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Sample records for acid oxidation carnitine

  1. Effect of L-carnitine on fatty acid oxidation of the muscle in hemodialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Siami, G.; Clinton, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-03-05

    Muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on long term hemodialysis (HD). Carnitine (C) is important for transport of fatty acids into mitochondria. The kidney is a major site of C biosynthesis which may be compromised in ESRD. C is lost during dialysis and is reduced in plasma and muscle. Although the cause of muscle weakness is multifactorial, the effect of supplemental C was tested on a group of ESRD patients on HD. C (1 gm I.V. 3 x/wk) or placebo was given to HD patients for 6 months. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after C supplementation and from control subjects. Muscle pathology was examined by histochemical light microscopy. Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by homogenate of the biopsied muscle was measured using (/sup 14/C) palmitate. Plasma aluminum (AL) and parthyroid hormone (PTH) were also measured and patients were evaluated for the degree of muscle weakness. All Pts had abnormal muscle pathology and C supplementation did not improve it. FAO by 3 HD Pts who had received placebo was 639 +/- 285 (S.D.) dpm/mg protein while control subjects were 1487 +/- 267 and was statistically different (p < .003). FAO by 8 HD Pts receiving C was not different from placebo. Addition of C in vitro stimulated FAO 70 to 80%, but there was not difference between groups. The degree of FAO was inversely correlated with the severity of the muscle pathology, and was directly correlated with the concentration of C in muscle. Pts with high plasma AL had lower FAO, but there was no correlation between FAO and PTH.

  2. Effect of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) on hepatic, heart and skeletal muscle mitochrondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and. beta. -oxidation of fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, L.J.; Brady, P.S.; Gandour, R.D.

    1986-05-01

    Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) is an antileukemic agent and polyamine analog which inhibits S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase. However, MGBG also produces mitochondrial structural damage and inhibition of ..beta..-oxidation. The present experiments were designed to determine if MGBG acts via carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A (CPT-A) inhibition. Liver, heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria were isolated from rats following a 24 h fast. MGBG was competitive with 1-carnitine. The MGBG CPT-A Ki were (mM): liver, 5.0 +/- 0.6 (n = 15); heart, 3.2 +/- 1.2 (n = 3); skeletal muscle, 2.8 +/- 1.0 (n = 3). Lysis of hepatic mitochondria with Triton X-100 yielded a Ki of 4.0 +/- 2.0. Purified hepatic CPT was also sensitive to MGBG inhibition (Ki = 4.5 mM). Spermine and spermidine, which are structurally similar to MGBG, did not inhibit CPT or acid-soluble product formation from 1-(/sup 14/C)-palmitoyl-CoA. MGBG inhibited mitochondrial state 3 oxidation rates of palmitoyl-CoA and palmitoylcarnitine, as well as of glutamate. However, the fatty acid substrates were considerably more sensitive than glutamate to MGBG inhibition. MGBG also increased hepatic mitochondrial aggregation which was reversed by 1-carnitine. Fluorescence polarization, using diphenylhexatriene as a probe, indicated that MGBG increased membrane rigidity in a dose dependent manner. This effect was not reversed by 1-carnitine. The authors conclude that MGBG exhibits competitive competition with 1-carnitine for CPT. However, MGBG also exhibits a number of effects which may be mediated through membrane interaction and which are not necessarily reversed by carnitine.

  3. Analysis of carnitine esters by radio-high performance liquid chromatography in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Bobrowski, P J; Penn, D; Rhead, W J; Wanders, R J; Bennett, M J

    1998-08-01

    Acylcarnitines are important diagnostic markers for inborn errors of fatty acid oxidation, but their analysis in body fluids may not always be reliable. Recently, disease-specific acylcarnitine profiles generated by cultured skin fibroblasts were reported to facilitate the diagnosis by localizing a specific enzymatic defect in the mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway. Using a novel methodologic approach, fibroblasts from 16 patients with inborn errors of fatty acid oxidation and 13 control subjects were preincubated with L-[3H]carnitine to label the intracellular carnitine pool. Cells were subsequently incubated with unlabeled palmitic acid and, after methanol extraction of cells and media, labeled free carnitine and acylcarnitines were analyzed by radio-HPLC. Quantitation was based on the integrated radioactivity of individual peaks relative to the total radioactivity recovered. In control cell lines, all saturated acylcarnitines were detected, and reference values were established. With the exception of one cell line deficient in electron transfer flavoprotein, all mutant cell lines showed abnormal and disease-specific relative concentrations of acylcarnitines. Advantages of the method include use of a small number of cells, no need for trypsinization and permeabilization of cells before incubation, simple extraction without purification of the specimen before HPLC, and relatively inexpensive equipment. The method allows a focused approach to the subsequent, more laborious confirmation of a particular disease by direct enzymatic and/or molecular analysis. It remains to be established whether the method can replace widely used global measurements of fatty acid oxidation rates in vitro that do not provide specific information about the enzyme deficiency involved.

  4. Age-associated mitochondrial oxidative decay: Improvement of carnitine acetyltransferase substrate-binding affinity and activity in brain by feeding old rats acetyl-l- carnitine and/or R-α-lipoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiankang; Killilea, David W.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2002-01-01

    We test whether the dysfunction with age of carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT), a key mitochondrial enzyme for fuel utilization, is due to decreased binding affinity for substrate and whether this substrate, fed to old rats, restores CAT activity. The kinetics of CAT were analyzed by using the brains of young and old rats and of old rats supplemented for 7 weeks with the CAT substrate acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) and/or the mitochondrial antioxidant precursor R-α-lipoic acid (LA). Old rats, compared with young rats, showed a decrease in CAT activity and in CAT-binding affinity for both substrates, ALCAR and CoA. Feeding ALCAR or ALCAR plus LA to old rats significantly restored CAT-binding affinity for ALCAR and CoA, and CAT activity. To explore the underlying mechanism, lipid peroxidation and total iron and copper levels were assayed; all increased in old rats. Feeding old rats LA or LA plus ALCAR inhibited lipid peroxidation but did not decrease iron and copper levels. Ex vivo oxidation of young-rat brain with Fe(II) caused loss of CAT activity and binding affinity. In vitro oxidation of purified CAT with Fe(II) inactivated the enzyme but did not alter binding affinity. However, in vitro treatment of CAT with the lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxy-nonenal caused a decrease in CAT-binding affinity and activity, thus mimicking age-related change. Preincubation of CAT with ALCAR or CoA prevented malondialdehyde-induced dysfunction. Thus, feeding old rats high levels of key mitochondrial metabolites can ameliorate oxidative damage, enzyme activity, substrate-binding affinity, and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:11854488

  5. Carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress provoke cardiotoxicity in an ifosfamide-induced Fanconi Syndrome rat model

    PubMed Central

    Darweesh, Amal Q; Fatani, Amal J

    2010-01-01

    In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO) therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with increased urinary carnitine excretion with subsequent secondary deficiency of the molecule. Cardiac abnormalities in IFO-treated cancer patients were reported as isolated clinical cases. This study examined whether carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress, secondary to Fanconi Syndrome, provoke IFO-induced cardiomyopathy as well as exploring if carnitine supplementation using Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) could offer protection against this toxicity. In the current study, an animal model of carnitine deficiency was developed in rats by D-carnitine-mildronate treatment Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups: the first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, D-carnitine (DC, 250 mg/kg/day) combined with mildronate (MD, 200 mg/kg/day) and PLC (250 mg/kg/day), respectively, for 10 successive days. The 4th, 5th and 6th groups were injected with the same doses of normal saline, DC-MD and PLC, respectively for 5 successive days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO (50 mg/kg/day). IFO significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary carnitine excretion and clearance, creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA/CoA-SH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in cardiac tissues and significantly decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total carnitine and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in cardiac tissues. In carnitine

  6. Carnitine supplementation alleviates lipid metabolism derangements and protects against oxidative stress in non-obese hereditary hypertriglyceridemic rats.

    PubMed

    Cahova, Monika; Chrastina, Petr; Hansikova, Hana; Drahota, Zdenek; Trnovska, Jaroslava; Skop, Vojtech; Spacilova, Jana; Malinska, Hana; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Papackova, Zuzana; Palenickova, Eliska; Kazdova, Ludmila

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of carnitine supplementation on lipid disorders and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity in a non-obese animal model of insulin resistance, the hereditary hypertriglyceridemic (HHTg) rat. Male HHTg rats were fed a standard diet, and half of them received daily doses of carnitine (500 mg·kg(-1) body weight) for 8 weeks. Rats of the original Wistar strain were used for comparison. HHTg rats exhibited increased urinary excretion of free carnitine and reduced carnitine content in the liver and blood. Carnitine supplementation compensated for this shortage and promoted urinary excretion of acetylcarnitine without any signs of (acyl)carnitine accumulation in skeletal muscle. Compared with their untreated littermates, carnitine-treated HHTg rats exhibited lower weight gain, reduced liver steatosis, lower fasting triglyceridemia, and greater reduction of serum free fatty acid content after glucose load. Carnitine treatment was associated with increased mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity for fatty acids, amelioration of oxidative stress, and restored substrate switching in the liver. In skeletal muscle (diaphragm), carnitine supplementation was associated with significantly higher palmitate oxidation and a more favorable complete to incomplete oxidation products ratio. Carnitine supplementation further enhanced insulin sensitivity ex vivo. No effects on whole-body glucose tolerance were observed. Our data suggest that some metabolic syndrome-related disorders, particularly fatty acid oxidation, steatosis, and oxidative stress in the liver, could be attenuated by carnitine supplementation. The effect of carnitine could be explained, at least partly, by enhanced substrate oxidation and increased fatty acid transport from tissues in the form of short-chain acylcarnitines.

  7. Disorders of carnitine biosynthesis and transport.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Carnitine is a hydrophilic quaternary amine that plays a number of essential roles in metabolism with the main function being the transport of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. Carnitine can be endogenously synthesized. However, only a small fraction of carnitine is obtained endogenously while the majority is obtained from diet, mainly animal products. Carnitine is not metabolized and is excreted in urine. Carnitine homeostasis is regulated by efficient renal reabsorption that maintains carnitine levels within the normal range despite variabilities in dietary intake. Diseases occurring due to primary defects in carnitine metabolism and homeostasis are comprised in two groups: disorders of carnitine biosynthesis and carnitine transport defect. While the hallmark of carnitine transport defect is profound carnitine depletion, disorders of carnitine biosynthesis do not cause carnitine deficiency due to the fact that both carnitine obtained from diet and efficient renal carnitine reabsorption can maintain normal carnitine levels with the absence of endogenously synthesized carnitine. Carnitine transport defect phenotype encompasses a broad clinical spectrum including metabolic decompensation in infancy, cardiomyopathy in childhood, fatigability in adulthood, or absence of symptoms. The phenotypes associated with the carnitine transport defect result from the unavailability of enough carnitine to perform its functions particularly in fatty acid β-oxidation. Carnitine biosynthetic defects have been recently described and the phenotypic consequences of these defects are still emerging. Although these defects do not result in carnitine deficiency, they still could be associated with pathological phenotypes due to excess or deficiency of intermediate metabolites in the carnitine biosynthetic pathway and potential carnitine deficiency in early stages of life when brain and other organs develop. In addition to these two

  8. Carnitine is associated with fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Benoîte; Adenier, Hervé; Perrin, Yolande

    2007-12-01

    The finding of acylcarnitines alongside free carnitine in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species, using tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography shows a link between carnitine and plant fatty acid metabolism. Moreover the occurrence of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines suggests that carnitine is connected to diverse fatty acid metabolic pathways in plant tissues. The carnitine and acylcarnitine contents in plant tissues are respectively a hundred and a thousand times lower than in animal tissues, and acylcarnitines represent less than 2% of the total carnitine pool whereas this percentage reaches 30% in animal tissues. These results suggest that carnitine plays a lesser role in lipid metabolism in plants than it does in animals.

  9. Aminocarnitine and acylaminocarnitines: Carnitine acyltransferase inhibitors affecting long-chain fatty acid and glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    DL-Aminocarnitine (DL-3-amino-4-trimethylaminobutyrate) and the acylaminocarnitines acetyl-, decanoyl- and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine have been synthesized and tested as inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase and carnitine acetyltransferase in vitro and in vivo. Acetyl-DL-aaminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine acetyltransferase reported to date, and is competitive with respect to acetyl-L-carnitine. Mice given acetyl-DL-aminocarnitine metabolize (U-{sup 14}C)acetyl-L-carnitine at about 60% of the rate of control mice. Palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase reported to date. Decanoyl-DL-aminocarnitine and DL-aminocarnitine are also very potent inhibitors; all compounds inhibit the catabolism of ({sup 14}C)palmitate to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in intact mice by at least 50%. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase controls the entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for {beta}-oxidation. The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by aminocarnitine or acylaminocarnitines in vivo prevents or reverses ketogenesis in fasted mice, and causes the reversible accumulation of triglycerides in liver, kidney and plasma. Administration of DL-aminocarnitine to streptozotocindiabetic mice lowers plasma glucose levels and improves the glucose tolerance test.

  10. Carnitine and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, O J

    1996-08-01

    Carnitine plays a central role in fatty acid (FA) metabolism. It transports long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for beta-oxidation. Carnitine also modulates the metabolism of coenzyme-A (CoA). It is not surprising that the use of supplementary carnitine to improve physical performance has become widespread in recent years, although there is no unequivocal support to this practice. However, critical reflections and current scientific-based knowledge are important because the implications of reduced or increased carnitine concentrations in vivo are not thoroughly understood. Several rationales have been forwarded in support of the potential ergogenic effects of oral carnitine supplementation. However, the following arguments derived from established scientific observations may be forwarded: (i) carnitine supplementation neither enhances FA oxidation in vivo or spares glycogen or postpones fatigue during exercise. Carnitine supplementation does not unequivocally improve performance of athletes; (ii) carnitine supplementation does not reduce body fat or help to lose weight; (iii) in vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is fully active already after a few seconds of intense exercise. Carnitine supplementation induces no further activation of PDC in vivo; (iv) despite an increased acetyl-CoA/free CoA ratio, PDC is not depressed during exercise in vivo and therefore supplementary carnitine has no effect on lactate accumulation; (v) carnitine supplementation per se does not affect the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max); (vi) during exercise there is a redistribution of free carnitine and acylcarnitines in the muscle but there is no loss of total carnitine. Athletes are not at risk for carnitine deficiency and do not have an increased need for carnitine. Although there are some theoretical points favouring potential ergogenic effects of carnitine supplementation, there is currently no scientific basis for healthy individuals or athletes to use carnitine

  11. Carnitine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carnitine (L-g-trimethylamino-ß-hydroxybutyrate) functions metabolically as a covalent molecular chaperone of acyl compounds esterified to its hydroxyl moiety (1,2). The quintessentialmetabolic function of L-carnitine is to shuttle long-chain FAs (LCFAs)2 across the inner mitochondrial membrane to t...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... into energy. Fatty acid oxidation takes place within mitochondria , which are the energy-producing centers in cells. ... to a substance known as carnitine to enter mitochondria. Once these fatty acids are inside mitochondria, carnitine ...

  13. Determining and surveying the role of carnitine and folic acid to decrease fatigue in β-thalassemia minor subjects.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Mazloom, Maryam; Shahriari, Mahdi; Zareifar, Soheila; Azimi, Ali; Hadaegh, Amirhossein; Karimi, Mehran

    2013-11-01

    Beta-thalassemia minor (BTM) patients usually experience fatigue, bone pain complaint, and muscle weakness. Carnitine is an essential protein for transportation of long-chain fatty acids to the matrix for beta-oxidation. BTM patients have abnormally low plasma carnitine concentrations, which results in deficient ATP production. Carnitine and folic acid together may have a role in preventing bone pain complaint and fatigue in these patients. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of carnitine and folic acid supplementation in subjects with BTM. Seventy three BTM (mean age 11.06 ± 5.46 years) and 23 healthy controls (mean age 8.48 ± 3.78 years) were enrolled in the study. Fasting blood was drawn to determine baseline free and total carnitine levels, red blood cell folate concentration, and hemoglobin level. BTM were divided into three groups and received different types of supplementation for 3 months: Group 1, 50 mg/kg/day carnitine; Group 2, 50 mg/kg/day carnitine plus 1 mg/day folic acid; and Group 3, 1 mg/day folic acid. Controls did not receive supplementation. Laboratory parameters were again evaluated after 3 months' supplementation. A detailed quality of life questionnaire was designed to investigate muscle symptoms before and after supplementation. Free and total plasma carnitine concentration and hemoglobin levels in BTM subjects increased significantly after carnitine supplementation (P < .0001). Bone pain complaint and muscle weakness decreased with carnitine. Red blood cell folate level increased after folic acid supplementation. Carnitine and folic acid supplementation resulted in a decrease in bone pain complaint and muscle weakness in cases with β-thalassemia minor.

  14. Carnitine in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bach, A C

    1982-12-01

    The oxidation of long-chain fatty acids is carnitine-dependent. Indeed, only when they are bound to carnitine, in the form of acyl-carnitines, do fatty acids penetrate into the mitochondria to be oxidized. To meet the need for carnitine, animals depend on both endogenous synthesis and an exogenous supply. A diet rich in meat supplies a lot of carnitine, while vegetables, fruits, and grains furnish relatively little. Although it has a low molecular weight and acts at low doses in a vital metabolic pathway, carnitine should not be considered a vitamin, but rather a nutritive substance. Indeed, it seems that the diet of the adult human need not necessarily furnish carnitine: the healthy organism, given a balanced nutrition (sufficiently rich in lysine and methionine), may well be able to meet all its needs. Furthermore, it seems that a reduction of the exogenous supply of carnitine results in a lowering of its elimination in the urine. However, dietary carnitine is more important during the neonatal period. The transition from fetal to extrauterine life is accompanied by an increased role of lipids in meeting energy needs. This change is accompanied by a rise in the body of the levels of carnitine, which is mainly supplied in the maternal milk. Finally, this review briefly surveys the illnesses in which a dietary carnitine supplement proves useful.

  15. Enzymology of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Strijbis, Karin; Vaz, Frédéric M; Distel, Ben

    2010-05-01

    The water-soluble zwitterion carnitine is an essential metabolite in eukaryotes required for fatty acid oxidation as it functions as a carrier during transfer of activated acyl and acetyl groups across intracellular membranes. Most eukaryotes are able to synthesize carnitine endogenously, besides their capacity to take up carnitine from the diet or extracellular medium through plasma membrane transporters. This review discusses the current knowledge on carnitine homeostasis with special emphasis on the enzymology of the four steps of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway.

  16. Evidence that L-carnitine and selenium supplementation reduces oxidative stress in phenylketonuric patients.

    PubMed

    Sitta, A; Vanzin, C S; Biancini, G B; Manfredini, V; de Oliveira, A B; Wayhs, C A Y; Ribas, G O S; Giugliani, L; Schwartz, I V D; Bohrer, D; Garcia, S C; Wajner, M; Vargas, C R

    2011-04-01

    It is well established that the involvement of reactive species in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases, including phenylketonuria (PKU), a metabolic genetic disorder biochemically characterized by elevated levels of phenylalanine (Phe). In previous studies, we verified that PKU patients (treated with a protein-restricted diet supplemented with a special formula not containing L-carnitine and selenium) presented high lipid and protein oxidative damage as well as a reduction of antioxidants when compared to the healthy individuals. Our goal in the present study was to evaluate the effect of Phe-restricted diet supplemented with L-carnitine and selenium, two well-known antioxidant compounds, on oxidative damage in PKU patients. We investigated various oxidative stress parameters in blood of 18 treated PKU patients before and after 6 months of supplementation with a special formula containing L-carnitine and selenium. It was verified that treatment with L-carnitine and selenium was capable of reverting the lipid peroxidation, measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive species, and the protein oxidative damage, measured by sulfhydryl oxidation, to the levels of controls. Additionally, the reduced activity of glutathione peroxidase was normalized by the antioxidant supplementation. It was also verified a significant inverse correlation between lipid peroxidation and L-carnitine blood levels as well as a significant positive correlation between glutathione peroxidase activity and blood selenium concentration. In conclusion, our results suggest that supplementation of L-carnitine and selenium is important for PKU patients since it could help to correct the oxidative stress process which possibly contributes, at least in part, to the neurological symptoms found in phenylketonuric patients.

  17. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  19. Experimental evidence of oxidative stress in patients with l-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria and that l-carnitine attenuates in vitro DNA damage caused by d-2-hydroxyglutaric and l-2-hydroxyglutaric acids.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daiane Grigolo Bardemaker; de Moura Coelho, Daniella; Sitta, Ângela; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Hauschild, Tatiane; Manfredini, Vanusa; Bakkali, Abdellatif; Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2017-04-07

    d-2-hydroxyglutaric (D-2-HGA) and l-2-hydroxyglutaric (L-2-HGA) acidurias are rare neurometabolic disorders biochemically characterized by increased levels of d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D-2-HG) and l-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (L-2-HG) respectively, in biological fluids and tissues. These diseases are caused by mutations in the specific enzymes involved in the metabolic pathways of these organic acids. In the present work, we first investigated whether D-2-HG and L-2-HGA could provoke DNA oxidative damage in blood leukocytes and whether l-carnitine (LC) could prevent the in vitro DNA damage induced by these organic acids. It was verified that 50μM of D-2-HG and 30μM of L-2-HG significantly induced DNA damage that was prevented by 30 and 150μM of LC. We also evaluated oxidative stress parameters in urine of L-2-HGA patients and observed a significant increase of oxidized guanine species and di-tyrosine, biomarkers of oxidative DNA and protein damage, respectively. In contrast, no significant changes of urinary isoprostanes and reactive nitrogen species levels were observed in these patients. Taken together, our data indicate the involvement of oxidative damage, especially on DNA, in patients affected by these diseases and the protective effect of LC.

  20. Inhibition of mitochondrial carnitine acylcarnitine translocase-mediated uptake of carnitine by 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate. Hydrazonopropionic acids, a new class of hypoglycaemic substances, VI.

    PubMed

    Beneking, M; Oellerich, M; Haeckel, R; Binder, L

    1987-08-01

    The rate of mitochondrial carnitine-carnitine exchange mediated by carnitine acylcarnitine translocase was measured by following the uptake of L-[methyl-14C]carnitine. It was demonstrated that the hypoglycaemic compound 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate causes a concentration-dependent decrease in the rate of the translocase-mediated transport of carnitine in guinea pig liver mitochondria. Apparent initial influx rates were decreased by 20% at 0.3 mmol/1 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate, 38% at 0.5 mmol/l, and 75% at 2.0 mmol/l of this compound. This finding may explain the previously observed inhibitory effects of this substance on long-chain fatty acid oxidation, ketone body production and gluconeogenesis.

  1. Carnitine in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Gianfranco

    2015-03-01

    Carnitine is a conditionally essential metabolite that plays a critical role in cell physiology. Carnitine is necessary for fatty acid transport to sites of beta-oxidation in the mitochondria, where it also helps to prevent organic acid accumulation. Because of these key regulatory functions, carnitine represents a crucial determinant of mitochondrial energy metabolism, whose deficiency may lead to metabolic and clinical disturbances. Loss of carnitine through dialytic membranes occurs in maintenance hemodialysis, resulting in potential carnitine depletion and relative increments of esterified carnitine forms. Carnitine supplementation has been reported to counteract some of these alterations and has been associated with some clinical benefits, such as enhanced response to erythropoietin as well as improvement in exercise tolerance, intradialytic symptom, hyperparathyroidism, insulin resistance, inflammatory and oxidant status, protein balance, lipid profile, cardiac function, and quality of life. Carnitine supplementation has an attractive theoretical rationale; however, there are no definitive supportive studies and conclusive evidence that L-carnitine supplementation in maintenance hemodialysis patients could improve these conditions. A trial of carnitine administration could be attempted for 6 to 12 months only in selected patients on dialysis who do not adequately respond to standard therapies, in the presence of symptomatology, and in conjunction with patient dialysis age and documented L-carnitine deficiency.

  2. [Carnitine - mitochondria and beyond].

    PubMed

    Nałęcz, Katarzyna A; Nałęcz, Maciej J

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine [(3R)-3-hydroxy-4-(trimethylazaniumyl)butanoate] in mammals is mainly delivered with diet. It enters the cell due to the activity of organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 (SLC22A5), it can be as well transported by CT2 (SLC22A16) and a transporter of neutral and basic amino acids ATB(0, +) (SLC6A14). The hydroxyl group of carnitine is able to form esters with organic acids (xenobiotics, fatty acids) due to the activity of acylcarnitine transferases. Carnitine is necessary for transfer of fatty acids to mitochondria: in functioning of the so-called carnitine shuttle an essential role is fulfilled by palmitoylcarnitine transferase 1, carnitine carrier (SLC25A20) in the inner mitochondrial membrane and palmitoylcarnitine transferase 2. Oxidation of fatty acids takes also place in peroxisomes. The produced medium-chain acyl derivatives are exported as acylcarnitines, most probably by OCTN3 (Slc22a21). It has been postulated that acylcarnitines can cross the outer mitochondrial membrane through the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and/or through the palmitoycarnitine transferase 1 oligomer. Mutations of genes coding carnitine plasma membrane transporters result in the primary carnitine deficiency, with symptoms affecting normal functioning of muscles (including heart) and brain. Mechanisms regulating functioning of these transporters have been presented with emphasis on their role as potential therapeutic targets.

  3. Carnitine supplementation to obese Zucker rats prevents obesity-induced type II to type I muscle fiber transition and favors an oxidative phenotype of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that carnitine supplementation counteracts obesity-induced muscle fiber transition from type I to type II. Methods 24 obese Zucker rats were randomly divided into two groups of 12 rats each (obese control, obese carnitine) and 12 lean Zucker rats were selected for lean control group. A control diet was given to both control groups and a carnitine supplemented diet (3 g/kg diet) was given to obese carnitine group for 4 wk. Components of the muscle fiber transformation in skeletal muscle were examined. Results The plasma level of carnitine were lower in the obese control group compared to the lean control group and higher in the obese carnitine group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). Plasma concentrations of triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids were increased in obese animals compared to lean animals and the obese carnitine group had lower level compared to the obese control group (P < 0.05). The obese carnitine group had an increased number of type I muscle fibers and higher mRNA levels of type I fiber-specific myosin heavy chain, regulators of muscle fiber transition and of genes involved in carnitine uptake, fatty acid transport, β-oxidation, angiogenesis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and thermo genesis in M. rectus femoris compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion The results demonstrate that carnitine supplementation to obese Zucker a rat counteracts the obesity-induced muscle fiber transition and restores the muscle oxidative metabolic phenotype. Carnitine supplementation is supposed to be beneficial for the treatment of elevated levels of plasma lipids during obesity or diabetes. PMID:23842456

  4. Effects of dietary supplemental L-carnitine and ascorbic acid on performance, carcass composition and plasma L-carnitine concentration of broiler chicks reared under different temperature.

    PubMed

    Celik, L; Oztürkcan, O

    2003-02-01

    The present study was initiated to determine whether dietary supplemental L-carnitine and ascorbic acid affect growth performance, carcass yield and composition, abdominal fat and plasma L-carnitine concentration of broiler chicks reared under normal and high temperature. During the experiment, two temperature regimes were employed in two experimental rooms, which were identical but different in environmental temperature. The regimes were thermoneutral (20-22 degrees C for 24 h) or recycling hot (34-36 degrees C for 8 h and 20-22 degrees C for 16 h). One-day-old broiler chicks (ROSS) were used in the experiment. A 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement was employed with two levels (0 and 50 mg/kg) of supplemental L-carnitine and two levels (0 or 500 mg/kg) of supplemental ascorbic acid in drinking water under thermoneutral or high temperature regimes. Body weight gain was affected by high temperature. However, body weight gain was significantly improved in animals receiving supplemental L-carnitine, ascorbic acid or L-carnitine + ascorbic acid compared to animals receiving unsupplemented diet under high temperature. On the other hand, supplemental L-carnitine or L-carnitine + ascorbic acid reduced body weight gain under thermoneutral condition. Supplemental ascorbic acid significantly improved feed conversion efficiency, the improvement was relatively greater under high temperature. The L-carnitine content in the plasma was higher in the groups receiving supplemental L-carnitine and ascorbic acid under high temperature, while broilers fed supplemental L-carnitine and ascorbic acid had a decreased level of plasma L-carnitine concentration under normal temperature. It is concluded that dietary supplemental L-carnitine or L-carnitine + ascorbic acid may have positive effects on body weight gain, carcass weight under high temperature conditions.

  5. Evaluation of Serum Carnitine Levels for Pediatric Patients Receiving Carnitine-Free and Carnitine-Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Daniel; Mulroy, Cecilia; MacKay, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carnitine is a carrier molecule transporting long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into the mitochondria for fatty acid β-oxidation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of carnitine supplementation in parenteral nutrition (PN) within the pediatric population. Our goal was to determine a weight range for which empiric carnitine supplementation is justified and to determine a weight range at which a carnitine level should first be drawn to confirm a deficiency prior to supplementation. Secondarily, we tried to determine a relationship among carnitine deficiency, hypoglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study to evaluate 2 groups of pediatric patients (weighing 0.68 kg to 60 kg) who were NPO and receiving PN. The first group of patients (n = 454) received carnitine supplementation (15 mg/kg/day) upon initiation of PN. The second group (n = 299) did not receive carnitine supplementation until they were determined to have a carnitine deficiency. Results: The data indicated that 82% of the patients weighing less than 5 kg were deficient. Patients weighing more than 5 kg had serum carnitine levels within the normal range. Therefore, patients receiving PN and weighing less than 5 kg should be supplemented with carnitine. Comparison of triglyceride, glucose, and carnitine showed no statistically significant difference (P = .1936). Conclusion: Patients weighing more than 5 kg should have serum carnitine levels drawn within 7 days to determine whether supplementation is needed. There is no statistical correlation among carnitine deficiency, hypoglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24958973

  6. L-carnitine attenuates oxidant injury in HK-2 cells via ROS-mitochondria pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junsheng; Li, Juan; Yu, Yuming; Wei, Qiang; Deng, Wenfeng; Yu, Lixin

    2010-04-09

    Oxidative stress has been considered as the possible mechanism of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. L-carnitine is an endogenous mitochondrial membrane compound and could effectively protect ischemia-reperfusion injury in the kidney. To elucidate the nephroprotective effects of L-carnitine, here we assessed the effect of L-carnitine on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-mediated oxidative stress in the human proximal tubule epithelial cell line, HK-2 cells. The results showed that pretreatment with L-carnitine 12h inhibited H(2)O(2)-induced cell viability loss, intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. Also L-carnitine promoted endogenous antioxidant defense components including total antioxidative capacity, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase. In parallel, cell apoptosis triggered by H(2)O(2) characterized with the DNA fragment and caspase-3 activity were also inhibited by L-carnitine. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cell apoptosis including membrane potential loss, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax and the release of cytochrome c were abrogated in the presence of L-carnitine. These results suggested that L-carnitine could protect HK-2 cells from H(2)O(2)-induced injury through the inhibition of oxidative damage, mitochondria dysfunction and ultimately inhibition of cell apoptosis, which indicates that L-carnitine may be a promising approach for the treatment of oxidative stress in renal diseases.

  7. Modulation of tissue fatty acids by L-carnitine attenuates metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Poudyal, Hemant; Ward, Leigh C; Waanders, Jennifer; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and dyslipidaemia are metabolic defects resulting from impaired lipid metabolism. These impairments are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Correcting the defects in lipid metabolism may attenuate obesity and dyslipidaemia, and reduce cardiovascular risk and liver damage. L-Carnitine supplementation was used in this study to enhance fatty acid oxidation so as to ameliorate diet-induced disturbances in lipid metabolism. Male Wistar rats (8-9 weeks old) were fed with either corn starch or high-carbohydrate, high-fat diets for 16 weeks. Separate groups were supplemented with L-carnitine (1.2% in food) on either diet for the last 8 weeks of the protocol. High-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats showed central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinaemia, cardiovascular remodelling and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. L-Carnitine supplementation attenuated these high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced changes, together with modifications in lipid metabolism including the inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, reduced storage of short-chain monounsaturated fatty acids in the tissues with decreased linoleic acid content and trans fatty acids stored in retroperitoneal fat. Thus, L-carnitine supplementation attenuated the signs of metabolic syndrome through inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, preferential β-oxidation of some fatty acids and increased storage of saturated fatty acids and relatively inert oleic acid in the tissues.

  8. Hepatic Concentration and Distribution of Coenzyme A and Carnitine during a Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection in the Rat: Possible Implications on Fatty Acid Metabolism and Ketogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-09

    the, total CoA was in the mitochondria-rich fraction. During infection cytoplasmic acid-soluble carnitine and acetyl -CoA increased, while long-chain...was a 65% decrease in acetyl -CoA and a 50% decrease in free CoA. The carnitine acylation ratio re- flected a decreased rate of fatty acid oxidation and...due to an increased production of triglyceride from long- chain fatty acyl groups and an increased rate of shuttling of acetyl groups to carnitine and

  9. Involvement of carnitine acyltransferases in peroxisomal fatty acid metabolism by the yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed Central

    Pagot, Y; Belin, J M

    1996-01-01

    This article provides information about peroxisomal fatty acid metabolism in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii. The existence of inducible mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and peroxisomal carnitine octanoyl-transferase activities was demonstrated after culture of this yeast in a medium containing methyl oleate. The subcellular sites and induction patterns were studied. The inhibition of carnitine octanoyl- and palmitoyl-transferases by chlorpromazine to a large extent prevented the otherwise observed metabolism-dependent inactivation of thiolase by 2-bromofatty acids in vivo. We concluded that the metabolism of long- and medium-chain fatty acids in the peroxisome of this yeast involved carnitine intermediates. PMID:8837442

  10. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C)palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C)acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO/sup 2/ and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 ..mu..M). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 ..mu..M and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine.

  11. Effects of fish oil and conjugated linoleic acids on carnitine homeostasis in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Shibani, M; Keller, J; König, B; Kluge, H; Hirche, F; Stangl, G I; Ringseis, R; Eder, K

    2012-01-01

    1. The effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on genes involved in carnitine homeostasis were compared in laying hens. Three groups of laying hens were fed on a control diet or a diet with either 3% of fish oil or CLA for 4 weeks. 2. Feed intake and egg production rate did not differ between the three groups. Diets with fish oil or CLA had only a weak effect on mRNA levels of PPARα target genes (ACO, CPT-I) in the liver and did not influence mRNA concentrations of the most important carnitine transporter OCTN2, enzymes of involved in carnitine synthesis (TMLD, TMABA-DH, BBD) or concentrations of carnitine in plasma, liver and total egg contents. 3. Hens fed the CLA diet had lower concentrations of free and total carnitine in egg yolk but higher concentrations of carnitine in albumen than control hens (P < 0·05), whereas the amount of free and total carnitine in whole egg did not differ. 4. In conclusion, the study showed that feeding fish oil or CLA causes only a weak activation of PPARα in tissues of laying hens that probably explained the lack of effect on carnitine homeostasis. The results contrast with those in humans and mice that show a significant effect of synthetic PPARα agonists on carnitine homeostasis in humans and mice.

  12. Cryoprotective effect of L-carnitine on motility, vitality and DNA oxidation of human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Banihani, S; Agarwal, A; Sharma, R; Bayachou, M

    2014-08-01

    Successful cryopreservation for human spermatozoa markedly influences the reproductive outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies. But in spite of its usefulness, cryopreservation significantly decreases sperm quality. l-carnitine has been found to improve the quality of spermatozoa in selected cases with male infertility. Here, we examined the efficacy of l-carnitine in improving sperm motility and vitality and reducing sperm DNA oxidation during cryopreservation. Semen samples from infertile patients (n = 22) were collected and analysed. Cryopreservation medium supplemented with l-carnitine was mixed with the semen at a ratio of 1 : 1 (v/v). The final l-carnitine concentration in each cryovial was 0.5 mg ml(-1) per 5 × 10(6) cell ml(-1) . Controls were cryopreserved without addition of l-carnitine. After 24 h of cryopreservation, thawed sperm samples were analysed for motility, vitality and DNA oxidation. Sperm vitality was assessed by the eosin-nigrosin test, while sperm DNA oxidation was measured by flow cytometry. Addition of l-carnitine significantly improved sperm motility and vitality (P < 0.05) compared with the control. The flow cytometry experiment showed no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the levels of DNA oxidation between samples and controls. In conclusion, l-carnitine improves human sperm motility and vitality, but has no effect on sperm DNA oxidation after cryopreservation.

  13. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. 862.1055 Section 862.1055 Food and... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  14. Heterologous expression of human carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II in yeast: A model for the molecular analysis of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Cavadini, P.; Invernizzi, F.; Baratta, S.

    1994-09-01

    The CPT enzyme system, which is composed of two distinct mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins (CPT I and CPT II), provides the mechanism whereby long-chain fatty acids are transferred from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix to undergo {beta}-oxidation. Here, we report the development of an expression system for investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in CPT II deficiency and, potentially, other mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects. To explore yeast as an expression system, we introduced a cDNA encoding the entire human CPT II precursor into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression was programmed by using an inducible galactose operon promoter (GAL1). Following induction, human CPT II was expressed at high levels, with activity 4- to 16-fold greater than in human fibroblasts. Levels of expression paralleled those of respiration, being higher in cells grown on a nonfermentable carbon source than in those grown on glucose. Immunoprecipitation of pulse-labeled transformed cells demonstrated that human CPT II expressed in yeast was targeted to mitochondria with correct proteolytic processing of its 25-residue mitochondrial leader sequence. Preliminary results on the expression of a number of mutant CPT II alleles associated with different clinical phenotypes demonstrated the value of this system for examining the functional consequences of disease-causing mutations and investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in patients with CPT II deficiency.

  15. Palmitoleic acid induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Eri; Uchida, Masataka; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka; Nagami, Kuniatsu; Utsumi, Kozo; Yano, Hiromi

    Although palmitoleic acid (C16:1) is associated with arrhythmias, and increases in an age-dependent matter, the effects of L-carnitine, which is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, are unclear. It has been postulated that L-carnitine may attenuate palmitate (C16:0)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the activity of L-carnitine in the prevention of the palmitoleic acid-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and cytochrome c release using isolated cardiac mitochondria from rats. Palmitoleoyl-CoA-induced mitochondrial respiration was not accelerated by L-carnitine treatment, and this respiration was slightly inhibited by oligomycin, which is an inhibitor of ATP synthase. Despite pretreatment with L-carnitine, the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased and mitochondrial swelling was induced by palmitoleoyl-CoA. In the presence of a combination of L-carnitine and tiron, a free radical scavenger, there was attenuated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release following palmitoleoyl-CoA treatment. We concluded that palmitoleic acid, but not palmitate, induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

  16. Protective role of L-carnitine supplementation against exhaustive exercise induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Síktar, Elif; Ekinci, Deniz; Síktar, Erdinç; Beydemir, Sükrü; Gülçin, Ilhami; Günay, Mehmet

    2011-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate temperature dependent effects of oral l-carnitine supplementation on exhaustive exercise induced oxidative damage in rats. 42 male Spraque Dawley rats were randomly divided into seven experimental groups. These groups were formed as three non-carnitine exercise groups, three carnitine-exercise groups and a sedentary group. l-carnitine was given intraperitoneally to the carnitine-exercise groups 1h before the exercise in 100mg/kg. Blood was collected to measure paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol concentrations. These biomarkers were measured in venous blood samples collected before and after the rats swam in pools at different water temperatures (18°C, 28°C and 38°C). In the non-carnitine group, exercise caused a significant decrease in PON1 activity and a significant elevation in MDA concentration at 28°C compared to the sedentary group. No significant alterations were evidenced in LDL and cholesterol concentrations upon exercise. The decrease in PON1 activity became higher with increasing temperature whereas the elevation in MDA levels increased at 18°C. In the l-carnitine supplementation group, recovery in PON1 activity was observed significant at 28°C and very significant at 38°C. MDA concentration was almost the same with that of the non-carnitine group at 18 and 38°C, but it significantly decreased at 28°C. Considering the recovery in PON1 and MDA levels at 28°C, which is the temperature of the sedentary group; our results suggest that l-carnitine supplementation has a protective role on exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative stress. Findings of this study also demonstrate influences of thermal stress on these parameters during exhaustive exercise.

  17. Changes in the levels of l-carnitine, acetyl-l-carnitine and propionyl-l-carnitine are involved in perfluorooctanoic acid induced developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qixiao; Wang, Chunbo; Xue, Chan; Xue, Lingfang; Wang, Meiting; Li, Changhao; Deng, Ziwen; Wang, Qian

    2016-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a persistent organic pollutant, is associated with developmental toxicity. This study investigated the mechanism of PFOA-induced developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryo, focusing on the interactions between developmental exposure to PFOA and the levels of l-carnitine (LC), acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) and propionyl-l-carnitine (PLC) in the heart. To evaluate the developmental cardiotoxicity, fertile chicken eggs were exposed to 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2 or 5mg/kg PFOA via air cell injection. Furthermore, exposure to 2mg/kg PFOA, with or without 100mg/kg LC were applied to investigate the effects of LC supplement. The results of functional and morphological assessments confirmed PFOA induced developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryo, which could be alleviated by co-exposure to LC. LC-MS/MS results also revealed remarkable decrease in LC, ALC and PLC levels in embryonic day six (ED6) chicken embryo hearts as well as LC level in embryonic day fifteen (ED15) chicken embryo hearts following developmental exposure to 2mg/kg PFOA. Meanwhile, co-exposure to 100mg/kg LC significantly elevated the levels of LC, ALC and PLC in chicken embryo hearts. Significantly elevated expression level of carnitine acetyltransferase (CRAT) in PFOA-exposed ED6 chicken embryo hearts was observed via western blotting, while LC co-exposure counteracted such changes. In conclusion, changes in the levels of LC, ALC and PLC in early embryonic stages are associated with PFOA induced developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryos.

  18. Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the carnitine metabolism in neural cells.

    PubMed

    Wawrzeńczyk, A; Nałecz, K A; Nałecz, M J

    1995-08-15

    Isolated rat cerebral cortex cells were able to accumulate L-carnitine and this process was competitively inhibited by 1 mM gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with a shift of Km from 7.8 +/- 1.9 mM to 14.6 +/- 4.0 mM. Addition of GABA also affected distribution of carnitine derivatives. The decrease of acetylcarnitine level by 1.6 fold was correlated with the inhibition of carnitine acetyltransferase (1.77 times). A postulated involvement of this enzyme in delivering acetyl moieties for acetylcholine synthesis would suggest a negative feedback between GABA and the level of acetylcholine.

  19. [Damage to calcium ion-loaded mitochondria by fatty acids and the protective effect of carnitine].

    PubMed

    Dedukhova, V I; Mokhova, E N; Starkov, A A; Batelli, D; Belleĭ, M; Bobyleva, V A

    1993-04-01

    The effect of fatty acids and L-carnitine on Ca2+ retention in rat liver mitochondria have been studied. Ca(2+)-retention was estimated as a sum of consecutive Ca2+ additions which leaded to transient stimulation of respiration coupled with influx of Ca2+ L-carnitine increases the Ca(2+)-retention; such an effect requires ATP. The Ca(2+)-retention was increased in the presence of 50 microM ATP or ADP. In all cases carboxyatractylate prevented the increase in Ca(2+)-retention. Palmitate and FCCP added at concentrations producing similar stimulating effect on respiration inhibit Ca(2+)-retention to about the same degree. The effect of palmitate is strongly diminished by L-carnitine. Again, the L-carnitine effect requires ATP. The data obtained suggest that the protonophoric effect of fatty acid plays a crucial role in Ca(2+)-dependent damage of mitochondria.

  20. L-carnitine--metabolic functions and meaning in humans life.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Jolanta; Patkowska-Sokoła, Bozena; Bodkowski, Robert; Jamroz, Dorota; Nowakowski, Piotr; Lochyński, Stanisław; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2011-09-01

    L-Carnitine is an endogenous molecule involved in fatty acid metabolism, biosynthesized within the human body using amino acids: L-lysine and L-methionine, as substrates. L-Carnitine can also be found in many foods, but red meats, such as beef and lamb, are the best choices for adding carnitine into the diet. Good carnitine sources also include fish, poultry and milk. Essentially, L-carnitine transports the chains of fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix, thus allowing the cells to break down fat and get energy from the stored fat reserves. Recent studies have started to shed light on the beneficial effects of L-carnitine when used in various clinical therapies. Because L-carnitine and its esters help reduce oxidative stress, they have been proposed as a treatment for many conditions, i.e. heart failure, angina and weight loss. For other conditions, such as fatigue or improving exercise performance, L-carnitine appears safe but does not seem to have a significant effect. The presented review of the literature suggests that continued studies are required before L-carnitine administration could be recommended as a routine procedure in the noted disorders. Further research is warranted in order to evaluate the biochemical, pharmacological, and physiological determinants of the response to carnitine supplementation, as well as to determine the potential benefits of carnitine supplements in selected categories of individuals who do not have fatty acid oxidation defects.

  1. Acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid affect rotenone-induced damage in nigral dopaminergic neurons of rat brain, implication for Parkinson's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Zaitone, Sawsan A; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Shaalan, Aly A

    2012-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease are not fully understood, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and environmental toxins may be involved. The current research was directed to investigate the protective role of two bioenergetic antioxidants, acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid, in rotenone-parkinsonian rats. Ninety six male rats were divided into five groups. Group I is the vehicle-injected group, group II is the disease control group and was injected with six doses of rotenone (1.5 mg/kg/48 h, s.c.). Groups III, IV and V received rotenone in addition to acetyl-L-carnitine (100 mg/kg/day, p.o.), α-lipoic acid (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or their combination, respectively. Results showed that rotenone-treated rats exhibited bradykinesia and motor impairment in the open-field and square bridge tests. In addition, ATP level was decreased whereas lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls increased in the striata of rotenone-treated rats as compared to vehicle-treated rats. Treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine or α-lipoic acid improved the motor performance and reduced the level of lipid peroxides in rat brains as compared to rotenone group. Further, ATP production was enhanced along with acetyl-L-carnitine treatments (p≤0.05). Taken together, our study reinforces the view that acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid are promising candidates for neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease.

  2. Changes in hepatic lipogenic and oxidative enzymes and glucose homeostasis induced by an acetyl-L-carnitine and nicotinamide treatment in dyslipidaemic insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria R; Camberos, Maria del C; Selenscig, Dante; Martucci, Lucía C; Chicco, Adriana; Lombardo, Yolanda B; Cresto, Juan C

    2013-03-01

    Normal rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) develop dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance. The present study examined whether administration of the mitochondrial nutrients nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine reversed or improved these metabolic abnormalities. Male Wistar rats were fed an SRD for 90 days. Half the rats then received daily injections of nicotinamide (25 mg/kg, i.p.) and acetyl-L-carnitine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) for a further 90 days. The remaining rats in the SRD-fed group and those in a normal chow-fed control group were injected with an equal volume of saline solution for the same period. The following parameters were determined in all groups: (i) liver activity of fatty acid synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and carnitine-palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1); (ii) hepatic and skeletal muscle triacylglycerol content, plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acid (FFA) and triacylglycerol levels and pancreatic insulin content; and (iii) glucose tolerance. Administration of nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine to the SRD-fed rats reduced dyslipidaemia, liver steatosis, muscle triacylglycerol content and hepatic FAS and ACC activities and increased CPT-1 activity. In addition nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine improved the glucose disappearance rate (K(g)), normalized plasma glucose levels and moderately increased insulinaemia without altering pancreatic insulin content. Finally, nicotinamide and acetyl-l-carnitine administration reduced bodyweight gain and visceral adiposity. The results of the present study suggest that altering key hepatic lipogenic and fatty acid oxidative enzymatic activity could improve dyslipidaemia, liver steatosis and visceral adiposity. Indeed, administration of nicotinamide and acetyl-l-carnitine improved glucose intolerance and normalized plasma glucose levels.

  3. Characterization of carnitine and fatty acid metabolism in the long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mouse

    PubMed Central

    van Vlies, Naomi; Tian, Liqun; Overmars, Henk; Bootsma, Albert H.; Kulik, Willem; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Wood, Philip A.; Vaz, Frédéric M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe a novel method which enables the analysis of tissue acylcarnitines and carnitine biosynthesis intermediates in the same sample. This method was used to investigate the carnitine and fatty acid metabolism in wild-type and LCAD−/− (long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient) mice. In agreement with previous results in plasma and bile, we found accumulation of the characteristic C14:1-acylcarnitine in all investigated tissues from LCAD−/− mice. Surprisingly, quantitatively relevant levels of 3-hydroxyacylcarnitines were found to be present in heart, muscle and brain in wild-type mice, suggesting that, in these tissues, long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase is rate-limiting for mitochondrial β-oxidation. The 3-hydroxyacylcarnitines were absent in LCAD−/− tissues, indicating that, in this situation, the β-oxidation flux is limited by the LCAD deficiency. A profound deficiency of acetylcarnitine was observed in LCAD−/− hearts, which most likely corresponds with low cardiac levels of acetyl-CoA. Since there was no carnitine deficiency and only a marginal elevation of potentially cardiotoxic acylcarnitines, we conclude from these data that the cardiomyopathy in the LCAD−/− mouse is caused primarily by a severe energy deficiency in the heart, stressing the important role of LCAD in cardiac fatty acid metabolism in the mouse. PMID:15535801

  4. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  7. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium.

  8. Systemic primary carnitine deficiency with hypoglycemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jae Sung; Lee, Eun Joo; Park, Hyung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Acute hypoglycemia in children is not an uncommon disease that can be encountered in the Emergency Department. Most cases of childhood hypoglycemia are caused by ketotic hypoglycemia due to missed meals. Often, hypoketotic hypoglycemia can also occur, which suggests hyperinsulinemia or a defect in fatty acid oxidation. Carnitine is essential for long chain fatty acids transfer into mitochondria for oxidation. We present a case of systemic primary carnitine deficiency who presented with seizures due to hypoketotic hypoglycemia. PMID:28164076

  9. Two cases of valproic acid poisoning treated with L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y C; Tse, M L; Lau, F L

    2007-12-01

    Two cases of acute valproic acid poisoning with central nervous system depression and raised ammonia level without hepatotoxicity were reported. They were treated successfully with the use of the antidotes: L-carnitine and other supportive measures. Clinical manifestation and progress was described, and discussion is focused on the use of L-carnitine in valproic acid-induced hyperammonemia, from its mechanism to the clinical experiences in the literature. Based on the favorable response of our two cases and the literature review, we recommend the administration of intravenous L-carnitine in patients of valproic acid overdose with hyperammonemia or valproic acid-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy and hepatotoxicity at a dose of 50 mg/kg every 8 h for the first initial 24 h with further individual assessment.

  10. Role of Carnitine Acetyl Transferase in Regulation of Nitric Oxide Signaling in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Sun, Xutong; Agarwal, Saurabh; Rafikov, Ruslan; Dasarathy, Sridevi; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart defects with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) result in pulmonary endothelial dysfunction that is dependent, at least in part, on decreases in nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Utilizing a lamb model with left-to-right shunting of blood and increased PBF that mimics the human disease, we have recently shown that a disruption in carnitine homeostasis, due to a decreased carnitine acetyl transferase (CrAT) activity, correlates with decreased bioavailable NO. Thus, we undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the CrAT enzyme plays a major role in regulating NO signaling through its effect on mitochondrial function. We utilized the siRNA gene knockdown approach to mimic the effect of decreased CrAT activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC). Our data indicate that silencing the CrAT gene disrupted cellular carnitine homeostasis, reduced the expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-and resulted in an increase in oxidative stress within the mitochondrion. CrAT gene silencing also disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics resulting in reduced ATP generation and decreased NO signaling secondary to a reduction in eNOS/Hsp90 interactions. Thus, this study links the disruption of carnitine homeostasis to the loss of NO signaling observed in children with CHD. Preserving carnitine homeostasis may have important clinical implications that warrant further investigation. PMID:23344032

  11. Medium-chain fatty acids but not L-carnitine accelerate the kinetics of [14C]triacylglycerol utilization by colostrum-deprived newborn pigs.

    PubMed

    Heo, Kinam N; Lin, Xi; Han, In K; Odle, Jack

    2002-07-01

    The effect of L-carnitine on in vivo fatty acid utilization was determined using colostrum-deprived newborn piglets fed emulsified triglycerides (TG) composed of [1-14C]octanoate (tri-8:0) or [1-14C]octadecanoate (tri-18:1). A soy protein-based liquid diet devoid of L-carnitine was fed piglets for 1 d to allow development of fatty acid-metabolizing enzymes and intestinal fat digestion and absorption before assessment of in vivo fat utilization. The radiolabeled TG were fed in isoenergetic amounts (97.7 kJ/kg(0.75)), with or without L-carnitine (1 mmol/kg(0.75)) as 30% (v/v) emulsions, using polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate as an emulsifier. Expired CO(2) was quantified and specific radioactivity (Bq/micromol) was determined at 20-min intervals over 24 h. The rate (mmol ATP.kg(-0.75).min(-1)) and extent (mol ATP/kg(0.75)) of TG oxidative utilization (i.e., composite of digestion, absorption and oxidation) were calculated from the kinetics of 14CO(2) expiration. The maximal rate and extent of tri-8:0 oxidation were three and fourfold greater than those of tri-18:1, respectively (P < 0.001), and tri-18:1 delayed the time to reach 10 and 50% of maximal oxidation rate by 1.2 and 1.9 h (P < 0.01, respectively), regardless of supplemental carnitine. Collectively, these findings quantify the accelerated oxidation of medium-chain vs. long-chain triglycerides, but fail to support a need for supplemental carnitine to maximize fat oxidation in colostrum-deprived piglets.

  12. A Phospholipid-Protein Complex from Antarctic Krill Reduced Plasma Homocysteine Levels and Increased Plasma Trimethylamine-N-Oxide (TMAO) and Carnitine Levels in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Ramsvik, Marie S.; Lindquist, Carine; Nordrehaug, Jan E.; Bruheim, Inge; Svardal, Asbjørn; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is assumed to be beneficial for cardiovascular health, mainly based on plasma lipid lowering and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, other plasma risk factors linked to cardiovascular disease are less studied. This study aimed to penetrate the effect of a phospholipid-protein complex (PPC) from Antarctic krill on one-carbon metabolism and production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed isoenergetic control, 6%, or 11% PPC diets for four weeks. Rats fed PPC had reduced total homocysteine plasma level and increased levels of choline, dimethylglycine and cysteine, whereas the plasma level of methionine was unchanged compared to control. PPC feeding increased the plasma level of TMAO, carnitine, its precursors trimethyllysine and γ-butyrobetaine. There was a close correlation between plasma TMAO and carnitine, trimethyllysine, and γ-butyrobetaine, but not between TMAO and choline. The present data suggest that PPC has a homocysteine lowering effect and is associated with altered plasma concentrations of metabolites related to one-carbon metabolism and B-vitamin status in rats. Moreover, the present study reveals a non-obligatory role of gut microbiota in the increased plasma TMAO level as it can be explained by the PPC’s content of TMAO. The increased level of carnitine and carnitine precursors is interpreted to reflect increased carnitine biosynthesis. PMID:26371012

  13. A Phospholipid-Protein Complex from Antarctic Krill Reduced Plasma Homocysteine Levels and Increased Plasma Trimethylamine-N-Oxide (TMAO) and Carnitine Levels in Male Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Ramsvik, Marie S; Lindquist, Carine; Nordrehaug, Jan E; Bruheim, Inge; Svardal, Asbjørn; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K

    2015-09-08

    Seafood is assumed to be beneficial for cardiovascular health, mainly based on plasma lipid lowering and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, other plasma risk factors linked to cardiovascular disease are less studied. This study aimed to penetrate the effect of a phospholipid-protein complex (PPC) from Antarctic krill on one-carbon metabolism and production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed isoenergetic control, 6%, or 11% PPC diets for four weeks. Rats fed PPC had reduced total homocysteine plasma level and increased levels of choline, dimethylglycine and cysteine, whereas the plasma level of methionine was unchanged compared to control. PPC feeding increased the plasma level of TMAO, carnitine, its precursors trimethyllysine and γ-butyrobetaine. There was a close correlation between plasma TMAO and carnitine, trimethyllysine, and γ-butyrobetaine, but not between TMAO and choline. The present data suggest that PPC has a homocysteine lowering effect and is associated with altered plasma concentrations of metabolites related to one-carbon metabolism and B-vitamin status in rats. Moreover, the present study reveals a non-obligatory role of gut microbiota in the increased plasma TMAO level as it can be explained by the PPC's content of TMAO. The increased level of carnitine and carnitine precursors is interpreted to reflect increased carnitine biosynthesis.

  14. Assessment of 3-nitropropionic acid-evoked peripheral neuropathy in rats: neuroprotective effects of acetyl-l-carnitine and resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Binienda, Zbigniew K; Beaudoin, Micheal A; Gough, Bobby; Ali, Syed F; Virmani, Ashraf

    2010-08-16

    Oxidative stress and secondary excitotoxicity, due to cellular energy deficit, are major factors playing roles in 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Acute or chronic exposure to 3-NPA also leads to neuronal degeneration in different brain regions. The present study quantitatively assessed peripheral neuropathy induced by chronic exposure to 3-NPA in rats. The neuroprotective abilities of two antioxidants, acetyl-l-carnitine and resveratrol, were investigated as well. Rats were exposed for up to four weeks to 3-NPA alone or 3-NPA combined with acetyl-l-carnitine or resveratrol, administered peripherally. The experimental outcome was evaluated by neurophysiological, histological, and morphometric analyses. Rats exposed to 3-NPA developed hind limb paresis. Furthermore, a significant decrease in motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) was detected in tail nerves and axonal degeneration in sciatic nerves (p<0.05). Treatment with resveratrol prevented the functional effects of 3-NPA exposure, whereas treatment with acetyl-l-carnitine, preventing paresis, was not effective to MCV and morphological changes. These data suggest that resveratrol is a good candidate for treatment of metabolic neuropathy. The experimental outcome of this study shows that chronic treatment with 3-NPA in rats is relevant in development of an experimental model of toxic neuropathy.

  15. Effects of Citric Acid and l-Carnitine on Physical Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Tomohiro; Aoyagi, Sayaka; Shirai, Tomoko; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Kajimoto, Osami

    2007-11-01

    We examined the effects of citric acid and l-carnitine administration on physical fatigue. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover study, 18 healthy volunteers were randomized to oral citric acid (2,700 mg/day), l-carnitine (1,000 mg/day), or placebo for 8 days. The fatigue-inducing physical task consisted of workload trials on a cycle ergometer at fixed workloads for 2 h on 2 occasions. Before the physical load, salivary chromogranin A, measured as a physiological stress marker, was lower in the group given citric acid than in the group given placebo. Also, after the physical load, the subjective feeling of fatigue assessed with a visual analogue scale was lower in the citric acid group than in the placebo group. In contrast, l-carnitine had no effect on chromogranin A or subjective fatigue. These results suggest that citric acid reduces physiological stress and attenuates physical fatigue, whereas l-carnitine does not.

  16. Enzymatic synthesis of radioactive (-)-carnitine from. gamma. -butyrobetaine prepared by the methylation of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Daveluy, A.; Parvin, R.; Pande, S.V.

    1982-01-15

    Radioactive ..gamma..-butyrobetaine was prepared by quaternization of ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid with tritiated methyl iodide under conditions giving high yields with respect to both the above precursors. Part of the product was passed through a column of ion-retardation resin and gave radioactive ..gamma..-butyrobetaine of good purity. The remainder was converted to (-)-carnitine stoichiometrically by employing a 50-60% ammonium sulfate fraction of rat liver supernatant as the source of ..gamma..-butyrobetaine hydroxylase (EC 1,14,11,1) Successive column chromatographies on a cation exchanger and ion-retardation resins then gave radioactive (-)-carnitine of good purity in high yield.

  17. Systemic regulation of L-carnitine in nutritional metabolism in zebrafish, Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia-Min; Li, Ling-Yu; Qin, Xun; Ning, Li-Jun; Lu, Dong-Liang; Li, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Wang, Xin; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Excess fat accumulation has been observed widely in farmed fish; therefore, efficient lipid-lowering factors have obtained high attention in the current fish nutrition studies. Dietary L-carnitine can increase fatty acid β-oxidation in mammals, but has produced contradictory results in different fish species. To date, the mechanisms of metabolic regulation of L-carnitine in fish have not been fully determined. The present study used zebrafish to investigate the systemic regulation of nutrient metabolism by dietary L-carnitine supplementation. L-carnitine significantly decreased the lipid content in liver and muscle, accompanied by increased concentrations of total and free carnitine in tissues. Meanwhile, L-carnitine enhanced mitochondrial β-oxidation activities and the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 mRNA significantly, whereas it depressed the mRNA expression of adipogenesis-related genes. In addition, L-carnitine caused higher glycogen deposition in the fasting state, and increased and decreased the mRNA expressions of gluconeogenesis-related and glycolysis-related genes, respectively. L-carnitine also increased the hepatic expression of mTOR in the feeding state. Taken together, dietary L-carnitine supplementation decreased lipid deposition by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, and is likely to promote protein synthesis. However, the L-carnitine-enhanced lipid catabolism would cause a decrease in glucose utilization. Therefore, L-carnitine has comprehensive effects on nutrient metabolism in fish. PMID:28102299

  18. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cells. A group of fats called long-chain fatty acids cannot enter mitochondria unless they are ... carnitine. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A connects carnitine to long-chain fatty acids so they can enter mitochondria and ...

  19. Risk assessment for carnitine.

    PubMed

    Hathcock, John N; Shao, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    Carnitine is a conditionally essential amino acid-like compound involved in the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria during the beta-oxidation process. Carnitine has become an increasingly popular ingredient in dietary supplements, especially weight loss and some sports nutrition products. A number of clinical trials have been conducted examining the effect of carnitine supplementation on weight loss and energy balance. Regarding safety, systematic evaluation of the research designs and data do not provide a basis for risk assessment and the usual safe upper level of intake (UL) derived from it unless the newer methods described as the observed safe level (OSL) or highest observed intake (HOI) are utilized. The OSL risk assessment method indicates that the evidence of safety is strong at intakes up to 2000mg/day l-carnitine equivalents for chronic supplementation, and this level is identified as the OSL. Although much higher levels have been tested without adverse effects and may be safe, the data for intakes above 2000mg/day are not sufficient for a confident conclusion of long-term safety.

  20. Inhibition of carnitine biosynthesis by valproic acid in rats--the biochemical mechanism of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Farkas, V; Bock, I; Cseko, J; Sandor, A

    1996-11-08

    The anticonvulsive drug, valproic acid (VPA), inhibits the biosynthesis of carnitine, and may contribute in this way to carnitine deficiency associated with VPA therapy. The conversion of [3H]-butyrobetaine into [3H]-carnitine was determined 60 min following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of 1.2 mmol/kg VPA in rats. The fraction of radioactivity found in [3H]-carnitine in the liver decreased from 63.2 +/- 1.50% to 39.2 +/- 1.11% (mean +/- SEM). Total carnitine in the liver also decreased, whereas the precursor butyrobetaine increased from 5.01 +/- 0.71 nmol/g to 8.22 +/- 0.82 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). VPA also exhibited a dramatic effect on the conversion of an unlabeled loading amount of butyrobetaine. The increment in total carnitine caused by butyrobetaine in liver was reduced from 161 +/- 15.4 nmol/g to 53.2 +/- 5.11 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). These data prove that VPA reduces the flux through butyrobetaine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.1.). The drug in vitro, however, did not inhibit the enzyme directly. Searching for the mechanism of action, we found that VPA decreased the level of alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG; a cofactor of butyrobetaine hydroxylase) from 73.5 +/- 2.90 nmol/g to 52.9 +/- 2.2 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM) in the liver. The level of 1-glutamate showed a rather dramatic decrease in the liver. Moreover, alpha-KG proved to have a protective role against VPA in the [3H]-butyrobetaine conversion experiment.

  1. Carnitine deficiency in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: effect of L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Penn, D; Wolf, H

    1983-06-01

    To investigate whether L-carnitine supplementation may correct nutritional carnitine deficiency and associated metabolic disturbances in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition, an intravenous fat tolerance test (1 gm/kg Intralipid over four hours) was performed in 29 premature infants 6 to 10 days of age (15 receiving carnitine supplement 10 mg/kg . day L-carnitine IV, and 14 receiving no supplement). Total carnitine plasma values were normal or slightly elevated in supplemented but decreased in nonsupplemented infants. In both groups, fat infusion resulted in an increase in plasma concentrations of triglycerides, free fatty acids, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, and short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine, but total carnitine values did not change. After fat infusion, the free fatty acids/D-beta-hydroxybutyrate ratios were lower and the increase of acylcarnitine greater in supplemented infants of 29 to 33 weeks' gestation than in nonsupplemented infants of the same gestational age. This study provides evidence that premature infants of less than 34 weeks' gestation requiring total parenteral nutrition develop nutritional carnitine deficiency with impaired fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. Carnitine supplementation improves this metabolic disturbance.

  2. Synthesis of phosphonic analogues of carnitine and gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Tadeusiak, Elzbieta J

    2004-12-01

    The involvement of carnitine and gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyric acid in the biology of mammalian cells, the physiology of the human body, and some important aspects of medicinal treatment has induced many research groups to develop their pharmacologically potent analogues. Among them are the very important phosphonic analogues: phosphocarnitine and gamma-amino-beta-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid. This mini-review describes the various methodologies used for the synthesis of these compounds.

  3. A fish protein hydrolysate alters fatty acid composition in liver and adipose tissue and increases plasma carnitine levels in a mouse model of chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) diets affect mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism in animals. The aim of the study was to determine if FPH could influence fatty acid metabolism and inflammation in transgene mice expressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNFα). Methods hTNFα mice (C57BL/6 hTNFα) were given a high-fat (23%, w/w) diet containing 20% casein (control group) or 15% FPH and 5% casein (FPH group) for two weeks. After an overnight fast, blood, adipose tissue, and liver samples were collected. Gene expression and enzyme activity was analysed in liver, fatty acid composition was analyzed in liver and ovarian white adipose tissue, and inflammatory parameters, carnitine, and acylcarnitines were analyzed in plasma. Results The n-3/n-6 fatty acid ratio was higher in mice fed the FPH diet than in mice fed the control diet in both adipose tissue and liver, and the FPH diet affected the gene expression of ∆6 and ∆9 desaturases. Mice fed this diet also demonstrated lower hepatic activity of fatty acid synthase. Concomitantly, a lower plasma INF-γ level was observed. Plasma carnitine and the carnitine precursor γ-butyrobetaine was higher in the FPH-group compared to control, as was plasma short-chained and medium-chained acylcarnitine esters. The higher level of plasma acetylcarnitine may reflect a stimulated mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids, as the hepatic activities of peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase-II were higher in the FPH-fed mice. Conclusions The FPH diet was shown to influence hepatic fatty acid metabolism and fatty acid composition. This indicates that effects on fatty acid metabolism are important for the bioactivity of protein hydrolysates of marine origin. PMID:24098955

  4. Comparison of vitamin E, L-carnitine and melatonin in ameliorating carbon tetrachloride and diabetes induced hepatic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shaker, M E; Houssen, M E; Abo-Hashem, E M; Ibrahim, T M

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether treatments with vitamin E, L-carnitine and melatonin can protect against CCl(4) and diabetes-induced hepatic oxidative stress. Hepatic oxidative stress was performed in rats through 50% v/v carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) (1 ml/kg/3 days, i.p.), and through diabetes mellitus induced by streptozotocin (STZ) (40 mg/kg, i.p.). Vitamin E (100 mg/kg/day, i.p), L-carnitine (300 mg/kg/day, i.p.) and melatonin (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.) were injected for a period of 6 weeks. Thereafter, changes in serum glucose level, liver function tests, hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) content, hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) content, hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) level were evaluated. In CCl(4)-induced liver fibrosis, the efficacy order was melatonin > L-carnitine > vitamin E, while in STZ-induced diabetes, the efficacy order was vitamin E > or = melatonin > L-carnitine. In conclusion, these data indicate that low dose of melatonin is more effective than high doses of vitamin E and L-carnitine in reducing hepatic oxidative stress induced by CCl(4) and diabetes. Moreover, the potent effect of vitamin E in ameliorating diabetes can be linked not only to the antioxidant actions, but also to the superior effect in reducing diabetes-induced hyperglycaemia. Meanwhile, potency of L-carnitine was nearly the same in CCl(4) and diabetes-induced liver damage.

  5. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Giudetti, Anna M.; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Gnoni, Gabriele V.; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs). The citrate carrier (CiC) and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27231907

  6. Stimulation of glucose metabolism in human blood cells by inhibitors of carnitine-dependent fatty acid transport.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, R; Colic, D; Binder, L; Oellerich, M

    1990-05-01

    According to a well accepted hypothesis, increased fatty acid oxidation can lead to hyperglycaemia by stimulating gluconeogenesis and reducing glycolysis. Therefore, inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism should cause hypoglycaemia by inhibiting gluconeogenesis and activating glycolysis. Various substances were tested to validate this hypothesis with regard to glucose oxidation in human mononuclear leukocytes and thrombocytes. 2-(3-Methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate, an inhibitor of the carnitine acyltransfer system was found to cause hypoglycaemia in whole animals and to inhibit gluconeogensis in the perfused guinea pig liver, while the acetyl-CoA/CoASH ratio was decreased. This substance stimulated the metabolism of glucose to CO2 in human mononuclear leukocytes and especially in platelets. This effect could be potentiated if concanavalin A and 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate were applied simultaneously. Under these conditions, however, fatty acid oxidation was no longer inhibited. From these results, it can be concluded that the activation of glucose oxidation by 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate is independent of its effect on fatty acid metabolism. Other inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism which were also investigated behaved similarly.

  7. Science review: Carnitine in the treatment of valproic acid-induced toxicity – what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Lheureux, Philippe ER; Penaloza, Andrea; Zahir, Soheil; Gris, Mireille

    2005-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug and is usually well tolerated, but rare serious complications may occur in some patients receiving VPA chronically, including haemorrhagic pancreatitis, bone marrow suppression, VPA-induced hepatotoxicity (VHT) and VPA-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy (VHE). Some data suggest that VHT and VHE may be promoted by carnitine deficiency. Acute VPA intoxication also occurs as a consequence of intentional or accidental overdose and its incidence is increasing, because of use of VPA in psychiatric disorders. Although it usually results in mild central nervous system depression, serious toxicity and even fatal cases have been reported. Several studies or isolated clinical observations have suggested the potential value of oral L-carnitine in reversing carnitine deficiency or preventing its development as well as some adverse effects due to VPA. Carnitine supplementation during VPA therapy in high-risk patients is now recommended by some scientific committees and textbooks, especially paediatricians. L-carnitine therapy could also be valuable in those patients who develop VHT or VHE. A few isolated observations also suggest that L-carnitine may be useful in patients with coma or in preventing hepatic dysfunction after acute VPA overdose. However, these issues deserve further investigation in controlled, randomized and probably multicentre trials to evaluate the clinical value and the appropriate dosage of L-carnitine in each of these conditions. PMID:16277730

  8. Carnitine supplementation modulates high dietary copper-induced oxidative toxicity and reduced performance in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Güçlü, Berrin Kocaoğlu; Kara, Kanber; Çakır, Latife; Çetin, Ebru; Kanbur, Murat

    2011-12-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of L-carnitine on performance, egg quality and certain biochemical parameters in laying hens fed a diet containing high levels of copper proteinate. Forty-eight 42-week-old laying hens were divided into four groups with four replicates. The laying hens were fed with a basal diet (control) or the basal diet supplemented with either 400 mg carnitine (Car)/kg diet, 800 mg copper proteinate (CuP)/kg diet or 400 mg carnitine + 800 mg copper (Car+CuP)/kg diet, for 6 weeks. Supplemental CuP decreased feed consumption (p < 0.01), feed efficiency and egg production (p < 0.001), as compared to control. The combination of Car and CuP increased (p < 0.001) egg production and feed efficiency as compared to CuP. The activities of alanine aminotransferase (p < 0.05) and alkaline phosphatase (p < 0.01) were increased, while lactate dehydrogenase activity was decreased (p < 0.001) by supplemental CuP and Car+CuP. Supplemental CuP caused an increase in plasma malondialdehyde (p < 0.01) and nitric oxide levels (p < 0.05). In the Car+CuP group, this increase was observed to have been reduced significantly (p < 0.05). Furthermore, Car+CuP increased (p < 0.05) glucose level. These results indicate that the carnitine and copper combination may prevent the possible adverse effects of high dietary copper on performance and lipid peroxidation in hens.

  9. Effect of L-carnitine on the hepatic transcript profile in piglets as animal model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Carnitine has attracted scientific interest due to several health-related effects, like protection against neurodegeneration, mitochondrial decay, and oxidative stress as well as improvement of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The mechanisms underlying most of the health-related effects of carnitine are largely unknown. Methods To gain insight into mechanisms through which carnitine exerts its beneficial metabolic effects, we fed piglets either a control or a carnitine supplemented diet, and analysed the transcriptome in the liver. Results Transcript profiling revealed 563 genes to be differentially expressed in liver by carnitine supplementation. Clustering analysis of the identified genes revealed that most of the top-ranked annotation term clusters were dealing with metabolic processes. Representative genes of these clusters which were significantly up-regulated by carnitine were involved in cellular fatty acid uptake, fatty acid activation, fatty acid β-oxidation, glucose uptake, and glycolysis. In contrast, genes involved in gluconeogenesis were down-regulated by carnitine. Moreover, clustering analysis identified genes involved in the insulin signaling cascade to be significantly associated with carnitine supplementation. Furthermore, clustering analysis revealed that biological processes dealing with posttranscriptional RNA processing were significantly associated with carnitine supplementation. Conclusion The data suggest that carnitine supplementation has beneficial effects on lipid and glucose homeostasis by inducing genes involved in fatty acid catabolism and glycolysis and repressing genes involved in gluconeogenesis. PMID:22040461

  10. Effects of carnitine coingested caffeine on carnitine metabolism and endurance capacity in athletes.

    PubMed

    Cha, Y S; Choi, S K; Suh, H; Lee, S N; Cho, D; Li, K

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether caffeine (CAF), carnitine (CAR), or CAF+CAR mixture administration affects exercise endurance time via carnitine metabolism. Water (CON), CAF, CAR, or CAF+CAR mixture was administered to five male rugby athletes participating in this study by a randomized double-blind fashion who were made to ride a cycle ergometer for exercise. The CAF effect on exercise endurance time was small, but the CAR trial significantly increased the exercise endurance time compared with CON trial; a further CAF+CAR mixture trial had greater effects on the exercise endurance time than those of a CON, CAF, or CAR trial. A CAR or CAF+CAR mixed trial increased urinary nonesterified carnitine (NEC) and total carnitine (TCAR), but no changes were observed in acid-soluble acylcarnitine (ASAC) and acid-insoluble acylcarnitine (AIAC) excretion. A CAR or CAF+CAR mixed trial resulted in higher levels of plasma NEC, ASAC, and TCAR fractions than the CON and CAF trials did on exhaustion time. Total cholesterol, triglyceride, and free fatty acid in blood were significantly increased at exhaustion time, but they were not affected in the CAF or the CAR trial. These results suggest that carnitine ingestion could promote fat oxidation, resulting in higher endurance performance in athletes, and especially these ergogenic effects of carnitine coingested with caffeine may be greater than those of carnitine alone.

  11. Oxidative stress parameters in urine from patients with disorders of propionate metabolism: a beneficial effect of L:-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Graziela S; Biancini, Giovana B; Mescka, Caroline; Wayhs, Carlos Y; Sitta, Angela; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen R

    2012-01-01

    Propionic (PA) and methylmalonic (MMA) acidurias are inherited disorders caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, respectively. Affected patients present acute metabolic crises in the neonatal period and long-term neurological deficits. Treatments of these diseases include a protein restricted diet and L: -carnitine supplementation. L: -Carnitine is widely used in the therapy of these diseases to prevent secondary L: -carnitine deficiency and promote detoxification, and several recent in vitro and in vivo studies have reported antioxidant and antiperoxidative effects of this compound. In this study, we evaluated the oxidative stress parameters, isoprostane and di-tyrosine levels, and the antioxidant capacity, in urine from patients with PA and MMA at the diagnosis, and during treatment with L: -carnitine and protein-restricted diet. We verified a significant increase of isoprostanes and di-tyrosine, as well as a significant reduction of the antioxidant capacity in urine from these patients at diagnosis, as compared to controls. Furthermore, treated patients presented a marked reduction of isoprostanes and di-tyrosine levels in relation to untreated patients. In addition, patients with higher levels of protein and lipid oxidative damage, determined by di-tyrosine and isoprostanes levels, also presented lower urinary concentrations of total and free L: -carnitine. In conclusion, the present results indicate that treatment with low protein diet and L: -carnitine significantly reduces urinary biomarkers of protein and lipid oxidative damage in patients with disorders of propionate metabolism and that L: -carnitine supplementation may be specially involved in this protection.

  12. Dietary L-carnitine affects periparturient nutrient metabolism and lactation in multiparous cows.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D B; McFadden, J W; D'Angelo, A; Woodworth, J C; Drackley, J K

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of dietary L-carnitine supplementation on liver lipid accumulation, hepatic nutrient metabolism, and lactation in multiparous cows during the periparturient period. Cows were assigned to treatments at d -25 relative to expected calving date and remained on the experiment until 56 d in milk. Treatments were 4 amounts of supplemental dietary carnitine: control (0 g/d of L-carnitine; n = 14); low carnitine (LC, 6 g/d; n = 11); medium carnitine (MC, 50 g/d; n = 12); and high carnitine (HC, 100 g/d; n = 12). Carnitine was supplied by mixing a feed-grade carnitine supplement with 113.5 g of ground corn and 113.5 g of dried molasses, which was then fed twice daily as a topdress to achieve desired daily carnitine intakes. Carnitine supplementation began on d -14 relative to expected calving and continued until 21 d in milk. Liver and muscle carnitine concentrations were markedly increased by MC and HC treatments. Milk carnitine concentrations were elevated by all amounts of carnitine supplementation, but were greater for MC and HC than for LC during wk 2 of lactation. Dry matter intake and milk yield were decreased by the HC treatment. The MC and HC treatments increased milk fat concentration, although milk fat yield was unaffected. All carnitine treatments decreased liver total lipid and triacylglycerol accumulation on d 10 after calving. In addition, carnitine-supplemented cows had higher liver glycogen during early lactation. In general, carnitine supplementation increased in vitro palmitate beta-oxidation by liver slices, with MC and HC treatments affecting in vitro palmitate metabolism more potently than did LC. In vitro conversion of Ala to glucose by liver slices was increased by carnitine supplementation independent of dose. The concentration of nonesterified fatty acids in serum was not affected by carnitine. As a result of greater hepatic fatty acid beta-oxidation, plasma beta-hydroxybutyric acid was

  13. Downregulation of Oxidative and Nitrosative Apoptotic Signaling by L-Carnitine in Ifosfamide-Induced Fanconi Syndrome Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Aldelemy, Meshan Lafi; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M.; Al-Rejaie, Salem S.; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A.; Al-Harbi, Naif O.; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that ifosfamide (IFO) therapy is associated with sever nephropathy in the form of Fanconi syndrome. Although oxidative stress has been reported as a major player in IFO-induced Fanconi syndrome, no mechanism for this effect has been ascertained. Therefore, this study has been initiated to investigate, on gene expression level, the mechanism of IFO-induce nephrotoxicity and those whereby carnitine supplementation attenuates this serious side effect of IFO. To achieve the ultimate goals of this study, adult male rats were assigned to one of four treatment groups, namely, control, L-carnitine, IFO, and IFO plus L-carnitine. Administration of IFO for 5 days significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production in kidney tissues. In addition, IFO significantly increased mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-9, and caspase-3 and significantly decreased expression of glutathione peroxides (GPx), catalase (CAT), and Bcl2 in kidney tissues. Administration of L-carnitine to IFO-treated rats resulted in a complete reversal of the all biochemical and gene expression changes, induced by IFO, to the control values. Data from this study suggest that L-carnitine prevents the development of IFO-induced nephrotoxicity via downregulation of oxidative and nitrosative apoptotic signaling in kidney tissues. PMID:23213347

  14. The role of carnitine in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Kępka, Alina; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Okungbowa, Osazee E; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine (2-hydroxy-4-trimethylammonium butyrate, vitamin BT) is a small hydrophilic molecule derived from protein-bound lysine, not degraded in the body but excreted via urine, bile and breast milk. Carnitine stimulates the catabolism of long-chain fatty acids (FAs), by transporting them to mitochondria for oxidation, and the intracellular decomposition of branched-chain ketoacids. It also helps to excrete toxic exogenous and nontoxic endogenous organic acids via urine. It further participates in the production of pulmonary surfactant, inhibits free radicals production and demonstrates other antioxidant properties. After delivery, infants dramatically increase energy demands for movement, growth, differentiation and maintenance of the body temperature that strongly depend on FAs oxidation which is facilitated by carnitine. At early stages of life, carnitine biosynthesis is less efficient than in adults and immature infants have less carnitine tissue reserves than term infants. Carnitine supplementation is recommended in newborns with aciduria, childhood epilepsy associated with valproate-induced hepatotoxicity, in kidney-associated syndromes, and premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. Concentrations of carnitine and acylcarnitines in neonatal blood have been postulated a useful tool for the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, as well as the detection and monitoring of many inherited and acquired metabolic disorders. Taking into account the complex metabolic role of cellular FAs transporters, further studies are needed on indications and contraindications for carnitine supplementation in different clinical settings during early developmental period.

  15. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone and carnitine treatment on rat liver.

    PubMed

    Battelli, D; Bellei, M; Kneer, N; Contri, M B; Ronchetti, I P; Bobyleva, V; Lardy, H A

    1994-08-01

    It is well established that DHEA treatment is associated in the rat to an increase in fatty acids metabolism. This condition would require levels of L-carnitine much higher than those physiologically present in the liver. The possibility thus exist that during DHEA treatment the concentration of L-carnitine may become a limiting factor for fatty acids oxidation and therefore responsible of some of the effects observed after administration of the hormone. The present experiments were designed to test this hypothesis. The results show that the increase in the levels of peroxisomal enzymes induced in hepatocytes by DHEA, is greatly reduced by parallel administration of L-carnitine. Furthermore, L-carnitine administration counteracts the effect of DHEA on mitochondrial structure. On the contrary, carnitine has no significant effect on the reduction in weight gain observed upon short- or long-term treatment with DHEA.

  16. Valproic Acid and topiramate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy in a patient with normal serum carnitine.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Martha G; Do, Stephanie T; Enlow, Thomas C; Reed, Michael D

    2013-04-01

    A 17-year-old female developed hyperammonemic encephalopathy 2 weeks after valproic acid (VPA), 500 mg twice a day, was added to her regimen of topiramate (TPM), 200 mg twice a day. She presented to the emergency department (ED) with altered mental status, hypotension, bradycardia, and lethargy. Laboratory analysis showed mild non-anion gap hyperchloremic acidosis, serum VPA concentration of 86 mg/L, and urine drug screen result that was positive for marijuana. She was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit for persistent symptoms, prolonged QTc, and medical history. Blood ammonia concentrations were obtained because of her persistent altered mental status, initially 94 μmol/L and a peak of 252 μmol/L. A serum carnitine profile was obtained at the time of hyperammonemia and was found to be normal (results were available postdischarge). VPA and TPM were discontinued on day 1 and day 2, respectively, as the patient's blood ammonia concentration remained elevated. On day 3, her mental status had returned to baseline, and blood ammonia concentrations trended downward; by day 4 her blood ammonia concentration was 23 μmol/L. VPA has been associated with numerous side effects including hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. Recently, drug interactions with TPM and VPA have been reported; however, serum carnitine concentrations have not been available. We discuss the possible mechanisms that VPA and TPM may affect serum ammonia and carnitine concentrations and the use of levocarnitine for patients or treating toxicity.

  17. Valproic Acid and Topiramate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy in a Patient With Normal Serum Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, Martha G.; Do, Stephanie T.; Enlow, Thomas C.; Reed, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old female developed hyperammonemic encephalopathy 2 weeks after valproic acid (VPA), 500 mg twice a day, was added to her regimen of topiramate (TPM), 200 mg twice a day. She presented to the emergency department (ED) with altered mental status, hypotension, bradycardia, and lethargy. Laboratory analysis showed mild non-anion gap hyperchloremic acidosis, serum VPA concentration of 86 mg/L, and urine drug screen result that was positive for marijuana. She was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit for persistent symptoms, prolonged QTc, and medical history. Blood ammonia concentrations were obtained because of her persistent altered mental status, initially 94 μmol/L and a peak of 252 μmol/L. A serum carnitine profile was obtained at the time of hyperammonemia and was found to be normal (results were available postdischarge). VPA and TPM were discontinued on day 1 and day 2, respectively, as the patient's blood ammonia concentration remained elevated. On day 3, her mental status had returned to baseline, and blood ammonia concentrations trended downward; by day 4 her blood ammonia concentration was 23 μmol/L. VPA has been associated with numerous side effects including hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. Recently, drug interactions with TPM and VPA have been reported; however, serum carnitine concentrations have not been available. We discuss the possible mechanisms that VPA and TPM may affect serum ammonia and carnitine concentrations and the use of levocarnitine for patients or treating toxicity. PMID:23798907

  18. Feeding healthy beagles medium-chain triglycerides, fish oil, and carnitine offsets age-related changes in serum fatty acids and carnitine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean A; Jewell, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if feeding dogs medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), fish oil, and L-carnitine enriched foods offsets age-associated changes in serum fatty acids (FA) and carnitine metabolites. Forty-one healthy Beagles, mean age 9.9 years (range 3.1 to 14.8), were fed control or one of two treatment foods for 6 months. All foods were complete and balanced and met the nutrient requirements for adult dogs, and had similar concentrations of moisture, protein, and fat (approx. 7.4%, 14.0%, and 18.1%, respectively). The treatment diets both contained added L-carnitine (300 mg/kg) and 0.6% (treatment food 1) or 1.5% (treatment food 2) added fish oil. Treatment food 2 also had increased MCT from coconut oil, added corn oil, and reduced animal fat. Composition of serum FA was determined by gas chromatography of FA methyl esters. Metabolomic profiles of serum samples were determined from extracted supernatants that were split and run on GC/MS and LC/MS/MS platforms, for identification and relative quantification of small metabolites. Body composition was determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Among dog groups, there was no change in total-lean-body weight, or in serum total protein and serum albumin concentrations, based on time or dietary treatment. Serum concentrations of carnitine metabolites were decreased in geriatric (>7 years) vs. mature adult (≤ 7 years) dogs, and supplementation with L-carnitine attenuated the effects of aging. The ratio of PUFA to SFA was significantly greater in mature dogs at baseline (P ≤ 0.05). Serum concentrations of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic FA increased in a dose-dependent manner. Dogs consuming treatment food 2 also had increased serum concentrations of lauric and myristic FA, and decreased concentrations of SFA, MUFA, and arachidonate (all P ≤ 0.05) and their PUFA to SFA ratio increased. In summary, dietary MCT, fish oil, and L-carnitine counterbalanced the effects of aging on circulating

  19. Oxidative phosphorylation accompanying oxidation of short-chain fatty acids by rat-liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hird, F. J. R.; Weidemann, M. J.

    1966-01-01

    1. The factors concerned in the estimation of P/O ratios when fatty acids are oxidized by rat-liver mitochondria have been assessed. 2. The oxidation of butyrate, hexanoate and octanoate is accompanied by ATP synthesis. At low concentrations of the fatty acids, P/O ratios approximately 2·5 are obtained. 3. Oxidative phosphorylation is uncoupled, respiratory control ratios are lowered and respiration is inhibited when the concentration of the fatty acid in the incubating medium is raised (to 5–10mm); octanoate is a more potent uncoupler than either hexanoate or butyrate. 4. Serum albumin and carnitine, either singly or in combination, protect the mitochondria from the effect exerted by the fatty acids. 5. The rate of oxidation of short-chain fatty acids in the presence of ADP is increased in the presence of carnitine. PMID:4223170

  20. Stimulation of fatty acid oxidation by a 3-thia fatty acid reduces triacylglycerol secretion in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Skrede, S; Bremer, J; Berge, R K; Rustan, A C

    1994-08-01

    The present work shows that when mitochondrial beta-oxidation is stimulated by the hypolipemic, non-beta-oxidizable fatty acid analogue tetradecylthioacetic acid, there is a decrease in the secretion of triacylglycerol in cultured rat hepatocytes. In order to study the effects of tetradecylthioacetic acid in cells with different fatty acid oxidation rates, cells were grown without or with L-carnitine supplement or with addition of the beta-oxidation inhibitor L-aminocarnitine. In cells grown without and with L-carnitine in the medium, the oxidation of [1-14C]oleic acid was stimulated by tetradecylthioacetic acid, whereas it was not significantly changed by palmitic acid. In cells grown with L-aminocarnitine, oxidation of [1-14C]oleic acid was almost abolished both in the absence and in presence of tetradecylthioacetic acid. The effect of tetradecylthioacetic acid and palmitic acid on incorporation of [1-14C]oleic acid into triacylglycerol was similar under all conditions. In the presence of L-carnitine, secretion of oleic acid-labeled triacylglycerol was reduced significantly more by tetradecylthioacetic acid than by palmitic acid. The effects of tetradecylthioacetic acid and palmitic acid on secretion of oleic acid-labeled triacylglycerol were reversed in cells grown with L-aminocarnitine, where palmitic acid was the stronger inhibitor. These results were substantiated by determination of mass of triacylglycerol secreted. It is concluded that tetradecylthioacetic acid reduces secretion of triacylglycerol from rat hepatocytes mainly by acutely stimulating fatty acid oxidation.

  1. L-Carnitine supplementation improved clinical status without changing oxidative stress and lipid profile in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Malek Mahdavi, Aida; Mahdavi, Reza; Kolahi, Sousan; Zemestani, Maryam; Vatankhah, Amir-Mansour

    2015-08-01

    Considering the pathologic importance of oxidative stress and altered lipid metabolism in osteoarthritis (OA), this study aimed to investigate the effect of l-carnitine supplementation on oxidative stress, lipid profile, and clinical status in women with knee OA. We hypothesized that l-carnitine would improve clinical status by modulating serum oxidative stress and lipid profile. In this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 72 overweight or obese women with mild to moderate knee OA were randomly allocated into 2 groups to receive 750 mg/d l-carnitine or placebo for 8 weeks. Dietary intake was evaluated using 24-hour recall for 3 days. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and lipid profile, visual analog scale for pain intensity, and patient global assessment of severity of disease were assessed before and after supplementation. Only 69 patients (33 in the l-carnitine group and 36 in the placebo group) completed the study. l-Carnitine supplementation resulted in significant reductions in serum MDA (2.46 ± 1.13 vs 2.16 ± 0.94 nmol/mL), total cholesterol (216.09 ± 34.54 vs 206.12 ± 39.74 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (129.45 ± 28.69 vs 122.05 ± 32.76 mg/dL) levels compared with baseline (P < .05), whereas these parameters increased in the placebo group. Serum triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TAC levels did not change significantly in both groups (P > .05). No significant differences were observed in dietary intake, serum lipid profile, MDA, and TAC levels between groups after adjusting for baseline values and covariates (P > .05). There were significant intragroup and intergroup differences in pain intensity and patient global assessment of disease status after supplementation (P < .05). Collectively, l-carnitine improved clinical status without changing oxidative stress and lipid profile significantly in women with knee OA.

  2. Hepatotoxicity in rat following administration of valproic acid: effect of L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, T; Araki, A; Nishida, N; Sakane, Y; Woo, M; Takeuchi, T; Kobayashi, Y

    1987-01-01

    The effect of prolonged administration (7 days) of valproate (VPA, 500 mg/kg/day), or VPA (500 mg/kg/day) with L-carnitine (200 mg/kg/day) on blood carnitine levels and the appearance of liver mitochondria were assessed in the rat. VPA-treated rats showed hypocarnitinemia and enlarged mitochondria when compared with saline-injected control rats. In rats treated with both VPA and L-carnitine, serum and liver carnitine levels were increased by the L-carnitine supplement and the liver mitochondria were not enlarged. L-Carnitine supplement in VPA-medicated patients seems to prevent hepatotoxicity, especially mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... other health conditions > Fatty acid oxidation disorders Fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... these disorders, go to genetests.org . What fatty acid oxidation disorders are tested for in newborn screening? ...

  4. Dietary supplementation with a combination of alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, glycerophosphocoline, docosahexaenoic acid, and phosphatidylserine reduces oxidative damage to murine brain and improves cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Suchy, James; Chan, Amy; Shea, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease has a complex etiology composed of nutritional and genetic risk factors and predispositions. Moreover, genetic risk factors for cognitive decline may remain latent pending age-related decline in nutrition, suggesting the potential importance of early nutritional intervention, including preventative approaches. We hypothesized that a combination of multiple nutritional additives may be able to provide neuroprotection. We demonstrate herein that dietary supplementation with a mixture of ALA, ALCAR, GPC, DHA, and PS reduced reactive oxygen species in normal mice by 57% and prevented the increase in reactive oxygen species normally observed in mice lacking murine ApoE when maintained on a vitamin-free, iron-enriched, oxidative-challenge diet. We further demonstrate that supplementation with these agents prevented the marked cognitive decline otherwise observed in normal mice maintained on this challenge diet. These findings add to the growing body of research indicating that key dietary supplementation may delay the progression of age-related cognitive decline.

  5. Brain-specific carnitine palmitoyl-transferase-1c: role in CNS fatty acid metabolism, food intake, and body weight.

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Michael J; Cha, Seung Hun; Millington, David S; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M Daniel

    2008-05-01

    While the brain does not utilize fatty acids as a primary energy source, recent evidence shows that intermediates of fatty acid metabolism serve as hypothalamic sensors of energy status. Increased hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, an intermediate in fatty acid synthesis, is indicative of energy surplus and leads to the suppression of food intake and increased energy expenditure. Malonyl-CoA functions as an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1 (CPT1), a mitochondrial outer membrane enzyme that initiates translocation of fatty acids into mitochondria for oxidation. The mammalian brain expresses a unique homologous CPT1, CPT1c, that binds malonyl-CoA tightly but does not support fatty acid oxidation in vivo, in hypothalamic explants or in heterologous cell culture systems. CPT1c knockout (KO) mice under fasted or refed conditions do not exhibit an altered CNS transcriptome of genes known to be involved in fatty acid metabolism. CPT1c KO mice exhibit normal levels of metabolites and of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and fatty acyl-CoA levels either in the fasted or refed states. However, CPT1c KO mice exhibit decreased food intake and lower body weight than wild-type littermates. In contrast, CPT1c KO mice gain excessive body weight and body fat when fed a high-fat diet while maintaining lower or equivalent food intake. Heterozygous mice display an intermediate phenotype. These findings provide further evidence that CPT1c plays a role in maintaining energy homeostasis, but not through altered fatty acid oxidation.

  6. Risks and benefits of carnitine supplementation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dambrova, M; Liepinsh, E

    2015-02-01

    L-carnitine is a very popular food supplement due to its safety profile, antioxidant-type activity and suggested effects on energy metabolism pathways. L-carnitine participates in both fatty acid transport pathways and the export of acetyl groups out of the mitochondria. However, contradictory data exist concerning the pharmacological outcomes of L-carnitine treatment in diabetes mellitus, which is a highly prevalent metabolic disease characterised by hyperglycemia and associated with severe complications, including cardiovascular disease and dyslipidemia. Recently, the L-carnitine-derived metabolites, acylcarnitines and trimethylamine-N-oxide, have been associated with increased cardio-metabolic risks. This review aims to highlight the possible risks and benefits of L-carnitine supplementation.

  7. L-carnitine Prevents Oxidative Stress in the Brains of Rats Subjected to a Chemically Induced Chronic Model of MSUD.

    PubMed

    Mescka, Caroline Paula; Rosa, Andrea Pereira; Schirmbeck, Gabriel; da Rosa, Thales Hein; Catarino, Felipe; de Souza, Laila Oliveira; Guerreiro, Gilian; Sitta, Angela; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2016-11-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), or branched-chain α-keto aciduria, is an inherited disorder that is caused by a deficiency in branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKAD) activity. Blockade of this pathway leads to the accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine, and valine, and their respective ketoacids in tissues. The main clinical symptoms presented by MSUD patients include ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, opisthotonos, poor feeding, apnea, ataxia, convulsions, coma, psychomotor delay, and mental retardation. Although increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of this disease, the mechanisms of the brain damage caused by this disorder remain poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effect of BCAAs on some oxidative stress parameters and evaluated the efficacy of L-carnitine (L-car), an efficient antioxidant that may be involved in the reduction of oxidative damage observed in some inherited neurometabolic diseases, against these possible pro-oxidant effects of a chronic MSUD model in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rats. Our results showed that chronic BCAA administration was able to promote both lipid and protein oxidation, impair brain antioxidant defenses, and increase reactive species production, particularly in the cerebral cortex, and that L-car was able to prevent these effects. Taken together, the present data indicate that chronic BCAA administration significantly increased oxidative damage in the brains of rats subjected to a chronic model of MSUD and that L-car may be an efficient antioxidant in this disorder.

  8. Effects of L-carnitine supplement on serum inflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein (a), and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients with Lp (a) hyperlipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Azam; Tabibi, Hadi; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2010-10-01

    Inflammation, oxidative stress, and high concentration of serum lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] are common complications in hemodialysis patients. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of L-carnitine supplement on serum inflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), Lp (a), and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients with Lp (a) hyperlipoproteinemia [hyper Lp (a)]. This was an unblinded, randomized clinical trial. Thirty-six hyper Lp (a) hemodialysis patients (23 men and 13 women) were randomly assigned to either a carnitine or control group. Patients in the carnitine group received 1000 mg/d oral L-carnitine for 12 weeks, whereas patients in the control group did not receive any L-carnitine supplement. At baseline and the end of week 12, 5 mL of blood were collected after a 12- to 14-hours fast and serum free carnitine, CRP, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, Lp (a), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein were measured. Serum free carnitine concentration increased significantly by 86% in the carnitine group at the end of week 12 compared with baseline (P<0.001), while serum CRP and IL-6 showed a significant decrease of 29% (P<0.05) and 61% (P<0.001), respectively. No significant changes were observed in serum free carnitine, CRP, and IL-6 in the control group. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean changes of serum interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, Lp (a), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein concentrations. L-carnitine supplement reduces inflammation in hemodialysis patients, but has no effect on hyper Lp (a) and oxidative stress.

  9. Nickel inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W; Brant, Kelly A; Fabisiak, James P; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-08-07

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy-in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with l-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 h), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis.

  10. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  11. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-02

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event.

  12. Altered carnitine homeostasis is associated with decreased mitochondrial function and altered nitric oxide signaling in lambs with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Carter, A. Lee; Kumar, Sanjiv; Hou, Yali; Rau, Thomas; Wilham, Jason; Harmon, Cynthia; Oishi, Peter; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing aortopulmonary vascular graft placement in the fetal lamb, we have developed a model (shunt) of pulmonary hypertension that mimics congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow. Our previous studies have identified a progressive development of endothelial dysfunction in shunt lambs that is dependent, at least in part, on decreased nitric oxide (NO) signaling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible role of a disruption in carnitine metabolism in shunt lambs and to determine the effect on NO signaling. Our data indicate that at 2 wk of age, shunt lambs have significantly reduced expression (P < 0.05) of the key enzymes in carnitine metabolism: carnitine palmitoyltransferases 1 and 2 as well as carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT). In addition, we found that CrAT activity was inhibited due to increased nitration. Furthermore, free carnitine levels were significantly decreased whereas acylcarnitine levels were significantly higher in shunt lambs (P < 0.05). We also found that alterations in carnitine metabolism resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, since shunt lambs had significantly decreased pyruvate, increased lactate, and a reduced pyruvate/lactate ratio. In pulmonary arterial endothelial cells cultured from juvenile lambs, we found that mild uncoupling of the mitochondria led to a decrease in cellular ATP levels and a reduction in both endothelial NO synthase-heat shock protein 90 (eNOS-HSP90) interactions and NO signaling. Similarly, in shunt lambs we found a loss of eNOS-HSP90 interactions that correlated with a progressive decrease in NO signaling. Our data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:18024721

  13. Anti-adipogenic and antiviral effects of l-carnitine on hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Tsukuda, Yoko; Suda, Goki; Tsunematsu, Seiji; Ito, Jun; Sato, Fumiyuki; Terashita, Katsumi; Nakai, Masato; Sho, Takuya; Maehara, Osamu; Shimazaki, Tomoe; Kimura, Megumi; Morikawa, Kenichi; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Ogawa, Koji; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Chuma, Makoto; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been reported to hijack fatty acid metabolism in infected hepatocytes, taking advantage of lipid droplets for virus assembly. In this study, we analyzed the anti-HCV activity of l-carnitine, a substance involved in the transport of fatty acids into mitochondria. JFH-1 or HCV replicon-transfected Huh7.5.1 cells were treated with or without l-carnitine to examine its anti-HCV effects. The effects of l-carnitine on HCV entry, HCV-induced adipogenesis and lipid droplet formation, and HCV-induced oxidative stress were examined. Treatment of JFH-1-infected cells with l-carnitine inhibited HCV propagation in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, l-carnitine had no anti-HCV activity in the HCV replicon system, which is lacking viral assembly. In addition, l-carnitine did not affect HCV entry. However, l-carnitine treatment decreased intracellular lipid droplets, which are crucial for HCV assembly in JFH-1-infected cells. The expression level of CPT-1 was decreased in JFH-1-infected cells, and l-carnitine treatment restored this expression. HCV-infected cells exhibited increased production of reactive oxygen species and glutathione oxidation. l-carnitine decreased oxidative stress induced by JFH-1-infection, as shown by glutathione/glutathione disulfide assays and MitoSOX staining. l-carnitine exhibited anti-HCV activity, possibly by inhibiting HCV assembly and through its anti-adipogenic activity in HCV-infected cells. Moreover, l-carnitine has antioxidant properties in HCV-infected hepatocytes. Overall, these results indicated that l-carnitine may be an effective adjunctive agent in antiviral therapies to treat chronic hepatitis C. J. Med. Virol. 89:857-866, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Acetyl-L-carnitine and lipoic acid improve mitochondrial abnormalities and serum levels of liver enzymes in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kathirvel, Elango; Morgan, Kengathevy; French, Samuel W; Morgan, Timothy R

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial abnormalities are suggested to be associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver. Liver mitochondrial content and function have been shown to improve in oral feeding of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) to rodents. Carnitine is involved in the transport of acyl-coenzyme A across the mitochondrial membrane to be used in mitochondrial β-oxidation. We hypothesized that oral administration ALC with the antioxidant lipoic acid (ALC + LA) would benefit nonalcoholic fatty liver. To test our hypothesis, we fed Balb/C mice a standard diet (SF) or SF with ALC + LA or high-fat diet (HF) or HF with ALC + LA for 6 months. Acetyl-L-carnitine and LA were dissolved at 0.2:0.1% (wt/vol) in drinking water, and mice were allowed free access to food and water. Along with physical parameters, insulin resistance (blood glucose, insulin, glucose tolerance), liver function (alanine transaminase [ALT], aspartate transaminase [AST]), liver histology (hematoxylin and eosin), oxidative stress (malondialdehyde), and mitochondrial abnormalities (carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 and electron microscopy) were done. Compared with SF, HF had higher body, liver, liver-to-body weight ratio, white adipose tissue, ALT, AST, liver fat, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance. Coadministration of ALC + LA to HF animals significantly improved the mitochondrial marker carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 and the size of the mitochondria in liver. Alanine transaminase and AST levels were decreased. In a nonalcoholic fatty liver mice model, ALC + LA combination improved liver mitochondrial content, size, serum ALT, and AST without significant changes in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and liver fat accumulation.

  15. Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine on Antioxidant Status, Lipid Peroxidation, and Oxidative Damage of Arsenic in Rat.

    PubMed

    Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Omidi, Ameneh; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Sabzevari, Samin; Kazemi, Ali Reza; Sabzevari, Omid

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widespread environmental contaminant present around the world in both organic and inorganic forms. Oxidative stress is postulated as the main mechanism for As-induced toxicity. This study was planned to examine the protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) on As-induced oxidative damage in male rats. Animals were randomly divided into four groups of control (saline), sodium arsenite (NaAsO2, 20 mg/kg), ALC (300 mg/kg), and NaAsO2 plus ALC. Animals were dosed orally for 28 successive days. Blood and tissue samples including kidney, brain, liver, heart, and lung were collected on the 28th day and evaluated for oxidative damage and histological changes. NaAsO2 exposure caused a significant lipid peroxidation as evidenced by elevation in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). The activity of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as sulfhydryl group content (SH group) was significantly suppressed in various organs following NaAsO2 treatment (P < 0.05). Furthermore, NaAsO2 administration increased serum values of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and bilirubin. Our findings revealed that co-administration of ALC and NaAsO2 significantly suppressed the oxidative damage induced by NaAsO2. Tissue histological studies have confirmed the biochemical findings and provided evidence for the beneficial role of ALC. The results concluded that ALC attenuated NaAsO2-induced toxicity, and this protective effect may result from the ability of ALC in maintaining oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  16. Potential Therapeutic Role of L-Carnitine in Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress and Atrophy Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Montesano, Anna; Senesi, Pamela; Luzi, Livio; Benedini, Stefano; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    The targeting of nutraceutical treatment to skeletal muscle damage is an emerging area of research, driven by the need for new therapies for a range of muscle-associated diseases. L-Carnitine (CARN) is an essential nutrient and plays a key role in mitochondrial β-oxidation and in the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulation. As a dietary supplement to improve athletic performance, CARN has been studied for its potential to enhance β-oxidation. However, CARN effects on myogenesis, mitochondrial activity, and hypertrophy process are not completely elucidated. This in vitro study aims to investigate CARN role on skeletal muscle remodeling, differentiation process, and myotubes formation. We analyzed muscle differentiation and morphological features in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to 5 mM CARN. Our results showed that CARN was able to accelerate C2C12 myotubes formation and induce morphological changes, characterizing the start of hypertrophy process. In addition, CARN improved AKT activation and downstream cellular signaling pathways involved in skeletal muscle atrophy process prevention. Also, CARN positively regulated the pathways involved in oxidative stress defense. In this work, we provide an interesting novel mechanism of the potential therapeutic use of CARN to treat pathological conditions characterized by skeletal muscle morphological and functional impairment, oxidative stress production, and atrophy process in aging. PMID:25838869

  17. Efficacy of tamoxifen and l-carnitine on sperm ultrastructure and seminal oxidative stress in patients with idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Nada, E A; El Taieb, M A; Ibrahim, H M; Al Saied, A E-R A

    2015-09-01

    Idiopathic oligoathenoteratozoospermia (iOAT) is a common finding in the evaluation of male infertility. Oxidative stress (OS) may underlie its pathology. Tamoxifen and l-carnitine are used to treat idiopathic male infertility. The aim of this work was to detect the efficacy of tamoxifen and l-carnitine on sperm parameters, sperm ultrastructure and seminal OS in iOAT patients. Sixty patients were recruited for this study and divided into three groups; the 1st was treated with tamoxifen, 2nd with l-carnitine and 3rd with both drugs. Semen analysis, malondialdehye (MDA) level and transmission electron microscopy were performed before and after three months treatment. The first group showed significant improvement in MDA levels, sperm concentration, sperm morphology, ultrastructural head, acrosomal and mitochondrial anomalies (P < 0.01). Other parameters were not significantly improved. In the 2nd group, significant improvements in MDA, sperm motility, sperm morphology, ultrastructural mitochondrial and tail anomalies were detected (P < 0.01). No significant improvement in the other parameters. Third group showed improvement in MDA, all semen parameters and all ultrastructural anomalies (P < 0.01). In conclusion, tamoxifen and l-carnitine are effective in improving seminal OS, semen parameters and sperm ultrastructure. Combination of both drugs is superior to monotherapy.

  18. Protective effects of acetyl-L-carnitine on cisplatin cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Altun, Zekiye Sultan; Güneş, Dilek; Aktaş, Safiye; Erbayraktar, Zübeyde; Erbayrktar, Zübeyde; Olgun, Nur

    2010-03-01

    The most widely used platinum-derived drug is cisplatin in neuroblastoma (NB) chemotherapy, which is severely neurotoxic. Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALC) is a natural occurring compound with a neuroprotective activity in several experimental paradigms. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ALC on cisplatin induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in NB cells. SH-SY5Y (N-Myc negative) and KELLY (N-Myc positive) human NB cell lines were used. Cisplatin induced apoptosis was assessed by using a Cell Death Detection ELISA(PLUS) kit. Lipid peroxidation levels were determined by HPLC analysis. Glutathione levels were determined spectrophotometrically. ALC was used prophylactic or after cisplatin application. The level of cisplatin doses were determined in both type of NB cells at which 50% cell death occurred along with synchronized apoptosis induced. Prophylactic 10 and 50 micromol of ALC concentrations were decreased cisplatin induced lipid peroxidation compared to controls that normally exhibited apoptosis especially in SH-SY5Y cells. Cisplatin caused oxidative stress through decreasing glutathione levels in both cell types. ALC were effectively inhibited the increase in cisplatin induced oxidized glutathione and lipid peroxidation formation in NB cells. We suggested that prophylactic ALC would be a useful agent for cisplatin induced toxicity in NB cells.

  19. An Open-label Phase 2 Study of UX007 (Triheptanoin) in Subjects With Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Long-chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD); Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase (CPT II) Deficiency; Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Longchain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCHAD) Deficiency; Trifunctional Protein (TFP) Deficiency

  20. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-08-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 M concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with (U- $C)oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of UC label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine.

  1. L-carnitine supplementation as a potential antioxidant therapy for inherited neurometabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Graziela S; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2014-01-10

    In recent years increasing evidence has emerged suggesting that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. However the clinical use of classical antioxidants in these diseases has been poorly evaluated and so far no benefit has been demonstrated. l-Carnitine is an endogenous substance that acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane necessary for subsequent beta-oxidation and ATP production. Besides its important role in the metabolism of lipids, l-carnitine is also a potent antioxidant (free radical scavenger) and thus may protect tissues from oxidative damage. This review addresses recent findings obtained from patients with some inherited neurometabolic diseases showing that l-carnitine may be involved in the reduction of oxidative damage observed in these disorders. For some of these diseases, reduced concentrations of l-carnitine may occur due to the combination of this compound to the accumulating toxic metabolites, especially organic acids, or as a result of protein restricted diets. Thus, l-carnitine supplementation may be useful not only to prevent tissue deficiency of this element, but also to avoid oxidative damage secondary to increased production of reactive species in these diseases. Considering the ability of l-carnitine to easily cross the blood-brain barrier, l-carnitine supplementation may also be beneficial in preventing neurological damage derived from oxidative injury. However further studies are required to better explore this potential.

  2. Carnitine protects the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans from glucose-induced reduction of survival depending on the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12.

    PubMed

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni; Beyrer, Melanie; Fitzenberger, Elena; Wenzel, Uwe

    2015-05-08

    Besides its function in transport of fatty acids into mitochondria in order to provide substrates for β-oxidation, carnitine has been shown to affect also glucose metabolism and to inhibit several mechanisms associated with diabetic complications. In the present study we used the mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans fed on a high glucose concentration in liquid media as a diabetes model and tested the effects of carnitine supplementation on their survival under heat-stress. Carnitine at 100 μM completely prevented the survival reduction that was caused by the application of 10 mM glucose. RNA-interference for sir-2.1, a candidate genes mediating the effects of carnitine revealed no contribution of the sirtuin for the rescue of survival. Under daf-12 RNAi rescue of survival by carnitine was abolished. RNA-interference for γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase 2, encoding the key enzyme for carnitine biosynthesis did neither increase glucose toxicity nor prevent the rescue of survival by carnitine, suggesting that the effects of carnitine supplementation on carnitine levels were significant. Finally, it was demonstrated that neither the amount of lysosomes nor the proteasomal activity were increased by carnitine, excluding that protein degradation pathways, such as autophagy or proteasomal degradation, are involved in the protective carnitine effects. In conclusion, carnitine supplementation prevents the reduction of survival caused by glucose in C. elegans in dependence on a nuclear hormone receptor which displays high homologies to the vertebrate peroxisomal proliferator activated receptors.

  3. In vivo stable isotope studies in three patients affected with mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders: limited diagnostic use of 1-13C fatty acid breath test using bolus technique.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, C; Kneer, J; Martin, D; Boulloche, J; Brivet, M; Poll-The, B T; Saudubray, J M

    1997-08-01

    The in vivo oxidation of fatty acids (FA) of different chain length was investigated in three patients with documented mitochondrial FA oxidation disorders: one patient with mild multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADM), one with medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD), and one with carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency (CPT I). Breath tests were performed after oral administration of 1-13C butyric. 1-13C octanoic, and 1-13C palmitic acids. 13C/12C ratio in the expired oxidative end product CO2 was measured. The cumulative 13C elimination was calculated and expressed as a percentage of the administered dose. In the MADM patient the influence of carnitine therapy (or deprivation) on the utilization of 1-13C palmitic acid was also examined. In the MCAD and CPT I patients, the 1-13C butyric, 1-13C octanoic and 1-13C palmitic acids in vivo oxidation were similar to five healthy controls. In the MADM patient, the oxidation of 1-13C butyric and 1-13C octanoic acids were normal, whereas the metabolism of 1-13C palmitic acid ranged from 33% of 66% of controls. In this patient the serum carnitine level decreased from 60 to 27 mumol/l without carnitine supplementation. Clinically there was mild hypotonia. 1-13C palmitic acid oxidation compared to controls was 50%. After 2 further weeks of carnitine deprivation the serum carnitine was 10-15 mumol/l. Clinically he was very hypotonic and had a large liver. 1-13C Palmitic acid oxidation was 33%. After 6 weeks of readministration of carnitine (L-carnitine 100 mg/kg/day p.o.) the serum carnitine was 60 mumol/l and the patient was in good clinical condition. 1-13C palmitic acid oxidation was 66% compared to controls. Our study implies that this simple fatty acid breath test is not of diagnostic use for detection of enzymatic defects in FA oxidation disorders. The carnitine dependent 1-13C palmitic acid oxidation indicates that this test might be of some value in cases with primary or secondary carnitine

  4. Simultaneous targeted analysis of trimethylamine-N-oxide, choline, betaine, and carnitine by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Zhao, Mingming; Zhou, Juntuo; Liu, Changjie; Zheng, Lemin; Yin, Yuxin

    2016-11-01

    Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is a metabolite generated from choline, betaine and carnitine in a gut microbiota-dependent way. This molecule is associated with development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. A sensitive liquid chromatographic electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of TMAO related molecules including TMAO, betaine, choline, and carnitine in mouse plasma. Analytes are extracted after protein precipitation by methanol and subjected to LC-ESI-MS/MS without preliminary derivatization. Separation of analytes was achieved on an amide column with acetonitrile-water as the mobile phase. This method has been fully validated in this study in terms of selectivity, linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, and carryover effect, and the stability of the analyte under various conditions has been confirmed. This developed method has successfully been applied to plasma samples of our mouse model.

  5. [The function of mitochondrion, carnitine, coenzyme-A, fat acids, glucose, the Randle cycle and insulin: a lecture].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2012-02-01

    acid and b) short chained C6-C10 fat acids and C16 palmitic acid for which in mitochondrion exists specific carrier - carnitin-palmitoilacyltransferase and "forces" mitochondrion to oxidize glucose. The main biologic role of insulin is to provide the biologic function of locomotion with substratum of energy

  6. Role of carnitine in disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Carnitine is a conditionally essential nutrient that plays a vital role in energy production and fatty acid metabolism. Vegetarians possess a greater bioavailability than meat eaters. Distinct deficiencies arise either from genetic mutation of carnitine transporters or in association with other disorders such as liver or kidney disease. Carnitine deficiency occurs in aberrations of carnitine regulation in disorders such as diabetes, sepsis, cardiomyopathy, malnutrition, cirrhosis, endocrine disorders and with aging. Nutritional supplementation of L-carnitine, the biologically active form of carnitine, is ameliorative for uremic patients, and can improve nerve conduction, neuropathic pain and immune function in diabetes patients while it is life-saving for patients suffering primary carnitine deficiency. Clinical application of carnitine holds much promise in a range of neural disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, hepatic encephalopathy and other painful neuropathies. Topical application in dry eye offers osmoprotection and modulates immune and inflammatory responses. Carnitine has been recognized as a nutritional supplement in cardiovascular disease and there is increasing evidence that carnitine supplementation may be beneficial in treating obesity, improving glucose intolerance and total energy expenditure. PMID:20398344

  7. [The biological function of L-carnitine and its content in the particular food examples].

    PubMed

    Rospond, Bartłomiej; Chłopicka, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information about L-carnitine, its physiological role in the human body and its content in some foods. This chemical compound is mainly synthesized in the liver, kidney and brain and is composed of two aminoacids, lyzine and metionine. L-carnitine regulates the level of acylo-CoA and CoA in the mitochondium and cytozolum, and it provides acetyl moieties for the biosythesis of acetocholine. L-carnitine plays a vital function in the metabolism of lipids and it carries long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for beta-oxidation. An increase of the amount of L-carnitine in the human body may lead to reduction and inhibition of production of fatty tissue. Despite the fact that human body can synthesise L-carnitine, about 80% of this chemical compound is delivered by food. It is crucial, especially for people who are on a slimming diet, to choose products rich in L-carnitine because this compound may potentially reduce the body weight. Animal by-products contain the highest amount of L-carnitine, and these are, e.g , kangaroo meat (637 mg), horse meat (423mg), beef (139 mg per 100 g of dry weight). The amount of L-carnitine in milk products may range from 1,4 to 42,8 mg per 100 g of dry matter. Vegetables and fruits are products which contain less than 5 mg of L-carnitine per 100 g of dry matter. Lipids are also very low in L-carnitine, e.g sunflower oil is free from this compound. It is worth mentioning that mushrooms are richer in L-carnitine than plants. The amount of L-carnitine (53 mg/100 g dry matter) in pleureotus ostreatus equals approximately 100 g of minced pork.

  8. Fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis during development.

    PubMed

    Girard, J; Duée, P H; Ferré, P; Pégorier, J P; Escriva, F; Decaux, J F

    1985-01-01

    Fatty acids are the preferred oxidative substrates of the heart, skeletal muscles, kidney cortex and liver in adult mammals. They are supplied to these tissues either as nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), or as triglycerides after hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase. During fetal life, tissue capacity to oxidize NEFA is very low, even in species in which the placental transfer of NEFA and carnitine is high. At birth, the ability to oxidize NEFA from endogenous sources or from milk (a high-fat diet) develops rapidly in various tissues and remains very high throughout the suckling period. Ketogenesis appears in the liver by 6 to 12 hrs after birth, and the ketone bodies are used as oxidative fuels by various tissues during the suckling period. At the time of weaning, the transition from a high-fat to a high-carbohydrate diet is attended by a progressive decrease in the ketogenic capacity of the liver, whereas other tissues (skeletal muscle, heart, kidney) maintain a high capacity for NEFA oxidation. The nutritional and hormonal factors involved in changes in fatty acid oxidation during development are discussed.

  9. L-carnitine Mediated Reduction in Oxidative Stress and Alteration in Transcript Level of Antioxidant Enzymes in Sheep Embryos Produced In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A; Reddy, I J; Gupta, P S P; Mondal, S

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the effect of L-carnitine on oocyte maturation and subsequent embryo development, with L-carnitine-mediated alteration if any in transcript level of antioxidant enzymes (GPx, Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1) and Mn-SOD (SOD2) in oocytes and developing sheep embryos produced in vitro. Different concentrations of L-carnitine (0 mm, 2.5 mm, 5 mm, 7.5 mm and 10 mm) were used in maturation medium. Oocytes matured with 10 mm L-carnitine showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher cleavage (66.80% vs 39.66, 41.76, 44.64, 64.31%), morula (48.50% vs 20.88, 26.01, 26.99, 44.72%) and blastocyst (33.22% vs 7.66, 9.19, 10.71, 28.57%) percentage as compared to lower concentrations (0 mm, 2.5 mm, 5 mm and 7.5 mm). Cleavage percentage between 10 mm and 7.5 mm L-carnitine were not significantly different. Maturation rate was not influenced by supplementation of any experimental concentration of L-carnitine. There was a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in intracellular ROS and increase in intracellular GSH in 10 mm L-carnitine-treated oocytes and embryos than control group. Antioxidant effect of L-carnitine was proved by culturing oocytes and embryos with H2O2 in the presence of L-carnitine which could be able to protect oocytes and embryos from H2O2-induced oxidative damage. L-carnitine supplementation significantly (p < 0.05) upregulated the expression of GPx and downregulated the expression of SOD2 genes, whereas the expression pattern of SOD1 and GAPDH (housekeeping gene) genes was unaffected in oocytes and embryos. It was concluded from the study that L-carnitine supplementation during in vitro maturation reduces oxidative stress-induced embryo toxicity by decreasing intracellular ROS and increasing intracellular GSH that in turn improved developmental potential of oocytes and embryos and alters transcript level of antioxidant enzymes.

  10. L-carnitine ameliorates cancer cachexia in mice by regulating the expression and activity of carnitine palmityl transferase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Wu, Han-Jun; Zhang, Zong-Qi; Chen, Qing; Liu, Bin; Wu, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Liang

    2011-07-15

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by progressive weight loss with the depletion of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Impaired fatty acid oxidation mainly resulting from the decrease of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II activities in the liver is an important factor that contributes to cancer cachexia . Although recent studies suggest a potential application of L-carnitine in treatment of cancer cachexia, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we aim to assess the effects of L-carnitine on the activity and expression of CPT I and II in the liver of cachectic cancer mice. Our results show that the inoculation of colon-26 adenocarcinoma cells into mice led to cancer cachexia characterized by notable decreases in food intake, gastrocnemius muscle and epididymus fat weight. In addition, the mRNA level and activity of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I and II, and serum levels of free carnitine and acetylcarnitine were markedly decreased in cachectic mice, accompanied by marked increases in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). A continuous oral treatment with L-carnitine at 18 mg/kg per day increased dietary uptake, gastrocnemius muscle weight and epididymus fat weight, increased blood glucose and serum albumin levels, and decreased total cholesterol level in cancer cachectic mice, but did not affect tumor growth. These effects of L-carnitine on cancer cachexia mice were accompanied by the upregulation of mRNA level of CPT I and II and increased enzyme activity of CPT I in the liver, as well as the downregulation of serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Moreover, free carnitine levels were negatively correlated with serum TNF-α or IL-6 level. These results indicate that L-carnitine ameliorates cancer cachexia by regulating serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels and modulating the expression and activity of CPT in the liver.

  11. Carnitine protects the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans from glucose-induced reduction of survival depending on the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12

    SciTech Connect

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni Beyrer, Melanie Fitzenberger, Elena Wenzel, Uwe

    2015-05-08

    Besides its function in transport of fatty acids into mitochondria in order to provide substrates for β-oxidation, carnitine has been shown to affect also glucose metabolism and to inhibit several mechanisms associated with diabetic complications. In the present study we used the mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans fed on a high glucose concentration in liquid media as a diabetes model and tested the effects of carnitine supplementation on their survival under heat-stress. Carnitine at 100 μM completely prevented the survival reduction that was caused by the application of 10 mM glucose. RNA-interference for sir-2.1, a candidate genes mediating the effects of carnitine revealed no contribution of the sirtuin for the rescue of survival. Under daf-12 RNAi rescue of survival by carnitine was abolished. RNA-interference for γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase 2, encoding the key enzyme for carnitine biosynthesis did neither increase glucose toxicity nor prevent the rescue of survival by carnitine, suggesting that the effects of carnitine supplementation on carnitine levels were significant. Finally, it was demonstrated that neither the amount of lysosomes nor the proteasomal activity were increased by carnitine, excluding that protein degradation pathways, such as autophagy or proteasomal degradation, are involved in the protective carnitine effects. In conclusion, carnitine supplementation prevents the reduction of survival caused by glucose in C. elegans in dependence on a nuclear hormone receptor which displays high homologies to the vertebrate peroxisomal proliferator activated receptors. - Highlights: • Carnitine protects from glucose-induced reduction of stress-resistance. • Carnitine acts via the PPAR homolog DAF-12 on glucose toxicity. • Carnitine protects from glucose toxicity independent of protein degradation.

  12. Promoting lipid utilization with l-carnitine to improve oocyte quality.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Kylie R; Robker, Rebecca L

    2012-09-01

    Successful embryo and fetal development is dependent on the quality of the oocyte from which it was derived. Several studies to date have demonstrated the link between appropriate metabolism and sufficient ATP production with oocyte quality and preimplantation embryo development. Metabolism of fatty acids for the purpose of synthesizing ATP occurs within mitochondria via β-oxidation and entry of fatty acids into this organelle is the rate-limiting step in this process. Transport of activated fatty acids into mitochondria is catalyzed by carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I (CPTI) which also requires the metabolite carnitine. Once inside the mitochondrial matrix, fatty acids are broken down into acetyl CoA molecules which are further metabolized via the TCA cycle and electron transport chain to produce ATP. The potential to improve oocyte quality by modulating fatty acid metabolism and β-oxidation with carnitine in culture media formulations or via dietary supplementation has received little attention. This review summarizes studies to date investigating the developmental importance of β-oxidation through the use of metabolic inhibitors and whether regulation by carnitine, in vitro or in vivo, has beneficial effects on oocyte and embryo development. Overall, there is little evidence to date that dietary carnitine can improve oocyte quality or female fertility; however inclusion of l-carnitine to in vitro oocyte maturation and embryo growth media improves embryo outcomes, most likely by supplying the oocyte and embryo with an essential co-factor required to utilize fatty acids.

  13. L-Carnitine transport in human placental brush-border membranes is mediated by the sodium-dependent organic cation transporter OCTN2.

    PubMed

    Lahjouji, Karim; Elimrani, Ihsan; Lafond, Julie; Leduc, Line; Qureshi, Ijaz A; Mitchell, Grant A

    2004-08-01

    Maternofetal transport of l-carnitine, a molecule that shuttles long-chain fatty acids to the mitochondria for oxidation, is thought to be important in preparing the fetus for its lipid-rich postnatal milk diet. Using brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles from human term placentas, we showed that l-carnitine uptake was sodium and temperature dependent, showed high affinity for carnitine (apparent K(m) = 11.09 +/- 1.32 microM; V(max) = 41.75 +/- 0.94 pmol.mg protein(-1).min(-1)), and was unchanged over the pH range from 5.5 to 8.5. l-Carnitine uptake was inhibited in BBM vesicles by valproate, verapamil, tetraethylammonium, and pyrilamine and by structural analogs of l-carnitine, including d-carnitine, acetyl-d,l-carnitine, and propionyl-, butyryl-, octanoyl-, isovaleryl-, and palmitoyl-l-carnitine. Western blot analysis revealed that OCTN2, a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent carnitine transporter, was present in placental BBM but not in isolated basal plasma membrane vesicles. The reported properties of OCTN2 resemble those observed for l-carnitine uptake in placental BBM vesicles, suggesting that OCTN2 may mediate most maternofetal carnitine transport in humans.

  14. Protein kinase C restricts transport of carnitine by amino acid transporter ATB(0,+) apically localized in the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Michalec, Katarzyna; Mysiorek, Caroline; Kuntz, Mélanie; Bérézowski, Vincent; Szczepankiewicz, Andrzej A; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M; Cecchelli, Roméo; Nałęcz, Katarzyna A

    2014-07-15

    Carnitine (3-hydroxy-4-trimethylammoniobutyrate) is necessary for transfer of fatty acids through the inner mitochondrial membrane. Carnitine, not synthesized in the brain, is delivered there through the strongly polarized blood-brain barrier (BBB). Expression and presence of two carnitine transporters - organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN2) and amino acid transporter B(0,+) (ATB(0,+)) have been demonstrated previously in an in vitro model of the BBB. Due to potential protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites within ATB(0,+) sequence, the present study verified effects of this kinase on transporter function and localization in the BBB. ATB(0,+) can be regulated by estrogen receptor α and up-regulated in vitro, therefore its presence in vivo was verified with the transmission electron microscopy. The analyses of brain slices demonstrated ATB(0,+) luminal localization in brain capillaries, confirmed by biotinylation experiments in an in vitro model of the BBB. Brain capillary endothelial cells were shown to control carnitine gradient. ATB(0,+) was phosphorylated by PKC, what correlated with inhibition of carnitine transport. PKC activation did not change the amount of ATB(0,+) present in the apical membrane of brain endothelial cells, but resulted in transporter exclusion from raft microdomains. ATB(0,+) inactivation by a lateral movement in plasma membrane after transporter phosphorylation has been postulated.

  15. Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency with severe hypoglycemia and auriculo ventricular block. Translocase assay in permeabilized fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, S V; Brivet, M; Slama, A; Demaugre, F; Aufrant, C; Saudubray, J M

    1993-01-01

    Deficiency of the enzymes of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and related carnitine dependent steps have been shown to be one of the causes of the fasting-induced hypoketotic hypoglycemia. We describe here carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency in a neonate who died eight days after birth. The proband showed severe fasting-induced hypoketotic hypoglycemia, high plasma creatine kinase, heartbeat disorder, hypothermia, and hyperammonemia. The plasma-free carnitine on day three was only 3 microM, and 92% of the total carnitine (37 microM) was present as acylcarnitine. Treatments with intravenous glucose, carnitine, and medium-chain triglycerides had been tried without improvements. Measurements in fibroblasts confirmed deficient oxidation of palmitate and showed normal activities of the carnitine palmitoyltransferases I and II and of the three acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. A total deficiency of the carnitine-acyl-carnitine translocase was found in fibroblasts using the carnitine acetylation assay (1986. Biochem. J. 236:143-148). This assay has been further simplified by seeking conditions permitting application to permeabilized fibroblasts and lymphocytes. Images PMID:8450053

  16. Effects of exercise on L-carnitine and lipid metabolism in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) fed different dietary L-carnitine and lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Ozorio, Rodrigo O A; Van Ginneken, Vincent J T; Bessa, Rui J B; Verstegen, Martin W A; Verreth, Johan A J; Huisman, Elbertus A

    2010-04-01

    African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) were fed four isonitrogenous diets (34 % crude protein), each containing one of two lipid (100 or 180 g/kg) and two L-carnitine (15 or 1000 mg/kg) levels. After 81 d of feeding, thirty-two fish (body weight 32 g) from each dietary group were randomly selected, sixteen fish were induced to a 3-h swim (speed of 1.5 body length (BL)/s), while the other sixteen fish were kept under resting condition. Fish fed 1000 mg L-carnitine accumulated 3.5 and 5 times more L-carnitine in plasma and muscle, respectively, than fish fed the 15 mg L-carnitine. Muscle L-carnitine content was significantly lower in exercised fish than in rested fish. High dietary lipid level (fish oil) led to an increase in muscle n-3 PUFA content and a decrease in SFA and MUFA content. In liver, the increase in dietary lipid level resulted in an increased levels of both n-6 and n-3 PUFA. L-carnitine supplementation significantly decreased n-3 PUFA content. Exercise decreased n-3 PUFA in both muscle and liver. Plasma lactate and lactate dehydrogenase, normally associated with increased glycolytic processes, were positively correlated with exercise and inversely correlated with dietary L-carnitine level. L-carnitine supplementation reduced significantly the RQ from 0.72 to 0.63, and an interaction between dietary L-carnitine and lipid was observed (P < 0.03). Our results indicate that an increase in fatty acids (FA) intake may promote FA oxidation, and both carnitine and exercise might influence the regulation of FA oxidation selectivity.

  17. Unique plasma metabolomic signatures of individuals with inherited disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blood and urine acylcarnitine profiles are commonly used to diagnose long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAOD: i.e., long-chain hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [LCHAD] and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 [CPT2] deficiency), but the global metabolic impact of long-chain FAOD has not been repor...

  18. Cardiac conduction improvement in two heterozygotes for primary carnitine deficiency on L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Sarafoglou, K; Tridgell, A H C; Bentler, K; Redlinger-Grosse, K; Berry, S A; Schimmenti, L A

    2010-08-01

    Expanded newborn screening (NBS) for free carnitine levels has led to the identification of a larger number of heterozygous infants of undiagnosed mothers affected with systemic primary carnitine deficiency (PCD), which in turn leads to the identification of other undiagnosed heterozygous family members. There is an increasing recognition that individuals heterozygous for mutations of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) may become symptomatic under environmental stress (fasting, prolonged exercise and illness). Considering the importance of carnitine in FAO, its role in heart and bowel function and in lipid metabolism, what is still little known is the phenotypic variability, biochemical parameters and clinical course of PCD heterozygotes with consistently low-to-normal levels to low levels of carnitine over a lifetime. We report on three generations of a family--an asymptomatic PCD heterozygous infant identified through NBS that led to the diagnosis of her asymptomatic PCD-affected mother and the heterozygous status of the maternal grandparents who report some cardiac symptoms that overlap with PCD that improved with L-carnitine supplementation.

  19. [6]-Gingerol inhibits de novo fatty acid synthesis and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity which triggers apoptosis in HepG2

    PubMed Central

    Impheng, Hathaichanok; Richert, Lysiane; Pekthong, Dumrongsak; Scholfield, C Norman; Pongcharoen, Sutatip; Pungpetchara, Ittipon; Srisawang, Piyarat

    2015-01-01

    The de novo fatty acid synthesis catalyzed by key lipogenic enzymes, including fatty acid synthase (FASN) has emerged as one of the novel targets of anti-cancer approaches. The present study explored the possible inhibitory efficacy of [6]-gingerol on de novo fatty acid synthesis associated with mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic induction in HepG2 cells. We observed a dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential accompanied by a reduction of fatty acid levels. [6]-gingerol administration manifested inhibition of FASN expression, indicating FASN is a major target of [6]-gingerol inducing apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Indeed, we found that increased ROS generation could likely be a mediator of the anti-cancer effect of [6]-gingerol. A reduction of fatty acid levels and induction of apoptosis were restored by inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) activity, suggesting an accumulation of malonyl-CoA level could be the major cause of apoptotic induction of [6]-gingerol in HepG2 cells. The present study also showed that depletion of fatty acid following [6]-gingerol treatment caused an inhibitory effect on carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity (CPT-1), whereas C75 augmented CPT-1 activity, indicating that [6]-gingerol exhibits the therapeutic benefit on suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. PMID:26101700

  20. Synthesis, purification, and time-dependent disposition studies of 9- or 10-mono-iodostearic acid and 9- and 10-mono-iodostearyl carnitine

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential use of radiolabeled 9- or 10-mono-iodostearyl carnitine as a perfusion and metabolic imaging agent for the heart. Radiochemical purity was achieved and determined by the use of silica gel and/or anion exchange resin chromatography. Radiochemical yields of 45-63 and 4% were obtained for the fatty acid and carnitine ester, respectively. Male albino mice were sacrificed at 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 50 minutes post-injection with either /sup 125/I 9- or 10-mono-iodostearic acid or 9- or 10-mono-iodostearyl (-) carnitine. The lungs, liver heart, kidney, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, stomach, thyroid, blood, fat, and skeletal muscle tissue were excised and assayed for levels of radioactivity in a NaI crystal well counter. The very low target-to-nontarget ratios obtained with /sup 125/I 9- or 10-mono-iodostearyl carnitine in mice strongly suggest that radioiodinated 9- or 10-mono-iodostearyl carnitine is not suitable for use as a myocardial imaging agent. However, radioiodinated 9- or 10-mono-iodostearic acid showed promise as a myocardial imaging agent and may warrant further investigation.

  1. The adverse effects of long-term l-carnitine supplementation on liver and kidney function in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zhang, D-M; Wang, M-X; Fan, C-Y; Zhou, F; Wang, S-J; Kong, L-D

    2015-11-01

    Levo-Carnitine (l-carnitine) is widely used in health and food. This study was to focus on the adverse effects of 8-week oral supplementation of l-carnitine (0.3 and 0.6 g/kg) in female and male Sprague Dawley rats. l-carnitine reduced body and fat weights, as well as serum, liver, and kidney lipid levels in rats. Simultaneously, hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation and lipid synthesis were disturbed in l-carnitine-fed rats. Moreover, l-carnitine accelerated reactive oxygen species production in serum and liver, thereby triggering hepatic NOD-like receptor 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation to elevate serum interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 levels in rats. Alteration of serum alkaline phosphatase levels further confirmed liver dysfunction in l-carnitine-fed rats. Additionally, l-carnitine may potentially disturb kidney function by altering renal protein levels of rat organic ion transporters. These observations may provide the caution information for the safety of long-term l-carnitine supplementation.

  2. Mechanism of the inhibitory effect of zwitterionic drugs (levofloxacin and grepafloxacin) on carnitine transporter (OCTN2) in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takeshi; Yasuda, Satoru; Osaka, Yuki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Itagaki, Shirou; Iseki, Ken

    2006-11-01

    L-Carnitine plays an important role in lipid metabolism by facilitating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the mitochondrial inner membrane followed by fatty acid beta-oxidation. It is known that L-carnitine exists as a zwitterion and that member of the OCTN family play an important role in its transport. The aims of this study were to characterize L-carnitine transport in the intestine by using Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the effects of levofloxacin (LVFX) and grepafloxacin (GPFX), which are zwitterionic drugs, on L-carnitine uptake. Kinetic analysis showed that the half-saturation Na+ concentration, Hill coefficient and Km value of L-carnitine uptake in Caco-2 cells were 10.3 +/- 4.5 mM, 1.09 and 8.0 +/- 1.0 microM, respectively, suggesting that OCTN2 mainly transports L-carnitine. LVFX and GPFX have two pKa values and the existence ratio of their zwitterionic forms is higher under a neutral condition than under an acidic condition. Experiments on the inhibitory effect of LVFX and GPFX on L-carnitine uptake showed that LVFX and GPFX inhibited L-carnitine uptake more strongly at pH 7.4 than at pH 5.5. It was concluded that the zwitterionic form of drugs plays an important role in inhibition of OCTN2 function.

  3. Acetyl-L-carnitine rescues scopolamine-induced memory deficits by restoring insulin-like growth factor II via decreasing p53 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Liang-Ping; Tang, Hui; Shan, Wan-Ying; Wang, Xiong; Liu, Dan; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Tian, Qing; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the cholinergic neurons loss and impairments of learning and memory. Scopolamine is common used to imitate AD pathological features and also causes an obvious oxidative stress. In this study, we found that intraperitoneal administration of supplementary acetyl-L-carnitine partially reverses the learning and memory defects induced by scopolamine. We also found that acetyl-L-carnitine reverses the impairment of long-term potentiation, dendritic abnormalities, and the impaired recruitment of synaptic protein. The beneficial effects of acetyl-L-carnitine may occur through amelioration of oxidative stress because it effectively decreases the levels of oxidative products and increases the activity of superoxide dismutase; this leads to a recovery in the suppressed activity of p53 caused oxidative stimuli, which in turn restores levels of insulin-like growth factor II, an important hormone for learning and memory. Our study provides the first evidence of the potential utility of acetyl-L-carnitine in treating the synaptic disorders prevalent in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'.

  4. Skeletal muscle carnitine loading increases energy expenditure, modulates fuel metabolism gene networks and prevents body fat accumulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Francis B; Wall, Benjamin T; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Shannon, Chris E; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Macdonald, Ian A; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Twelve weeks of daily l-carnitine and carbohydrate feeding in humans increases skeletal muscle total carnitine content, and prevents body mass accrual associated with carbohydrate feeding alone. Here we determined the influence of l-carnitine and carbohydrate feeding on energy metabolism, body fat mass and muscle expression of fuel metabolism genes. Twelve males exercised at 50% maximal oxygen consumption for 30 min once before and once after 12 weeks of twice daily feeding of 80 g carbohydrate (Control, n= 6) or 1.36 g l-carnitine + 80 g carbohydrate (Carnitine, n= 6). Maximal carnitine palmitolytransferase 1 (CPT1) activity remained similar in both groups over 12 weeks. However, whereas muscle total carnitine, long-chain acyl-CoA and whole-body energy expenditure did not change over 12 weeks in Control, they increased in Carnitine by 20%, 200% and 6%, respectively (P < 0.05). Moreover, body mass and whole-body fat mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) increased over 12 weeks in Control by 1.9 and 1.8 kg, respectively (P < 0.05), but did not change in Carnitine. Seventy-three of 187 genes relating to fuel metabolism were upregulated in Carnitine vs. Control after 12 weeks, with ‘insulin signalling’, ‘peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signalling’ and ‘fatty acid metabolism’ as the three most enriched pathways in gene functional analysis. In conclusion, increasing muscle total carnitine in healthy humans can modulate muscle metabolism, energy expenditure and body composition over a prolonged period, which is entirely consistent with a carnitine-mediated increase in muscle long-chain acyl-group translocation via CPT1. Implications to health warrant further investigation, particularly in obese individuals who have a reduced reliance on muscle fat oxidation during low-intensity exercise. PMID:23818692

  5. Plasma carnitine concentrations in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Nakamura, Katsutoshi; Miyoshi, Yutaka; Sakai, Akira

    2004-02-01

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for fatty acid (FA) metabolism, the predominant source of ATP in the normal aerobic heart. During myocardial ischemia, FA metabolism is impaired and tissue carnitine levels are depleted. Since the heart cannot synthesize carnitine, plasma carnitine could play an important role in maintaining myocardial carnitine levels during reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of abnormal plasma carnitine concentrations in open heart surgery. Blood samples were obtained from eleven patients before, immediately after, and two hours after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Total and free carnitine levels were significantly reduced immediately after CPB (p<0.01) and remained depressed until two hours after CPB (p<0.01 vs. pre CPB), while acyl carnitine levels were unchanged over the course of this study. These depressed free carnitine levels might affect cardiac metabolism in the heart after open heart surgery. Carnitine supplement might be a useful adjunct in the therapy after open heart surgery.

  6. Dynamic monitoring of plasma amino acids and carnitine during chemotherapy of patients with alimentary canal malignancies and its clinical value

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jiaqi; Wang, Zhenghua; Wang, Qingjun; Li, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to observe the plasma amino acid and carnitine characteristics in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal malignancies during chemotherapy and to identify markers for the early diagnosis and evaluation of adverse reactions and prognosis of the digestive tract malignant tumor patients. Methods Blood samples of 30 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal malignancies were collected at four time points: before chemotherapy, the first day after chemotherapy (+1 day), bone marrow depression period (+14 days), and hematopoietic recovery period (+21 days). The plasma amino acids and carnitine from those 30 patients were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. Simultaneously, the levels of 21 amino acids were detected in 30 healthy individuals, who were considered as control. Biochemical indexes were also detected at four time points, adverse reactions were recorded during the chemotherapy process, and patients were followed up for 1 year to observe time to progression (TTP) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results Compared to healthy people in the control group, patients with malignancies showed significantly increased levels of plasma amino acids such as Arg, Asp, Cit, Gly, Orn, Tyr, Val, and carnitine (such as C2). The levels of compounds such as C3, Asn, Leu, Lys, Pip, Pro, C0, C5:1 decreased significantly before chemotherapy. The levels of Cit, Cys, Lys, Pro, Tyr, Val, C0, and C2 decreased significantly on the second day of chemotherapy (+1 day), whereas the level of C3 increased significantly. During myelosuppression (+14 days), the levels of Asp, Cit, Met, and Orn were observed to still decrease significantly, whereas the level of Val appeared to increase significantly. The levels of Asp, Glu, and Met were clearly different among patients with gastric carcinoma, rectal cancer, and colon cancer. Compared to the control group, aspartate amino transferase and alanine

  7. Moderate severity heart failure does not involve a downregulation of myocardial fatty acid oxidation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    pyruvate oxi- dation (and hence glucose and lactate oxidation) was not affected by HF. We did not observe any difference in the activity of carnitine ...transplantation. A similar downregulation of FAO enzymes [MCAD and carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT-I)] accompanied by enhanced glucose oxidation...pyruvate, which is converted to [1-14C]acetylcarnitine in the presence of excess L- carnitine and carnitine acetyltransferase. The positively charged prod

  8. [Effects of L-carnitine in poultry].

    PubMed

    Leibetseder, J

    1995-01-01

    Because of the well established function of carnitine possible effects of carnitine were studied in poultry. In trial I it was investigated if carnitine and its precursors (lysine, methionine) reduce the formation of abdominal fat in broilers. Chickens (10 groups of 10 chickens each) were fed different diets (control, lysine and methionine in excess and deficient, respectively, with or without 5% fat supplement, L-carnitine and DL-carnitine supplement, respectively). Performance (body weight gain, feed conversion), amount of abdominal fat and carnitine concentration in blood, muscles (M. sartorius, M. pectoralis superficialis, cardiac), liver and kidney were determined. Performance and abdominal fat were influenced by dietary fat, lysine and methionine as expected and were not altered by carnitine. Excess and deficiency of lysine and methionine did not influence, fat supplement reduced and carnitine supplementation significantly increased tissue concentration of carnitine. In trial II it was studied if supplementation of a commercial layers' ration with either 500 mg L-carnitine or 500 mg nicotinic acid or both per kg reduces the cholesterol concentration in yolk. Influence on body weight, feed intake, laying performance, serum and yolk cholesterol concentration could not be observed, but yolk concentration of carnitine was significantly increased in supplemented groups. Trial III should clarify if the L-carnitine content in broiler parent stock ration influences hatchability. Four groups of 1350 hens each were fed a commercial all-mash supplemented with 0, 20, 50 and 100 mg L-carnitine, respectively. Hatching rate was increased from 83% to 87% and from 82.4% to 85.3% in groups supplemented with 50 and 100 mg L-carnitine, respectively, and in randomly sampled eggs of these groups carnitine concentration in yolk was higher.

  9. Combined R-alpha-lipoic acid and acetyl-L-carnitine exerts efficient preventative effects in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Jia, Haiqun; Liu, Jianghai; Ao, Ni; Yan, Bing; Shen, Weili; Wang, Xuemin; Li, Xin; Luo, Cheng; Liu, Jiankang

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage are highly involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Some mitochondrial antioxidants/nutrients that can improve mitochondrial function and/or attenuate oxidative damage have been implicated in PD therapy. However, few studies have evaluated the preventative effects of a combination of mitochondrial antioxidants/nutrients against PD, and even fewer have sought to optimize the doses of the combined agents. The present study examined the preventative effects of two mitochondrial antioxidant/nutrients, R-alpha-lipoic acid (LA) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), in a chronic rotenone-induced cellular model of PD. We demonstrated that 4-week pretreatment with LA and/or ALC effectively protected SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells against rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage and accumulation of alpha-synuclein and ubiquitin. Most notably, we found that when combined, LA and ALC worked at 100-1000-fold lower concentrations than they did individually. We also found that pretreatment with combined LA and ALC increased mitochondrial biogenesis and decreased production of reactive oxygen species through the up-regulation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha as a possible underlying mechanism. This study provides important evidence that combining mitochondrial antioxidant/nutrients at optimal doses might be an effective and safe prevention strategy for PD.

  10. Functional activity of L-carnitine transporters in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ingoglia, Filippo; Visigalli, Rossana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Barilli, Amelia; Riccardi, Benedetta; Puccini, Paola; Dall'Asta, Valeria

    2016-02-01

    Carnitine plays a physiologically important role in the β-oxidation of fatty acids, facilitating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Distribution of carnitine within the body tissues is mainly performed by novel organic cation transporter (OCTN) family, including the isoforms OCTN1 (SLC22A4) and OCTN2 (SLC22A5) expressed in human. We performed here a characterization of carnitine transport in human airway epithelial cells A549, Calu-3, NCl-H441, and BEAS-2B, by means of an integrated approach combining data of mRNA/protein expression with the kinetic and inhibition analyses of L-[(3)H]carnitine transport. Carnitine uptake was strictly Na(+)-dependent in all cell models. In A549 and BEAS-2B cells, carnitine uptake was mediated by one high-affinity component (Km<2 μM) identifiable with OCTN2. In both these cell models, indeed, carnitine uptake was maximally inhibited by betaine and strongly reduced by SLC22A5/OCTN2 silencing. Conversely, Calu-3 and NCl-H441 exhibited both a high (Km~20 μM) and a low affinity (Km>1 mM) transport component. While the high affinity component is identifiable with OCTN2, the low affinity uptake is mediated by ATB(0,+), a Na(+), and Cl(-)-coupled transport system for neutral and cationic amino acids, as demonstrated by the inhibition by leucine and arginine, as well as by SLC6A14/ATB(0,+) silencing. The presence of this transporter leads to a massive accumulation of carnitine inside the cells and may be of peculiar relevance in pathologic conditions of carnitine deficiency, such as those associated to OCTN2 defects.

  11. Pregnancy increases urinary loss of carnitine and reduces plasma carnitine in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Woon; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2005-05-01

    This study compared plasma and urinary carnitine concentrations in pregnant and non-pregnant Korean women. The subjects were fifty pregnant women and thirty non-pregnant women aged 24-28 years. During the first trimester, dietary carnitine intakes in the pregnant women were much lower than in non-pregnant women (70.00 (SD 29.22) micromol/d), but over the course of pregnancy carnitine intake increased from 44.64 (SD 24.84) micromol/d during the first trimester to 96.11 (SD 36.56) micromol/d during the third trimester. Pregnant women had a significantly lower plasma carnitine concentration than non-pregnant women. Plasma concentrations of non-esterified carnitine, acid-soluble acylcarnitine and total carnitine were significantly lower during the second and third trimesters than the first. Plasma acid-insoluble acylcarnitine levels, which tended to be higher in the non-pregnant women compared with the pregnant women, increased significantly as gestation proceeded. The urinary excretion of non-esterified carnitine, acid-soluble acylcarnitine and total carnitine was significantly higher in the pregnant women during the first and second trimesters than in non-pregnant women and decreased significantly as gestation proceeded. We found that there was a significant decrease in plasma carnitine level even though dietary carnitine intake increased as gestation proceeded. The low urinary excretion of carnitine in late pregnancy may be caused by an increased demand during pregnancy.

  12. OCTN3 is a mammalian peroxisomal membrane carnitine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Tilups, Aina; Edwards, Vernon D.; Wanders, Ronald J.; Tein, Ingrid . E-mail: ingrid.tein@sickkids.ca

    2005-12-30

    Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the {beta}-oxidation of fatty acids. The role of the carnitine system is to maintain homeostasis in the acyl-CoA pools of the cell, keeping the acyl-CoA/CoA pool constant even under conditions of very high acyl-CoA turnover, thereby providing cells with a critical source of free CoA. Carnitine derivatives can be moved across intracellular barriers providing a shuttle mechanism between mitochondria, peroxisomes, and microsomes. We now demonstrate expression and colocalization of mOctn3, the intermediate-affinity carnitine transporter (K {sub m} 20 {mu}M), and catalase in murine liver peroxisomes by TEM using immunogold labelled anti-mOctn3 and anti-catalase antibodies. We further demonstrate expression of hOCTN3 in control human cultured skin fibroblasts both by Western blotting and immunostaining analysis using our specific anti-mOctn3 antibody. In contrast with two peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, we show reduced expression of hOCTN3 in human PEX 1 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes is impaired but the biosynthesis of peroxisomal membrane proteins is normal, versus a complete absence of hOCTN3 in human PEX 19 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which both the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes as well as peroxisomal membranes are deficient. This supports the localization of hOCTN3 to the peroxisomal membrane. Given the impermeability of the peroxisomal membrane and the key role of carnitine in the transport of different chain-shortened products out of peroxisomes, there appears to be a critical need for the intermediate-affinity carnitine/organic cation transporter, OCTN3, on peroxisomal membranes now shown to be expressed in both human and murine peroxisomes. This Octn3 localization is in keeping with the essential role of carnitine in peroxisomal lipid metabolism.

  13. Deficiency of Carnitine in Cachectic Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rudman, Daniel; Sewell, Charles W.; Ansley, Joseph D.

    1977-01-01

    Carnitine is synthesized from lysine and methionine. In the rat, inadequate intake of either of these essential amino acids causes carnitine depletion. Inasmuch as protein deficiency is common in the hospital population, we have investigated the possible occurrence of nosocomial carnitine deficiency. Fasting serum carnitine concentration was measured in 16 normal and 247 patients in 16 disease groups. Normal range of carnitine was 55-103 μM. Only the cirrhotic group showed significant (P < 0.05) hypocarnitinemia. 14 of 36 hospitalized cirrhotics had subnormal values for serum carnitine. The creatinine/height index, midarm muscle circumference, and triceps skin-fold thickness indicated protein-calorie starvation in the 14 hypocarnitinemic liver patients. In six of the hypocarnitinemic cirrhotics (average serum level 50% of normal), spontaneous dietary intakes of carnitine, lysine, and methionine were measured and found to be only 5-15% as great as in six normocarnitinemic, healthy controls. When these six cirrhotic and six normal subjects were given the same lysine-rich, methionine-rich, and carnitine-free nutritional intake, the normals maintained normal serum carnitine levels and excreted 100 μmol/day, whereas the cirrhotics' serum level fell to 25% of normal, and urinary excretion declined to 15 μmol/day. Seven hypocarnitinemic cirrhotics died. Postmortem concentrations of carnitine in liver, muscle, heart, kidney, and brain averaged only one-fourth to one-third those in corresponding tissues of eight normally nourished nonhepatic patients who died after an acute illness of a 1-3-day duration. These data show that carnitine depletion is common in patients hospitalized for advanced cirrhosis, and that it results from three factors: substandard intake of dietary carnitine; substandard intake of lysine and methionine, the precursors for endogenous carnitine synthesis; and loss of capacity to synthesize carnitine from lysine and methionine. PMID:893675

  14. The protective role of l-carnitine against cylindrospermopsin-induced oxidative stress in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Guillén, R; Prieto, A I; Vázquez, C M; Vasconcelos, V; Cameán, A M

    2013-05-15

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is one of the most important cyanotoxins in terms of both human health and environmental quality and is produced by several different species of cyanobacteria, including Aphanizomenon ovalisporum. The principal mechanisms of action of CYN involve inhibition of protein and glutathione synthesis. In addition, CYN-mediated genotoxicity results from DNA fragmentation. The results of both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that oxidative stress also plays a significant role in CYN pathogenesis in fish. We investigated the protective effects of l-carnitine (LC) pre-treatment on A. ovalisporum-induced oxidative stress in cells containing CYN and deoxy-CYN, or pure standard CYN, in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) that had been acutely exposed via oral administration. Various oxidative stress markers, including lipid peroxidation (LPO), protein oxidation, DNA oxidation, and the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidised glutathione (GSH/GSSG), and the activities of NADPH oxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and gamma-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), were evaluated in the livers and kidneys of fish in the absence and presence of 400 or 880mgLC/kgfish/day during a 21 day period prior to CYN-intoxication. The results of our study demonstrated for the first time the beneficial antioxidant effects of LC dietary supplementation on oxidative stress status in fish. No pro-oxidant effects were detected at any of the LC doses assayed, suggesting that LC is a chemoprotectant that reduces hepatic and renal oxidative stress and may be effective when used for the prophylaxis and treatment of CYN-related intoxication in fish.

  15. Effect of inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis on male rat sexual performance.

    PubMed

    Dambrova, Maija; Cirule, Helena; Svalbe, Baiba; Zvejniece, Liga; Pugovichs, Osvalds; Zorenko, Tatjana; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Liepinsh, Edgars; Belozertseva, Irina

    2008-10-20

    l-carnitine has a documented role as a cofactor in cellular energy metabolism and fatty acid beta-oxidation pathways and it has also been considered to function in reproductive biology. We investigated whether decreasing concentrations of L-carnitine using an inhibitor of its biosynthesis, mildronate (3-(2,2,2-trimethylhydrazinium)-propionate), would influence the sexual behavior or sperm quality in male rats. Mildronate treatment induced a significant decrease in carnitine concentration and an increase in gamma-butyrobetaine (GBB) concentration in both plasma and testes extracts. However, the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in testes and testosterone concentration in plasma was not changed in mildronate treated rat. Behavioral experiments demonstrated that mildronate treatment did not decrease the sexual motivation in both sexually naive and sexually experienced rats. The densities of spermatozoa in the cauda epididymis, as well as motility, were unchanged after mildronate treatment at a dose of 100 mg/kg. In conclusion, our study provides experimental evidence that mildronate induces decrease in the free carnitine concentration in rat testes, but does not decrease the sexual activity or sperm quality of male rats.

  16. Specific alkylation of a histidine residue in carnitine acetyltransferase by bromoacetyl-l-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J. F. A.; Tubbs, P. K.

    1970-01-01

    Incubation of carnitine acetyltransferase with low concentrations of bromoacetyl-l-carnitine causes a rapid and irreversible loss of enzyme activity; one mol of inhibitor can inactivate one mol of enzyme. Bromoacetyl-d-carnitine, iodoacetate or iodoacetamide are ineffective. l-Carnitine protects the transferase from bromoacetyl-l-carnitine. Investigation shows that the enzyme first reversibly binds bromoacetyl-l-carnitine with an affinity similar to that shown for the normal substrate acetyl-l-carnitine; this binding is followed by an alkylation reaction, forming the carnitine ester of a monocarboxymethyl-protein, which is catalytically inactive. The carnitine is released at an appreciable rate by spontaneous hydrolysis, and the resulting carboxymethyl-enzyme is also inactive. Total acid hydrolysis of enzyme after treatment with 2-[14C]bromoacetyl-l-carnitine yields N-3-carboxy[14C]methylhistidine as the only labelled amino acid. These findings, taken in conjunction with previous work, suggest that the single active centre of carnitine acetyltransferase contains a histidine residue. PMID:5461620

  17. CARNITINE HOMEOSTASIS, MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION, AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Black, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitines are involved in mitochondrial transport of fatty acids and are of critical importance for maintaining normal mitochondrial function. This review summarizes recent experimental and clinical studies showing that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to a disruption of carnitine homeostasis may play a role in decreased NO signaling and the development of endothelial dysfunction. Future challenges include development of agents that can positively modulate L-carnitine homeostasis which may have high therapeutic potential. PMID:20648231

  18. Serum carnitine as an independent biomarker of malnutrition in patients with impaired oral intake

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Honda, Akira; Miyamoto, Yasunori; Miyazaki, Teruo; Murakami, Masashi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Ikegami, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Jiro; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine is a vitamin-like compound that plays important roles in fatty acid β-oxidation and the control of the mitochondrial coenzyme A/acetyl-CoA ratio. However, carnitine is not added to ordinary enteral nutrition or total parenteral nutrition. In this study, we determined the serum carnitine concentrations in subjects receiving ordinary enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases to compare its levels with those of other nutritional markers. Serum samples obtained from 11 EN and 11 TPN patients and 82 healthy controls were examined. In addition, 10 Crohn’s disease and 10 ulcerative colitis patients with malnutrition who were barely able to ingest an ordinary diet were also evaluated. Carnitine and its derivatives were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The carnitine concentrations in EN and TPN subjects were significantly lower compared with those of the control subjects. Neither the serum albumin nor the total cholesterol level was correlated with the carnitine concentration, although a significant positive correlation was found between the serum albumin and total cholesterol levels. Indeed, patients with CD and UC showed significantly reduced serum albumin and/or total cholesterol levels, but their carnitine concentrations remained normal. In conclusion, only a complete blockade of an ordinary diet, such as EN or TPN, caused a reduction in the serum carnitine concentration. Serum carnitine may be an independent biomarker of malnutrition, and its supplementation is needed in EN and TPN subjects even if their serum albumin and total cholesterol levels are normal. PMID:25411530

  19. Serum carnitine as an independent biomarker of malnutrition in patients with impaired oral intake.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Honda, Akira; Miyamoto, Yasunori; Miyazaki, Teruo; Murakami, Masashi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Ikegami, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Jiro; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2014-11-01

    Carnitine is a vitamin-like compound that plays important roles in fatty acid β-oxidation and the control of the mitochondrial coenzyme A/acetyl-CoA ratio. However, carnitine is not added to ordinary enteral nutrition or total parenteral nutrition. In this study, we determined the serum carnitine concentrations in subjects receiving ordinary enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases to compare its levels with those of other nutritional markers. Serum samples obtained from 11 EN and 11 TPN patients and 82 healthy controls were examined. In addition, 10 Crohn's disease and 10 ulcerative colitis patients with malnutrition who were barely able to ingest an ordinary diet were also evaluated. Carnitine and its derivatives were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The carnitine concentrations in EN and TPN subjects were significantly lower compared with those of the control subjects. Neither the serum albumin nor the total cholesterol level was correlated with the carnitine concentration, although a significant positive correlation was found between the serum albumin and total cholesterol levels. Indeed, patients with CD and UC showed significantly reduced serum albumin and/or total cholesterol levels, but their carnitine concentrations remained normal. In conclusion, only a complete blockade of an ordinary diet, such as EN or TPN, caused a reduction in the serum carnitine concentration. Serum carnitine may be an independent biomarker of malnutrition, and its supplementation is needed in EN and TPN subjects even if their serum albumin and total cholesterol levels are normal.

  20. Tissue-specific changes in fatty acid oxidation in hypoxic heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morash, Andrea J; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murray, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is sufficient to decrease cardiac PCr/ATP and alters skeletal muscle energetics in humans. Cellular mechanisms underlying the different metabolic responses of these tissues and the time-dependent nature of these changes are currently unknown, but altered substrate utilization and mitochondrial function may be a contributory factor. We therefore sought to investigate the effects of acute (1 day) and more sustained (7 days) hypoxia (13% O₂) on the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and its targets in mouse cardiac and skeletal muscle. In the heart, PPARα expression was 40% higher than in normoxia after 1 and 7 days of hypoxia. Activities of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) were 75% and 35% lower, respectively, after 1 day of hypoxia, returning to normoxic levels after 7 days. Oxidative phosphorylation respiration rates using palmitoyl-carnitine followed a similar pattern, while respiration using pyruvate decreased. In skeletal muscle, PPARα expression and CPT I activity were 20% and 65% lower, respectively, after 1 day of hypoxia, remaining at this level after 7 days with no change in HOAD activity. Oxidative phosphorylation respiration rates using palmitoyl-carnitine were lower in skeletal muscle throughout hypoxia, while respiration using pyruvate remained unchanged. The rate of CO₂ production from palmitate oxidation was significantly lower in both tissues throughout hypoxia. Thus cardiac muscle may remain reliant on fatty acids during sustained hypoxia, while skeletal muscle decreases fatty acid oxidation and maintains pyruvate oxidation.

  1. Tissue-specific changes in fatty acid oxidation in hypoxic heart and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kotwica, Aleksandra O.; Murray, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is sufficient to decrease cardiac PCr/ATP and alters skeletal muscle energetics in humans. Cellular mechanisms underlying the different metabolic responses of these tissues and the time-dependent nature of these changes are currently unknown, but altered substrate utilization and mitochondrial function may be a contributory factor. We therefore sought to investigate the effects of acute (1 day) and more sustained (7 days) hypoxia (13% O2) on the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and its targets in mouse cardiac and skeletal muscle. In the heart, PPARα expression was 40% higher than in normoxia after 1 and 7 days of hypoxia. Activities of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) were 75% and 35% lower, respectively, after 1 day of hypoxia, returning to normoxic levels after 7 days. Oxidative phosphorylation respiration rates using palmitoyl-carnitine followed a similar pattern, while respiration using pyruvate decreased. In skeletal muscle, PPARα expression and CPT I activity were 20% and 65% lower, respectively, after 1 day of hypoxia, remaining at this level after 7 days with no change in HOAD activity. Oxidative phosphorylation respiration rates using palmitoyl-carnitine were lower in skeletal muscle throughout hypoxia, while respiration using pyruvate remained unchanged. The rate of CO2 production from palmitate oxidation was significantly lower in both tissues throughout hypoxia. Thus cardiac muscle may remain reliant on fatty acids during sustained hypoxia, while skeletal muscle decreases fatty acid oxidation and maintains pyruvate oxidation. PMID:23785078

  2. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Sirtori, Cesare; Peracino, Andrea; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Borum, Peggy; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential.

  3. Effects of breeder hen age and dietary L-carnitine on progeny embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Peebles, E D; Kidd, M T; McDaniel, C D; Tanksley, J P; Parker, H M; Corzo, A; Woodworth, J C

    2007-06-01

    1. Ross 308 broiler breeder hens were given diets containing 0 or 25 mg L-carnitine/kg (8 replications per treatment) from 21 weeks of age. 2. Hens were inseminated with semen from Ross broiler breeder males. In a common facility, subsequent progeny hatchability and embryonic mortality at 25, 30, 32, and 38 weeks of breeder age were evaluated. 3. Subsequent egg component weights, incubational egg water loss, progeny embryo growth, and embryo, yolk sac and liver composition through 18 d of incubation at 27, 32, and 38 weeks of breeder age were evaluated. 4. Calculated additions of L-carnitine were in agreement with analysed contents of 3.5 and 31.1 mg free L-carnitine/kg of diet, respectively, and total L-carnitine concentrations increased by 48.6, 21.7, and 10.0% in 0-d yolk, 18-d yolk sac, and 18-d liver samples, respectively, due to the addition of dietary L-carnitine. 5. Supplemental L-carnitine resulted in increased (0.6%) relative 0-d egg yolk weight across weeks 27, 32, and 38, and reduced (0.38%) 18-d yolk sac palmitoleic acid concentration at week 27 without altering embryogenesis. 6. In conclusion, dietary L-carnitine (25 mg/kg of the diet) was deposited in the yolks of broiler breeder hens and was subsequently transferred to the embryonic liver via yolk sac absorption through 18 d of incubation. Furthermore, dietary L-carnitine supplementation increased ovarian follicle yolk deposition in 27-, 32-, and 38-week-old breeder hens, and influenced yolk sac fatty acid beta-oxidation in embryos from 27-week-old breeder hens causing yolk sac palmitoleic acid concentrations to be reduced by 18 d of incubation.

  4. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 deficiency: the time-course of blood and urinary acylcarnitine levels during initial L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Tomohiro; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hironori; Teramoto, Takahide; Takayanagi, Masaki; Hasegawa, Yuki; Yasuno, Tetsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Kondo, Naomi

    2010-07-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) deficiency is one of the most common mitochondrial beta-oxidation defects. A female patient with an infantile form of CPT2 deficiency first presented as having a Reye-like syndrome with hypoglycemic convulsions. Oral L-carnitine supplementation was administered since serum free carnitine level was very low (less than 10 micromol/L), indicating secondary carnitine deficiency. Her serum and urinary acylcarnitine profiles were analyzed successively to evaluate time-course effects of L-carnitine supplementation. After the first two days of L-carnitine supplementation, the serum level of free carnitine was elevated; however, the serum levels of acylcarnitines and the urinary excretion of both free carnitine and acylcarnitines remained low. A peak of the serum free carnitine level was detected on day 5, followed by a peak of acetylcarnitine on day 7, and peaks of long-chain acylcarnitines, such as C16, C18, C18:1 and C18:2 carnitines, on day 9. Thereafter free carnitine became predominant again. These peaks of the serum levels corresponded to urinary excretion peaks of free carnitine, acetylcarnitine, and medium-chain dicarboxylic carnitines, respectively. It took several days for oral L-carnitine administration to increase the serum carnitine levels, probably because the intracellular stores were depleted. Thereafter, the administration increased the excretion of abnormal acylcarnitines, some of which had accumulated within the tissues. The excretion of medium-chain dicarboxylic carnitines dramatically decreased on day 13, suggesting improvement of tissue acylcarnitine accumulation. These time-course changes in blood and urinary acylcarnitine levels after L-carnitine supplementation support the effectiveness of L-carnitine supplementation to CPT2-deficient patients.

  5. Does carnitine have a role in fat absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Leichter, J.; Ottem, A.; Hahn, P.

    1987-08-24

    The effect of D-carnitine and tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA), an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase, on intestinal absorption of palmitic acid was determined. The proximal intestinal segment was ligated in adult male rats and filled with 0.5 ..mu..Ci of /sup 14/C-palmitic acid alone or with either D-carnitine or TDGA. Thirty minutes alter the radioactivity was determined in the intestinal lumen, intestinal wall and plasma. The absorption of palmitic acid was decreased in the presence of D-carnitine (10 mg/ml) as evidenced by significantly lower levels of radioactivity in the gut wall and the plasma and by significantly greater residual radioactivity in the lumenal contents. L-carnitine had no effect on plasma radioactivity but if D- and L-carnitine were given together the effect of D-carnitine was still in evidence. TDGA also inhibited intestinal absorption of palmitic acid. 8 references, 2 tables.

  6. Clinical and biochemical monitoring of patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders.

    PubMed

    Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Skovby, Flemming; Vestergaard, Helle; Christensen, Mette; Christensen, Ernst

    2010-10-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for monitoring patients with disorders in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) are lacking, and most protocols are based on expert statements. Here, we describe our protocol for Danish patients. Clinical monitoring is the most important measure and has the main aims of checking growth, development and diet and of bringing families to the clinic regularly to remind them of their child's risk and review how they cope and adjust, e.g. to an acute intercurrent illness. Most of these measures are simple and can be carried out during a routine out-patient visit; we seldom do more complicated assessments by a neuropsychologist, speech therapist, or physical and occupational therapists. Paraclinical measurements are not used for short-chain and medium-chain disorders; electrocardiography (including 24 h monitoring) and echocardiography are done for most patients with long-chain and carnitine transporter deficiencies. Eye examination is done in all, and liver ultrasonography in some patients with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase/tri-functional protein (LCHAD/TFP) deficiencies. Biochemical follow-up includes determination of free carnitine and acylcarnitines. Free carnitine is measured to monitor carnitine supplementation in patients with multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) and carnitine transporter deficiency (CTD) and to follow metabolic control and disclose deficiency states in other FAO disorders. We are evaluating long-chain acylcarnitines in patients with long-chain disorders; so far there does not seem to be any clear-cut benefit in following these levels. An erythrocyte fatty acid profile is done in patients with long-chain disorders to test for essential fatty acid and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) deficiencies. The measurement of creatine kinase is helpful in long-chain disorders. Ongoing follow-up and education of the patient is important throughout life to prevent disease morbidity or death from metabolic crises.

  7. Short-term supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine and lipoic acid alters plasma protein carbonyl levels but does not improve cognition in aged beagles

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Lori-Ann; Opii, Wycliffe O.; Head, Elizabeth; Araujo, Joseph A.; De Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W.; Cotman, Carl W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous work has shown that a diet enriched with antioxidants and mitochondrial co-factors improves cognition in aged dogs, which was accompanied by a reduction oxidative damage in the brain. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of supplementation with mitochondrial co-factors on cognition and plasma protein carbonyl levels in aged dogs. Specifically, we aimed to test whether the individual or combined action of lipoic acid (LA) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) could account for the beneficial effects of the enriched diet that contained both plus antioxidants. Dogs were given LA or ALCAR, alone and then in combination and cognition was assessed using a spatial learning task and two discrimination and reversal paradigms. Dogs receiving the ALCAR supplement showed an increase in protein carbonyl levels that was associated with increased error scores on the spatial task, and which was reduced upon additional supplementation with LA. We did not observe significant positive effects on cognition. The present findings suggest that short-term supplementation with LA and ALCAR is insufficient to improve cognition in aged dogs, and that the beneficial effects of the full spectrum diet arose from either the cellular antioxidants alone or their interaction with LA and ALCAR. PMID:19735717

  8. L-Carnitine moiety assay: an up-to-date reappraisal covering the commonest methods for various applications.

    PubMed

    Marzo, A; Curti, S

    1997-11-21

    L-Carnitine and its esters are typical endogenous substances. Their homeostatic equilibria are effectively controlled by various mechanisms which include rate-limiting enteral absorption, a multicomponent endogenous pool which is regulated according to a mammillary metabolism, an asymmetric body distribution and a saturable tubular reabsorption process leading to renal thresholds. In formal pharmacokinetic and metabolic investigations, the whole L-carnitine pool should be investigated, owing to the rapid interchange process between the various components of the pool. Free L-carnitine, as well as its acyl esters, must therefore be considered from an analytical viewpoint. L-Carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine and total L-carnitine (the latter as an expression of the whole pool) can easily be assayed by enzyme or radioenzyme methods. Propionyl-L-carnitine and other esters containing fatty acids with more than three carbon atoms can be assayed using various HPLC approaches. Tandem mass spectrometry is another excellent approach to the assay of carnitine and its short-chain, medium-chain and long-chain esters. As L-carnitine contains a chiral carbon atom, the enantioselectivity of the assays is also considered in this review. Metabolites produced by enteral bacteria, namely tri-, di- and mono-methylamine, gamma-butyrobetaine, along with other systemic metabolites, namely trimethylamine N-oxide and N-nitroso dimethylamine, are very important in quantitative and toxicokinetic terms and require specific assay methods. This review covers the commonest methods of assaying carnitine and its esters, their impurities and pre-systemic and systemic metabolites and gives analytical details and information on their applications in pharmaceutics, biochemistry, pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics.

  9. Quantification of total and free carnitine in human plasma by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sowell, John; Fuqua, Megan; Wood, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Carnitine is an endogenous quaternary amine whose primary function is to shuttle long chain fatty acids to the mitochondrial matrix, where they subsequently undergo beta oxidation. Accurate quantification of total and free carnitine is essential for the accurate diagnosis of a number of inborn errors of metabolism, including disorders of fatty acid oxidation as well as various organic acidurias. Early methods for carnitine measurement were enzyme based. Recently, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has become the method of choice for carnitine measurement. Typically, carnitine is derivitized to from a butyl ester, thus improving its ionization and retention characteristics. A potential problem with this approach is that the acidic conditions used to carry out the reaction may hydrolyze other acyl esters, resulting in ex-vivo artifacts. Consequently, we developed a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HILIC) tandem mass spectrometry method for the quantification of carnitine. The use of HILIC allows for the derivitization step to be circumvented, while still allowing for favorable chromatographic performance. The method was shown to be accurate, precise, and robust.

  10. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gahl, W.A.; Bernardini, I.; Dalakas, M.; Rizzo, W.B.; Harper, G.S.; Hoeg, J.M.; Hurko, O.; Bernar, J.

    1988-02-01

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-(/sup 3/H)carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cystinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: primary carnitine deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... bring certain types of fats (fatty acids) into mitochondria , which are the energy-producing centers within cells. ... within cells. Without carnitine, fatty acids cannot enter mitochondria and be used to make energy. Reduced energy ...

  12. Altered carnitine transport in pressure-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.; Reibel, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously observed reduced carnitine levels in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for reduced myocardial carnitine content, carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Hearts were excised from sham-operated and aortic-constricted rats 3 weeks following surgery and perfused at 60 mm Hg aortic pressure with buffer containing various concentrations of L-/sup 14/C-carnitine. Carnitine uptake by control and hypertrophied hearts was linear throughout 30 minutes of perfusion with 40 ..mu..M carnitine. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by 25% in hypertrophied hearts at each time point examined. The reduction in uptake by hypertrophied hearts was also evident when hearts were perfused with 100 or 200 ..mu..M carnitine. When 0.05 mM mersalyl acid was included in the buffer to inhibit the carrier-mediated component of transport, no difference in carnitine uptake was observed indicating that the transport of carnitine by diffusion was unaltered in the hypertrophied myocardium. Carrier-mediated carnitine uptake (total uptake - uptake by diffusion) was significantly reduced by approximately 40% in hypertrophied hearts at all concentrations examined. Thus, the reduction in carnitine content in the pressure-overload hypertrophied rat heart appears to be due to a reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake by the heart.

  13. Acetyl-l-carnitine partially prevents benzene-induced hematotoxicity and oxidative stress in C3H/He mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongli; Zhang, Juan; Wei, Haiyan; Meng, Xing; Ding, Qin; Sun, Fengxia; Cao, Meng; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2017-02-13

    Benzene is an environmental pollutant and occupational toxicant which induces hematotoxicity. Our previous metabonomics study suggested that acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) decreased in the mouse plasma and bone marrow (BM) cells due to benzene exposure. In the present study, the topic on whether ALCAR influences hematotoxicity caused by benzene exposure was explored. Thirty-two male C3H/He mice were divided into four groups: control group (C: vehicle, oil), benzene group (150mg/kg body weight (b.w.) benzene), benzene+A1 group (150mg/kg b.w. benzene+100mg/kg b.w. ALCAR), and benzene+A2 group (150mg/kg b.w. benzene+200mg/kg b.w. ALCAR). Benzene was injected subcutaneously, and ALCAR was orally administrated via gavage once daily for 4 weeks consecutively. After the experimental period, the blood routine, BM cell number and frequency of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HS/PC) were assessed. The mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP level were determined to evaluate the mitochondrial function. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also examined, and the comet assay was performed to measure oxidative stress. Results showed that ALCAR intervention can partially reduce the benzene-induced damage on BM and HS/PCs and can simultaneously alleviate the DNA damage by reducing benzene-induced H2O2, ROS, and MDA.

  14. Intramitochondrial control of the oxidation of hexadecanoate in skeletal muscle. A study of the acyl-CoA esters which accumulate during rat skeletal-muscle mitochondrial beta-oxidation of [U-14C]hexadecanoate and [U-14C]hexadecanoyl-carnitine.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, S; Bhuiyan, A K; Kler, R S; Turnbull, D M; Bartlett, K

    1993-01-01

    1. We describe the acyl-CoA and acyl-carnitine esters which arise from the incubation of well-coupled State 3 rat skeletal-muscle mitochondrial fractions with [U-14C]hexadecanoate and [U-14C]hexadecanoyl-carnitine. 2. Acyl-CoA ester intermediates of chain length 16, 14, 12, 10 and 8 carbons were detected. 3. Although incubations were in steady state in respect of oxygen consumption, 14CO2 production and generation of acid-soluble radioactivity, quantitative analysis of acyl-CoA esters showed that steady state was not achieved in respect of all intermediates. 4. 3-Hydroxyacyl- and 2-enoyl-CoA and -carnitine esters were found under normoxic conditions. 5. Direct measurement of NAD+ and NADH shows that under identical incubation conditions our observations cannot be explained by gross perturbation of the [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio. 6. We hypothesize that there is a small pool of rapidly recycling NAD+ channelled between complex I of the respiratory chain and the newly described mitochondrial-inner-membrane-associated beta-oxidation trifunctional enzyme [Uchida, Izai, Orii and Hashimoto (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 1034-1041]. PMID:8424753

  15. Acetyl-L-carnitine supplementation reverses the age-related decline in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity in interfibrillar mitochondria without changing the L-carnitine content in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Luis A; Heath, Shi-Hua D; Hagen, Tory M

    2012-01-01

    The aging heart displays a loss of bioenergetic reserve capacity partially mediated through lower fatty acid utilization. We investigated whether the age-related impairment of cardiac fatty acid catabolism occurs, at least partially, through diminished levels of L-carnitine, which would adversely affect carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acyl-CoA uptake into mitochondria for β-oxidation. Old (24-28 mos) Fischer 344 rats were fed±acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR; 1.5% [w/v]) for up to four weeks prior to sacrifice and isolation of cardiac interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria. IFM displayed a 28% (p<0.05) age-related loss of CPT1 activity, which correlated with a decline (41%, p<0.05) in palmitoyl-CoA-driven state 3 respiration. Interestingly, SSM had preserved enzyme function and efficiently utilized palmitate. Analysis of IFM CPT1 kinetics showed both diminished V(max) and K(m) (60% and 49% respectively, p<0.05) when palmitoyl-CoA was the substrate. However, no age-related changes in enzyme kinetics were evident with respect to L-carnitine. ALCAR supplementation restored CPT1 activity in heart IFM, but not apparently through remediation of L-carnitine levels. Rather, ALCAR influenced enzyme activity over time, potentially by modulating conditions in the aging heart that ultimately affect palmitoyl-CoA binding and CPT1 kinetics.

  16. Effect of L-Carnitine Supplementation on Reverse Remodeling in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    da Silva Guimarães, Sheila; de Souza Cruz, Wanise; da Silva, Licinio; Maciel, Gabrielle; Huguenin, Ana Beatriz; de Carvalho, Monicque; Costa, Bárbara; da Silva, Geisiane; da Costa, Carlos; D'Ippolito, João Alvaro; Colafranceschi, Alexandre; Scalco, Fernanda; Boaventura, Gilson

    2017-03-25

    During cardiac failure, cardiomyocytes have difficulty in using the substrates to produce energy. L-carnitine is a necessary nutrient for the transport of fatty acids that are required for generating energy. Coronary artery graft surgery reduces the plasma levels of L-carnitine and increases the oxidative stress. This study demonstrates the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on the reverse remodeling of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Patients with ischemic heart failure who underwent coronary graft surgery were randomized to group A - supplemented with L-carnitine or group B controls. Left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters were assessed preoperatively, 60 and 180 days after surgery. Our study included 28 patients (26 [93.0%] males) with a mean age ± SD of 58.1 ± 10.5 years. The parameters for the evaluation of reverse remodeling did not improve after 60 and 180 days of coronary artery bypass grafting in comparison between groups (p > 0.05). Evaluation within the L-carnitine group showed a 37.1% increase in left ventricle ejection fraction (p = 0.002) and 14.3% (p = 0.006) and 3.3% (p > 0.05) reduction in systolic and diastolic diameters, respectively. L-carnitine supplementation at a dose of 50 mg/kg combined with artery bypass surgery did not demonstrate any additional benefit in reverse remodeling. However, evaluation within the L-carnitine group may indicate a clinical benefit of L-carnitine supplementation.

  17. Acetyl-L-carnitine suppresses thyroid hormone-induced and spontaneous anuran tadpole tail shortening.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Hideki; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Masanao; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Katsu, Kenjiro; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Sasaki, Junzo; Inoue, Masayasu; Utsumi, Kozo

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) plays a crucial role in apoptotic tail shortening during anuran metamorphosis. L-carnitine is known to shuttle free fatty acids (FFAs) from the cytosol into mitochondria matrix for β-oxidation and energy production, and in a previous study we found that treatment with L-carnitine suppresses 3, 3', 5-triiodothyronine (T3 ) and FFA-induced MPT by reducing the level of FFAs. In the present study we focus on acetyl-L-carnitine, which is also involved in fatty acid oxidation, to determine its effect on T3 -induced tail regression in Rana rugosa tadpoles and spontaneous tail regression in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The ladder-like DNA profile and increases in caspase-3 and caspase-9 indicative of apoptosis in the tails of T3 -treated tadpoles were found to be suppressed by the addition of acetyl-L-carnitine. Likewise, acetyl-L-carnitine was found to inhibit thyroid hormone regulated spontaneous metamorphosis in X. laevis tadpoles, accompanied by decreases in caspase and phospholipase A2 activity, as well as non-ladder-like DNA profiles. These findings support our previous conclusion that elevated levels of FFAs initiate MPT and activate the signaling pathway controlling apoptotic cell death in tadpole tails during anuran metamorphosis.

  18. The effect of dietary supplementation with calcium salts of long chain fatty acids and/or L-carnitine on ovarian activity of Rahmani ewes.

    PubMed

    El-Shahat, K H; Abo-El maaty, Amal M

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of dietary supplementation with calcium salts of long chain fatty acids with or without of l-carnitine on ovarian activity using 24 Rahmani ewes randomly allocated to four treatments. Control animals (n=6) were fed a basal diet of hay (64.2%) and barley grain (35.0%) plus minerals and vitamins (0.8%). Ewes on the three treatments received the same basal diet supplemented with calcium salts of long chain fatty acids (CSFA) at 3% of the basal diet dry matter intake (1.4 kg/ewe/d); 250 ppm l-carnitine (LC); or both these supplements (CSFA+LC). All use exhibited natural estrus on one or two occasions and were weighed at the start and the end of the study as well as body condition score was assessed at the end of study. All ewes were then synchronised for estrus using intravaginal sponges for 12 d prior to the start of the nutritional treatments and three weeks after the nutritional treatments began. The nutritional treatments were imposed for a total of 8 weeks. Blood samples were collected prior to the start of treatments and every two weeks thereafter except after sponge removal of first and second synchronisation where the blood samples were collected daily for progesterone assay. The results revealed that Rahmani ewes received basal diet (control) and l-carnitine had significantly decrease final body weight and body condition score (36.3+/-0.4; 36.8+/-0.3; 2.2+/-0.04; 2.1+/-0.05; p<0.05, respectively) than those on CSFA and CSFA+LC (38.6+/-0.9; 39.5+/-0.6; 3.3+/-0.07; 3.4+/-0.06; respectively). At the second ultrasound examination, the control animals had significantly fewer total follicles (7.3+/-0.8; p<0.05) than those on the CSFA (8.4+/-0.8), l-carnitine (8.7+/-1.5) and CSFA+LC (8.0+/-0.6) treatments. The increased numbers occurred in the medium and large categories of follicles. In addition, the ovulation rates were significantly lower (p<0.05) for control (1.3+/-0.2) and l-carnitine (1.5+/-0.00) than for CSFA (2.5+/-0.3) and

  19. The role of the carnitine system in human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Foster, Daniel W

    2004-11-01

    Metabolism cycles daily between the fed and fasted states. The pathways of energy production are reversible and distinct. In the anabolic (fed) state, the liver stores glucose as glycogen, and fatty acid/triglyceride synthesis is active. In the catabolic (fasted) state, the liver becomes a glucose producer, lipogenesis is slowed, and fatty acid oxidation/ketogenesis is activated. The rate-limiting step for the latter is vested in the carnitine/carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) system, and the off/on regulator of this is malonyl CoA. The AMP-induced protein kinase primarily determines the concentration of malonyl CoA. Four other systems have significant influence: two on fatty acid oxidation and two on lipogenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-1 alpha, a master regulator of metabolism, induces hepatic gluconeogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in the catabolic phase. Deficiency of stearoyl CoA desaturase, although having no role in gluconeogenesis, powerfully induces fatty acid oxidation and weight loss despite increased food intake in rodents. Major stimulators of lipogenesis are carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein and the Insig system. The malonyl CoA-regulated CPT system has been firmly established in humans. The other systems have not yet been confirmed in humans, but likely are active there as well. Activation of fatty acid oxidation has considerable clinical promise for the treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, steatohepatitis, and lipotoxic damage to the heart.

  20. Inhibition of Inflammatory Gene Expression in Keratinocytes Using a Composition Containing Carnitine, Thioctic Acid and Saw Palmetto Extract

    PubMed Central

    Chittur, Sridar; Parr, Brian; Marcovici, Geno

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the hair follicle (HF) is considered a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Previously, we clinically tested liposterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESr) and its glycoside, β-sitosterol, in subjects with AGA and showed a highly positive response to treatment. In this study, we sought to determine whether blockade of inflammation using a composition containing LSESr as well as two anti-inflammatory agents (carnitine and thioctic acid) could alter the expression of molecular markers of inflammation in a well-established in vitro system. Using a well-validated assay representative of HF keratinocytes, specifically, stimulation of cultured human keratinocyte cells in vitro, we measured changes in gene expression of a spectrum of well-known inflammatory markers. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provided an inflammatory stimulus. In particular, we found that the composition effectively suppressed LPS-activated gene expression of chemokines, including CCL17, CXCL6 and LTB(4) associated with pathways involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Our data support the hypothesis that the test compound exhibits anti-inflammatory characteristics in a well-established in vitro assay representing HF keratinocyte gene expression. These findings suggest that 5-alpha reductase inhibitors combined with blockade of inflammatory processes could represent a novel two-pronged approach in the treatment of AGA with improved efficacy over current modalities. PMID:19692448

  1. Inhibition of inflammatory gene expression in keratinocytes using a composition containing carnitine, thioctic Acid and saw palmetto extract.

    PubMed

    Chittur, Sridar; Parr, Brian; Marcovici, Geno

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the hair follicle (HF) is considered a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Previously, we clinically tested liposterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESr) and its glycoside, β-sitosterol, in subjects with AGA and showed a highly positive response to treatment. In this study, we sought to determine whether blockade of inflammation using a composition containing LSESr as well as two anti-inflammatory agents (carnitine and thioctic acid) could alter the expression of molecular markers of inflammation in a well-established in vitro system. Using a well-validated assay representative of HF keratinocytes, specifically, stimulation of cultured human keratinocyte cells in vitro, we measured changes in gene expression of a spectrum of well-known inflammatory markers. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provided an inflammatory stimulus. In particular, we found that the composition effectively suppressed LPS-activated gene expression of chemokines, including CCL17, CXCL6 and LTB(4) associated with pathways involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Our data support the hypothesis that the test compound exhibits anti-inflammatory characteristics in a well-established in vitro assay representing HF keratinocyte gene expression. These findings suggest that 5-alpha reductase inhibitors combined with blockade of inflammatory processes could represent a novel two-pronged approach in the treatment of AGA with improved efficacy over current modalities.

  2. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  3. Carnitine and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, Randall L

    2009-09-01

    Studies in humans and animals demonstrate that "lipid over supply" causes or worsens insulin resistance via multiple mechanisms involving the accumulation of intracellular lipids in multiple tissues. In particular, the accumulation of fatty acyl CoA derivatives/metabolites in muscle inhibits both insulin signaling and glucose oxidation. Therefore agents that ameliorate the accumulation of fatty acyl CoA derivatives and/or their metabolites would be beneficial in the treatment or prevention of insulin resistance and T2D. Hyperinsulemic/euglycemic clamp studies in humans and carnitine supplementation studies in rodents provide "proof-of-concept" that carnitine is effective at improving insulin-stimulated glucose utilization and in reversing abnormalities of fuel metabolism associated with T2D. Carefully controlled clinical trials are warranted to determine the efficacy dietary carnitine supplementation as an adjunctive treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  4. The Loss Of Macrophage Fatty Acid Oxidation Does Not Potentiate Systemic Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Selen Alpergin, Ebru S; Collins, Samuel L; Horton, Maureen R; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2017-02-21

    Fatty acid oxidation in macrophages has been suggested to play a causative role in high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysfunction, particularly in the etiology of adipose driven insulin resistance. To understand the contribution of macrophage fatty acid oxidation directly to metabolic dysfunction in high-fat diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with a myeloid-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2 Mϕ-KO), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. While fatty acid oxidation was clearly induced upon IL-4 stimulation, fatty acid oxidation deficient CPT2 Mϕ-KO bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) displayed canonical markers of M2 polarization following IL-4 stimulation in vitro. In addition, loss of macrophage fatty acid oxidation in vivo did not alter the progression of high-fat diet induced obesity, inflammation, macrophage polarization, oxidative stress, or glucose intolerance. These data suggest that although alternatively activated macrophages up-regulate fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid oxidation is dispensable for macrophage polarization and high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysfunction. Macrophage fatty acid oxidation likely plays a correlative rather than causative role in systemic metabolic dysfunction.

  5. Carnitine in bacterial physiology and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Jamie A.

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine is a quaternary amine compound found at high concentration in animal tissues, particularly muscle, and is most well studied for its contribution to fatty acid transport into mitochondria. In bacteria, carnitine is an important osmoprotectant, and can also enhance thermotolerance, cryotolerance and barotolerance. Carnitine can be transported into the cell or acquired from metabolic precursors, where it can serve directly as a compatible solute for stress protection or be metabolized through one of a few distinct pathways as a nutrient source. In this review, we summarize what is known about carnitine physiology and metabolism in bacteria. In particular, recent advances in the aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways as well as the use of carnitine as an electron acceptor have addressed some long-standing questions in the field. PMID:25787873

  6. Determination of trimethylamine-N-oxide in combination with L-carnitine and γ-butyrobetaine in human plasma by UPLC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Grinberga, Solveiga; Dambrova, Maija; Latkovskis, Gustavs; Strele, Ieva; Konrade, Ilze; Hartmane, Dace; Sevostjanovs, Eduards; Liepinsh, Edgars; Pugovics, Osvalds

    2015-11-01

    An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) simultaneously with TMAO-related molecules L-carnitine and γ-butyrobetaine (GBB) in human blood plasma. The separation of analytes was achieved using a Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-type column with ammonium acetate-acetonitrile as the mobile phase. TMAO determination was validated according to valid US Food and Drug Administration guidelines. The developed method was successfully applied to plasma samples from healthy volunteers.

  7. Carnitine metabolism in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, S; Reichen, J

    1997-01-01

    Carnitine metabolism was studied in 79 patients with chronic liver disease, including 22 patients with noncirrhotic liver disease and 57 patients with different types of cirrhosis (22 patients with hepatitis B- or C-associated cirrhosis, 15 patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis, 15 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC], and 5 patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis), and compared with 28 control subjects. In comparison with control subjects, patients with noncirrhotic liver disease showed no change in the plasma carnitine pool, whereas patients with cirrhosis had a 29% increase in the long-chain acylcarnitine concentration. Analysis of subgroups of patients with cirrhosis showed that patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis had an increase in the total plasma carnitine concentration (67.8 +/- 29.5 vs. 55.2 +/- 9.9 micromol/L in control subjects), resulting from increases in both the short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine concentration. In this group of patients, the acylcarnitine concentrations showed a close correlation with the total carnitine concentration, and the total carnitine concentration with the serum bilirubin concentration. Urinary excretion of carnitine was not different between patients with noncirrhotic or cirrhotic liver disease and control patients. However, patients with PBC showed an increased urinary excretion of total carnitine (52.5 +/- 40.0 vs. 28.0 +/- 16.7 micromol carnitine/mmol creatinine), resulting from an increase in the fractional excretion of both free carnitine and short-chain acylcarnitine. The current studies show that patients with cirrhosis are normally not carnitine deficient. Patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis have increased plasma carnitine concentrations, which may result from increased carnitine biosynthesis because of increased skeletal muscle protein turnover. The increase in the fractional carnitine excretion in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis may result from competition of bile acids and

  8. Membrane microenvironment regulation of carnitine palmitoyltranferases I and II.

    PubMed

    Kashfi, Khosrow; Mynatt, Randall L; Park, Edwards A; Cook, George A

    2011-06-01

    CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) 1 and CPT2 regulate fatty acid oxidation. Recombinant rat CPT2 was isolated from the soluble fractions of bacterial extracts and expressed in Escherichia coli. The acyl-CoA chain-length-specificity of the recombinant CPT2 was identical with that of the purified enzyme from rat liver mitochondrial inner membranes. The Km for carnitine for both the mitochondrial preparation and the recombinant enzyme was identical. In isolated mitochondrial outer membranes, cardiolipin (diphosphatidylglycerol) increased CPT1 activity 4-fold and the Km for carnitine 6-fold. It decreased the Ki for malonyl-CoA inhibition 60-fold, but had no effect on the apparent Km for myristoyl-CoA. Cardiolipin also activated recombinant CPT2 almost 4-fold, whereas phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine activated the enzyme 3-, 2- and 2-fold respectively. Most of the recombinant CPT2 was found to have substantial interaction with cardiolipin. A model is proposed whereby cardiolipin may hold the fatty-acid-oxidizing enzymes in the active functional conformation between the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes in conjunction with the translocase and the acyl-CoA synthetase, thus combining all four enzymes into a functional unit.

  9. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  10. Treatment of Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty acid oxidation disorders Treatment of fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Fatty acid oxidation disorders are rare health conditions that affect ...

  11. L-carnitine protects C2C12 cells against mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Le Borgne, Françoise; Ravaut, Gaétan; Bernard, Arnaud; Demarquoy, Jean

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify and characterize the protective effect that L-carnitine exerted against an oxidative stress in C2C12 cells. METHODS Myoblastic C2C12 cells were treated with menadione, a vitamin K analog that engenders oxidative stress, and the protective effect of L-carnitine (a nutrient involved in fatty acid metabolism and the control of the oxidative process), was assessed by monitoring various parameters related to the oxidative stress, autophagy and cell death. RESULTS Associated with its physiological function, a muscle cell metabolism is highly dependent on oxygen and may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially under pathological conditions. High levels of ROS are known to induce injuries in cell structure as they interact at many levels in cell function. In C2C12 cells, a treatment with menadione induced a loss of transmembrane mitochondrial potential, an increase in mitochondrial production of ROS; it also induces autophagy and was able to provoke cell death. Pre-treatment of the cells with L-carnitine reduced ROS production, diminished autophagy and protected C2C12 cells against menadione-induced deleterious effects. CONCLUSION In conclusion, L-carnitine limits the oxidative stress in these cells and prevents cell death. PMID:28289521

  12. Determination of free and total carnitine with a random-access chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Wan, L; Hubbard, R W

    1998-04-01

    Carnitine deficiency presents as a major problem in fatty acid oxidation. The use of a plasma carnitine assay can rapidly help to describe this deficiency. The method we describe here requires two simple steps of sample preparation, followed by automated analysis with the Beckman Synchron CX4 random-access chemistry analyzer. The goal of this method development was to reduce the cost of analysis and to allow a greater number of laboratories to perform this assay on demand within 1 h for both free and total carnitine. The method has a linearity of 0-150 micromol/L and a detection limit of 5 micromol/L. The inter- and intraday CVs are <20%. The method agreed closely with both the widely used RIA and spectrophotometric methods.

  13. Differentiation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders using alternative precursors and acylcarnitine profiling in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Roe, D S; Yang, B Z; Vianey-Saban, C; Struys, E; Sweetman, L; Roe, C R

    2006-01-01

    The differentiation of carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency (CACT) from carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II deficiency (CPT-II) and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency from mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency (MTP) continues to be ambiguous using current acylcarnitine profiling techniques either from plasma or blood spots, or in the intact cell system (fibroblasts/amniocytes). Currently, enzyme assays are required to unequivocally differentiate CACT from CPT-II, and LCHAD from MTP. Over the years we have studied the responses of numerous FOD deficient cell lines to both even and odd numbered fatty acids of various chain lengths as well as branched-chain amino acids. In doing so, we discovered diagnostic elevations of unlabeled butyrylcarnitine detected only in CACT deficient cell lines when incubated with a shorter chain fatty acid, [7-2H3]heptanoate plus l-carnitine compared to the routinely used long-chain fatty acid, [16-2H3]palmitate. In monitoring the unlabeled C4/C5 acylcarnitine ratio, further differentiation from ETF/ETF-DH is also achieved. Similarly, incubating LCHAD and MTP deficient cell lines with the long-chain branched fatty acid, pristanic acid, and monitoring the C11/C9 acylcarnitine ratio has allowed differentiation between these disorders. These methods may be considered useful alternatives to specific enzyme assays for differentiation between these long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders, as well as provide insight into new treatment strategies.

  14. Quantification of Free Carnitine and Acylcarnitines in Plasma or Serum Using HPLC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Scott, David; Heese, Bryce; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Acylcarnitines are formed by esterification between fatty acids CoA or organic acids CoA molecules and carnitine. In various fatty acids oxidation defects and organic acidurias, there is increased concentration of corresponding acylcarnitines. Abnormalities in specific acylcarnitines are used in the diagnosis of fatty acids oxidation defects and organic acidurias. Most commonly used method for the assay of acylcarnitines is HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). A HPLC/MS/MS method is described for the quantification of number of acylcarnitines. The method involves butylation of carnitine/acylcarnitines using acidified butanol, HPLC flow injection, and measurement of acylcarnitines using precursor ion scan and multiple reactions monitoring (MRM).

  15. Novel localization of OCTN1, an organic cation/carnitine transporter, to mammalian mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Tein, Ingrid . E-mail: ingrid.tein@sickkids.ca

    2006-07-14

    Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the {beta}-oxidation of fatty acids. We report novel localization of the organic cation/carnitine transporter, OCTN1, to mitochondria. We made GFP- and RFP-human OCTN1 cDNA constructs and showed expression of hOCTN1 in several transfected mammalian cell lines. Immunostaining of GFP-hOCTN1 transfected cells with different intracellular markers and confocal fluorescent microscopy demonstrated mitochondrial expression of OCTN1. There was striking co-localization of an RFP-hOCTN1 fusion protein and a mitochondrial-GFP marker construct in transfected MEF-3T3 and no co-localization of GFP-hOCTN1 in transfected human skin fibroblasts with other intracellular markers. L-[{sup 3}H]Carnitine uptake in freshly isolated mitochondria of GFP-hOCTN1 transfected HepG2 demonstrated a K {sub m} of 422 {mu}M and Western blot with an anti-GFP antibody identified the expected GFP-hOCTN1 fusion protein (90 kDa). We showed endogenous expression of native OCTN1 in HepG2 mitochondria with anti-GST-hOCTN1 antibody. Further, we definitively confirmed intact L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine uptake (K {sub m} 1324 {mu}M), solely attributable to OCTN1, in isolated mitochondria of mutant human skin fibroblasts having <1% of carnitine acylcarnitine translocase activity (alternate mitochondrial carnitine transporter). This mitochondrial localization was confirmed by TEM of murine heart incubated with highly specific rabbit anti-GST-hOCTN1 antibody and immunogold labeled goat anti-rabbit antibody. This suggests an important yet different role for OCTN1 from other OCTN family members in intracellular carnitine homeostasis.

  16. Utility of metformin as an adjunct to hydroxycitrate/carnitine for reducing body fat in diabetics.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1998-11-01

    Excessive exposure of tissues to fatty acids is likely to be the chief cause of the various dysfunctions that lead to sustained hyperglycemia in type II diabetes. These dysfunctions are likely to be substantially reversible if body fat and dietary fat can be greatly reduced. Disinhibition of hepatic fatty acid oxidation with hydroxycitrate (HCA) and carnitine has considerable potential as a new weight-loss strategy, but in diabetics runs the risk of further enhancing excessive hepatic gluconeogenesis. Since the clinical utility of metformin in diabetes is probably traceable to inhibition of gluconeogenesis, its use as an adjunct to HCA/carnitine treatment of obesity in diabetics deserves evaluation, particularly as metformin therapy itself tends to reduce body weight. A consideration of relevant evidence suggests that metformin therapy will not impede the activation of fatty acid oxidation by HCA/carnitine, and is likely to potentiate the appetite-suppressant and thermogenic benefits of this strategy. Indeed, since metformin has been reported to lower body weight and improve cardiovascular risk factors in obese non-diabetics, a broader application of a metformin/HCA/carnitine therapy for obesity can be contemplated.

  17. Effects of L-carnitine supplementation to suckling piglets on carcass and meat quality at market age.

    PubMed

    Lösel, D; Rehfeldt, C

    2013-07-01

    In a previous study, carnitine supplementation to piglets during the suckling period resulted in an increased total muscle fibre number at weaning in piglets of low birth weight. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether this effect is maintained until market age and whether this would attenuate the negative consequences of low birth weight on carcass and meat quality. Using a split-plot design with litter as block, sex as whole plot and treatment as subplot, the effects of early-postnatal l-carnitine supplementation on female and castrated male piglets of low birth weight were investigated on a total of 56 German Landrace piglets from 14 litters. From days 7 to 27 of age piglets were orally supplemented once daily with 400 mg of l-carnitine dissolved in 1 ml of water or received an equal volume of water without carnitine. From weaning (day 28) until slaughter (day 166 of age) all pigs were fed standard diets. At weaning, carnitine-supplemented piglets had a twofold increased concentration of free carnitine (P < 0.001) and a lower concentration of non-esterified fatty acids (P < 0.05) in blood plasma indicating that carnitine became bioavailable and increased fatty acid utilization during the period of supplementation. Growth performance was not influenced by treatment in any growth period. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed no differences in body composition between groups in weeks 12, 16 and 20 of age. LW at slaughter, carcass weight, measures of meat yield and fat accretion, as well as body composition by chemical analyses and dissection of primal cuts did not differ between treatments. No differences between control and carnitine-treated pigs in total fibre number (P = 0.85) and fibre cross-sectional area (P = 0.68) in m. semitendinosus (ST) measured at slaughter could be observed. The carnitine group tended to exhibit a smaller proportion of slow-twitch oxidative fibres (P = 0.08), a greater proportion of fast-twitch glycolytic

  18. Plasma and hepatic carnitine and coenzyme A pools in a patient with fatal, valproate induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Krähenbühl, S; Mang, G; Kupferschmidt, H; Meier, P J; Krause, M

    1995-01-01

    Reduced hepatic mitochondrial beta-oxidation and changes in the plasma carnitine pool are important biochemical findings in valproate induced liver toxicity. The carnitine pools in plasma and liver and the liver coenzyme A (CoA) pool in a patient with fatal, valproate induced hepatotoxicity were measured. In plasma and liver the free and total carnitine contents were decreased, whereas the ratios short chain acylcarnitine/total acid soluble carnitine were increased. The long chain acylcarnitine content was unchanged in plasma, and increased in liver. The total CoA content in liver was decreased by 84%. This was due to reduced concentrations of CoASH, acetyl-CoA, and long chain acyl-CoA whereas the concentrations of succinyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA were both increased. The good agreement between the plasma and liver carnitine pools reflects the close relation between these two pools. The observed decrease in the hepatic CoASH and total CoA content has so far not been reported in humans with valproate induced hepatotoxicity and may be functionally significant. PMID:7672665

  19. Crystal Structures of Murine Carnitine Acetyltransferase in Ternary Complexes with Its Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine acyltransferases catalyze the reversible exchange of acyl groups between coenzyme A (CoA) and carnitine. They have important roles in many cellular processes, especially the oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the mitochondria for energy production, and are attractive targets for drug discovery against diabetes and obesity. To help define in molecular detail the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, we report here the high resolution crystal structure of wild-type murine carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) in a ternary complex with its substrates acetyl-CoA and carnitine, and the structure of the S554A/M564G double mutant in a ternary complex with the substrates CoA and hexanoylcarnitine. Detailed analyses suggest that these structures may be good mimics for the Michaelis complexes for the forward and reverse reactions of the enzyme, representing the first time that such complexes of CrAT have been studied in molecular detail. The structural information provides significant new insights into the catalytic mechanism of CrAT and possibly carnitine acyltransferases in general.

  20. Alterations in the carnitine cycle in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mucerino, Sabrina; Di Salle, Anna; Alessio, Nicola; Margarucci, Sabrina; Nicolai, Raffaella; Melone, Mariarosa A. B.; Galderisi, Umberto; Peluso, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disease that leads to intellectual deficit, motor disability, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. Although in up to 95% of cases this disease is caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene, it is a multisystem disease associated also with mitochondrial metabolic imbalance. In addition, the presence of long QT intervals (LQT) on the patients’ electrocardiograms has been associated with the development of ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden death. In the attempt to shed light on the mechanism underlying heart failure in RTT, we investigated the contribution of the carnitine cycle to the onset of mitochondrial dysfunction in the cardiac tissues of two subgroups of RTT mice, namely Mecp2+/− NQTc and Mecp2+/− LQTc mice, that have a normal and an LQT interval, respectively. We found that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 A/B and carnitine acylcarnitine translocase were significantly upregulated at mRNA and protein level in the heart of Mecp2+/− mice. Moreover, the carnitine system was imbalanced in Mecp2+/− LQTc mice due to decreased carnitine acylcarnitine transferase expression. By causing accumulation of intramitochondrial acylcarnitines, this imbalance exacerbated incomplete fatty acid oxidation, which, in turn, could contribute to mitochondrial overload and sudden death. PMID:28150739

  1. BRAIN-SPECIFIC CARNITINE PALMITOYLTRANSFERASE-1C: ROLE IN CNS FATTY ACID METABOLISM, FOOD INTAKE AND BODY WEIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Cha, Seung Hun; Millington, David S.; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    While the brain does not utilize fatty acids as a primary energy source, recent evidence shows that intermediates of fatty acid metabolism serve as hypothalamic sensors of energy status. Increased hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, an intermediate in fatty acid synthesis, is indicative of energy surplus and leads to the suppression of food intake and increased energy expenditure. Malonyl-CoA functions as an inhibitor of CPT1, a mitochondrial outer membrane enzyme that initiates translocation of fatty acids into mitochondria for oxidation. The mammalian brain expresses a unique homologous CPT1, CPT1c, that binds malonyl-CoA tightly but does not support fatty acid oxidation in vivo, in hypothalamic explants or in heterologous cell culture systems. CPT1c KO mice under fasted or refed conditions do not exhibit an altered CNS transcriptome of genes known to be involved in fatty acid metabolism. CPT1c KO mice exhibit normal levels of metabolites and of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and fatty acyl-CoA levels either in the fasted or refed states. However, CPT1c KO mice exhibit decreased food intake and lower body weight than WT littermates. In contrast, CPT1c KO mice gain excessive body weight and body fat when fed a high-fat diet while maintaining lower or equivalent food intake. Heterozygous mice display an intermediate phenotype. These findings provide further evidence that CPT1c plays a role in maintaining energy homeostasis, but not through altered fatty acid oxidation. PMID:18248603

  2. Aspects of carnitine ester metabolism in sheep liver

    PubMed Central

    Snoswell, A. M.; Henderson, G. D.

    1970-01-01

    1. Carnitine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.7) activity in sheep liver mitochondria was 76nmol/min per mg of protein, in contrast with 1.7 for rat liver mitochondria. The activity in bovine liver mitochondria was comparable with that of sheep liver mitochondria. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was the same in both sheep and rat liver mitochondria. 2. The [free carnitine]/[acetylcarnitine] ratio in sheep liver ranged from 6:1 for animals fed ad libitum on lucerne to approx. 1:1 for animals grazed on open pastures. This change in ratio appeared to reflect the ratio of propionic acid to acetic acid produced in the rumen of the sheep under the two dietary conditions. 3. In sheep starved for 7 days the [free carnitine]/[acetylcarnitine] ratio in the liver was 0.46:1. The increase in acetylcarnitine on starvation was not at the expense of free carnitine, as the amounts of free carnitine and total acid-soluble carnitine rose approximately fivefold on starvation. An even more dramatic increase in total acid-soluble carnitine of the liver was seen in an alloxan-diabetic sheep. 4. The [free CoA]/[acetyl-CoA] ratio in the liver ranged from 1:1 in the sheep fed on lucerne to 0.34:1 for animals starved for 7 days. 5. The importance of carnitine acetyltransferase in sheep liver and its role in relieving `acetyl pressure' on the CoA system is discussed. PMID:5485754

  3. The effect of acute and prolonged ethanol treatment on the concentrations of coenzyme A, carnitine and their derivatives in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Kondrup, Jens; Grunnet, Niels

    1973-01-01

    1. CoA, acetyl-CoA, long-chain acyl-CoA, carnitine, acetylcarnitine and long-chain acylcarnitine were measured in rat liver under various conditions. 2. Starvation caused an increase in the contents of these intermediates, except that of carnitine. 3. A single dose of ethanol had no effect on CoA content, whereas those of acetyl-CoA, acetylcarnitine and carnitine were increased and those of long-chain acyl-CoA and acylcarnitine were decreased. 4. Four weeks' adaptation to ethanol consumption did not change the effect of ethanol administration on these metabolites. 5. It is suggested that ethanol directly increases hepatic fatty acid synthesis and esterification. It is also suggested that this change is reversible and limited to the period of ethanol oxidation. 6. It is demonstrated that ethanol-induced triglyceride accumulation is not related to carnitine deficiency. PMID:4737499

  4. The inborn errors of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vianey-Liaud, C; Divry, P; Gregersen, N; Mathieu, M

    1987-01-01

    To date, seven inborn errors of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have been identified. A total of about 100 patients in the world have been reported. Clinically the beta-oxidation defects are more often characterized by episodic hypoglycaemia leading to a coma mimicking Reye's syndrome. The hypoglycaemia is non-ketotic since the synthesis of ketone bodies is deficient. Periods of decompensation occur when carbohydrate supply is poor, e.g. prolonged fasting, vomiting, or increased caloric requirements, as and when lipid stores are used. Defects in beta-oxidation have also been reported to be one cause of sudden infant death syndrome. The diagnosis of these inborn errors is by biochemical investigation since where symptoms suggest such a defect, the precise aetiology cannot be assessed. The biochemical diagnosis is based firstly on identification of abnormal plasma and of urinary metabolites during acute attacks. Derivatives of the omega-oxidation and omega-1-oxidation of medium chain fatty acids have been identified, as well as acylglycine and acylcarnitine conjugates. These metabolites are nearly always absent when patients are in good clinical condition. Secondly, the diagnosis must be based on the identification of the enzymatic defects: this involves global assays which allow a localization of the 'level' of the defect (i.e. the oxidation of long, medium or short chain fatty acids) and specific measurement of enzyme activities (acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and electron carriers: ETF and ETF-DH). The diagnosis of these disorders is of prime importance because of the severity of the clinical symptoms. These can be prevented, in some cases, by an appropriate diet (a high carbohydrate, low fat diet, sometimes supplemented with L-carnitine). In other cases, genetic counselling can be offered.

  5. The neurobiology of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    A large body of evidence points to the positive effects of dietary supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Its use has shown health benefits in neuroinflammation, which is a common denominator in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. ALC is the principal acetyl ester of L-Carnitine (LC), and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism, acting as a donor of acetyl groups and facilitating the transfer of fatty acids from cytosol to mitochondria during beta-oxidation. Dietary supplementation of ALC exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, antidepressive and analgesic effects in painful neuropathies. ALC also has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activity. Moreover, ALC exhibits positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and shows promise in the treatment of aging and neurodegenerative pathologies by slowing the progression of mental deterioration. In addition, ALC plays neuromodulatory effects on both synaptic morphology and synaptic transmission. These effects are likely due to affects of ALC through modulation of gene expression on several targets in the central nervous system. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on effects of ALC in the nervous system.

  6. Increasing mitochondrial muscle fatty acid oxidation induces skeletal muscle remodeling toward an oxidative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hénique, Carole; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Vavrova, Eliska; Lenoir, Véronique; Ferry, Arnaud; Esnous, Catherine; Ramond, Elodie; Girard, Jean; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Prip-Buus, Carina; Cohen, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Adult skeletal muscle is a dynamic, remarkably plastic tissue, which allows myofibers to switch from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative types and to increase mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (mFAO) capacity and vascularization in response to exercise training. mFAO is the main muscle energy source during endurance exercise, with carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) being the key regulatory enzyme. Whether increasing muscle mFAO affects skeletal muscle physiology in adulthood actually remains unknown. To investigate this, we used in vivo electrotransfer technology to express in mouse tibialis anterior (TA), a fast/glycolytic muscle, a mutated CPT1 form (CPT1mt) that is active but insensitive to malonyl-CoA, its physiologic inhibitor. In young (2-mo-old) adult mice, muscle CPT1mt expression enhanced mFAO (+40%), but also increased the percentage of oxidative fibers (+28%), glycogen content, and capillary-to-fiber density (+45%). This CPT1mt-induced muscle remodeling, which mimicked exercise-induced oxidative phenotype, led to a greater resistance to muscle fatigue. In the context of aging, characterized by sarcopenia and reduced oxidative capacity, CPT1mt expression in TAs from aged (20-mo-old) mice partially reversed aging-associated sarcopenia and fiber-type transition, and increased muscle capillarity. These findings provide evidence that mFAO regulates muscle phenotype and may be a potential target to combat age-related decline in muscle function.

  7. Excitotoxic damage, disrupted energy metabolism, and oxidative stress in the rat brain: antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Herrera-Mundo, María Nieves; Mendoza-Macedo, Karina; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-05-01

    Excitotoxicity and disrupted energy metabolism are major events leading to nerve cell death in neurodegenerative disorders. These cooperative pathways share one common aspect: triggering of oxidative stress by free radical formation. In this work, we evaluated the effects of the antioxidant and energy precursor, levocarnitine (L-CAR), on the oxidative damage and the behavioral, morphological, and neurochemical alterations produced in nerve tissue by the excitotoxin and free radical precursor, quinolinic acid (2,3-pyrindin dicarboxylic acid; QUIN), and the mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). Oxidative damage was assessed by the estimation of reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in synaptosomal fractions. Behavioral, morphological, and neurochemical alterations were evaluated as markers of neurotoxicity in animals systemically administered with L-CAR, chronically injected with 3-NP and/or intrastriatally infused with QUIN. At micromolar concentrations, L-CAR reduced the three markers of oxidative stress stimulated by both toxins alone or in combination. L-CAR also prevented the rotation behavior evoked by QUIN and the hypokinetic pattern induced by 3-NP in rats. Morphological alterations produced by both toxins (increased striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactivity for QUIN and enhanced neuronal damage in different brain regions for 3-NP) were reduced by L-CAR. In addition, L-CAR prevented the synergistic action of 3-NP and QUIN to increase motor asymmetry and depleted striatal GABA levels. Our results suggest that the protective properties of L-CAR in the neurotoxic models tested are mostly mediated by its characteristics as an antioxidant agent.

  8. High concentrations of stavudine impair fatty acid oxidation without depleting mitochondrial DNA in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Igoudjil, Anissa; Massart, Julie; Begriche, Karima; Descatoire, Véronique; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The antiretroviral nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) stavudine (d4T) can induce mild to severe liver injuries such as steatosis (i.e. triglyceride accumulation), steatohepatitis and liver failure. NRTI-induced toxicity has been ascribed to the inhibition of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication causing mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain dysfunction. This can secondarily impair the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty acid oxidation (FAO), thus leading to lactic acidosis and hepatic steatosis. However, NRTIs could also impair mitochondrial function and induce hepatic steatosis through other mechanisms. In this study, we sought to determine whether d4T could inhibit mitochondrial FAO and induce triglyceride accumulation through a mtDNA-independent mechanism. Since human tumoral and non-tumoral hepatic cell lines were unable to efficiently oxidize palmitic acid, the effects of d4T on mitochondrial FAO were assessed on cultured rat hepatocytes. Our results showed that 750 microM of d4T significantly inhibited palmitic acid oxidation after 48 or 72 h of culture, without inducing cell death. Importantly, high concentrations of zidovudine and zalcitabine (two other NRTIs that can induce hepatic steatosis), or beta-aminoisobutyric acid (a d4T metabolite), did not impair FAO in rat hepatocytes. D4T-induced FAO inhibition was observed without mtDNA depletion and lactate production, and was fully prevented with l-carnitine or clofibrate coincubation. l-carnitine also prevented the accretion of neutral lipids within rat hepatocytes. High concentrations of d4T were unable to inhibit FAO on freshly isolated liver mitochondria. Moreover, a microarray analysis was performed to clarify the mechanism whereby d4T can inhibit mitochondrial FAO and induce triglyceride accumulation in rat hepatocytes. The microarray data, confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, showed that d4T increased the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c

  9. Carnitine deficiency in OCTN2-/- newborn mice leads to a severe gut and immune phenotype with widespread atrophy, apoptosis and a pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Srinivas; Shekhawat, Prem S; Matern, Dietrich; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Ignatowicz, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the gross, microscopic and molecular effects of carnitine deficiency in the neonatal gut using a mouse model with a loss-of-function mutation in the OCTN2 (SLC22A5) carnitine transporter. The tissue carnitine content of neonatal homozygous (OCTN2(-/-)) mouse small intestine was markedly reduced; the intestine displayed signs of stunted villous growth, early signs of inflammation, lymphocytic and macrophage infiltration and villous structure breakdown. Mitochondrial β-oxidation was active throughout the GI tract in wild type newborn mice as seen by expression of 6 key enzymes involved in β-oxidation of fatty acids and genes for these 6 enzymes were up-regulated in OCTN2(-/-) mice. There was increased apoptosis in gut samples from OCTN2(-/-) mice. OCTN2(-/-) mice developed a severe immune phenotype, where the thymus, spleen and lymph nodes became atrophied secondary to increased apoptosis. Carnitine deficiency led to increased expression of CD45-B220(+) lymphocytes with increased production of basal and anti-CD3-stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokines in immune cells. Real-time PCR array analysis in OCTN2(-/-) mouse gut epithelium demonstrated down-regulation of TGF-β/BMP pathway genes. We conclude that carnitine plays a major role in neonatal OCTN2(-/-) mouse gut development and differentiation, and that severe carnitine deficiency leads to increased apoptosis of enterocytes, villous atrophy, inflammation and gut injury.

  10. Dietary L-carnitine supplementation in obese cats alters carnitine metabolism and decreases ketosis during fasting and induced hepatic lipidosis.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Géraldine; Paragon, Bernard M; Milliat, Fabien; Lutton, Claude

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to determine whether dietary carnitine supplement could protect cats from ketosis and improve carnitine and lipid metabolism in experimental feline hepatic lipidosis (FHL). Lean spayed queens received a diet containing 40 (CL group, n = 7) or 1000 (CH group, n = 4) mg/kg of L-carnitine during obesity development. Plasma fatty acid, beta-hydroxybutyrate and carnitine, and liver and muscle carnitine concentrations were measured during experimental induction of FHL and after treatment. In control cats (CL group), fasting and FHL increased the plasma concentrations of fatty acids two- to threefold (P < 0.0001) and beta-hydroxybutyrate > 10-fold (from a basal 0.22 +/- 0.03 to 1.70 +/- 0.73 after 3 wk fasting and 3.13 +/- 0.49 mmol/L during FHL). In carnitine-supplemented cats, these variables increased significantly (P < 0.0001) only during FHL (beta-hydroxybutyrate, 1.42 +/- 0.17 mmol/L). L-Carnitine supplementation significantly increased plasma, muscle and liver carnitine concentrations. Liver carnitine concentration increased dramatically from the obese state to FHL in nonsupplemented cats, but not in supplemented cats, which suggests de novo synthesis of carnitine from endogenous amino acids in control cats and reversible storage in supplemented cats. These results demonstrate the protective effect of a dietary L-carnitine supplement against fasting ketosis during obesity induction. Increasing the L-carnitine level of diets in cats with low energy requirements, such as after neutering, and a high risk of obesity could therefore be recommended.

  11. L-carnitine attenuates H2O2-induced neuron apoptosis via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junli; Han, Yantao; Chen, Xuehong; Xie, Jing; Liu, Xiaojin; Qiao, Shunhong; Wang, Chunbo

    2014-12-01

    Both oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) have been linked to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Our previous study has shown that L-carnitine may function as an antioxidant to inhibit H2O2-induced oxidative stress in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. To further explore the neuroprotection of L-carnitine, here we study the effects of L-carnitine on the ER stress response in H2O2-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury. Our results showed that L-carnitine pretreatment could increase cell viability; inhibit apoptosis and ROS accumulation caused by H2O2 or tunicamycin (TM). L-carnitine suppress the endoplasmic reticulum dilation and activation of ER stress-associated proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP), JNK, Bax and Bim induced by H2O2 or TM. In addition, H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and activation of ER stress can also be attenuated by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), CHOP siRNA and the inhibitor of ER stress 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA). Taken together, our results demonstrated that H2O2 could trigger both oxidative stress and ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells, and ER stress participated in SH-SY5Y apoptosis mediated by H2O2-induced oxidative stress. CHOP/Bim or JNK/Bim-dependent ER stress signaling pathways maybe related to the neuroprotective effects of L-carnitine against H2O2-induced apoptosis and oxidative injury.

  12. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fed L-carnitine exhibit altered intermediary metabolism and reduced tissue lipid, but no change in growth rate.

    PubMed

    Ji, H; Bradley, T M; Tremblay, G C

    1996-08-01

    Metabolic evidence was sought to explain the reduced body fat and increased body protein observed in Atlantic salmon fed diets supplemented with L-carnitine. By stimulating fatty acid oxidation, dietary carnitine might increase flux through pyruvate carboxylase and decrease flux through the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, by increasing regulatory ratios of acetyl CoA:free enzyme A (CoA-SH) and ATP:ADP. Such changes could conserve nitrogen by providing more carbon for amino acid biosynthesis and by blocking oxidative loss of the branched-chain amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, salmon fed carnitine (23 mmol/kg diet) for 9 wk exhibited greater metabolic rates than cohorts fed a carnitine-free diet (P < 0.05) for the following: 1) 1-[14C] palmitate oxidation by liver cubes (48%) and by isolated hepatocytes (151%), 2) pyruvate-dependent [14 CO2]-fixation by isolated mitochondria (81%), 3) incorporation of 1-[14C] lactate into glucose by liver cubes (120%) and by isolated hepatocytes (210%), and 4) incorporation of [35S]-methionine into the acid-insoluble fraction of liver cubes (59%) and isolated hepatocytes (89%). Hepatic concentrations of seven amino acids, including the branched-chain amino acids, were greater (7-112%), as were the plasma concentrations of three of these (45-130%). However, 230% more enzyme in the mitochondria of carnitine-fed fish, and not a difference in the ratios of acetyl CoA:CoA-SH or ATP:ADP, appeared to account for accelerated flux through pyruvate carboxylase; flux through the dehydrogenase complex was unchanged. These results implicate induction of pyruvate carboxylase (or a reduction in turnover) and enhanced protein synthesis in the mechanism for carnitine-induced changes in gluconeogenesis and nitrogen metabolism.

  13. Carnitine supplementation has protective and detrimental effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are genetically mediated.

    PubMed

    Franken, Jaco; Bauer, Florian F

    2010-05-01

    l-Carnitine plays a well-documented role in eukaryotic energy homeostasis by acting as a shuttling molecule for activated acyl residues across intracellular membranes. This activity, supported by carnitine acyl-transferases and transporters, is referred to as the carnitine shuttle. However, several pleiotropic and often beneficial effects of carnitine in humans have been reported that appear to be unrelated to shuttling activity, but little conclusive evidence regarding molecular mechanisms exists. We have recently demonstrated a role of carnitine, independent of the carnitine shuttle, in yeast stress protection. Here, we show that carnitine specifically protects against oxidative stress caused by H(2)O(2) and the superoxide-generating agent menadione. Surprisingly, carnitine has a detrimental effect on survival when combined with thiol-modifying agents. Central elements of the oxidative stress response, specifically the transcription factors Yap1p and Skn7p, are shown to be required for carnitine's protective effect, but several downstream effectors are dispensable. A DNA microarray-based analysis identifies Cyc3p, a cytochrome c heme lyase, as being important for carnitine's impact during oxidative stress. These findings establish a direct genetic link to a carnitine-related phenotype that is independent of the shuttle system and suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae should provide a useful model for further elucidation of carnitine's physiological roles.

  14. Novel role of FATP1 in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián, David; Guitart, Maria; García-Martínez, Celia; Mauvezin, Caroline; Orellana-Gavaldà, Josep M.; Serra, Dolors; Gómez-Foix, Anna M.; Hegardt, Fausto G.; Asins, Guillermina

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) catalyzes the first step in long-chain fatty acid import into mitochondria, and it is believed to be rate limiting for β-oxidation of fatty acids. However, in muscle, other proteins may collaborate with CPT1. Fatty acid translocase/CD36 (FAT/CD36) may interact with CPT1 and contribute to fatty acid import into mitochondria in muscle. Here, we demonstrate that another membrane-bound fatty acid binding protein, fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1), collaborates with CPT1 for fatty acid import into mitochondria. Overexpression of FATP1 using adenovirus in L6E9 myotubes increased both fatty acid oxidation and palmitate esterification into triacylglycerides. Moreover, immunocytochemistry assays in transfected L6E9 myotubes showed that FATP1 was present in mitochondria and coimmunoprecipitated with CPT1 in L6E9 myotubes and rat skeletal muscle in vivo. The cooverexpression of FATP1 and CPT1 also enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, similar to the cooverexpression of FAT/CD36 and CPT1. However, etomoxir, an irreversible inhibitor of CPT1, blocked all these effects. These data reveal that FATP1, like FAT/CD36, is associated with mitochondria and has a role in mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids. PMID:19429947

  15. Fatty Acid Oxidation in Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria is Unaffected by Deletion of CD36

    PubMed Central

    King, Kristen L.; Stanley, William C.; Rosca, Mariana; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.; Febbraio, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies found that the plasma membrane fatty acid transport protein CD36 also resides in mitochondrial membranes in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Pharmacological studies suggest that CD36 may play an essential role in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We isolated cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria from wild type and CD36 knock-out mice. There were no differences between wild type and CD36 knock-out mice in mitochondrial respiration with palmitoyl-CoA, palmitoyl-carnitine or glutamate as substrate. We investigated a potential alternative role for CD36 in mitochondria, ie. the export of fatty acids generated in the matrix. Palmitate export was not different between wild type and CD36 knock out mice. Taken together, CD36 does not appear to play an essential role in mitochondrial uptake of fatty acids or export of fatty acid anions. PMID:17904092

  16. Measurement of free carnitine and acylcarnitines in plasma by HILIC-ESI-MS/MS without derivatization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Minzhi; Liu, Li; Jiang, Minyan; Liang, Cuili; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Cai, Yanna; Sheng, Huiying; Ou, Zhiying; Luo, Hong

    2013-08-01

    Measurement of carnitine and acylcarnitines in plasma is important in diagnosis of fatty acid β-oxidation disorders and organic acidemia. The usual method uses flow injection tandem mass spectrometry (FIA-MS/MS), which has limitations. A rapid and more accurate method was developed to be used for high-risk screening and diagnosis. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were separated by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) without derivatization and detected with a QTRAP MS/MS System. Total analysis time was 9.0min. The imprecision of within- and between-run were less than 6% and 17%, respectively. Recoveries were in the range of 85-110% at three concentrations. Some acylcarnitine isomers could be separated, such as dicarboxylic and hydroxyl acylcarnitines. The method could also separate interferent to avoid false positive results. 216 normal samples and 116 patient samples were detected with the validated method, and 49 patients were identified with fatty acid oxidation disorders or organic acidemias.

  17. Transport of carnitine in neuroblastoma NB-2a cells.

    PubMed

    Nałecz, K A; Korzon, D; Wawrzeńczyk, A; Nałecz, M J

    1995-09-10

    Carnitine accumulation was measured in cultured neuroblastoma NB-2a cells. This process was found partially sodium dependent and its kinetics to be a sum of a saturable transport (Km = 123 +/- 13 microM) and diffusion (D = 63 +/- 7 pmol/mg protein/min/mM). On the contrary to previous reports on neural cells, the accumulation of carnitine was found insensitive to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Measurements of carnitine accumulation in the presence of different compounds resulted in the conclusion that carnitine transport does not occur through the known systems specific toward choline and/or amino acids. For instance, an observed inhibition of carnitine transport by serine and cysteine, without any effect of alanine, excluded a possible role of ASC amino acid transport system. An involvement of a new transporter is thus postulated, specific toward compounds with a polar group in the beta position with respect to the carboxylic group.

  18. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; MacFabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels—a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of

  19. l-carnitine protects human hepatocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Yanli; Luan, Haiyun; Chen, Xuehong; Han, Yantao; Wang, Chunbo

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, l-carnitine was shown to have cytoprotective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in human normal HL7702 hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the protective effect of l-carnitine was associated with the nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NFE2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Our results showed that pretreatment with l-carnitine augmented Nrf2 nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in H2O2-treated HL7702 cells, although l-carnitine treatment alone had no effect on them. Analysis using Nrf2 siRNA demonstrated that Nrf2 activation was involved in l-carnitine-induced HO-1 expression. In addition, l-carnitine-mediated protection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by Nrf2 siRNA, indicating the important role of Nrf2 in l-carnitine-induced cytoprotection. Further experiments revealed that l-carnitine pretreatment enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt in H2O2-treated cells. Blocking Akt pathway with inhibitor partly abrogated the protective effect of l-carnitine. Moreover, our finding demonstrated that the induction of Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression by l-carnitine directly correlated with the Akt pathway because Akt inhibitor showed inhibitory effects on the Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that l-carnitine protects HL7702 cells against H2O2-induced cell damage through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  20. L-carnitine Reduces Muscle Cramps in Patients With Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Takada, Hitomi; Matsuda, Shuya; Gondo, Kouichi; Asano, Yu; Hattori, Nobuhiro; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Suzuki, Shoko; Yasui, Yutaka; Hosokawa, Takanori; Itakura, Jun; Takahashi, Yuka; Izumi, Namiki

    2015-08-01

    We performed a prospective study to evaluate the ability of L-carnitine, which is involved in the β-oxidation of fatty acids, to reduce muscle cramps in patients with cirrhosis. Consecutive patients with cirrhosis and muscle cramps were given L-carnitine 300 mg, 3 times/day (900 mg/day, n = 19) or 4 times/day (1200 mg/day, n = 23) for 8 weeks. The frequency of muscle cramps was assessed by questionnaires, and the degree of muscle cramping was assessed by using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Muscle cramping was reduced in 88.1% of all subjects at the end of the 8-week study period and disappeared for 28.6% of patients. Overall VAS scores decreased significantly from 69.9 ± 22.5 at baseline to 26.2 ± 29.1 after 8 weeks (P < .0001). The dose of L-carnitine was significantly associated with percentages of patients with reduced muscle cramps after 8 weeks (43.5% in the 1200 mg/day group vs 10.5% in the 900 mg/day group, P = .037) and VAS scores at 8 weeks (9.9 ± 13.5 in the 1200 mg/day group vs 39.6 ± 31.9 in the 900 mg/day group, P = .003). No adverse events were reported. Therefore, L-carnitine appears to be safe and effective for reducing liver cramps in patients with cirrhosis.

  1. Doxorubicin toxicity can be ameliorated during antioxidant L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Alshabanah, Othman A; Hafez, Mohamed M; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M; Hassan, Zeinab K; Al Rejaie, Salim S; Asiri, Yosef A; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M

    2010-01-01

    Doxorubicin is an antibiotic broadly used in treatment of different types of solid tumors. The present study investigates whether L-carnitine, antioxidant agent, can reduce the hepatic damage induced by doxorubicin. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups: group 1 were intraperitoneal injected with normal saline for 10 consecutive days; group 2, 3 and 4 were injected every other day with doxorubicin (3 mg/kg, i.p.), to obtain treatments with cumulative doses of 6, 12, and 18 mg/kg. The fifth group was injected with L-carnitine (200 mg/kg, i.p.) for 10 consecutive days and the sixth group was received doxorubicin (18 mg/kg) and L-carnitine (200 mg/kg). High cumulative dose of doxorubicin (18 mg/kg) significantly increase the biochemical levels of alanine transaminase , alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin, total carnitine, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs), total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) p < 0.05 and decrease in glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), glutathione-s-transferase (GST),glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) activity p < 0.05. The effect of doxorubicin on the activity of antioxidant genes was confirmed by real time PCR in which the expression levels of these genes in liver tissue were significantly decrease compared to control p < 0.05. Interestingly, L-carnitine supplementation completely reverse the biochemical and gene expression levels induced by doxorubicin to the control values. In conclusion, data from this study suggest that the reduction of antioxidant defense during doxorubicin administration resulted in hepatic injury could be prevented by L-carnitine supplementation by decreasing the oxidative stress and preserving both the activity and gene expression level of antioxidant enzymes.

  2. Inflammation and carnitine in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Pertosa, Giovanni; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Simone, Simona; Soccio, Michela; Schena, Francesco Paolo

    2005-01-01

    The bioincompatibility of dialytic systems along with the loss of antioxidant substances via the dialysis may contribute to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) activation and the production of inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines, oxygen radicals, and complement fragments, that may sustain a state of chronic microinflammation responsible for the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, anemia, and malnutrition. Moreover, during hemodialysis (HD), oxidative stress may influence several intracellular signaling enzymes, including some stress-activated kinases, such as jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), potentially leading to PBMC activation and proinflammatory cytokine production. Recent reports suggest that L-carnitine may play an important role in balancing antioxidative systems. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on the PBMC responses to oxidative stress induced by different HD membranes. We observed in PBMC from cellulosic (C)-treated patients an increase in the amount of intracellular tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and a striking activation of JNK, as compared with synthetic (S)-treated patients. On the contrary, 3 months of L-carnitine supplementation significantly lowered intracellular levels of phosphorylated proteins and JNK activity in PBMC from C-treated patients. In addition, after 180 minutes of HD, a significant decrease in global plasma antioxidant capacity was found, particularly in C-treated patients, whereas L-carnitine supplementation improved plasma antioxidant capacity levels in these patients. These observations were also confirmed by in vitro experiments, showing the ability of L-carnitine to reduce the JNK activation in normal PBMC exposed to different amounts of hydrogen peroxide. In conclusion, the uremic milieu is characterized by an enhanced inflammatory response and an increased oxidant load, affecting lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. Regular L-carnitine

  3. Effects of Combined Treatment with Branched-Chain Amino Acids, Citric Acid, L-Carnitine, Coenzyme Q10, Zinc, and Various Vitamins in Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Awa, Hiroko; Futamura, Akihiko; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Mori, Naoharu; Murai, Miyo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Chihara, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takaaki

    2017-03-01

    A functional dietary supplement (FDS) containing Coenzyme Q10, branched-chain amino acids and L-carnitine was administered to tumor-bearing mice, investigating its effects on tumor and muscle tissues. Experiment (A): B16 melanoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into the right side of the abdomen of 8- to 9-week-old C57BL/6J mice. The mice were divided into two groups: a FDS group that received oral administration of FDS (n=10), and a control group that received oral administration of glucose (n=10). The moribund condition was used as the endpoint, and median survival time was determined. Experiment (B): On day 21 after tumor implantation, tumors, soleus muscle, gastrocnemius muscle, and suprahyoid muscles were collected. Tumor and muscle weight and other aspects were evaluated in each group: FDS group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The median survival time was comparable (21 d in the FDS group vs. 18 d in the control group, p=0.30). However, cumulative food intake was significantly higher in the FDS group than the control group (p=0.011). Metastasis of melanoma to the lung was observed in the control group but not in the FDS group (p=0.043). The weight of the suprahyoid muscles was significantly higher in the FDS group than in the control group (p=0.0045). The weight of the tumor was significantly lower in the FDS group than in the control group (p=0.013). The results possibly suggest oral administration of FDS in tumor-bearing mice enhances the maintenance of suprahyoid muscles, resulting in an extended feeding period and suppression of tumor growth and metastasis.

  4. Reduction of lipid and protein damage in patients with disorders of propionate metabolism under treatment: a possible protective role of L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Graziela S; Manfredini, Vanusa; de Mari, Jurema F; Wayhs, Carlos Y; Vanzin, Camila S; Biancini, Giovana B; Sitta, Angela; Deon, Marion; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen R

    2010-04-01

    Disorders of propionate metabolism are autosomal recessive diseases clinically characterized by acute metabolic crises in the neonatal period and long-term neurological deficits whose pathophysiology is not completely established. There are increasing evidences demonstrating antioxidant properties for L-carnitine, which is used in the treatment of propionic and methylmalonic acidemias to increase the excretion of organic acids accumulated in tissues and biological fluids of the affected patients. In this work we aimed to evaluate lipid (malondialdehyde content) and protein (carbonyl formation and sulfhydryl oxidation) oxidative damage in plasma from patients with propionic and methylmalonic acidemias at the moment of diagnosis and during treatment with L-carnitine. We also correlated the parameters of oxidative damage with plasma total, free and esterified L-carnitine levels. We found a significant increase of malondialdehyde and carbonyl groups, as well as a reduction of sulfhydryl groups in plasma of these patients at diagnosis compared to controls. Furthermore, patients under treatment presented a marked reduction of the content of protein carbonyl groups, similar to controls, and malondialdehyde content in relation to patients at diagnosis. In addition, plasma total and free L-carnitine concentrations were negatively correlated with malondialdehyde levels. Taken together, the present data indicate that treatment significantly reduces oxidative damage in patients affected by disorders of propionate metabolism and that l-carnitine supplementation may be involved in this protection.

  5. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D. , Hopital Beaujon, Clichy )

    1990-11-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid but not that of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)octanoic acid and (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids.

  6. Transport of L-carnitine in isolated cerebral cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Wawrzeńczyk, A; Sacher, A; Mac, M; Nałecz, M J; Nałecz, K A

    2001-04-01

    The accumulation of carnitine was measured in cerebral cortex neurons isolated from adult rat brain. This process was found to be lowered by 40% after preincubation with ouabain and with SH-group reagents (N-ethylmaleimide and mersalyl). The initial velocity of carnitine transport was found to be inhibited by 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in a competitive way (Ki = 20.9 +/- 2.4 mM). However, of various inhibitors of GABA transporters, only nipecotic acid and very high concentrations of 1-[2-([(diphenylmethylene)amino]oxy)ethyl]-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (NO-711) acid decreased carnitine accumulation while betaine, taurine and beta-alanine had no effect. The GABA transporters expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes did not transport carnitine. Moreover, carnitine was not observed to diminish the accumulation of GABA in cerebral cortex neurons, which further excluded a possible involvement of the GABA transporter GAT1 in the process of carnitine accumulation, despite the expression of this protein in the cells under study. The absence of carnitine transporter OCTN2 in rat cerebral cortex neurons (K. A. Nałecz, D. Dymna, J. E. Mroczkowska, A. Broër, S. Broër, M. J. Nałecz and R. Cecchelli, unpublished results), together with the insensitivity of carnitine accumulation towards betaines, implies that a novel transporting protein is present in these cells.

  7. Effects of acetyl-L-carnitine on lamb oocyte blastocyst rate, ultrastructure, and mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Reader, Karen L; Cox, Neil R; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    Viable lambs can be produced after transfer of in vitro-derived embryos from oocytes harvested from prepubertal lambs. However, this occurs at a much lower efficiency than from adult ewe oocyte donors. The reduced competence of prepubertal oocytes is believed to be due, at least in part, to deficiencies in cytoplasmic maturation. Differences in the cytoplasmic ultrastructure between prepubertal and adult oocytes have been described in the sheep, pig, and cow. Prepubertal lamb oocytes have been shown to have a different distribution of mitochondria and lipid droplets, and less mitochondria and storage vesicles than their adult counterparts. L-carnitine plays a role in supplying energy to the cell by transporting long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for β-oxidation to produce ATP. Both L-carnitine and its derivative acetyl-L-carnitine have been reported to increase the blastocyst rate of oocytes from mice, cows, and pigs, treated during IVM. L-carnitine has also been shown to increase mitochondrial biogenesis in adipose cells. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine if treatment of oocytes from prepubertal lambs with acetyl-L-carnitine during IVM could increase the blastocyst rate and alter mitochondria, vesicle, or lipid droplet number, volume, or distribution. The blastocyst rate was doubled in prepubertal lamb oocytes treated with acetyl-L-carnitine when compared to untreated oocytes (10.0% and 4.6%, respectively; P = 0.028). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and stereology techniques were used to quantify organelles in untreated and acetyl-L-carnitine-treated lamb oocytes, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods were used to measure the mitochondrial DNA copy number. There were no differences in mitochondrial volume, number, or mitochondrial DNA copy number. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment increased the cytoplasmic volume (P = 0.015) of the oocytes, and there were trends toward an increase in the vesicle volume (P = 0

  8. Mitigation of statins-induced cytotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction by L-carnitine in freshly-isolated rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, N.; Azarmi, Y.; Eghbal, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Statins are widely used as anti hyperlipidemic agents. Hepatotoxicity is one of their adverse effects appearing in some patients. No protective agents have yet been developed to treat statins-induced hepatotoxicity. Different investigations have suggested L-carnitine as a hepatoprotective agent against drugs-induced toxicity. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine on the cytotoxic effects of statins on the freshly-isolated rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats by collagenase enzyme perfusion via portal vein. Cells were treated with the different concentrations of statins (simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin), alone or in combination with L-carnitine. Cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial depolarization were assessed as toxicity markers. Furthermore, the effects of statins on cellular reduced and oxidized glutathione reservoirs were evaluated. In accordance with previous studies, an elevation in ROS formation, cellular oxidized glutathione and lipid peroxidation were observed after statins administration. Moreover, a decrease in cellular reduced glutathione level and cellular mitochondrial membrane potential collapse occurred. L-carnitine co-administration decreased the intensity of aforementioned toxicity markers produced by statins treatment. This study suggests the protective role of L-carnitine against statins-induced cellular damage probably through its anti oxidative and reactive radical scavenging properties as well as its effects on sub cellular components such as mitochondria. The mechanism of L-carnitine protection may be related to its capacity to facilitate fatty acid entry into mitochondria; possibly adenosine tri-phosphate or the reducing equivalents are increased, and the toxic effects of statins toward mitochondria are encountered. PMID:26487891

  9. Downregulation of carnitine acyl-carnitine translocase by miRNAs 132 and 212 amplifies glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Soni, Mufaddal S; Rabaglia, Mary E; Bhatnagar, Sushant; Shang, Jin; Ilkayeva, Olga; Mynatt, Randall; Zhou, Yun-Ping; Schadt, Eric E; Thornberry, Nancy A; Muoio, Deborah M; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D

    2014-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that micro-RNAs (miRNAs) 132 and 212 are differentially upregulated in response to obesity in two mouse strains that differ in their susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes. Here we show the overexpression of miRNAs 132 and 212 enhances insulin secretion (IS) in response to glucose and other secretagogues including nonfuel stimuli. We determined that carnitine acyl-carnitine translocase (CACT; Slc25a20) is a direct target of these miRNAs. CACT is responsible for transporting long-chain acyl-carnitines into the mitochondria for β-oxidation. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CACT in β-cells led to the accumulation of fatty acyl-carnitines and enhanced IS. The addition of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines promoted IS from rat insulinoma β-cells (INS-1) as well as primary mouse islets. The effect on INS-1 cells was augmented in response to suppression of CACT. A nonhydrolyzable ether analog of palmitoyl-carnitine stimulated IS, showing that β-oxidation of palmitoyl-carnitine is not required for its stimulation of IS. These studies establish a link between miRNA-dependent regulation of CACT and fatty acyl-carnitine-mediated regulation of IS.

  10. A requirement for fatty acid oxidation in the hormone-induced meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Valsangkar, Deepa; Downs, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    We have previously shown that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is required for AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKA)-induced maturation in vitro. In the present study, we have further investigated the role of this metabolic pathway in hormone-induced meiotic maturation. Incorporating an assay with (3)H-palmitic acid as the substrate, we first examined the effect of PRKA activators on FAO levels. There was a significant stimulation of FAO in cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and RSVA405. In denuded oocytes (DO), AICAR stimulated FAO only in the presence of carnitine, the molecule that facilitates fatty acyl CoA entry into the mitochondria. The carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 activator C75 successfully stimulated FAO in CEO. All three of these activators trigger germinal vesicle breakdown. Meiotic resumption induced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or amphiregulin was completely inhibited by the FAO inhibitors etomoxir, mercaptoacetate, and malonyl CoA. Importantly, FAO was increased in CEO stimulated by FSH and epidermal growth factor, and this increase was blocked by FAO inhibitors. Moreover, compound C, a PRKA inhibitor, prevented the FSH-induced increase in FAO. Both carnitine and palmitic acid augmented hormonal induction of maturation. In a more physiological setting, etomoxir eliminated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced maturation in follicle-enclosed oocytes. In addition, CEO and DO from hCG-treated mice displayed an etomoxir-sensitive increase in FAO, indicating that this pathway was stimulated during in vivo meiotic resumption. Taken together, our data indicate that hormone-induced maturation in mice requires a PRKA-dependent increase in FAO.

  11. Early nerve ending rescue from oxidative damage and energy failure by L: -carnitine as post-treatment in two neurotoxic models in rat: recovery of antioxidant and reductive capacities.

    PubMed

    Elinos-Calderón, Diana; Robledo-Arratia, Yolanda; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2009-08-01

    Cell rescue is a primary need during acute and chronic insults to the central nervous system. Functional preservation during the early stages of toxicity in a given degenerative event may represent a significant amelioration of detrimental processes linked to neuronal cell loss. Excitotoxicity and depleted cellular energy are toxic events leading to cell death in several neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, the effects of the well-known antioxidant and energy precursor, L: -carnitine (L: -CAR), were tested as a post-treatment in two neurotoxic models under in vitro and in vivo conditions. The experimental models tested included: (1) a typical excitotoxic and pro-oxidant inducer, quinolinic acid (QUIN); and (2) a mitochondrial energy inhibitor, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). For in vitro studies, increasing concentrations of L: -CAR (10-1,000 microM) were added to the isolated brain synaptosomes at different times (1, 3 and 6 h) after the incubation with toxins (100 microM QUIN and 1 mM 3-NP), and 30 min later, lipid peroxidation (LP) and mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) were evaluated. For in vivo purposes, L: -CAR (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was given to rats either as a single administration 120 min after the intrastriatal infusion of QUIN (240 nmol/microl) or 3-NP (500 nmol/microl), or for 7 consecutive days (starting 120 min post-lesion). LP and MD were evaluated 4 h and 7 days post-lesions in isolated striatal synaptosomes. Our results show that, despite some variations depending on the toxic model tested, the time of exposure, or the biomarker evaluated, nerve ending protection can be mostly achieved by L: -CAR within the first hours after the toxic insults started, suggesting that targeting the ongoing oxidative damage and/or energy depletion during the first stages of neurotoxic events is essential to rescue nerve endings.

  12. L-carnitine supplementation for the management of fatigue in patients with hypothyroidism on levothyroxine treatment: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    An, Jee Hyun; Kim, Yoon Jung; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kim, Nam Hoon; Kim, Hee Young; Kim, Nan Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop; Kim, Sin Gon

    2016-10-29

    Hypothyroid patients experience fatigue-related symptoms despite adequate thyroid hormone replacement. Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in carnitine-dependent fatty acid import and oxidation. We investigated the effects of L-carnitine supplementation on fatigue in patients with hypothyroidism. In total, 60 patients (age 50.0 ± 9.2 years, 3 males, 57 females) who still experienced fatigue (fatigue severity scale [FSS] score ≥ 36) were given L-carnitine (n = 30, 990 mg L-carnitine twice daily) or placebo (n = 30) for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, although neither the FSS score nor the physical fatigue score (PFS) changed significantly, the mental fatigue score (MFS) was significantly decreased by treatment with L-carnitine compared with placebo (from 4.5 ± 1.9 to 3.9 ± 1.5 vs. from 4.2 ± 1.8 to 4.6 ± 1.6, respectively; P < 0.01). In the L-carnitine group, 75.0%, 53.6%, and 50.0% of patients showed improvement in the FSS score, PFS, and MFS, respectively, but only 20.0%, 24.0%, and 24.0%, respectively, did so in the placebo group (all P < 0.05). Both the PFS and MFS were significantly improved in patients younger than 50 years and those with free T3 ≥ 4.0 pg/mL by treatment with L-carnitine compared with placebo. Additionally, the MFS was significantly improved in patients taking thyroid hormone after thyroid cancer surgery. These results suggest that L-carnitine supplementation may be useful in alleviating fatigue symptoms in hypothyroid patients, especially in those younger than 50 years and those who have hypothyroidism after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01769157).

  13. Metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in human adults: Identification and quantification of urinary and fecal metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Chenard, C.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Results of kinetic and pharmacokinetic studies have suggested that dietary carnitine is not totally absorbed and is in part degraded in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. To determine the metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in humans, we administered orally a tracer dose of methyl-{sup 3}H L-carnitine with a meal to subjects who had been adapted to a low-carnitine diet or a high-carnitine diet. Urinary and fecal excretion of radiolabeled carnitine and metabolites was monitored for 5 to 11 d following administration of the test dose. Total radioactive metabolites excreted ranged from 13 to 34% (low carnitine diet) and 27 to 46% (high carnitine diet) of the ingested tracer. Major metabolites found were ({sup 3}H)trimethylamine N-oxide (8 to 39% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in urine) and ({sup 3}H)gamma-butyrobetaine (0.09 to 8% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in feces). Urinary excretion of total carnitine was 42 to 95% (high carnitine diet) and 190 to 364% (low carnitine diet) of intake. These results indicate that oral carnitine is 54 to 87% bioavailable from normal Western diets; the percentage of intake absorbed is related to the quantity ingested.

  14. Carnitine supplementation in high-fat diet-fed rats does not ameliorate lipid-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Bart; van den Broek, Nicole M A; Ciapaite, Jolita; Houten, Sander M; Wanders, Ronald J A; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2015-10-01

    Muscle lipid overload and the associated accumulation of lipid intermediates play an important role in the development of insulin resistance. Carnitine insufficiency is a common feature of insulin-resistant states and might lead to incomplete fatty acid oxidation and impaired export of lipid intermediates out of the mitochondria. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that carnitine supplementation reduces high-fat diet-induced lipotoxicity, improves muscle mitochondrial function, and ameliorates insulin resistance. Wistar rats were fed either normal chow or a high-fat diet for 15 wk. One group of high-fat diet-fed rats was supplemented with 300 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) L-carnitine during the last 8 wk. Muscle mitochondrial function was measured in vivo by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and ex vivo by high-resolution respirometry. Muscle lipid status was determined by (1)H MRS (intramyocellular lipids) and tandem mass spectrometry (acylcarnitines). High-fat diet feeding induced insulin resistance and was associated with decreases in muscle and blood free carnitine, elevated levels of muscle lipids and acylcarnitines, and an increased number of muscle mitochondria that showed an improved capacity to oxidize fat-derived substrates when tested ex vivo. This was, however, not accompanied by an increase in muscle oxidative capacity in vivo, indicating that in vivo mitochondrial function was compromised. Despite partial normalization of muscle and blood free carnitine content, carnitine supplementation did not induce improvements in muscle lipid status, in vivo mitochondrial function, or insulin sensitivity. Carnitine insufficiency, therefore, does not play a major role in high-fat diet-induced muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo.

  15. The influence of chronic L-carnitine supplementation on the formation of preneoplastic and atherosclerotic lesions in the colon and aorta of male F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Empl, Michael T; Kammeyer, Patricia; Ulrich, Reiner; Joseph, Jan F; Parr, Maria K; Willenberg, Ina; Schebb, Nils H; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Röhrdanz, Elke; Steffen, Christian; Steinberg, Pablo

    2015-11-01

    L-Carnitine, a key component of fatty acid oxidation, is nowadays being extensively used as a nutritional supplement with allegedly "fat burning" and performance-enhancing properties, although to date there are no conclusive data supporting these claims. Furthermore, there is an inverse relationship between exogenous supplementation and bioavailability, i.e., fairly high oral doses are not fully absorbed and thus a significant amount of carnitine remains in the gut. Human and rat enterobacteria can degrade unabsorbed L-carnitine to trimethylamine or trimethylamine-N-oxide, which, under certain conditions, may be transformed to the known carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine. Recent findings indicate that trimethylamine-N-oxide might also be involved in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. We therefore investigated whether a 1-year administration of different L-carnitine concentrations (0, 1, 2 and 5 g/l) via drinking water leads to an increased incidence of preneoplastic lesions (so-called aberrant crypt foci) in the colon of Fischer 344 rats as well as to the appearance of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta of these animals. No significant difference between the test groups regarding the formation of lesions in the colon and aorta of the rats was observed, suggesting that, under the given experimental conditions, L-carnitine up to a concentration of 5 g/l in the drinking water does not have adverse effects on the gastrointestinal and vascular system of Fischer 344 rats.

  16. Early changes in oxidative stress markers in a rat model of acute stress: effect of l-carnitine on the striatum.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Cuesta, Luis A; Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Pérez-De la Cruz, Verónica; Maldonado, Perla D; Santana, Ricardo A; Escobar-Briones, Carolina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2011-08-01

    This work focuses on the effect of acute stress on different markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat striatum. In addition, the effect of a single dose of l-carnitine (l-CAR, 300 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated in these animals. Immobilization (restraint) stress was induced to rats for 24 hr. The levels of lipid peroxidation (LP) and mitochondrial function (MF), as well as the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and content and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, were all measured in striatal samples of animals subjected to stress. Our results indicate that acute stress is able to increase the striatal LP and reduced the levels of MF, while significantly lowered the manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. No changes were observed in the total striatal content of SOD, nor in GSH levels, but serum corticosterone content was increased by stress. l-CAR exhibited partial protective effects on the immobilized group, reducing the striatal LP and recovering the striatal MF and Mn-SOD activity. Our results suggest that acute restraint stress brings an accurate model for early pro-oxidant responses that can be targeted by broad-spectrum antioxidants like l-CAR.

  17. Molecular and biochemical evidence on the protection of cardiomyocytes from phosphine-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis by acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Baghaei, Amir; Solgi, Reza; Jafari, Abbas; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hossein; Golaghaei, Alireza; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Baeeri, Maryam; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) on pathologic changes of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, ATP production, oxidative stress, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis induced by aluminum phosphide (AlP) poisoning. The study groups included: the Sham that received almond oil only; the AlP that received oral LD50 dose of aluminum; the AC-100, AC-200, and AC-300 which received concurrent oral LD50 dose of AlP and single 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg of ALCAR by intraperitoneal injection. After 24 h, the rats were sacrificed; the heart and blood sample were taken for measurement of biochemical and mitochondrial factors. The results specified that ALCAR significantly attenuated the oxidative stress (elevated ROS and plasma iron levels) caused by AlP poisoning. ALCAR also increased the activity of cytochrome oxidase, which in turn amplified ATP production. Furthermore, flow cytometric assays and caspase activity indicated that ALCAR prohibited AlP-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes.

  18. L-Carnitine supplementation during suckling intensifies the early postnatal skeletal myofiber formation in piglets of low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Lösel, D; Kalbe, C; Rehfeldt, C

    2009-07-01

    by unchanged myofiber size, creatine kinase activity, and protein concentration. The results indicate that energy balance has been improved through intensified fatty acid oxidation. As a consequence, myogenic proliferation appears to be stimulated, which in LW piglets may have contributed to a compensatory increase in myofiber number. Thus, piglets, particularly those of low birth weight, could profit from an early postnatal L-carnitine supplementation, which may attenuate the negative consequences of low birth weight on body composition and meat quality at market weight.

  19. Carnitine prolongs the half-life of ethanol in broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, M O; Cha, Y S; Sachan, D S

    1994-09-01

    The object was to determine if carnitine attenuated ethanol metabolism in broilers similar to that reported in the rats. Two groups (n = 5) of 5-week-old broilers were given for 10 days the feed with or without 0.5% L-carnitine supplement. A single oral dose of ethanol on day 8 was followed by serial blood samples which were analysed for ethanol. Another dose of ethanol was given on day 10 and 2 hr later, plasma and liver were collected and analysed for ethanol, total lipid, triglycerides and carnitine. The carnitine supplemented diet prolonged the half-life of ethanol due to attenuation of ethanol metabolism which is similar to that reported earlier in rodents. The increases in plasma and hepatic acylcarnitines indicate that supplementary carnitine lessens the load of free acyl groups in the liver by eventual oxidation or excretion.

  20. Creatine, L-Carnitine, and ω3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation from Healthy to Diseased Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    D'Antona, Giuseppe; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Micheletti, Piero; Aquilani, Roberto; Nisoli, Enzo; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Daglia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Myopathies are chronic degenerative pathologies that induce the deterioration of the structure and function of skeletal muscle. So far a definitive therapy has not yet been developed and the main aim of myopathy treatment is to slow the progression of the disease. Current nonpharmacological therapies include rehabilitation, ventilator assistance, and nutritional supplements, all of which aim to delay the onset of the disease and relieve its symptoms. Besides an adequate diet, nutritional supplements could play an important role in the treatment of myopathic patients. Here we review the most recent in vitro and in vivo studies investigating the role supplementation with creatine, L-carnitine, and ω3 PUFAs plays in myopathy treatment. Our results suggest that these dietary supplements could have beneficial effects; nevertheless continued studies are required before they could be recommended as a routine treatment in muscle diseases. PMID:25243159

  1. Creatine, L-carnitine, and ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation from healthy to diseased skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    D'Antona, Giuseppe; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Micheletti, Piero; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Aquilani, Roberto; Nisoli, Enzo; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Daglia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Myopathies are chronic degenerative pathologies that induce the deterioration of the structure and function of skeletal muscle. So far a definitive therapy has not yet been developed and the main aim of myopathy treatment is to slow the progression of the disease. Current nonpharmacological therapies include rehabilitation, ventilator assistance, and nutritional supplements, all of which aim to delay the onset of the disease and relieve its symptoms. Besides an adequate diet, nutritional supplements could play an important role in the treatment of myopathic patients. Here we review the most recent in vitro and in vivo studies investigating the role supplementation with creatine, L-carnitine, and ω3 PUFAs plays in myopathy treatment. Our results suggest that these dietary supplements could have beneficial effects; nevertheless continued studies are required before they could be recommended as a routine treatment in muscle diseases.

  2. Mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation in liver homogenates and isolated hepatocytes from control and clofibrate-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Mannaerts, G P; Debeer, L J; Thomas, J; De Schepper, P J

    1979-06-10

    Mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation were compared in whole liver homogenates. Oxidation of 0.2 mM palmitoyl-CoA or oleate by mitochondria increased rapidly with increasing molar substrate:albumin ratios and became saturated at ratios below 3, while peroxisomal oxidation increased more slowly and continued to rise to reach maximal activity in the absence of albumin. Under the latter condition mitochondrial oxidation was severely depressed. In homogenates from normal liver peroxisomal oxidation was lower than mitochondrial oxidation at all ratios tested except when albumin was absent. In contrast with mitochondrial oxidation, peroxisomal oxidation did not produce ketones, was cyanide-insensitive, was not dependent on carnitine, and was not inhibited by (+)-octanoylcarnitine, malonyl-CoA and 4-pentenoate. Mitochondrial oxidation was inhibited by CoASH concentrations that were optimal for peroxisomal oxidation. In the presence of albumin, peroxisomal oxidation was stimulated by Triton X-100 but unaffected by freeze-thawing; both treatments suppressed mitochondrial oxidation. Clofibrate treatment increased mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation 2- and 6- to 8-fold, respectively. Peroxisomal oxidation remained unchanged in starvation and diabetes. Fatty acid oxidation was severely depressed by cyanide and (+)-octanoylcarnitine in hepatocytes from normal rats. Hepatocytes from clofibrate-treated rats, which displayed a 3- to 4-fold increase in fatty acid oxidation, were less inhibited by (+)-octanoylcarnitine. Hydrogen peroxide production was severalfold higher in hepatocytes from treated animals oxidizing fatty acids than in control hepatocytes. Assuming that all H2O2 produced during fatty acid oxidation was due to peroxisomal oxidation, it was calculated that the contribution of the peroxisomes to fatty acid oxidation was less than 10% both in cells from control and clofibrate-treated animals.

  3. Crystal Structure of an L-Carnitine Complex with Pyrogallol[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, I.; Takeuchi, D.; Kitamura, Y.; Okamoto, R.; Aoki, K.

    2012-03-01

    L-Carnitine is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids from cytosol into mitochondria for generating metabolic energy. The survey of crystal structures of carnitine-containing proteins in the Protein Data Bank reveals that carnitine can take several conformations with the quarternary trimethylammonium terminal being always bound to aromatic residues through cation-π interactions in acyltransferases or carnitine-binding proteins. In order to demonstrate the importance of cation-π interaction as a carnitine recognition mechanism in the artificial receptor-ligand system that mimics the carnitine-binding sites, we have determined the crystal structure of a complex formed between L-carnitine and pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer: PCT) as a carnitine receptor, 2PCT·2(L-carnitine)·4EtOH. There form two crystallographically independent monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, which further form an obliquely arranged capsule-like dimeric [PCT·L-carnitine]2 structure through a pair of O-H (PCT)···O (L-carnitine) hydrogen bonds. This is the first report of PCT complex with chiral molecules. In each of the two monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, the L-carnitine molecule takes the elongated form with an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group and the carboxylate oxygen, and the cationic trimethylammonium moiety is incorporated into the cavity of the bowl-shaped PCT molecule through cation-π interactions. These features are similar to those at the D-carnitine-binding site in the crystal structure of the glycine betaine/carnitine/choline-binding protein complex.

  4. Some aspects of carnitine metabolism in avocado (Persea americana) (Short Communication)

    PubMed Central

    Panter, R. A.; Mudd, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    The fact that palmitoyl-l-carnitine is oxidized by avocado mitochondria at a rate comparable with that of succinate oxidation suggests that there are at least two systems for β-oxidation in higher plants. The carnitine-associated system is located in a mitochondrial fraction, whereas the glyoxylate-cycle-associated system is located in the glyoxysomes. PMID:16742829

  5. Carnitine supplementation effects on nonenzymatic antioxidants in young rats submitted to exhaustive exercise stress.

    PubMed

    Bucioli, Sérvio A; De Abreu, Luiz C; Valenti, Vitor E; Vannucchi, Helio

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exercise stress increases oxidative stress in rats. However, antioxidant supplement therapy effects on reactive oxygen substances are conflicting. We evaluated the effects of carnitine on renal nonenzymatic antioxidants in young rats submitted to exhaustive exercise stress. Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: (a) control group (not submitted to exercise stress), (b) exercise stress group, and (c) exercise stress and carnitine group. The rats from group 3 were treated with gavage administration of 1 ml of carnitine (5 mg·kg⁻¹) for 7 consecutive days. The animals from groups 2 and 3 were submitted to a bout of swimming exhaustive exercise stress. Kidney samples were analyzed for reactive substances to thiobarbituric acid by malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and vitamin-E levels. Carnitine treatment attenuated MDA increase caused by exercise stress (1: 0.16 ± 0.02 vs. 2: 0.34 ± 0.07 vs. 3: 0.1 ± 0.01 mmmol per milligram of protein; p < 0.0001). It also increased the renal levels of GSH (1: 23 ± 4 vs. 2: 23 ± 2 vs. 3: 58 ± 9 μmol per gram of protein; p < 0.0001); however, it did not change renal vitamin E (1: 24 ± 5 vs. 2: 27 ± 1 vs. 3: 28 ± 5 μM per gram of tissue; p < 0.001). In conclusion, carnitine improved oxidative stress and partially improved the nonenzymatic antioxidant activity in young rats submitted to exhaustive exercise stress.

  6. Carnitine acts as a compatible solute in Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Jebbar, M; Champion, C; Blanco, C; Bonnassie, S

    1998-03-01

    Carnitine is a trimethyl amino acid found at relatively high concentrations in materials of animal origin. Exogenously provided L-carnitine was found to stimulate growth of Brevibacterium linens ATCC 19391 in media with inhibitory osmotic strength. Its osmoprotective ability was as potent as that of glycine betaine. Electrophoretic and spectroscopic (NMR) analysis showed that this compound is only transiently accumulated, but in significant amounts, by B. linens under hyperosmotic stress and is converted into glycine betaine. The L-carnitine/glycine betaine pathway is inducible by L-carnitine in B. linens. The D-enantiomer did not improve growth of B. linens, even though this solute is accumulated by B. linens at the same level as glycine betaine. The two isomeric forms of carnitine repress the build-up of ectoine, the main endogenous osmolyte in B. linens.

  7. The effects of magnesium, L-carnitine, and concurrent magnesium-L-carnitine supplementation in migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tarighat Esfanjani, Ali; Mahdavi, Reza; Ebrahimi Mameghani, Mehrangiz; Talebi, Mahnaz; Nikniaz, Zeinab; Safaiyan, Abdolrasool

    2012-12-01

    Given the conflicting results about the positive effects of magnesium and L-carnitine and as there is no report concerning concurrent supplementation of magnesium and L-carnitine on migraine prophylaxis, the effects of magnesium, L-carnitine, and concurrent magnesium-L-carnitine supplementation on migraine indicators were assessed. In this clinical trial, 133 migrainous patients were randomly assigned into three intervention groups: magnesium oxide (500 mg/day), L-carnitine (500 mg/day), and Mg-L-carnitine (500 mg/day magnesium and 500 mg/day L-carnitine), and a control group. After 12 weeks of supplementation, the checklist of migraine indicators including migraine attacks/month, migraine days/month, and headache severity was completed, and serum concentrations of magnesium and L-carnitine were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and enzymatic UV test, respectively. The results showed a significant reduction in all migraine indicators in all studied groups (p < 0.05). The ANOVA results showed a significant reduction in migraine frequency across various supplemented and control groups (p = 0.008). By separating the effects of magnesium supplementation from other confounding factors such as routine treatments using the repeated measures and nested model, it was clarified that magnesium supplementation had a significant effect on all migraine indicators. Oral supplementation with magnesium oxide and L-carnitine and concurrent supplementation of Mg-L-carnitine besides routine treatments could be effective in migraine prophylaxis; however, larger trials are needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  8. Structural model of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I based on the carnitine acetyltransferase crystal.

    PubMed Central

    Morillas, Montserrat; López-VViñas, Eduardo; Valencia, Alfonso; Serra, Dolors; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Asins, Guillermina

    2004-01-01

    CPT I (carnitine palmitoyltransferase I) catalyses the conversion of palmitoyl-CoA into palmitoylcarnitine in the presence of L-carnitine, facilitating the entry of fatty acids into mitochondria. We propose a 3-D (three-dimensional) structural model for L-CPT I (liver CPT I), based on the similarity of this enzyme to the recently crystallized mouse carnitine acetyltransferase. The model includes 607 of the 773 amino acids of L-CPT I, and the positions of carnitine, CoA and the palmitoyl group were assigned by superposition and docking analysis. Functional analysis of this 3-D model included the mutagenesis of several amino acids in order to identify putative catalytic residues. Mutants D477A, D567A and E590D showed reduced L-CPT I activity. In addition, individual mutation of amino acids forming the conserved Ser685-Thr686-Ser687 motif abolished enzyme activity in mutants T686A and S687A and altered K(m) and the catalytic efficiency for carnitine in mutant S685A. We conclude that the catalytic residues are His473 and Asp477, while Ser687 probably stabilizes the transition state. Several conserved lysines, i.e. Lys455, Lys505, Lys560 and Lys561, were also mutated. Only mutants K455A and K560A showed decreases in activity of 50%. The model rationalizes the finding of nine natural mutations in patients with hereditary L-CPT I deficiencies. PMID:14711372

  9. Modulatory effects of vitamin E, acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid on new potential biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease in rat model.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanaa H

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common chronic neurodegenerative disorder associated with aging. This study aimed to explore new markers for AD as total homocysteine (tHcy), insulin, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), interlukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α); to determine the modulatory effects of vitamin E (VE), acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) and α-lipoic acid (LA) on the investigated parameters and to evaluate the possible therapeutic role of these nutraceutical in AD-induced in rats. Our results revealed that brain acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity and tHcy levels were significantly increased in AD model. Folic acid, vitamin B(12) levels and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity were markedly reduced. Plasma insulin and IGF-1 levels were noticeably decreased but plasma TNF-α and IL-1β concentrations were significantly increased, confirming that abnormal inflammatory response is associated with AD. Treatment by VE, ALC and LA restored the above mentioned parameters to about normal levels comparable to those of donepezil, indicating that tHcy, insulin, IGF-1, IL-1β and TNF-α may be considered as new biomarkers for AD. The study points to the potential restoring effects of VE, ALC and LA in AD model. Our study provides evidence for the importance of dietary supplementation in delaying the progression of age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Requirements for Carnitine Shuttle-Mediated Translocation of Mitochondrial Acetyl Moieties to the Yeast Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    van Rossum, Harmen M.; Kozak, Barbara U.; Niemeijer, Matthijs S.; Dykstra, James C.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In many eukaryotes, the carnitine shuttle plays a key role in intracellular transport of acyl moieties. Fatty acid-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells employ this shuttle to translocate acetyl units into their mitochondria. Mechanistically, the carnitine shuttle should be reversible, but previous studies indicate that carnitine shuttle-mediated export of mitochondrial acetyl units to the yeast cytosol does not occur in vivo. This apparent unidirectionality was investigated by constitutively expressing genes encoding carnitine shuttle-related proteins in an engineered S. cerevisiae strain, in which cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthesis could be switched off by omitting lipoic acid from growth media. Laboratory evolution of this strain yielded mutants whose growth on glucose, in the absence of lipoic acid, was l-carnitine dependent, indicating that in vivo export of mitochondrial acetyl units to the cytosol occurred via the carnitine shuttle. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was identified as the predominant source of acetyl-CoA in the evolved strains. Whole-genome sequencing revealed mutations in genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (MCT1), nuclear-mitochondrial communication (RTG2), and encoding a carnitine acetyltransferase (YAT2). Introduction of these mutations into the nonevolved parental strain enabled l-carnitine-dependent growth on glucose. This study indicates intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA concentration and constitutive expression of carnitine shuttle genes as key factors in enabling in vivo export of mitochondrial acetyl units via the carnitine shuttle. PMID:27143389

  11. Aspirin increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uppala, Radha; Dudiak, Brianne; Beck, Megan E; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Stolz, Donna B; Goetzman, Eric S

    2017-01-08

    The metabolic effects of salicylates are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of aspirin on fatty acid oxidation. Aspirin increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation, but inhibited peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, in two different cell lines. Aspirin increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and was found to be a stronger acetylating agent in vitro than acetyl-CoA. However, aspirin-induced acetylation did not alter the activity of fatty acid oxidation proteins, and knocking out the mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 did not affect the induction of long-chain fatty acid oxidation by aspirin. Aspirin did not change oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids, which can freely traverse the mitochondrial membrane. Together, these data indicate that aspirin does not directly alter mitochondrial matrix fatty acid oxidation enzymes, but most likely exerts its effects at the level of long-chain fatty acid transport into mitochondria. The drive on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation may be a compensatory response to altered mitochondrial morphology and inhibited electron transport chain function, both of which were observed after 24 h incubation of cells with aspirin. These studies provide insight into the pathophysiology of Reye Syndrome, which is known to be triggered by aspirin ingestion in patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders.

  12. [Slow replenishment of carnitine level after long-term treatment with pivampicillin/pivmecillinam].

    PubMed

    Diep, Q N; Bøhmer, T; Storrøsten, O T; Holme, J I; Torvik, A; Loennecken, C W; Monstad, P; Jellum, E

    1994-05-30

    Long-term treatment with pivampicillin and pivmecillinam for 6-24 months in five adults and one child reduced the total serum carnitine concentrations to 3.7-14.0 mumol/l (reference value 25-66 mumol/l). The muscle carnitine was reduced to 0.3-0.7 mumol/g wet weight (reference value 3-5 mumol/g) in two cases. All patients had asthenia and muscle symptoms with weakness and pain. One showed signs of carnitine depletion in the liver, with increased secretion of dicarboxylic acids (C6, C8, C10) in urine and limited ketone body formation during prolonged fasting (32 hours). The serum carnitine increased slowly after cessation of therapy and reached normal concentrations after 6-12 months. All symptoms caused by carnitine depletion disappeared after the serum carnitine reached 20 mumol/l. This was achieved on a normal diet without carnitine supplement.

  13. Effect of carnitine supplementation on mitochondrial enzymes in liver and skeletal muscle of rat after dietary lipid manipulation and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Jyothsna; Jeevaratnam, K

    2010-05-01

    Effect of carnitine supplementation in enhancing fat utilization was investigated by looking into its effects on mitochondrial respiratory enzymes activity in liver and muscle as well as on membrane fatty acid profile in rats fed with hydrogenated fat (HF) and MUFA-rich peanut oil (PO) with or without exercise. Male Wistar rats were fed HF-diet (4 groups, 8 rats in each group) or PO-diet (4 groups, 8 rats in each group), with or without carnitine for 24 weeks. One group for each diet acted as sedentary control while the other groups were allowed swimming for 1 hr a day, 6 days/week, for 24 weeks. The PO diet as well as exercise increased the activities of mitochondrial enzymes, NADH dehydrogenase, NADH oxidase, cytochrome C reductase, cytochrome oxidase, while carnitine supplementation further augmented the oxidative capacity of both liver and muscle significantly by enhancing the activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferase and the respiratory chain enzymes. These effects can be attributed to the enhanced unsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids of mitochondria and may be due to increased fluidity of the membrane in these rats. Results of this study show a significant health promoting effects of carnitine supplementation which could be further augmented by regular exercise.

  14. Quantitative estimation of absorption and degradation of a carnitine supplement by human adults.

    PubMed

    Rebouche, C J

    1991-12-01

    Results of kinetic and pharmacokinetic studies have suggested that dietary carnitine supplements are not totally absorbed, and are in part degraded in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. To determine the metabolic fate of dietary carnitine supplements in humans, we administered orally a tracer dose of [methyl-3H]L-carnitine with a meal to five normal adult males, who had been adapted to a high-carnitine diet plus carnitine supplement (2 g/d) for 14 days. Appearance of [methyl-3H]L-carnitine and metabolites in serum, and urinary and fecal excretion of radiolabeled carnitine and metabolites was monitored for 5 to 11 days following administration of the test dose. Maximum concentration of [methyl-3H]L-carnitine in serum occurred at 2.0 to 4.5 hours after administration of the tracer, indicating relatively slow absorption from the intestinal lumen. Total radioactive metabolites excreted in urine and feces ranged from 47% to 55% of the ingested tracer. Major metabolites found were [3H]trimethylamine N-oxide (8% to 49% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in urine) and [3H]gamma-butyrobetaine (0.44% to 45% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in feces). Urinary excretion of total carnitine was 16% to 23% of intake. Fecal excretion of total carnitine was negligible (less than 2% of total carnitine excretion).

  15. Downregulation of Carnitine Acyl-Carnitine Translocase by miRNAs 132 and 212 Amplifies Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Mufaddal S.; Rabaglia, Mary E.; Bhatnagar, Sushant; Shang, Jin; Ilkayeva, Olga; Mynatt, Randall; Zhou, Yun-Ping; Schadt, Eric E.; Thornberry, Nancy A.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Keller, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that micro-RNAs (miRNAs) 132 and 212 are differentially upregulated in response to obesity in two mouse strains that differ in their susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes. Here we show the overexpression of miRNAs 132 and 212 enhances insulin secretion (IS) in response to glucose and other secretagogues including nonfuel stimuli. We determined that carnitine acyl-carnitine translocase (CACT; Slc25a20) is a direct target of these miRNAs. CACT is responsible for transporting long-chain acyl-carnitines into the mitochondria for β-oxidation. Small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of CACT in β-cells led to the accumulation of fatty acyl-carnitines and enhanced IS. The addition of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines promoted IS from rat insulinoma β-cells (INS-1) as well as primary mouse islets. The effect on INS-1 cells was augmented in response to suppression of CACT. A nonhydrolyzable ether analog of palmitoyl-carnitine stimulated IS, showing that β-oxidation of palmitoyl-carnitine is not required for its stimulation of IS. These studies establish a link between miRNA-dependent regulation of CACT and fatty acyl-carnitine–mediated regulation of IS. PMID:24969106

  16. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma; Iacobazzi, Francesco; Liu, Aiping; Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP{sup +}) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP{sup +} accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [{sup 14}C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [{sup 14}C]O{sub 2} release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency.

  17. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine and R-alpha-lipoic acid treatment in ApoE4 mouse as a model of human Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Justin C; Liu, Jiankang; Fischbach, Kathryn; Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michel; Obrenovich, Mark E; Gasimov, Eldar; Alvarez, Ludis Morales; Ames, Bruce N; Lamanna, Joseph C; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2009-08-15

    We measured age-dependent effects of human ApoE4 on cerebral blood flow (CBF) using ApoE4 transgenic mice compared to age-matched wild-type (WT) mice by use of [(14)C] iodoantipyrene autoradiography. ApoE4 associated factors reduce CBF gradually to create brain hypoperfusion when compared to WT, and the differences in CBF are greatest as animals age from 6-weeks to 12-months. Transmission electron microscopy with colloidal gold immunocytochemistry showed structural damage in young and aged microvessel endothelium of ApoE4 animals extended to the cytoplasm of perivascular cells, perivascular nerve terminals and hippocampal neurons and glial cells. These abnormalities coexist with mitochondrial structural alteration and mitochondrial DNA overproliferation and/or deletion in all brain cellular compartments. Spatial memory and temporal memory tests showed a trend in improving cognitive function in ApoE4 mice fed selective mitochondrial antioxidants acetyl-l-carnitine and R-alpha-lipoic acid. Our findings indicate that ApoE4 genotype-induced mitochondrial changes and associated structural damage may explain age-dependent pathology seen in AD, indicating potential for novel treatment strategies in the near future.

  18. Cardiac effects of carnitine supplementation in experimental uraemia.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Anne-Marie; Reddy, Veena; Bhandari, Sunil

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease. The uraemic heart undergoes remodelling and changes in metabolic function. Experimental uraemia produces a reduction in the myocardial energy reserve phosphocreatine in parallel with left ventricular hypertrophy and depletion of serum carnitine. This study investigated the effects of chronic L-carnitine supplementation on myocardial substrate metabolism and function in the experimental uraemia. Experimental uraemia was induced surgically in male Sprague-Dawley rats via a subtotal nephrectomy. Carnitine was administered continuously via subcutaneous mini-osmotic pumps. Cardiac function and substrate oxidation were assessed in vitro by means of isovolumic perfusion using 13C NMR, at 3 and 6 weeks. Uraemic animals exhibited anaemia, kidney dysfunction and systemic carnitine deficiency but no myocardial tissue carnitine deficiency. Myocardial hypertrophy was abolished following carnitine supplementation. This was associated with a reduction in glucose utilisation. In summary carnitine supplementation prevents cardiac hypertrophy, and this effect is amplified with the duration of treatment. This is associated with a reduction in myocardial glucose utilisation but no significant modulation of myocardial function.

  19. Metabolic effects induced by L-carnitine and propionyl-L-carnitine in human hypoxic muscle tissue during exercise.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Montanari, G; Mancinelli, G; D'Iddio, S

    1990-01-01

    An experimental model was developed to investigate some metabolic effects of strenuous exercise in hypoxic muscle tissue of human volunteers. The incidence of carnitine supplementation was studied, assuming as marker the thiobarbituric acid reaction products analysed in plasma samples collected during the course of the protocol programme. Propionyl-L-carnitine appears to antagonize in a significant degree the damaging effects of muscle fatigue combined with hypoxic status. Under these conditions the detoxifying role played by propionyl-L-carnitine, previously reported in various tissues and in other pathological conditions, appears to be relevant, although further studies are needed to elucidate the pharmacodynamics of this molecule.

  20. An Acidity Scale for Binary Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the classification of binary oxides as acidic, basic, or amphoteric. Demonstrates how a numerical scale for acidity/basicity of binary oxides can be constructed using thermochemical data for oxoacid salts. Presents the calculations derived from the data that provide the numeric scale values. (TW)

  1. Pro-Lipogenic Action of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    One of the key mediators of fatty acid b-oxidation is carnitine pamitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A), which is overexpressed in malignant ovarian...phospholipases is consistent with our previous observation that exogenously supplemented LPA did not fully reverse the effect of the iPLA2b inhibitor BEL on...MAGL, inhibits growth of ovarian cancer cell lines. Most interestingly, inhibition of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting

  2. Preparation of radioactive acetyl-l-carnitine by an enzymatic exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Emaus, R.; Bieber, L.L.

    1982-01-15

    A rapid method for the preparation of (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine is described. The method involves exchange of (1-/sup 14/C)acetic acid into a pool of unlabeled acetyl-L-carnitine using the enzymes acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. After isotopic equilibrium is attained, radioactive acetylcarnitine is separated from the other reaction components by chromatography on Dowex 1 (C1/sup -/) anion exchange resin. One of the procedures used to verify the product (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine can be used to synthesize (3S)-(5-/sup 14/C)citric acid.

  3. Transient carnitine transport defect with cholestatic jaundice: report of one case in a premature baby

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Seok; Choo, Young Kwang; Lee, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Carnitine (β-hydroxy-γ-trimethylaminobutyric acid) is involved in the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix and the removal of potentially toxic acylcarnitine esters. Transient carnitine transport defect is a rare condition in newborns reported in 1/90,000 live births. In this paper, we describe a case of transient carnitine transport defect found in a premature baby who had prolonged cholestatic jaundice and poor weight gain, and who responded dramatically to oral carnitine supplementation. PMID:22375151

  4. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio; Takakura, Hisashi; Hanai, Yoshiteru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Masuda, Kazumi

    2012-02-24

    Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL(uptake)) of l-[(3)H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL(uptake) of [(14)C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL(uptake) of l-[(3)H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p<0.05). The CL(uptake) of [(14)C]IAP was much higher than that of l-[(3)H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p<0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly via the contraction-induced translocation of its specific transporter OCTN2 to the plasma membrane.

  5. Carnitine, acylcarnitine and amino acid profiles analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M G; Crocker, J F S; O'Regan, P; Lee, S H S; Geldenhuys, L; Dooley, K; Al-Khalidi, M; Acott, P D

    2007-08-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to analyze multiple serum metabolites for the first time in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy (AHE). AHE is characterized by acute liver failure that can lead to potentially lethal increases in intracranial pressure. We have reproduced AHE in young CD-1 mice exposed from postnatal day (P) 2-13 to the industrial surfactant, Toximul 3409F (Tox), and then infected intranasally on P14 with sublethal doses (LD(10-30)) of mouse-adapted human influenza B (Lee) virus (FluB). The sera analyzed by MS/MS were from mice exhibiting typical markers of Tox-mediated potentiation of viral illness, including reduced weights and blood glucose levels. Most metabolite abnormalities were not evident until five days after viral infection (P19), the time corresponding to the onset of weight loss and mortality. Values for fatty acylcarnitines and amino acids in the Tox+FluB-treated mice were either additive or supra-additive relative to the effects of either treatment alone. Amino acid profiles were consistent with those reported for human AHE. None of the treated mice exhibited signs of carnitine deficiency, and propionylcarnitine levels were normal. On P19, mice given combined Tox+FluB treatment had significant increases in levels of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (C6:0-C12:0 and C14:0-C20:0, respectively), including their monounsaturated metabolites. Levels of medium-chain dicarboxylic and long-chain hydroxy-acylcarnitines were also elevated in the combined treatment group. The results of this study indicate a diffuse mitochondrial dysfunction in Tox+FluB-treated mice that results in a serum metabolite profile unique from those observed in classic inherited metabolic disorders.

  6. L-Carnitine intake prevents irregular feeding-induced obesity and lipid metabolism disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Guo, Anqi; Shu, Qingyu; Qi, Yangjian; Kong, Ying; Sun, Zhiping; Sun, Shumin; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-10

    L-Carnitine supplementation has been used to reduce obesity caused by high-fat diet, which is beneficial for lowering blood and hepatic lipid levels, and for ameliorating fatty liver. However, whether l-carnitine may affect irregular feeding-induced obesity and lipid metabolism disorder is still largely unknown. In the present study, we developed a time-delayed pattern of eating, and investigated the effects of l-carnitine on the irregular eating induced adiposity in mice. After an experimental period of 8 weeks with l-carnitine supplementation, l-carnitine significantly inhibited body weight increase and epididymal fat weight gain induced by the time-delayed feeding. In addition, l-carnitine administration decreased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (GPT), glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) and triglyceride (TG), which were significantly elevated by the irregular feeding. Moreover, mice supplemented with l-carnitine did not display glucose intolerance-associated hallmarks, which were found in the irregular feeding-induced obesity. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that l-carnitine counteracted the negative alterations of lipid metabolic gene expression (fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase) in the liver and fat of mice caused by the irregular feeding. Therefore, our results suggest that the time-delayed pattern of eating can induce adiposity and lipid metabolic disorders, while l-carnitine supplementation might prevent these negative symptoms.

  7. L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    2004-11-22

    Although advertised on the Internet for weight loss, prevention of aging and enhancement of athletic and sexual performance, levocarnitine has only one well-established indication, and that is for treatment of carnitine deficiency. In clinical trials, the drug also seems to have had modest effects in some other conditions, particularly intermittent claudication and recovery after myocardial infarction, but more studies are needed.

  8. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jambor de Sousa, Ulrike L.; Koss, Michael D.; Fillies, Marion; Gahl, Anja; Scheeder, Martin R.L.; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Monika . E-mail: monika.leonhardt@inw.agrl.ethz.ch

    2005-12-16

    To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1{alpha} (CPT1{alpha}). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1{alpha} transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1{alpha} over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1{alpha}, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo.

  9. The effect of dietary α-lipoic acid, betaine, l-carnitine, and swimming on the obesity of mice induced by a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Jang, Aera; Kim, Dongwook; Sung, Ki-Seung; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Jo, Cheorun

    2014-08-01

    We evaluate the effect of supplementation, at 300 mg kg(-1) body weight (BW), with the antioxidants α-lipoic acid (AL), betaine (BT), l-carnitine (LC), and the combination of these and exercise on obesity induced by a 9 week high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Healthy 5 week-old male C57BL/6J mice were divided into 9 groups: (1) CON, control group fed with a commercial mice chow containing 10% crude fat; (2) HFD, high fat diet group fed with a commercial mice chow containing 60% crude fat; (3) HFD-AL, HFD group fed with AL; (4) HFD-BT, HFD group fed with BT; (5) HFD-LC, HFD group fed with LC; (6) HFD-SW, HFD with swimming as an exercise; (7) HFD-SWAL, HFD-AL with swimming; (8) HFD-SWBT, HFD-BT with swimming, and (9) HFD-SWLC, HFD-LC with swimming. The BW of mice with LC and swimming reduced the increase of BW after 9 weeks. Relative adipose tissue weights were reduced by the combinations of antioxidant supplementation and swimming. Levels of serum glucose and leptin were reduced in the HFD-SWLC group when compared with the HFD group. Serum triglyceride and total cholesterol and the size of adipose were also decreased in the HFD-LC and HFD-SWLC groups. These results show that LC at a dose of 300 mg kg(-1) BW was the most effective for reducing fat accumulation in mice with HFD for 9 weeks. In addition, exercise should be given in combination to enhance the BW reduction and serum lipid level.

  10. Increasing Fatty Acid Oxidation Remodels the Hypothalamic Neurometabolome to Mitigate Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Joseph W.; Aja, Susan; Li, Qun; Bandaru, Veera V. R.; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Haughey, Norman J.; Kuhajda, Francis P.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2014-01-01

    Modification of hypothalamic fatty acid (FA) metabolism can improve energy homeostasis and prevent hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in diet-induced obesity (DIO) from a diet high in saturated fatty acids. We have shown previously that C75, a stimulator of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1) and fatty acid oxidation (FAOx), exerts at least some of its hypophagic effects via neuronal mechanisms in the hypothalamus. In the present work, we characterized the effects of C75 and another anorexigenic compound, the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) inhibitor FSG67, on FA metabolism, metabolomics profiles, and metabolic stress responses in cultured hypothalamic neurons and hypothalamic neuronal cell lines during lipid excess with palmitate. Both compounds enhanced palmitate oxidation, increased ATP, and inactivated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hypothalamic neurons in vitro. Lipidomics and untargeted metabolomics revealed that enhanced catabolism of FA decreased palmitate availability and prevented the production of fatty acylglycerols, ceramides, and cholesterol esters, lipids that are associated with lipotoxicity-provoked metabolic stress. This improved metabolic signature was accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and yet favorable changes in oxidative stress, overt ER stress, and inflammation. We propose that enhancing FAOx in hypothalamic neurons exposed to excess lipids promotes metabolic remodeling that reduces local inflammatory and cell stress responses. This shift would restore mitochondrial function such that increased FAOx can produce hypothalamic neuronal ATP and lead to decreased food intake and body weight to improve systemic metabolism. PMID:25541737

  11. The Mechanism of High Pressure Oxidations of Aliphatic Acids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ACETIC ACID , *OXIDATION), (*CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, OXIDATION), CHROMIUM ALLOYS, REACTION KINETICS, COPPER ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, TEMPERATURE, HIGH PRESSURE, CATALYSTS, GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY, VOLUMETRIC ANALYSIS, THESES

  12. Hepatic uptake of gamma-butyrobetaine, a precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaharu; Nakanishi, Takeo; Shibue, Yuta; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Moseley, Richard H; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Tamai, Ikumi

    2009-10-01

    Gamma-butyrobetaine (GBB) is a precursor in the biosynthesis of carnitine, which plays an important role in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids, and is converted to carnitine by gamma-butyrobetaine dioxygenase (BBD) predominantly in liver. We investigated the molecular mechanism of hepatic uptake of GBB in rat hepatocytes. Cellular localization of rat Octn2 (rOctn2:Slc22A5) was studied by Western blot analysis. Uptake of deuterated GBB (d(3)-GBB) was examined in HEK293 cells expressing rOctn2 (HEK293/rOctn2) and freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. d(3)-GBB was quantified by use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Western blot analysis demonstrated an expression of OCTN2 protein in hepatic basolateral membrane but not in bile canalicular membrane fraction. Furthermore, we found that d(3)-GBB was taken up by rOctn2 in an Na(+)-dependent manner with K(m) value of 13 microM. The apparent K(m) value for d(3)-GBB transport in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes was 9 microM. d(3)-GBB uptake by the rat hepatocytes was inhibited by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to 30% of the control, whereas it was inhibited by carnitine to 62% of the control, even at 500 microM. Furthermore, d(3)-GBB uptake by rat hepatocytes was decreased by 45% with rat Gat2 (Slc6A13, a major liver GABA transporter) silenced by the microRNA method. Accordingly, the present study clearly demonstrates that GBB is taken up by hepatocytes for carnitine biosynthesis not only via Octn2 but also via the GABA transporter, possibly Gat2.

  13. Supplementation with carnitine reduces the severity of constipation: a retrospective study of patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Shinya; Inoue, Keisuke; Aomatsu, Tomoki; Yoden, Atsushi; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Carnitine is an essential nutrient for the mitochondrial transport of fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency causes a variety of symptoms in multiple organs. Patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities often have carnitine deficiency. This study aimed to determine the correlation between constipation and carnitine deficiency in them. Patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities at our hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The correlation between level of free carnitine and severity of constipation was examined. Constipation and non-constipation groups were compared for age; sex; body mass index; bed rest period; use of anti-epileptic drugs, valproate sodium, or enteral nutrition; and serum levels of albumin, pre-albumin, totalcholesterol, free carnitine, folic acid, and trace elements. Moreover, severity of constipation before and after carnitine supplementation was assessed. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. Of these, 14 were assigned to the constipation group and 13 to the non-constipation group. The free carnitine level was significantly correlated with severity of constipation (R = 0.7604, p<0.01). Free carnitine was significantly lower in the constipation compared with the non-constipation group (p<0.01). No other significant differences between the groups were found. The severity of constipation was significantly relieved after carnitine supplementation (p<0.001). In conclusion, carnitine supplementation could reduce the severity of constipation. PMID:28366991

  14. Supplementation with carnitine reduces the severity of constipation: a retrospective study of patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Murata, Shinya; Inoue, Keisuke; Aomatsu, Tomoki; Yoden, Atsushi; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Carnitine is an essential nutrient for the mitochondrial transport of fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency causes a variety of symptoms in multiple organs. Patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities often have carnitine deficiency. This study aimed to determine the correlation between constipation and carnitine deficiency in them. Patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities at our hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The correlation between level of free carnitine and severity of constipation was examined. Constipation and non-constipation groups were compared for age; sex; body mass index; bed rest period; use of anti-epileptic drugs, valproate sodium, or enteral nutrition; and serum levels of albumin, pre-albumin, totalcholesterol, free carnitine, folic acid, and trace elements. Moreover, severity of constipation before and after carnitine supplementation was assessed. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. Of these, 14 were assigned to the constipation group and 13 to the non-constipation group. The free carnitine level was significantly correlated with severity of constipation (R = 0.7604, p<0.01). Free carnitine was significantly lower in the constipation compared with the non-constipation group (p<0.01). No other significant differences between the groups were found. The severity of constipation was significantly relieved after carnitine supplementation (p<0.001). In conclusion, carnitine supplementation could reduce the severity of constipation.

  15. Biotin and carnitine deficiency due to hypoallergenic formula nutrition in infants with milk allergy.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisako; Tokuriki, Shuko; Okuno, Takashi; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Yasushi, Akiba; Matsuyama, Go; Sawada, Ken; Ohshima, Yusei

    2014-04-01

    Amino acid formulas and hydrolyzed formulas given to infants in Japan with milk allergies theoretically contain little, if any, biotin and carnitine. We assessed biotin and carnitine insufficiency in six infants with milk allergy who were fed amino acid formulas and/or hydrolyzed formulas, by measuring urine 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-HIA) and serum free carnitine (C0), respectively. All patients presented with elevated urine 3-HIA and lowered serum C0 compared with post-menstrual age-matched infants who were fed breast milk or standard infant formulas. Supplementation with biotin and L-carnitine immediately improved the insufficiency. Care should be taken to avoid biotin and carnitine deficiency in allergic infants fed amino acid or hydrolyzed formulas.

  16. Omega-9 Oleic Acid Induces Fatty Acid Oxidation and Decreases Organ Dysfunction and Mortality in Experimental Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Medeiros-de-Moraes, Isabel Matos; Oliveira, Flora Magno de Jesus; Burth, Patrícia; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Castro Faria, Mauro Velho; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire de

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by inflammatory and metabolic alterations, which lead to massive cytokine production, oxidative stress and organ dysfunction. In severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome, plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) are increased. Several NEFA are deleterious to cells, activate Toll-like receptors and inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase, causing lung injury. A Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil is beneficial. The main component of olive oil is omega-9 oleic acid (OA), a monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA). We analyzed the effect of OA supplementation on sepsis. OA ameliorated clinical symptoms, increased the survival rate, prevented liver and kidney injury and decreased NEFA plasma levels in mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). OA did not alter food intake and weight gain but diminished reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NEFA plasma levels. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT1A) mRNA levels were increased, while uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) liver expression was enhanced in mice treated with OA. OA also inhibited the decrease in 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) expression and increased the enzyme expression in the liver of OA-treated mice compared to septic animals. We showed that OA pretreatment decreased NEFA concentration and increased CPT1A and UCP2 and AMPK levels, decreasing ROS production. We suggest that OA has a beneficial role in sepsis by decreasing metabolic dysfunction, supporting the benefits of diets high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA).

  17. Wet oxidation of salicylic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2010-11-15

    Salicylic acid is a frequent pollutant in several industrial wastewaters. Uncatalyzed wet air oxidation, which is a promising technique for the treatment of phenolic effluents, has not been analyzed yet for the removal of salicylic acid. The effect of different conditions of pH (1.3-12.3), pressure (1.0-4.1 MPa), temperature (413-443 K), and initial concentrations (1.45-14.50 mM) on the wet oxidation of salicylate/salicylic acid solutions have here been investigated. The pH value of the reaction media was found to be a key parameter for the rate of the oxidation process with an optimum at pH 3.1, when the concentrations of salicylic acid and salicylate were similar. The oxidation reaction followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with respect to salicylic acid and 0.82 order with respect to dissolved oxygen. Additionally, the evolution of the color during the wet oxidation was analyzed and discussed in relation with the formation of intermediate compounds. Then, a reaction pathway for the noncatalytic wet oxidation of the salicylic acid was proposed.

  18. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mass spectrometry is a device that consists of stable isotope internal standards, control materials... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1055...

  19. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2

    SciTech Connect

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio; Takakura, Hisashi; Hanai, Yoshiteru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Masuda, Kazumi

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscle contraction augmented carnitine uptake into rat hindlimb muscles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in carnitine uptake was due to an intrinsic clearance, not blood flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histochemical analysis showed sarcolemmal OCTN2 was emphasized after contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OCTN2 protein in sarcolemmal fraction was increased in contracting muscles. -- Abstract: Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL{sub uptake}) of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL{sub uptake} of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p < 0.05). The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]IAP was much higher than that of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p < 0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly

  20. Caveolin-1 - A Novel Interacting Partner of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter (Octn2): Effect of Protein Kinase C on This Interaction in Rat Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Czeredys, Magdalena; Samluk, Łukasz; Michalec, Katarzyna; Tułodziecka, Karolina; Skowronek, Krzysztof; Nałęcz, Katarzyna A.

    2013-01-01

    OCTN2 - the Organic Cation Transporter Novel family member 2 (SLC22A5) is known to be a xenobiotic/drug transporter. It transports as well carnitine - a compound necessary for oxidation of fatty acids and mutations of its gene cause primary carnitine deficiency. Octn2 regulation by protein kinase C (PKC) was studied in rat astrocytes - cells in which β-oxidation takes place in the brain. Activation of PKC with phorbol ester stimulated L-carnitine transport and increased cell surface presence of the transporter, although no PKC-specific phosphorylation of Octn2 could be detected. PKC activation resulted in an augmented Octn2 presence in cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich microdomains of plasma membrane (rafts) and increased co-precipitation of Octn2 with raft-proteins, caveolin-1 and flotillin-1. Deletion of potential caveolin-1 binding motifs pointed to amino acids 14–22 and 447–454 as the caveolin-1 binding sites within Octn2 sequence. A direct interaction of Octn2 with caveolin-1 in astrocytes upon PKC activation was detected by proximity ligation assay, while such an interaction was excluded in case of flotillin-1. Functioning of a multi-protein complex regulated by PKC has been postulated in rOctn2 trafficking to the cell surface, a process which could be important both under physiological conditions, when carnitine facilitates fatty acids catabolism and controls free Coenzyme A pool as well as in pathology, when transport of several drugs can induce secondary carnitine deficiency. PMID:24349196

  1. Might carnitine status in animals indicate environmental/toxicological harm at the cellular level?

    SciTech Connect

    Garst, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    It is well known that R-(L)-carnitine (Cn) is essential for the energy-producing, mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long chain fatty acids. Cn can ameliorate the diverse effects of drugs, a chemicals and pollutants. Moreover, the toxicities of carbon monoxide, several heavy metals, and even the antibiotic cephaloridine seem mediated, in part, by actions affecting the Cn system. Data which could suggest that the Cn system is an integrator/regulator of the cellular response by the organism to it`s environment is described.

  2. Effects of dietary α-lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, and sex on antioxidative ability, energy, and lipid metabolism in broilers.

    PubMed

    Jia, R; Bao, Y H; Zhang, Y; Ji, C; Zhao, L H; Zhang, J Y; Gao, C Q; Ma, Q G

    2014-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary α-lipoic acid (LA), acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC), and sex on antioxidative ability, energy, and lipid metabolism in broilers. A total of 972 one-day-old broilers with equal sex were randomly assigned in a 3 × 3 × 2 factorial design using 3 LA, 3 ALC levels, and 2 sexes (6 replications, 9 birds/replication). The LA and ALC levels were 0, 50, and 100 mg/kg, respectively. Results showed that increased LA or ALC resulted in increased total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and decreased levels of malondialdehyde in serum and liver of birds (P < 0.05). In addition, with increasing addition of LA or ALC, an increased (P < 0.01) level of insulin (Ins), as well as decreased (P < 0.05) levels of glucose and glucagon (Glu), were observed in serum of broilers. Total cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) levels decreased (P < 0.05) and nonesterified fatty acid, lipoprotein lipase, and lipase levels increased (P < 0.05) in serum with increased administration of LA or ALC. Moreover, a significant (P < 0.05) interaction of LA × ALC was observed for serum and liver SOD, serum GSH-Px, glucose, and TG levels. Birds fed diets containing 50 mg/kg of LA and 50 mg/kg of ALC had higher serum and liver SOD activities and lower serum glucose and TG levels than those fed diets containing 100 mg/kg of LA or ALC alone. The main effect of sex and all interactions among main effects (except LA × ALC) were not significant (P > 0.05) for all of the above parameters. Overall, the present data indicate that LA or ALC supplementation, or both, at low levels (50 or 100 mg/kg) improved antioxidative ability, energy metabolism, and lipid metabolism in broilers, and synergistic effects by the combined supplementation of LA and ALC were indicated by serum and liver SOD activities and serum glucose and TG levels.

  3. The brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1c regulates energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Michael J; Kurama, Takeshi; Dai, Yun; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shun-Ichiro; Cha, Seung Hun; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M Daniel

    2006-05-09

    Fatty acid synthesis in the central nervous system is implicated in the control of food intake and energy expenditure. An intermediate in this pathway, malonyl-CoA, mediates these effects. Malonyl-CoA is an established inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an outer mitochondrial membrane enzyme that controls entry of fatty acids into mitochondria and, thereby, fatty acid oxidation. CPT1c, a brain-specific enzyme with high sequence similarity to CPT1a (liver) and CPT1b (muscle) was recently discovered. All three CPTs bind malonyl-CoA, and CPT1a and CPT1b catalyze acyl transfer from various fatty acyl-CoAs to carnitine, whereas CPT1c does not. These findings suggest that CPT1c has a unique function or activation mechanism. We produced a targeted mouse knockout (KO) of CPT1c to investigate its role in energy homeostasis. CPT1c KO mice have lower body weight and food intake, which is consistent with a role as an energy-sensing malonyl-CoA target. Paradoxically, CPT1c KO mice fed a high-fat diet are more susceptible to obesity, suggesting that CPT1c is protective against the effects of fat feeding. CPT1c KO mice also exhibit decreased rates of fatty acid oxidation, which may contribute to their increased susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings indicate that CPT1c is necessary for the regulation of energy homeostasis.

  4. The brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1c regulates energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Kurama, Takeshi; Dai, Yun; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shun-ichiro; Cha, Seung Hun; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in the central nervous system is implicated in the control of food intake and energy expenditure. An intermediate in this pathway, malonyl-CoA, mediates these effects. Malonyl-CoA is an established inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an outer mitochondrial membrane enzyme that controls entry of fatty acids into mitochondria and, thereby, fatty acid oxidation. CPT1c, a brain-specific enzyme with high sequence similarity to CPT1a (liver) and CPT1b (muscle) was recently discovered. All three CPTs bind malonyl-CoA, and CPT1a and CPT1b catalyze acyl transfer from various fatty acyl-CoAs to carnitine, whereas CPT1c does not. These findings suggest that CPT1c has a unique function or activation mechanism. We produced a targeted mouse knockout (KO) of CPT1c to investigate its role in energy homeostasis. CPT1c KO mice have lower body weight and food intake, which is consistent with a role as an energy-sensing malonyl-CoA target. Paradoxically, CPT1c KO mice fed a high-fat diet are more susceptible to obesity, suggesting that CPT1c is protective against the effects of fat feeding. CPT1c KO mice also exhibit decreased rates of fatty acid oxidation, which may contribute to their increased susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings indicate that CPT1c is necessary for the regulation of energy homeostasis. PMID:16651524

  5. Fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Auestad, N.

    1988-01-01

    Astrocytes were derived from cortex of two-day-old rat brain and grown in primary culture to confluence. The metabolism of the fatty acids, octanoate and palmitate, to CO{sub 2} in oxidative respiration and to the formation of ketone bodies was examined by radiolabeled tracer methodology. The net production of acetoacetate was also determined by measurement of its mass. The enzymes in the ketogenic pathway were examined by measuring enzymic activity and/or by immunoblot analyses. Labeled CO{sub 2} and labeled ketone bodies were produced from the oxidation of fatty acids labeled at carboxy- and {omega}-terminal carbons, indicating that fatty acids were oxidized by {beta}-oxidation. The results from the radiolabeled tracer studies also indicated that a substantial proportion of the {omega}-terminal 4-carbon unit of the fatty acids bypassed the {beta}-ketothiolase step of the {beta}-oxidation pathway. The ({sup 14}C)acetoacetate formed from the (1-{sup 14}C)labeled fatty acids, obligated to pass through the acetyl-CoA pool, contained 50% of the label at carbon 3 and 50% at carbon 1. In contrast, the ({sup 14}C)acetoacetate formed from the ({omega}-1)labeled fatty acids contained 90% of the label at carbon 3 and 10% at carbon 1.

  6. Metabolomics screening identifies reduced L-carnitine to be associated with progressive emphysema.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Thomas M; Bartel, Jörg; Ballweg, Korbinian; Günter, Stefanie; Prehn, Cornelia; Krumsiek, Jan; Meiners, Silke; Theis, Fabian J; Adamski, Jerzy; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2016-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic bronchitis, small airway remodelling and emphysema. Emphysema is the destruction of alveolar structures, leading to enlarged airspaces and reduced surface area impairing the ability for gaseous exchange. To further understand the pathological mechanisms underlying progressive emphysema, we used MS-based approaches to quantify the lung, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum metabolome during emphysema progression in the established murine porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model on days 28, 56 and 161, compared with PBS controls. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis revealed greater changes in the metabolome of lung followed by BALF rather than serum during emphysema progression. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that emphysema progression is associated with a reduction in lung-specific L-carnitine, a metabolite critical for transporting long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for their subsequent β-oxidation. In vitro, stimulation of the alveolar epithelial type II (ATII)-like LA4 cell line with L-carnitine diminished apoptosis induced by both PPE and H2O2. Moreover, PPE-treated mice demonstrated impaired lung function compared with PBS-treated controls (lung compliance; 0.067±0.008 ml/cmH20 compared with 0.035±0.005 ml/cmH20, P<0.0001), which improved following supplementation with L-carnitine (0.051±0.006, P<0.01) and was associated with a reduction in apoptosis. In summary, our results provide a new insight into the role of L-carnitine and, importantly, suggest therapeutic avenues for COPD.

  7. Supplementation of L-carnitine in athletes: does it make sense?

    PubMed

    Karlic, Heidrun; Lohninger, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    Studies in athletes have shown that carnitine supplementation may foster exercise performance. As reported in the majority of studies, an increase in maximal oxygen consumption and a lowering of the respiratory quotient indicate that dietary carnitine has the potential to stimulate lipid metabolism. Treatment with L-carnitine also has been shown to induce a significant postexercise decrease in plasma lactate, which is formed and used continuously under fully aerobic conditions. Data from preliminary studies have indicated that L-carnitine supplementation can attenuate the deleterious effects of hypoxic training and speed up recovery from exercise stress. Recent data have indicated that L-carnitine plays a decisive role in the prevention of cellular damage and favorably affects recovery from exercise stress. Uptake of L-carnitine by blood cells may induce at least three mechanisms: 1) stimulation of hematopoiesis, 2) a dose-dependent inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation, and 3) the prevention of programmed cell death in immune cells. As recently shown, carnitine has direct effects in regulation of gene expression (i.e., carnitine-acyltransferases) and may also exert effects via modulating intracellular fatty acid concentration. Thus there is evidence for a beneficial effect of L-carnitine supplementation in training, competition, and recovery from strenuous exercise and in regenerative athletics.

  8. Effects of Dietary Alpha-lipoic Acid and Acetyl-L-carnitine on Growth Performance and Meat Quality in Arbor Acres Broilers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Ru; Ji, Cheng; Ma, Qiugang; Huang, Jin; Yin, Haicheng; Liu, Laiting

    2014-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary alpha-lipoic acid (LA) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality in Arbor Acres broilers. A total of 486 1-d-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allocated to 9 dietary treatments, 9 treatments were group A (0 mg/kg LA and 0 mg/kg ALC), group B (50 mg/kg LA and 0 mg/kg ALC), group C (100 mg/kg LA and 0 mg/kg ALC), group D (0 mg/kg LA and 50 mg/kg ALC), group E (50 mg/kg LA and 50 mg/kg ALC), group F (100 mg/kg LA and 50 mg/kg ALC), group G (0 mg/kg LA and 100 mg/kg ALC), group H (50 mg/kg LA and 100 mg/kg ALC), group I (100 mg/kg LA and 100 mg/kg ALC). Birds were slaughtered at 42 days old. Average daily gain (ADG), average feed intake (AFI), feed conversion rate (FCR), eviscerated rate, breast muscle percentage, thigh muscle percentage, abdominal fat percentage, liver weight, muscle color (L* value, a* value, b* value), pH values at 45 min and 24 h postmortem were measured. Results showed that there existed an interaction between LA and ALC in growth performance of broilers, carcass traits and meat quality. The overall result is that high level of LA and ALC led to lower AFI, ADG (p<0.01), lower abdominal fat percentage, liver weight (p<0.01), lower L* value, a* value, and b* value of breast muscle, L* value of thigh muscle (p<0.05), and higher FCR (p<0.01), eviscerated rate (p<0.01), breast muscle percentage, thigh muscle percentage (p<0.05), a* value, pH 45 min and pH 24 h of thigh muscle (p<0.01). These results suggested that dietary LA and ALC contributed to the improvement of meat quality in broilers.

  9. Relative Carnitine Deficiency in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipek, Pauline A.; Juranek, Jenifer; Nguyen, Minh T.; Cummings, Christa; Gargus, J. Jay

    2004-01-01

    A random retrospective chart review was conducted to document serum carnitine levels on 100 children with autism. Concurrently drawn serum pyruvate, lactate, ammonia, and alanine levels were also available in many of these children. Values of free and total carnitine ([rho] less than 0.001), and pyruvate ([rho]=0.006) were significantly reduced…

  10. Bioconversion of α-linolenic acid to n-3 LCPUFA and expression of PPAR-alpha, acyl Coenzyme A oxidase 1 and carnitine acyl transferase I are incremented after feeding rats with α-linolenic acid-rich oils.

    PubMed

    González-Mañán, Daniel; Tapia, Gladys; Gormaz, Juan Guillermo; D'Espessailles, Amanda; Espinosa, Alejandra; Masson, Lilia; Varela, Patricia; Valenzuela, Alfonso; Valenzuela, Rodrigo

    2012-07-01

    High dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids in relation to n-3 fatty acids may generate health disorders, such as cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. Fish consumption rich in n-3 fatty acids is low in Latin America, it being necessary to seek other alternatives to provide α-linolenic acid (ALA), precursor of n-3 LCPUFA (EPA and DHA). Two innovative oils were assayed, chia (Salvia hispanica) and rosa mosqueta (Rosa rubiginosa). This study evaluated hepatic bioconversion of ALA to EPA and DHA, expression of PPAR-α, acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and carnitine acyltransferase I (CAT-I), and accumulation of EPA and DHA in plasma and adipose tissue in Sprague-Dawley rats. Three experimental groups were fed 21 days: sunflower oil (SFO, control); chia oil (CO); rosa mosqueta oil (RMO). Fatty acid composition of total lipids and phospholipids from plasma, hepatic and adipose tissue was assessed by gas-liquid chromatography and TLC. Expression of PPAR-α (RT-PCR) and ACOX1 and CAT-I (Western blot). CO and RMO increased plasma, hepatic and adipose tissue levels of ALA, EPA and DHA and decreased n-6:n-3 ratio compared to SFO (p < 0.05, One-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls test). CO increased levels of ALA and EPA compared to RMO (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed for DHA levels. CO also increased the expression of PPAR-α, ACOX1 and CAT-I. Only CAT-I levels were increased by RO. CO and RMO may be a nutritional alternative to provide ALA for its bioconversion to EPA and DHA, and to increase the expression of PPAR-α, ACOX1 and CAT-I, especially CO-oil.

  11. Fatty acid oxidation in brain is limited by the low activity of 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; He, X.; Schulz, H.

    1987-05-01

    In an attempt to establish why the brain is virtually incapable of oxidizing fatty acids, the activities of the ..beta..-oxidation enzymes in rat brain and rat heart mitochondria were measured and compared with each other. Although the apparent K/sub m/ values and chain-length specificities of the brain and heart enzymes are similar, the specific activities of all but one brain enzyme are between 4% and 50% of those observed in heart mitochondria. The exception is 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase (EC 2.3.1.16) whose specific activity in brain mitochondria is 125-times lower than in heart mitochondria. The partially purified brain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase was shown to be catalytically and immunologically identical with the heart enzyme. The low rate of fatty acid oxidation in brain mitochondria estimated on the basis of palmitoylcarnitine-supported respiration and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitoylcarnitine degradation may be the consequence of the low activity of 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. Inhibition of (1-/sup 14/C)palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by 4-bromocrotonic acid proves that the observed oxidation of fatty acids in brain is dependent on 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and thus occurs via ..beta..-oxidation. Since the reactions catalyzed by carnitine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.21) and acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.3) do not seem to restrict fatty acid oxidation in brain, it is concluded that the oxidation of fatty acids in rat brain is limited by the activity of the mitochondrial 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase.

  12. Plasma acylcarnitine profiles suggest incomplete long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation and altered tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in type 2 diabetic African-American women.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sean H; Hoppel, Charles L; Lok, Kerry H; Zhao, Ling; Wong, Scott W; Minkler, Paul E; Hwang, Daniel H; Newman, John W; Garvey, W Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Inefficient muscle long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) combustion is associated with insulin resistance, but molecular links between mitochondrial fat catabolism and insulin action remain controversial. We hypothesized that plasma acylcarnitine profiling would identify distinct metabolite patterns reflective of muscle fat catabolism when comparing individuals bearing a missense G304A uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3 g/a) polymorphism to controls, because UCP3 is predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle and g/a individuals have reduced whole-body fat oxidation. MS analyses of 42 carnitine moieties in plasma samples from fasting type 2 diabetics (n = 44) and nondiabetics (n = 12) with or without the UCP3 g/a polymorphism (n = 28/genotype: 22 diabetic, 6 nondiabetic/genotype) were conducted. Contrary to our hypothesis, genotype had a negligible impact on plasma metabolite patterns. However, a comparison of nondiabetics vs. type 2 diabetics revealed a striking increase in the concentrations of fatty acylcarnitines reflective of incomplete LCFA beta-oxidation in the latter (i.e. summed C10- to C14-carnitine concentrations were approximately 300% of controls; P = 0.004). Across all volunteers (n = 56), acetylcarnitine rose and propionylcarnitine decreased with increasing hemoglobin A1c (r = 0.544, P < 0.0001; and r = -0.308, P < 0.05, respectively) and with increasing total plasma acylcarnitine concentration. In proof-of-concept studies, we made the novel observation that C12-C14 acylcarnitines significantly stimulated nuclear factor kappa-B activity (up to 200% of controls) in RAW264.7 cells. These results are consistent with the working hypothesis that inefficient tissue LCFA beta-oxidation, due in part to a relatively low tricarboxylic acid cycle capacity, increases tissue accumulation of acetyl-CoA and generates chain-shortened acylcarnitine molecules that activate proinflammatory pathways implicated in insulin resistance.

  13. Peroxisomal proliferation in heart and liver of mice receiving chlorpromazine, ethyl 2(5(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl) oxiran-2-carboxylic acid or high fat diet: a biochemical and morphometrical comparative study.

    PubMed

    Vamecq, J; Roels, F; Van den Branden, C; Draye, J P

    1987-12-01

    Chlorpromazine and related drugs including trifluoperazine, clopenthixol, and fluphenazine are in vitro inhibitors of mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and cytochrome c oxidase and of peroxisomal carnitine octanoyltransferase from mouse heart and liver. By contrast with 0.1% ethyl 2(5(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl) oxiran-2-carboxylic acid or 0.1% clofibrate-containing diets, the treatment of mice with 0.1% chlorpromazine-containing diet fails to induce peroxisomal proliferation in liver and heart. An 0.5% chlorpromazine-containing diet did induce peroxisomal proliferation. Inhibition of peroxisomal beta-oxidation presumably via the reduction of carnitine octanoyltransferase by chlorpromazine elicits the appearance in liver of lamellar structures resembling those seen in human peroxisomal disorders and induces accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in plasma. The peroxisomal proliferation induced by administration of high dose chlorpromazine is ascribed to its ability to depress mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation by impairing cytochrome c oxidase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activities.

  14. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO[sub 2], highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO[sub 4]/2.5M H[sub 3]PO[sub 4] solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO[sub 2] (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.

  15. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO{sub 2}, highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO{sub 4}/2.5M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO{sub 2} (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.

  16. Effect of Carnitine and herbal mixture extract on obesity induced by high fat diet in rats

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kamal A; Nagy, Mohamed A

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity-associated type 2 diabetes is rapidly increasing throughout the world. It is generally recognized that natural products with a long history of safety can modulate obesity. Aim To investigate the development of obesity in response to a high fat diet (HFD) and to estimate the effect of L-carnitine and an Egyptian Herbal mixture formulation (HMF) (consisting of T. chebula, Senae, rhubarb, black cumin, aniseed, fennel and licorice) on bodyweight, food intake, lipid profiles, renal, hepatic, cardiac function markers, lipid Peroxidation, and the glucose and insulin levels in blood and liver tissue in rats. Method White male albino rats weighing 80-90 gm, 60 days old. 10 rats were fed a normal basal diet (Cr), 30 rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks during the entire study. Rats of the HFD group were equally divided into 3 subgroups each one include 10 rats. The first group received HFD with no supplement (HFD), the 2nd group HFD+L-carnitine and the third group received HFD+HMF. Carnitine and HMF were administered at 10th week (start time for treatments) for 4 weeks. Body weight, lipid profile & renal function (urea, uric acid creatinine) ALT & AST activities, cardiac markers, (LDH, C.K-NAC and MB) the oxidative stress marker reduced glutathione (GSH), and Malondialdehyde (MDA) catalase activity, in addition to glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance in serum & tissues were analyzed. Results Data showed that feeding HFD diet significantly increased final body weight, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, & LDL concentration compared with controls, while significantly decreasing HDL; meanwhile treatment with L-carnitine, or HMF significantly normalized the lipid profile. Serum ALT, urea, uric acid, creatinine, LDH, CK-NAC, CK-MB were significantly higher in the high fat group compared with normal controls; and administration of L-carnitine or herbal extract significantly lessened the effect of the HFD. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and high

  17. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C: From cognition to cancer.

    PubMed

    Casals, Núria; Zammit, Victor; Herrero, Laura; Fadó, Rut; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Rosalía; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) C was the last member of the CPT1 family of genes to be discovered. CPT1A and CPT1B were identified as the gate-keeper enzymes for the entry of long-chain fatty acids (as carnitine esters) into mitochondria and their further oxidation, and they show differences in their kinetics and tissue expression. Although CPT1C exhibits high sequence similarity to CPT1A and CPT1B, it is specifically expressed in neurons (a cell-type that does not use fatty acids as fuel to any major extent), it is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells, and it has minimal CPT1 catalytic activity with l-carnitine and acyl-CoA esters. The lack of an easily measurable biological activity has hampered attempts to elucidate the cellular and physiological role of CPT1C but has not diminished the interest of the biomedical research community in this CPT1 isoform. The observations that CPT1C binds malonyl-CoA and long-chain acyl-CoA suggest that it is a sensor of lipid metabolism in neurons, where it appears to impact ceramide and triacylglycerol (TAG) metabolism. CPT1C global knock-out mice show a wide range of brain disorders, including impaired cognition and spatial learning, motor deficits, and a deregulation in food intake and energy homeostasis. The first disease-causing CPT1C mutation was recently described in humans, with Cpt1c being identified as the gene causing hereditary spastic paraplegia. The putative role of CPT1C in the regulation of complex-lipid metabolism is supported by the observation that it is highly expressed in certain virulent tumor cells, conferring them resistance to glucose- and oxygen-deprivation. Therefore, CPT1C may be a promising target in the treatment of cancer. Here we review the molecular, biochemical, and structural properties of CPT1C and discuss its potential roles in brain function, and cancer.

  18. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefont, J.P.; Cepanec, C.; Leroux, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical act phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the Ser-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, without consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  19. L-carnitine and propionyl-L-carnitine improve endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats: different participation of NO and COX-products.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Rosario; Alvarez de Sotomayor, Maria; Perez-Guerrero, Concepción; Gomez-Amores, Lucia; Vazquez, Carmen M; Herrera, M Dolores

    2005-09-09

    L-carnitine and propionyl-L-carnitine are supplements to therapy in cardiovascular pathologies. Their effect on endothelial dysfunction in hypertension was studied after treatment with either 200 mg/kg of L-carnitine or propionyl-L-carnitine during 8 weeks of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). Endothelial function was assessed in aortic rings by carbachol-induced relaxation (CCh 10(-8) to 10(-4) M) and factors involved were characterized in the presence of the inhibitors: L-NAME, indomethacin, the TXA2/PGH2 Tp receptor antagonist ICI-192,605 and the thromboxane synthetase inhibitor-Tp receptor antagonist, Ro-68,070. The effect on phenylephrine-induced contractions was also observed. To identify the nature of vasoactive COX-derived products, enzyme-immunoassay of incubation media was assessed. Involvement of reactive oxygen species was evaluated by incubating with superoxide dismutase and catalase. Nitric oxide production was evaluated by serum concentration of NO2+NO3.Treatment with both compounds improved endothelial function of rings from SHR without blood pressure change. Propionyl-L-carnitine increased NO participation in WKY and SHR. L-carnitine reduced endothelium-dependent responses to CCh in WKY due to an increase of TXA2 production. In both SHR and WKY, L-carnitine enhanced concentration of PGI2 and increased participation of NO. Results in the presence of SOD plus catalase show that it might be related to antioxidant properties of L-carnitine and propionyl-L-carnitine. Comparison between the effect of both compounds shows that both may reduce reactive oxygen species and increase NO participation in endothelium-dependent relaxations in SHR. However, only L-carnitine was able to increase the release of the vasodilator PGI2 and even enhanced TXA2 production in normotensive rats.

  20. Circadian and Dopaminergic Regulation of Fatty Acid Oxidation Pathway Genes in Retina and Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vancura, Patrick; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Iuvone, P. Michael; Spessert, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of the retina might comply with daily changes in energy demand and is impaired in diabetic retinopathy—one of the most common causes of blindness in Europe and the USA. The aim of this study was to investigate putative adaptation of energy metabolism in healthy and diabetic retina. Hence expression analysis of metabolic pathway genes was performed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, semi-quantitative western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional profiling of key enzymes of energy metabolism identified transcripts of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, i.e. carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (Cpt-1α) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acadm) to display daily rhythms with peak values during daytime in preparations of the whole retina and microdissected photoreceptors. The cycling of both enzymes persisted in constant darkness, was dampened in mice deficient for dopamine D4 (D4) receptors and was altered in db/db mice—a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study are consistent with circadian clock-dependent and dopaminergic regulation of fatty acid oxidation in retina and its putative disturbance in diabetic retina. PMID:27727308

  1. Verapamil reverses PTH- or CRF-induced abnormal fatty acid oxidation in muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, A.F.; Smogorzewski, M.; Massry, S.G.

    1988-12-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with impaired long chain fatty acids (LCFA) oxidation by skeletal muscle mitochondria. This is due to reduced activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT). These derangements were attributed to the secondary hyperparathyroidism of CRF, since prior parathyroidectomy in CRF rats reversed these abnormalities and PTH administration to normal rats reproduced them. It was proposed that these effects of PTH are mediated by its ionophoric property leading to increased entry of calcium into skeletal muscle. A calcium channel blocker may, therefore, correct these derangements. The present study examined the effects of verapamil on LCFA oxidation, CPT activity by skeletal muscle mitochondria, and /sup 45/Ca uptake by skeletal muscle obtained from CRF rats and normal animals treated with PTH with and without verapamil. Both four days of PTH administration and 21 days of CRF produced significant (P less than 0.01) reduction in LCFA oxidation and CPT activity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, and significant (P less than 0.01) increment in /sup 45/Ca uptake by skeletal muscle. Simultaneous treatment with verapamil corrected all these derangements. Administration of verapamil alone to normal rats did not cause a significant change in any of these parameters. The data are consistent with the proposition that the alterations in LCFA in CRF or after PTH treatment are related to the ionophoric action of the hormone and could be reversed by a calcium channel blocker.

  2. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S. ); Rocchi, M. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH{sub 2}-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH{sub 2}-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids.

  3. Effect of externally added carnitine on the synthesis of acetylcholine in rat cerebral cortex cells.

    PubMed

    Wawrzeńczyk, A; Nałecz, K A; Nałecz, M J

    1995-06-01

    Acetylcholine synthesis from radiolabelled glucose was monitored in cerebral cortex cells isolated from brains of suckling and adult rats. Acetylcholine synthesis was found much higher in suckling animals, both in the absence and presence of acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) inhibitor, paraoxon. Together with choline (20 microM), carnitine was found to stimulate acetylcholine synthesis in a synergistic way in cortex cells from adult rats (18%). Choline, however, was incapable of reversing an inhibitory effect exerted by carnitine on acetylcholine synthesis in cortex cells from suckling animals. Distribution of carnitine derivatives was found significantly different in the cells from young and old animals, the content of acetylcarnitine decreased with age with a corresponding increase of free carnitine. The observed differences in carnitine effect on acetylcholine synthesis suggested that high acetylcarnitine in cells capable of beta-oxidation might be correlated with the lower level of acetylcholine synthesis.

  4. Reference electrode for strong oxidizing acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Bullock, Sr., Jack C.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    A reference electrode for the measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials of solutions is especially suitable for oxidizing solutions such as highly concentrated and fuming nitric acids, the solutions of nitrogen oxides, N.sub.2 O.sub.4 and N.sub.2 O.sub.5, in nitric acids. The reference electrode is fabricated of entirely inert materials, has a half cell of Pt/Ce(IV)/Ce(III)/70 wt. % HNO.sub.3, and includes a double-junction design with an intermediate solution of 70 wt. % HNO.sub.3. The liquid junctions are made from Corning No. 7930 glass for low resistance and negligible solution leakage.

  5. Fatty acid binding protein facilitates sarcolemmal fatty acid transport but not mitochondrial oxidation in rat and human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Graham P; Lally, Jamie; Nickerson, James G; Alkhateeb, Hakam; Snook, Laelie A; Heigenhauser, George J F; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2007-01-01

    The transport of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) across mitochondrial membranes is regulated by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) activity. However, it appears that additional fatty acid transport proteins, such as fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36, influence not only LCFA transport across the plasma membrane, but also LCFA transport into mitochondria. Plasma membrane-associated fatty acid binding protein (FABPpm) is also known to be involved in sacrolemmal LCFA transport, and it is also present on the mitochondria. At this location, it has been identified as mitochondrial aspartate amino transferase (mAspAT), despite being structurally identical to FABPpm. Whether this protein is also involved in mitochondrial LCFA transport and oxidation remains unknown. Therefore, we have examined the ability of FABPpm/mAspAT to alter mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Muscle contraction increased (P < 0.05) the mitochondrial FAT/CD36 content in rat (+22%) and human skeletal muscle (+33%). By contrast, muscle contraction did not alter the content of mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein in either rat or human muscles. Electrotransfecting rat soleus muscles, in vivo, with FABPpm cDNA increased FABPpm protein in whole muscle (+150%; P < 0.05), at the plasma membrane (+117%; P < 0.05) and in mitochondria (+80%; P < 0.05). In these FABPpm-transfected muscles, palmitate transport into giant vesicles was increased by +73% (P < 0.05), and fatty acid oxidation in intact muscle was increased by +18% (P < 0.05). By contrast, despite the marked increase in mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein content (+80%), the rate of mitochondrial palmitate oxidation was not altered (P > 0.05). However, electrotransfection increased mAspAT activity by +70% (P < 0.05), and the mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein content was significantly correlated with mAspAT activity (r= 0.75). It is concluded that FABPpm has two distinct functions depending on its subcellular location: (a) it contributes to

  6. Carnitine and/or Acetylcarnitine Deficiency as a Cause of Higher Levels of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Cecilia; Guevara, Natalia; Queijo, Cecilia; González, Raquel; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Blood carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine deficiencies are postulated in the literature as possible causes of higher ammonia levels. The aim of this study was to investigate if the use of valproic acid, the age of the patients, or certain central nervous system pathologies can cause carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine deficiency leading to increased ammonia levels. Three groups of patients were studied: (A) epileptic under phenytoin monotherapy (n = 31); (B) with bipolar disorder under valproic acid treatment (n = 28); (C) elderly (n = 41). Plasma valproic acid and blood carnitine and acyl carnitine profiles were determined using a validated HPLC and LC-MS/MS method, respectively. Blood ammonia concentration was determined using an enzymatic automated assay. Higher ammonia levels were encountered in patients under valproic acid treatment and in the elderly. This may be due to the lower carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine found in these patients. Patients with controlled seizures had normal carnitine and acetylcarnitine levels. Further studies are necessary in order to conclude if the uncontrolled bipolar disorder could be the cause of higher carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine levels.

  7. Carnitines slow down tumor development of colon cancer in the DMH-chemical carcinogenesis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Mori, Federica; Di Napoli, Arianna; Mancini, Rita; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Virmani, Ashraf; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2013-07-01

    Dietary agents are receiving much attention for the chemoprevention of cancer. While curcumin is known to influence several pathways and affect tumor growth in vivo, carnitin and its congeners play a variety of important metabolic functions: are involved in the oxydation of long-chain fatty acids, regulate acyl-CoA levels and influence protein activity and stability by modifying the extent of protein acetylation. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of carnitines in the prevention of cancer development using the 1,2,-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis model. We also assessed whether their combination was able to give rise to increased protection from cancer development. Mice treated with DMH were dosed orally with curcumin and/or carnitine and acylcarnitines for 20 weeks. At the end of the treatment colon samples were collected, and scored for multiple ACF and adenomas. We observed that carnitine and acyl-carnitines had same, if not higher, efficacy than curcumin alone in inhibiting the formation of neoplastic lesions induced by DMH treatment. Interestingly, the combination of curcumin and acetyl-L-carnitine was able to fully inhibit the development of advanced adenoma lesions. Our data unveil the antitumor effects of carnitines and warrant additional studies to further support the adoption of carnitines as cancer chemopreventative agents.

  8. HIV-Protease Inhibitors Suppress Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Oxidation by Reducing CD36 and CPT-I Fatty Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Scott R.; Carper, Michael J.; Lei, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Sheng; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Ramanadham, Sasanka

    2010-01-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and treatment with HIV-protease inhibitor (PI)-based highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) is associated with dysregulated fatty acid and lipid metabolism. Enhanced lipolysis, increased circulating fatty acid levels, and hepatic and intramuscular lipid accumulation appear to contribute to insulin resistance in HIV-infected people treated with PI-based HAART. However, it is unclear whether currently prescribed HIV-PIs directly alter skeletal muscle fatty acid transport, oxidation, and storage. We find that ritonavir (r, 5 μmol/l) plus 20 μmol/l of atazanavir (ATV), lopinavir (LPV), or darunavir (DRV) reduce palmitate oxidation(16-21%) in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. Palmitate oxidation was increased following exposure to high fatty acid media but this effect was blunted when myotubes were pre-exposed to the HIV-PIs. However, LPV/r and DRV/r, but not ATV/r suppressed palmitate uptake into myotubes. We found no effect of the HIV-PIs on FATP1, FATP4, or FABPpm but both CD36/FAT and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) were reduced by all three regimens though ATV/r caused only a small decrease in CPT1, relative to LPV/r or DRV/r. In contrast, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 was increased by all 3 HIV-PIs. These findings suggest that HIV-PIs suppress fatty acid oxidation in murine skeletal muscle cells and that this may be related to decreases in cytosolic- and mitochondrial-associated fatty acid transporters. HIV-PIs may also directly impair fatty acid handling and partitioning in skeletal muscle, and this may contribute to the cluster of metabolic complications that occur in people living with HIV. PMID:20117238

  9. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the human carnitine deficiency syndromes. Evidence for alterations in tissue carnitine transport

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Engel, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    The human primary carnitine deficiency syndromes are potentially fatal disorders affecting children and adults. The molecular etiologies of these syndromes have not been determined. In this investigation, we considered the hypothesis that these syndromes result from defective transport of carnitine into tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. The problem was approached by mathematical modeling, by using the technique of kinetic compartmental analysis. A tracer dose of L-(methyl-3H)carnitine was administered intravenously to six normal subjects, one patient with primary muscle carnitine deficiency (MCD), and four patients with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (SCD). Specific radioactivity was followed in plasma for 28 d. A three-compartment model (extracellular fluid, muscle, and ''other tissues'') was adopted. Rate constants, fluxes, pool sizes, and turnover times were calculated. Results of these calculations indicated reduced transport of carnitine into muscle in both forms of primary carnitine deficiency. However, in SCD, the reduced rate of carnitine transport was attributed to reduced plasma carnitine concentration. In MCD, the results are consistent with an intrinsic defect in the transport process. Abnormal fluctuations of the plasma carnitine, but of a different form, occurred in MCD and SCD. The significance of these are unclear, but in SCD they suggest abnormal regulation of the muscle/plasma carnitine concentration gradient. In 8 of 11 subjects, carnitine excretion was less than dietary carnitine intake. Carnitine excretion rates calculated by kinetic compartmental analysis were higher than corresponding rates measured directly, indicating degradation of carnitine. However, we found no radioactive metabolites of L-(methyl-3H)carnitine in urine. These observations suggest that dietary carnitine was metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Fatty Acid Oxidation-Driven Src Links Mitochondrial Energy Reprogramming and Regulation of Oncogenic Properties in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Hyoung; Vithayathil, Sajna; Kumar, Santosh; Sung, Pi-Lin; Dobrolecki, Lacey Elizabeth; Putluri, Vasanta; Bhat, Vadiraja B.; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Gupta, Vineet; Arora, Kavisha; Wu, Danli; Tsouko, Efrosini; Zhang, Yiqun; Maity, Suman; Donti, Taraka R.; Graham, Brett H.; Frigo, Daniel E.; Coarfa, Cristian; Yotnda, Patricia; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Lewis, Michael T.; Creighton, Chad J.; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Summary Transmitochondrial cybrids and multiple OMICs approaches were used to understand mitochondrial reprogramming and mitochondria-regulated cancer pathways in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Analysis of cybrids and established breast cancer (BC) cell lines showed that metastatic TNBC maintains high levels of ATP through fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and activates Src oncoprotein through autophosphorylation at Y419. Manipulation of FAO including the knocking down of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1) and 2 (CPT2), the rate-limiting proteins of FAO, and analysis of patient-derived xenograft models, confirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO in Src activation and metastasis. Analysis of TCGA and other independent BC clinical data further reaffirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO and CPT genes in Src regulation and their significance in BC metastasis. PMID:26923594

  11. Fatty Acid Oxidation-Driven Src Links Mitochondrial Energy Reprogramming and Oncogenic Properties in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hyoung; Vithayathil, Sajna; Kumar, Santosh; Sung, Pi-Lin; Dobrolecki, Lacey Elizabeth; Putluri, Vasanta; Bhat, Vadiraja B; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Gupta, Vineet; Arora, Kavisha; Wu, Danli; Tsouko, Efrosini; Zhang, Yiqun; Maity, Suman; Donti, Taraka R; Graham, Brett H; Frigo, Daniel E; Coarfa, Cristian; Yotnda, Patricia; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Lewis, Michael T; Creighton, Chad J; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-03-08

    Transmitochondrial cybrids and multiple OMICs approaches were used to understand mitochondrial reprogramming and mitochondria-regulated cancer pathways in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Analysis of cybrids and established breast cancer (BC) cell lines showed that metastatic TNBC maintains high levels of ATP through fatty acid β oxidation (FAO) and activates Src oncoprotein through autophosphorylation at Y419. Manipulation of FAO including the knocking down of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1) and 2 (CPT2), the rate-limiting proteins of FAO, and analysis of patient-derived xenograft models confirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO in Src activation and metastasis. Analysis of TCGA and other independent BC clinical data further reaffirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO and CPT genes in Src regulation and their significance in BC metastasis.

  12. Methane activation and oxidation in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Dinér, Peter; Ahlberg, Per; Sommer, Jean

    2002-07-15

    The H/D exchange observed when methane is contacted with D(2)SO(4) at 270-330 degrees C shows that the alkane behaves as a sigma base and undergoes rapid and reversible protonation at this temperature. DFT studies of the hydrogen exchange between a monomer and a dimer of sulfuric acid and methane show that the transition states involved in the exchange are bifunctional, that is one hydrogen atom is transferred from a hydroxy group in sulfuric acid to methane, while one hydrogen atom is abstracted from methane by a non-hydroxy oxygen atom in sulfuric acid. All the transition states include a CH(5) moiety, which shows similarities to the methanium ion CH(5) (+). The calculated potential activation energy of the hydrogen exchange for the monomer is 174 kJ mol(-1), which is close to the experimental value (176 kJ mol(-1)). Solvation of the monomer and the transition state of the monomer with an extra sulfuric acid molecule, decrease the potential activation energy by 6 kJ mol(-1). The acid-base process is in competition, however, with an oxidative process involving methane and sulfuric acid which leads to CO(2), SO(2), and water, and thus to a decrease of acidity and loss of reactivity of the medium.

  13. Measurement of succinyl-carnitine and methylmalonyl-carnitine on dried blood spot by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Cristiano; Boenzi, Sara; Inglese, Rita; la Marca, Giancarlo; Muraca, Maurizio; Martinez, Tegra Barreiro; Johnson, David W; Zelli, Eleonora; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2014-02-15

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is one of the most frequent organic acidurias, a class of diseases caused by enzymatic defects mainly involved in the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids. Recently, mild MMA and C4-dicarboxylyl-carnitine (C4DC-C) accumulation have been reported in patients carrying mutation in genes encoding the α-subunit (SUCLG1) and the β-subunit (SUCLA2) of the ADP-forming succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS). We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantify in dried blood spot the two isobaric compounds of C4DC-C, succinyl-carnitine and methylmalonyl-carnitine, to allow the differential diagnosis between classical MMA and SCS-related defects. This method, with an easy liquid-phase extraction and derivatization procedure, has been validated to demonstrate the specificity, linearity, recovery, lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ), accuracy and precision for quantitative determination of blood succinyl-carnitine and methylmalonyl-carnitine. The assay was linear over a concentration range of 0.025-10 μmol/L and achieved the LLOQ of 0.025 μmol/L for both metabolites. The average slope, intercept, and coefficient of linear regression (r(2)) were respectively: 0.3389 (95% confidence interval 0.2888-0.3889), 0.0113 (95% confidence interval -0.0157 to 0.0384), 0.9995 (95% confidence interval 0.9990-1.0000) for succinyl-carnitine and 0.5699 (95% confidence interval 0.5263-0.6134), 0.0319 (95% confidence interval -0.0038 to 0.0677), 0.9997 (95% confidence interval 0.9995-1.0000) for methylmalonyl-carnitine. Within-day and between-day coefficients of variation (CV) were 1.94% and 3.19% for succinyl-carnitine and 3.21%, and 2.56 for methylmalonyl-carnitine. This method is accurate and provides a new tool to differentiate patients with classical methylmalonic acidemia from those with SCS-related defects.

  14. Hypochlorous and peracetic acid induced oxidation of dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Aedo, Philip Roger; Ling, Shen Yan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-02-09

    Hypochlorous and peracetic acids, both known disinfectants in the food industry, were compared for their oxidative capacity toward dairy proteins. Whey proteins and caseins were oxidized under well controlled conditions at pH 8 as a function of the sanitizing concentration. Different markers for protein oxidation were monitored. The results established that the protein carbonyl content was a rather unspecific marker for protein oxidation, which did not allow one to differentiate the oxidant used especially at the lower concentrations. Cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine were proven to be the most vulnerable amino acids for degradation upon hypochlorous and peracetic acid treatment, while tyrosine was only prone to degradation in the presence of hypochlorous acid. Hypochlorous acid induced oxidation gave rise to protein aggregation, while during peracetic acid induced oxidation, no high molecular weight aggregates were observed. Protein aggregation upon hypochlorous acid oxidation could primarily be linked to tryptophan and tyrosine degradation.

  15. Newborn screening for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: regional experience and high incidence of carnitine deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common inherited defect in the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation pathway, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in undiagnosed patients. Newborn screening (NBS) has considerably improved MCADD outcome, but the risk of complication remains in some patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between genotype, biochemical parameters and clinical data at diagnosis and during follow-up, in order to optimize monitoring of these patients. Methods We carried out a multicenter study in southwest Europe, of MCADD patients detected by NBS. Evaluated NBS data included free carnitine (C0) and the acylcarnitines C8, C10, C10:1 together with C8/C2 and C8/C10 ratios, clinical presentation parameters and genotype, in 45 patients. Follow-up data included C0 levels, duration of carnitine supplementation and occurrence of metabolic crises. Results C8/C2 ratio and C8 were the most accurate biomarkers of MCADD in NBS. We found a high number of patients homozygous for the prevalent c.985A > G mutation (75%). Moreover, in these patients C8, C8/C10 and C8/C2 were higher than in patients with other genotypes, while median value of C0 was significantly lower (23 μmol/L vs 36 μmol/L). The average follow-up period was 43 months. To keep carnitine levels within the normal range, carnitine supplementation was required in 82% of patients, and for a longer period in patients homozygotes for the c.985A>G mutation than in patients with other genotypes (average 31 vs 18 months). Even with treatment, median C0 levels remained lower in homozygous patients than in those with other genotypes (14 μmol/L vs 22 μmol/L). Two patients died and another three suffered a metabolic crisis, all of whom were homozygous for the c.985 A>G mutation. Conclusions Our data show a direct association between homozygosity for c.985A>G and lower carnitine values at diagnosis, and a higher dose of carnitine

  16. Maternal-fetal carnitine relationship and neonatal ketosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Robles-Valdes, C; McGarry, J D; Foster, D W

    1976-10-10

    The concentration of ketone bodies in plasma and of carnitine in various maternal, fetal, and neonatal tissues was examined during the developmental period in rats. Plasma ketone levels were low in the fetus, increased 10-fold during the first 24 h postpartom, and thereafter gradually declined such that normal values were found at the end of the suckling period. An almost identical profile was observed for liver carnitine concentrations in the baby rats. The converse was true for heart tissue, the carnitine content of which was low at birth and steadily increased to adult levels with the time of suckling. The primary source of carnitine in neonatal tissues, at least during the first 2 to 3 days postpartum, was shown to be the mother rat whose liver and milk carnitine content was very high at this time and fell as nursing continued. Experiments in which the fate of [14C]butyrobetaine, the immediate precursor of carnitine, was followed after injection into nursing mother rats indicated movement of carnitine from maternal liver leads to maternal plasma leads to milk leads to neonatal tissues. The above findings support the view expressed earlier that one prerequisite for the development of a high ketogenic profile in liver may be an elevation in the tissue carnitine concentration. Additional factors, however, are clearly involved as evidenced by the observation that in the fed state perfused livers from nursing mother rats synthesized ketone bodies from oleic acid at low rates compared with those seen after a 24 h fast, despite the fact that tissue carnitine levels were equally elevated in both groups. This paradox is likely related to the fact that in the fed state such livers also contained large quantities of glycogen, depletion of which through fasting was accompanied by marked acceleration of ketogenesis from oleate. The data indicate, therefore, that maximal ketogenic capacity of the liver requires for its induction an increase in carnitine coupled with a

  17. Oxalic acid mineralization by electrochemical oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Hui; Shih, Yu-Jen; Liu, Cheng-Hong

    2011-04-15

    In this study, two electrochemical oxidation processes were utilized to mineralize oxalic acid which was a major intermediate compound in the oxidation of phenols and other aromatic compounds. The anode rod and cathode net were made of a titanium coated with RuO(2)/IrO(2) (Ti-DSA) and stainless steel (S.S. net, SUS304), respectively. First, the Fered-Fenton process, which used H(2)O(2) and Fe(2+) as additive reagents, achieved 85% of TOC removal. It proceeded with ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT), which was evidenced by the accumulation of metallic foil on the selected cathode. However, in the absence of H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+), it showed a higher TOC removal efficiency while using Cl(-) only as an additive reagent due to the formation of hypochlorite on the anode. It was also found that the mineralization of oxalic acid by electrolysis generated hypochlorite better than the dosage of commercial hypochlorite without electricity. Also, pH value was a major factor that affected the mineralization efficiency of the oxalic acid due to the chlorine chemistry. 99% TOC removal could be obtained by Cl(-) electrolysis in an acidic environment.

  18. L-carnitine for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dinicolantonio, James J; Niazi, Asfandyar K; McCarty, Mark F; Lavie, Carl J; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; O'Keefe, James H

    2014-01-01

    Although the therapeutic strategies available for treating acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have evolved dramatically in recent decades, coronary artery disease remains the leading cause of death in our society, and the rates of recurrent myocardial infarction and mortality are still unacceptably high. Therefore, exploration of alternative therapeutic strategies for AMI is of utmost importance. One such strategy is to target metabolic pathways via L-carnitine supplementation. L-carnitine is a physiologically essential metabolic cofactor that has been shown to provide a plethora of benefits when administered after AMI. L-carnitine has been shown to lessen infarct size, to reduce ventricular arrhythmias, left ventricular dilation, and heart failure incidence, as well as improve survival. These benefits may, in part, be related to its ability to boost glucose oxidation in ischemic tissues, while moderating increases in fatty acyl-coenzyme A levels that can impair mitochondrial efficiency and promote oxidative stress and inflammation. This article summarizes the evidence pertinent to the therapeutic use of L-carnitine for AMI.

  19. Susceptibility of podocytes to palmitic acid is regulated by fatty acid oxidation and inversely depends on acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Kampe, Kapil; Sieber, Jonas; Orellana, Jana Marina; Mundel, Peter; Jehle, Andreas Werner

    2014-02-15

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by dyslipidemia with elevated free fatty acids (FFAs). Loss of podocytes is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy, and podocytes are susceptible to saturated FFAs, which induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and podocyte death. Genome-wide association studies indicate that expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) 2, a key enzyme of fatty acid oxidation (FAO), is associated with proteinuria in type 2 diabetes. Here, we show that stimulation of FAO by aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) or by adiponectin, activators of the low-energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), protects from palmitic acid-induced podocyte death. Conversely, inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT-1), the rate-limiting enzyme of FAO and downstream target of AMPK, augments palmitic acid toxicity and impedes the protective AICAR effect. Etomoxir blocked the AICAR-induced FAO measured with tritium-labeled palmitic acid. The beneficial effect of AICAR was associated with a reduction of ER stress, and it was markedly reduced in ACC-1/-2 double-silenced podocytes. In conclusion, the stimulation of FAO by modulating the AMPK-ACC-CPT-1 pathway may be part of a protective mechanism against saturated FFAs that drive podocyte death. Further studies are needed to investigate the potentially novel therapeutic implications of these findings.

  20. The cardioprotective effect of mildronate is diminished after co-treatment with L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Kuka, Janis; Vilskersts, Reinis; Cirule, Helena; Makrecka, Marina; Pugovics, Osvalds; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Dambrova, Maija; Liepinsh, Edgars

    2012-06-01

    Mildronate, an inhibitor of L-carnitine biosynthesis and uptake, is a cardioprotective drug whose mechanism of action is thought to rely on the changes in concentration of L-carnitine in heart tissue. In the present study, we compared the cardioprotective effect of mildronate (100 mg/kg) and a combination of mildronate and L-carnitine (100 + 100 mg/kg) administered for 14 days with respect to the observed changes in l-carnitine level and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I)-dependent fatty acid metabolism in the heart tissues. Concentrations of L-carnitine and its precursor γ-butyrobetaine (GBB) were measured by ultraperformance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, mitochondrial respiration, activity of CPT-I, and expression of CPT-IA/B messenger RNA (mRNA) were measured. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Administration of mildronate induced a 69% decrease in L-carnitine concentration and a 6-fold increase in GBB concentration in the heart tissue as well as a 27% decrease in CPT-I-dependent mitochondrial respiration on palmitoyl-coenzyme A. In addition, mildronate treatment induced a significant reduction in infarct size and also diminished the ischemia-induced respiration stimulation by exogenous cytochrome c. Treatment with a combination had no significant impact on L-carnitine concentration, CPT-I-dependent mitochondrial respiration, and infarct size. Our results demonstrated that the mildronate-induced decrease in L-carnitine concentration, concomitant decrease in fatty acid transport, and maintenance of the intactness of outer mitochondrial membrane in heart mitochondria are the key mechanisms of action for the anti-infarction activity of mildronate.

  1. Regulation of fatty acid oxidation in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes during maturation and modulation by PPAR agonists.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Kylie R; Anastasi, Marie R; Zhang, Voueleng J; Russell, Darryl L; Robker, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation is an important energy source for the oocyte; however, little is known about how this metabolic pathway is regulated in cumulus-oocyte complexes. Analysis of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation showed that many are regulated by the luteinizing hormone surge during in vivo maturation, including acyl-CoA synthetases, carnitine transporters, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and acetyl-CoA transferase, but that many are dysregulated when cumulus-oocyte complexes are matured under in vitro maturation conditions using follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor. Fatty acid oxidation, measured as production of ³H₂O from [³H]palmitic acid, occurs in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes in response to the luteinizing hormone surge but is significantly reduced in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro. Thus we sought to determine whether fatty acid oxidation in cumulus-oocyte complexes could be modulated during in vitro maturation by lipid metabolism regulators, namely peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) agonists bezafibrate and rosiglitazone. Bezafibrate showed no effect with increasing dose, while rosiglitazone dose dependently inhibited fatty acid oxidation in cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation. To determine the impact of rosiglitazone on oocyte developmental competence, cumulus-oocyte complexes were treated with rosiglitazone during in vitro maturation and gene expression, oocyte mitochondrial activity and embryo development following in vitro fertilization were assessed. Rosiglitazone restored Acsl1, Cpt1b and Acaa2 levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes and increased oocyte mitochondrial membrane potential yet resulted in significantly fewer embryos reaching the morula and hatching blastocyst stages. Thus fatty acid oxidation is increased in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vivo and deficient during in vitro maturation, a known model of poor oocyte quality. That rosiglitazone further decreased fatty acid

  2. Direct activation of Ca2+ channels by palmitoyl carnitine, a putative endogenous ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, M.; Mir, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    1 Palmitoyl carnitine, a lipid metabolite which accumulates in cytoplasmic membranes during ischaemia, has been shown to resemble the Ca2+ channel activator, Bay K 8644, in K+-depolarized smooth muscle. Palmitoyl carnitine caused concentration-dependent (1-1000 mumol l-1) augmentations in the sensitivity to Ca2+ of K+-depolarized taenia preparations from the guinea-pig caecum. The (+/-)-isomer was equieffective with the (-)-isomer, whereas carnitine was ineffective and palmitic acid relaxed the tissues. The shift to the left of Ca2+ concentration-response curves induced by palmitoyl carnitine (100 mumol l-1) was additive with that of Bay K 8644 (1 mumol l-1). 2 The interactions of palmitoyl carnitine with the different classes of calcium-antagonist were similar to those seen with Bay K 8644. Schild plots of the calcium-antagonist effects of nifedipine were shifted to the right following preincubation of the taenia with palmitoyl carnitine (30-300 mumol l-1). The inhibitory effects of verapamil were especially sensitive to palmitoyl carnitine (100 mumol l-1). Whereas the potency of diltiazem as a calcium-antagonist was reduced by palmitoyl carnitine (100 mumol l-1), the inhibitory effects of the lipophilic class III calcium-antagonists, cinnarizine and flunarizine, were entirely resistant to palmitoyl carnitine (100 mumol l-1). 3 Although palmitoyl carnitine has detergent properties in high concentrations and lyses red blood cells, these effects were not Ca2+-dependent, nor were they modified by calcium-antagonists. Other detergents did not have selective interactions with Ca2+ channels. 4 Palmitoyl carnitine inhibited [3H]-nitrendipine, [3H]-verapamil and [3H]-diltiazem binding to rat cortical membranes with IC50 values (mumol l-1) of 120 +/- 1, 95 +/- 17 and 120 +/- 15 mumol l-1 respectively. The inhibition showed little temperature-dependence, in contrast to that of Bay K 8644, except for a small reduction in the IC50 value for [3H]-verapamil binding at 37

  3. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  4. Unique plasma metabolomic signatures of individuals with inherited disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    McCoin, Colin S; Piccolo, Brian D; Knotts, Trina A; Matern, Dietrich; Vockley, Jerry; Gillingham, Melanie B; Adams, Sean H

    2016-05-01

    Blood and urine acylcarnitine profiles are commonly used to diagnose long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAOD: i.e., long-chain hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [LCHAD] and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 [CPT2] deficiency), but the global metabolic impact of long-chain FAOD has not been reported. We utilized untargeted metabolomics to characterize plasma metabolites in 12 overnight-fasted individuals with FAOD (10 LCHAD, two CPT2) and 11 healthy age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls, with the caveat that individuals with FAOD consume a low-fat diet supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) while matched controls consume a typical American diet. In plasma 832 metabolites were identified, and partial least squared-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) identified 114 non-acylcarnitine variables that discriminated FAOD subjects and controls. FAOD individuals had significantly higher triglycerides and lower specific phosphatidylethanolamines, ceramides, and sphingomyelins. Differences in phosphatidylcholines were also found but the directionality differed by metabolite species. Further, there were few differences in non-lipid metabolites, indicating the metabolic impact of FAOD specifically on lipid pathways. This analysis provides evidence that LCHAD/CPT2 deficiency significantly alters complex lipid pathway flux. This metabolic signature may provide new clinical tools capable of confirming or diagnosing FAOD, even in subjects with a mild phenotype, and may provide clues regarding the biochemical and metabolic impact of FAOD that is relevant to the etiology of FAOD symptoms.

  5. Phytochemicals in regulating fatty acid β-oxidation: Potential underlying mechanisms and their involvement in obesity and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Mantso, Theodora; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I

    2016-09-01

    Excessive accumulation of fat as the result of more energy intake and less energy expenditure is known as obesity. Lipids are essential components in the human body and are vital for maintaining homeostasis and physiological as well as cellular metabolism. Fatty acid synthesis and catabolism (by fatty acid oxidation) are normal part of basic fuel metabolism in animals. Fatty acids are degraded in the mitochondria by a biochemical process called β-oxidation in which two-carbon fragments are produced in each cycle. The increase in fatty acid β-oxidation is negatively correlated with body mass index. Although healthy life style, avoiding Western diet, dieting and strenuous exercise are the commonly used methods to lose weight, they are not considered a permanent solution in addition to risk attenuation of basal metabolic rate (BMR). Pharmacotherapy offers benefits of weight loss by altering the satiety and lowering absorption of fat from the food; however, its side effects may outweigh the benefits of weight loss. Alternatively, dietary phytochemicals and natural health products offer great potential as an efficient weight loss strategy by modulating lipid metabolism and/or increasing BMR and thermogenesis. Specifically, polyphenols such as citrus flavonoids, green tea epigallocatechin gallate, resveratrol, capsaicin and curcumin, have been reported to increase lipolysis and induce fatty acid β-oxidation through modulation of hormone sensitive lipase, acetyl-coA carboxylase, carnitine acyl transferase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1. In this review article, we discuss selected phytochemicals in relation to their integrated functionalities and specific mechanisms for weight loss.

  6. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in children with non-ketotic hypoglycemia and low carnitine levels.

    PubMed

    Stanley, C A; Hale, D E; Coates, P M; Hall, C L; Corkey, B E; Yang, W; Kelley, R I; Gonzales, E L; Williamson, J R; Baker, L

    1983-11-01

    Three children in two families presented in early childhood with episodes of illness associated with fasting which resembled Reye's syndrome: coma, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and fatty liver. One child died with cerebral edema during an episode. Clinical studies revealed an absence of ketosis on fasting (plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate less than 0.4 mmole/liter) despite elevated levels of free fatty acids (2.6-4.2 mmole/liter) which suggested that hepatic fatty acid oxidation was impaired. Urinary dicarboxylic acids were elevated during illness or fasting. Total carnitine levels were low in plasma (18-25 mumole/liter), liver (200-500 nmole/g), and muscle (500-800 nmole/g); however, treatment with L-carnitine failed to correct the defect in ketogenesis. Studies on ketone production from fatty acid substrates by liver tissue in vitro showed normal rates from short-chain fatty acids, but very low rates from all medium and long-chain fatty acid substrates. These results suggested that the defect was in the mid-portion of the intramitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway at the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase step. A new assay for the electron transfer flavoprotein-linked acyl-CoA dehydrogenases was used to test this hypothesis. This assay follows the decrease in electron transfer flavoprotein fluorescence as it is reduced by acyl-CoA-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase complex. Results with octanoyl-CoA as substrate indicated that patients had less than 2.5% normal activity of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The activities of short-chain and isovaleryl acyl-CoA dehydrogenases were normal; the activity of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was one-third normal. These results define a previously unrecognized inherited metabolic disorder of fatty acid oxidation due to deficiency of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase.

  7. Fatty acid transduction of nitric oxide signaling. Nitrolinoleic acid is a hydrophobically stabilized nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, Francisco J; Baker, Paul R S; Giles, Gregory; Chumley, Phil; Batthyany, Carlos; Crawford, Jack; Patel, Rakesh P; Hogg, Neil; Branchaud, Bruce P; Lancaster, Jack R; Freeman, Bruce A

    2005-05-13

    The aqueous decay and concomitant release of nitric oxide (*NO) by nitrolinoleic acid (10-nitro-9,12-octadecadienoic acid and 12-nitro-9,12-octadecadienoic acid; LNO2) are reported. Mass spectrometric analysis of reaction products supports a modified Nef reaction as the mechanism accounting for the generation of *NO by the aqueous reactions of fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives. Nitrolinoleic acid is stabilized by an aprotic milieu, with LNO2 decay and *NO release strongly inhibited by phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol liposome membranes and detergents when present at levels above their critical micellar concentrations. The release of *NO from LNO2 was induced by UV photolysis and triiodide-based ozone chemiluminescence reactions currently used to quantify putative protein nitrosothiol and N-nitrosamine derivatives. This reactivity of LNO2 complicates the qualitative and quantitative analysis of biological oxides of nitrogen when applying UV photolysis and triiodide-based analytical systems to biological preparations typically abundant in nitrated fatty acids. The results reveal that nitroalkene derivatives of linoleic acid are pluripotent signaling mediators that act not only via receptor-dependent mechanisms, but also by transducing the signaling actions of *NO via pathways subject to regulation by the relative distribution of LNO2 to hydrophobic versus aqueous microenvironments.

  8. l-Carnitine ameliorates the oxidative stress response to angiotensin II by modulating NADPH oxidase through a reduction in protein kinase c activity and NF-κB translocation to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Blanca, Antonio J; Ruiz-Armenta, María V; Zambrano, Sonia; Miguel-Carrasco, José L; González-Roncero, Francisco M; Fortuño, Ana; Revilla, Elisa; Mate, Alfonso; Vázquez, Carmen M

    2017-08-01

    l-Carnitine (LC) exerts beneficial effects in arterial hypertension due, in part, to its antioxidant capacity. We investigated the signalling pathways involved in the effect of LC on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced NADPH oxidase activation in NRK-52E cells. Ang II increased the generation of superoxide anion from NADPH oxidase, as well as the amount of hydrogen peroxide and nitrotyrosine. Co-incubation with LC managed to prevent these alterations and also reverted the changes in NADPH oxidase expression triggered by Ang II. Cell signalling studies evidenced that LC did not modify Ang II-induced phosphorylation of Akt, p38 MAPK or ERK1/2. On the other hand, a significant decrease in PKC activity, and inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) translocation, were attributable to LC incubation. In conclusion, LC counteracts the pro-oxidative response to Ang II by modulating NADPH oxidase enzyme via reducing the activity of PKC and the translocation of NF-kB to the nucleus.

  9. Cardiogenic shock and L-carnitine: clinical data and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Lettieri, B

    1991-01-01

    Research experiences on the use of L-carnitine in conditions of acute hypoxia underline the protective role of this molecule on the cellular enzymic complex. To obtain unconfutable clinical data at this regard, the survival rate in two groups of patients affected by cardiogeic shock was evaluated. The first group (80 patients) was treated with L-carnitine while the second group (36 patients) received sodium bicarbonate. The results showed a significant response to L-carnitine treatment, indicating the role of this molecule on the metabolic acidosis due to shock. The sum of these data confirmed the role of L-carnitine in the reversible phase of cardiogenic shock in terms of enzymic protection in the course of cellular oxidative damage.

  10. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  11. Interactions of inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and fibrates in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gerondaes, P; Alberti, K G; Agius, L

    1988-01-01

    Culture of rat hepatocytes with etomoxir, an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), for 48 h, resulted in increased carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT) activity (74%), a marked decrease in CPT activity (82%) measured in detergent extracts, and increased activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (227%) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (65%). Changes in CAT and CPT activities were not observed after 4 h culture with etomoxir. When hepatocytes were cultured with etomoxir and benzafibrate (a hypolipidaemic analogue of clofibrate) for 48 h, etomoxir prevented the 5-fold increase in CAT activity caused by bezafibrate, whereas bezafibrate suppressed the increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and fructose-bisphosphatase caused by etomoxir. However, bezafibrate did not prevent the suppression of CPT activity by etomoxir. Etomoxir inhibited palmitate beta-oxidation and ketogenesis after short-term (0-4 h) and long-term (48 h) exposure, but it caused accumulation of triacylglycerol in hepatocytes only after short-term exposure (0-4 h). These effects of etomoxir on fatty acid metabolism and suppression of CPT (after 48 h) were similar in periportal and perivenous hepatocytes, but the increases in CAT and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were higher in periportal than in perivenous cells. The effects of CPT I inhibitors on CAT activity and long-term suppression of CPT activity are probably mediated by independent mechanisms. PMID:3421940

  12. The fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway is important for decidualization of endometrial stromal cells in both humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-He; Chi, Maggie M-Y; Schulte, Maureen B; Moley, Kelle H

    2014-02-01

    Embryo implantation and development requires the endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) to undergo decidualization. This differentiation process requires glucose utilization, and blockade of the pentose phosphate pathway inhibits decidualization of ESCs both in vitro and in vivo. Glucose and fatty acids are energy substrates for many cell types, and fatty acid beta-oxidation is critical for embryo implantation. Here, we investigated whether beta-oxidation is required for decidualization of ESCs. As assessed by marker gene expression, decidualization of human primary ESCs was blocked by reducing activity of carnitine calmitoyltransferase I, the rate-limiting enzyme in beta-oxidation, either by short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing or by treatment with the inhibitor etomoxir. Ranolazine (RAN), a partial beta-oxidation inhibitor, blocked early decidualization of a human ESC line. However, decidualization resumed after several days, most likely due to a compensatory up-regulation of GLUT1 expression and an increase in glucose metabolism. Simultaneous inhibition of the beta-oxidation pathway with RAN and the pentose phosphate pathway with glucosamine (GlcN) impaired in vitro decidualization of human ESCs more strongly than inhibition of either pathway alone. These findings were confirmed in murine ESCs in vitro, and exposure to RAN plus GlcN inhibited decidualization in vivo in a deciduoma model. Finally, intrauterine implantation of time-release RAN and GlcN pellets reduced pup number. Importantly, pup number returned to normal after the end of the pellet-active period. This work indicates that both fatty acids and glucose metabolism pathways are important for ESC decidualization, and suggests novel pathways to target for the design of future nonhormonal contraceptives.

  13. Tryptophan depletion under conditions that imitate insulin resistance enhances fatty acid oxidation and induces endothelial dysfunction through reactive oxygen species-dependent and independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Sounidaki, Maria; Antoniadi, Georgia; Rountas, Christos; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Loannis

    2017-04-01

    In atherosclerosis-associated pathologic entities characterized by malnutrition and inflammation, L-tryptophan (TRP) levels are low. Insulin resistance is an independent cardiovascular risk factor and induces endothelial dysfunction by increasing fatty acid oxidation. It is also associated with inflammation and low TRP levels. Low TRP levels have been related to worse cardiovascular outcome. This study evaluated the effect of TRP depletion on endothelial dysfunction under conditions that imitate insulin resistance. Fatty acid oxidation, harmful pathways due to increased fatty acid oxidation, and endothelial dysfunction were assessed in primary human aortic endothelial cells cultured under normal glucose, low insulin conditions in the presence or absence of TRP. TRP depletion activated general control non-derepressible 2 kinase and inhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor. It increased fatty acid oxidation by increasing expression and activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1. Elevated fatty acid oxidation increased the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggering the polyol and hexosamine pathways, and enhancing protein kinase C activity and methylglyoxal production. TRP absence inhibited nitric oxide synthase activity in a ROS-dependent way, whereas it increased the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in a ROS independent and possibly p53-dependent manner. Thus, TRP depletion, an amino acid whose low levels have been related to worse cardiovascular outcome and to inflammatory atherosclerosis-associated pathologic entities, under conditions that imitate insulin resistance enhances fatty acid oxidation and induces endothelial dysfunction through ROS-dependent and independent pathways. These findings may offer new insights at the molecular mechanisms involved in accelerated atherosclerosis that frequently accompanies malnutrition and inflammation.

  14. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Sarah E.; Martin, Ola J.; Noland, Robert C.; Slentz, Dorothy H.; DeBalsi, Karen L.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B.; Koves, Timothy R.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  15. The reduction of heat production in exercising pigeons after L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Janssens, G P; Buyse, J; Seynaeve, M; Decuypere, E; De Wilde, R

    1998-04-01

    Four groups (CS,CR,PS,PR) of nine trained male racing pigeons were deprived of feed for 1 d and then subjected to a respiration chamber test in order to study the effect of oral 1-carnitine supplementation on the energy metabolism during flight. One week before, groups CS and CR were orally supplemented with 90 mg of 1-carnitine daily, whereas PS and PR were given a placebo. Groups CS and PS underwent flight simulation by electrostimulation of the breast muscles. Flight simulation increased heat production, kept respiratory quotient from decreasing, decreased thyroxine levels, and increased weight loss. L-Carnitine decreased the rise in heat production during electrostimulation but did not influence respiratory quotient, weight loss, or thyroid hormones. L-Carnitine supplementation in pigeons improves fatty acid combustion efficiency during heavy exercise.

  16. Malonyl-CoA metabolism in cardiac myocytes and its relevance to the control of fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Awan, M M; Saggerson, E D

    1993-01-01

    1. Viable myocytes were obtained from rat hearts. Oxidation of [1-14C]palmitate by these cells could be decreased by the addition of glucose (5 mM) or lactate (2 mM). In the presence of glucose, insulin decreased and adrenaline increased palmitate oxidation. 2. The myocytes contained activities of ATP citrate-lyase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and the condensing enzyme of the fatty acid elongation system. No fatty acid synthase activity was demonstrable in myocytes. 3. In rat hearts perfused with 5 mM glucose, malonyl-CoA content was acutely raised by insulin. In the presence of glucose+insulin, perfusion with palmitate or adrenaline decreased the malonyl-CoA content. 4. It is concluded that malonyl-CoA can be synthesized within cardiac myocytes and that the level of this metabolite can be acutely regulated. This is likely to have consequences for the regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase in the heart. PMID:8216240

  17. L-Carnitine induces recovery of liver lipid metabolism in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Silvério, Renata; Laviano, Alessandro; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Seelaender, Marília

    2012-05-01

    Cancer cachexia causes metabolic alterations with a marked effect on hepatic lipid metabolism. L-Carnitine modulates lipid metabolism and its supplementation has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy in many diseases. In the present study, the effects of L-carnitine supplementation on gene expression and on liver lipid metabolism-related proteins was investigated in cachectic tumour-bearing rats. Wistar rats were assigned to receive 1 g/kg of L-carnitine or saline. After 14 days, supplemented and control animals were assigned to a control (N), control supplemented with L-carnitine (CN), tumour-bearing Walker 256 carcinosarcoma (TB) and tumour-bearing supplemented with L-carnitine (CTB) group. The mRNA expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II (CPT I and II), microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) and organic cation transporter 2 (OCTN2) was assessed, and the maximal activity of CPT I and II in the liver measured, along with plasma and liver triacylglycerol content. The gene expression of MTP, and CPT I catalytic activity were reduced in TB, who also showed increased liver (150%) and plasma (3.3-fold) triacylglycerol content. L-Carnitine supplementation was able to restore these parameters back to control values (p<0.05). These data show that L-carnitine preserves hepatic lipid metabolism in tumour-bearing animals, suggesting its supplementation to be of potential interest in cachexia.

  18. Anaplerotic Treatment of Long-Chain Fat Oxidation Disorders with Triheptanoin: Review of 15 years Experience

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Charles R.; Brunengraber, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of long-chain mitochondrial β-oxidation disorders (LC-FOD) with a low fat-high carbohydrate diet, a diet rich in medium-even-chain triglycerides (MCT), or a combination of both has been associated with high morbidity and mortality for decades. The pathological tableau appears to be caused by energy deficiency resulting from reduced availability of citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates required for optimal oxidation of acetyl-CoA. This hypothesis was investigated by diet therapy with carnitine and anaplerotic triheptanoin (TH). Methods Fifty-two documented LC-FOD patients were studied in this investigation (age range: birth to 51 years). Safety monitoring included serial quantitative measurements of routine blood chemistries, blood levels of carnitine and acylcarnitines, and urinary organic acids. Results The average frequency of serious clinical complications were reduced from ~ 60 % with conventional diet therapy to 10 % with TH and carnitine treatment and mortality decreased from ~ 65 % with conventional diet therapy to 3.8 %. Carnitine supplementation was uncomplicated. Conclusion The energy deficiency in LC-FOD patients was corrected safely and more effectively with the triheptanoin diet and carnitine supplement than with conventional diet therapy. Safe intervention in neonates and infants will permit earlier intervention following pre-natal diagnosis or diagnosis by expanded newborn screening. PMID:26547562

  19. Fatty acid metabolism during maturation affects glucose uptake and is essential to oocyte competence.

    PubMed

    Paczkowski, M; Schoolcraft, W B; Krisher, R L

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) is essential for oocyte maturation in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of etomoxir (a FAO inhibitor; 100 μM), carnitine (1 mM), and palmitic acid (1 or 100 μM) during maturation on metabolism and gene expression of the oocyte and cumulus cells, and subsequent embryo development in the mouse. Carnitine significantly increased embryo development, while there was a decrease in development following maturation with 100 μM palmitic acid or etomoxir (P<0.05) treatment. Glucose consumption per cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) was decreased after treatment with carnitine and increased following etomoxir treatment (P<0.05). Intracellular oocyte lipid content was decreased after carnitine or etomoxir exposure (P<0.05). Abundance of Slc2a1 (Glut1) was increased after etomoxir treatment in the oocyte and cumulus cells (P<0.05), suggesting stimulation of glucose transport and potentially the glycolytic pathway for energy production when FAO is inhibited. Abundance of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2) tended to increase in oocytes (P=0.1) after treatment with 100 μM palmitic acid and in cumulus cells after exposure to 1 μM palmitic acid (P=0.07). Combined with carnitine, 1 μM palmitic acid increased the abundance of Acsl3 (P<0.05) and Cpt2 tended to increase (P=0.07) in cumulus cells, suggesting FAO was increased during maturation in response to stimulators and fatty acids. In conclusion, fatty acid and glucose metabolism are related to the mouse COC, as inhibition of FAO increases glucose consumption. Stimulation of FAO decreases glucose consumption and lipid stores, positively affecting subsequent embryo development, while an overabundance of fatty acid or reduced FAO negatively affects oocyte quality.

  20. Acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxides catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkovets, G.A.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Tarasova, D.V.; Yurchenko, E.N.

    1982-06-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxide catalysts were studied by the methods of back titration and ir spectroscopy. The interrelationship between the acid-base and catalytic properties in the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene was discussed. 3 figures, 1 table.

  1. The protective effect of L-carnitine against hippocampal damage due to experimental formaldehyde intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, E; Ozsoy, S Y; Donmez, N; Ozsoy, B; Yumuşak, N

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the protective effects of L-carnitine on hippocampus tissue damage in rats during experimental formaldehyde (FA) intoxication. Male Wistar albino rats were assigned into four groups: (1) control (C), (2) formaldehyde (FA), (3) formaldehyde + 0.5 g/kg of L-carnitine (FA + 0.5 LC) (4) formaldehyde + 1 g/kg L-carnitine (FA + 1 LC). At the end of the 14 day trial period, animals were sacrificed by decapitation under anesthesia. The hippocampus tissue samples were extracted to measure MDA, GSH and SOD activity. Neuronal degeneration was assessed based on histopathological (hematoxylin and eosin) and immunohistochemical (anti-ubiquitin) examination. To detect oxidative stress, specimens were reacted with anti-Cu/Zn-SOD antibody. After administering L-carnitine with FA to the animals, the activities of SOD and GSH increased, but the levels of MDA decreased in hippocampus tissue. Neuronal degeneration was observed in the FA group. L-carnitine administration reduced neuronal degeneration and histological structure was similar to controls. After FA application, degenerated hippocampus neurons were stained with anti-ubiquitin and Cu/Zn-SOD antibodies; weakly positive staining was observed in L- carnitine-treated groups. L-carnitine may be useful for preventing oxidative damage in the hippocampus tissue due to formaldehyde intoxication.

  2. The effect of marathon running on carnitine metabolism and on some aspects of muscle mitochondrial activities and antioxidant mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M B; Jones, D A; Edwards, R H; Corbucci, G C; Montanari, G; Trevisani, C

    1986-01-01

    Carnitine is an essential co-factor in the catabolism of fats as an energy source. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of running a marathon on the metabolism of carnitine by endurance-trained athletes, and to evaluate the effect of carnitine administration on the performance of such exercise. The effects of marathon running on mitochondrial enzymes and cellular anti-oxidants were also examined to assess whether the expression of these activities is altered by exercise. Subjects were 10 experienced male marathon runners aged between 19 and 25 years. Running a marathon caused a fall in the plasma content of unesterified carnitine (37%) and an increase in the level of acetylcarnitine present (288%). Loading of the athletes with L-carnitine for 10 days before running a marathon abolished the exercise-induced fall in plasma-free carnitine (P less than 0.05) whilst amplifying the production of acetylcarnitine (P less than 0.05). Carnitine loading of the athletes studied made no detectable improvement in performance of the marathon (P greater than 0.05). Cytochrome oxidase, succinate cytochrome C reductase and superoxide dismutase activities present in skeletal muscle were unaltered by marathon running. However, such exercise caused a large increase in the tissue content of oxidized glutathione (189%) at the expense of reduced glutathione (-18%).

  3. Carnitine transporter CT2 (SLC22A16) is over-expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and target knockdown reduces growth and viability of AML cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Hurren, Rose; MacLean, Neil; Gronda, Marcela; Jitkova, Yulia; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Minden, Mark D; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-08-01

    AML (acute myeloid leukemia) cells have a unique reliance on mitochondrial metabolism and fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Thus, blocking FAO is a potential therapeutic strategy to target these malignant cells. In the current study, we assessed plasma membrane carnitine transporters as novel therapeutic targets for AML. We examined the expression of the known plasma membrane carnitine transporters, OCTN1, OCTN2, and CT2 in AML cell lines and primary AML samples and compared expression to normal hematopoietic cells. Of the three carnitine transporters, CT2 demonstrated the greatest differential expression between AML and normal cells. Using shRNA, we knocked down CT2 and demonstrated that target knockdown impaired the function of the transporter. In addition, knockdown of CT2 reduced the growth and viability of AML cells with high expression of CT2 (OCI-AML2 and HL60), but not low expression. CT2 knockdown reduced basal oxygen consumption without a concomitant increase in glycolysis. Thus, CT2 may be a novel target for a subset of AML.

  4. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Ascorbic acid oxidation of thiol groups from dithiotreitol is mediated by its conversion to dehydroascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Nilda B.V.; Lissner, Leandro A.; Klimaczewski, Cláudia V.; Colpo, Elisangela; Rocha, Joao B.T.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the in vitro pro-oxidant effect of ascorbic acid towards thiol groups could be mediated by free radicals formed during its auto-oxidation and/or by a direct oxidation of -SH groups by its oxidized form (dehydroascorbic acid). This hypothesis was examined by measuring the rate of AA (ascorbic acid) oxidation in MOPS (3-morpholinepropanesulfonic acid buffer) and phosphate buffer (PB). Here we have used dithiothreitol (DTT) as model of vicinal thiol-containing enzymes, namely δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase. The rate of AA and DTT oxidation was more pronounced in the presence of PB than in the MOPS. AA oxidation induced by iron/EDTA complex was significantly reduced by addition of superoxide dismutase, catalase and DTT to the reaction medium. H2O2 alone did not stimulate the oxidation of AA; however, AA oxidation was enhanced significantly with the addition of crescent concentrations of iron. Conversely, in DTT oxidation assay (without AA) the addition of iron, EDTA and H2O2, did not promote the oxidation of -SH groups. Our findings suggest that in the presence of physiological concentrations of AA and thiols, the oxidation of -SH groups is mediated by AA conversion to dehydroascorbic acid with the participation of iron. Furthermore, free radical species formed during the auto-oxidation of AA apparently did not oxidize thiol groups to a significant extent. PMID:27847448

  6. Relationships between carnitine and coenzyme A esters in tissues of normal and alloxan-diabetic sheep

    PubMed Central

    Snoswell, A. M.; Koundakjian, Patricia P.

    1972-01-01

    1. The total acid-soluble carnitine concentrations of four tissues from Merino sheep showed a wide variation not reported for other species. The concentrations were 134, 538, 3510 and 12900nmol/g wet wt. for liver, kidney cortex, heart and skeletal muscle (M. biceps femoris) respectively. 2. The concentration of acetyl-CoA was approximately equal to the concentration of free CoA in all four tissues and the concentration of acid-soluble CoA (free CoA plus acetyl-CoA) decreased in the order liver>kidney cortex>heart>skeletal muscle. 3. The total amount of acid-soluble carnitine in skeletal muscle of lambs was 40% of that in the adult sheep, whereas the concentration of acid-soluble CoA was 2.5 times as much. A similar inverse relationship between carnitine and CoA concentrations was observed when different muscles in the adult sheep were compared. 4. Carnitine was confined to the cytosol in all four tissues examined, whereas CoA was equally distributed between the mitochondria and cytosol in liver, approx. 25% was present in the cytosol in kidney cortex and virtually none in this fraction in heart and skeletal muscle. 5. Carnitine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.7) was confined to the mitochondria in all four tissues and at least 90% of the activity was latent. 6. Acetate thiokinase (EC 6.2.1.1) was predominantly (90%) present in the cytosol in liver, but less than 10% was present in this fraction in heart and skeletal muscle. 7. In alloxan-diabetes, the concentration of acetylcarnitine was increased in all four tissues examined, but the total acid-soluble carnitine concentration was increased sevenfold in the liver and twofold in kidney cortex. 8. The concentration of acetyl-CoA was approximately equal to that of free CoA in the four tissues of the alloxan diabetic sheep, but the concentration of acid-soluble CoA in liver increased approximately twofold in alloxan-diabetes. 9. The relationship between CoA and carnitine and the role of carnitine acetyltransferase in the

  7. Analysis of peroxytrifluoroacetic acid oxidation products from Victorian brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Verheyen, T.V.; Johns, R.B.

    1983-08-01

    A method is described for the detailed quantitative structural identification of the components present in the oxidation product mixtures of a highly aliphatic brown coal. The results showed them to be predominantly long chain diols, hydroxy acids, dicarboxylic acids and short chain polycarboxylic acids.

  8. Influence of virgin coconut oil-enriched diet on the transcriptional regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation in rats - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Arunima, Sakunthala; Rajamohan, Thankappan

    2014-05-28

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) compared with copra oil, olive oil and sunflower-seed oil on the synthesis and oxidation of fatty acids and the molecular regulation of fatty acid metabolism in normal rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the test oils at 8 % for 45 d along with a synthetic diet. Dietary supplementation of VCO decreased tissue lipid levels and reduced the activity of the enzymes involved in lipogenesis, namely acyl CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase (FAS) (P< 0·05). Moreover, VCO significantly (P< 0·05) reduced the de novo synthesis of fatty acids by down-regulating the mRNA expression of FAS and its transcription factor, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, compared with the other oils. VCO significantly (P< 0·05) increased the mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids, which was evident from the increased activities of carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, acyl CoA oxidase and the enzymes involved in mitochondrial β-oxidation; this was accomplished by up-regulating the mRNA expression of PPARα and its target genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. In conclusion, the present results confirmed that supplementation of VCO has beneficial effects on lipid parameters by reducing lipogenesis and enhancing the rate of fatty acid catabolism; this effect was mediated at least in part via PPARα-dependent pathways. Thus, dietary VCO reduces the risk for CHD by beneficially modulating the synthesis and degradation of fatty acids.

  9. Dietary L-carnitine supplementation increases lipid deposition in the liver and muscle of yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) through changes in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Lang; Luo, Zhi; Zhuo, Mei-Qing; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Song, Yu-Feng; Hu, Wei; Chen, Qi-Liang

    2014-09-14

    Carnitine has been reported to improve growth performance and reduce body lipid content in fish. Thus, we hypothesised that carnitine supplementation can improve growth performance and reduce lipid content in the liver and muscle of yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco), a commonly cultured freshwater fish in inland China, and tested this hypothesis in the present study. Diets containing l-carnitine at three different concentrations of 47 mg/kg (control, without extra carnitine addition), 331 mg/kg (low carnitine) and 3495 mg/kg (high carnitine) diet were fed to yellow catfish for 8 weeks. The low-carnitine diet significantly improved weight gain (WG) and reduced the feed conversion ratio (FCR). In contrast, the high-carnitine diet did not affect WG and FCR. Compared with the control diet, the low-carnitine and high-carnitine diets increased lipid and carnitine contents in the liver and muscle. The increased lipid content in the liver could be attributed to the up-regulation of the mRNA levels of SREBP, PPARγ, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and ACCa and the increased activities of lipogenic enzymes (such as FAS, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme) and to the down-regulation of the mRNA levels of the lipolytic gene CPT1A. The increased lipid content in muscle could be attributed to the down-regulation of the mRNA levels of the lipolytic genes CPT1A and ATGL and the increased activity of lipoprotein lipase. In conclusion, in contrast to our hypothesis, dietary carnitine supplementation increased body lipid content in yellow catfish.

  10. Maternal L-Carnitine Supplementation Improves Brain Health in Offspring from Cigarette Smoke Exposed Mothers.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yik Lung; Saad, Sonia; Al-Odat, Ibrahim; Oliver, Brian G; Pollock, Carol; Jones, Nicole M; Chen, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Maternal cigarette smoke exposure (SE) causes detrimental changes associated with the development of chronic neurological diseases in the offspring as a result of oxidative mitochondrial damage. Maternal L-Carnitine administration has been shown to reduce renal oxidative stress in SE offspring, but its effect in the brain is unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of maternal L-Carnitine supplementation on brain markers of oxidative stress, autophagy, mitophagy and mitochondrial energy producing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in SE offspring. Female Balb/c mice (8 weeks) were exposed to cigarette smoke prior to mating, during gestation and lactation with or without L-Carnitine supplementation (1.5 mM in drinking water). In 1 day old male SE offspring, brain mitochondrial damage was suggested by increased mitochondrial fusion and reduced autophagosome markers; whereas at 13 weeks, enhanced brain cell damage was suggested by reduced fission and autophagosome markers, as well as increased apoptosis and DNA fragmentation markers, which were partially reversed by maternal L-Carnitine supplementation. In female SE offspring, enhanced mitochondrial regeneration was suggested by decreased fission and increased fusion markers at day 1. At 13 weeks, there was an increase in brain energy demand, oxidative stress and mitochondrial turnover, reflected by the protein changes of OXPHOS complex, fission and autophagosome markers, as well as the endogenous antioxidant, which were also partially normalized by maternal L-Carnitine supplementation. However, markers of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation were not significantly changed. Thus L-Carnitine supplementation may benefit the brain health of the offspring from smoking mothers.

  11. Maternal L-Carnitine Supplementation Improves Brain Health in Offspring from Cigarette Smoke Exposed Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yik Lung; Saad, Sonia; Al-Odat, Ibrahim; Oliver, Brian G.; Pollock, Carol; Jones, Nicole M.; Chen, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Maternal cigarette smoke exposure (SE) causes detrimental changes associated with the development of chronic neurological diseases in the offspring as a result of oxidative mitochondrial damage. Maternal L-Carnitine administration has been shown to reduce renal oxidative stress in SE offspring, but its effect in the brain is unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of maternal L-Carnitine supplementation on brain markers of oxidative stress, autophagy, mitophagy and mitochondrial energy producing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in SE offspring. Female Balb/c mice (8 weeks) were exposed to cigarette smoke prior to mating, during gestation and lactation with or without L-Carnitine supplementation (1.5 mM in drinking water). In 1 day old male SE offspring, brain mitochondrial damage was suggested by increased mitochondrial fusion and reduced autophagosome markers; whereas at 13 weeks, enhanced brain cell damage was suggested by reduced fission and autophagosome markers, as well as increased apoptosis and DNA fragmentation markers, which were partially reversed by maternal L-Carnitine supplementation. In female SE offspring, enhanced mitochondrial regeneration was suggested by decreased fission and increased fusion markers at day 1. At 13 weeks, there was an increase in brain energy demand, oxidative stress and mitochondrial turnover, reflected by the protein changes of OXPHOS complex, fission and autophagosome markers, as well as the endogenous antioxidant, which were also partially normalized by maternal L-Carnitine supplementation. However, markers of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation were not significantly changed. Thus L-Carnitine supplementation may benefit the brain health of the offspring from smoking mothers. PMID:28243190

  12. Effect of L-Carnitine in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis on Energy Metabolism Using Indirect Calorimetry: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Iwata, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Takata, Ryo; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Akio; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Background L-carnitine supplementation has been suggested to show several favorable effects on patients with liver cirrhosis (LC). However, there have been no reports regarding the effect of L-carnitine on energy metabolism in patients with LC using indirect calorimetry which is a well-established method for assessing the degree of liver malnutrition. We examined the effect of L-carnitine in patients with LC on energy metabolism using indirect calorimetry. Methods A total of 13 LC patients who are scheduled to be treated with L-carnitine (1,800 mg/day) were analyzed in this study. None of the patients previously received L-carnitine. An evaluation of the nutritional status was performed at the initiation of L-carnitine therapy and after 4 weeks of L-carnitine therapy. We evaluated the effect of L-carnitine on the nutritional status and energy metabolism by comparing various clinical variables at these two time points. In addition, the changes in the nutritional status of the patients were also evaluated using indirect calorimetry. Results After 4 weeks of L-carnitine treatment, for all cases, the mean substrate oxidation rates of carbohydrate (%C) increased from 37.6% to 48.2%, the mean substrate oxidation rates of fat (%F) decreased from 40.2% to 31.9% and the mean substrate oxidation rates of protein (%P) decreased from 22.2% to 19.9%. In a subgroup analysis of patients with baseline non-protein respiratory quotient (npRQ) < 0.85, the mean %C increased from 15.3% to 34.2%, the mean %F decreased from 59.9% to 45.1%, and the mean %P decreased from 24.8% to 20.6%. After 4 weeks of L-carnitine treatment, for all cases (n = 13), the mean value of npRQ increased in comparison with the baseline levels, although the difference was not significant (0.868 ± 0.060 vs. 0.838 ± 0.097, P = 0.19). Conversely, in patients with baseline npRQ < 0.85, the npRQ value significantly increased after 4 weeks treatment of L-carnitine compared with the baseline levels (0.827 ± 0.030 vs

  13. Defective (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.E.; Norris, B.J.; Brooke, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation. (1-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

  14. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  15. Impact of high altitude on the hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Qian; Shao, Yuan; Wang, Ying Zhen; Jing, Yu Hong; Zhang, You Cheng

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Acute exposure to high altitude (HA) increased hepatic fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation. • Acute exposure of rats to HA increased hepatic FA synthesis. • PPARα and AMPK can regulate the FA metabolism. • FA may be a key energy fuel and a compensation for CHO during acute exposure to HA. • The acute changes of FA metabolism may be a mechanism of acclimatization. - Abstract: High altitude (HA) affects energy metabolism. The impact of acute and chronic HA acclimatization on the major metabolic pathways is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to unveil the impact of HA on the key enzymes involved in the fatty acid (FA) metabolism in liver. Rats were exposed to an altitude of 4300 m for 30 days and the expressions of two key proteins involved in FA β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, CPT-I; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα), two proteins involved in FA synthesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase-1, ACC-1; and AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK), as well as the total ketone body in the liver and the plasma FFAs were examined. Rats without HA exposure were used as controls. We observed that the acute exposure of rats to HA (3 days) led to a significant increase in the expressions of CPT-I and PPARα and in the total hepatic ketone body. Longer exposure (15 days) caused a marked decrease in the expression of CPT-I and PPARα. By 30 days after HA exposure, the expression levels of CPT-I and PPARα returned to the control level. The hepatic ACC-1 level showed a significant increase in rats exposed to HA for 1 and 3 days. In contrast, the hepatic level of AMPK showed a significant reduction throughout the experimental period. Plasma FFA concentrations did not show any significant changes following HA exposure. Thus, increased hepatic FA oxidation and synthesis in the early phase of HA exposure may be among the important mechanisms for the rats to respond to the hypoxic stress in order to acclimatize themselves to the

  16. Chronic Oral L-Carnitine Supplementation Drives Marked Plasma TMAO Elevations in Patients with Organic Acidemias Despite Dietary Meat Restrictions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marcus J; Bostwick, Bret L; Kennedy, Adam D; Donti, Taraka R; Sun, Qin; Sutton, V Reid; Elsea, Sarah H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) in atherosclerosis, raising concern about L-carnitine, a common supplement for patients with inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) and a TMAO precursor metabolized, in part, by intestinal microbes. Dietary meat restriction attenuates carnitine-to-TMAO conversion, suggesting that TMAO production may not occur in meat-restricted individuals taking supplemental L-carnitine, but this has not been tested. Here, we mine a metabolomic dataset to assess TMAO levels in patients with diverse IEMs, including organic acidemias. These data were correlated with clinical information and confirmed using a quantitative TMAO assay. Marked plasma TMAO elevations were detected in patients treated with supplemental L-carnitine, including those on a meat-free diet. On average, patients with an organic acidemia had ~45-fold elevated [TMAO], as compared to the reference population. This effect was mitigated by metronidazole therapy lasting 7 days each month. Collectively, our data show that TMAO production occurs at high levels in patients with IEMs receiving oral L-carnitine. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term safety and efficacy of chronic oral L-carnitine supplementation and whether suppression or circumvention of intestinal bacteria may improve L-carnitine therapy.

  17. L-carnitine supplementation decreases lipid peroxidation and improves cardiopulmonary function in broiler chickens reared at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Khajali, Fariborz; Khajali, Zahra

    2014-12-01

    An experiment was carried out to examine the effects of L-carnitine supplementation on growth performance and cardiopulmonary function of broiler chickens reared at high altitude (2100 m above sea level). A total of 96 day-old male chicks (Cobb 500) were randomly assigned into two dietary treatments containing 0 (control group) and 200 mg/kg L-carnitine. The experimental diets were fed for a period of 42 days consisting of the starting (days 1 to 21) and growing periods (days 21 to 42). Nutrient requirements of chickens met the NRC (1994) recommendations. The results showed that dietary L-carnitine had no significant influence on body weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio. L-carnitine reduced plasma concentration of malondialdehyde, packed cell volume (PCV) and abdominal fat deposition compared to the control (P < 0.05). A significant (P < 0.05) decrease was observed in the right to total ventricular weight ratio (RV:TV) in birds receiving L-carnitine when compared to the control. Supplementation of L-carnitine increased plasma nitric oxide and immune responsiveness, which manifested in an increased toe-web thickness index measured at 24 h following the injection of phytohaemagglutinin P. In conclusion, supplementation of L-carnitine had beneficial effects on preventing lipid peroxidation and pulmonary hypertension in broiler chickens raised at high altitude.

  18. Primary carnitine deficiency in a male adult.

    PubMed

    Karmaniolas, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Liatis, Stavros; Dalamanga, Maria; Papalambros, Theoharis; Migdalis, Ilias

    2002-01-01

    The case is described of a 36 year-old man who presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness and weight loss. His serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were markedly elevated. The muscle biopsy showed lipid storage myopathy. The muscle carnitine concentration was extremely low (5.6% of normal levels), establishing the diagnosis of myopathic carnitine deficiency. The disorder was considered as primary because there were no indications of any other identifiable condition which could result in a secondary carnitine deficiency. The patient was treated with oral L-carnitine (2 g per day) and showed rapid improvement. Primary myopathic carnitine deficiency is a curable disorder and therefore it should always be considered as a potential diagnosis in cases of myopathy in young adults.

  19. Inhibition of mitochondrial carnitine acylcarnitine translocase by hypoglycaemia-inducing substances.

    PubMed

    Beneking, M; Oellerich, M; Binder, L; Choitz, G F; Haeckel, R

    1990-05-01

    The rate of mitochondrial carnitine-carnitine exchange mediated by carnitine acylcarnitine translocase was measured in the presence of the two hypoglycaemia-inducing drugs, 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate and 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid (BM 13.677). Both substances caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the rate of carnitine uptake in guinea pig liver mitochondria. Apparent initial influx rates were decreased by 75% and 80% at a concentration of 2 mmol/l 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate and 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid, respectively. Intraperitoneal injections of 212 mumol 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid or 21 mumol 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate per kg body weight caused a noticeable decrease in blood glucose concentration. A significant fall of the blood ketone body concentration was achieved with 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate or 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid, at dosages of 21 and 255 mumol/l, respectively. Furthermore there was a dose-dependent increase in the plasma free fatty acid concentration in the presence of 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate. This increase, however, was much less pronounced with 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid. Metabolic effects of 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate are consistent with an inhibition of long-chain fatty acid transport, whereas an additional mechanism of action has to be assumed for 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid.

  20. L-carnitine enhances axonal plasticity and improves white-matter lesions after chronic hypoperfusion in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yuji; Koike, Masato; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Hideki; Hira, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Ryota; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2015-03-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causes white-matter lesions (WMLs) with oxidative stress and cognitive impairment. However, the biologic mechanisms that regulate axonal plasticity under chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have not been fully investigated. Here, we investigated whether L-carnitine, an antioxidant agent, enhances axonal plasticity and oligodendrocyte expression, and explored the signaling pathways that mediate axonal plasticity in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model. Adult male Wistar rats subjected to ligation of the bilateral common carotid arteries (LBCCA) were treated with or without L-carnitine. L-carnitine-treated rats exhibited significantly reduced escape latency in the Morris water maze task at 28 days after chronic hypoperfusion. Western blot analysis indicated that L-carnitine increased levels of phosphorylated high-molecular weight neurofilament (pNFH), concurrent with a reduction in phosphorylated phosphatase tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), and increased phosphorylated Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at 28 days after chronic hypoperfusion. L-carnitine reduced lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage, and enhanced oligodendrocyte marker expression and myelin sheath thickness after chronic hypoperfusion. L-carnitine regulates the PTEN/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and enhances axonal plasticity while concurrently ameliorating oxidative stress and increasing oligodendrocyte myelination of axons, thereby improving WMLs and cognitive impairment in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model.

  1. L-carnitine enhances axonal plasticity and improves white-matter lesions after chronic hypoperfusion in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Yuji; Koike, Masato; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Hideki; Hira, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Ryota; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causes white-matter lesions (WMLs) with oxidative stress and cognitive impairment. However, the biologic mechanisms that regulate axonal plasticity under chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have not been fully investigated. Here, we investigated whether L-carnitine, an antioxidant agent, enhances axonal plasticity and oligodendrocyte expression, and explored the signaling pathways that mediate axonal plasticity in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model. Adult male Wistar rats subjected to ligation of the bilateral common carotid arteries (LBCCA) were treated with or without L-carnitine. L-carnitine-treated rats exhibited significantly reduced escape latency in the Morris water maze task at 28 days after chronic hypoperfusion. Western blot analysis indicated that L-carnitine increased levels of phosphorylated high-molecular weight neurofilament (pNFH), concurrent with a reduction in phosphorylated phosphatase tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), and increased phosphorylated Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at 28 days after chronic hypoperfusion. L-carnitine reduced lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage, and enhanced oligodendrocyte marker expression and myelin sheath thickness after chronic hypoperfusion. L-carnitine regulates the PTEN/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and enhances axonal plasticity while concurrently ameliorating oxidative stress and increasing oligodendrocyte myelination of axons, thereby improving WMLs and cognitive impairment in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model. PMID:25465043

  2. Gut microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Ussher, John R; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Arduini, Arduino

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have alluded to the importance of the intestinal microflora in controlling whole-body metabolic homeostasis and organ physiology. In particular, it has been suggested that the hepatic production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) from gut microbiota-derived trimethylamine (TMA) may enhance cardiovascular risk via promoting atherosclerotic lesion development. The source of TMA production via the gut microbiota appears to originate from 2 principle sources, either phosphatidylcholine/choline and/or L-carnitine. Therefore, it has been postulated that consumption of these dietary sources, which are often found in large quantities in red meats, may be critical factors promoting cardiovascular risk. In contrast, a number of studies demonstrate beneficial properties for l-carnitine consumption against metabolic diseases including skeletal muscle insulin resistance and ischemic heart disease. Furthermore, fish are a significant source of TMAO, but dietary fish consumption and fish oil supplementation may exhibit positive effects on cardiovascular health. In this mini-review we will discuss the discrepancies regarding L-carnitine supplementation and its possible negative effects on cardiovascular risk through potential increases in TMAO production, as well as its positive effects on metabolic health via increasing glucose metabolism in the muscle and heart.

  3. Short-term effects of administration of anticonvulsant drugs on free carnitine and acylcarnitine in mouse serum and tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Camiña, M. F.; Rozas, I.; Gómez, M.; Paz, J. M.; Alonso, C.; Rodriguez-Segade, S.

    1991-01-01

    1. The short-term evolution of concentrations of free carnitine and acylcarnitine was studied in the serum, liver, kidney, heart and skeletal muscle of mice after administration of single therapeutic doses of the anticonvulsant drugs, valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT) and phenobarbitone (PHB). 2. The effects of the drugs were immediate but transitory, control levels of free carnitine and acylcarnitine having been recovered or almost recovered in serum and in all tissues 8 h post administration (p.a.). 3. VPA was the only drug that significantly reduced free carnitine concentration in serum, which recovered control levels by 4 h p.a. 4. All the drugs studied brought about marked deficits of serum acylcarnitine, which had disappeared 2 h p.a. in the case of VPA and not until 8 h p.a. for CBZ, PHT or PHB. 5. The minimum concentrations of free carnitine and acylcarnitine in serum were invariably associated with the maximum concentration of drug in serum. 6. Free carnitine concentration was not affected by VPA in any tissue, PHT and PHB brought about significant deficits in heart and kidney, and CBZ a significant deficit in muscle. 7. Acylcarnitine concentration was significantly reduced in heart, kidney and muscle by CBZ, PHT and PHB, but in liver the effects of all drugs were very small. 8. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that the primary cause of anticonvulsant-induced alteration of carnitine metabolism is interference with renal reabsorption of carnitine. PMID:1878756

  4. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large ... clear view of the walls of the colon. Sodium picosulfate is in a class of medications called ...

  5. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  6. Oxidation of Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Amino Acid Conjugates by Horseradish Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ro Dong; Park, Chang Kyu

    1987-01-01

    The stability of 21 amino acid conjugates of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) toward horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. The IAA conjugates of Arg, Ile, Leu, Tyr, and Val were oxidized readily by peroxidase. Those of Ala, β-Ala, Asp, Cys, Gln, Glu, Gly, and Lys were not degraded and their recovery was above 92% after 1 hour incubation with HRP. A correlation between the stability of IAA conjugates toward peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation and the hydrophobicity of the amino acid moiety conjugated to IAA was demonstrated. Polar amino acid conjugates of IAA are more resistant to HRP-catalyzed oxidation. PMID:16665529

  7. Oral carnitine supplementation for dyslipidemia in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Naini, Afsoon Emami; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Moghadasi, Mojdeh; Harandi, Asghar Amini

    2012-05-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a commonly observed problem in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients, which results in altered metabolism of fatty acids and subsequently development of dyslipidemia. To evaluate the effect of oral L-carnitine (LC) supplementation on lipid profile of adult MHD patients, we studied 30 of them (19 males, 11 females) who received LC supplementation of 250 mg tablets three times a day for eight weeks. They were compared with 30 matched patients as a control group. Serum lipid profiles were compared before and after the intervention between the two groups. There was a significant decrease of the values of the lipid profile in the intervention group before and after carnitine supplementation including the mean values of total cholesterol (190 ± 36.8 vs. 177 ± 31.2 mg/dL), triglyceride (210 ± 64.7 vs. 190 ± 54.1 mg/dL) and LDL-cholesterol (117 ± 30.1 vs. 106 ± 26.3 mg/dL), while the values did not change siginificantly from base line in the control group. However, the difference for HDL-cholesterol in intervention group was not statistically significant. None of the patients dropped out of the study due to drug side effects. Oral LC supplementation (750 mg/day) is able to improve lipid profile in patients on MHD. Further long-term studies with adequate sample size are needed to define the population of patients who would benefit more from carnitine therapy and the optimal dose and the most efficient route for administration of the drug.

  8. The effect of L-carnitine supplementation on lipid parameters, inflammatory and nutritional markers in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Suchitra, M M; Ashalatha, V L; Sailaja, E; Rao, A Madhusudhana; Reddy, V Sheshadri; Bitla, Aparna R; Sivakumar, V; Rao, P V L N Srinivasa

    2011-11-01

    Protein energy malnutrition and inflammation are common and usually concurrent in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. Carnitine, a small molecule involved in fatty acid metabolism, is significantly decreased in long-term HD patients. L-Carnitine supplementation may have potential benefits in improving dialysis-related disorders. However, there are conflicting reports with regard to the beneficial effects of L-Carnitine supplementation. Hence, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of L-Carnitine supplementation on lipid parameters, apoproteins and inflammatory and nutritional markers in HD patients. A total of 35 patients with end-stage renal disease, on MHD for a period of 2 to 5 years were recruited into the study. The study group consisted of 20 patients who received Carnitine supplementation intravenously three times a week after each HD session, at 1 g/dose, while the control group consisted of 15 patients without supplementation with L-Carnitine. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), total protein, albumin, lipid profile and apoprotein AI and B were determined at baseline and at the end of the study. A significant decrease in the hsCRP levels was observed in the Carnitine-supplemented group (P < 0.05). However, no significant change was observed in the lipid parameters and nutritional markers in the Carnitine-supplemented group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the significant benefit of L-Carnitine supplementation on inflammatory status in MHD patients as noted by marked decrease in hsCRP levels in comparison with the control group.

  9. Rare disorders of metabolism with elevated butyryl- and isobutyryl-carnitine detected by tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P; Gregersen, Niels S; Vockley, Jerry; Smith, Wendy E; Benjamin, Daniel Kelly; An, Yan; Weavil, Susan D; Chaing, Shu H; Bali, Deeksha; McDonald, Marie T; Kishnani, Priya S; Chen, Y-T; Millington, David S

    2003-08-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry was adopted for newborn screening by North Carolina in April 1999. Since then, three infants with short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) and one with isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency were detected on the basis of elevated butyrylcarnitine/isobutyrylcarnitine (C4-carnitine) concentrations in newborn blood spots analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. For three SCAD-deficient infants, biochemical evaluation included a plasma acylcarnitine profile with markedly elevated C4-carnitine, urine organic acid analysis with markedly elevated ethylmalonic and 2-methylsuccinic acids, and markedly elevated [U-13C]butyrylcarnitine concentrations in medium from fibroblasts incubated with [U-13C]palmitic acid and excess l-carnitine, consistent with classic SCAD deficiency. Two of three infants diagnosed with classic SCAD deficiency remained asymptomatic; however, the third infant presented with seizures and a cerebral infarct at 10 wk of age. All three infants had putatively inactivating mutations in both alleles of the SCAD gene. The highly elevated plasma C4-carnitine levels in the three infants detected by newborn screening tandem mass spectrometry differentiated them from infants and children who were homozygous or compound heterozygous for one of two SCAD gene susceptibility variations; for the latter group the C4-carnitine levels were normal. Isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in a fourth infant was confirmed after isolated elevation of C4-carnitine in the acylcarnitine profile.

  10. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  11. Organic acids as indicators of VOC oxidation: Measurements of formic acid and other gas-phase acids during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, D.; Brophy, P.; Murschell, T.

    2013-12-01

    Oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere affects not only the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, but also the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Organic acids are produced during VOC oxidation, although additional sources include biomass burning and primary emissions. While some organic acids are semi-volatile and dominantly present in the aerosol phase, formic acid and other small organic acids are dominantly present in the gas phase. The concentrations of these gas-phase organic acids can provide insight into oxidation chemistry. Here, we present measurements made during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centerville, Alabama during the summer of 2013 by a high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) operated in a novel switching reagent ion mode to measure gas phase organic acids with both acetate (CH3COO-) and iodide (I-) reagent ions. Formic acid was quantified using for both ionization schemes using multiple calibration techniques. In this study, we will focus on the impact of anthropogenic pollutants, including nitrogen and sulfur oxides, on oxidation chemistry, and discuss the potential use of organic acids as tracers for atmospheric oxidation chemistry.

  12. Isoniazid cocrystals with anti-oxidant hydroxy benzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadi, Syed Muddassir Ali; Yunus, Uzma; Bhatti, Moazzam Hussain; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2014-11-01

    Isoniazid is the primary constituent of “triple therapy” used to effectively treat tuberculosis. In tuberculosis and other diseases, tissue inflammation and free radical burst from macrophages results in oxidative stress. These free radicals cause pulmonary inflammation if not countered by anti-oxidants. Therefore, in the present study cocrystals of isoniazid with four anti-oxidant hydroxy benzoic acids have been reported. Gallic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid resulted in the formation of cocrystals when reacted with isoniazid. Cocrystal structure analysis confirmed the existence of pyridine-carboxylic acid synthon in the cocrystals of isoniazid with Gallic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid. While cocrystal of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid formed the pyridine-hydroxy group synthon. Other synthons of different graph sets are formed between hydrazide group of isoniazid and coformers involving Nsbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯N bonds. All the cocrystals were in 1:1 stoichiometric ratio.

  13. The oxidation of linoleic acid in the Udenfriend's system.

    PubMed

    Wakizaka, A; Imai, Y

    1974-11-01

    The autocatalytic oxidation of linoleate was observed in the incubation mixture containing ferrous ion and ascorbic acid as the catalysts (Undenfriend's system). The rate of oxidation of linoleate was estimated wither by the TBA method, iodometry or by the measurement of the absorbance at 235 nm. Reaction products were analyzed by TLC, GLC and UV-, IR-, NMR- and mass spectrometries. The main oxidized products were assumed to have one oxygen atom at the position of carbon 9 or 13 of linoleate or two oxygen atoms at the both positions of the original acid. The conjugated double bond was formed at carbon 10 and 12 of the carbon chain of linoleate.

  14. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Sulfurous Acid in an Aqueous Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Alicia; Hernandez, Willie; Suarez, Marco F.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of some parameters on sulfurous acid and sulfur oxidation kinetics such as initial concentration of sulfurous acid, oxygen, TiO[2] crystalline concentration, the power of black light, and quantity of TiO[2] is investigated. The experiments can be performed in an undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory with an inexpensive…

  15. Enhancement of shortening velocity, power, and acto-myosin crossbridge (CB) kinetics following long-term treatment with propionyl-L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, and omega-3 fatty acids in BIO TO-2 cardiomyopathic Syrian hamsters papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Littarru, Gian Paolo; Fraschini, Matteo; Perinu, Anna; Tiano, Luca; Capra, Alessandro; Mancinelli, Rino

    2010-01-01

    Impaired functions of myocardial muscle cells in human and animals, is a primary defect associated with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in the DCM are yet to be clarified and an effective therapy is still not available. The BIO TO-2 cardiomyopathic Syrian Hamsters (CMSHs) represent an animal model of idiopathic DCM. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term treatment (2 months) with propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC), coenzyme Q(10), omega-3 fatty acids and a combination of these three agents (formulation HS12607) on mechanical properties and acto-myosin crossbridges (CBs) kinetics of left ventricular (LV) papillary muscle from control and treated 10 month old BIO TO-2 CMSHs. Isometric and isotonic contractile properties of isolated papillary muscle from control and treated CMSHs were investigated, and acto-myosin CB number, force and kinetics were calculated using Huxley's equations. Mechanical parameter values were higher in treated than in control hamsters, particularly when substances were administered together in a coformulation (HS12607). Compared to control, HS12607-treated papillary muscles showed a significant increase of maximum peak isometric tension (P(o)) (30.06 +/- 4.91 vs. 19.74 +/- 5.00 mN/mm(2)), maximum extent of muscle shortening (0.13 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.07 +/- 0.02 L/L(max)), maximum unloaded shortening velocity (1.18 +/- 0.24 vs. 0.53 +/- 0.13 L/L(max) s(-1)) and maximum peak of power output (5.52 +/- 1.61 vs. 1.58 +/- 0.83). The curvature of the hyperbolic force-velocity relationships did not differ between control and treated hamsters. When compared to controls, acto-myosin CB number increased in treated hamsters [(6.67 +/- 1.91) 10(10)/mm(2) vs. (3.55 +/- 2.08) 10(10)/mm(2)], whereas the unitary force of single CB was similar in control and treated animals. The peak value of the rate constant for CB attachment (f(1)) and detachment (g(2)) was higher in treated animals when

  16. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Koeth, Robert A.; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S.; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T.; Britt, Earl B.; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D.; Lewis, James D.; Warrier, Manya; Brown, J. Mark; Krauss, Ronald M.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Bushman, Frederic D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline/phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Herein we demonstrate that intestinal microbiota metabolism of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis. Omnivorous subjects are shown to produce significantly more TMAO than vegans/vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. Specific bacterial taxa in human feces are shown to associate with both plasma TMAO and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predict increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (MI, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice significantly altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA/TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but not following suppression of intestinal microbiota. Dietary supplementation of TMAO, or either carnitine or choline in mice with intact intestinal microbiota, significantly reduced reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. Intestinal microbiota may thus participate in the well-established link between increased red meat consumption and CVD risk. PMID:23563705

  17. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Koeth, Robert A; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S; Buffa, Jennifer A; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T; Britt, Earl B; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D; DiDonato, Joseph A; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Warrier, Manya; Brown, J Mark; Krauss, Ronald M; Tang, W H Wilson; Bushman, Frederic D; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2013-05-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline and phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). We demonstrate here that metabolism by intestinal microbiota of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice. Omnivorous human subjects produced more TMAO than did vegans or vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. The presence of specific bacterial taxa in human feces was associated with both plasma TMAO concentration and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predicted increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (myocardial infarction, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA and TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but this did not occur if intestinal microbiota was concurrently suppressed. In mice with an intact intestinal microbiota, dietary supplementation with TMAO or either carnitine or choline reduced in vivo reverse cholesterol transport. Intestinal microbiota may thus contribute to the well-established link between high levels of red meat consumption and CVD risk.

  18. The Oxidation of Cysteine, Cysteinesulfinic Acid and Cysteic Acid on a Polycrystalline Gold Electrode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    The mechanism of cysteine, cysteinesulfinic acid and cysteic acid electrooxidation in perchloric acid solutions has been studied using cyclic ... voltammetry . All compounds investigated have been found to be chemisorbed on a polycrystalline gold electrode and oxidized with four, two or one electron

  19. L-carnitine in cardiogenic shock therapy: pharmacodynamic aspects and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Loche, F

    1993-01-01

    Following our previous work on biochemical and clinical aspects of cardiogenic shock, we carried out an open study on 27 patients hospitalized in shock condition and investigated for the entire period of permanence in intensive care units (ICU). The subjects were treated with high doses of L-carnitine following previous results on the use of this molecule in conditions of oxidative damage due to acute cellular hypoxia. When compared with the data reported in the literature, the results obtained in this study show a surprisingly positive trend for the carnitine-treated patients in terms of survival rate to the cardiogenic shock. This finding and statistical analysis of the clinical parameters confirm the suggestion that L-carnitine could be credited with a new and interesting role in the therapy of cardiogenic shock.

  20. Stability of acetyl-1-carnitine in 5% dextrose using a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry times 2 method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Hongliang; Hutson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    A stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry times 2 method was developed to establish the stability of acetyl-l-carnitine dissolved in 5% dextrose in water; quantitation of acetyl-l-carnitine and its hydrolysis product I-carnitine was performed using this method. Acetyl-l-carnitine dissolved in water was stress-degraded at a pH range of 3 to 12, and conversion to l-carnitine was quantified over 18 hours. The method was further validated by stressing the acetyl-l-carnitine solution at 68 degrees C, 82 degrees C, and 90 degrees C for up to 10 days, yielding a temperature-dependent hydrolysis rate constant. Acetyl-l-carnitine solutions were stored at 25 degrees C and 4 degrees C to 8 degrees C for 33 days to validate the kinetics prediction. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry times 2 method was sensitive and specific, allowing rapid separation and simultaneous quantitation of acetyl-l-carnitine and l-carnitine. Acetyl-l-carnitine dissolved in aqueous solutions is stable at neutral to acidic pH, but unstable at pH > 9. After 1 hour storage at room temperature, only 72.6% of acetyl-l-carnitine was left at pH 11 and 4.2% left at pH 12. The kinetics relationship between temperature and rate constant was In(k) = -8650.1 /T + 20.344 (r2 = 0.9851) at pH 5.2. The time required to degrade 15% of acetyl-I-carnitine was estimated to be 38 days at 25 degrees C or 234 days at 8 degrees C, and was confirmed with actual storage stability testing. Acetyl-l-carnitine dissolved in water (pH 5.2) at concentrations of 1 and 10 mg/mL was found stable at room temperature or refrigerated for at least 33 days using the established stability-indicating method. Acetyl-l-carnitine solutions are not stable at basic pH. When reconstituted in water, acetyl-l-carnitine is stable for over 30 days at room temperature or under refrigeration.

  1. L-carnitine and cancer cachexia. I. L-carnitine distribution and metabolic disorders in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Szefel, Jarosław; Kruszewski, Wiesław Janusz; Ciesielski, Maciej; Szajewski, Mariusz; Kawecki, Krzysztof; Aleksandrowicz-Wrona, Ewa; Jankun, Jerzy; Lysiak-Szydłowska, Wiesława

    2012-07-01

    Cancer cachexia (CC), a progressive loss of body mass, is associated with decreased energy production. Abnormally low levels of L-carnitine (LC) in skeletal muscle means that mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) does not occur efficiently in patients with CC. We assessed the influence of CC on LC distribution and the effects of parenteral lipid emulsions on plasma LC levels and urinary excretion. Fifty patients with CC were randomly assigned to total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), or LCTs plus medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) as 50/50. Patients were further separated into those with body-mass index (BMI) ≤ 19 kg/m(2) and BMI >19 kg/m(2). Plasma concentrations of total LC (TC) and free LC (FC) and their urinary excretion were measured, along with skeletal muscle LC levels. On average, plasma FC and TC were higher than reference values in all patients. Patients with BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2) had lower plasma FC and TC than those with BMI >19 kg/m(2). Skeletal muscle FC in the BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2) group was lower than reference value, but within the normal range in others. LC and FC urinary excretion was higher than reference values. Plasma LC and its urinary excretion were higher in patients administered pure LCTs relative to those given MCTs/LCTs. A decrease in skeletal muscle LC in cancer patients with CC (BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2)) correlates with an increase in its plasma levels and increased renal excretion. A diet of MCTs/LCTs reduces LC release from muscle to plasma and urine more effectively than LCTs.

  2. Rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure: rare presentation of carnitine palmityl-transferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gentili, A; Iannella, E; Masciopinto, F; Latrofa, M E; Giuntoli, L; Baroncini, S

    2008-05-01

    Carnitine palmityl-transferase (CPT) II deficiency is a rare disorder of the fatty acid beta-oxidation cycle. CPT II deficiency can be associated with rhabdomyolysis in particular conditions that increase the requirement for fatty acid oxidation, such as low-carbohydrate and high-fat diet, fasting, exposure to excessive cold, lack of sleep and prolonged exercise. The best known CPT II deficiency is the muscular form with episodic muscle necrosis and paroxysmal myoglobinuria after prolonged exercise. We report a case of a four-year-old male child, who, after one day of hyperthermia and fasting, developed a massive rhabdomyolysis beginning with acute respiratory failure and later complicated by acute renal failure. Appropriate management in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) (mechanical ventilatory support, fluid supply combined with mannitol and bicarbonate infusions, administration of acetaminophen and antibiotics, and continuous venovenous haemofiltration) brought about complete resolution with an excellent outcome. Biochemical investigation of muscle biopsy and genetic analysis showed a deficiency of CPT II. The onset of CPT II deficiency with respiratory failure is extremely rare, but a correct and early diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis is the key to successful treatment. A metabolic myopathy such as CPT II deficiency should be suspected in children affected by rhabdomyolysis if trauma, crash, infections, drugs or extreme exertion can be excluded.

  3. Examination of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 abundance in white adipose tissue: implications in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jaycob D; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Dubuisson, Olga S; Hodgeson, Sydney M; Elks, Carrie M; Ravussin, Eric; Mynatt, Randall L

    2017-03-22

    Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is essential for the transport of long chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for oxidation. Recently, it was reported that decreased CPT1b mRNA in adipose tissue was a contributing factor for obesity in rats. We therefore closely examined the expression level of Cpt1 in adipose tissue from mice, rats, and humans. Cpt1a is the predominate isoform in adipose tissue from all three species. Rat white adipose tissue has a moderate amount of Cpt1b mRNA, but it is very minor compared to Cpt1b expression in muscle. Total CPT1 activity in adipose tissue is also minor relative to other tissues. Both Cpt1a and Cpt1b mRNA were increased in gonadal fat but not inguinal fat by diet-induced obesity in mice. We also measured CPT1a and CPT1b expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue from human subjects with a wide range of BMI. Interestingly, CPT1a expression positively correlated with BMI (R=0.46), but there was no correlation with CPT1b (R=0.04). Our findings indicate that white adipose tissue fatty acid oxidation capacity is minor compared to metabolically active tissues. Further, given the already low abundance of Cpt1b in white adipose tissue, it is unlikely that decreases in its expression can quantitatively decrease whole body energy expenditure enough to contribute to an obese phenotype.

  4. Effect of dietary lipid, carnitine and exercise on lipid profile in rat blood, liver and muscle.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Jyothsna; Jeevaratnam, K

    2009-09-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of physical exercise on effects of the daily intake of vegetarian diet of either vegetable hydrogenated fat (HF) or peanut oil (PO) with or without carnitine on the lipid profile. Eight groups of male Wistar rats were fed HF-diet (4 groups) or PO-diet (4 groups), with or without carnitine for 24 weeks. One group for each diet acted as sedentary control while the other groups were allowed swimming for 1 hr a day, 6 days/week, for 24 weeks. Plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol, free fatty acids (FFA), liver and thigh muscle glycogen, total fat (TF), TG, TC and FFA were analyzed. HF-fed rats showed significantly increased plasma TC, VLDL+LDL-cholesterol and TG compared to PO-fed rats, wherein a lowered plasma TC, TG levels in all the groups with significantly increased liver cholesterol and decreased muscle cholesterol was observed. Physical exercise of moderate intensity reduced plasma TC and TG accompanied by significantly reduced tissue TG and cholesterol while FFA and glycogen increased in all the groups. The influence of exercise was less pronounced in carnitine supplemented rats since carnitine could significantly reduce TG in plasma and tissues of sedentary rats. Results from the present study showed that the intake of HF diet significantly increased the plasma and tissue lipid profile and MUFA-rich diet or carnitine supplementation and/or exercise may ameliorate the deleterious effects of HF.

  5. Effect of dietary yeast chromium and L-carnitine on lipid metabolism of sheep.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingrui; Wang, Hongwei; Luo, Guangying; Niu, Ruiyan; Wang, Jundong

    2013-11-01

    A 56-day feeding experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of yeast chromium (Cr, 300 μg/kg diet) and/or L-carnitine (100 mg/kg diet) on lipid metabolism and their interaction in sheep. After a 14-day adaptation period, 32 3-month-old sheep were randomly divided into four groups of eight. All sheep were fed with basal diets according to the American feeding standard of the National Research Council. At the end of the experiment, yeast Cr and/or L-carnitine supplementation significantly decreased abdominal fat mass and abdominal fat percentage, suggesting an improved mutton quality. Compared with the control group, the ratio of glucose to insulin was significantly increased, due to unchanged glucose levels and reduced insulin levels in yeast Cr and/or L-carnitine supplement groups, indicating high insulin sensitivity and well-controlled serum glucose levels. In addition, yeast chromium and/or L-carnitine induced significant decreases in serum triglyceride levels and serum total cholesterol levels, while increasing serum free fatty acid levels and high-density lipoproteincholesterol levels. The findings show that adding a yeast Cr and/or L-carnitine supplement may give better control of glucose and lipid variables.

  6. Oxidation-resistant acidic resins prepared by partial carbonization as cocatalysts in synthesis of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huijuan; Li, Hongbian; Liu, Yangqing; Jin, Peng; Wang, Xiangyu; Li, Baojun

    2012-08-01

    The oxidation-resistant acidic resins are of great importance for the catalytic oxidation systems. In this paper, the oxidatively stable acidic resins are obtained from the cation ion exchange resins (CIERs) through the thermal treatment in N(2) atmosphere. The structure and properties of the thermally treated CIERs were characterized by chemical analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, acid capacity measurement and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermally treated CIERs possess high acid capacity up to 4.09 mmol g(-1). A partial carbonization is observed in the thermal treatment process of CIERs, but the morphology of resin spheres maintains well. The as-prepared CIERs are used as solid acids to assist the hydrogen peroxide oxidation of cyclohexene to adipic acid (ADA) with tungstic acid as the catalyst precursor. The improved yields of ADA in the recycling reaction are obtained in the presence of acidic CIERs. Meanwhile, the unproductive decomposition of H(2)O(2) is effectively suppressed. The high yields of ADA (about 81%) are kept by the thermally treated CIERs even after the fifth cycle. The thermally treated CIERs exhibit excellent acid-catalytic performance and possess remarkable oxidation-resistant capability.

  7. [Changes in myocardium, skeletal muscle and liver of rats fed carnitine-deficient diet and treated with carnitine optical isomers].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Iezhitsa, I N; Pisarev, V B; Snigur, G L; Kravchenko, M S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was a comparative assessment of L-, D-and DL-carnitine effect on morphometric and histological parameters of myocardium, skeletal muscles (m. gastrocnemius) and liver in 60 rats fed carnitine-deficient diet. Carnitine-deficient diet fed 2 months resulted in a substantial reduction of carnitine concentration in blood plasma of rats. In carnitine-deficient animals, lipid vacuoles were found to accumulate within the hepatocytes in all the zones of hepatic lobules, which mainly had the character of micro- and macrovesicular steatosis. This was accompanied by a reduction of skeletal muscle fiber and cardiomyocyte average thickness. L-carnitine administration resulted in the compensation of carnitine deficiency in animals with alimentary carnitine deficient state, while the racemate and D-stereoisomere did not affect its content in blood. Pharmacological correction of carnitine deficiency with L-carnitine prevented the development of liver fatty dystrophy to a greater degree, than the administration of other carnitine stereoisomeres and promoted the restoration of muscular fiber thickness of skeletal muscles. DL-carnitine administration was accompanied by a moderate correction of fatty dystrophy and did not prevent the development of skeletal muscles atrophy. D-carnitine stereoisomere did not prevent liver fatty dystrophy, but it reduced its severity. Correction of carnitine deficiency with D- stereoisomere was not accompanied by essential morphological and morphometric differences in degree of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  8. Studies on the oxidation of hexamethylbenzene 1: Oxidation of hexamethylbenzene with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiba, K.; Tomura, S.; Mizuno, T.

    1986-01-01

    The oxidative reaction of hexamethylbenzene (HMB) with nitric acid was studied, and the hitherto unknown polymethylbenzenepolycarboxylic acids were isolated: tetramethylphthalic anhydride, tetramethylisophthalic acid, 1,3,5-, 1,2,4- and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzenetricarboxylic acids. When HMB was warmed with 50% nitric acid at about 80 C, tetramethylphthalic anhydride and tetramethylisophthalic acid were initially produced. The continued reaction led to the production of trimethylbenzenetricarboxylic acids, but only slight amounts of dimethylbenzenetetracarboxylic acids were detected in the reaction mixture. Whereas tetramethylphthalic anydride and tetramethylisophthalic acid were obtained, pentamethylbenzoic acid, a possible precursor of them, was scarcely produced. On the other hand, a yellow material extracted with ether from the initial reaction mixture contained bis-(nitromethyl)prehnitene (CH3)4C6(CH2NO2)2, which was easily converted into the phthalic anhydride.

  9. L-carnitine supplementation in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mitwalli, Ahmed Hassan; Al-Wakeel, Jamal S; Alam, Awatif; Tarif, Nauman; Abu-Aisha, Hassan; Rashed, Mohamed; Al Nahed, Nora

    2005-01-01

    L-Carnitine supplementation has shown beneficial effects in patients on hemodialysis. We studied 36 ESRD adult patients with a mean age of 47.5 +/- 15 years to evaluate the effect of L-Carnitine supplementation on hemoglobin, lipid levels and physical performance in patients on hemodialysis. The study group consisted of 18 randomly selected patients who received L-Carnitine 15 mg/kg and the control group consisted of 18 randomly selected patients who received equal volume of normal saline as a placebo three times a week for six months. Laboratory tests were performed at baseline, then monthly until the end of the study. A significant increase in the hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (HCT) in the presence of unchanged doses of erythropoietin hormonal supplementation was observed (pre 79 +/- 7.5 gm/l, post 103 +/- 10.6 gm/l) P< 0.001 (pre 24+/- 2 %, post 33 +/- 4%) P< 0.001 respectively) in the L-Carnitine treated group. Similarly total serum cholesterol (TCL) and serum triglyceride (TG) levels showed a statistically significant decrease in the study group, TCL (pre 4.6 +/- 1.2, post 3.7 +/- 1.1 mmol/L), P < 0.03 and TG (pre 3.1 +/- 1.7, post 1.8 +/- 0.6 mmol/L) P < 0.004. The physical performance as assessed by mild and moderate exercise showed a trend towards improvement. There was a significant increase in free carnitine and total carnitine levels in the L-Carnitine treated group. In conclusion, these results demostrate positive effect of L-Carnitine supplementation in the hemodialysis patients marked by an increase in Hb, HCT, a decrease in TCL and TG and improved physical performance in comparison to the control group.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPAR gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) induce carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT-1A) via independent gene elements

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shulan; Attia, Ramy R.; Connaughton, Sara; Niesen, Melissa I.; Ness, Gene C.; Elam, Marshall B.; Hori, Roderick T.; Cook, George A.; Park, Edwards A.

    2010-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids and pharmacologic ligands for the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activate expression of genes involved in fatty acid and glucose oxidation including carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT-1A) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4). CPT-1A catalyzes the transfer of long chain fatty acids from acyl-CoA to carnitine for translocation across the mitochondrial membranes and is an initiating step in the mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids. PDK4 phosphorylates and inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in the glucose oxidation pathway. The activity of CPT-1A is modulated both by transcriptional changes as well as by malonyl-CoA inhibition. In the liver, CPT-1A and PDK4 gene expression are induced by starvation, high fat diets and PPARα ligands. Here, we characterized a binding site for PPARα in the second intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Our studies indicated that WY14643 and long chain fatty acids induce CPT-1A gene expression through this element. In addition, we found that mutation of the PPARα binding site reduced the expression of CPT-1A-luciferase vectors in the liver of fasted rats. We had demonstrated previously that CPT-1A was stimulated by the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) via sequences in the first intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Surprisingly, PGC-1α did not enhance CPT-1A transcription through the PPARα binding site in the second intron. Following knockdown of PGC-1α with short hairpin RNA, the CPT-1A and PDK4 genes remained responsive to WY14643. Overall, our studies indicated that PPARα and PGC-1α stimulate transcription of the CPT-1A gene through different regions of the CPT-1A gene. PMID:20638986

  11. Stilbenes and resveratrol metabolites improve mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inborn enzyme defects of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation (FAO) form a large group of genetic disorders associated to variable clinical presentations ranging from life-threatening pediatric manifestations up to milder late onset phenotypes, including myopathy. Very few candidate drugs have been identified in this group of disorders. Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenol with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, recently shown to have beneficial metabolic properties in mice models. Our study explores its possible effects on FAO and mitochondrial energy metabolism in human cells, which are still very little documented. Methods Using cells from controls and from patients with Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 2 (CPT2) or Very Long Chain AcylCoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency we characterized the metabolic effects of RSV, RSV metabolites, and other stilbenes. We also focused on analysis of RSV uptake, and on the effects of low RSV concentrations, considering the limited bioavailability of RSV in vivo. Results Time course of RSV accumulation in fibroblasts over 48 h of treatment were consistent with the resulting stimulation or correction of FAO capacities. At 48 h, half maximal and maximal FAO stimulations were respectively achieved for 37,5 microM (EC50) and 75 microM RSV, but we found that serum content of culture medium negatively modulated RSV uptake and FAO induction. Indeed, decreasing serum from 12% to 3% led to shift EC50 from 37,5 to 13 microM, and a 2.6-3.6-fold FAO stimulation was reached with 20 microM RSV at 3% serum, that was absent at 12% serum. Two other stilbenes often found associated with RSV, i.e. cis- RSV and piceid, also triggered significant FAO up-regulation. Resveratrol glucuro- or sulfo- conjugates had modest or no effects. In contrast, dihydro-RSV, one of the most abundant circulating RSV metabolites in human significantly stimulated FAO (1.3-2.3-fold). Conclusions This study provides the first compared data on

  12. Mechanisms for altered carnitine content in hypertrophied rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Reibel, D.K.; O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.A.

    1987-03-01

    Carnitine levels are reduced in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction (banding) and evaluated in hypertrophied hearts of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In an attempt to determine the mechanisms for these alterations, L-(/sup 14/C)carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by approx.20% in hypertrophied hearts of banded rats at all perfusate carnitine concentrations employed. The reduction in total uptake was due to a 40% reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake with no difference in uptake by diffusion. In contrast, carnitine uptake was not altered in isolated hypertrophied hearts of SHR. However, serum carnitine levels were elevated in SHR, which could result in increased myocardial carnitine uptake in vivo. The data suggest that altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of aortic-banded rats is due to an alteration in the carrier-mediated carnitine transport system in the myocardium. However, altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of SHR is not due to a change in the carnitine transport system per se but may rather be due to a change in serum carnitine levels.

  13. Increased fatty acid β-oxidation as a possible mechanism for fat-reducing effect of betaine in broilers.

    PubMed

    Leng, Zhixian; Fu, Qin; Yang, Xue; Ding, Liren; Wen, Chao; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-08-01

    Two hundred and forty 1-day-old male Arbor Acres broiler chickens were randomly assigned to five dietary treatments with six replicates of eight chickens per replicate cage for a 42-day feeding trial. Broiler chickens were fed a basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 250, 500, 750 or 1000 mg/kg betaine, respectively. Growth performance was not affected by betaine. Incremental levels of betaine decreased the absolute and relative weight of abdominal fat (linear P < 0.05, quadratic P < 0.01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) (linear P < 0.05), and increased concentration of nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) (linear P = 0.038, quadratic P = 0.003) in serum of broilers. Moreover, incremental levels of betaine increased linearly (P < 0.05) the proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), the carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I (CPT-I) and 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HADH) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, but decreased linearly (P < 0.05) the fatty acid synthase (FAS) and 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMGR) mRNA expression in liver of broilers. In conclusion, this study indicated that betaine supplementation did not affect growth performance of broilers, but was effective in reducing abdominal fat deposition in a dose-dependent manner, which was probably caused by combinations of a decrease in fatty acid synthesis and an increase in β-oxidation.

  14. [Investigation on mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions].

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Yi, Xiao-Yun; Dang, Zhi; Liu, Yun

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions was investigated by electrochemical analysis methods, such as open-circuit potential, cyclic voltammetry, Tafel polarization curve and anodic polarization curve, using a pyrite-carbon paste electrode as working electrode. The results showed that the oxidation process of pyrite in acidic solutions was via a two-step reaction: the first step was the dissolution of iron moiety and formation of a passivation film composed of elemental sulphur, metal-deficient sulfide and polysulfide; the second step was the further oxidation of these intermediate products to SO4(2-). The final reaction products of pyrite oxidation were Fe3+ and SO4(2-) in acidic solutions. In addition, the open-circuit potential and corrosion potential were positively shifted, the peak current and the corrosion current were increased with the increase in concentration of H2SO4 solutions. This indicated that increased acidity of the system was advantageous to the oxidation of pyrite.

  15. Role of tartaric and malic acids in wine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Danilewicz, John C

    2014-06-04

    Tartaric acid determines the reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple. Therefore, it is proposed that it determines the ability of Fe to catalyze wine oxidation. The importance of tartaric acid was demonstrated by comparing the aerial oxidation of 4-methylcatechol (4-MeC) in model wine made up with tartaric and acetic acids at pH 3.6. Acetic acid, as a weaker Fe(III) ligand, should raise the reduction potential of the Fe couple. 4-MeC was oxidized in both systems, but the mechanisms were found to differ. Fe(II) readily reduced oxygen in tartrate model wine, but Fe(III) alone failed to oxidize the catechol, requiring sulfite assistance. In acetate model wine the reverse was found to operate. These observations should have broad application to model systems designed to study the oxidative process in foods and other beverages. Consideration should be given to the reduction potential of metal couples by the inclusion of appropriate ligands.

  16. Fatty Acid Beta-Oxidation Disorders: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Vijay A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation disorders (FAODs) are a heterogeneous group of defects in fatty acid transport and mitochondrial β-oxidation. They are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders and have a wide range of clinical presentations. Summary The background information and case report provide important insight into mitochondrial FAODs. The article provides a wealth of information describing the scope of these disorders. Key Messages This article presents a typical case of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and summarizes the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of mitochondrial FAODs. PMID:27536022

  17. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Selective oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions using gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    H-mordenite-supported PtAu nanoparticles are highly active and selective in the oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions, which allows the direct preparation of free acids (see picture). The high selectivity for C{sub 3} compounds results from the negligible formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in contrast to PtAu nanoparticles supported on activated carbon.

  19. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism integrates nutrient and hormonal feedback to regulate energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-15

    The maintenance of energy homeostasis requires the hypothalamic integration of nutrient feedback cues, such as glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and metabolic hormones such as insulin, leptin and ghrelin. Although hypothalamic neurons are critical to maintain energy homeostasis research efforts have focused on feedback mechanisms in isolation, such as glucose alone, fatty acids alone or single hormones. However this seems rather too simplistic considering the range of nutrient and endocrine changes associated with different metabolic states, such as starvation (negative energy balance) or diet-induced obesity (positive energy balance). In order to understand how neurons integrate multiple nutrient or hormonal signals, we need to identify and examine potential intracellular convergence points or common molecular targets that have the ability to sense glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and hormones. In this review, we focus on the role of carnitine metabolism in neurons regulating energy homeostasis. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a novel means for neurons to facilitate and control both nutrient and hormonal feedback. In terms of nutrient regulation, carnitine metabolism regulates hypothalamic fatty acid sensing through the actions of CPT1 and has an underappreciated role in glucose sensing since carnitine metabolism also buffers mitochondrial matrix levels of acetyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and hence glucose metabolism. Studies also show that hypothalamic CPT1 activity also controls hormonal feedback. We hypothesis that hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a key molecular target that can concurrently integrate nutrient and hormonal information, which is critical to maintain energy homeostasis. We also suggest this is relevant to broader neuroendocrine research as it predicts that hormonal signaling in the brain varies depending on current nutrient status. Indeed, the metabolic action of ghrelin, leptin or insulin

  20. Identification of OpuC as a Chill-Activated and Osmotically Activated Carnitine Transporter in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Angelidis, Apostolos S.; Smith, Linda Tombras; Hoffman, Les M.; Smith, Gary M.

    2002-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is notable for its ability to grow under osmotic stress and at low temperatures. It is known to accumulate the compatible solutes glycine betaine and carnitine from the medium in response to osmotic or chill stress, and this accumulation confers tolerance to these stresses. Two permeases that transport glycine betaine have been identified, both of which are activated by hyperosmotic stress and one of which is activated by low temperature. An osmotically activated transporter for carnitine, OpuC, has also been identified. We have isolated a Tn917-LTV3 insertional mutant that could not be rescued from hyperosmotic stress by exogenous carnitine. The mutant, LTS4a, grew indistinguishably from a control strain (DP-L1044) in the absence of stress or in the absence of carnitine, but DP-L1044 grew substantially faster under osmotic or chill stress in the presence of carnitine. LTS4a was found to be strongly impaired in KCl-activated as well as chill-activated carnitine transport. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of perchloric acid extracts showed that accumulation of carnitine by LTS4a was negligible under all conditions tested. Direct sequencing of LTS4a genomic DNA with a primer based on Tn917-LTV3 yielded a 487-bp sequence, which allowed us to determine that the opuC operon had been interrupted by the transposon. It can be concluded that opuC encodes a carnitine transporter that can be activated by either hyperosmotic stress or chill and that the transport system plays a significant role in the tolerance of L. monocytogenes to both forms of environmental stress. PMID:12039715

  1. Identification of opuC as a chill-activated and osmotically activated carnitine transporter in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Apostolos S; Smith, Linda Tombras; Hoffman, Les M; Smith, Gary M

    2002-06-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is notable for its ability to grow under osmotic stress and at low temperatures. It is known to accumulate the compatible solutes glycine betaine and carnitine from the medium in response to osmotic or chill stress, and this accumulation confers tolerance to these stresses. Two permeases that transport glycine betaine have been identified, both of which are activated by hyperosmotic stress and one of which is activated by low temperature. An osmotically activated transporter for carnitine, OpuC, has also been identified. We have isolated a Tn917-LTV3 insertional mutant that could not be rescued from hyperosmotic stress by exogenous carnitine. The mutant, LTS4a, grew indistinguishably from a control strain (DP-L1044) in the absence of stress or in the absence of carnitine, but DP-L1044 grew substantially faster under osmotic or chill stress in the presence of carnitine. LTS4a was found to be strongly impaired in KCl-activated as well as chill-activated carnitine transport. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of perchloric acid extracts showed that accumulation of carnitine by LTS4a was negligible under all conditions tested. Direct sequencing of LTS4a genomic DNA with a primer based on Tn917-LTV3 yielded a 487-bp sequence, which allowed us to determine that the opuC operon had been interrupted by the transposon. It can be concluded that opuC encodes a carnitine transporter that can be activated by either hyperosmotic stress or chill and that the transport system plays a significant role in the tolerance of L. monocytogenes to both forms of environmental stress.

  2. Effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation in low-birth-weight premature infants maintained on human milk.

    PubMed

    Melegh, B; Kerner, J; Sándor, A; Vincellér, M; Kispál, G

    1987-01-01

    Effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation on fat and protein metabolism have been studied in 20 low-birth-weight premature infants (mean weight at birth 1.519 g, range 1,200-1,880 g) fed with pooled pasteurized human milk. Throughout 7 consecutive days, started at various postnatal ages (range 10-33 days) infants were fed exclusively with milk containing 300 nmol/ml L-carnitine as added supplement. The amount of extra carnitine intake ranged from 42.6 to 72.0 mumol/kg/day. Until day 5 of supplementation there was a continuous increase in the daily urinary excretion of total carnitine, which levelled off thereafter, corresponding approximately to 50% of the extra L-carnitine intake, indicating that a part of the supplement was retained by the body. Total, free and esterified carnitine levels were significantly elevated in the plasma at the end of the study period. The increased levels of acylcarnitines in plasma and urine indicate that the carnitine supplement was taken up by tissues and entered the intermediary metabolism. Plasma triglyceride level was decreased, whereas 3-hydroxybutyrate level was increased at the end of supplementation, indicating an enhanced fat utilization. Plasma and urine analysis also revealed an altered nitrogen handling. There was a marked decrease in plasma urea level as well as a significant fall in the urea and total N excretion, with a trend of decrease in excretion of 3-methylhistidine, suggesting a reduced amino acid and protein catabolism during L-carnitine supplementation.

  3. The carnitine biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana shares similar features with the pathway of mammals and fungi.

    PubMed

    Rippa, Sonia; Zhao, Yingjuan; Merlier, Franck; Charrier, Aurélie; Perrin, Yolande

    2012-11-01

    Carnitine is an essential quaternary ammonium amino acid that occurs in the microbial, plant and animal kingdoms. The role and synthesis of this compound are very well documented in bacteria, fungi and mammals. On the contrary, although the presence of carnitine in plant tissue has been reported four decades ago and information about its biological implication are available, nothing is known about its synthesis in plants. We designed experiments to determine if the carnitine biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana is similar to the pathway in mammals and in the fungi Neurospora crassa and Candida albicans. We first checked for the presence of trimetyllysine (TML) and γ-butyrobetaine (γ-BB), two precursors of carnitine in fungi and in mammals, using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Both compounds were shown to be present in plant extracts at concentrations in the picomole range per mg of dry weight. We next synthesized deuterium-labeled TML and transferred A. thaliana seedlings on growth medium supplemented with 1 mM of the deuterated precursor. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of plant extracts clearly highlighted the synthesis of deuterium labeled γ-BB and labeled carnitine in deuterated-TML fed plants. The similarities between plant, fungal and mammalian pathways provide very useful information to search homologies between genomes. As a matter of fact the analysis of A. thaliana protein database provides homology for several enzymes responsible for carnitine synthesis in fungi and mammals. The study of mutants affected in the corresponding genes would be very useful to elucidate the plant carnitine biosynthetic pathway and to investigate further the role of carnitine in plant physiology.

  4. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, A.C.; Bravo, D.M.; Nápolis, L.M.; Mello, M.T.; Oliveira, A.S.B.; Neder, J.A.; Nery, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min) and oxygen consumption (V˙O2) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO. PMID:25714882

  5. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gimenes, A C; Bravo, D M; Nápolis, L M; Mello, M T; Oliveira, A S B; Neder, J A; Nery, L E

    2015-04-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min) and oxygen consumption ( V ˙ O 2 ) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO.

  6. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  7. Effects of metabolic modifiers such as carnitines, coenzyme Q10, and PUFAs against different forms of neurotoxic insults: metabolic inhibitors, MPTP, and methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Gaetani, Franco; Binienda, Zbigniew

    2005-08-01

    A number of strategies using the nutritional approach are emerging for the protection of the brain from damage caused by metabolic toxins, age, or disease. Neural dysfunction and metabolic imbalances underlie many diseases, and the inclusion of metabolic modifiers may provide an alternative and early intervention approach that may prevent further damage. Various models have been developed to study the impact of metabolism on brain function. These have also proven useful in expanding our understanding of neurodegeneration processes. For example, the metabolic compromise induced by inhibitors such as 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA), rotenone, and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) can cause neurodegeneration in animal models and these models are thought to simulate the processes that may lead to diseases such as Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. These inhibitors of metabolism are thought to selectively kill neurons by inhibiting various mitochondrial enzymes. However, the eventual cell death is attributed to oxidative stress damage of selectively vulnerable cells, especially highly differentiated neurons. Various studies indicate that the neurotoxicity resulting from these types of metabolic compromise is related to mitochondrial dysfunction and may be ameliorated by metabolic modifiers such as L-carnitine (L-C), creatine, and coenzyme Q10, as well as by antioxidants such as lipoic acid, vitamin E, and resveratrol. Mitochondrial function and cellular metabolism are also affected by the dietary intake of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which may regulate membrane composition and influence cellular processes, especially the inflammatory pathways. Cellular metabolic function may also be ameliorated by caloric restriction diets. L-C is a naturally occurring quaternary ammonium compound that is a vital cofactor for the mitochondrial entry and oxidation of fatty acids. Any factors affecting L-C levels may also affect ATP levels. This endogenous compound

  8. Plasma free and total carnitine measured in children by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Osorio, J H; Pourfarzam, M

    2002-11-01

    Free and total carnitine quantification is important as a complementary test for the diagnosis of unusual metabolic diseases, including fatty acid degradation disorders. The present study reports a new method for the quantification of free and total carnitine in dried plasma specimens by isotope dilution electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with sample derivatization. Carnitine is determined by looking for the precursor of ions of m/z = 103 of N-butylester derivative, and the method is validated by comparison with radioenzymatic assay. We obtained an inter- and intra-day assay coefficient of variation of 4.3 and 2.3, respectively. Free and total carnitine was analyzed in 309 dried plasma spot samples from children ranging in age from newborn to 14 years using the new method, which was found to be suitable for calculating reference age-related values for free and total carnitine (less than one month: 19.3 +/- 2.4 and 23.5 +/- 2.9; one to twelve months: 28.8 +/- 10.2 and 35.9 +/- 11.4; one to seven years: 30.7 +/- 10.3 and 38.1 +/- 11.9; seven to 14 years: 33.7 +/- 11.6, and 43.1 +/- 13.8 micro M, respectively). No difference was found between males and females. A significant difference was observed between neonates and the other age groups. We compare our data with reference values in the literature, most of them obtained by radioenzymatic assay. However, this method is laborious and time consuming. The electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method presented here is a reliable, rapid and automated procedure for carnitine quantitation.

  9. Carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism during exercise after oral carnitine supplementation in humans.

    PubMed

    Broad, Elizabeth M; Maughan, Ronald J; Galloway, Stuart D

    2008-12-01

    Twenty nonvegetarian active males were pair-matched and randomly assigned to receive 2 g of L-carnitine L-tartrate (LC) or placebo per day for 2 wk. Participants exercised for 90 min at 70% VO2max after 2 days of a prescribed diet (M +/- SD: 13.6 +/- 1.6 MJ, 57% carbohydrate, 15% protein, 26% fat, 2% alcohol) before and after supplementation. Results indicated no change in carbohydrate oxidation, nitrogen excretion, branched-chain amino acid oxidation, or plasma urea during exercise between the beginning and end of supplementation in either group. After 2 wk of LC supplementation the plasma ammonia response to exercise tended to be suppressed (0 vs. 2 wk at 60 min exercise, 97 +/- 26 vs. 80 +/- 9, and 90 min exercise, 116 +/- 47 vs. 87 +/- 25 micromol/L), with no change in the placebo group. The data indicate that 2 wk of LC supplementation does not affect fat, carbohydrate, and protein contribution to metabolism during prolonged moderate-intensity cycling exercise. The tendency toward suppressed ammonia accumulation, however, indicates that oral LC supplementation might have the potential to reduce the metabolic stress of exercise or alter ammonia production or removal, which warrants further investigation.

  10. Chloramines and hypochlorous acid oxidize erythrocyte peroxiredoxin 2.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Melissa M; Peskin, Alexander V; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2009-11-15

    Peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2) is an abundant thiol protein that is readily oxidized in erythrocytes exposed to hydrogen peroxide. We investigated its reactivity in human erythrocytes with hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and chloramines, relevant oxidants in inflammation. Prx2 was oxidized to a disulfide-linked dimer by HOCl, glycine chloramine (GlyCl), and monochloramine (NH(2)Cl) in a dose-dependent manner. In the absence of added glucose, Prx2 and GSH showed similar sensitivities. Second-order rate constants for the reactions of Prx2 with NH(2)Cl and GlyCl were 1.5 x 10(4) and 8 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The NH(2)Cl value is approximately 10 times higher than that for GSH, whereas Prx2 is approximately 30 times less sensitive than GSH to GlyCl. Thus, the relative sensitivity of Prx2 to GlyCl is greater in the erythrocyte. Oxidation of erythrocyte Prx2 and GSH was less in the presence of glucose, probably because of recycling. High doses of NH(2)Cl resulted in incomplete regeneration of reduced Prx2, suggesting impairment of the recycling mechanism. Our results show that, although HOCl and chloramines are less selective than H(2)O(2), they nevertheless oxidize Prx2. Exposure to these inflammatory oxidants will result in Prx2 oxidation and could compromise the erythrocyte's ability to resist damaging oxidative insult.

  11. Sensitive and reliable ascorbic acid sensing by lanthanum oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Mogha, Navin Kumar; Sahu, Vikrant; Sharma, Meenakshi; Sharma, Raj Kishore; Masram, Dhanraj T

    2014-10-01

    A simple strategy for the detection and estimation of ascorbic acid (AA), using lanthanum oxide-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (LO/RGO) on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate, is reported. LO/RGO displays high catalytic activity toward the oxidation of AA, and the synergism between lanthanum oxide and reduced graphene oxide was attributed to the successful and efficient detection. Detection mechanism and sensing efficacy of LO/RGO nanocomposite are investigated by electrochemical techniques. Chronoamperometric results under optimal conditions show a linear response range from 14 to 100 μM for AA detection. Commercially available vitamin C tablets were also analyzed using the proposed LO/RGO sensor, and the remarkable recovery percentage (97.64-99.7) shows the potential application in AA detection.

  12. Incomplete oxidation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in chemical oxygen demand analysis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James E; Mueller, Sherry A; Kim, Byung R

    2007-09-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was found to incompletely oxidize in chemical oxygen demand (COD) analysis, leading to incorrect COD values for water samples containing relatively large amounts of EDTA. The degree of oxidation depended on the oxidant used, its concentration, and the length of digestion. The COD concentrations measured using COD vials with a potassium dichromate concentration of 0.10 N (after dilution by sample and sulfuric acid) were near theoretical oxygen demand values. However, COD measured with dichromate concentrations of 0.010 N and 0.0022 N were 30 to 40% lower than theoretical oxygen demand values. Similarly, lower COD values were observed with manganic sulfate as oxidant at 0.011 N. Extended digestion yielded somewhat higher COD values, suggesting incomplete and slower oxidation of EDTA, as a result of lower oxidant concentrations. For wastewater in which EDTA is a large fraction of COD, accurate COD measurement may not be achieved with methods using dichromate concentrations less than 0.1 N.

  13. Increased beta-oxidation in muscle cells enhances insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and protects against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance despite intramyocellular lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, German; Commerford, S Renee; Richard, Ann-Marie T; Adams, Sean H; Corkey, Barbara E; O'Doherty, Robert M; Brown, Nicholas F

    2004-06-25

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance may be aggravated by intramyocellular accumulation of fatty acid-derived metabolites that inhibit insulin signaling. We tested the hypothesis that enhanced fatty acid oxidation in myocytes should protect against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance by limiting lipid accumulation. L6 myotubes were transduced with adenoviruses encoding carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) isoforms or beta-galactosidase (control). Two to 3-fold overexpression of L-CPT I, the endogenous isoform in L6 cells, proportionally increased oxidation of the long-chain fatty acids palmitate and oleate and increased insulin stimulation of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen by 60% while enhancing insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of p38MAPK. Incubation of control cells with 0.2 mm palmitate for 18 h caused accumulation of triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and ceramide (but not long-chain acyl-CoA) and decreased insulin-stimulated [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen (60%), [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake (60%), and protein kinase B phosphorylation (20%). In the context of L-CPT I overexpression, palmitate preincubation produced a relative decrease in insulin-stimulated incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen (60%) and [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake (40%) but did not inhibit phosphorylation of protein kinase B. Due to the enhancement of insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism induced by L-CPT I overexpression itself, net insulin-stimulated incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen and [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake in L-CPT I-transduced, palmitate-treated cells were significantly greater than in palmitate-treated control cells (71 and 75% greater, respectively). However, L-CPT I overexpression failed to decrease intracellular triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, ceramide, or long-chain acyl-CoA. We propose that accelerated beta-oxidation in muscle cells exerts an insulin-sensitizing effect independently of changes in intracellular lipid content.

  14. How the mitochondrion was shaped by radical differences in substrates: what carnitine shuttles and uncoupling tell us about mitochondrial evolution in response to ROS.

    PubMed

    Speijer, Dave

    2014-07-01

    As free-living organisms, alpha-proteobacteria produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that diffuse into the surroundings; once constrained inside the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes, however, ROS production presented evolutionary pressures - especially because the alpha-proteobacterial symbiont made more ROS, from a variety of substrates. I previously proposed that ratios of electrons coming from FADH2 and NADH (F/N ratios) correlate with ROS production levels during respiration, glucose breakdown having a much lower F/N ratio than longer fatty acid (FA) breakdown. Evidently, higher endogenous ROS formation did not hinder eukaryotic evolution, so how were its disadvantages mitigated? I propose that the resulting selection pressures favoured the evolution of a variety of eukaryotic 'innovations': peroxisomes for FA breakdown, carnitine shuttles, the linkage of beta-oxidation to antioxidant properties, uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and using mitochondrial uncoupling during beta-oxidation to reduce ROS. Recently observed relationships between peroxisomes and mitochondria further support the model.

  15. Nucleic acid oxidation: an early feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Whitman, Melissa A; Timmons, Michael D; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, Michael P; Lynn, Bert C; Lovell, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Studies of oxidative damage during the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest its central role in disease pathogenesis. To investigate levels of nucleic acid oxidation in both early and late stages of AD, levels of multiple base adducts were quantified in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from the superior and middle temporal gyri (SMTG), inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and cerebellum (CER) of age-matched normal control subjects, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, preclinical AD, late-stage AD, and non-AD neurological disorders (diseased control; DC) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Median levels of multiple DNA adducts in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) elevated in the SMTG, IPL, and CER in multiple stages of AD and in DC subjects. Elevated levels of fapyguanine and fapyadenine in mitochondrial DNA suggest a hypoxic environment early in the progression of AD and in DC subjects. Overall, these data suggest that oxidative damage is an early event not only in the pathogenesis of AD but is also present in neurodegenerative diseases in general. Levels of oxidized nucleic acids in nDNA and mtDNA were found to be significantly elevated in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), preclinical Alzheimer's disease (PCAD), late-stage AD (LAD), and a pooled diseased control group (DC) of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) subjects compared to normal control (NC) subjects. Nucleic acid oxidation peaked early in disease progression and remained elevated. The study suggests nucleic acid oxidation is a general event in neurodegeneration.

  16. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/ greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  17. Effect of (L-Carnitine) on acetyl-L-carnitine production by heart mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, L.L.; Lilly, K.; Lysiak, W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors recently reported a large efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine from rat heart mitochondria during state 3 respiration with pyruvate as substrate both in the presence and absence of malate. In this series of experiments, the effect of the concentration of L-carnitine on the efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine and on the production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from 2-/sup 14/C-pyruvate was determined. Maximum acetylcarnitine production (approximately 25 n moles/min/mg protein) was obtained at 3-5 mM L-carnitine in the absence of added malate. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production decreased as the concentration of L-carnitine increased; it plateaued at 3-5 mM L-carnitine. These data indicate carnitine can stimulate flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase and can reduce flux of acetyl CoA through the Krebs cycle by acting as an acceptor of the acetyl moieties of acetyl CoA generated by pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  18. Management and outcome in 75 individuals with long-chain fatty acid oxidation defects: results from a workshop.

    PubMed

    Spiekerkoetter, U; Lindner, M; Santer, R; Grotzke, M; Baumgartner, M R; Boehles, H; Das, A; Haase, C; Hennermann, J B; Karall, D; de Klerk, H; Knerr, I; Koch, H G; Plecko, B; Röschinger, W; Schwab, K O; Scheible, D; Wijburg, F A; Zschocke, J; Mayatepek, E; Wendel, U

    2009-08-01

    At present, long-chain fatty acid oxidation (FAO) defects are diagnosed in a number of countries by newborn screening using tandem mass spectrometry. In the majority of cases, affected newborns are asymptomatic at time of diagnosis and acute clinical presentations can be avoided by early preventive measures. Because evidence-based studies on management of long-chain FAO defects are lacking, we carried out a retrospective analysis of 75 patients from 18 metabolic centres in Germany, Switzerland, Austria and the Netherlands with special regard to treatment and disease outcome. Dietary treatment is effective in many patients and can prevent acute metabolic derangements and prevent or reverse severe long-term complications such as cardiomyopathy. However, 38% of patients with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency had intermittent muscle weakness and pain despite adhering to therapy. Seventy-six per cent of patients with disorders of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP)-complex including long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency, had long-term myopathic symptoms. Of these, 21% had irreversible peripheral neuropathy and 43% had retinopathy. The main principle of treatment was a fat-reduced and fat-modified diet. Fat restriction differed among patients with different enzyme defects and was strictest in disorders of the TFP-complex. Patients with a medium-chain fat-based diet received supplementation of essential long-chain fatty acids. l-Carnitine was supplemented in about half of the patients, but in none of the patients with VLCAD deficiency identified by newborn screening. In summary, in this cohort the treatment regimen was adapted to the severity of the underlying enzyme defect and thus differed among the group of long-chain FAO defects.

  19. Acetyl-L-carnitine in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The clinical diagnosis is based on two concurrent types of symptoms: impaired mental status and impaired neuromotor function. Impaired mental status is characterized by deterioration in mental status with psychomotor dysfunction, impaired memory, and increased reaction time, sensory abnormalities, poor concentration, disorientation and coma. Impaired neuromotor function include hyperreflexia, rigidity, myoclonus and asterixis. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been clearly defined. The general consensus is that elevated levels of ammonia and an inflammatory response work in synergy to cause astrocyte to swell and fluid to accumulate in the brain which is thought to explain the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Acetyl-L-carnitine, the short-chain ester of carnitine is endogenously produced within mitochondria and peroxisomes and is involved in the transport of acetyl-moieties across the membranes of these organelles. Acetyl-L-carnitine administration has shown the recovery of neuropsychological activities related to attention/concentration, visual scanning and tracking, psychomotor speed and mental flexibility, language short-term memory, attention, and computing ability. In fact, Acetyl-L-carnitine induces ureagenesis leading to decreased blood and brain ammonia levels. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment decreases the severity of mental and physical fatigue, depression cognitive impairment and improves health-related quality of life. The aim of this review was to provide an explanation on the possible toxic effects of ammonia in HE and evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ALC.

  20. Investigation of inflammatory profile in MSUD patients: benefit of L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Mescka, Caroline Paula; Guerreiro, Gilian; Donida, Bruna; Marchetti, Desirèe; Wayhs, Carlos Alberto Yasin; Ribas, Graziela Schimitt; Coitinho, Adriana Simon; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-10-01

    Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) is a metabolic disorder caused by a severe deficiency of the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex activity which leads to the accumulation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine (Leu), isoleucine and valine and their respective α-keto-acids in body fluids. The main symptomatology presented by MSUD patients includes ketoacidosis, failure to thrive, poor feeding, apnea, ataxia, seizures, coma, psychomotor delay and mental retardation, but, the neurological pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. The treatment consists of a low protein diet and a semi-synthetic formula restricted in BCAA and supplemented with essential amino acids. It was verified that MSUD patients present L-carnitine (L-car) deficiency and this compound has demonstrated an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory role in metabolic diseases. Since there are no studies in the literature reporting the inflammatory profile of MSUD patients and the L-car role on the inflammatory response in this disorder, the present study evaluates the effect of L-car supplementation on plasma inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-gamma (INF-ɣ), and a correlation with malondialdehyde (MDA), as a marker of oxidative damage, and with free L-car plasma levels in treated MSUD patients. Significant increases of IL-1β, IL-6, and INF-ɣ were observed before the treatment with L-car. Moreover, there is a negative correlation between all cytokines tested and L-car concentrations and a positive correlation among the MDA content and IL-1β and IL-6 values. Our data show that L-car supplementation can improve cellular defense against inflammation and oxidative stress in MSUD patients and may represent an additional therapeutic approach to the patients affected by this disease.

  1. Metabolic aspects of acute tissue hypoxia during extracorporeal circulation and their modification induced by L-carnitine treatment.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Menichetti, A; Cogliatti, A; Nicoli, P; Ruvolo, C

    1992-01-01

    In this study the authors examine the effects of acute hypoxia due to extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and the role played by L-carnitine treatment on some plasmatic metabolites linked to glycolytic cellular metabolism. To obtain biochemical data, 120 patients in extracorporeal circulation during aortopulmonary bypass surgery were evaluated. The patients received either sodium bicarbonate (40 patients), or L-carnitine during ECC (40 patients) or before and during ECC (40 patients), and plasma samples were collected before ECC, during ECC and after ECC. The levels of lactate and pyruvate showed significant alterations in sodium bicarbonate-treated patients, and there was also a considerable imbalance in the succinate/fumarate ratio. This means that tissue hypoxia due to ECC leads to cellular oxidative damage and to a considerable decrease in the intracellular energy pools. The use of L-carnitine antagonizes the oxidative stress, as is well documented by the levels of plasmatic metabolites which remain confined to normal amounts.

  2. Oxidation of nitrapyrin to 6-chloropicolinic acid by the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium nitrosomonas europaea

    SciTech Connect

    Vannelli, T.; Hooper, A.B.

    1992-07-01

    Suspensions of Nitrosomonas europaea catalyzed the oxidation of the commercial nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin (2-chloro-6-(trichloromethyl)-pyridine). Rapid oxidation of nitrapyrin (at a concentration of 10 microM) required the concomitant oxidation of ammonia, hydroxylamine, or hydrazine. The turnover rate was highest in the presence of 10 mM ammonia (0.8 nmol of nitrapyrin per min/mg of protein). The product of the reaction was 6-chloropicolinic acid. By the use of (18)O2, it was shown that one of the oxygens in 6-chloropicolinic acid came from diatomic oxygen and that the other came from water. Approximately 13% of the radioactivity of (2,6-(14)C) nitrapyrin was shown to bind to cells. Most (94%) of the latter was bound indiscriminately to membrane proteins. The nitrapyrin bound to membrane proteins may account for the observed inactivation of ammonia oxidation. (Copyright (c) 1992, American Society for Microbiology.)

  3. Pd oxides/hydrous oxides as highly efficient catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Yao, Shikui; Chang, Jinfa; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2014-03-01

    A novel Pd-based catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation (FAEO) was prepared by annealing commercial Pd/C catalyst under the O2 atmosphere at 100 °C, which exhibits excellent catalytic activity and stability for FAEO due to introduction of Pd oxides/hydrous oxides (POHOs). The catalytic activity of the as-prepared catalyst towards FAEO is 1.86 times of the commercial Pd/C catalyst in 0.5 M H2SO4 + 0.5 M HCOOH solution. Chronoamperometric curves show obvious improvement of the as-prepared catalyst electrocatalytic stability for FAEO. It is confirmed that POHOs can provide the required oxygen species for intermediate CO oxidation during the oxidation process of formic acid.

  4. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  5. Metabolic aspects of acute cerebral hypoxia during extracorporeal circulation and their modification induced by acetyl-carnitine treatment.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Menichetti, A; Cogliatti, A; Nicoli, P; Arduini, A; Damonti, W; Marchionni, A; Calvani, M

    1992-01-01

    Following their previous research experiences in human tissue hypoxia, in the present study the authors. investigated the metabolic effects of acute brain hypoxia in a group of patients in course of extracorporeal circulation for aorto-pulmonary bypass. One hundred subjects were treated, half with a placebo and half with acetyl-carnitine to evaluate the effects of oxidative stress in some brain plasmatic metabolites and to verify the effect of acetyl-carnitine on the tissue energy capacity. The levels of lactate, pyruvate, succinate and fumarate showed a significant imbalance due to hypoxia, while the acetyl-carnitine treatment confined the metabolic gradients within physiological limits. This means that during the course of extracorporeal circulation brain hypoxia plays a pathological role assuming the typical picture of cellular oxidative damage and the acetyl-carnitine antagonizes these deleterious effects of hypoxia by a protective mechanism on the energy processes and then on the cellular enzymic activities. In this regard, the d-tyrosine levels, considered as a proteolytic index, confirm the action of acetyl-carnitine on the cell morpho-functional integrity.

  6. C75 is converted to C75-CoA in the hypothalamus, where it inhibits carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and decreases food intake and body weight.

    PubMed

    Mera, Paula; Bentebibel, Assia; López-Viñas, Eduardo; Cordente, Antonio G; Gurunathan, Chandrashekaran; Sebastián, David; Vázquez, Irene; Herrero, Laura; Ariza, Xavier; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Asins, Guillermina; Serra, Dolors; García, Jordi; Hegardt, Fausto G

    2009-03-15

    Central nervous system administration of C75 produces hypophagia and weight loss in rodents identifying C75 as a potential drug against obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism underlying this effect is unknown. Here we show that C75-CoA is generated chemically, in vitro and in vivo from C75 and that it is a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltranferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting step of fatty-acid oxidation. Three-D docking and kinetic analysis support the inhibitory effect of C75-CoA on CPT1. Central nervous system administration of C75 in rats led to C75-CoA production, inhibition of CPT1 and lower body weight and food intake. Our results suggest that inhibition of CPT1, and thus increased availability of fatty acids in the hypothalamus, contribute to the pharmacological mechanism of C75 to decrease food intake.

  7. Production of dicarboxylic acids from novel unsaturated fatty acids by laccase-catalyzed oxidative cleavage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Michiki; Kishino, Shigenobu; Park, Si-Bum; Kitamura, Nahoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Saika, Azusa; Hibi, Makoto; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Ogawa, Jun

    2016-06-27

    The establishment of renewable biofuel and chemical production is desirable because of global warming and the exhaustion of petroleum reserves. Sebacic acid (decanedioic acid), the material of 6,10-nylon, is produced from ricinoleic acid, a carbon-neutral material, but the process is not eco-friendly because of its energy requirements. Laccase-catalyzing oxidative cleavage of fatty acid was applied to the production of dicarboxylic acids using hydroxy and oxo fatty acids involved in the saturation metabolism of unsaturated fatty acids in Lactobacillus plantarum as substrates. Hydroxy or oxo fatty acids with a functional group near the carbon-carbon double bond were cleaved at the carbon-carbon double bond, hydroxy group, or carbonyl group by laccase and transformed into dicarboxylic acids. After 8 h, 0.58 mM of sebacic acid was produced from 1.6 mM of 10-oxo-cis-12,cis-15-octadecadienoic acid (αKetoA) with a conversion rate of 35% (mol/mol). This laccase-catalyzed enzymatic process is a promising method to produce dicarboxylic acids from biomass-derived fatty acids.

  8. Uric acid protects membranes and linolenic acid from ozone-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Meadows, J; Smith, R C; Reeves, J

    1986-05-29

    Aqueous preparations of linolenic acid, bovine serum albumin, and bovine erythrocyte membrane fragments were bubbled with ozone in the presence or absence of uric acid. Ozonation of the membrane fragments or the bovine serum albumin did not result in protein degradation. After 15 min of ozonation, the absorbance of the thiobarbituric acid-reactive material increased by 0.34 in the linolenic acid preparation and by 0.08 in the suspension of membrane fragments. In the presence of uric acid, these changes in absorbance were reduced to 0.14 for the fatty acid and to 0.01 for the membrane fragments. This result indicates that uric acid protects lipids from ozone-induced oxidation.

  9. Oxidation of hypotaurine and cysteine sulphinic acid by peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the sulphinic group of both HTAU (hypotaurine) and CSA (cysteine sulphinic acid), producing the respective sulphonates, TAU (taurine) and CA (cysteic acid). The reaction is associated with extensive oxygen uptake, suggesting that HTAU and CSA are oxidized by the one-electron transfer mechanism to sulphonyl radicals, which may initiate an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction with the sulphonates as final products. Besides the one-electron mechanism, HTAU and CSA can be oxidized by the two-electron pathway, leading directly to sulphonate formation without oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the direct reaction of peroxynitrite with HTAU and CSA at pH 7.4 and 25 °C are 77.4±5 and 76.4±9 M−1·s−1 respectively. For both sulphinates, the apparent second-order rate constants increase sharply with decrease in pH, and the sigmoidal curves obtained are consistent with peroxynitrous acid as the species responsible for sulphinate oxidation. The kinetic data, together with changes in oxygen uptake, sulphinate depletion, sulphonate production, and product distribution of nitrite and nitrate, suggest that oxidation of sulphinates by peroxynitrite may take place by the two reaction pathways whose relative importance depends on reagent concentrations and pH value. In the presence of bicarbonate, the direct reaction of sulphinates with peroxynitrite is inhibited and the oxidative reaction probably involves only the radicals •NO2 and CO3•−, generated by decomposition of the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct. PMID:15740460

  10. Effects of carnitine supplementation on flow-mediated dilation and vascular inflammatory responses to a high-fat meal in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S; Judelson, Daniel A; Silvestre, Ricardo; Yamamoto, Linda M; Spiering, Barry A; Hatfield, Disa L; Vingren, Jakob L; Quann, Erin E; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2008-11-15

    Because carnitine has been shown to decrease oxidative stress and improve endothelial cell functioning, we examined the effects of carnitine supplementation on postprandial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and circulating biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress after a high-fat meal. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study design was used. Thirty men and women (age 30 +/- 8 year, body mass 72.9 +/- 17.1 kg, body fat 13.0 +/- 6.4%) participated in 2 vascular testing days, each preceded by 3 weeks of supplementation with either 2 g/day of L-Carnitine (L-Carnitine L-Tartrate) or placebo with a 3- to 5-week washout period between trials. Brachial artery FMD in response to 5 minutes of upper arm occlusion and circulating markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were measured in the fasting state and after a standardized high-fat meal. After 3 weeks of supplementation, peak FMD in the fasting state was similar between the carnitine and placebo trials, averaging 6.6%. Peak FMD during the postprandial period decreased to 5.8% at 1.5 hours during placebo and increased to 7.7% during the carnitine trial (n = 30: p = 0.043 for supplement by time interaction effect). This improvement in postprandial vascular function was most dramatic in subjects who showed a decrease in peak FMD in response to the meal (n = 15: p = 0.003 for supplement by time interaction effect). There was a significant increase in postprandial lipemia and plasma interleukin-6 but no effect of supplementation. There were no significant postprandial changes or supplement effects for plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha and malondialdehyde. In conclusion, consistent with other work showing a beneficial effect of carnitine on vascular function, these findings indicate that carnitine supplementation in healthy individuals improves postprandial FMD after a high-fat meal.

  11. Mechanistic Insights into the Catalytic Oxidation of Carboxylic Acids on Au/TiO2: Partial Oxidation of Propionic and Butyric Acid to Gold Ketenylidene through Unsaturated Acids

    DOE PAGES

    McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; ...

    2014-12-12

    Here, the partial oxidation of model C2–C4 (acetic, propionic, and butyric) carboxylic acids on Au/TiO2 catalysts consisting of Au particles ~3 nm in size was investigated using transmission infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory. All three acids readily undergo oxidative dehydrogenation on Au/TiO2. Propionic and butyric acid dehydrogenate at the C2–C3 positions, whereas acetic acid dehydrogenates at the C1–C2 position. The resulting acrylate and crotonate intermediates are subsequently oxidized to form β-keto acids that decarboxylate. All three acids form a gold ketenylidene intermediate, Au2C=C=O, along the way to their full oxidation to form CO2. Infrared measurements of Au2C=C=O formation asmore » a function of time provides a surface spectroscopic probe of the kinetics for the activation and oxidative dehydrogenation of the alkyl groups in the carboxylate intermediates that form.« less

  12. Bond energies in polyunsaturated acids and kinetics of co-oxidation of protiated and deuterated acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianova, Z. S.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Pliss, E. M.; Buchachenko, A. L.

    2016-10-01

    A computational program specially designed to analyze co-oxidation of substances in mixtures is suggested. The rigorous kinetic scheme of 32 reactions describing co-oxidation of isotope differing polyunsaturated fatty acids was computed to enlighten experimentally detected enormously large H/D isotope effects. The latter were shown to depend on the kinetic chain length and exhibit two extreme regimes of short and long chains which characterize isotope effects on the initiation and propagation chain reactions of hydrogen (deuterium) atom abstraction. No protective effect of deuterated polyunsaturated acids on the oxidation of protiated acids was detected. Protective effect of the deuterated compounds on the biologically important processes seems to be induced by the low yield of products formed in the chain termination reactions due to the low rate of initiation by deuterated compounds.

  13. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barazzouk, Saïd; Daneault, Claude

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectroscopic techniques.

  14. Methamphetamine inhibits the glucose uptake by human neurons and astrocytes: stabilization by acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Abdul Muneer, P M; Alikunju, Saleena; Szlachetka, Adam M; Haorah, James

    2011-04-27

    Methamphetamine (METH), an addictive psycho-stimulant drug exerts euphoric effects on users and abusers. It is also known to cause cognitive impairment and neurotoxicity. Here, we hypothesized that METH exposure impairs the glucose uptake and metabolism in human neurons and astrocytes. Deprivation of glucose is expected to cause neurotoxicity and neuronal degeneration due to depletion of energy. We found that METH exposure inhibited the glucose uptake by neurons and astrocytes, in which neurons were more sensitive to METH than astrocytes in primary culture. Adaptability of these cells to fatty acid oxidation as an alternative source of energy during glucose limitation appeared to regulate this differential sensitivity. Decrease in neuronal glucose uptake by METH was associated with reduction of glucose transporter protein-3 (GLUT3). Surprisingly, METH exposure showed biphasic effects on astrocytic glucose uptake, in which 20 µM increased the uptake while 200 µM inhibited glucose uptake. Dual effects of METH on glucose uptake were paralleled to changes in the expression of astrocytic glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1). The adaptive nature of astrocyte to mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acid appeared to contribute the survival of astrocytes during METH-induced glucose deprivation. This differential adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes also governed the differential sensitivity to the toxicity of METH in these brain cells. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine for enhanced production of ATP from fatty oxidation in glucose-free culture condition validated the adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes. These findings suggest that deprivation of glucose-derived energy may contribute to neurotoxicity of METH abusers.

  15. Dietary soya protein intake and exercise training have an additive effect on skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation enzyme activities and mRNA levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Morifuji, Masashi; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Sugiura, Katsumi

    2006-09-01

    Exercise training and regular physical activity increase oxidation of fat. Enhanced oxidation of fat is important for preventing lifestyle diseases such as hypertension and obesity. The aim of the present study in rats was to determine whether intake of dietary soya protein and exercise training have an additive effect on the activity and mRNA expression of enzymes involved in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n 32) were assigned randomly into four groups (eight rats per group) and then divided further into sedentary or exercise-trained groups fed either casein or soya protein diets. Rats in the exercise groups were trained for 2 weeks by swimming for 120 min/d, 6 d/week. Exercise training decreased hepatic triacylglycerol levels and retroperitoneal adipose tissue weight and increased skeletal muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity and mRNA expression of CPT1, beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD), acyl-CoA oxidase, PPARgamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC1alpha) and PPARalpha. Soya protein significantly decreased hepatic triacylglycerol levels and epididymal adipose tissue weight and increased skeletal muscle CPT1 activity and CPT1, HAD, acyl-CoA oxidase, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, PGC1alpha and PPARalpha mRNA levels. Furthermore, skeletal muscle HAD activity was the highest in exercise-trained rats fed soya protein. We conclude that exercise training and soya protein intake have an important additive role on induction of PPAR pathways, leading to increased activity and mRNA expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle and reduced accumulation of body fat.

  16. Heterogeneous OH Oxidation of Two Structure Isomers of Dimethylsuccinic Acid Aerosol: Reactivity and Oxidation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. N.; Cheng, C. T.; Wilson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosol contribute a significant mass fraction of ambient aerosol carbon and can continuously undergo oxidation by colliding with gas phase OH radicals. Although heterogeneous oxidation plays a significant role in the chemical transformation of organic aerosol, the effect of molecular structure on the reactivity and oxidation products remains unclear. We investigate the effect of branched methyl groups on the reactivity of two dimethylsuccinic acids (2,2-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,2-DMSA) and 2,3-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,3-DMSA)) toward gas phase OH radicals in an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The oxidation products formed upon oxidation is characterized in real time by the Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART), an ambient soft ionization source. The 2,2-DMSA and 2,3-DMSA are structural isomers with the same oxidation state (OSC = -0.33) and carbon number (NC = 6), but different branching characteristics (2,2-DMSA has one secondary carbon and 2,3-DMSA has two tertiary carbons). The difference in molecular distribution of oxidation products observed in these two structural isomers would allow one to assess the sensitivity of kinetics and chemistry to the position of branched methyl group in the DMSA upon oxidation. We observe that the reactivity of 2,3-DMSA toward OH radicals is about 2 times faster than that of 2,2-DMSA. This difference in OH reactivity may attribute to the stability of the carbon-centered radical generated after hydrogen abstraction because an alkyl radical formed from the hydrogen abstraction on a tertiary carbon in 2,3-DMSA is more stable than on a secondary carbon in 2,2-DMSA. For both 2,2-DMSA and 2,3-DMSA, the molecular distribution and evolution of oxidation products is characterized by a predominance of functionalization products at the early oxidation stages. When the oxidation further proceeds, the fragmentation becomes more favorable and the oxidation mainly leads to the reduction of the carbon chain length through

  17. Germanium oxide removal by citric acid and thiol passivation from citric acid-terminated Ge(100).

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Aureau, Damien; Holmes, Justin D; Etcheberry, Arnaud; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2014-12-02

    Many applications of germanium (Ge) are underpinned by effective oxide removal and surface passivation. This important surface treatment step often requires H-X (X = Cl, Br, I) or HF etchants. Here, we show that aqueous citric acid solutions are effective in the removal of GeOx. The stability of citric acid-treated Ge(100) is compared to HF and HCl treated surfaces and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further Ge surface passivation was investigated by thiolation using alkane monothiols and dithiols. The organic passivation layers show good stability with no oxide regrowth observed after 3 days of ambient exposure.

  18. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA.

  19. Downscaled anodic oxidation process for aluminium in oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, M.; Morgenstern, R.; Kuhn, D.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Schubert, A.; Lampke, T.

    2017-03-01

    The increasing multi-functionality of parts and assemblies in several fields of engineering demands, amongst others, highly functionalised surfaces. For the different applications, on the one hand, there is a need to scale up surface modification processes originating in the nano- and micro-scale. On the other hand, conventional macro-scale surface refinement methods offer a huge potential for application in the said nano- and micro-scale. The anodic oxidation process, which is established especially for aluminium and its alloys, allows the formation of oxide ceramic layers on the surface. The build-up of an oxide ceramic coating comes along with altered chemical, tribological and electrical surface properties. As a basis for further investigations regarding the use of the anodic oxidation process for micro-scale-manufacturing, the scale effects of oxalic acid anodising on commercially pure aluminium as well as on the AlZn5.5MgCu alloy are addressed in the present work. The focus is on the amount of oxide formed during a potentiostatic process in relation to the exchanged amount of charge. Further, the hardness of the coating as an integral measure to assess the porous oxide structure is approached by nano-indentation technique.

  20. Enhanced formic acid oxidation on Cu-Pd nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin; Zou, Shouzhong

    Developing catalysts with high activity and high resistance to surface poisoning remains a challenge in direct formic acid fuel cell research. In this work, copper-palladium nanoparticles were formed through a galvanic replacement process. After electrochemically selective dissolution of surface Cu, Pd-enriched Cu-Pd nanoparticles were formed. These particles exhibit much higher formic acid oxidation activities than that on pure Pd nanoparticles, and they are much more resistant to the surface poisoning. Possible mechanisms of catalytic activity enhancement are briefly discussed.

  1. Oxidized fatty acids as inter-kingdom signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Carolina H; Kock, Johan L F

    2014-01-20

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to "listen" and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  2. L-Carnitine supplementation decreases DNA damage in treated MSUD patients.

    PubMed

    Mescka, Caroline Paula; Guerreiro, Gilian; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; Faverzani, Jéssica; de Moura Coelho, Daniella; Mandredini, Vanusa; Wayhs, Carlos Alberto Yasin; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited disorder caused by severe deficient activity of the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex involved in the degradation pathway of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and their α-ketoacid derivatives. MSUD patients generally present ketoacidosis, poor feeding, ataxia, coma, psychomotor delay, mental retardation and brain abnormalites. Treatment consists of dietary restriction of the BCAA (low protein intake) supplemented by a BCAA-free amino acid mixture. Although the mechanisms of brain damage in MSUD are poorly known, previous studies have shown that oxidative stress may be involved in the neuropathology of this disorder. In this regard, it was recently reported that MSUD patients have deficiency of l-carnitine (l-car), a compound with antioxidant properties that is used as adjuvant therapy in various inborn errors of metabolism. In this work, we investigated DNA damage determined by the alkaline comet assay in peripheral whole blood leukocytes of MSUD patients submitted to a BCAA-restricted diet supplemented or not with l-car. We observed a significant increase of DNA damage index (DI) in leukocytes from MSUD patients under BCAA-restricted diet as compared to controls and that l-car supplementation significantly decreased DNA DI levels. It was also found a positive correlation between DI and MDA content, a marker of lipid peroxidation, and an inverse correlation between DI and l-car levels. Taken together, our present results suggest a role for reactive species and the involvement of oxidative stress in DNA damage in this disorder. Since l-car reduced DNA damage, it is presumed that dietary supplementation of this compound may serve as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy for MSUD patients in addition to other therapies.

  3. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  8. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) suppresses postprandial lipidemia through fatty acid oxidation in enterocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rino; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Murota, Kaeko; Yamada, Yuko; Niiya, Saori; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Murakami, Yoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased oxygen consumption rate and CO{sub 2} production and decreased secretion of triglyceride and ApoB from Caco-2 cells. {yields} Orally administration of bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and CO{sub 2} production in small intestinal epithelial cells. {yields} Treatment with bezafibrate decreased postprandial serum concentration of triglyceride after oral injection of olive oil in mice. {yields} It suggested that intestinal lipid metabolism regulated by PPAR{alpha} activation suppresses postprandial lipidemia. -- Abstract: Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} which regulates lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues such as the liver and skeletal muscle, decreases circulating lipid levels, thus improving hyperlipidemia under fasting conditions. Recently, postprandial serum lipid levels have been found to correlate more closely to cardiovascular diseases than fasting levels, although fasting hyperlipidemia is considered an important risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of PPAR{alpha} activation on postprandial lipidemia has not been clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of PPAR{alpha} activation in enterocytes on lipid secretion and postprandial lipidemia. In Caco-2 enterocytes, bezafibrate, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes, such as acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, and acyl-CoA synthase, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and suppressed secretion levels of both triglycerides and apolipoprotein B into the basolateral side. In vivo experiments revealed that feeding high-fat-diet containing bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and

  9. Inhibitory effects of fatty acids on glucose-regulated B-cell function: association with increased islet triglyceride stores and altered effect of fatty acid oxidation on glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y P; Ling, Z C; Grill, V E

    1996-08-01

    Long-term exposure to fatty acids (FA) inhibits B-cell function. We tested whether the inhibitory effects are associated with increased islet triglycerides (TG). Rat pancreatic islets were cultured for 48 hours in RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and 11 mmol/L glucose in the presence or absence of the long-chain FA, palmitate. Palmitate (0.125 mmol/L) exposure successively increased islet TG 70% after 6 hours and 200% after 48 hours of culture. The dose-response for palmitate was similar for the increase in TG and inhibition of glucose-induced insulin secretion. Reversal of elevated islet TG in RPMI medium (after 48 hours of palmitate) was 29% after 6 hours and 84% after 24 hours. A more rapid decline of TG was observed in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate (KRB) medium in the absence of nutrients. This decline was totally prevented by 1 mumol/L of the carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I (CPT-I) inhibitor, etomoxir. Etomoxir enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretion from palmitate-cultured islets; however, this effect was lost when TG were normalized. Under conditions when oxidation of FA from islet TG stores was blocked with etomoxir, we tested the effects of octanoate, the oxidation of which is not blocked by etomoxir. Oxidation of [1-14C]octanoate from islets precultured with palmitate (48 hours) did not differ from that in control islets. Conversely, after palmitate, octanoate inhibited glucose oxidation (14CO2 production from [U-14C]glucose, 613 +/- 41 pmol/10 islets/90 min v 1,129 +/- 87 after control conditions, P < .01). In conclusion, (1) palmitate induces increases in islet TG that are associated with inhibition of B-cell function, and (2) long-term exposure to palmitate also induces an inhibitory effect of FA oxidation on glucose metabolism that is independent of TG.

  10. Sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide for graphene preparation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-12-06

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable.

  11. Ceramides and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Fucho, Raquel; Casals, Núria; Serra, Dolors; Herrero, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is an epidemic, complex disease that is characterized by increased glucose, lipids, and low-grade inflammation in the circulation, among other factors. It creates the perfect scenario for the production of ceramide, the building block of the sphingolipid family of lipids, which is involved in metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. In addition, obesity causes a decrease in fatty acid oxidation (FAO), which contributes to lipid accumulation within the cells, conferring more susceptibility to cell dysfunction. C16:0 ceramide, a specific ceramide species, has been identified recently as the principal mediator of obesity-derived insulin resistance, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and hepatic steatosis. In this review, we have sought to cover the importance of the ceramide species and their metabolism, the main ceramide signaling pathways in obesity, and the link between C16:0 ceramide, FAO, and obesity.-Fucho, R., Casals, N., Serra, D., Herrero, L. Ceramides and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in obesity.

  12. Ruthenium oxide modified nickel electrode for ascorbic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuan-Gee; Liao, Bo-Xuan; Weng, Yu-Ching

    2017-04-01

    Electrodes of ruthenium oxide modified nickel were prepared by a thermal decomposition method. The stoichiometry of the modifier, RuOx, was quantitatively determined to be a meta-stable phase, RuO5. The electrodes were employed to sense ascorbic acid in alkaline solution with a high sensitivity, 296 μAcm(-2) mM(-1), and good selectivity for eight kinds of disturbing reagents. We found that the ascorbic acid was oxidized irreversibly in solution. To match with the variation of the morphology, the sensitivity reached a maximum when the RuOx segregated with a nano-crystalline feature. We find that the substrate oxidized as the deposited RuOx grew thicker. The feature of the deposited RuOx changed from nano-particles to small islands resulting from the wetting effect of the substrate oxide, NiO; meanwhile the sensitivity decreased dramatically. The endurance of the RuOx/Ni electrode also showed a good performance after 38 days of successive test.

  13. Activation of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase is associated with elevated ketone body levels in the elasmobranch Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Treberg, Jason R; Crockett, Elizabeth L; Driedzic, William R

    2006-01-01

    Elasmobranch fishes are an ancient group of vertebrates that have unusual lipid metabolism whereby storage lipids are mobilized from the liver for peripheral oxidation largely as ketone bodies rather than as nonesterified fatty acids under normal conditions. This reliance on ketones, even when feeding, implies that elasmobranchs are chronically ketogenic. Compared to specimens sampled within 2 d of capture (recently captured), spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias that were held for 16-33 d without apparent feeding displayed a 4.5-fold increase in plasma concentration of d- beta -hydroxybutyrate (from 0.71 to 3.2 mM) and were considered ketotic. Overt activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 in liver mitochondria from ketotic dogfish was characterized by an increased apparent maximal activity, a trend of increasing affinity (reduced apparent K(m); P=0.09) for l-carnitine, and desensitization to the inhibitor malonyl-CoA relative to recently captured animals. Acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (ACoAT) activity in isolated liver mitochondria was also markedly increased in the ketotic dogfish compared to recently captured fish, whereas no difference in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase activity was found between these groups, suggesting that ACoAT plays a more important role in the activation of ketogenesis in spiny dogfish than in mammals and birds.

  14. Same-day batch measurement of glycine betaine, carnitine, and other betaines in biological material.

    PubMed

    Lever, M; Bason, L; Leaver, C; Hayman, C M; Chambers, S T

    1992-08-15

    Glycine betaine, carnitine, carnitine esters, butyrobetaine, and proline betaine (stachydrine) concentrations in biological materials can be reliably measured in 100-microliters samples, with a detection limit below 1 mumol/liter. The procedure is suitable for batches of more than 30 specimens and it is possible to obtain a single result within 2 h. The betaines are extracted into an acetonitrile:methanol mixture, dried with anhydrous disodium hydrogen phosphate containing argentous oxide. The 4-bromophenacyl ester derivatives are formed using 4-bromophenacyl triflate as reagent, in the presence of solid magnesium oxide as base. The derivatives are separated by high-performance chromatography on a silica column, in a mixed partition and ion-exchange mode.

  15. Metabolism of acetyl-L-carnitine for energy and neurotransmitter synthesis in the immature rat brain.

    PubMed

    Scafidi, Susanna; Fiskum, Gary; Lindauer, Steven L; Bamford, Penelope; Shi, Da; Hopkins, Irene; McKenna, Mary C

    2010-08-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) is an endogenous metabolic intermediate that facilitates the influx and efflux of acetyl groups across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Exogenously administered ALCAR has been used as a nutritional supplement and also as an experimental drug with reported neuroprotective properties and effects on brain metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine oxidative metabolism of ALCAR in the immature rat forebrain. Metabolism was studied in 21-22 day-old rat brain at 15, 60 and 120 min after an intraperitoneal injection of [2-(13)C]acetyl-L-carnitine. The amount, pattern, and fractional enrichment of (13)C-labeled metabolites were determined by ex vivo(13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolism of the acetyl moiety from [2-(13)C]ALCAR via the tricarboxylic acid cycle led to incorporation of label into the C4, C3 and C2 positions of glutamate (GLU), glutamine (GLN) and GABA. Labeling patterns indicated that [2-(13)C]ALCAR was metabolized by both neurons and glia; however, the percent enrichment was higher in GLN and GABA than in GLU, demonstrating high metabolism in astrocytes and GABAergic neurons. Incorporation of label into the C3 position of alanine, both C3 and C2 positions of lactate, and the C1 and C5 positions of glutamate and glutamine demonstrated that [2-(13)C]ALCAR was actively metabolized via the pyruvate recycling pathway. The enrichment of metabolites with (13)C from metabolism of ALCAR was highest in alanine C3 (11%) and lactate C3 (10%), with considerable enrichment in GABA C4 (8%), GLN C3 (approximately 4%) and GLN C5 (5%). Overall, our (13)C-NMR studies reveal that the acetyl moiety of ALCAR is metabolized for energy in both astrocytes and neurons and the label incorporated into the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Cycling ratios showed prolonged cycling of carbon from the acetyl moiety of ALCAR in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Labeling of compounds formed from metabolism of [2-(13)C]ALCAR via the pyruvate recycling pathway

  16. Physiological effects of γ-linolenic acid and sesamin on hepatic fatty acid synthesis and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ide, Takashi; Iwase, Haruka; Amano, Saaya; Sunahara, Saki; Tachihara, Ayuka; Yagi, Minako; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Interrelated effects of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and sesamin, a sesame lignan, on hepatic fatty acid synthesis and oxidation were examined. Rats were fed experimental diets supplemented with 0 or 2 g/kg sesamin (1:1 mixture of sesamin and episesamin) and containing 100 g/kg of palm oil (saturated fat), safflower oil rich in linoleic acid, or oil of evening primrose origin containing 43% GLA (GLA oil) for 18 days. In rats fed sesamin-free diets, GLA oil, compared with other oils, increased the activity and mRNA levels of various enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation, except for some instances. Sesamin greatly increased these parameters, and the enhancing effects of sesamin on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation rate and acyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities were more exaggerated in rats fed GLA oil than in the animals fed other oils. The combination of sesamin and GLA oil also synergistically increased the mRNA levels of some peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation enzymes and of several enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism located in other cell organelles. In the groups fed sesamin-free diets, GLA oil, compared with other oils, markedly reduced the activity and mRNA levels of various lipogenic enzymes. Sesamin reduced all these parameters, except for malic enzyme, in rats fed palm and safflower oils, but the effects were attenuated in the animals fed GLA oil. These changes by sesamin and fat type accompanied profound alterations in serum lipid levels. This may be ascribable to the changes in apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins.

  17. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  18. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L.; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E.; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E.; Rotstein, Nora P.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat (PQ) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. PMID:26662863

  19. The kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Kochergin, B. A.; Antina, E. V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of a comparative study of the oxidation of bilirubin, ascorbic acid, and their mixture in aqueous solutions under the action of air oxygen and hydrogen peroxide are presented. The observed and true rate constants for the oxidation reactions were determined. It was shown that the oxidation of tetrapyrrole pigment occurred under these conditions bypassing the stage of biliverdin formation to monopyrrole products. Simultaneous oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid was shown to be accompanied by the inhibition of ascorbic acid oxidation by bilirubin, whereas ascorbic acid itself activated the oxidation of bilirubin.

  20. PPARα regulates tumor cell proliferation and senescence via a novel target gene carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yixin; Wang, Yongtao; Huang, Yaoyao; Zeng, Hang; Hu, Bingfang; Guan, Lihuan; Zhang, Huizhen; Yu, Ai-Ming; Johnson, Caroline H; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2017-03-03

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), an enzyme located in the outer mitochondria membrane, has a crucial role in fatty acid transport and oxidation. It is also involved in cell proliferation and is a potential driver for cancer cell senescence. However, its upstream regulatory mechanism is unknown. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates lipid metabolism and tumor progression. The current study aimed to elucidate whether and how PPARα regulates CPT1C and then affects cancer cell proliferation and senescence. Here, for the first time we report that PPARα directly activated CPT1C transcription and CPT1C was a novel target gene of PPARα, as revealed by dual-luciferase reporter and ChIP assays. Moreover, regulation of CPT1C by PPARα was p53-independent. We further confirmed that depletion of PPARα resulted in low CPT1C expression and then inhibited proliferation and induced senescence of MDA-MB-231 and PANC-1 tumor cell lines in a CPT1C dependent manner, while forced PPARα overexpression promoted cell proliferation and reversed cellular senescence. Taken together, these results indicate that CPT1C is a novel PPARα target gene that regulates cancer cell proliferation and senescence. The PPARα-CPT1C axis may be a new target for the intervention of cancer cellular proliferation and senescence.

  1. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F.; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M.; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137