1 and PPO 2) were separated using an ion-exchange column with CM-Sepharose. PPO 1 was purified up to 13.2-fold with a 22.6% yield. PPO 2 bound to CM-Sepharose, eluted with NaCl, and was purified up to 22.5-fold with a 17.4% yield. PPO 2 was further chromatographed on phenyl-Sepharose. The molecular weight of the purified PPO 2 from fresh ginseng was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and was about 40 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH were 20℃ and 7.0, respectively, using catechol as a substrate. Pyrogallol showed the highest substrate specificity. The effect of a PPO inhibitor showed that its activity increased slightly in the presence of a low concentration of citric acid. High concentrations of acidic compounds and sulfite agents significantly inhibited purified ginseng PPO 2. PMID:23717165

  14. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  15. Variations in the alternative oxidase in chlamydomonas grown in air or high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1989-03-01

    Chlamydomonas in the resting phase of growth has an equal capacity of about 15 micromole O{sub 2} uptake per hour per milligram of chlorophyll for both the cytochrome c, CN-sensitive respiration, and for the alternative, salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration. Alternative respiration capacity was measured as salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited O{sub 2} uptake in the presence of CN, and cytochrome c respiration capacity as CN inhibition of O{sub 2} uptake in the presence of salicylhydroxamic acid. Measured total respiration was considerably less than the combined capacities for respiration. During the log phase of growth on high (2-5%) CO{sub 2}, the alternative respiration capacity decreased about 90% but returned as the culture entered the lag phase. When the alternative oxidase capacity was low, addition of salicylic acid or cyanide induced its reappearance. When cells were grown on low (air-level) CO{sub 2}, which induced a CO{sub 2} concentrating mechanism, the alternative oxidase capacity did not decrease during the growth phase. Attempts to measure in vivo distribution of respiration between the two pathways with either CN or salicylhydroxamic acid alone were inconclusive.

  16. NADPH oxidase-derived oxidant stress is critical for neutrophil cytotoxicity during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Jaspreet S; Hinson, Jack A; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2004-07-01

    Neutrophils can cause liver injury during endotoxemia through generation of reactive oxygen species. However, the enzymatic source of the oxidant stress and the nature of the oxidants generated remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of NADPH oxidase in the pathophysiology by using the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) in the galactosamine/endotoxin (700 mg/kg Gal:100 microg/kg ET) model of liver injury. In addition, we measured chlorotyrosine as indicator for hypochlorous acid formation by myeloperoxidase. Gal/ET treatment of male C3HeB/FeJ mice resulted in sinusoidal neutrophil accumulation and parenchymal cell apoptosis (14 +/- 3% of cells) at 6 h. At 7 h, 35% of neutrophils had transmigrated. The number of apoptotic cells increased to 25 +/- 2%, and the overall number of dead cells was 48 +/- 3%; many of them showed the characteristic morphology of necrosis. Hepatocytes, which colocalized with extravasated neutrophils, stained positive for chlorotyrosine and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein adducts. In contrast, animals pretreated with DPI (2.5 mg/kg) were protected against liver injury at 7 h (necrosis = 20 +/- 2%). These livers showed little chlorotyrosine or 4-HNE staining, but apoptosis and neutrophil accumulation and extravasation remained unaffected. However, DPI-treated animals showed serious liver injury at 9 h due to sustained apoptosis. The results indicate that NADPH oxidase is responsible for the neutrophil-derived oxidant stress, which includes formation of hypochlorous acid by myeloperoxidase. Thus NADPH oxidase could be a promising therapeutic target to prevent neutrophil-mediated liver injury. However, the long-term benefit of this approach needs to be investigated in models relevant for human liver disease. PMID:15044177

  17. NADPH oxidase promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Röhm, Marc; Grimm, Melissa J; D'Auria, Anthony C; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Segal, Brahm H; Urban, Constantin F

    2014-05-01

    NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous, filamentous fungi, which can cause invasive aspergillosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CGD, reflecting the critical role for NADPH oxidase in antifungal host defense. Activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils can be coupled to the release of proteins and chromatin that comingle in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can augment extracellular antimicrobial host defense. NETosis can be driven by NADPH oxidase-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore undertook an analysis of whether NADPH oxidase was required for NETosis in Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Oropharyngeal instillation of live Aspergillus hyphae induced neutrophilic pneumonitis in both wild-type and NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47(phox-/-)) mice which had resolved in wild-type mice by day 5 but progressed in p47(phox-/-) mice. NETs, identified by immunostaining, were observed in lungs of wild-type mice but were absent in p47(phox-/-) mice. Using bona fide NETs and nuclear chromatin decondensation as an early NETosis marker, we found that NETosis required a functional NADPH oxidase in vivo and ex vivo. In addition, NADPH oxidase increased the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils. Together, our results show that NADPH oxidase is required for pulmonary clearance of Aspergillus hyphae and generation of NETs in vivo. We speculate that dual modulation of NETosis and apoptosis by NADPH oxidase enhances antifungal host defense and promotes resolution of inflammation upon infection clearance. PMID:24549323

  18. Source challenges resulting of the first applications of a UV storage ring FEL on Super-ACO

    SciTech Connect

    Couprie, M.E.; Bakker, R.; Nahon, L. |

    1995-12-31

    Since 1992, significant progresses were achieved on the Super-ACO (S-ACO) storage ring Free Electron Laser (FEL) in the UV. The operation at the nominal energy 800 MeV has several consequences: higher average power in the UV (25 mW at 60 mA and more recently 100 mW at 100 mA available for the users), 10 hours of lasing for the same injection of positrons, providing enough time for performing an user experiment, compatibility with the users of synchrotron radiation (SR) in the temporal structure mode for 120 mA with the possibility of closing the four insertion devices of S-ACO. The main difficulties to extend the FEL optical performances come from the small gain (2%), limiting a rapid extention of the spectral range (either in the laser mode or by coherent harmonic generation from the FEL itself in the undulator) or linewidth narrowing. The installation of a 500 MHz harmonic cavity for bunch length reduction and gain increase is under consideration{hor_ellipsis} The stability of the FEL temporal and spectral was systematically followed versus time, for various scales (from ns to half an hour) with different detectors. The stability of the laser source has been significantly improved with a longitudinal feedback system allowing the jitter of the 25 ps RMS laser micropulse to be reduced from 150-200 ps down to 10-20 ps. the intensity fluctuations to be damped down 1% and the spectral drift to be smaller than the resolution of the scanning Fabry-Perot (0.01{angstrom}) at perfect synchronism. The laser can work during more than 3 consecutive hours without readjustments. In addition, according to the ring current, the positron beam is submitted to coherent modes of synchrotron oscillations. Right now, a Pedersen type longitudinal feedback damps the dipolar modes of such oscillation. The quadrupolar modes in the 120-60 mA range leading to a rather unstable FEL are on the way to be damped with an additional feedback.

  19. Multicopper oxidase-1 orthologs from diverse insect species have ascorbate oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zeyu; Dittmer, Neal T.; Lang, Minglin; Brummett, Lisa M.; Braun, Caroline L.; Davis, Lawrence C.; Kanost, Michael R.; Gorman, Maureen J.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes can be classified by their substrate specificity; for example, ferroxidases oxidize ferrous iron, ascorbate oxidases oxidize ascorbate, and laccases oxidize aromatic substrates such as diphenols. Our previous work on an insect multicopper oxidase, MCO1, suggested that it may function as a ferroxidase. This hypothesis was based on three lines of evidence: RNAi-mediated knock down of Drosophila melanogaster MCO1 (DmMCO1) affects iron homeostasis, DmMCO1 has ferroxidase activity, and DmMCO1 has predicted iron binding residues. In our current study, we expanded our focus to include MCO1 from Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, and Manduca sexta. We verified that MCO1 orthologs have similar expression profiles, and that the MCO1 protein is located on the basal surface of cells where it is positioned to oxidize substrates in the hemolymph. In addition, we determined that RNAi-mediated knock down of MCO1 in A. gambiae affects iron homeostasis. To further characterize the enzymatic activity of MCO1 orthologs, we purified recombinant MCO1 from all four insect species and performed kinetic analyses using ferrous iron, ascorbate and two diphenols as substrates. We found that all of the MCO1 orthologs are much better at oxidizing ascorbate than they are at oxidizing ferrous iron or diphenols. This result is surpring because ascorbate oxidases are thought to be specific to plants and fungi. An analysis of three predicted iron binding residues in DmMCO1 revealed that they are not required for ferroxidase or laccase activity, but two of the residues (His374 and Asp380) influence oxidation of ascorbate. These two residues are conserved in MCO1 orthologs from insects and crustaceans; therefore, they are likely to be important for MCO1 function. The results of this study suggest that MCO1 orthologs function as ascorbate oxidases and influence iron homeostasis through an unknown mechanism. PMID:25701385

  20. Hybridisations Of Simulated Annealing And Modified Simplex Algorithms On A Path Of Steepest Ascent With Multi-Response For Optimal Parameter Settings Of ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luangpaiboon, P.

    2009-10-01

    Many entrepreneurs face to extreme conditions for instances; costs, quality, sales and services. Moreover, technology has always been intertwined with our demands. Then almost manufacturers or assembling lines adopt it and come out with more complicated process inevitably. At this stage, products and service improvement need to be shifted from competitors with sustainability. So, a simulated process optimisation is an alternative way for solving huge and complex problems. Metaheuristics are sequential processes that perform exploration and exploitation in the solution space aiming to efficiently find near optimal solutions with natural intelligence as a source of inspiration. One of the most well-known metaheuristics is called Ant Colony Optimisation, ACO. This paper is conducted to give an aid in complicatedness of using ACO in terms of its parameters: number of iterations, ants and moves. Proper levels of these parameters are analysed on eight noisy continuous non-linear continuous response surfaces. Considering the solution space in a specified region, some surfaces contain global optimum and multiple local optimums and some are with a curved ridge. ACO parameters are determined through hybridisations of Modified Simplex and Simulated Annealing methods on the path of Steepest Ascent, SAM. SAM was introduced to recommend preferable levels of ACO parameters via statistically significant regression analysis and Taguchi's signal to noise ratio. Other performance achievements include minimax and mean squared error measures. A series of computational experiments using each algorithm were conducted. Experimental results were analysed in terms of mean, design points and best so far solutions. It was found that results obtained from a hybridisation with stochastic procedures of Simulated Annealing method were better than that using Modified Simplex algorithm. However, the average execution time of experimental runs and number of design points using hybridisations were

  1. Defining the role of tyrosine and rational tuning of oxidase activity by genetic incorporation of unnatural tyrosine analogs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Lv, Xiaoxuan; Li, Jiasong; Zhou, Qing; Cui, Chang; Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Mukherjee, Arnab; Nilges, Mark J; Wang, Jiangyun; Lu, Yi

    2015-04-15

    While a conserved tyrosine (Tyr) is found in oxidases, the roles of phenol ring pKa and reduction potential in O2 reduction have not been defined despite many years of research on numerous oxidases and their models. These issues represent major challenges in our understanding of O2 reduction mechanism in bioenergetics. Through genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acid analogs of Tyr, with progressively decreasing pKa of the phenol ring and increasing reduction potential, in the active site of a functional model of oxidase in myoglobin, a linear dependence of both the O2 reduction activity and the fraction of H2O formation with the pKa of the phenol ring has been established. By using these unnatural amino acids as spectroscopic probe, we have provided conclusive evidence for the location of a Tyr radical generated during reaction with H2O2, by the distinctive hyperfine splitting patterns of the halogenated tyrosines and one of its deuterated derivatives incorporated at the 33 position of the protein. These results demonstrate for the first time that enhancing the proton donation ability of the Tyr enhances the oxidase activity, allowing the Tyr analogs to augment enzymatic activity beyond that of natural Tyr. PMID:25672571

  2. Effect of contraceptive steroids on monoamine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, Jennifer; Collins, G. G. S.; Pryse-Davies, J.; Sandler, M.

    1969-01-01

    Cyclical variations in monoamine oxidase activity during the human menstrual cycle, specific to the endometrium and modified in women undergoing contraceptive steroid treatment, may reflect changes in hormonal environment. Treatment of rats with individual constituents of the contraceptive pill causes analogous changes: oestrogens inhibit and progestogens potentiate uterine monoamine oxidase activity. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3

  3. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Garcinia esculenta twigs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lun-Lun; Fu, Wen-Wei; Watanabe, Shimpei; Shao, Yi-Nuo; Tan, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Tan, Chang-Heng; Xiu, Yan-Feng; Norimoto, Hisayoshi; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-12-01

    The EtOAc-soluble portion of the 80 % (v/v) EtOH extract from the twigs of Garcinia esculenta exhibited strong xanthine oxidase inhibition in vitro. Bioassay-guided purification led to the isolation of 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (3) and griffipavixanthone (8) as the main xanthine oxidase inhibitors, along with six additional compounds (1, 2, 4-7), including two new compounds (1 and 2). This enzyme inhibition was dose dependent with an IC50 value of approximately 1.2 µM for 3 and 6.3 µM for 8. The inhibitory activity of 3 was stronger than the control allopurinol (IC50 value: 5.3 µM). To our knowledge, compound 8 is the first bixanthone that demonstrated potent XO inhibitory activity in vitro. The structures of the new compounds were established by spectroscopic analysis, and the optical properties and absolute stereochemistry of racemic (±) esculentin A (2) were further determined by the calculation of the DP4 probability and analysis of its MTPA ester derivatives. PMID:25340468

  4. Activation of antibacterial autophagy by NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju; Canadien, Veronica; Lam, Grace Y.; Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Dinauer, Mary C.; Magalhaes, Marco A. O.; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in immunity to microbial pathogens. The autophagy system can target bacteria in phagosomes, promoting phagosome maturation and preventing pathogen escape into the cytosol. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling from phagosomes was found to initiate their targeting by the autophagy system, but the mechanism by which TLR signaling activates autophagy is unclear. Here we show that autophagy targeting of phagosomes is not exclusive to those containing TLR ligands. Engagement of either TLRs or the Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) during phagocytosis induced recruitment of the autophagy protein LC3 to phagosomes with similar kinetics. Both receptors are known to activate the NOX2 NADPH oxidase, which plays a central role in microbial killing by phagocytes through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that NOX2-generated ROS are necessary for LC3 recruitment to phagosomes. Antibacterial autophagy in human epithelial cells, which do not express NOX2, was also dependent on ROS generation. These data reveal a coupling of oxidative and nonoxidative killing activities of the NOX2 NADPH oxidase in phagocytes through autophagy. Furthermore, our results suggest a general role for members of the NOX family in regulating autophagy. PMID:19339495

  5. CO2 Measurements from Space: Lessons Learned from the Collaboration between the ACOS/OCO-2 and GOSAT Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; Gunson, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) were the first two missions designed to collect space-based observations of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, with the sensitivity, coverage, and resolution needed to quantify CO2 fluxes on regional scales over the globe. The OCO and GOSAT teams formed a close collaboration during the development phases of these missions. After the loss of OCO, the GOSAT project team invited the OCO team to contribute to the analysis of measurements collected by the GOSAT Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS). NASA responded by reformulating the OCO science team under the Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS) task to exploit this opportunity. This collaboration is providing an independent GOSAT XCO2 product, and valuable insights into the retrieval algorithms, calibration methods, and validation techniques that are being developed to analyze data anticipated the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2). The ACOS/OCO-2 and GOSAT teams have conducted four, joint, vicarious calibration campaigns at Railroad Valley, Nevada to track the long-term radiometric performance of the TANSO-FTS instrument. The methods used in these campaigns evolved from those used to characterize the radiometric performance of high spatial resolution, imaging spectroradiometers. For TANSO-FTS, the conventional, surface based radiometric measurements have been augmented with surface and aircraft measurements of atmospheric temperature and trace gas profiles, as well as surface observations from MODIS and ASTER to characterize spatial variations of the surface reflectance within the (relatively large) sounding footprints. Similar methods will be needed for OCO-2. The ACOS/OCO-2 retrieval algorithm and associated data screening methods have been modified to estimate XCO2 from TANSO-FTS observations. Comparisons of TANSO

  6. Emission "Off-On" effect from europium complexes triggered by AcO anion: synthesis, characterization and sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jing

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a series of Eu(III) complexes based on four diamine ligands and two diketone ligands were synthesized. Their single crystal structures were studied, where intermolecular π-π stacking was found. The photophysical parameters of these Eu(III) complexes were measured, along with their ligand triplet levels. The energy transfer mechanism between ligand and metal center was discussed in detail. Energy transfer roll-back was found in Eu(III) complexes owing large-conjugated diamine ligands, compromising emissive performance. This energy transfer roll-back, however, could be stopped by the presence of AcO anion, leading to Eu(III) complex emission enhancement. The sensing performance of such Eu(III) complexes was thus investigated in detail. High sensitivity and selectivity were observed. PMID:24632149

  7. Separation of the primary dehydrogenase from the cytochromes of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) oxidase of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Wolin, M J

    1972-01-01

    A selective extraction procedure was developed for sequentially extracting a fraction containing the primary dehydrogenase and a fraction containing the cytochromes of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) (NADH) oxidase of Bacillus megaterium KM membranes. The primary dehydrogenase (NADH-2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase) activity was extracted from sonically treated membranes with 0.4% sodium deoxycholate for 30 min at 4 C. The insoluble residue was extracted with 0.4% sodium deoxycholate in 1 m KCl for 30 min at 25 C. A combination of the two extracts and dilution in Mg(2+) gave good recovery of the original membrane NADH oxidase activity. The primary dehydrogenase fraction contained 41% of the membrane protein, no cytochromes, flavine adenine dinucleotide as the sole acid-extractable flavine, and most of the membrane ribonucleic acid (RNA). The cytochrome-containing fraction had 16% of the membrane protein, 61% of the membrane cytochrome with the same relative amounts of cytochromes a and b as the original membrane, no acid-extractable flavine, little RNA, and no oxidoreductase activity. The oxidoreductase fraction remained soluble after removal of deoxycholate whereas the cytochrome fraction became insoluble after removal of deoxycholate-KCl, but the precipitated fraction could be redissolved in 0.4% sodium deoxycholate. Treatment of both fractions with ribonuclease to destroy all of the RNA present did not affect the ability of the fractions to recombine into a functional oxidase unit. Treatment of either fraction with phospholipase A prevented restoration of a functional oxidase when the oxidoreductase and cytochrome fractions were treated in solution, but no affect on restoration of oxidase was observed when the phospholipase A treatment was carried out with the soluble oxidoreductase fraction and the insoluble cytochrome fraction. PMID:4333382

  8. The complex roles of NADPH oxidases in fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Deborah; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NADPH oxidases play key roles in immunity and inflammation that go beyond the production of microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS). The past decade has brought a new appreciation for the diversity of roles played by ROS in signaling associated with inflammation and immunity. NADPH oxidase activity affects disease outcome during infections by human pathogenic fungi, an important group of emerging and opportunistic pathogens that includes Candida, Aspergillus and Cryptococcus species. Here we review how alternative roles of NADPH oxidase activity impact fungal infection and how ROS signaling affects fungal physiology. Particular attention is paid to roles for NADPH oxidase in immune migration, immunoregulation in pulmonary infection, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, autophagy and inflammasome activity. These recent advances highlight the power and versatility of spatiotemporally controlled redox regulation in the context of infection, and point to a need to understand the molecular consequences of NADPH oxidase activity in the cell. PMID:24905433

  9. Apocyanin, a Microglial NADPH Oxidase Inhibitor Prevents Dopaminergic Neuronal Degeneration in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Parkinson's Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neha; Nehru, Bimla

    2016-07-01

    Microglia-associated inflammatory processes have been strongly implicated in the development and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). Specifically, microglia are activated in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and become chronic source of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex is responsible for extracellular as well as intracellular production of ROS by microglia and its expression is upregulated in PD. Therefore, targeting NADPH oxidase complex activation using an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, i.e., apocyanin seems to be an effective approach. The aim of present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of apocyanin in a LPS-induced PD model. LPS (5 μg) was injected intranigral and apocyanin was administered daily at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.wt (i.p.) during the experiment. LPS when injected into the substantia nigra (SN) reproduced the characteristic hallmark features of PD in rats. It elicited an inflammatory response characterized by glial cell activation (Iba-1, GFAP). Furthermore, LPS upregulated the gene expression of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB), iNOS, and gp91PHOX and resulted in an elevated total ROS production as well as NADPH oxidase activity. Subsequently, this resulted in dopaminergic loss as depicted by decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression with substantial loss in neurotransmitter dopamine and its metabolites, whereas treatment with apocyanin significantly reduced the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1-positive cells in LPS-treated animals. It also mitigated microglial activation-induced inflammatory response and elevation in NADPH oxidase activity, thus reducing the extracellular as well as intracellular ROS production. The present study indicated that targeting NADPH oxidase can inhibit microglial activation and reduce a broad spectrum of toxic factors generation (i.e., cytokines, ROS, and reactive nitrogen species [RNS

  10. Oxidases and Peroxidases in Cardiovascular and Lung Disease: New Concepts in Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ghouleh, Imad Al; Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Knaus, Ulla G.; Griendling, Kathy K.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Thannickal, Victor J.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Nauseef, William M.; Kelley, Eric E.; Bauer, Phillip M.; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Shiva, Sruti; Cifuentes-Pagano, Eugenia; Freeman, Bruce A.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Pagano, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in numerous physiological and pathophysiological responses. Increasing evidence implicates ROS as signaling molecules involved in the propagation of cellular pathways. The NADPH oxidase (Nox) family of enzymes is a major source of ROS in the cell and has been related to the progression of many diseases and even in environmental toxicity. The complexity of this family’s effects on cellular processes stems from the fact that there are 7 members, each with unique tissue distribution, cellular localization and expression. Nox proteins also differ in activation mechanisms and the major ROS detected as their product. To add to this complexity, mounting evidence suggests that other cellular oxidases or their products may be involved in Nox regulation. The overall redox and metabolic status of the cell, specifically the mitochondria, also has implications on ROS signaling. Signaling of such molecules as electrophillic fatty acids has impact on many redox sensitive pathologies, and thus, as anti-inflammatory molecules, contributes to the complexity of ROS regulation. The following review is based on the proceedings of a recent international Oxidase Signaling Symposium at the University of Pittsburgh’s Vascular Medicine Institute and Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, and encompasses further interaction and discussion among the presenters. PMID:21722728

  11. Role of cytochrome bd oxidase from Corynebacterium glutamicum in growth and lysine production.

    PubMed

    Kabus, Armin; Niebisch, Axel; Bott, Michael

    2007-02-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum possesses two terminal oxidases, cytochrome aa3 and cytochrome bd. Cytochrome aa3 forms a supercomplex with the cytochrome bc1 complex, which contains an unusual diheme cytochrome c1. Both the bc1 -aa3 supercomplex and cytochrome bd transfer reducing equivalents from menaquinol to oxygen; however, they differ in their proton translocation efficiency by a factor of three. Here, we analyzed the role of cytochrome bd for growth and lysine production. When cultivated in glucose minimal medium, a cydAB deletion mutant of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 grew like the wild type in the exponential phase, but growth thereafter was inhibited, leading to a biomass formation 40% less than that of the wild type. Constitutive overproduction of functional cytochrome bd oxidase in ATCC 13032 led to a reduction of the growth rate by approximately 45% and of the maximal biomass by approximately 35%, presumably as a consequence of increased electron flow through the inefficient cytochrome bd oxidase. In the L-lysine-producing C. glutamicum strain MH20-22B, deletion of the cydAB genes had only minor effects on growth rate and biomass formation, but lysine production was increased by approximately 12%. Thus, the respiratory chain was shown to be a target for improving amino acid production by C. glutamicum. PMID:17142369

  12. Bioconversion of airborne methylamine by immobilized recombinant amine oxidase from the thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Sigawi, Sasi; Nisnevitch, Marina; Zakalska, Oksana; Zakalskiy, Andriy; Nitzan, Yeshayahu; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2014-01-01

    Aliphatic amines, including methylamine, are air-pollutants, due to their intensive use in industry and the natural degradation of proteins, amino acids, and other nitrogen-containing compounds in biological samples. It is necessary to develop systems for removal of methylamine from the air, since airborne methylamine has a negative effect on human health. The primary amine oxidase (primary amine : oxygen oxidoreductase (deaminating) or amine oxidase, AMO; EC 1.4.3.21), a copper-containing enzyme from the thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha which was overexpressed in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was tested for its ability to oxidize airborne methylamine. A continuous fluidized bed bioreactor (CFBR) was designed to enable bioconversion of airborne methylamine by AMO immobilized in calcium alginate (CA) beads. The results demonstrated that the bioreactor with immobilized AMO eliminates nearly 97% of the airborne methylamine. However, the enzymatic activity of AMO causes formation of formaldehyde. A two-step bioconversion process was therefore proposed. In the first step, airborne methylamine was fed into a CFBR which contained immobilized AMO. In the second step, the gas flow was passed through another CFBR, with alcohol oxidase from the yeast H. polymorpha immobilized in CA, in order to decompose the formaldehyde formed in the first step. The proposed system provided almost total elimination of the airborne methylamine and the formaldehyde. PMID:24672387

  13. Characterization and expression analysis of a banana gene encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Huang, P L; Do, Y Y; Huang, F C; Thay, T S; Chang, T W

    1997-04-01

    A cDNA encoding the banana 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase has previously been isolated from a cDNA library that was constructed by extracting poly(A)+ RNA from peels of ripening banana. This cDNA, designated as pMAO2, has 1,199 bp and contains an open reading frame of 318 amino acids. In order to identify ripening-related promoters of the banana ACC oxidase gene, pMAO2 was used as a probe to screen a banana genomic library constructed in the lambda EMBL3 vector. The banana ACC oxidase MAO2 gene has four exons and three introns, with all of the boundaries between these introns and exons sharing a consensus dinucleotide sequence of GT-AG. The expression of MAO2 gene in banana begins after the onset of ripening (stage 2) and continuous into later stages of the ripening process. The accumulation of MAO2 mRNA can be induced by 1 microliter/l exogenous ethylene, and it reached steady state level when 100 microliters/l exogenous ethylene was present. PMID:9137825

  14. Structural and kinetic studies on the Ser101Ala variant of choline oxidase: Catalysis by compromise

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, S.; Orville, A.; Yuan, H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Weber, I. T.; Gadda, G.

    2010-09-15

    The oxidation of choline catalyzed by choline oxidase includes two reductive half-reactions where FAD is reduced by the alcohol substrate and by an aldehyde intermediate transiently formed in the reaction. Each reductive half-reaction is followed by an oxidative half-reaction where the reduced flavin is oxidized by oxygen. Here, we have used mutagenesis to prepare the Ser101Ala mutant of choline oxidase and have investigated the impact of this mutation on the structural and kinetic properties of the enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the Ser101Ala enzyme indicates that the only differences between the mutant and wild-type enzymes are the lack of a hydroxyl group on residue 101 and a more planar configuration of the flavin in the mutant enzyme. Kinetics established that replacement of Ser101 with alanine yields a mutant enzyme with increased efficiencies in the oxidative half-reactions and decreased efficiencies in the reductive half-reactions. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the overall rate of turnover with choline. Thus, this mutation has revealed the importance of a specific residue for the optimization of the overall turnover of choline oxidase, which requires fine-tuning of four consecutive half-reactions for the conversion of an alcohol to a carboxylic acid.

  15. A low perfusion rate microreactor for continuous monitoring of enzyme characteristics: application to glucose oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Venema, K.; van Berkel, W. J. H.; Korf, J.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a versatile and robust microreactor for bioactive proteins physically immobilized on a polyether sulfone filter. The potential of the reactor is illustrated with glucose oxidase immobilized on a filter with a cut-off value of 30 kDa. A flow-injection system was used to deliver the reactants and the device was linked on-line to an electrochemical detector. The microreactor was used for on-line preparation of apoglucose oxidase in strong acid and its subsequent reactivation with flavin adenine dinucleotide. In addition we describe a miniaturized version of the microreactor used to assess several characteristics of femtomole to attomole amounts of glucose oxidase. A low negative potential over the electrodes was used when ferrocene was the mediator in combination with horseradish peroxidase, ensuring the absence of oxidation of electro-active compounds in biological fluids. A low backpressure at very low flow rates is an advantage, which increases the sensitivity. A variety of further applications of the microreactor are suggested. Figure Preparation of apoGOx and restoration of enzyme activity using a soluton of FAD PMID:17909761

  16. Mechanism-based inactivators of plant copper/quinone containing amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Longu, Silvia; Mura, Anna; Padiglia, Alessandra; Medda, Rosaria; Floris, Giovanni

    2005-08-01

    Copper/quinone amine oxidases contain Cu(II) and the quinone of 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine (topaquinone; TPQ) as cofactors. TPQ is derived by post-translational modification of a conserved tyrosine residue in the protein chain. Major advances have been made during the last decade toward understanding the structure/function relationships of the active site in Cu/TPQ amine oxidases using specific inhibitors. Mechanism-based inactivators are substrate analogues that bind to the active site of an enzyme being accepted and processed by the normal catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. During the reaction a covalent modification of the enzyme occurs leading to irreversible inactivation. In this review mechanism-based inactivators of plant Cu/TPQ amine oxidases from the pulses lentil (Lens esculenta), pea (Pisum sativum), grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) and sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia,) are described. Substrates forming, in aerobiotic and in anaerobiotic conditions, killer products that covalently bound to the quinone cofactor or to a specific amino acid residue of the target enzyme are all reviewed. PMID:16054177

  17. A Peroxidase-linked Spectrophotometric Assay for the Detection of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Kangkang; Yang, Zhongduo; Sheng, Jie; Shu, Zongmei; Shi, Yin

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new more accurate spectrophotometric method for detecting monoamine oxidase inhibitors from plant extracts, a series of amine substrates were selected and their ability to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase was evaluated by the HPLC method and a new substrate was used to develop a peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. 4-(Trifluoromethyl) benzylamine (11) was proved to be an excellent substrate for peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. Therefore, a new peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay was set up. The principle of the method is that the MAO converts 11 into aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of peroxidase, the hydrogen peroxide will oxidize 4-aminoantipyrine into oxidised 4-aminoantipyrine which can condense with vanillic acid to give a red quinoneimine dye. The production of the quinoneimine dye was detected at 490 nm by a microplate reader. The ⊿OD value between the blank group and blank negative control group in this new method is twice as much as that in Holt's method, which enables the procedure to be more accurate and avoids the produce of false positive results. The new method will be helpful for researchers to screening monoamine oxidase inhibitors from deep-color plant extracts. PMID:27610153

  18. A Peroxidase-linked Spectrophotometric Assay for the Detection of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Kangkang; Yang, Zhongduo; Sheng, Jie; Shu, Zongmei; Shi, Yin

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new more accurate spectrophotometric method for detecting monoamine oxidase inhibitors from plant extracts, a series of amine substrates were selected and their ability to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase was evaluated by the HPLC method and a new substrate was used to develop a peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. 4-(Trifluoromethyl) benzylamine (11) was proved to be an excellent substrate for peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. Therefore, a new peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay was set up. The principle of the method is that the MAO converts 11 into aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of peroxidase, the hydrogen peroxide will oxidize 4-aminoantipyrine into oxidised 4-aminoantipyrine which can condense with vanillic acid to give a red quinoneimine dye. The production of the quinoneimine dye was detected at 490 nm by a microplate reader. The ⊿OD value between the blank group and blank negative control group in this new method is twice as much as that in Holt’s method, which enables the procedure to be more accurate and avoids the produce of false positive results. The new method will be helpful for researchers to screening monoamine oxidase inhibitors from deep-color plant extracts. PMID:27610153

  19. Glucose oxidase-functionalized fluorescent gold nanoclusters as probes for glucose.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaodong; Long, Yunfei; Wang, Jianxiu

    2013-04-15

    Creation and application of noble metal nanoclusters have received continuous attention. By integrating enzyme activity and fluorescence for potential applications, enzyme-capped metal clusters are more desirable. This work demonstrated a glucose oxidase (an enzyme for glucose)-functionalized gold cluster as probe for glucose. Under physiological conditions, such bioconjugate was successfully prepared by an etching reaction, where tetrakis (hydroxylmethyl) phosphonium-protected gold nanoparticle and thioctic acid-modified glucose oxidase were used as precursor and etchant, respectively. These bioconjugates showed unique fluorescence spectra (λ(em max)=650 nm, λ(ex max)=507 nm) with an acceptable quantum yield (ca. 7%). Moreover, the conjugated glucose oxidase remained active and catalyzed reaction of glucose and dissolved O2 to produce H2O2, which quenched quantitatively the fluorescence of gold clusters and laid a foundation of glucose detection. A linear range of 2.0×10(-6)-140×10(-6)M and a detection limit of 0.7×10(-6)M (S/N=3) were obtained. Also, another horseradish peroxidase/gold cluster bioconjugate was produced by such general synthesis method. Such enzyme/metal cluster bioconjugates represented a promising class of biosensors for biologically important targets in organelles or cells. PMID:23540251

  20. Auxin-activated NADH oxidase activity of soybean plasma membranes is distinct from the constitutive plasma membrane NADH oxidase and exhibits prion-like properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Morre, Dorothy M.; Ternes, Philipp

    2003-01-01

    The hormone-stimulated and growth-related cell surface hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase activity of etiolated hypocotyls of soybeans oscillates with a period of about 24 min or 60 times per 24-h day. Plasma membranes of soybean hypocotyls contain two such NADH oxidase activities that have been resolved by purification on concanavalin A columns. One in the apparent molecular weight range of 14-17 kDa is stimulated by the auxin herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The other is larger and unaffected by 2,4-D. The 2,4-D-stimulated activity absolutely requires 2,4-D for activity and exhibits a period length of about 24 min. Also exhibiting 24-min oscillations is the rate of cell enlargement induced by the addition of 2,4-D or the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Immediately following 2,4-D or IAA addition, a very complex pattern of oscillations is frequently observed. However, after several hours a dominant 24-min period emerges at the expense of the constitutive activity. A recruitment process analogous to that exhibited by prions is postulated to explain this behavior.

  1. Expression of the alternative oxidase complements cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Emmanuel P; Dufour, Eric; Gonçalves, Sérgio; Paupe, Vincent; Hakkaart, Gertjan A J; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from early onset devastating encephalomyopathy and cardiomyopathy, to neurological diseases in adulthood and in the elderly. No method of compensating successfully for COX deficiency has been reported so far. In vitro, COX-deficient human cells require additional glucose, pyruvate and uridine for normal growth and are specifically sensitive to oxidative stress. Here, we have tested whether the expression of a mitochondrially targeted, cyanide-resistant, alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis could alleviate the metabolic abnormalities of COX-deficient human cells either from a patient harbouring a COX15 pathological mutation or rendered deficient by silencing the COX10 gene using shRNA. We demonstrate that the expression of the AOX, well-tolerated by the cells, compensates for both the growth defect and the pronounced oxidant-sensitivity of COX-deficient human cells. PMID:20049701

  2. Iodide Oxidation by a Novel Multicopper Oxidase from the Alphaproteobacterium Strain Q-1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mio; Eda, Yoshifumi; Ohsawa, Shiaki; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Kan; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Yoshikawa, Jun; Sato, Ikuo; Fujii, Takaaki

    2012-01-01

    Alphaproteobacterium strain Q-1 is able to oxidize iodide (I−) to molecular iodine (I2) by an oxidase-like enzyme. One of the two isoforms of the iodide-oxidizing enzyme (IOE-II) produced by this strain was excised from a native polyacrylamide gel, eluted, and purified. IOE-II appeared as a single band (51 kDa) and showed significant in-gel iodide-oxidizing activity in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis without heat treatment. However, at least two bands with much higher molecular masses (150 and 230 kDa) were observed with heat treatment (95°C, 3 min). IOE-II was inhibited by NaN3, KCN, EDTA, and a copper chelator, o-phenanthroline. In addition to iodide, IOE-II showed significant activities toward phenolic compounds such as syringaldazine, 2,6-dimethoxy phenol, and p-phenylenediamine. IOE-II contained copper atoms as prosthetic groups and had UV/VIS absorption peaks at 320 and 590 nm. Comparison of several internal amino acid sequences obtained from trypsin-digested IOE-II with a draft genome sequence of strain Q-1 revealed that the products of two open reading frames (IoxA and IoxC), with predicted molecular masses of 62 and 71 kDa, are involved in iodide oxidation. Furthermore, subsequent tandem mass spectrometric analysis repeatedly detected peptides from IoxA and IoxC with high sequence coverage (32 to 40%). IoxA showed homology with the family of multicopper oxidases and included four copper-binding regions that are highly conserved among various multicopper oxidases. These results suggest that IOE-II is a multicopper oxidase and that it may occur as a multimeric complex in which at least two proteins (IoxA and IoxC) are associated. PMID:22447601

  3. The Function of Ascorbate Oxidase in Tobacco1

    PubMed Central

    Pignocchi, Cristina; Fletcher, John M.; Wilkinson, Joy E.; Barnes, Jeremy D.; Foyer, Christine H.

    2003-01-01

    The function of the apoplastic enzyme ascorbate oxidase (AO) was investigated in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The abundance of AO mRNA was up-regulated by light. Cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (APX1) transcripts were also highest in the light. In contrast, l-galactono-γ-lactone dehydrogenase, stromal APX, and thylakoid APX transcripts remained constant over the day/night cycle. Salicylic acid inhibited growth, increased expression of the pathogenesis-related protein (PR) 1a, and decreased AO transcript abundance. In contrast, the application of auxin enhanced growth and increased AO and PR 1a gene expression. Therefore, AO transcript abundance varied in a manner similar to hormone-mediated changes in plant growth. To study the effects of modified AO expression on growth, transformed tobacco plants expressing AO in the sense and antisense orientations were generated. The resultant large changes in apoplastic AO activity in the transformed tobacco plants had little effect on whole leaf ascorbate (AA) content, but they had dramatic effects on apoplastic AA levels. Enhanced AO activity oxidized the apoplastic AA pool, whereas decreased AO activity increased the amount of AA compared with dehydroascorbate. A relationship was observed between AO activity and plant height and biomass. Native AO transcript levels were no longer subject to light/dark regulation in AO sense and antisense plants. Taken together, these data show that there is an interaction between hormone, redox, and light signals at the level of the apoplast via modulation of ion of AA content. PMID:12857842

  4. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (acetovanillone) induces oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara . E-mail: dario.ghigo@unito.it

    2006-05-01

    Apocynin (acetovanillone) is often used as a specific inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. In N11 glial cells, apocynin induced, in a dose-dependent way, a significant increase of both malonyldialdehyde level (index of lipid peroxidation) and lactate dehydrogenase release (index of a cytotoxic effect). Apocynin evoked also, in a significant way, an increase of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and a decrease of the intracellular glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio, accompanied by augmented efflux of glutathione and glutathione disulfide. Apocynin induced the activation of both pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle, which was blocked when the cells were incubated with glutathione together with apocynin. The cell incubation with glutathione prevented also the apocynin-induced increase of malonyldialdehyde generation and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Apocynin exerted an oxidant effect also in a cell-free system: indeed, in aqueous solution, it evoked a faster oxidation of the thiols glutathione and dithiothreitol, and elicited the generation of reactive oxygen species, mainly superoxide anions. Our results suggest that apocynin per se can induce an oxidative stress and exert a cytotoxic effect in N11 cells and other cell types, and that some effects of apocynin in in vitro and in vivo experimental models should be interpreted with caution.

  5. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Si-Yin; Houska, Milan; Reed, Shawndrika

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens. Since high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts containing caffeic acid were treated with each of the following: (1) HP; (2) HP+PPO; (3) PPO; and (4) none. HP was conducted at 300 and 500 MPa, each for 3 and 10 min, 37 °C. After treatment, SDS-PAGE was performed and allergenic capacity (IgE binding) was determined colorimetrically in inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots, using a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic patients. Data showed that HP alone had no effect on major peanut allergens. However, HP at 500 MPa combined with PPO (HP500/PPO) induced a higher (approximately twofold) reduction of major peanut allergens and IgE binding than PPO alone or HP300/PPO. There was no difference between treatment times. We concluded that HP500/PPO at 3-min enhanced a twofold reduction of the allergenic capacity of peanut extracts, as compared to PPO itself.

  6. cDNA cloning and expression of potato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hunt, M D; Eannetta, N T; Yu, H; Newman, S M; Steffens, J C

    1993-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) of plants are copper metalloproteins which catalyze the oxidation of mono- and o-diphenols to o-diquinones. Although PPOs are believed to be primarily responsible for the deleterious browning of many fruit and vegetable crops and are thought to be involved in plant-pest interactions, direct evidence for these roles is lacking. We report the cloning of two PPO cDNAs from Solanum tuberosum leaves. These cDNAs exhibit 97% and 98% sequence similarity at the DNA and deduced amino acid levels, respectively. Putative copper-binding regions of both cDNAs are very similar to those of mammalian, bacterial and Neurospora tyrosinases. Both leaf PPO cDNAs appear to encode polypeptides which are processed to a mature molecular weight of 57,000. In potato leaves, petioles, roots, and flowers, PPO is encoded by ca. 2 kb transcripts. Leaf PPO mRNA is developmentally regulated and only detectable in young foliage. In contrast, the protein profile of immunologically detectable PPO remains constant from the apical node through the eleventh leaf node. PMID:7678763

  7. Reexamining Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics for xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Bassingthwaighte, James B; Chinn, Tamara M

    2013-03-01

    Abbreviated expressions for enzyme kinetic expressions, such as the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) equations, are based on the premise that enzyme concentrations are low compared with those of the substrate and product. When one does progress experiments, where the solute is consumed during conversion to form a series of products, the idealized conditions are violated. Here, we analyzed data of xanthine oxidase in vitro from Escribano et al. (Biochem J 254: 829, 1988) on two conversions in series, hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid. Analyses were done using four models: standard irreversible M-M reactions (model 1), Escribano et al.'s M-M forward reaction expressions with product inhibition (model 2), fully reversible M-M equations (model 3), and standard differential equations allowing forward and backward reactions with mass balance accounting for binding (model 4). The results showed that the need for invoking product inhibition vanishes with more complete analyses. The reactions were not quite irreversible, so the backward reaction had a small effect. Even though the enzyme concentration was only 1-2% of the initial substrate concentrations, accounting for the fraction of solutes bound to the enzyme did influence the parameter estimates, but in this case, the M-M model overestimated Michaelis constant values by only about one-third. This article also presents the research and models in a reproducible and publicly available form. PMID:23471247

  8. Reexamining Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics for xanthine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Tamara M.

    2013-01-01

    Abbreviated expressions for enzyme kinetic expressions, such as the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) equations, are based on the premise that enzyme concentrations are low compared with those of the substrate and product. When one does progress experiments, where the solute is consumed during conversion to form a series of products, the idealized conditions are violated. Here, we analyzed data of xanthine oxidase in vitro from Escribano et al. (Biochem J 254: 829, 1988) on two conversions in series, hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid. Analyses were done using four models: standard irreversible M-M reactions (model 1), Escribano et al.'s M-M forward reaction expressions with product inhibition (model 2), fully reversible M-M equations (model 3), and standard differential equations allowing forward and backward reactions with mass balance accounting for binding (model 4). The results showed that the need for invoking product inhibition vanishes with more complete analyses. The reactions were not quite irreversible, so the backward reaction had a small effect. Even though the enzyme concentration was only 1–2% of the initial substrate concentrations, accounting for the fraction of solutes bound to the enzyme did influence the parameter estimates, but in this case, the M-M model overestimated Michaelis constant values by only about one-third. This article also presents the research and models in a reproducible and publicly available form. PMID:23471247

  9. Purification and properties of dihydrogeodin oxidase from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Fujii, I; Iijima, H; Tsukita, S; Ebizuka, Y; Sankawa, U

    1987-01-01

    The last step of (+)-geodin biosynthesis is a phenol oxidative coupling, which is one of the most important reactions in biosynthesis of natural products. The enzyme named dihydrogeodin oxidase catalyzes the regio- and stereospecific phenol oxidative coupling reaction to form (+)-geodin from dihydrogeodin. The enzyme was purified from the cell-free extract of Aspergillus terreus, a (+)-geodin producer, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, acid treatment, and column chromatographies on DEAE-cellulose, Hydroxyapatite, chromatofocusing, and Toyopearl HW-55S. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 153,000 by gel filtration on a Toyopearl HW-55S column and 76,000 by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that the enzyme is a dimer. The purified enzyme showed an intense blue color and had absorption maxima at 280 and 600 nm, which suggested it to be a blue copper protein. The copper content was found to be 8 atoms per subunit by atomic absorption analysis and no significant amount of other metals was detected by ICP emission spectrometry. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum showed the presence of type 1 and type 2 copper atoms in the enzyme molecule. Sodium azide and ethylxanthate inhibited the enzyme activity, but potassium cyanide and diethyldithiocarbamate, both known as potent copper enzyme inhibitors, were not inhibitory. PMID:3032923

  10. NADPH Oxidases in Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Joy X.; Török, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature observed in a wide spectrum of chronic liver diseases including viral hepatitis, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) are emerging as major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several major isoforms are expressed in the liver, including NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4. While the phagocytic NOX2 has been known to play an important role in Kupffer cell and neutrophil phagocytic activity and inflammation, the nonphagocytic NOX homologues are increasingly recognized as key enzymes in oxidative injury and wound healing. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in knowledge on the regulatory pathways of NOX activation, their cellular distribution, and their role in the modulation of redox signaling in liver diseases. PMID:26436133

  11. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  12. Drugs related to monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-08-01

    Progress in understanding the role of monoamine neurotransmission in pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders was made after the discovery of the mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs, including monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. The increase in monoamine neurotransmitter availability, decrease in hydrogen peroxide production, and neuroprotective effects evoked by MAO inhibitors represent an important approach in the development of new drugs for the treatment of mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. New drugs are synthesized by acting as multitarget-directed ligands, with MAO, acetylcholinesterase, and iron chelation as targets. Basic information is summarized in this paper about the drug-induced regulation of monoaminergic systems in the brain, with a focus on MAO inhibition. Desirable effects of MAO inhibition include increased availability of monoamine neurotransmitters, decreased oxidative stress, decreased formation of neurotoxins, induction of pro-survival genes and antiapoptotic factors, and improved mitochondrial functions. PMID:26944656

  13. NADPH Oxidases in Lung Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Karen; Hecker, Louise; Luckhardt, Tracy R.; Cheng, Guangjie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The evolution of the lungs and circulatory systems in vertebrates ensured the availability of molecular oxygen (O2; dioxygen) for aerobic cellular metabolism of internal organs in large animals. O2 serves as the physiologic terminal acceptor of mitochondrial electron transfer and of the NADPH oxidase (Nox) family of oxidoreductases to generate primarily water and reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively. Recent advances: The purposeful generation of ROS by Nox family enzymes suggests important roles in normal physiology and adaptation, most notably in host defense against invading pathogens and in cellular signaling. Critical issues: However, there is emerging evidence that, in the context of chronic stress and/or aging, Nox enzymes contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of lung diseases. Future Directions: Here, we review evolving functions of Nox enzymes in normal lung physiology and emerging pathophysiologic roles in lung disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2838–2853. PMID:24093231

  14. Modeling dioxygen reduction at multicopper oxidase cathodes.

    PubMed

    Agbo, Peter; Heath, James R; Gray, Harry B

    2014-10-01

    We report a general kinetics model for catalytic dioxygen reduction on multicopper oxidase (MCO) cathodes. Our rate equation combines Butler-Volmer (BV) electrode kinetics and the Michaelis-Menten (MM) formalism for enzymatic catalysis, with the BV model accounting for interfacial electron transfer (ET) between the electrode surface and the MCO type 1 copper site. Extending the principles of MM kinetics to this system produced an analytical expression incorporating the effects of subsequent intramolecular ET and dioxygen binding to the trinuclear copper cluster into the cumulative model. We employed experimental electrochemical data on Thermus thermophilus laccase as benchmarks to validate our model, which we suggest will aid in the design of more efficient MCO cathodes. In addition, we demonstrate the model's utility in determining estimates for both the electronic coupling and average distance between the laccase type-1 active site and the cathode substrate. PMID:25188422

  15. Lysyl oxidase binds transforming growth factor-beta and regulates its signaling via amine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Kaku, Masaru; Fong, Keith S K; Csiszar, Katalin; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2008-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX), an amine oxidase critical for the initiation of collagen and elastin cross-linking, has recently been shown to regulate cellular activities possibly by modulating the functions of growth factors. In this study, we investigated the interaction between LOX and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a potent growth factor abundant in bone, the effect of LOX on TGF-beta1 signaling, and its potential mechanism. The specific binding between mature LOX and mature TGF-beta1 was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pulldown assay in vitro. Both proteins were colocalized in the extracellular matrix in an osteoblastic cell culture system, and the binding complex was identified in the mineral-associated fraction of bone matrix. Furthermore, LOX suppressed TGF-beta1-induced Smad3 phosphorylation likely through its amine oxidase activity. The data indicate that LOX binds to mature TGF-beta1 and enzymatically regulates its signaling in bone and thus may play an important role in bone maintenance and remodeling. PMID:18835815

  16. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase and specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Cachat, Julien; Deffert, Christine; Hugues, Stephanie; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2 produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a well-known player in host defence. However, there is also increasing evidence for a regulatory role of NOX2 in adaptive immunity. Deficiency in phagocyte NADPH oxidase causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) in humans, a condition that can also be studied in CGD mice. Clinical observations in CGD patients suggest a higher susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, in particular lupus, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and rheumatoid arthritis. In mice, a strong correlation exists between a polymorphism in a NOX2 subunit and the development of autoimmune arthritis. NOX2 deficiency in mice also favours lupus development. Both CGD patients and CGD mice exhibit increased levels of immunoglobulins, including autoantibodies. Despite these phenotypes suggesting a role for NOX2 in specific immunity, mechanistic explanations for the typical increase of CGD in autoimmune disease and antibody levels are still preliminary. NOX2-dependent ROS generation is well documented for dendritic cells and B-lymphocytes. It is unclear whether T-lymphocytes produce ROS themselves or whether they are exposed to ROS derived from dendritic cells during the process of antigen presentation. ROS are signalling molecules in virtually any cell type, including T- and B-lymphocytes. However, knowledge about the impact of ROS-dependent signalling on T- and B-lymphocyte phenotype and response is still limited. ROS might contribute to Th1/Th2/Th17 cell fate decisions during T-lymphocyte activation and might enhance immunoglobulin production by B-lymphocytes. In dendritic cells, NOX2-derived ROS might be important for antigen processing and cell activation. PMID:25760962

  17. Polyphenol Oxidase Activity Expression in Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Solano, Francisco; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). To study the actual expression of these genes, we looked for and detected all kinds of PPO activities, including laccase, cresolase, and catechol oxidase activities, in cellular extracts of this microorganism. The conditions for the PPO assays were optimized for the phenolic substrate, pH, and sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration used. It was demonstrated that three different PPOs are expressed. The genes coding for the enzymes were unambiguously correlated with the enzymatic activities detected by generation of null mutations in the genes by using insertional mutagenesis with a suicide plasmid and estimating the changes in the levels of enzymatic activities compared to the levels in the wild-type strain. The protein encoded by the RSp1530 locus is a multicopper protein with laccase activity. Two other genes, RSc0337 and RSc1501, code for nonblue copper proteins exhibiting homology to tyrosinases. The product of RSc0337 has strong tyrosine hydroxylase activity, and it has been shown that this enzyme is involved in melanin synthesis by R. solanacearum. The product of the RSc1501 gene is an enzyme that shows a clear preference for oxidation of o-diphenols. Preliminary characterization of the mutants obtained indicated that PPOs expressed by R. solanacearum may participate in resistance to phenolic compounds since the mutants exhibited higher sensitivity to l-tyrosine than the wild-type strain. These results suggest a possible role in the pathogenic process to avoid plant resistance mechanisms involving the participation of phenolic compounds. PMID:16269713

  18. Dephenolization of industrial wastewaters catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Atlow, S.C.; Bonadonna-Aparo, L.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A new enzymatic method for the removal of phenols from industrial aqueous effluents has been developed. The method uses the enzyme polyphenol oxidase which oxidizes phenols to the corresponding o-quinones; the latter then undergo a nonenzymatic polymerization to form water-insoluble aggregates. Therefore, the enzyme in effect precipitates phenols from water. Polyphenol oxidase has been found to nearly completely dephenolize solutions of phenol in the concentration range from 0.01 to 1.0 g/L. The enzymatic treatment is effective over a wide range of pH and temperature; a crude preparation of polyphenol oxidase (mushroom extract) is as effective as a purified, commercially obtained version. In addition to phenol itself, polyphenol oxidase is capable of precipitating from water a number of substituted phenols (cresols, chlorophenols, naphthol, etc.). Also, even pollutants which are unreactive towards polyphenol oxidase can be enzymatically coprecipitated with phenol. The polyphenol oxidase treatment has been successfully used to dephenolize two different real industrial wastewater samples, from a plant producing triarylphosphates and from a coke plant. The advantage of the polyphenol oxidase dephenolization over the peroxidase-catalyzed one previously elaborated by the authors is that the former enzyme uses molecular oxygen instead of costly hydrogen peroxide (used by peroxidase) as an oxidant.

  19. Studies on Polyphenol Content, Activities and Isozymes of Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase During Air-Curing in Three Tobacco Types 1

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, S. J.; Calvert, J.

    1969-01-01

    The change in polyphenol content in the primed leaves of burley, flue-cured, and Turkish tobaccos during air-curing was related to the activities and isozymes of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The quantity of chlorogenic acid was rapidly reduced during the first week of curing. The decrease in rutin content during curing was less significant, especially when the concentration of chlorogenic acid was high in leaf tissues. This result was further confirmed by in vitro assays with partially purified tobacco polyphenol oxidase. The polyphenol oxidase activity did not differ at any stage of curing in the 3 tobaccos. When the activity was measured by the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine it rose rapidly during the first day of curing and then decreased sharply so that in the fully cured leaf only 15% activity remained. The increase in activity was not observed when chlorogenic acid was used as the substrate. A similar level of peroxidase activity was found in the 3 tobaccos before curing. Peroxidase activities increased rapidly during the first 24 hr of curing, declined thereafter, and remained highest in the flue-cured tobacco, less in the Turkish line, and least in the burley at the end of curing process. By polyacrylamide gel block electrophoresis, 10 peroxidase isozyme bands, 2 cationic and 8 anionic, appeared identical in all 3 tobaccos. When catechol replaced benzidine-2 HCl as the electron donor, 1 cationic and 2 anionic peroxidase isozymes did not form. Of interest is that the same 10 peroxidase isozyme bands also exhibited polyphenol oxidase activities when treated with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine or chlorogenic acid. Results suggest that in the crude tobacco leaf extract the peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase may associate as protein complexes, and peroxidase isozymes may differ in electron-donor requirements. Isozyme patterns for both oxidases at various curing intervals differed only quantitatively. Images PMID:16657046

  20. [Sulfite oxidase activity deficiency caused by cofactor molybdenum deficiency: A case of early severe encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Durousset, C; Gay, C; Magnin, S; Acquaviva, C; Patural, H

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal seizure incidence is approximately 3.5/1000 live births. Inborn metabolic diseases account for approximately 1-4% of neonatal seizure cases. Among them, the catabolism anomaly of sulfite to sulfate caused by sulfite oxidase or cofactor molybdenum deficiency (MoCD) is a rare metabolic disorder in which neurological damage is similar to that found in neonatal asphyxia. We report the case of a newborn child with a MoCD. Born of related parents, this child had intrauterine growth retardation predominating on size diagnosed in the third trimester of pregnancy. After an uneventful birth, he presented convulsions at the 12th hour of life, confirmed by an electroencephalogram. Anticonvulsants and adjuvant treatments were ineffective; the child then required intubation at day 5 of life. The initial biological assessment found an elevated blood lactate level and the chromatography of amino acids showed a significant decrease of cystine and the abnormal presence of sulfocysteine, suggestive of a lack of sulfite oxidase activity. The uric acid level measured secondarily was low, suggesting a MoCD. Brain MRI was performed at day 5 for diffuse ischemic injury of different ages. After limiting acute care, the child died at day 14 of life. The genetic study of the child found a homozygous mutation c.564+1G>A in the MOCS2 gene, confirming the diagnosis of MoCD, present in the heterozygous state in both parents. Investigations in a logical sequence quickly suggested the MoCD diagnosis in presence of a low plasma concentration of cysteine, the abnormal presence of sulfocysteine, and low uric acid levels. The diagnosis of sulfite oxidase deficiency was made. Until now, no treatment has proven effective but a new treatment appears to be effective in cases with a MOCS1 mutation. PMID:26775885

  1. Manganese(IV) Oxide Production by Acremonium sp. Strain KR21-2 and Extracellular Mn(II) Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Naoyuki; Tani, Yukinori; Maruo, Kanako; Tsuno, Hiroshi; Sakata, Masahiro; Iwahori, Keisuke

    2006-01-01

    Ascomycetes that can deposit Mn(III, IV) oxides are widespread in aquatic and soil environments, yet the mechanism(s) involved in Mn oxide deposition remains unclear. A Mn(II)-oxidizing ascomycete, Acremonium sp. strain KR21-2, produced a Mn oxide phase with filamentous nanostructures. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy showed that the Mn phase was primarily Mn(IV). We purified to homogeneity a laccase-like enzyme with Mn(II) oxidase activity from cultures of strain KR21-2. The purified enzyme oxidized Mn(II) to yield suspended Mn particles; XANES spectra indicated that Mn(II) had been converted to Mn(IV). The pH optimum for Mn(II) oxidation was 7.0, and the apparent half-saturation constant was 0.20 mM. The enzyme oxidized ABTS [2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] (pH optimum, 5.5; Km, 1.2 mM) and contained two copper atoms per molecule. Moreover, the N-terminal amino acid sequence (residues 3 to 25) was 61% identical with the corresponding sequence of an Acremonium polyphenol oxidase and 57% identical with that of a Myrothecium bilirubin oxidase. These results provide the first evidence that a fungal multicopper oxidase can convert Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxide. The present study reinforces the notion of the contribution of multicopper oxidase to microbially mediated precipitation of Mn oxides and suggests that Acremonium sp. strain KR21-2 is a good model for understanding the oxidation of Mn in diverse ascomycetes. PMID:17021194

  2. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  3. The use of glucose oxidase and catalase for the enzymatic reduction of the potential ethanol content in wine.

    PubMed

    Röcker, Jessica; Schmitt, Matthias; Pasch, Ludwig; Ebert, Kristin; Grossmann, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Due to the increase of sugar levels in wine grapes as one of the impacts of climate change, alcohol reduction in wines becomes a major focus of interest. This study combines the use of glucose oxidase and catalase activities with the aim of rapid conversion of glucose into non-fermentable gluconic acid. The H2O2 hydrolysing activity of purified catalase is necessary in order to stabilize glucose oxidase activity. After establishing the adequate enzyme ratio, the procedure was applied in large-scale trials (16L- and 220L-scale) of which one was conducted in a winery under industrial wine making conditions. Both enzyme activity and wine flavour were clearly influenced by the obligatory aeration in the different trials. With the enzyme treatment an alcohol reduction of 2%vol. was achieved after 30h of aeration. However the enzyme treated wines were significantly more acidic and less typical. PMID:27211694

  4. CotA, a Multicopper Oxidase from Bacillus pumilus WH4, Exhibits Manganese-Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmei; Bao, Peng; Bai, Tenglong; Deng, Lin; Wu, Hui; Liu, Fan; He, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are a family of enzymes that use copper ions as cofactors to oxidize various substrates. Previous research has demonstrated that several MCOs such as MnxG, MofA and MoxA can act as putative Mn(II) oxidases. Meanwhile, the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus species has been confirmed as a typical MCO. To study the relationship between CotA and the Mn(II) oxidation, the cotA gene from a highly active Mn(II)-oxidizing strain Bacillus pumilus WH4 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain M15. The purified CotA contained approximately four copper atoms per molecule and showed spectroscopic properties typical of blue copper oxidases. Importantly, apart from the laccase activities, the CotA also displayed substantial Mn(II)-oxidase activities both in liquid culture system and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum Mn(II) oxidase activity was obtained at 53°C in HEPES buffer (pH 8.0) supplemented with 0.8 mM CuCl2. Besides, the addition of o-phenanthroline and EDTA both led to a complete suppression of Mn(II)-oxidizing activity. The specific activity of purified CotA towards Mn(II) was 0.27 U/mg. The Km, Vmax and kcat values towards Mn(II) were 14.85±1.17 mM, 3.01×10−6±0.21 M·min−1 and 0.32±0.02 s−1, respectively. Moreover, the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity of the recombinant E. coli strain M15-pQE-cotA was significantly increased when cultured both in Mn-containing K liquid medium and on agar plates. After 7-day liquid cultivation, M15-pQE-cotA resulted in 18.2% removal of Mn(II) from the medium. Furthermore, the biogenic Mn oxides were clearly observed on the cell surfaces of M15-pQE-cotA by scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides the direct observation of Mn(II) oxidation with the heterologously expressed protein CotA, Therefore, this novel finding not only establishes the foundation for in-depth study of Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms, but also offers a

  5. The terminal oxidase in the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H; Denis, M; Malatesta, F

    1997-06-01

    The molecular properties of a novel membrane quinol oxidase from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617 are presented. The protein contains 2b hemes/mole which may be distinguished by EPR spectroscopy but not by optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Respiration, though being cyanide insensitive, is not inhibited by carbon monoxide and oxygen reduction is carried out only half-way with production of hydrogen peroxide. The terminal oxidase represents, therefore, a unique example in the large family of terminal oxidases known up to date. PMID:9337488

  6. Identification of yeasts from clinical specimens by oxidase test.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Arora, B S; Mathur, M D

    2000-10-01

    A total of 100 yeasts and yeast like fungi isolates from clinical specimens were negative for oxidase production on Sabouraud dextrose agar. When grown on Columbia agar, chocolate agar, tryptose agar, Mueller-Hinton agar, brain heart infusion and a medium resembling Sabouraud's dextrose agar but with starch instead of dextrose, all the isolate of Candida albicans (55), C. guilliermondii (6), C. parapsilosis (14), C. tropicalis (6), C. pseudotropicalis (6) and Crytococcus neoformans (2) were positive for oxidase producation. Torulopsis glabrata (2), Saccharomyces cervisiae (2) and two out of seven isolates of C. krusei were negative for oxidase test. PMID:11344606

  7. Aiding and abetting roles of NOX oxidases in cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    NADPH oxidases of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) family are dedicated reactive oxygen species-generating enzymes that broadly and specifically regulate redox-sensitive signalling pathways that are involved in cancer development and progression. They act at specific cellular membranes and microdomains through the activation of oncogenes and the inactivation of tumour suppressor proteins. In this Review, we discuss primary targets and redox-linked signalling systems that are influenced by NOX-derived ROS, and the biological role of NOX oxidases in the aetiology of cancer. PMID:22918415

  8. Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules: Interaction with the Enzyme Cytochrome C Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Noor, Mohamed R.; Soulimane, Tewfik; Bianchini, Paolo; D'Autilia, Francesca; Antipov, Alexei; Diaspro, Alberto; Tofail, Syed A. M.; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-01-01

    Cell-sized polyelectrolyte capsules functionalized with a redox-driven proton pump protein were assembled for the first time. The interaction of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, with cytochrome c oxidase molecules was investigated. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase retained its functionality, that the functionalized microcapsules interacting with cytochrome c oxidase were permeable and that the permeability characteristics of the microcapsule shell depend on the shell components. This work provides a significant input towards the fabrication of an integrated device made of biological components and based on specific biomolecular functions and properties. PMID:25372607

  9. Entrapment of Water at the Transmembrane Helix-Helix Interface of Quiescin Sulfhydryl Oxidase 2.

    PubMed

    Ried, Christian L; Scharnagl, Christina; Langosch, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about how a membrane can regulate interactions between transmembrane helices. Here, we show that strong self-interaction of the transmembrane helix of human quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 2 rests on a motif of conserved amino acids comprising one face of the helix. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations suggest that water molecules enter the helix-helix interface and connect serine residues of both partner helices. In addition, an interfacial tyrosine can interact with noninterfacial water or lipid. Dimerization of this transmembrane helix might therefore be controlled by membrane properties controlling water permeation and/or by the lipid composition of the membrane. PMID:26894260

  10. An antifungal gamma-pyrone and xanthones with monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity from Hypericum brasiliense.

    PubMed

    Rocha, L; Marston, A; Kaplan, M A; Stoeckli-Evans, H; Thull, U; Testa, B; Hostettmann, K

    1994-08-01

    A new gamma-pyrone (hyperbrasilone), three known xanthones (1,5-dihydroxyxanthone, 5-hydroxy-1-methoxyxanthone and 6-deoxyjacareubin) and betulinic acid have been isolated from a dichloromethane extract of stems and roots of Hypericum brasiliense. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods (UV, EI-MS, 1H and 13C NMR) and that of the gamma-pyrone was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Hyperbrasilone and the xanthones were all antifungal against Cladosporium cucumerinum, while the three xanthones showed differing degrees of inhibition of monoamine oxidase A and B. PMID:7765428

  11. Various instrumental approaches for determination of organic acids in wines.

    PubMed

    Zeravik, Jiri; Fohlerova, Zdenka; Milovanovic, Miodrag; Kubesa, Ondrej; Zeisbergerova, Marta; Lacina, Karel; Petrovic, Aleksandar; Glatz, Zdenek; Skladal, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Biosensors based on lactate oxidase, sarcosine oxidase and mixture of fumarase and sarcosine oxidase were used for monitoring of organic acids in wine samples. Additionally, tartaric acid was determined by modified colorimetric method based on formation of the vanadate-tartrate complex. The above mentioned methods were used for the analysis of 31 wine samples and obtained data were compared with the results from capillary electrophoresis as a basic standard method. This comparison showed a certain degree of correlation between biosensors and capillary electrophoresis. The provided information pointed to the potential uses of biosensors in the field of winemaking. PMID:26471576

  12. Isolation and analysis of a cDNA clone encoding an S. guttatum alternataive oxidase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, D.M.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Antibodies that recognize the 35, 36, and 37 kilodalton (kDa) alternative oxidase proteins were used to isolate a cDNA proteins were used to isolate a cDNA clone of a nuclearly encoded protein of Sauromatum guttatum. The amino acid sequence deduced from clone pAOSG81 revealed a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 44 kDa, while a 42 kDa protein is immunoprecipitated from in vitro translation products made using S. guttatum poly A+ RNA. The protein contains a 60-65 amino acid transit peptide which is predicted to form amphiphilic helices. We have also identified regions of the mature 42 kDa protein which are likely to be membrane associated. Clone pAOSG81 is being used to screen a genomic library. The genomic clone encoding the 42 kDa protein will be used to investigate the salicylic-acid-controlled transcriptional regulation of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase proteins.

  13. Urate-oxidase for the treatment of tophaceous gout in heart transplant recipients. A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, S; Roche, B; Dorent, R; Koeger, A C; Borget, C; Wrona, N; Bourgeois, P

    1995-05-01

    Gout in heart transplant recipients is common and poses a significant therapeutic challenge. Concomitant administration of azathioprine and allopurinol therapy carries a high risk of leukopenia. Uricosuric agents can cause renal lithiasis and/or acute renal failure in patients with renal failure and/or high urinary levels of uric acid. We report our experience with urate-oxidase in three heart transplant recipients with severe polyarticular and tophaceous gout, a history of leukopenia under allopurinol and unresponsiveness or contraindications to uricosuric agents. Urate-oxidase was given parenterally in a dosage of 1000 units per day, seven days a month. The injections were done intramuscularly in one patient and intravenously in the other two, who were under anticoagulant therapy. Patients 1 and 2 received 12 and 6 courses, respectively. The third patient had had four courses and was still under treatment at the time of this writing. Shrinking of the tophi and improved mobility of the fingers were seen in all three patients after the second course. No adverse effects were recorded. Our experience suggests that urate-oxidase therapy may decrease the urate burden in patients with severe tophaceous gout. Urate-oxidase therapy should be viewed as a phase in the treatment of gout, which must be followed by administration of another agent. PMID:7655872

  14. Interstitial renal fibrosis due to multiple cisplatin treatments is ameliorated by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Daisuke; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Doi, Kent; Negishi, Kousuke; Sugaya, Takeshi; Nangaku, Masaomi; Noiri, Eisei

    2016-02-01

    Elucidation of acute kidney diseases and disorders (AKD), including acute kidney injury (AKI), is important to prevent their progression to chronic kidney disease. Current animal AKI models are often too severe for use in evaluating human AKI. Therefore, new animal models of mild kidney injury are needed. Here a new clinically relevant animal model using multiple low doses of cisplatin (CP) was used to evaluate AKD. When 10 mg/kg CP was administered intraperitoneally once weekly for three times to L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) transgenic mice, moderate renal interstitial fibrosis and tubule dilatation occurred, accompanied by brush-border loss. Urinary L-FABP, a promising biomarker of AKI, changed more drastically than blood urea nitrogen or creatinine. Preventing fibrosis in organs was also studied. Oral administration of a recently reported selective semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase inhibitor, PXS-4728A, for 1 week attenuated kidney injury and interstitial fibrosis compared with vehicle. Inhibition of renal lipid accumulation in semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase inhibitor-treated mice, together with reduced oxidative stress and L-FABP suppression in proximal tubules, suggested an antifibrotic effect of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase inhibition in this CP-AKD model, a representative onco-nephrology. Thus, semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase inhibitors may be promising candidates for the prevention of chronic kidney disease in patients using CP to treat malignancy. PMID:26535996

  15. Study and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.).

    PubMed

    Todaro, Aldo; Cavallaro, Rosalinda; Argento, Sergio; Branca, Ferdinando; Spagna, Giovanni

    2011-10-26

    In this study the catecholase and cresolase activities of eggplant polyphenol oxidase (PPO) were investigated. Enzyme activity was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance using catechol as substrate and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH) as coupled reagent. The effects of substrate specificity, heat inactivation, temperature, pH, and inhibitors were investigated to understand the enzymatic alteration of ready-to-eat preparations. Browning of vegetables was determined through a colorimeter. Decrease of lightness (L*) and increase of color difference values (ΔE*) were correlated with tissue browning. Antibrowning agents were tested on PPO under the same conditions. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by 0.4 M citric acid. Under natural pH conditions, the enzyme was also inhibited by tartaric acid and acetic acid. All of the results were used to understand the best conditions for food transformation (ready-to-eat and grilled eggplant slices). PMID:21942648

  16. Metabolism of Ferulic Acid by Paecilomyces variotii and Pestalotia palmarum

    PubMed Central

    Rahouti, Mohammed; Seigle-Murandi, Françoise; Steiman, Régine; Eriksson, Karl-Erik

    1989-01-01

    Ferulic acid metabolism was studied in cultures of two micromycetes producing different amounts of phenol oxidases. In cultures of the low phenol oxidase producer Paecilomyces variotii, ferulic acid was decarboxylated to 4-vinylguaiacol, which was converted to vanillin and then either oxidized to vanillic acid or reduced to vanillyl alcohol. Vanillic acid underwent simultaneously an oxidative decarboxylation to methoxyhydroquinone and a nonoxidative decarboxylation to guaiacol. Methoxyhydroquinone and guaiacol were demethylated to yield hydroxyquinol and catechol, respectively. Catechol was hydroxylated to pyrogallol. Degradation of ferulic acid by Paecilomyces variotii proceeded mainly via methoxyhydroquinone. The high phenol oxidase producer Pestalotia palmarum catabolized ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, vanillyl alcohol, vanillic acid, and methoxyhydroquinone. However, the main reactions observed with this fungus involved polymerization reactions. Images PMID:16348018

  17. Hemin/G-quadruplexes as DNAzymes for the fluorescent detection of DNA, aptamer-thrombin complexes, and probing the activity of glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Golub, Eyal; Freeman, Ronit; Niazov, Angelica; Willner, Itamar

    2011-11-01

    Hemin/G-quadruplex catalyzes the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of Amplex Red to the fluorescent product resorufin. This process is implemented to develop hairpin nucleic acid structures for the detection of DNA, to probe the catalytic activity of glucose oxidase, to use the thrombin-aptamer complex as a catalytic readout structure, and to quantitatively analyze telomere chain composition. PMID:21881641

  18. RUMINAL MICRO-ORGANISMS DO NOT ADAPT TO INCREASE UTILIZATION OF POLY-PHENOL OXIDASE PROTECTED RED CLOVER PROTEIN AND GLYCEROL-BASED LIPID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), reduces the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis within red clover fed to ruminants with subsequent increases in the efficiency of N utilization and the level of beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids in their products (meat and milk). It has also been reported t...

  19. Auto-Oxidation of Ortho-Diphenolic Substrate and Deactivation of Polyphenol Oxidases (Catecholase) During Wilting and Post Harvest Damage in Red Clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPO) in red clover convert diphenolic substrate to highly reactive quinones which, through their reaction with proteins, increase the efficiency of N utilization and increase the proportion of beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids in bovine products (meat and milk). Auto-oxidat...

  20. Evolution of eutherian cytochrome c oxidase subunit II: heterogeneous rates of protein evolution and altered interaction with cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Adkins, R M; Honeycutt, R L; Disotell, T R

    1996-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII), encoded by the mitochondrial genome, exhibits one of the most heterogeneous rates of amino acid replacement among placental mammals. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cytochrome c oxidase has undergone a structural change in higher primates which has altered its physical interaction with cytochrome c. We collected a large data set of COII sequences from several orders of mammals with emphasis on primates, rodents, and artiodactyls. Using phylogenetic hypotheses based on data independent of the COII gene, we demonstrated that an increased number of amino acid replacements are concentrated among higher primates. Incorporating approximate divergence dates derived from the fossil record, we find that most of the change occurred independently along the New World monkey lineage and in a rapid burst before apes and Old World monkeys diverged. There is some evidence that Old World monkeys have undergone a faster rate of nonsynonymous substitution than have apes. Rates of substitution at four-fold degenerate sites in primates are relatively homogeneous, indicating that the rate heterogeneity is restricted to nondegenerate sites. Excluding the rate acceleration mentioned above, primates, rodents, and artiodactyls have remarkably similar nonsynonymous replacement rates. A different pattern is observed for transversions at four-fold degenerate sites, for which rodents exhibit a higher rate of replacement than do primates and artiodactyls. Finally, we hypothesize specific amino acid replacements which may account for much of the structural difference in cytochrome c oxidase between higher primates and other mammals. PMID:8952084

  1. Genetic and genomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani interactions with Arabidopsis; evidence of resistance mediated through NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Foley, Rhonda C; Gleason, Cynthia A; Anderson, Jonathan P; Hamann, Thorsten; Singh, Karam B

    2013-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important soil-borne necrotrophic fungal pathogen, with a broad host range and little effective resistance in crop plants. Arabidopsis is resistant to R. solani AG8 but susceptible to R. solani AG2-1. A screen of 36 Arabidopsis ecotypes and mutants affected in the auxin, camalexin, salicylic acid, abscisic acid and ethylene/jasmonic acid pathways did not reveal any variation in response to R. solani and demonstrated that resistance to AG8 was independent of these defense pathways. The Arabidopsis Affymetrix ATH1 Genome array was used to assess global gene expression changes in plants infected with AG8 and AG2-1 at seven days post-infection. While there was considerable overlap in the response, some gene families were differentially affected by AG8 or AG2-1 and included those involved in oxidative stress, cell wall associated proteins, transcription factors and heat shock protein genes. Since a substantial proportion of the gene expression changes were associated with oxidative stress responses, we analysed the role of NADPH oxidases in resistance. While single NADPH oxidase mutants had no effect, a NADPH oxidase double mutant atrbohf atrbohd resulted in an almost complete loss of resistance to AG8, suggesting that reactive oxidative species play an important role in Arabidopsis's resistance to R. solani. PMID:23451091

  2. Beyond brown: polyphenol oxidases as enzymes of plant specialized metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Most cloned and/or characterized plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have catechol oxidase activity (i.e., they oxidize o-diphenols to o-quinones) and are localized or predicted to be localized to plastids. As a class, they have broad substrate specificity and are associated with browning of produce and other plant materials. Because PPOs are often induced by wounding or pathogen attack, they are most generally believed to play important roles in plant defense responses. However, a few well-characterized PPOs appear to have very specific roles in the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites via both tyrosinase (monophenol oxidase) and catechol oxidase activities. Here we detail a few examples of these and explore the possibility that there may be many more “biosynthetic” PPOs. PMID:25642234

  3. Inhibition of plant and mammalian diamine oxidase by substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Biegański, T; Osińska, Z; Masliński, C

    1982-04-01

    Imidazoles, aliphatic substrate analogues and the natural dipeptides, carnosine and anserine, were investigated as inhibitors of diamine oxidase from the pig kidney, human pregnancy plasma and pea seedlings. Imidazole, methylimidazoles, N-acetylimidazole, histamine and N tau-methylhistamine are relatively potent inhibitors of mammalian diamine oxidase showing no influence on plant enzymes. Anserine and carnosine are inhibitors of pig kidney and pea seedling enzymes. Ki values are 2 microM and 10 microM respectively. Investigated natural derivatives of putrescine and cadaverine have no influence on diamine oxidase of different origin. In conclusion, we present some evidence to suggest that mammalian diamine oxidase, despite a high reaction rate with putrescine, is better adapted to histamine oxidation, whereas for plant enzymes the diamines are preferred substrates. PMID:6805264

  4. [Heterogeneity of molecular forms of phenol oxidase from grape leaves].

    PubMed

    Pruidze, G N; Zaprometov, M N; Durmishidze, S V; Kintsurashvili, D F

    1983-07-01

    The substrate specificity and some kinetic properties of the monomeric (Mr = 26 000--35 000) and dimeric (Mr = 55 000--70 000) forms of phenol oxidase from vine leaves were studied. These forms possess different hydroxylating and o-diphenol oxidase activities. A kinetic analysis demonstrated that the monomeric form of the enzyme possesses a higher affinity for monophenols and can more effectively accomplish the hydroxylation reaction as compared to the dimeric one. During vine vegetation the ratio of molecular forms of phenol oxidase is altered manifesting itself in quantitative and qualitative changes of enzymatic activity. During plant maturation the dimeric fraction is predominant. The maturation process is associated with a sharp rise of the o-phenol oxidase activity, a disappearance of the hydroxylating activity and a substantial deceleration of phenol compounds production. PMID:6412775

  5. Design and performance of a beam line with a 1 m focal length toroidal grating monochromator at the ACO storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudat, W.; Kisker, E.; Rothberg, G. M.; Depautex, C.

    We describe a new beam line at the ACO storage ring for solid state photoelectron spectorscopy incorporating a 1 m focal length toroidal grating monochromator for the photon energy range 6 eV to 120 eV custom-built by Jobin-Yvon Instruments S.A. Test results for the TGM with laboratory line light sources are reported as well as performance data with synchrotron radiation.

  6. Interaction of L-glutamate oxidase with triazine dyes: selection of ligands for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Katsos, N E; Labrou, N E; Clonis, Y D

    2004-08-01

    Glutamate oxidase (GOX, EC 1.4.3.11) from Streptomyces catalyses the oxidation of L-glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate. Its kinetic constants for L-glutamate were measured equal to 2 mM for Km and 85.8 s(-1) for kcat. BLAST search and amino acid sequence alignments revealed low homology to other L-amino acid oxidases (18-38%). Threading methodology, homology modeling and CASTp analysis resulted in certain conclusions concerning the structure of catalytic alpha-subunit and led to the prediction of a binding pocket that provides favorable conditions of accommodating negatively charged aromatic ligands, such as sulphonated triazine dyes. Eleven commercial textile dyes and four biomimetic dyes or minodyes, bearing a ketocarboxylated-structure as their terminal biomimetic moiety, immobilized on cross-linked agarose gel. The resulted mini-library of affinity adsorbents was screened for binding and eluting L-glutamate oxidase activity. All but Cibacron Blue 3GA (CB3GA) affinity adsorbents were able to bind GOX at pH 5.6. One immobilized minodye-ligand, bearing as its terminal biomimetic moiety p-aminobenzyloxanylic acid (BM1), displayed the higher affinity for GOX. Kinetic inhibition studies showed that BM1 inhibits GOX in a non-competitive manner with a Ki of 10.5 microM, indicating that the dye-enzyme interaction does not involve the substrate-binding site. Adsorption equilibrium data, obtained from a batch system with BM1 adsorbent, corresponded well to the Freundlich isotherm with a rate constant k of 2.7 mg(1/2)ml(1/2)/g and Freundlich isotherm exponent n of 1. The interaction of GOX with the BM1 adsorbent was further studied with regards to adsorption and elution conditions. The results obtained were exploited in the development of a facile purification protocol for GOX, which led to 335-fold purification in a single step with high enzyme recovery (95%). The present purification procedure is the most efficient reported so far for L-glutamate oxidase. PMID:15203041

  7. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with ({sup 14}C)iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 ({plus minus} 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked.

  8. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability. PMID:24113189

  9. Heterologous Production and Characterization of Two Glyoxal Oxidases from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Marianne; Piumi, François; Cullen, Daniel; Record, Eric

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of the white rot fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus includes a large number of genes encoding enzymes implicated in lignin degradation. Among these, three genes are predicted to encode glyoxal oxidase, an enzyme previously isolated from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The glyoxal oxidase of P. chrysosporium is physiologically coupled to lignin-oxidizing peroxidases via generation of extracellular H2O2 and utilizes an array of aldehydes and α-hydroxycarbonyls as the substrates. Two of the predicted glyoxal oxidases of P. cinnabarinus, GLOX1 (PciGLOX1) and GLOX2 (PciGLOX2), were heterologously produced in Aspergillus niger strain D15#26 (pyrG negative) and purified using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, yielding 59 and 5 mg of protein for PciGLOX1 and PciGLOX2, respectively. Both proteins were approximately 60 kDa in size and N-glycosylated. The optimum temperature for the activity of these enzymes was 50°C, and the optimum pH was 6. The enzymes retained most of their activity after incubation at 50°C for 4 h. The highest relative activity and the highest catalytic efficiency of both enzymes occurred with glyoxylic acid as the substrate. The two P. cinnabarinus enzymes generally exhibited similar substrate preferences, but PciGLOX2 showed a broader substrate specificity and was significantly more active on 3-phenylpropionaldehyde. IMPORTANCE This study addresses the poorly understood role of how fungal peroxidases obtain an in situ supply of hydrogen peroxide to enable them to oxidize a variety of organic and inorganic compounds. This cooperative activity is intrinsic in the living organism to control the amount of toxic H2O2 in its environment, thus providing a feed-on-demand scenario, and can be used biotechnologically to supply a cheap source of peroxide for the peroxidase reaction. The secretion of multiple glyoxal oxidases by filamentous fungi as part of a lignocellulolytic mechanism suggests a controlled system, especially as these

  10. Expression of genes associated with the biosynthetic pathways of abscisic acid, gibberellin, and ethylene during the germination of lettuce seeds.

    PubMed

    Clemente, A C S; Guimarães, R M; Martins, D C; Gomes, L A A; Caixeta, F; Reis, R G E; Rosa, S D V F

    2015-01-01

    Seed germination and dormancy are complex phenomena that are controlled by many genes and environmental factors. Such genes are indicated by phytohormones that interact with each other, and may cause dormancy or promote seed germination. The objective of this study was to investigate gene expression associated with the biosynthetic pathways of abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellic acid (GA), and ethylene (ET) in dormant and germinated lettuce seeds. The expressions of LsNCED, LsGA3ox1, and ACO-B were evaluated in germinating and dormant seeds from the cultivars Everglades, Babá de Verão, Verônica, Salinas, Colorado, and Regina 71. The expressions of LsNCED, LsGA3ox1, and ACO-B were related to the biosynthesis of ABA, GA, and ET, respectively; therefore, the presence of these substances depends on genotype. LsNCED expression only occurred in dormant seeds, and was connected to dormancy. LsGA3ox1expression only occurred in germinated seeds, and was connected to germination. The ACO-B gene was involved in ET biosynthesis, and was expressed differently in germinated and dormant seeds, depending on the genotype, indicating different functions for different characteristics. Furthermore, sensitivity to phytohormones appeared to be more important than the expression levels of LsNCED, LsGA3ox1, or ACO-B. PMID:25966245

  11. Temporal and spectral evolution of a storage ring FEL source: Experimental results on Super-ACO and new theoretical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Couprie, M.E. ||

    1995-12-31

    The Super-ACO FEL source in UV is now used for applications like a time-resolved fluorescence in biology and two colors experiments coupling FEL and Synchrotron Radiation, which are naturally synchronized. The stability of the FEL is then a critical issue for the users. Detailed experimental studies conducted on the temporal characteristics of the laser micropulse showed various phenomena, such as a longitudinal micropulse jitter and a deformation of a longitudinal micropulse distribution. A similar analysis has been performed on the laser spectral evolution with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer, showing a spectrum narrowing, and a wavelength drift. A longitudinal feedback system developed after the first user experiment, allowed to reduce significantly the longitudinal jitter, the intensity fluctuation and the spectral drift. Nevertheless, the stability of the FEL is very dependent on any perturbation, and the observed phenomena can not be described by former models like super-mode assuming a stationary regime. A new theoretical model has then been developed, in order to simulate dynamic behaviors. A simple iterative method is employed to obtain the laser spectrum. The access to the temporal distribution requires additional complexity, because the Fourier transformation has to be performed for each pass. The comparison between the experimental data and the simulation results will be given.

  12. Molecular aspects of monoamine oxidase B.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Rona R

    2016-08-01

    Monoamine oxidases (MAO) influence the monoamine levels in brain by virtue of their role in neurotransmitter breakdown. MAO B is the predominant form in glial cells and in platelets. MAO B structure, function and kinetics are described as a background for the effect of alterations in its activity on behavior. The need to inhibit MAO B to combat decreased brain amines continues to drive the search for new drugs. Reversible and irreversible inhibitors are now designed using data-mining, computational screening, docking and molecular dynamics. Multi-target ligands designed to combat the elevated activity of MAO B in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases incorporate MAO inhibition (usually irreversible) as well as iron chelation, antioxidant or neuroprotective properties. The main focus of drug design is the catalytic activity of MAO, but the imidazoline I2 site in the entrance cavity of MAO B is also a pharmacological target. Endogenous regulation of MAO B expression is discussed briefly in light of new studies measuring mRNA, protein, or activity in healthy and degenerative samples, including the effect of DNA methylation on the expression. Overall, this review focuses on examples of recent research on the molecular aspects of the expression, activity, and inhibition of MAO B. PMID:26891670

  13. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea – which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes. PMID:26024311

  14. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases.

    PubMed

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea - which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes. PMID:26024311

  15. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  16. Analyzing the electrogenicity of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-07-12

    Measurements of voltage changes in response to charge separation within membrane proteins can offer fundamental information on spectroscopically "invisible" steps. For example, results from studies of voltage changes associated with electron and proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase could, in principle, be used to discriminate between different theoretical models describing the molecular mechanism of proton pumping. Earlier analyses of data from these measurements have been based on macroscopic considerations that may not allow for exploring the actual molecular mechanisms. Here, we have used a coarse-grained model describing the relation between observed voltage changes and specific charge-transfer reactions, which includes an explicit description of the membrane, the electrolytes, and the electrodes. The results from these calculations offer mechanistic insights at the molecular level. Our main conclusion is that previously assumed mechanistic evidence that was based on electrogenic measurements is not unique. However, the ability of our calculations to obtain reliable voltage changes means that we have a tool that can be used to describe a wide range of electrogenic charge transfers in channels and transporters, by combining voltage measurements with other experiments and simulations to analyze new mechanistic proposals. PMID:27357681

  17. Molecularly "wired" cholesterol oxidase for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Leonida, Mihaela D; Aurian-Blajeni, Benedict

    2015-02-01

    The influence of several factors on the activity of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) transiently exposed to a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was studied. Presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, prosthetic group of ChOx) during exposure to RTIL makes the procedure enzyme-friendly, while the use of RTIL (green reagent) makes it environmentally-friendly. Following exposure to RTIL and its subsequent removal, FAD becomes part of the molecular structure of the refolded protein (a molecular "wire"). This makes the procedure used here a molecular one. The factors studied were: FAD presence in RTIL during modification, water presence during exposure to RTIL, and ratio FAD:RTIL during "wiring". Performance parameters monitored were: enzyme activity before and after "wiring" (expressed as (dA/dt)/mg enzyme, and measured spectrophotometrically), peak current in an amperometric biosensor for cholesterol detection, and linearity of the biosensor response depending on cholesterol concentration. After RTIL removal, the modified enzyme (ME) retained a high percentage of the added FAD, which supplemented that of the native enzyme (functioning as a "wire" and enhancing electron transfer kinetics), and a fraction of the initial activity. Used in an amperometric biosensor, ME showed catalytic activity, linear behavior as a function of cholesterol concentration, and stability. PMID:25579496

  18. Crystallization of carbohydrate oxidase from Microdochium nivale.

    PubMed

    Dusková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Østergaard, Lars Henrik; Fuglsang, Claus Crone; Kolenko, Petr; Stepánková, Andrea; Hasek, Jindrich

    2009-06-01

    Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was produced by heterologous recombinant expression in Aspergillus oryzae, purified and crystallized. The enzyme crystallizes with varying crystal morphologies depending on the crystallization conditions. Several different crystal forms were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, two of which were used for diffraction measurements. Hexagon-shaped crystals (form I) diffracted to 2.66 A resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.7, c = 610.4 A and apparent space group P6(2)22. Analysis of the data quality showed almost perfect twinning of the crystals. Attempts to solve the structure by molecular replacement did not give satisfactory results. Recently, clusters of rod-shaped crystals (form II) were grown in a solution containing PEG MME 550. These crystals belonged to the monoclinic system C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 132.9, b = 56.6, c = 86.5 A, beta = 95.7 degrees . Data sets were collected to a resolution of 2.4 A. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. Model refinement is currently in progress. PMID:19478452

  19. Crystallization of carbohydrate oxidase from Microdochium nivale

    PubMed Central

    Dušková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Østergaard, Lars Henrik; Fuglsang, Claus Crone; Kolenko, Petr; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich

    2009-01-01

    Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was produced by heterologous recombinant expression in Aspergillus oryzae, purified and crystallized. The enzyme crystallizes with varying crystal morphologies depending on the crystallization conditions. Several different crystal forms were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, two of which were used for diffraction measurements. Hexagon-shaped crystals (form I) diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.7, c = 610.4 Å and apparent space group P6222. Analysis of the data quality showed almost perfect twinning of the crystals. Attempts to solve the structure by molecular replacement did not give satisfactory results. Recently, clusters of rod-shaped crystals (form II) were grown in a solution containing PEG MME 550. These crystals belonged to the monoclinic system C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 132.9, b = 56.6, c = 86.5 Å, β = 95.7°. Data sets were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. Model refinement is currently in progress. PMID:19478452

  20. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  1. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  2. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, D R; Hulmes, D J

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a [4,5-3H]-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware. PMID:1971160

  3. Acetoin catabolic system of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43: sequence, expression, and organization of the aco operon.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W L; Chang, H Y; Peng, H L

    1994-01-01

    A cosmid clone which was capable of depleting acetoin in vivo was isolated from a library of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43 cosmids. The smallest functional subclone contained a 3.9-kb DNA fragment of the cosmid clone. Sequencing of the DNA fragment revealed three open reading frames (ORFs A, B, and C) encoding polypeptides of 34, 36, and 52 kDa, respectively. The presence of these proteins was demonstrated by expression of the recombinant DNA clone in Escherichia coli. Considerable similarities between the deduced amino acid sequences of the ORFs and those of the following enzymes were found: acetoin dissimilation enzymes, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex of various origins. Activities of these enzymes, including acetoin-dependent dichlorophenolin-dohenol oxidoreductase and dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, were detected in the extracts of E. coli harboring the genes encoding products of the three ORFs. Although not required for acetoin depletion in vivo, a possible fourth ORF (ORF D), located 39 nucleotides downstream of ORF C, was also identified. The deduced N-terminal sequence of the ORF D product was highly homologous to the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases of several organisms. Primer extension analysis identified the transcriptional start of the operon as an A residue 72 nucleotides upstream of ORF A. Images PMID:8206829

  4. Molecular Basis of Reduced Pyridoxine 5′-Phosphate Oxidase Catalytic Activity in Neonatal Epileptic Encephalopathy Disorder*

    PubMed Central

    Musayev, Faik N.; Di Salvo, Martino L.; Saavedra, Mario A.; Contestabile, Roberto; Ghatge, Mohini S.; Haynes, Alexina; Schirch, Verne; Safo, Martin K.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase are known to cause neonatal epileptic encephalopathy. This disorder has no cure or effective treatment and is often fatal. Pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of pyridoxine 5′-phosphate to pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, the active cofactor form of vitamin B6 required by more than 140 different catalytic activities, including enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and biosynthesis of neurotransmitters. Our aim is to elucidate the mechanism by which a homozygous missense mutation (R229W) in the oxidase, linked to neonatal epileptic encephalopathy, leads to reduced oxidase activity. The R229W variant is ∼850-fold less efficient than the wild-type enzyme due to an ∼192-fold decrease in pyridoxine 5′-phosphate affinity and an ∼4.5-fold decrease in catalytic activity. There is also an ∼50-fold reduction in the affinity of the R229W variant for the FMN cofactor. A 2.5 Å crystal structure of the R229W variant shows that the substitution of Arg-229 at the FMN binding site has led to a loss of hydrogen-bond and/or salt-bridge interactions between FMN and Arg-229 and Ser-175. Additionally, the mutation has led to an alteration of the configuration of a β-strand-loop-β-strand structure at the active site, resulting in loss of two critical hydrogen-bond interactions involving residues His-227 and Arg-225, which are important for substrate binding and orientation for catalysis. These results provide a molecular basis for the phenotype associated with the R229W mutation, as well as providing a foundation for understanding the pathophysiological consequences of pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase mutations. PMID:19759001

  5. Is Xanthine Oxidase, a Marker in Pre-eclampsia? A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bambrana, Vanishree; Kotur, Pushpa P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia is an obstetrics problem that affects multiple systemic functions and leads to the increased maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The objective of the study was to evaluate the plasma levels of Xanthine oxidase (XO) activity, uric acid and Nitric oxide (NO) levels in women with pre-eclampsia and normal pregnancy during antenatal and postpartum period. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted in women with normal pregnancy (n=50) and pre-eclampsia (n=50) before and after delivery. XO activity, uric acid and NO levels were determined from samples at 30-39 weeks of gestation. The current study was conducted in association with Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of R.L. Jalappa Hospital and Research Center. The blood samples were analysed for assay of XO, uric acid and NO. The results were analysed by using SPSS software version 2013. P-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The plasma XO activity was elevated (p<0.001) in the pre-eclampsia compared to normotensive pregnant women before delivery and decreased after delivery (p<0.001) significantly. Uric acid level showed a significant increase in pre-eclampsia when compared to the control before delivery (p<0.001) however values were non-significant after delivery. Conclusion Placenta plays a key role in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. Placenta removal leads to decrease trend of xanthine oxidase activity, uric acid and elevation of Nitric oxide as reversible changes in pre-eclampsia patients within 48 hours after delivery. PMID:26557508

  6. Expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase during leaf ontogeny in white clover.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D A; Yoo, S D; Butcher, S M; McManus, M T

    1999-05-01

    We examined the expression of three distinct 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase genes during leaf ontogeny in white clover (Trifolium repens). Significant production of ethylene occurs at the apex, in newly initiated leaves, and in senescent leaf tissue. We used a combination of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends to identify three distinct DNA sequences designated TRACO1, TRACO2, and TRACO3, each with homology to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase. Southern analysis confirmed that these sequences represent three distinct genes. Northern analysis revealed that TRACO1 is expressed specifically in the apex and TRACO2 is expressed in the apex and in developing and mature green leaves, with maximum expression in developing leaf tissue. The third gene, TRACO3, is expressed in senescent leaf tissue. Antibodies were raised to each gene product expressed in Escherichia coli, and western analysis showed that the TRACO1 antibody recognizes a protein of approximately 205 kD (as determined by gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis) that is expressed preferentially in apical tissue. The TRACO2 antibody recognizes a protein of approximately 36.4 kD (as determined by gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis) that is expressed in the apex and in developing and mature green leaves, with maximum expression in mature green tissue. No protein recognition by the TRACO3 antibody could be detected in senescent tissue or at any other stage of leaf development. PMID:10318691

  7. Oxidation of Phe454 in the Gating Segment Inactivates Trametes multicolor Pyranose Oxidase during Substrate Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Volc, Jindrich; Peterbauer, Clemens K.; Leitner, Christian; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The flavin-dependent enzyme pyranose oxidase catalyses the oxidation of several pyranose sugars at position C-2. In a second reaction step, oxygen is reduced to hydrogen peroxide. POx is of interest for biocatalytic carbohydrate oxidations, yet it was found that the enzyme is rapidly inactivated under turnover conditions. We studied pyranose oxidase from Trametes multicolor (TmPOx) inactivated either during glucose oxidation or by exogenous hydrogen peroxide using mass spectrometry. MALDI-MS experiments of proteolytic fragments of inactivated TmPOx showed several peptides with a mass increase of 16 or 32 Da indicating oxidation of certain amino acids. Most of these fragments contain at least one methionine residue, which most likely is oxidised by hydrogen peroxide. One peptide fragment that did not contain any amino acid residue that is likely to be oxidised by hydrogen peroxide (DAFSYGAVQQSIDSR) was studied in detail by LC-ESI-MS/MS, which showed a +16 Da mass increase for Phe454. We propose that oxidation of Phe454, which is located at the flexible active-site loop of TmPOx, is the first and main step in the inactivation of TmPOx by hydrogen peroxide. Oxidation of methionine residues might then further contribute to the complete inactivation of the enzyme. PMID:26828796

  8. Purification and structural analysis of membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase from Fuji apple.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhao, Jin-Hong; Wen, Xin; Ni, Yuan-Ying

    2015-09-15

    Membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase (mPPO) in Fuji apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Red Fuji) was purified and analyzed with a nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometer. The three-dimensional model and binding site of mPPO to 4-methyl catechol were also studied using molecular docking. mPPO was purified 54.41-fold using temperature-induced phase partitioning technique and ion exchange chromatography. mPPO had a molecular weight of 67.3kDa. Even though a significant level of homology was observed between mPPO and the soluble polyphenol oxidase in the copper binding sequence, there was another region, rich in histidine residues, which differed in 13 amino acids. The three-dimensional structure of mPPO consisted of six α-helices, two short β-strands, and ten random coils. The putative substrate-binding pocket contained six polar or charged amino acids, His191, His221, Trp224, Trp228, Phe227, and Val190. Trp224 and Trp228 formed hydrogen bonds with 4-methyl-catechol. PMID:25863612

  9. Pre-heating and polyphenol oxidase inhibition impact on extraction of purple sweet potato anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Cipriano, Paula; Ekici, Lutfiye; Barnes, Ryan C; Gomes, Carmen; Talcott, Stephen T

    2015-08-01

    Purple sweet potatoes (PSP) have been used as a natural food colorant with high acylated anthocyanins concentrations. Commercially extracting pigments from PSP can be challenging due to firm texture and high polyphenol oxidase (PPO) content. These studies evaluated hot water immersions (30, 50, 70, and 90°C for 10 min) as pre-heating treatments and addition of PPO inhibitors (citric acid, oxalic acid, and sodium borate) to aqueous extraction solutions to aid pigment recovery. Predominant PSP anthocyanins included acylated cyanidin or peonidin derivatives. Non-pigmented cinnamates acted as oxidase substrates and induced co-oxidation reactions with anthocyanins. Pre-heating PSP significantly increased polyphenolic yields in a temperature-dependent manner, consistent with tissue softening and PPO inactivation. The use of solvent modifiers in the extraction solution associated with heat helped minimize enzyme action and increased polyphenolic recovery. Minimizing the impact of PPO with heat was critical to the extraction and recovery of PSP anthocyanins, suitable for food use. PMID:25766822

  10. The purification and properties of a ribonucleoenzyme, o-diphenol oxidase, from potatoes.

    PubMed

    Balasingam, K; Ferdinand, W

    1970-06-01

    1. o-Diphenol oxidase was isolated from potato tubers by a new approach that avoids the browning due to autoxidation. 2. There are at least three forms of the enzyme, of different molecular weights. The major form, of highest molecular weight, was separated from the others in good yield and with high specific activity by gel filtration through Bio-Gel P-300. 3. The major form is homogeneous by disc electrophoresis but regenerates small amounts of the species of lower molecular weight, as shown by rechromatography on Bio-Gel P-300. 4. There is an equal amount of RNA and protein by weight in the fully active enzyme. The RNA cannot be removed without loss of activity, and is not attacked by ribonuclease. 5. The pH optimum of the enzyme is at pH5.0 when assayed with 4-methylcatechol as substrate. It is ten times more active with this substrate than with chlorogenic acid or catechol. The enzyme is fully active in 4m-urea. 6. A minimal molecular weight of 36000 is indicated by copper content and amino acid analysis of the protein component of the enzyme. 7. The protein contains five half-cystinyl residues per 36000 daltons, a value similar to that found in o-diphenol oxidase from mushrooms. It also contains tyrosine residues although, when pure, it does not turn brown by autoxidation. PMID:4990583

  11. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Induces NADPH-Oxidase Activity in Human Neutrophils by Interaction with Mobilizable Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Anna

    1999-01-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a lectin with specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid, was investigated with respect to its ability to activate the NADPH-oxidase of in vivo-exudated neutrophils (obtained from a skin chamber), and the activity was compared to that of peripheral blood neutrophils. The exudate cells responded to WGA, by both releasing reactive oxygen species into the extracellular milieu and producing oxygen metabolites intracellularly. The peripheral blood cells were unresponsive. To mimic the in vivo-exuded neutrophils with regards to receptor exposure, peripheral blood neutrophils were induced to mobilize their granules and vesicles to varying degrees (in vitro priming), prior to challenge with WGA. The oxidative response to WGA increased with increasing levels of granule mobilization, and the receptor(s) could be shown to reside in the secretory vesicles and/or the gelatinase granules in resting neutrophils. Several WGA-binding glycoproteins were detected in subcellular fractions containing these organelles. The extra- and intracellular NADPH-oxidase responses showed differences in sialic acid dependency, indicating that these two responses are mediated by different receptor structures. PMID:10377127

  12. Alternative oxidase involvement in Daucus carota somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Frederico, António Miguel; Campos, Maria Doroteia; Cardoso, Hélia Guerra; Imani, Jafargholi; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2009-12-01

    Plant alternative oxidase (AOX) is a mitochondrial inner membrane enzyme involved in alternative respiration. The critical importance of the enzyme during acclimation upon stress of plant cells is not fully understood and is still an issue of intensive research and discussion. Recently, a role of AOX was suggested for the ability of plant cells to change easily its fate upon stress. In order to get new insights about AOX involvement in cell reprogramming, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and inhibitor studies were performed during cell redifferentiation and developmental stages of Daucus carota L. somatic embryogenesis. Transcript level analysis shows that D. carota AOX genes (DcAOX1a and DcAOX2a) are differentially expressed during somatic embryogenesis. DcAOX1a shows lower expression levels, being mainly down-regulated, whereas DcAOX2a presented a large up-regulation during initiation of the realization phase of somatic embryogenesis. However, when globular embryos start to develop, both genes are down-regulated, being this state transient for DcAOX2a. In addition, parallel studies were performed using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) in order to inhibit AOX activity during the realization phase of somatic embryogenesis. Embryogenic cells growing in the presence of the inhibitor were unable to develop embryogenic structures and its growth rate was diminished. This effect was reversible and concentration dependent. The results obtained contribute to the hypothesis that AOX activity supports metabolic reorganization as an essential part of cell reprogramming and, thus, enables restructuring and de novo cell differentiation. PMID:19863756

  13. Antioxidant, α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of bioactive compounds from maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Nile, Shivraj H; Park, Se W

    2014-01-01

    Chemical investigations into maize (Zea mays L.) kernels yielded phenolic compounds, which were structurally established using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The isolated phenolic compounds from maize kernel were examined in vitro for their antioxidant abilities by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazine) radical, OH radical scavenging activity, and reducing ability, along with α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition. The isolated maize phenolics revealed significant xanthine oxidase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity to that of allopurinol and acarbose in vitro and in vivo, respectively. The kinetics study with xanthine oxidase revealed competitive type of inhibition by isolated maize vanillic acid (M2), ferulic acid (M5), 3'-methoxyhirsutrin (M7), and peonidin-3-glucoside (M10) as compared to control allopurinol. Overall, with few exceptions, all the phenolic compounds from maize kernel revealed significant biological activities with all parameters examined. Also, the phenolic compounds from maize were found to be more reactive toward DPPH radical and had considerable reducing ability and OH radical scavenging activity. These findings suggest that maize kernel phenolic compounds can be considered as potential antioxidant, α-glucosidase, and XO inhibitory agents those might be further explored for the design of lead antioxidant, antidiabetic and antigout drug candidates using in vivo trials. PMID:23957301

  14. The conserved baculovirus protein p33 (Ac92) is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C.M.; Rohrmann, G.F.; Merrill, G.F.

    2009-06-05

    Open reading frame 92 of the Autographa californica baculovirus (Ac92) is one of about 30 core genes present in all sequenced baculovirus genomes. Computer analyses predicted that the Ac92 encoded protein (called p33) and several of its baculovirus orthologs were related to a family of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-linked sulfhydryl oxidases. Alignment of these proteins indicated that, although they were highly diverse, a number of amino acids in common with the Erv1p/Alrp family of sulfhydryl oxidases are present. Some of these conserved amino acids are predicted to stack against the isoalloxazine and adenine components of FAD, whereas others are involved in electron transfer. To investigate this relationship, Ac92 was expressed in bacteria as a His-tagged fusion protein, purified, and characterized both spectrophotometrically and for its enzymatic activity. The purified protein was found to have the color (yellow) and absorption spectrum consistent with it being a FAD-containing protein. Furthermore, it was demonstrated to have sulfhydryl oxidase activity using dithiothreitol and thioredoxin as substrates.