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Sample records for acid oxidation rates

  1. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Travis Shane; Mincher, Bruce Jay; Schmitt, Nicholas C

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  2. Measurement of Fatty Acid Oxidation Rates in Animal Tissues and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Frank K.; Green, Michelle F.; Koves, Timothy R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    While much oncological research has focused on metabolic shifts in glucose and amino acid oxidation, recent evidence suggests that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) may also play an important role in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. Here, we present a simple method for measuring FAO rates using radiolabeled palmitate, common laboratory reagents, and standard supplies. This protocol is broadly applicable for measuring FAO rates in cultured cancer cells as well as in both malignant and nontransformed animal tissues. PMID:24862277

  3. Influence of fatty acid oxidation rate on glycerol release from cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, T.S.; Severson, D.L.

    1986-03-05

    Quiescent cardiac myocytes are characterized by low rates of fatty acid oxidation due to the reduced energy demand compared with beating hearts. The accumulation of intracellular fatty acid metabolites may, therefore, result in feed-back inhibition of the cardiac lipase responsible for the mobilization of triacylglycerols (lipolysis). The objective of this study was to examine if interventions that increase fatty acid oxidation rates in myocytes have an effect on lipolysis. Addition of 100 ..mu..M dinitrophenol (DNP) to calcium-tolerant rat ventricular myocytes caused an increase in the rate of /sup 14/C-oleic acid oxidation from 1.11 +/- 0.06 to 2.38 +/- 0.17 nmol /sup 14/CO/sub 2//10/sup 6/ cells/min (115% stimulation; mean +/- S.D., n = 3). In parallel incubations, DNP increased the rate of lipolysis from 4.4 +/- 1.7 to 13.6 +/- 3.2 nmol glycerol/10/sup 6/ cells/30 min (215% stimulation). The addition of 1 mM barium to a modified Ringer's incubation medium produced an increase in the contractile activity of the myocytes, and increased the rates of oleic acid oxidation from 0.62 +/- 0.16 to 0.88 +/- 0.23 nmol/10/sup 6/ cells/min (42% stimulation; n = 6) and lipolysis from 13.1 +/- 6.5 to 22.2 +/- 6.4 nmol/10/sup 6/ cells/30 min (70% stimulation). These data show that stimulation of fatty acid oxidation in myocardial myocytes is accompanied by increased lipolytic rates, the latter probably due to release of feed-back inhibition of cardiac lipases by accumulated fatty acid metabolites.

  4. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  5. The influence of phosphorus oxides and acids on the rate of H + OH recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Twarowski, A. )

    1993-07-01

    The addition of small amounts of phosphine combustion products (phosphorus oxides and acids) to water vapor resulted in a large increase in the relaxation rate of OH to equilibrium concentrations following H[sub 2]O photolysis. The thermochemical properties of 17 simple phosphorus species were assembled and the equilibrium densities of the phosphorus species were calculated under typical test conditions. The thermochemical properties of many of the phosphorus species have not been determined but for the purposes of this analysis they were estimated from the results of ab initio quantum chemical calculations available in the literature. Of the phosphorus species examined, eight were selected for construction of a reaction set. Thirteen species (7 HxOy species and 6 HxOyPz species) were ultimately used to assemble a set of 33 reactions which comprise all of the bimolecular reactions (including recombination reactions) likely to participate in the overall reaction chemistry. Rate constant values were estimated using standard methods for the metathesis reactions and using simplified RRKM calculations to estimate the rates of recombination reactions. The increase rate of OH recovery was well described by this reaction set at the experimental conditions of 1,970 K and 532 Torr. The two reaction mechanisms OH + PH[sub 2] [yields] HOPO[sub 2], H + HOPO[sub 2] [yields] H[sub 2]O + PO[sub 2], and H + PO[sub 2] [yields] HOPO, OH + H[sub 2] [yields] H[sub 2]O + H, H + HOPO [yields] H[sub 2] + PO[sub 2] appear to be the predominant pathways for recombination of H and OH radicals to form H[sub 2]O and for reestablishment of chemical equilibrium when phosphine combustion products are present in the reaction mixture.

  6. Support Effects on Bronsted acid site densities and alcohol dehydration turnover rates on tungsten oxide domains

    SciTech Connect

    Macht, Josef; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; May-Lozano, Marcos; Soled, Stuart L.; Wang, Yong; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Initial activity and acid site density of several WAl, WSi (MCM41) and one WSn sample were determined. Trans/cis 2-butene selectivity is dependent on the support. Presumably, these differences are due to subtle differences in base strengths. 2-Butanol dehydration rates (per W-atom) reached maximum values at intermediate WOx surface densities on WAl, as reported for 2-butanol dehydration reactions on WZr. Titration results indicate that Bronsted acid sites are required for 2-butanol dehydration on WAl, WSi and WSn. UV-visible studies suggest that WAl is much more difficult to reduce than WZr. The detection of reduced centers on WAl, the number of which correlates to Bronsted acid site density and catalyst activity, as well as the temperature dependence of Bronsted acid site density indicate the in-situ formation of these active sites. We infer that this mechanism is common among all supported WOx samples described in this study. Turnover rates are a function of Bronsted acid site density only. High acid site densities lead to high turnover rates. Higher active site densities may cause stronger conjugate bases, as a higher electron density has to be stabilized, and thus weaker acidity, enabling a faster rate of product desorption. The maximum achievable active site density is dependent on the support. WZr reaches a higher active site density than WAl.

  7. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  8. Bile acid production in human subjects: rate of oxidation of (24,25-/sup 3/H)cholesterol compared to fecal bile acid excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, N.O.; Bradlow, H.L.; Ahrens, E.H. Jr.; Rosenfeld, R.S.; Schwartz, C.C.

    1986-02-01

    Bile acid production has been quantitated in seven subjects by methods that compare the results of two independent approaches, namely, quantitation of cholesterol side-chain oxidation and fecal bile acid excretion. Six hypertriglyceridemic (HT) subjects and one normolipidemic control were studied by both techniques. A further control subject was studied by the cholesterol side-chain oxidation method alone. Cholesterol side-chain oxidation was quantitated by measuring the appearance of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O after intravenous administration of (24,25-/sup 3/H)cholesterol, using multicompartmental analysis of plasma cholesterol and (/sup 3/H)water specific activity. Body water kinetics were independently defined by use of oral D/sub 2/O. Two HT subjects were restudied while they were taking cholestyramine, 16 g/day. In all ten studies, multicompartmental analysis closely simulated the observed appearance of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O. Values obtained for bile acid production suggest that cholesterol oxidation, or bile acid input, was significantly greater than fecal bile acid output in the HT subjects (P less than 0.05). Cholesterol side-chain oxidation rates in the two normal subjects were lower than those encountered in HT subjects, being similar to published values for normal subjects both for bile acid synthesis as determined by isotope dilution kinetics and fecal bile acid excretion. Studies conducted with two, synthetically different, preparations of (24,25-/sup 3/H)cholesterol indicated that, in one of the two preparations, approximately 20% of the tritium label was at positions proximal to C24. In the other preparation examined, all of the tritium was located at, or distal to, C24. Further studies revealed that 0.055-0.24% of the dose was present as labile tritium by virtue of its appearance as /sup 3/H/sub 2/O following in vitro incubation with human plasma. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. Regio- and stereo-chemical oxidation of linoleic acid by human myoglobin and hydrogen peroxide: Tyr103 affects rate and product distribution

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Mb (myoglobin) plus H2O2 catalyses the oxidation of various substrates via a peroxidase-like activity. A Y103F (Tyr103→Phe) variant of human Mb has been constructed to assess the effect of exchanging an electron-rich oxidizable amino acid on the peroxidase activity of human Mb. Steady-state analyses of reaction mixtures containing Y103F Mb, purified linoleic acid and H2O2 revealed a lower total yield of lipid oxidation products than mixtures containing the wild-type protein, consistent with the reported decrease in the rate constant for reaction of Y103F Mb with H2O2 [Witting, Mauk and Lay (2002) Biochemistry 41, 11495–11503]. Irrespective of the Mb employed, lipid oxidation yielded 9(R/S)-HODE [9(R,S)-hydroxy-10E,12Z-octadecadienoic acid] in preference to 13(R/S)-HODE [13(R,S)-hydroxy-9Z,11E-octadecadienoic acid], while 9- and 13-keto-octadecadienoic acid were formed in trace amounts. However, lipid oxidation by the Y103F variant of Mb proceeded with a lower Vmax value and an increased Km value relative to the wild-type control. Consistent with the increased Km, the product distribution from reactions with Y103F Mb showed decreased selectivity compared with the wild-type protein, as judged by the decreased yield of 9(S)-relative to 9(R)-HODE. Together, these data verify that Tyr103 plays a significant role in substrate binding and orientation in the haem pocket of human Mb. Also, the midpoint potential for the Fe(III)/(II) one-electron reduction was shifted slightly, but significantly, to a higher potential, confirming the importance of Tyr103 to the hydrogen-bonding network involving residues that line the haem crevice of human Mb. PMID:15035657

  10. Treatment of Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty acid oxidation disorders Treatment of fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Fatty acid oxidation disorders are rare health conditions that affect ...

  11. BACTERIAL OXIDATION OF DIPICOLINIC ACID

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yasuo; Arima, Kei

    1962-01-01

    Kobayashi, Yasuo (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan) and Kei Arima. Bacterial oxidation of dipicolinic acid. II. Identification of α-ketoglutaric acid and 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid and some properties of cell-free extracts. J. Bacteriol. 84:765–771. 1962—When a dipicolinic acid (DPA)-decomposing bacterium, Achromobacter strain 1–2, was incubated at 30 C with shaking in a DPA solution containing 10−3m arsenite, a keto acid was accumulated. The 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone of this acid was synthesized and identified as α-ketoglutaric acid by paper chromatography, visible absorption spectrum, infrared analysis, elemental analysis, and mixed melting point. During this incubation, oxalic acid equivalent to the consumed dipicolinic acid was produced. A fluorescent material was also isolated from culture fluid and identified as 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid by paper chromatography and the ultraviolet absorption spectrum. Further, cell-free extracts were prepared by sonic oscillation. Ferrous ion and a reduced di- or triphosphopyridine nucleotide-generating system were proven to be required for enzymic oxidation of DPA. And 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid was also oxidized by this preparation. From the results obtained, a possible metabolic pathway of dipicolinic acid was proposed. PMID:14033954

  12. OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC ACIDS CONJUGATED WITH SULFITE OXIDATION IN FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k12, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times th...

  13. Effect of In Vitro Maturation Technique and Alpha Lipoic Acid Supplementation on Oocyte Maturation Rate: Focus on Oxidative Status of Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zavareh, Saeed; Karimi, Isaac; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Rahnama, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic potential of in vitro maturation (IVM) in infertility is growing with great promise. Although significant progress is obtained in recent years, existing IVM protocols are far from favorable results. The first aim of this study was to investigate whether two step IVM manner change reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total anti- oxidant capacity (TAC) levels. The second aim was to find the effect of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) supplementation on oocyte maturation rate and on ROS/TAC levels during IVM. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, mouse germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes divided into cumulus denuded oocytes (DOs) and cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) groups. GVs were matured in vitro in the presence or absence of ALA only for 18 hours (control) or with pre-culture of forskolin plus cilostamide for an additional 18 hours. Matured oocytes obtained following 18 and 36 hours based on experimental design. In parallel, the ROS and TAC levels were measured at different time (0, 18 and 36 hours) by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCFH) probe and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, respectively. Results Maturation rate of COCs was significantly higher than DOs in control group (P<0.05), while there was no significant difference between COCs and DOs when were pre-cultured with forskolin plus cilostamide. ROS and TAC levels was increased and decreased respectively in DOs after 18 hours while in COCs did not change at 18 hours and showed a significant increase and decrease respectively at 36 hours (P<0.05). ROS and TAC levels in the presence of ALA were significantly decreased and increased respectively after 36 hours (P<0.05) whereas, maturation rates of COCs and DOs were similar to their corresponding control groups. Conclusion ALA decreased ROS and increased TAC but could not affect maturation rate of both COCs and DOs in one or two step IVM manner. PMID:26985332

  14. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  15. Deposition rates of oxidized iron on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The reddened oxidized surface of Mars is indicative of temporal interactions between the Martian atmosphere and its surface. During the evolution of the Martian regolith, primary ferromagnesian silicate and sulfide minerals in basaltic rocks apparently have been oxidized to secondary ferric-bearing assemblages. To evaluate how and when such oxidized deposits were formed on Mars, information about the mechanisms and rates of chemical weathering of Fe(2+)-bearing minerals has been determined. In this paper, mechanisms and rates of deposition of ferric oxide phases on the Martian surface are discussed.

  16. An Acidity Scale for Binary Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the classification of binary oxides as acidic, basic, or amphoteric. Demonstrates how a numerical scale for acidity/basicity of binary oxides can be constructed using thermochemical data for oxoacid salts. Presents the calculations derived from the data that provide the numeric scale values. (TW)

  17. Acetic acid oxidation and hydrolysis in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.C.; Marrone, P.A.; Tester, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    Acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) hydrolysis and oxidation in supercritical water were examined from 425--600 C and 246 bar at reactor residence times of 4.4 to 9.8 s. Over the range of conditions studied, acetic acid oxidation was globally 0.72 {+-} 0.15 order in acetic acid and 0.27 {+-} 0.15 order in oxygen to a 95% confidence level, with an activation energy of 168 {+-} 21 kJ/mol, a preexponential factor of 10{sup 9.9{+-}1.7}, and an induction time of about 1.5 s at 525 C. Isothermal kinetic measurements at 550 C over the range 160 to 263 bar indicated that pressure or density did not affect the rate of acetic acid oxidation as much as was previously observed in the oxidation of hydrogen or carbon monoxide in supercritical water. Major products of acetic acid oxidation in supercritical water are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen. Trace amounts of propenoic acid were occasionally detected. Hydrolysis or hydrothermolysis in the absence of oxygen resulted in approximately 35% conversion of acetic acid at 600 C, 246 bar, and 8-s reactor residence time. Regression of the limited hydrolysis runs assuming a reaction rate first-order in organic gave a global rate expression with a preexponential factor of 10{sup 4.4{+-}1.1} and an activation energy of 94 {+-} 17 kJ/mol.

  18. Sildenafil reduces signs of oxidative stress in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Evaluation by fatty acid composition, level of hydroxynonenal and heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Semen, Khrystyna; Yelisyeyeva, Olha; Jarocka-Karpowicz, Iwona; Kaminskyy, Danylo; Solovey, Lyubomyr; Skrzydlewska, Elzbieta; Yavorskyi, Ostap

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare multifactorial disease with an unfavorable prognosis. Sildenafil therapy can improve functional capacity and pulmonary hemodynamics in PAH patients. Nowadays, it is increasingly recognized that the effects of sildenafil are pleiotropic and may also involve changes of the pro-/antioxidant balance, lipid peroxidation and autonomic control. In present study we aimed to assess the effects of sildenafil on the fatty acids (FAs) status, level of hydroxynonenal (HNE) and heart rate variability (HRV) in PAH patients. Patients with PAH were characterized by an increase in HNE and changes in the FAs composition with elevation of linoleic, oleic, docosahexanoic acids in phospholipids as well as reduced HRV with sympathetic predominance. Sildenafil therapy improved exercise capacity and pulmonary hemodynamics and reduced NT-proBNP level in PAH. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of sildenafil were noted from the significant lowering of HNE level and reduction of the phopholipid derived oleic, linoleic, docosahexanoic, docosapentanoic FAs. That was also associated with some improvement of HRV on account of the activation of the neurohumoral regulatory component. Incomplete recovery of the functional metabolic disorders in PAH patients may be assumed from the persistent increase in free FAs, reduced HRV with the sympathetic predominance in the spectral structure after treatment comparing to control group. The possibilities to improve PAH treatment efficacy through mild stimulation of free radical reactions and formation of hormetic reaction in the context of improved NO signaling are discussed. PMID:26654977

  19. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  20. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  1. Oxidation of dimethylselenide by δMnO2: oxidation product and factors affecting oxidation rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Burau, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    Volatile dimethylselenide (DMSe) was transformed to a nonvolatile Se compound in a ??-MnO2 suspension. The nonvolatile product was a single compound identified as dimethylselenoxide based on its mass spectra pattern. After 24 h, 100% of the DMSe added to a ??-MnO2 suspension was converted to nonpurgable Se as opposed to 20%, 18%, and 4% conversion for chromate, permanganate, and the filtrate from the suspension, respectively. Manganese was found in solution after reaction. These results imply that the reaction between manganese oxide and DMSe was a heterogeneous redox reaction involving solid phase ??-MnO2 and solution phase DMSe. Oxidation of DMSe to dimethylselenoxide [OSe(CH3)2] by a ??-MnO2 suspension appears to be first order with respect to ??-MnO2, to DMSe, and to hydrogen ion with an overall rate law of d[OSe(CH3)2 ]/dt = 95 M-2 min-1 [MnO2]1[DMSe]1[H+]1 for the MnO2 concentration range of 0.89 ?? 10-3 - 2.46 ?? 10-3 M, the DMSe concentration range of 3.9 ?? 10-7 - 15.5 ?? 10-7 M Se, and a hydrogen ion concentation range of 7.4 ?? 10-6 -9.5 ?? 10-8 M. A general surface site adsorption model is consistent with this rate equation if the uncharged |OMnOH is the surface adsorption site. DMSe acts as a Lewis base, and the manganese oxide surface acts as a Lewis acid. DMSe adsorption to |OMnOH can be viewed as a Lewis acid/ base complex between the largely p orbitals of the DMSe lone pair and the unoccupied eg orbitals on manganese oxide. For such a complex, frontier molecular orbital theory predicts electron transfer to occur via an inner-sphere complex between the DMSe and the manganese oxide. ?? 1995 American Chemical Society.

  2. The anodic oxidation of p-benzoquinone and maleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, C.; MacDougall, B.

    1999-08-01

    The oxidation of organics, in particular of p-benzoquinone and maleic acid, at high anodic potentials has been studied using a range of anode materials such as noble-metal-based oxides and antimony-doped tin oxides. The influence of the current density was also investigated showing that the oxidation rate of p-benzoquinone increased only slightly with increasing current density. The efficiency of the p-benzoquinone oxidation was found to depend on several properties of the anode material, not just its chemical nature. Furthermore, efficiencies for the partial oxidation of p-benzoquinone using specially prepared noble-metal-oxide-based anodes were found to be only somewhat smaller or even as high as those observed for PbO{sub 2} or antimony-doped tin oxide anodes, respectively. The anodic electrolysis of maleic acid solutions was found to decrease the activity of IrO{sub 2} for the oxidation of organic compounds. This was not observed when PbO{sup 2} was employed for the oxidation of maleic acid.

  3. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils Joakim

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans has during the past decade proven to be a valuable model organism to identify and examine molecular mechanisms regulating lipid storage and metabolism. While the primary approach has been to identify genes and pathways conferring alterations in lipid accumulation, only a few recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in live C. elegans by examining oxidation of tritium-labeled fatty acids to tritiated H2O that can be measured by scintillation counting. Treating animals with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the electron transport chain, reduced (3)H2O production to approximately 15%, while boiling of animals prior to assay completely blocked the production of labeled water. We demonstrate that worms fed different bacterial strains exhibit different fatty acid oxidation rates. We show that starvation results in increased fatty acid oxidation, which is independent of the transcription factor NHR-49. On the contrary, fatty acid oxidation is reduced to approximately 70% in animals lacking the worm homolog of the insulin receptor, DAF-2. Hence, the present methodology can be used to delineate the role of specific genes and pathways in the regulation of β-oxidation in C. elegans. PMID:24058820

  4. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  5. Fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Auestad, N.

    1988-01-01

    Astrocytes were derived from cortex of two-day-old rat brain and grown in primary culture to confluence. The metabolism of the fatty acids, octanoate and palmitate, to CO{sub 2} in oxidative respiration and to the formation of ketone bodies was examined by radiolabeled tracer methodology. The net production of acetoacetate was also determined by measurement of its mass. The enzymes in the ketogenic pathway were examined by measuring enzymic activity and/or by immunoblot analyses. Labeled CO{sub 2} and labeled ketone bodies were produced from the oxidation of fatty acids labeled at carboxy- and {omega}-terminal carbons, indicating that fatty acids were oxidized by {beta}-oxidation. The results from the radiolabeled tracer studies also indicated that a substantial proportion of the {omega}-terminal 4-carbon unit of the fatty acids bypassed the {beta}-ketothiolase step of the {beta}-oxidation pathway. The ({sup 14}C)acetoacetate formed from the (1-{sup 14}C)labeled fatty acids, obligated to pass through the acetyl-CoA pool, contained 50% of the label at carbon 3 and 50% at carbon 1. In contrast, the ({sup 14}C)acetoacetate formed from the ({omega}-1)labeled fatty acids contained 90% of the label at carbon 3 and 10% at carbon 1.

  6. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO{sub 2}, highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO{sub 4}/2.5M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO{sub 2} (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.

  7. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO[sub 2], highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO[sub 4]/2.5M H[sub 3]PO[sub 4] solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO[sub 2] (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.

  8. Calculations of oxidation rates of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, J.B.

    1981-12-01

    The rates of oxidation for zirconium metal in oxygen are calculated using perfusive-precipitation modeling with the boundary conditions that: there is no moving boundary and metal matrix saturation is reached for oxygen solubility. The perfusive-precipitation model is a diffusion model with a chemical reaction. It uses Fick's Second Law of Diffusion with an added sink term. The sink term is an overall second order reaction, first order with respect to each the dissolved oxygen and the metal. The stationary boundary condition is valid for the ductile zirconium as long as the expansion due to the reaction product formation does not cause metal failure or spalling. The metal matrix saturated condition implies an upper limit to the metastable solubility of oxygen in the zirconium metal and is approximated from the phase diagram. The calculated rates are compared to the rates listed in the literature. These calculated rates, using no variable parameters, are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Rate of organic film formation and oxidation on aqueous drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, E.; Tabazadeh, A.

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that saturated fatty acids or other lipids, which are known to be strong film-forming agents, form condensed films on aqueous drops. Specifically, stearic acid (SA) has been used in laboratory and modeling studies to mimic the surface composition of some particles in the atmosphere. In this study, laboratory measurements were used to determine the rate of SA spreading from a solid on aqueous surfaces,ranging in composition from ammonium sulfate to highly acidic sulfuric acid. Maximum spreading rates were measured on neutral electrolyte solutions, while spreading was not observed on aqueous sulfuric and hydrochloric acids (pH < 0). Also, the spreading rates on water and electrolyte surfaces declined sharply as the solution pH was lowered from 7 to 3. Spreading rates are reported with a dependence on the length of solid-aqueous-air boundary (triple interface perimeter). Spreading rates measured on bulk solutions were modeled on atmospheric particles to determine the time constant of organic film formation on aqueous drops. The time required for a saturated fatty acid to spread and coat a submicron salt particle or a cloud drop is on the order of seconds to minutes or minutes to hours, respectively. In conclusion, lipid coatings can form quickly on neutral or slightly acidic salt drops if a sufficient amount of lipid is present in the drop and the lipid is in direct contact with the aqueous solution surface. Rapid film formation and fast heterogeneous oxidation can provide an efficient way of converting water-insoluble organic films into more water-soluble components in aerosols or cloud drops.

  10. Rates of oxidative weathering on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1993-01-01

    A model of acid weathering is proposed for the iron-rich basalts on Mars. Aqueous oxidation of iron sulfides released SO4(2-) and H(+) ions that initiated the dissolution of basaltic ferromagnesian silicates and released Fe(2+) ions. The Fe(2+) ions eventually underwent ferrolysis reactions and produced insoluble hydrous ferric oxide phases. Measurements of the time-dependence of acid weathering reactions show that pyrrhotite is rapidly converted to pyrite plus dissolved ferrous iron, the rate of pyrite formation decreasing with rising pH and lower temperatures. On Mars, oxidation rates of dissolved Fe(2+) ions in equatorial melt-waters in contact with the atmosphere are estimated to lie in the range 0.3-3.0 ppb Fe/yr over the pH range 2 to 6. Oxidation of Fe(2+) ions is estimated to be extremely slow in brine eutectic solutions that might be present on Mars and to be negligible in the frozen regolith.

  11. Rates of oxidative weathering on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R. G.; Fisher, D. S.

    1993-02-01

    A model of acid weathering is proposed for the iron-rich basalts on Mars. Aqueous oxidation of iron sulfides released SO4(2-) and H(+) ions that initiated the dissolution of basaltic ferromagnesian silicates and released Fe(2+) ions. The Fe(2+) ions eventually underwent ferrolysis reactions and produced insoluble hydrous ferric oxide phases. Measurements of the time-dependence of acid weathering reactions show that pyrrhotite is rapidly converted to pyrite plus dissolved ferrous iron, the rate of pyrite formation decreasing with rising pH and lower temperatures. On Mars, oxidation rates of dissolved Fe(2+) ions in equatorial melt-waters in contact with the atmosphere are estimated to lie in the range 0.3-3.0 ppb Fe/yr over the pH range 2 to 6. Oxidation of Fe(2+) ions is estimated to be extremely slow in brine eutectic solutions that might be present on Mars and to be negligible in the frozen regolith.

  12. Co-oxidation of the sulfur-containing amino acids in an autoxidizing lipid system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.A.; Dollar, A.M.

    1963-01-01

    Oxidation of the sulfur amino acids by autoxidizing lipids was studied in a model system consisting of an amino acid dispersed in cold-pressed, molecularly distilled menhaden oil (20–80% w/w). Under all conditions investigated, cysteine was oxidized completely to cystine. Preliminary results suggest that at 110°C the oxidation follows first-order kinetics for at least the first 8 hr. A specific reaction rate constant of 0.25 per hour was calculated. When fatty acids were added to the system, cystine was oxidized to its thiosulfinate ester. When the fatty acid-cystine ratio was 1:2, oxidation of cystine was a maximum. No oxidation of cystine occurred unless either a fatty acid, volatile organic acid, or ethanol was added. Under the conditions investigated, methionine was not oxidized to either its sulfoxide or its sulfone.

  13. Reference electrode for strong oxidizing acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Bullock, Sr., Jack C.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    A reference electrode for the measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials of solutions is especially suitable for oxidizing solutions such as highly concentrated and fuming nitric acids, the solutions of nitrogen oxides, N.sub.2 O.sub.4 and N.sub.2 O.sub.5, in nitric acids. The reference electrode is fabricated of entirely inert materials, has a half cell of Pt/Ce(IV)/Ce(III)/70 wt. % HNO.sub.3, and includes a double-junction design with an intermediate solution of 70 wt. % HNO.sub.3. The liquid junctions are made from Corning No. 7930 glass for low resistance and negligible solution leakage.

  14. Hysteresis-free high rate reactive sputtering of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, and aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Särhammar, Erik Berg, Sören; Nyberg, Tomas

    2014-07-01

    This work reports on experimental studies of reactive sputtering from targets consisting of a metal and its oxide. The composition of the targets varied from pure metal to pure oxide of Al, Ta, and Nb. This combines features from both the metal target and oxide target in reactive sputtering. If a certain relation between the metal and oxide parts is chosen, it may be possible to obtain a high deposition rate, due to the metal part, and a hysteresis-free process, due to the oxide part. The aim of this work is to quantify the achievable boost in oxide deposition rate from a hysteresis-free process by using a target consisting of segments of a metal and its oxide. Such an increase has been previously demonstrated for Ti using a homogeneous substoichiometric target. The achievable gain in deposition rate depends on transformation mechanisms from oxide to suboxides due to preferential sputtering of oxygen. Such mechanisms are different for different materials and the achievable gain is therefore material dependent. For the investigated materials, the authors have demonstrated oxide deposition rates that are 1.5–10 times higher than what is possible from metal targets in compound mode. However, although the principle is demonstrated for oxides of Al, Ta, and Nb, a similar behavior is expected for most oxides.

  15. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/ greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  16. [The influence of panthotenic acid mitochondrial oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation in liver of rats with alimentary obesity].

    PubMed

    Naruta, E E; Egorov, A I; Omel'ianchik, C N; Buko, V U

    2004-01-01

    Alimentary obesity induced by the long-term feeding of rats by high-fat diet results the reducing of rate and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in liver mitochondria when NAD-dependent substrates are used. The treatment of the obese rats with panthotenic acid derivatives (phosphopantotenate, panthetin, panthenol) enhanced oxidative phosphorylation of pyruvate and fatty acid carnitine esters. Among investigated compounds panthenol activated respiratory control and phosphorylation rate more effectively. Moreover, panthenol, but not phosphopanthotenate nor panthetine, increased the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 that confirms the preferable usage of fatty acids for mitochondrial oxidation under the influence of this compound. PMID:15460980

  17. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, ... oxide and anhydrous citric acid combine when the powder is mixed with water to form a medication ...

  18. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-08-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 M concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with (U- $C)oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of UC label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine.

  19. Detection and characterization of oxidizing acids in the Atacama Desert using the Mars Oxidation Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, R. C.; Zent, A. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Taylor, C. L.; Garry, J. R. C.

    2005-11-01

    We have performed field experiments to further develop and validate the Mars Oxidation Instrument (MOI) as well as measurement strategies for the in situ characterization of oxidation mechanisms, kinetics, and carbon cycling on Mars. Using the Atacama Desert as a test site for the current dry conditions on Mars, we characterized the chemical reactivity of surface and near-surface atmosphere in the dry core of the Atacama. MOI is a chemiresistor-based sensor array that measures the reaction rates of chemical films that are sensitive to particular types of oxidants or that mimic chemical characteristics of pre-biotic and biotic materials. With these sensors, the chemical reactivity of a planetary environment is characterized by monitoring the resistance of the film as a function of time. Our instrumental approach correlates reaction rates with dust abundance, UV flux, humidity, and temperature, allowing discrimination between competing hypotheses of oxidant formation and organic decomposition. The sensor responses in the Atacama are consistent with an oxidative attack by strong acids triggered by dust accumulation, followed by transient wetting due to an increase in relative humidity during the night. We conclude that in the Atacama Desert, and perhaps on Mars, low pH resulting from acid accumulation, combined with limited water availability and high oxidation potential, can result in oxidizing acid reactions on dust and soil surfaces during low-moisture transient wetting events (i.e. thin films of water). These soil acids are expected to play a significant role in the oxidizing nature of the soils, the formation of mineral surface coatings, and the chemical modification of organics in the surface material.

  20. Oxidation of hypotaurine and cysteine sulphinic acid by peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the sulphinic group of both HTAU (hypotaurine) and CSA (cysteine sulphinic acid), producing the respective sulphonates, TAU (taurine) and CA (cysteic acid). The reaction is associated with extensive oxygen uptake, suggesting that HTAU and CSA are oxidized by the one-electron transfer mechanism to sulphonyl radicals, which may initiate an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction with the sulphonates as final products. Besides the one-electron mechanism, HTAU and CSA can be oxidized by the two-electron pathway, leading directly to sulphonate formation without oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the direct reaction of peroxynitrite with HTAU and CSA at pH 7.4 and 25 °C are 77.4±5 and 76.4±9 M−1·s−1 respectively. For both sulphinates, the apparent second-order rate constants increase sharply with decrease in pH, and the sigmoidal curves obtained are consistent with peroxynitrous acid as the species responsible for sulphinate oxidation. The kinetic data, together with changes in oxygen uptake, sulphinate depletion, sulphonate production, and product distribution of nitrite and nitrate, suggest that oxidation of sulphinates by peroxynitrite may take place by the two reaction pathways whose relative importance depends on reagent concentrations and pH value. In the presence of bicarbonate, the direct reaction of sulphinates with peroxynitrite is inhibited and the oxidative reaction probably involves only the radicals •NO2 and CO3•−, generated by decomposition of the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct. PMID:15740460

  1. Fatty acid oxidation: systems analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Cintolesi, Angela; Rodríguez-Moyá, María; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are essential components of cellular structure and energy-generating routes in living organisms. They exist in a variety of chemical configurations and functionalities and are catabolized by different oxidative routes, according to their structure. α- and ω-Oxidation are minor routes that occur only in eukaryotes, while β-oxidation is the major degradation route in eukaroytes and prokaryotes. These pathways have been characterized and engineered from different perspectives for industrial and biomedical applications. The severity of FA oxidation disorders in humans initially guided the study of FA metabolism at a molecular-level. On the other hand, recent advances in metabolic engineering and systems biology have powered the study of FA biosynthetic and catabolic routes in microorganisms at a systems-level. Several studies have proposed these pathways as platforms for the production of fuels and chemicals from biorenewable sources. The lower complexity of microbial systems has allowed a more comprehensive study of FA metabolism and has opened opportunities for a wider range of applications. Still, there is a need for techniques that facilitate the translation of high-throughput data from microorganisms to more complex eukaryotic systems in order to aid the development of diagnostic and treatment strategies for FA oxidation disorders. In addition, further systems biology analyses on human systems could also provide valuable insights on oxidation disorders. This article presents a comparison of the three main FA oxidative routes, systems biology analyses that have been used to study FA metabolism, and engineering efforts performed on microbial systems. PMID:23661533

  2. Process for the oxidation of materials in water at supercritical temperatures utilizing reaction rate enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, K.C.; Killilea, W.R.; Hong, G.T.; Bourhis, A.L.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for substantially completely oxidizing combustible materials in which an aqueous stream bearing the combustible materials is reacted in the presence of an oxidant comprising diatomic oxygen and at a temperature greater than the critical temperature of water and at a pressure greater than about 25 bar, within a reactor for a period of less than about 5 minutes to produce a reaction product stream, wherein the reaction is initiated in the presence of a rate enhancer comprising at least one oxidizing agent in addition to said oxidant selected from the group consisting of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, salts containing persulfate, salts containing permanganate, nitric acid, salts containing nitrate, oxyacids of chlorine and their corresponding salts, hypochlorous acid, salts containing hypochlorite, chlorous acid, salts containing chlorite, chloric acid, salts containing chlorate, perchloric acid, and salts containing perchlorate.

  3. The effect of limestone treatments on the rate of acid generation from pyritic mine gangue.

    PubMed

    Burt, R A; Caruccio, F T

    1986-09-01

    Surface water enters the Haile Gold Mine, Lancaster County, South Carolina by means of a small stream and is ponded behind a dam and in an abandoned pit. This water is affected by acidic drainage. In spite of the large exposures of potentially acid producing pyritic rock, the flux of acid to the water is relatively low. Nevertheless, the resulting pH values of the mine water are low (around 3.5) due to negligible buffering capacity. In view of the observed low release of acidity, the potential for acid drainage abatement by limestone ameliorants appears feasible.This study investigated the effects of limestone treatment on acid generation rates of the Haile mine pyritic rocks through a series of leaching experiments. Below a critical alkalinity threshold value, solutions of dissolved limestone were found consistently to accelerate the rate of pyrite oxidation by varying degrees. The oxidation rates were further accelerated by admixing solid limestone with the pyritic rock. However, after a period of about a month, the pyrite oxidation rate of the admixed samples declined to a level lower than that of untreated pyrite. Leachates produced by the pyrite and limestone mixtures contained little if any iron. Further, in the mixtures, an alteration of the pyrite surface was apparent.The observed behaviour of the treated pyrite appears to be related to the immersion of the pyrite grains within a high alkalinity/high pH environment. The high pH increases the rate of oxidation of ferrous iron which results in a higher concentration of ferric iron at the pyrite surface. This, in turn, increases the rate of pyrite oxidation. Above a threshold alkalinity value, the precipitation of hydrous iron oxides at the pyrite surface eventually outpaces acid generation and coats the pyrite surface, retarding the rate of pyrite oxidation. PMID:24214013

  4. Oxide for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, L. T.; Lim, O. V.; Haigh, N. P.; Rand, D. A. J.; Manders, J. E.; Rice, D. M.

    In order to meet the increasing demand for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, a new soft lead has been produced by Pasminco Metals. In this material, bismuth is increased to a level that produces a significant improvement in battery cycle life. By contrast, other common impurities, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel, antimony and tellurium, that are known to be harmful to VRLA batteries are controlled to very low levels. A bismuth (Bi)-bearing oxide has been manufactured (Barton-pot method) from this soft lead and is characterized in terms of phase composition, particle size distribution, BET surface area, and reactivity. An investigation is also made of the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from the Bi-bearing oxide. For comparison, the characteristics and performance of a Bi-free (Barton-pot) oxide, which is manufactured in the USA, are also examined. Increasing the level of bismuth and lowering those of the other impurities in soft lead produces no unusual changes in either the physical or the chemical properties of the resulting Bi-bearing oxide compared with Bi-free oxide. This is very important because there is no need for battery manufacturers to change their paste formulae and paste-mixing procedures on switching to the new Bi-bearing oxide. There is little difference in the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from Bi-bearing or Bi-free oxides. On the other hand, these rates increase on the former electrodes when the levels of all the other impurities are made to exceed (by deliberately adding the impurities as oxide powders) the corresponding, specified values for the Bi-bearing oxide. The latter behaviour is particularly noticeable for hydrogen evolution, which is enhanced even further when a negative electrode prepared from Bi-bearing oxide is contaminated through the deposition of impurities added to the sulfuric acid solution. The effects of impurities in the positive

  5. Imaging of myocardial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mather, Kieren J; DeGrado, Timothy R

    2016-10-01

    Myocardial fuel selection is a key feature of the health and function of the heart, with clear links between myocardial function and fuel selection and important impacts of fuel selection on ischemia tolerance. Radiopharmaceuticals provide uniquely valuable tools for in vivo, non-invasive assessment of these aspects of cardiac function and metabolism. Here we review the landscape of imaging probes developed to provide non-invasive assessment of myocardial fatty acid oxidation (MFAO). Also, we review the state of current knowledge that myocardial fatty acid imaging has helped establish of static and dynamic fuel selection that characterizes cardiac and cardiometabolic disease and the interplay between fuel selection and various aspects of cardiac function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26923433

  6. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides.

    PubMed

    Yngard, Ria A; Sharma, Virender K; Filip, Jan; Zboril, Radek

    2008-04-15

    Cyanide is commonly found in electroplating, mining, coal gasification, and petroleum refining effluents, which require treatment before being discharged. Cyanide in effluents exists either as free cyanide or as a metal complex. The kinetics of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by an environmentally friendly oxidant, ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)), were studied as a function of pH (9.1-10.5) and temperature (15-45 degrees C) using a stopped-flow technique. The weak-acid dissociable cyanides were Cd(CN)4(2-) and Ni(CN)4(2-), and the rate-laws for the oxidation may be -d[Fe(VI)]/dt = k[Fe(VI)][M(CN)4(2-)]n where n = 0.5 and 1 for Cd(CN)4(2-) and Ni(CN)4(2-), respectively. The rates decreased with increasing pH and were mostly related to a decrease in concentration of the reactive protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO4(-). The stoichiometries with Fe(VI) were determined to be: 4HFeO4(-) + M(CN)4(2-) + 6H2O --> 4Fe(OH)3 + M(2+) + 4NCO(-) + O2 + 4OH(-). Mechanisms are proposed that agree with the observed reaction rate-laws and stoichiometries of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by Fe(VI). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is effective in removing cyanide in coke oven plant effluent, where organics are also present. PMID:18497158

  7. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides

    SciTech Connect

    Ria A. Yngard; Virender K. Sharma; Jan Filip; Radek Zboril

    2008-04-15

    Cyanide is commonly found in electroplating, mining, coal gasification, and petroleum refining effluents, which require treatment before being discharged. Cyanide in effluents exists either as free cyanide or as a metal complex. The kinetics of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by an environmentally friendly oxidant, ferrate, were studied as a function of pH (9.1-10.5) and temperature (15-45{sup o}C) using a stopped-flow technique. The weak-acid dissociable cyanides were Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, and the rate-laws for the oxidation may be -d(Fe(VI))/dt = k (Fe(VI))(M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}){sup n} where n = 0.5 and 1 for Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, respectively. The rates decreased with increasing pH and were mostly related to a decrease in concentration of the reactive protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO{sub 4}{sup -}. The stoichiometries with Fe(VI) were determined to be: 4HFeO{sub 4}{sup -} + M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} + 6H{sub 2}O {yields} 4Fe(OH){sub 3} + M{sup 2+} + 4NCO{sup -} + O{sub 2} + 4OH{sup -}. Mechanisms are proposed that agree with the observed reaction rate-laws and stoichiometries of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by Fe(VI). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is effective in removing cyanide in coke oven plant effluent, where organics are also present. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of the Ce(IV) oxidation of methylmalonic acid in H sub 2 SO sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoff, P.; Nevdal, G. )

    1989-11-16

    In sulfuric acid solutions Ce(IV) oxidizes methylmalonic acid by a sequential mechanism to carbon dioxide and acetic acid as the major products and with hydroxymethylmalonic acid and pyruvic acid as probable intermediates. Additional complexities have been found due to the formation of polymeric material. Both H{sup +} and sulfate ion decrease reaction rates independently and can be described as noncompetitive inhibitors.

  9. Effects of Fe oxide on N transformations in subtropical acid soils

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xianjun; Xin, Xiaoping; Li, Shiwei; Zhou, Junchao; Zhu, Tongbin; Müller, Christopher; Cai, Zucong; Wright, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Subtropical ecosystems are often characterized by high N cycling rates, but net nitrification rates are often low in subtropical acid soils. NO3−-N immobilization into organic N may be a contributing factor to understand the observed low net nitrification rates in these acid soils. The effects of Fe oxide and organic matter on soil N transformations were evaluated using a 15N tracing study. Soil net nitrification was low for highly acidic yellow soil (Ferralsols), but gross ammonia oxidation was 7 times higher than net nitrification. In weakly acidic purple soil (Cambisols), net nitrification was 8 times higher than in Ferralsols. The addition of 5% Fe oxide to Cambisols, reduced the net nitrification rate to a negative rate, while NO3−-N immobilization rate increased 8 fold. NO3−-N immobilization was also observed in Ferralsols which contained high Fe oxides levels. A possible mechanism for these reactions could be stimulation of NO3−-N immobilization by Fe oxide which promoted the abiotic formation of nitrogenous polymers, suggesting that the absence of net nitrification in some highly acid soils may be due to high rates of NO3−-N immobilization caused by high Fe oxide content rather than a low pH. PMID:25722059

  10. Effects of Fe oxide on N transformations in subtropical acid soils.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xianjun; Xin, Xiaoping; Li, Shiwei; Zhou, Junchao; Zhu, Tongbin; Müller, Christopher; Cai, Zucong; Wright, Alan L

    2015-01-01

    Subtropical ecosystems are often characterized by high N cycling rates, but net nitrification rates are often low in subtropical acid soils. NO3(-)-N immobilization into organic N may be a contributing factor to understand the observed low net nitrification rates in these acid soils. The effects of Fe oxide and organic matter on soil N transformations were evaluated using a (15)N tracing study. Soil net nitrification was low for highly acidic yellow soil (Ferralsols), but gross ammonia oxidation was 7 times higher than net nitrification. In weakly acidic purple soil (Cambisols), net nitrification was 8 times higher than in Ferralsols. The addition of 5% Fe oxide to Cambisols, reduced the net nitrification rate to a negative rate, while NO3(-)-N immobilization rate increased 8 fold. NO3(-)-N immobilization was also observed in Ferralsols which contained high Fe oxides levels. A possible mechanism for these reactions could be stimulation of NO3(-)-N immobilization by Fe oxide which promoted the abiotic formation of nitrogenous polymers, suggesting that the absence of net nitrification in some highly acid soils may be due to high rates of NO3(-)-N immobilization caused by high Fe oxide content rather than a low pH. PMID:25722059

  11. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  12. Lipidomics of oxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Karen A.; Nicolaou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Lipid mediators are produced from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids through enzymatic and free radical-mediated reactions. When subject to oxygenation via cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, polyunsaturated fatty acids give rise to an array of metabolites including eicosanoids, docosanoids, and octadecanoids. These potent bioactive lipids are involved in many biochemical and signaling pathways, with inflammation being of particular importance. Moreover, because they are produced by more than one pathway and substrate, and are present in a variety of biological milieus, their analysis is not always possible with conventional assays. Liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry offers a versatile and sensitive approach for the analysis of bioactive lipids, allowing specific and accurate quantitation of multiple species present in the same sample. Here we explain the principles of this approach to mediator lipidomics and present detailed protocols for the assay of enzymatically produced oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids that can be tailored to answer biological questions or facilitate assessment of nutritional and pharmacological interventions. PMID:22940496

  13. Oxidase-peroxidase enzymes of Datura innoxia. Oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, V S; Mahadevan, S; Kumar, S A

    1975-01-01

    An enzyme system from Datura innoxia roots oxidizing formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was purified 38-fold by conventional methods such as (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, negative adsorption on alumina Cy gel and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The purified enzyme was shown to catalyse the stoicheiometric oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester to benzoylformic acid ethyl ester and formic acid, utilizing molecular O2. Substrate analogues such as phenylacetaldehyde and phenylpyruvate were oxidized at a very low rate, and formylphenylacetonitrile was an inhilating agents, cyanide, thiol compounds and ascorbic acid. This enzyme was identical with an oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme. Another oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme which separated on DEAE-chromatography also showed formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester oxidase activity, albeit to a lesser extent. The properties of the two isoenzymes of the oxidase were compared and shown to differ in their oxidation and peroxidation properties. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was also catalysed by horseradish peroxidase. The Datura isoenzymes exhibited typical haemoprotein spectra. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was different from other peroxidase-catalysed reactions in not being activated by either Mn2+ or monophenols. The oxidation was inhibited by several mono- and poly-phenols and by catalase. A reaction mechanism for the oxidation is proposed. PMID:997

  14. Comparison of the Oxidation Rates of Some New Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper alloys were studied for oxidation resistance and mechanisms between 550 and 700 C, in reduced-oxygen environments expected in rocket engines, and their oxidation behaviors compared to that of pure copper. They included two dispersion-strengthened alloys (precipitation-strengthened and oxide-dispersion strengthened, respectively) and one solution-strengthened alloy. In all cases the main reaction was oxidation of Cu into Cu2O and CuO. The dispersion-strengthened alloys were superior to both Cu and the solution-strengthened alloy in oxidation resistance. However, factors retarding oxidation rates seemed to be different for the two dispersion-strengthened alloys.

  15. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  16. In situ electrocatalytic oxidation of acid violet 12 dye effluent.

    PubMed

    Mohan, N; Balasubramanian, N

    2006-08-21

    Electrochemical treatment of organic pollutants is a promising treatment technique for substances which are recalcitrant to biodegradation. Experiments were carried out to treat acid violet 12 dye house effluent using electrochemical technique for removal color and COD reduction covering wide range in operating conditions. Ruthenium/lead/tin oxide coated titanium and stainless steel were used as anode and cathode, respectively. The influence of effluent initial concentration, pH, supporting electrolyte and the electrode material on rate of degradation has been critically examined. The results indicate that the electrochemical method can be used to treat dye house effluents. PMID:16730894

  17. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  18. Effect of trace metals and sulfite oxidation of adipic acid degradation in FGD systems. Final report Dec 81-May 82

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, J.B.; Terry, J.C.; Schubert, S.A.; Utley, B.L.

    1982-12-01

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the sulfite oxidation rate, the adipic acid concentration, the presence of manganese in solution, and temperature. The degradation rate is also affected by pH, but only when manganese is present. Adipic acid degradation products identified in the liquid phase include valeric, butyric, propionic, succinic, and glutaric acids. When manganese was present, the predominant degradation products were succinic and glutaric acids. Analysis of solids from the bench scale tests shows large concentrations of coprecipitated adipic acid in low oxidation sulfite solids. By contrast, low quantities of coprecipitated adipic acid were found in high oxidation gypsum solids.

  19. Ferrous iron oxidation by molecular oxygen under acidic conditions: The effect of citrate, EDTA and fulvic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Adele M.; Griffin, Philippa J.; Waite, T. David

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the rates of Fe(II) oxidation by molecular oxygen in the presence of citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were determined over the pH range 4.0-5.5 and, for all of the ligands investigated, found to be substantially faster than oxidation rates in the absence of any ligand. EDTA was found to be particularly effective in enhancing the rate of Fe(II) oxidation when sufficient EDTA was available to complex all Fe(II) present in solution, with a kinetic model of the process found to adequately describe all results obtained. When Fe(II) was only partially complexed by EDTA, reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heterogeneous Fe(II) oxidation were found to contribute significantly to the removal rate of iron from solution at different stages of oxidation. This was possible due to the rapid rate at which EDTA enhanced Fe(II) oxidation and formed ROS and Fe(III). The rapid rate of Fe(III) generation facilitated the formation of free ferric ion activities in excess of those required for ferric oxyhydroxide precipitation following Fe(III)-EDTA dissociation. In comparison, the rate of Fe(II) oxidation was slower in the presence of citrate, and therefore the concentrations of free Fe(III) able to form in the initial stages of Fe(II) oxidation were much lower than those formed in the presence of EDTA, despite the resultant Fe(III)-citrate complex being less stable than that of Fe(III)-EDTA. The slower rate of citrate enhanced oxidation also resulted in slower rates of ROS generation, and, as such, oxidation of the remaining inorganic Fe(II) species by ROS was negligible. Overall, this study demonstrates that organic ligands may substantially enhance the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Even under circumstances where the ligand is not present at sufficient concentrations to complex all of the Fe(II) in solution, ensuing oxidative processes may sustain an enhanced rate of Fe(II) oxidation relative to that of

  20. Acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxides catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkovets, G.A.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Tarasova, D.V.; Yurchenko, E.N.

    1982-06-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxide catalysts were studied by the methods of back titration and ir spectroscopy. The interrelationship between the acid-base and catalytic properties in the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene was discussed. 3 figures, 1 table.

  1. High emission rate of sulfuric acid from Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, Michael; Taran, Yuri; Galle, Bo

    2015-09-01

    High concentrations of primary sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in fumarolic gases and high emission rate of sulfuric acid aerosol in the plume were measured at Bezymianny volcano, an active dome-growing andesitic volcano in central Kamchatka. Using direct sampling, filter pack sampling, and differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements, we estimated an average emission of H2SO4 at 243 ± 75 t/d in addition to an average SO2 emission of 212 ± 65 t/d. The fumarolic gases of Bezymianny correspond to arc gases released by several magma bodies at different stages of degassing and contain 25-92% of entrained air. H2SO4 accounts for 6-87 mol% of the total sulfur content, 42.8 mol% on average, and SO2 is the rest. The high H2SO4 in Bezymianny fumaroles can be explained by catalytic oxidation of SO2 inside the volcanic dome. Because sulfate aerosol is impossible to measure remotely, the total sulfur content in a plume containing significant H2SO4 may be seriously underestimated.

  2. Carnitine transport and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Nicola; Frigeni, Marta; Pasquali, Marzia

    2016-10-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent β-oxidation. It can be synthesized by the body or assumed with the diet from meat and dairy products. Defects in carnitine biosynthesis do not routinely result in low plasma carnitine levels. Carnitine is accumulated by the cells and retained by kidneys using OCTN2, a high affinity organic cation transporter specific for carnitine. Defects in the OCTN2 carnitine transporter results in autosomal recessive primary carnitine deficiency characterized by decreased intracellular carnitine accumulation, increased losses of carnitine in the urine, and low serum carnitine levels. Patients can present early in life with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and hepatic encephalopathy, or later in life with skeletal and cardiac myopathy or sudden death from cardiac arrhythmia, usually triggered by fasting or catabolic state. This disease responds to oral carnitine that, in pharmacological doses, enters cells using the amino acid transporter B(0,+). Primary carnitine deficiency can be suspected from the clinical presentation or identified by low levels of free carnitine (C0) in the newborn screening. Some adult patients have been diagnosed following the birth of an unaffected child with very low carnitine levels in the newborn screening. The diagnosis is confirmed by measuring low carnitine uptake in the patients' fibroblasts or by DNA sequencing of the SLC22A5 gene encoding the OCTN2 carnitine transporter. Some mutations are specific for certain ethnic backgrounds, but the majority are private and identified only in individual families. Although the genotype usually does not correlate with metabolic or cardiac involvement in primary carnitine deficiency, patients presenting as adults tend to have at least one missense mutation retaining residual activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler

  3. Liquid-Phase Heat-Release Rates of the Systems Hydrazine-Nitric Acid and Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine-Nitric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somogyi, Dezso; Feiler, Charles E.

    1960-01-01

    The initial rates of heat release produced by the reactions of hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine with nitric acid were determined in a bomb calorimeter under conditions of forced mixing. Fuel-oxidant weight ratio and injection velocity were varied. The rate of heat release apparently depended on the interfacial area between the propellants. Above a narrow range of injection velocities representing a critical amount of interfacial area, the rates reached a maximum and were almost constant with injection velocity. The maximum rate for hydrazine was about 70 percent greater than that for unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine. The total heat released did not vary with mixture ratio over the range studied.

  4. Quantitative analysis of amino acid oxidation and related gluconeogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Jungas, R L; Halperin, M L; Brosnan, J T

    1992-04-01

    Significant gaps remain in our knowledge of the pathways of amino acid catabolism in humans. Further quantitative data describing amino acid metabolism in the kidney are especially needed as are further details concerning the pathways utilized for certain amino acids in liver. Sufficient data do exist to allow a broad picture of the overall process of amino acid oxidation to be developed along with approximate quantitative assessments of the role played by liver, muscle, kidney, and small intestine. Our analysis indicates that amino acids are the major fuel of liver, i.e., their oxidative conversion to glucose accounts for about one-half of the daily oxygen consumption of the liver, and no other fuel contributes nearly so importantly. The daily supply of amino acids provided in the diet cannot be totally oxidized to CO2 in the liver because such a process would provide far more ATP than the liver could utilize. Instead, most amino acids are oxidatively converted to glucose. This results in an overall ATP production during amino acid oxidation very nearly equal to the ATP required to convert amino acid carbon to glucose. Thus gluconeogenesis occurs without either a need for ATP from other fuels or an excessive ATP production that could limit the maximal rate of the process. The net effect of the oxidation of amino acids to glucose in the liver is to make nearly two-thirds of the total energy available from the oxidation of amino acids accessible to peripheral tissues, without necessitating that peripheral tissues synthesize the complex array of enzymes needed to support direct amino acid oxidation. As a balanced mixture of amino acids is oxidized in the liver, nearly all carbon from glucogenic amino acids flows into the mitochondrial aspartate pool and is actively transported out of the mitochondria via the aspartate-glutamate antiport linked to proton entry. In the cytoplasm the aspartate is converted to fumarate utilizing urea cycle enzymes; the fumarate flows via

  5. Measurement of oxidation rate of sulfite in rain water in Yokohama, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Yamanaka, K.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1986-04-01

    In recent years, the influences of acid rain such as the acidification of lake water, on bio-system by the heavy metals from effluent of soils with acid rain and also on the structural materials of buildings are seriously discussed. Sulfur and nitrogen that are contained in fossil fuels are released into the atmosphere by the fuel combustion as their oxides dissolve in rain drops as sulfite and nitrous ions, where they are further oxidized into sulfate and nitrate ions These ions lower the pH of rain water resulting so-called acid rain. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine these ions in rain water for the investigation of reality of acid rain. However, it is not easy to accurately determine these ions, especially for sulfite ions in rain water, since they are quickly oxidized by the catalytic action of metallic ions such as ferric and manganous ions. And light, temperature, pH of solution and also species and concentrations of dissolved metallic ions as catalysts, must be influential factors for the rate of oxidation of sulfite ions. In this paper, first, the rate of oxidation of sulfite ion in the test solutions by the catalytic reactions of metallic ions was examined, since the metallic ions is most influential in the oxidation of sulfite ion, and then the relations between the rate of oxidation of sulfite ion and the metallic ions were investigated for rain samples. The contribution of hydrogen ion that was produced by the oxidation of sulfite ion to sulfate was also examined for the change of pH values of rain water.

  6. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in human hepatoma cells (HEP-G2)

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, P.A.; Blake, D.C. Jr.; Pedersen, J.I.

    1987-05-01

    Hep-G2 cells oxidize (1-/sup 14/C)palmitic acid (C16) and (1-/sup 14/C) lignoceric acid (C24) via beta-oxidation to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and water-soluble (WS) products. After perchloric acid precipitation and chloroform-methanol extraction, the WS fraction contained labelled oxidation products as well as fatty acyl CoA's, thus, measurement of WS radioactivity is an overestimate of Hep-G2 beta-oxidation. Alkaline hydrolysis of fatty acyl CoA's prior to measurement of WS radioactivity permits more accurate assessment of beta-oxidation. Using this method, the optimal pH for oxidation of each fatty acid to WS products by Hep-G2 cells was 9.0, while /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production was maximal at pH 7.0. To determine the subcellular location of beta-oxidation, mitochondria (M) were partially separated from peroxisomes (P) on linear Nycodenz gradients. In Hep-G2 cells, oxidation of both C16 and C24 was observed mainly in fractions enriched in succinate dehydrogenase, an M marker enzyme. In contrast, both P and M of rat liver oxidized these fatty acids. However, when Hep-G2 cells were fractionated on discontinuous sucrose gradients, C16 and C24 were oxidized by both P and M fractions. They conclude that beta-oxidation of both long (C16) and very long (C24) chain fatty acids occurs in P as well as in M of Hep-G2 cells, and the present method reflects a more accurate and sensitive measurement of oxidation rates.

  7. Defective (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.E.; Norris, B.J.; Brooke, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation. (1-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

  8. Anthropogenic Oxidation of Seafloor Massive Sulfide (SMS) deposits: Implications for Localized Seafloor Acid Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenker, L.; Romano, G. Y.; Mckibben, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    A rapid increase in the price of transition metals in recent years has piqued interest in deep sea in situ mining of seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits. There are important unanswered questions about the potential environmental effects of seafloor mining, particularly localized sulfuric acid generation. Currently there is a paucity of data on the oxidation kinetics of sulfide minerals in seawater. Seafloor massive sulfides oxidize rapidly via irreversible, acid-producing reactions. The oxidation kinetics of these minerals need to be quantified to estimate the significance of acid production. Laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the effects of pH, temperature, oxidant concentration, and mineral surface area on the rate of oxidation of chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) in seawater. Temperature controlled circulation baths, Teflon reaction vessels, synthetic seawater, and pure, hand sorted natural sulfide mineral crystals are used in experiments. Both batch and flow-through reactor methods are employed. Reaction products are analyzed using ICP-MS. The rate law is expressed as follows: R = k (MO2,aq)a(MH+)b where R is the specific mineral oxidation rate (moles/m2/sec), k is the rate constant (a function of temperature), and a and b are reaction orders for molar aqueous species' concentrations (M). The initial rate method is used to determine the reaction order of each variable. Chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite are being studied because as the slowest- and fastest-oxidizing of the common sulfide minerals found in SMS deposits, they bound the range of rates seen in seafloor settings and can be used to place lower and upper limits on abiotic rates of metal release and sulfuric acid production. Experiments to date indicate an oxidation rate of pyrrhotite several times faster than that of chalcopyrite. The rate laws, when incorporated into reactive-transport computer codes, will enable the prediction of localized anthropogenic sulfuric acid

  9. Quantifying Rates of Complete Microbial Iron Redox Cycling in Acidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Clair, B.; Pottenger, J. W.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    Large accumulations of iron oxide commonly occur in shallow outflows of acidic hot springs, and culturing, molecular techniques, and microscopy by others indicate that this iron oxide (often ferrihydrite) is largely biogenic in Yellowstone National Park. The hot springs that support iron mats have several consistent geochemical features including combinations of pH, temperature, sulfide, dissolved oxygen, depth and ferrous iron concentration appropriate to support iron oxidation. These springs nearly always have a point source leading to a large shallow outflow apron. Microbial zones often, but not always, include a small clear zone near the source, followed by a sulfide oxidation zone, iron mat, and finally photosynthesis. The yellow sulfide oxidation zone is separated from the red iron mat by a sharp transition resulting from increasing dissolved oxygen from atmospheric contact and microbial depletion of sulfide. The iron mat is typically the largest microbial zone in the feature by area. Further down the outflow, iron oxidation appears to be outcompeted by phototrophs as the temperature cools. Occasionally there is overlap in these zones, but one metabolism always appears dominant. Our experiments at diverse hot springs indicate that microbial reduction is less geochemically restricted than oxidation, requiring only organic carbon, ferric minerals and an anoxic environment. With iron oxidizers fixing carbon and producing layers of ferric minerals that become rapidly anoxic with depth, iron reduction is invariably proximal to where biogenic iron oxides are forming. To characterize the interplay of oxidation and reduction rates that permit oxide accumulation, we conducted rate experiments at geochemically diverse Yellowstone hot springs featuring visible iron oxides in thermal areas throughout the park. These experiments were performed during two summer field seasons to determine in situ and maximum rates of iron oxidation and reduction by measuring changing

  10. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation in heart failure associated with obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems, and are linked to the development of heart failure. Emerging data highlight the importance of alterations in cardiac energy metabolism as a major contributor to cardiac dysfunction related to obesity and diabetes. Increased rates of fatty acid oxidation and decreased rates of glucose utilization are two prominent changes in cardiac energy metabolism that occur in obesity and diabetes. This metabolic profile is probably both a cause and consequence of a prominent cardiac insulin resistance, which is accompanied by a decrease in both cardiac function and efficiency, and by the accumulation of potentially toxic lipid metabolites in the heart that can further exaggerate insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. The high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in obesity and diabetes are attributable to several factors, including: 1) increased fatty acid supply and uptake into the cardiomyocyte, 2) increased transcription of fatty acid metabolic enzymes, 3) decreased allosteric control of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake and fatty acid oxidation, and 4) increased post-translational acetylation control of various fatty acid oxidative enzymes. Emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic approaches aimed at switching the balance of cardiac energy substrate preference from fatty acid oxidation to glucose use can prevent cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes. Modulating acetylation control of fatty acid oxidative enzymes is also a potentially attractive strategy, although presently this is limited to precursors of nicotinamide adenine or nonspecific activators of deacetylation such as resveratrol. This review will focus on the metabolic alterations in the heart that occur in obesity and diabetes, as well as on the molecular mechanisms controlling these metabolic changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26996746

  11. Beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids and their coenzyme A derivatives by human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Derwas, N; Poulos, A

    1987-05-01

    The beta-oxidation of lignoceric acid (C24:0), hexacosanoic acid (C26:0), and their coenzyme A derivatives was investigated in human skin fibroblast homogenates. The cofactor requirements for oxidation of lignoceric acid and hexacosanoic acid were identical but were different from their coenzyme A derivatives. For example, lignoceric acid and hexacosanoic acid oxidation was strictly ATP dependent whereas the oxidation of the corresponding coenzyme A derivatives was ATP independent. Also the rate of oxidation of coenzyme A derivatives of lignoceric acid or hexacosanoic acid was much higher compared to the free fatty acids. In patients with Zellweger's syndrome, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and infantile Refsum's disease, the beta-oxidation of lignoceric and hexacosanoic acids was defective whereas the oxidation of their corresponding coenzyme A derivatives was nearly normal. The results presented in this communication suggest strongly that the beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids occurs exclusively in peroxisomes. However, the coenzyme A derivatives of very-long-chain fatty acids can be oxidized in mitochondria as well as in peroxisomes. The inability of the mitochondrial system to oxidize free fatty acids may be due to its inability to convert them to their corresponding coenzyme A derivatives. Our results suggest that a specific very-long-chain fatty acyl CoA synthetase may be required for the activation of the free fatty acids and that this synthetase may be deficient in patients with Zellweger's syndrome and possibly X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, as well. The results presented suggest that substrate specificity and the subcellular localization of the synthetase may regulate the beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids in the cell. PMID:2437859

  12. Oleic Acid Stimulates Complete Oxidation of Fatty Acids through Protein Kinase A-dependent Activation of SIRT1-PGC1α Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Hong; Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Dominy, John E.; Lee, Yoonjin; Kim, Sungjin; Tabata, Mitsuhisa; Xiang, Yang K.; Puigserver, Pere

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids are essential components of the dynamic lipid metabolism in cells. Fatty acids can also signal to intracellular pathways to trigger a broad range of cellular responses. Oleic acid is an abundant monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid that impinges on different biological processes, but the mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Here, we report that oleic acid stimulates the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway and activates the SIRT1-PGC1α transcriptional complex to modulate rates of fatty acid oxidation. In skeletal muscle cells, oleic acid treatment increased intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) that turned on protein kinase A activity. This resulted in SIRT1 phosphorylation at Ser-434 and elevation of its catalytic deacetylase activity. A direct SIRT1 substrate is the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC1α), which became deacetylated and hyperactive after oleic acid treatment. Importantly, oleic acid, but not other long chain fatty acids such as palmitate, increased the expression of genes linked to fatty acid oxidation pathway in a SIRT1-PGC1α-dependent mechanism. As a result, oleic acid potently accelerated rates of complete fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle cells. These results illustrate how a single long chain fatty acid specifically controls lipid oxidation through a signaling/transcriptional pathway. Pharmacological manipulation of this lipid signaling pathway might provide therapeutic possibilities to treat metabolic diseases associated with lipid dysregulation. PMID:23329830

  13. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) before a colonoscopy (examination of the inside of the colon to check ...

  14. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  15. Heart Rate Response and Lactic Acid Concentration in Squash Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Paula; And Others

    1978-01-01

    It was concluded that playing squash is an activity that results in heart rate responses of sufficient intensity to elicit aerobic training effects without producing high lactic acid concentration in the blood. (MM)

  16. Increase in fatty acid oxidation in calvaria cells cultured with diphosphonates.

    PubMed Central

    Felix, R; Fleisch, H

    1981-01-01

    1. Cultured calvaria cells oxidized palmitate and octanoate to CO2 and water-soluble products. 2. When these cells were treated for 6 days with 0.025 and 0.25 mM-dichloromethanediphosphonate, oxidation of palmitate was increased, whereas that of octanoate was influenced less. 3. When the rate of oxidation was raised by increasing the palmitate concentration in the medium, the effect of the diphosphonate was decreased and finally disappeared. 4. 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonate had only minor effects. 5. The increase in palmitate oxidation appeared 2 days after the addition of dichloromethanediphosphonate, simultaneously with a fall in lactate production. (Inhibition of glycolysis by diphosphonates has already been shown.) 6. Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, did not influence the effect of dichloromethanediphosphonate on the oxidation of palmitate and the production of lactate. 7. Cells cultured with dichloromethanediphosphonate showed a faster uptake of palmitic acid than did control cells. However, this observation did not explain the increased palmitate oxidation, since uptake was much faster than oxidation, and was therefore not the rate-limiting step. 8. 2-Bromopalmitate, an inhibitor of fatty acid oxidation, did not influence the inhibition of glycolysis by the diphosphonates. This inhibition, therefore, did not result from the increased oxidation of palmitate. It is also unlikely that the increased oxidation of palmitate is connected with the inhibition of glycolysis. PMID:6458286

  17. Biological implications of oxidation and unidirectional chiral inversion of D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Gong, Nian; Xin, Yan-Fei; Hao, Bin; Zhou, Xiang-Jun; Pang, Catherine C Y

    2012-03-01

    Recent progress in chiral separation of D- and L-amino acids by chromatography ascertained the presence of several free Damino acids in a variety of mammals including humans. Unidirectional chiral inversion of many D-amino acid analogs such as exogenous NG-nitro-D-arginine (D-NNA), endogenous D-leucine, D-phenylanine and D-methionine have been shown to take place with inversion rates of 4-90%, probably dependent on various species D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) enzymatic activities. DAAO is known to catalyze the oxidative deamination of neutral and basic D-amino acids to their corresponding α-keto acids, hydrogen peroxide and ammonia, and is responsible for the chiral inversion. This review provides an overview of recent research in this area: 1) oxidation and chiral inversion of several D-amino acid analogs in the body; 2) the indispensable but insufficient role of DAAO particularly in the kidneys and brain for the oxidation and chiral inversion of D-amino acids analogs; and 3) unidentified transaminase(s) responsible for the second step of chiral inversion. The review also discusses the physiological significance of oxidation and chiral inversion of D-amino acids, which is still a subject of dispute. PMID:22304623

  18. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  19. Ammonia oxidation rates and nitrification in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Silvia E.; Babbin, Andrew R.; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrification rates, as well as the relationships between rates and ammonia oxidizer abundance (both archaeal and bacterial), were investigated in the Arabian Sea. Ammonia oxidation rates were measured directly using 15N-NH4+stable isotope additions in gas-impermeable, trace metal clean trilaminate bags (500 mL) at in situ temperature. Tracer incubations were performed at three stations at depths above, below, and within the oxycline of the open-ocean oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Ammonia oxidation rates were similar to previous open-ocean measurements, ranging from undetectable to 21.6 ± 0.1 nmol L-1 d-1. The highest rates at each station occurred at the primary nitrite maximum (above the OMZ), and rates were very low at depths greater than 900 m. The abundances of both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were estimated using theamoA gene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Both AOA and AOB amoA were detected above, within, and below the OMZ, although the AOA were always more abundant than the AOB, by a factor of 35-216. Nitrification rates were not directly correlated to AOA or AOB amoA abundance. These rates offer new insight into the role of nitrification in the mesopelagic zone. The abundance of AOA amoA genes at 1000 m suggests that ˜50% of the microbial biomass could be autotrophic. Additionally, the integrated nitrification rate at depth implies that nitrification could consume most of the ammonium produced by the flux of organic carbon in the mesopelagic zone.

  20. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, L. F.; Bazerbashi, M. F.; Beekman, C. P.; Hadad, C. M.; Allen, H. C.

    2006-12-01

    Field studies of marine and continental aerosols find that fatty acid films form on aqueous tropospheric aerosols. Oxidation of the acyl chains is thought to be key to aerosol growth. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both fresh and salt water sources. Using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, we present a molecular-level investigation of fatty acid monolayers at the air-water and air- sodium chloride solution interface and explore reactions with atmospheric oxidants by these model systems. Using sum frequency generation spectroscopy coupled with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 molar sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous sub-phase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  1. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  2. Photo-oxidation of gaseous ethanol on photocatalyst prepared by acid leaching of titanium oxide/hydroxyapatite composite

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.; Rachi, T.; Yokouchi, M.; Kamimoto, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Okada, K.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Photocatalyst powder was prepared by acid leaching of TiO{sub 2}/apatite composite. ► The photocatalytic activity was evaluated from in situ FT-IR study using ethanol. ► Apatite in the composite had positive effect for the photo-oxidation of ethanol. ► The enhanced oxidation rate was explained by the difference in deactivation rate. - Abstract: Highly active photocatalysts were synthesized by leaching of heat-treated titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2})/hydroxyapatite (HAp) powder with hydrochloric acid at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 mol/l, and their photocatalytic activities were evaluated from in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) study of photo-oxidation of gaseous ethanol. By changing the acid concentration, the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composite had different atomic ratios of Ca/Ti (0.0–2.8) and P/Ti (0.3–2.1). It was found that phosphate group remained on the surface of TiO{sub 2} particle even in the sample treated with concentrated acid (0.75 mol/l). These acid-treated samples showed higher rates for ethanol photo-oxidation than the commercial TiO{sub 2} powder, Degussa P25. The highest rate was obtained in the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composite treated with the dilute (0.25 mol/l) acid in spite of its low content of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst. This enhanced photocatalytic activity was attributed to the result that the deactivation with repeated injections of ethanol gas was suppressed in the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composites compared with the TiO{sub 2} powders.

  3. Ghrelin reduces hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rigault, C; Le Borgne, F; Georges, B; Demarquoy, J

    2007-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide secreted during starvation by gastric cells. Ghrelin physiologically induces food intake and seems to alter lipid and glucid metabolism in several tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. Liver has a key position in lipid metabolism as it allows the metabolic orientation of fatty acids between oxidation and esterification. We investigated the effects of peripheral ghrelin administration on 2 crucial parameters of fatty acid oxidation: the levocarnitine (L-carnitine)-dependent entry of the fatty acids in the mitochondria and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Ghrelin was either given to rats prior to the hepatocyte preparation and culture or used to treat hepatocytes prepared from control animals. Direct incubation of ghrelin to raw hepatocytes did not induce any change in the studied parameters. In hepatocytes prepared from 3 nmol ghrelin-treated rats, a 44% reduction of the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation while no alteration of the L-carnitine-related parameters were observed. These results suggested (a) that ghrelin has no direct effect on liver, and (b) that when administrated to a whole organism, ghrelin may alter the lipid metabolism and the energy balance through a marked decrease in liver fatty acid oxidation. PMID:17556859

  4. Rates of oxidative weathering on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1992-01-01

    Implicit in the mnemonic 'MSATT' (Mars surface and atmosphere through time) is that rates of surface processes on Mars through time should be investigated, including studies of the kinetics and mechanism of oxidative weathering reactions occurring in the Martian regolith. Such measurements are described. Two major elements analyzed in the Viking Lander XRF experiment that are most vulnerable to atmospheric oxidation are iron and sulfur. Originally, they occurred as Fe(2+)-bearing silicate and sulfide minerals in basaltic rocks on the surface of Mars. However, chemical weathering reactions through time have produced ferric- and sulfate-bearing assemblages now visible in the Martian regolith. Such observations raise several question about: (1) when the oxidative weathering reactions took place on Mars; (2) whether or not the oxidized regolith is a fossilized remnant of past weathering processes; (3) deducting chemical interactions of the ancient Martian atmosphere with its surface from surviving phases; (4) possible weathering reactions still occurring in the frozen regolith; and (5) the kinetics and mechanism of past and present-day oxidative reactions on Mars. These questions may be addressed experimentally by studying reaction rates of dissolution and oxidation of basaltic minerals, and by identifying reaction products forming on the mineral surfaces. Results for the oxidation of pyrrhotite and dissolved ferrous iron are reported.

  5. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  6. Effect of propionic acid on fatty acid oxidation and ureagenesis.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, A M; Chase, H P

    1976-07-01

    Propionic acid significantly inhibited 14CO2 production from [1-14C] palmitate at a concentration of 10 muM in control fibroblasts and 100 muM in methylmalonic fibroblasts. This inhibition was similar to that produced by 4-pentenoic acid. Methylmalonic acid also inhibited 14CO2 production from [1-14C] palmitate, but only at a concentration of 1 mM in control cells and 5 mM in methylmalonic cells. Propionic acid (5 mM) also inhibited ureagenesis in rat liver slices when ammonia was the substrate but not with aspartate and citrulline as substrates. Propionic acid had no direct effect on either carbamyl phosphate synthetase or ornithine transcarbamylase. These findings may explain the fatty degeneration of the liver and the hyperammonemia in propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. PMID:934734

  7. Isoniazid cocrystals with anti-oxidant hydroxy benzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadi, Syed Muddassir Ali; Yunus, Uzma; Bhatti, Moazzam Hussain; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2014-11-01

    Isoniazid is the primary constituent of “triple therapy” used to effectively treat tuberculosis. In tuberculosis and other diseases, tissue inflammation and free radical burst from macrophages results in oxidative stress. These free radicals cause pulmonary inflammation if not countered by anti-oxidants. Therefore, in the present study cocrystals of isoniazid with four anti-oxidant hydroxy benzoic acids have been reported. Gallic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid resulted in the formation of cocrystals when reacted with isoniazid. Cocrystal structure analysis confirmed the existence of pyridine-carboxylic acid synthon in the cocrystals of isoniazid with Gallic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid. While cocrystal of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid formed the pyridine-hydroxy group synthon. Other synthons of different graph sets are formed between hydrazide group of isoniazid and coformers involving Nsbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯N bonds. All the cocrystals were in 1:1 stoichiometric ratio.

  8. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Sulfurous Acid in an Aqueous Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Alicia; Hernandez, Willie; Suarez, Marco F.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of some parameters on sulfurous acid and sulfur oxidation kinetics such as initial concentration of sulfurous acid, oxygen, TiO[2] crystalline concentration, the power of black light, and quantity of TiO[2] is investigated. The experiments can be performed in an undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory with an inexpensive…

  9. Exposure assessment of oxidant gases and acidic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Clearly the presence of high ozone and acidic species in North America is primarily dependent upon photochemical air pollution. Evidence shows, however, that high acid exposures may occur in specific types of areas of high sulfur fuel use during the winter. At the present time, our concerns about exposure to local populations and regional populations should be directed primarily toward the outdoor activity patterns of individuals in the summer, and how those activity patterns relate to the location, duration, and concentrations of ozone and acid aerosol in photochemical air pollution episodes. Lioy Dyba and Mage et al have examined the activity patterns of children in summer camps. Because they spend more time outside than the normal population, these children form an important group of exercising individuals subject to photochemical pollution exposures. The dose of ozone inhaled by the children in the two camps was within 50% and 25% of the dose inhaled by adults in controlled clinical situations that produced clinically significant decrements in pulmonary function and increased the symptoms after 6.6 hr exposure in a given day. The chamber studies have used only ozone, whereas in the environment this effect may be enhanced by the presence of a complex mixture. The work of Lioy et al in Mendham, New Jersey found that hydrogen ion seemed to play a role in the inability of the children to return immediately to their normal peak expiratory flow rate after exposure. The camp health study conducted in Dunsville, Ontario suggested that children participating in a summer camp where moderate levels of ozone (100 ppb) but high levels of acid (46 micrograms/m3) occurred during an episode had a similar response. Thus, for children or exercising adults who are outdoors for at least one hour or more during a given day, the presence and persistence of oxidants in the environment are of particular concern. 63 references.

  10. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Laura

    2008-03-01

    Field studies of marine and continental aerosols find that fatty acid films form on aqueous tropospheric aerosols. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both fresh and salt water sources. Using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, we present a molecular-level investigation of fatty acid monolayers at the air-water and air-sodium chloride solution interface and explore reactions with atmospheric oxidants by these model systems. Coupling sum frequency generation spectroscopy with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 molar sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous sub-phase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  11. Method for predicting photocatalytic oxidation rates of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Melanie L; Liljestrand, Howard M

    2003-01-01

    In designing a photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) system for a given air pollution source, destruction rates for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are required. The objective of this research was to develop a systematic method of predicting PCO rate constants by correlating rate constants with physical-chemical characteristics of compounds. Accordingly, reaction rate constants were determined for destruction of volatile organics over a titanium dioxide (TiO2) catalyst in a continuous mixed-batch reactor. It was found that PCO rate constants for alkanes and alkenes vary linearly with gas-phase ionization potential (IP) and with gas-phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant. The correlations allow rates of destruction of compounds not tested in this research to be predicted based on physical-chemical characteristics. PMID:12568248

  12. Carbon monoxide oxidation rates computed for automobile thermal reactor conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokaw, R. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation rates in thermal reactors for exhaust manifolds are computed by integrating differential equations for system of twenty-nine reversible chemical reactions. Reactors are noncatalytic replacements for conventional exhaust manifolds and are a system for reducing carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons in automobile exhausts.

  13. Oxidized amino acids: culprits in human atherosclerosis and indicators of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, Jay W

    2002-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is implicated in atherogenesis, but the mechanisms that oxidize LDL in the human artery wall have proven difficult to identify. A powerful investigative approach is mass spectrometric quantification of the oxidized amino acids that are left in proteins by specific oxidation reactions. Comparison of these molecular fingerprints in biological samples with those produced in proteins by various in vitro oxidation systems can indicate which biochemical pathway has created damage in vivo. For example, the pattern of oxidized amino acids in proteins isolated from atherosclerotic lesions implicates reactive intermediates generated by myeloperoxidase, a major phagocyte enzyme. These intermediates include hypochlorous acid, tyrosyl radical, and reactive nitrogen species, each of which generates a different pattern of stable end products. Despite this strong evidence that myeloperoxidase promotes LDL oxidation in vivo, the antioxidant that has been tested most extensively in clinical trials, vitamin E, fails to inhibit myeloperoxidase pathways in vitro. Because the utility of an antioxidant depends critically on the nature of the pathway that inflicts tissue damage, interventions that specifically inhibit myeloperoxidase or other physiologically relevant pathways would be more logical candidates for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Moreover, levels of oxidized amino acids in urine and plasma might reflect those in tissues and therefore identify individuals with high levels of oxidative stress. Trials with such subjects would seem more likely to uncover effective antioxidant therapies than trials involving the general population. PMID:12031894

  14. Studies on the oxidation of hexamethylbenzene 1: Oxidation of hexamethylbenzene with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiba, K.; Tomura, S.; Mizuno, T.

    1986-01-01

    The oxidative reaction of hexamethylbenzene (HMB) with nitric acid was studied, and the hitherto unknown polymethylbenzenepolycarboxylic acids were isolated: tetramethylphthalic anhydride, tetramethylisophthalic acid, 1,3,5-, 1,2,4- and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzenetricarboxylic acids. When HMB was warmed with 50% nitric acid at about 80 C, tetramethylphthalic anhydride and tetramethylisophthalic acid were initially produced. The continued reaction led to the production of trimethylbenzenetricarboxylic acids, but only slight amounts of dimethylbenzenetetracarboxylic acids were detected in the reaction mixture. Whereas tetramethylphthalic anydride and tetramethylisophthalic acid were obtained, pentamethylbenzoic acid, a possible precursor of them, was scarcely produced. On the other hand, a yellow material extracted with ether from the initial reaction mixture contained bis-(nitromethyl)prehnitene (CH3)4C6(CH2NO2)2, which was easily converted into the phthalic anhydride.

  15. Rate of Nitric Oxide Scavenging by hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Azarov, Ivan; He, Xiaojun; Jeffers, Anne; Basu, Swati; Ucer, Burak; Hantgan, Roy R.; Levy, Andrew; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin, released from the red cell, may play a major role in regulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide. The abundant serum protein haptoglobin, rapidly binds to free hemoglobin forming a stable complex accelerating its clearance. The haptoglobin gene is polymorphic with two classes of alleles denoted 1 and 2. We have previously demonstrated that the haptoglobin 1 protein-hemoglobin complex is cleared twice as fast as the haptoglobin 2 protein-hemoglobin complex. In this report we explored whether haptoglobin binding to hemoglobin reduces the rate of nitric oxide scavenging using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. We found that both the haptoglobin 1 and haptoglobin 2 protein complexes react with nitric oxide at the same rate as unbound cell-free hemoglobin. To confirm these results we developed a novel assay where free hemoglobin and hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin competed in the reaction with NO. The relative rate of the NO reaction was then determined by examining the amount of reacted species using analytical ultracentrifugation. Since complexation of hemoglobin with haptoglobin does not reduce NO scavenging, we propose that the haptoglobin genotype may influence nitric oxide bioavailability by determining the clearance rate of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex. We provide computer simulations showing that a two-fold difference in the rate of uptake of the haptoglobin hemoglobin complex by macrophages significantly affects nitric oxide bioavailability thereby providing a plausible explanation for why there is more vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in individuals and transgenic mice homozygous for the Hp 2 allele. PMID:18364244

  16. Oxidation of oleic acid at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Laura F.; Bazerbashi, Mohamad F.; Beekman, Christopher P.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Allen, Heather C.

    2007-03-01

    Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both freshwater and saltwater sources. Oleic acid monolayers at the air/water interface and at the air/sodium chloride solution interface were investigated using surface-specific, broad-bandwidth, sum frequency generation spectroscopy. Complementary techniques of infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy and surface pressure measurements taken during monolayer oxidation confirmed the sum frequency results. Using this nonlinear optical technique coupled with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 M sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous subphase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  17. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  18. Obesity-induced lysine acetylation increases cardiac fatty acid oxidation and impairs insulin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Alrob, Osama Abo; Sankaralingam, Sowndramalingam; Ma, Cary; Wagg, Cory S.; Fillmore, Natasha; Jaswal, Jagdip S.; Sack, Michael N.; Lehner, Richard; Gupta, Mahesh P.; Michelakis, Evangelos D.; Padwal, Raj S.; Johnstone, David E.; Sharma, Arya M.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Lysine acetylation is a novel post-translational pathway that regulates the activities of enzymes involved in both fatty acid and glucose metabolism. We examined whether lysine acetylation controls heart glucose and fatty acid oxidation in high-fat diet (HFD) obese and SIRT3 knockout (KO) mice. Methods and results C57BL/6 mice were placed on either a HFD (60% fat) or a low-fat diet (LFD; 4% fat) for 16 or 18 weeks. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates were significantly increased in HFD vs. LFD mice (845 ± 76 vs. 551 ± 87 nmol/g dry wt min, P < 0.05). Activities of the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) were increased in hearts from HFD vs. LFD mice, and were associated with LCAD and β-HAD hyperacetylation. Cardiac protein hyperacetylation in HFD-fed mice was associated with a decrease in SIRT3 expression, while expression of the mitochondrial acetylase, general control of amino acid synthesis 5 (GCN5)-like 1 (GCN5L1), did not change. Interestingly, SIRT3 deletion in mice also led to an increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation compared with wild-type (WT) mice (422 ± 29 vs. 291 ± 17 nmol/g dry wt min, P < 0.05). Cardiac lysine acetylation was increased in SIRT3 KO mice compared with WT mice, including increased acetylation and activity of LCAD and β-HAD. Although the HFD and SIRT3 deletion decreased glucose oxidation, pyruvate dehydrogenase acetylation was unaltered. However, the HFD did increase Akt acetylation, while decreasing its phosphorylation and activity. Conclusion We conclude that increased cardiac fatty acid oxidation in response to high-fat feeding is controlled, in part, via the down-regulation of SIRT3 and concomitant increased acetylation of mitochondrial β-oxidation enzymes. PMID:24966184

  19. Reduction of a phosphorus oxide and acid reaction set

    SciTech Connect

    Twarowski, A.

    1995-07-01

    It has been predicted for some time that hypersonic aircraft will suffer from diminished fuel efficiency due to the slow speed of radical recombination in the nozzle of the aircraft and the consequent expulsion of high-energy fragments during high Mach number flight. The addition of small amounts of phosphine combustion products (phosphorus oxides and acids) to water vapor has been found to result in a faster relaxation rate of OH to its equilibrium density following H{sub 2}O photolysis. This article describes the systematic construction of a reaction model of 162 phosphorus reactions among 17 phosphorus-containing species. Those reactions that contribute to the reestablishment of equilibrium following the perturbation of the system by H{sub 2}O photolysis or by an increase in temperature are identified. A thermodynamic free energy function is used to quantify the rate of system relaxation back to equilibrium for a series of 36 reaction conditions covering a temperature range of 1,500 to 3,000 K, a gas density range of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} mol/cm{sup 3} and a fuel equivalence ratio of 0.8 to 1.2.

  20. Mechanistic studies of nitrations and oxidations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Willmer, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of nitrations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid of 1,2,4-trichloro-5-nitrobenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene have been proposed. The kinetics and products of the nitration, in the title medium, of substantially deactivated benzoic acids and benzaldehydes have been investigated. Kinetics of nitration of some substituted benzoic acids in nitric acid solutions containing dinitrogen pentaoxide or nitronium trifluoro-methanesulphonate (nitronium triflate) have been compared. Rate coefficients for reactions in dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions were generally similar to those from nitronium triflate solutions of the same estimated nitronium ion concentration. Yields of aromatic products of nitration of some benzoic acid derivatives in the nitric acid solutions have been determined. Nitrodecarboxylation of 4-fluorobenzoic acid occurs as a result of nitronium ion attach at C(1). The competition between oxidation to the corresponding benzoic acid and nitration in the aromatic ring of some substituted benzaldehydes has been probed by kinetic and product studies. 4-Carboxybenzaldehyde is nitrated but more deactivated substrates are predominantly oxidized. Rapid reversible gem-dinitrate formation occurs in concentrated dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions. The equilibrium extent of formation of [alpha]-deuterio-(4-nitropheny)-dinitratomethane from [alpha]-deuterio-4-nitrobenzaldehyde is reported. 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the gem-dinitrate are oxidized in processes in which [alpha]-hydrogen loss is at least partially rate determining. The relative rates of oxidation in nitronium triflate solutions suggest that the [alpha]-hydrogen is removed as a hydride ion in that medium. There is evidence for the intrusion of a radical mechanism of nitration in concentrated solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide. (4-Nitrophenyl)dinitratomethane was produced on the addition of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde to a solution of dinitrogen pentaoxide in dichloromethane.

  1. Cationic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) iron oxide microspheres for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Sharma, Aditya; Sumana, Gajjala; Tiwari, Ida; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2013-04-01

    Herein, we envisage the possibility of preparing stable cationic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulating the iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs; 8-12 nm). The IONPs are incorporated into PLGA in organic phase followed by microsphere formation and chitosan coating in aqueous medium via nano-emulsion technique. The average size of the microspheres, as determined by dynamic light scattering are about 310 nm, while the zeta potential for the composite remains near 35 mV at pH 4.0. These microspheres are electrophoretically deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate used as cathode and parallel platinum plate as the counter electrode. This platform is utilized to fabricate a DNA biosensor, by immobilizing a probe sequence specific to Escherichia coli. The bioelectrode shows a surface-controlled electrode reaction with the electron transfer coefficient (α) of 0.64 and charge transfer rate constant (ks) of 61.73 s-1. Under the optimal conditions, this biosensor shows a detection limit of 8.7 × 10-14 M and is found to retain about 81% of the initial activity after 9 cycles of use.Herein, we envisage the possibility of preparing stable cationic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulating the iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs; 8-12 nm). The IONPs are incorporated into PLGA in organic phase followed by microsphere formation and chitosan coating in aqueous medium via nano-emulsion technique. The average size of the microspheres, as determined by dynamic light scattering are about 310 nm, while the zeta potential for the composite remains near 35 mV at pH 4.0. These microspheres are electrophoretically deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate used as cathode and parallel platinum plate as the counter electrode. This platform is utilized to fabricate a DNA biosensor, by immobilizing a probe sequence specific to Escherichia coli. The bioelectrode shows a surface-controlled electrode reaction with the

  2. Fatty acid oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I: emerging therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Q; Zeng, F; Liu, X; Wang, Q J; Deng, F

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells exhibit unique metabolic adaptations that are increasingly viewed as potential targets for novel and specific cancer therapies. Among these targets, the carnitine palmitoyltransferase system is responsible for delivering the long-chain fatty acid (FA) from cytoplasm into mitochondria for oxidation, where carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). With increasing understanding of the crucial role had by fatty acid oxidation in cancer, CPTI has received renewed attention as a pivotal mediator in cancer metabolic mechanism. CPTI activates FAO and fuels cancer growth via ATP and NADPH production, constituting an essential part of cancer metabolism adaptation. Moreover, CPTI also functionally intertwines with other key pathways and factors to regulate gene expression and apoptosis of cancer cell. Here, we summarize recent findings and update the current understanding of FAO and CPTI in cancer and provide theoretical basis for this enzyme as an emerging potential molecular target in cancer therapeutic intervention. PMID:27195673

  3. Fatty acid oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I: emerging therapeutic targets in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Q; Zeng, F; Liu, X; Wang, Q J; Deng, F

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells exhibit unique metabolic adaptations that are increasingly viewed as potential targets for novel and specific cancer therapies. Among these targets, the carnitine palmitoyltransferase system is responsible for delivering the long-chain fatty acid (FA) from cytoplasm into mitochondria for oxidation, where carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). With increasing understanding of the crucial role had by fatty acid oxidation in cancer, CPTI has received renewed attention as a pivotal mediator in cancer metabolic mechanism. CPTI activates FAO and fuels cancer growth via ATP and NADPH production, constituting an essential part of cancer metabolism adaptation. Moreover, CPTI also functionally intertwines with other key pathways and factors to regulate gene expression and apoptosis of cancer cell. Here, we summarize recent findings and update the current understanding of FAO and CPTI in cancer and provide theoretical basis for this enzyme as an emerging potential molecular target in cancer therapeutic intervention. PMID:27195673

  4. Structure and friction of stearic acid and oleic acid films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces in squalane.

    PubMed

    Doig, Michael; Warrens, Chris P; Camp, Philip J

    2014-01-14

    The structure and friction of fatty acid surfactant films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces lubricated by squalane are examined using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The structures of stearic acid and oleic acid films under static and shear conditions, and at various surface coverages, are described in detail, and the effects of unsaturation in the tail group are highlighted. At high surface coverage, the measured properties of stearic acid and oleic acid films are seen to be very similar. At low and intermediate surface coverages, the presence of a double bond, as in oleic acid, is seen to give rise to less penetration of lubricant in to the surfactant film and less layering of the lubricant near to the film. The kinetic friction coefficient is measured as a function of shear rate within the hydrodynamic (high shear rate) lubrication regime. Lubricant penetration and layering are observed to be correlated with friction coefficient. The friction coefficient with oleic acid depends only weakly on surface coverage, while stearic acid admits more lubricant penetration, and its friction coefficient increases significantly with decreasing surface coverage. Connections between film structure and friction are discussed. PMID:24364665

  5. [Investigation on mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions].

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Yi, Xiao-Yun; Dang, Zhi; Liu, Yun

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions was investigated by electrochemical analysis methods, such as open-circuit potential, cyclic voltammetry, Tafel polarization curve and anodic polarization curve, using a pyrite-carbon paste electrode as working electrode. The results showed that the oxidation process of pyrite in acidic solutions was via a two-step reaction: the first step was the dissolution of iron moiety and formation of a passivation film composed of elemental sulphur, metal-deficient sulfide and polysulfide; the second step was the further oxidation of these intermediate products to SO4(2-). The final reaction products of pyrite oxidation were Fe3+ and SO4(2-) in acidic solutions. In addition, the open-circuit potential and corrosion potential were positively shifted, the peak current and the corrosion current were increased with the increase in concentration of H2SO4 solutions. This indicated that increased acidity of the system was advantageous to the oxidation of pyrite. PMID:23323425

  6. Fatty Acid Beta-Oxidation Disorders: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Vijay A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation disorders (FAODs) are a heterogeneous group of defects in fatty acid transport and mitochondrial β-oxidation. They are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders and have a wide range of clinical presentations. Summary The background information and case report provide important insight into mitochondrial FAODs. The article provides a wealth of information describing the scope of these disorders. Key Messages This article presents a typical case of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and summarizes the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of mitochondrial FAODs.

  7. Degradation rates of glycerol polyesters at acidic and basic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyesters prepared from glycerol with mixtures of adipic and citric acids were evaluated in the laboratory to estimate degradation rates over a range of pH conditions. These renewable polymers provide a market for glycerol that is generated during biodiesel production. The polyesters were prepared...

  8. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs.

    PubMed

    Beam, Jacob P; Bernstein, Hans C; Jay, Zackary J; Kozubal, Mark A; Jennings, Ryan deM; Tringe, Susannah G; Inskeep, William P

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3-3.5; temperature = 68-75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4-40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14-30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1-2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day(-1), and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems. PMID:26913020

  9. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Jacob P.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Zackary J.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3–3.5; temperature = 68–75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4–40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14–30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1–2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day−1, and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems. PMID:26913020

  10. Selective oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions using gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    H-mordenite-supported PtAu nanoparticles are highly active and selective in the oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions, which allows the direct preparation of free acids (see picture). The high selectivity for C{sub 3} compounds results from the negligible formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in contrast to PtAu nanoparticles supported on activated carbon.

  11. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  12. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Uric acid photo-oxidation assay: in vitro comparison of sunscreening agents.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, W C; Yamamoto, Y; Inoue, M; Kashiba-Iwatsuki, M; Yamaguchi, M; Tomita, K

    1998-02-01

    We present a new method to evaluate the photo-oxidative activity of sunscreening agents based on the photodynamic oxidation of uric acid. Uric acid was selected as the oxidant probe for its high reactivity to singlet oxygen and oxygen radicals, high sensitivity of detection using electrochemical (EC) techniques, low light absorptivity and high photochemical stability in the UVA/B region of interest, and stability to autoxidation. The method is demonstrated by the photodynamic oxidation of uric acid on co-irradiation with Rose Bengal, a highly efficient photosensitizing dye for the production of singlet oxygen (1O2). Using this assay we found that the relative photodynamic oxidation rates of UVB-absorbing sunscreens in 80% methanol on irradiation with >290 nm light decreased in the order 2-ethylhexyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (DMABA-2EH) > 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (MCA-2EH) and the experimental sunscreens, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-octanoyl-4,4-dimethyl- 1,4,5,6,-tetrahydropyridine (ICI-319) and 1-(2-methylpropyl)-3-propionyl-4,4-dimethyl-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyridine (ICI-855). The relative photodynamic oxidation rates of UVA-absorbing sunscreens decreased in the order 4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzoylmethane (BMDBM) and 4-(2-propyl)benzophenone (PB) > 2-hydroxy-4'-methoxy-benzophenone (HMB) and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (DHMB). We have confirmed the photodynamic activity of DMABA-2EH for the production of singlet oxygen (1O2) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and the reagent 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone (4-oxo-TEMP). We failed to detect the photodynamic production of the oxyradicals, superoxide (O2.-) and hydroxyl radical (HO.) using N-tert-butyl-a-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrrolidine-1-oxide (DMPO) as a result of photochemical interference caused by these spin-trapping reagents. The uric acid photo-oxidation assay was also used to compare the photodynamic reactivity of light-reflective, microfine oxides TiO2, Zn

  14. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites. PMID:27322707

  15. Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Fukawa, Tomoya; Yan-Jiang, Benjamin Chua; Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Huang, Dan; Qian, Chao-Nan; Ong, Pauline; Li, Zhimei; Chen, Shuwen; Mak, Shi Ya; Lim, Wan Jun; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Mohan, Rosmin Elsa; Wang, Ruiqi Rachel; Lai, Jiunn Herng; Chua, Clarinda; Ong, Hock Soo; Tan, Ker-Kan; Ho, Ying Swan; Tan, Iain Beehuat; Teh, Bin Tean; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-06-01

    Cachexia is a devastating muscle-wasting syndrome that occurs in patients who have chronic diseases. It is most commonly observed in individuals with advanced cancer, presenting in 80% of these patients, and it is one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality associated with cancer. Additionally, although many people with cachexia show hypermetabolism, the causative role of metabolism in muscle atrophy has been unclear. To understand the molecular basis of cachexia-associated muscle atrophy, it is necessary to develop accurate models of the condition. By using transcriptomics and cytokine profiling of human muscle stem cell-based models and human cancer-induced cachexia models in mice, we found that cachectic cancer cells secreted many inflammatory factors that rapidly led to high levels of fatty acid metabolism and to the activation of a p38 stress-response signature in skeletal muscles, before manifestation of cachectic muscle atrophy occurred. Metabolomics profiling revealed that factors secreted by cachectic cancer cells rapidly induce excessive fatty acid oxidation in human myotubes, which leads to oxidative stress, p38 activation and impaired muscle growth. Pharmacological blockade of fatty acid oxidation not only rescued human myotubes, but also improved muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia models in vivo. Therefore, fatty acid-induced oxidative stress could be targeted to prevent cancer-induced cachexia. PMID:27135739

  16. Impact of 1 wk of diabetes on the regulation of myocardial carbohydrate and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chatham, J C; Gao, Z P; Forder, J R

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of increasing exogenous palmitate concentration on carbohydrate and palmitate oxidation in hearts from control and 1-wk diabetic rats. Hearts were perfused with glucose, [3-(13)C]lactate, and [U-(13)C]palmitate. Substrate oxidation rates were determined by combining (13)C-NMR glutamate isotopomer analysis of tissue extracts with measurements of oxygen consumption. Carbohydrate oxidation was markedly depressed after diabetes in the presence of low (0.1 mM) but not high (1.0 mM) palmitate concentration. Increasing exogenous palmitate concentration 10-fold resulted in a 7-fold increase in the contribution of palmitate to energy production in controls but only a 30% increase in the diabetic group. Consequently, at 0.1 mM palmitate, the rate of fatty acid oxidation was higher in the diabetic group than in controls; however, at 1.0 mM fatty acid oxidation, it was significantly depressed. Therefore, after 1 wk of diabetes, the major differences in carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism occur primarily at low rather than high exogenous palmitate concentration. PMID:10444431

  17. Amino Acid Degradations Produced by Lipid Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-06-10

    Differently to amino acid degradations produced by carbohydrate-derived reactive carbonyls, amino acid degradations produced by lipid oxidation products are lesser known in spite of being lipid oxidation a major source of reactive carbonyls in food. This article analyzes the conversion of amino acids into Strecker aldehydes, α-keto acids, and amines produced by lipid-derived free radicals and carbonyl compounds, as well as the role of lipid oxidation products on the reactions suffered by these compounds: the formation of Strecker aldehydes and other aldehydes from α-keto acids; the formation of Strecker aldehydes and olefins from amines; the formation of shorter aldehydes from Strecker aldehydes; and the addition reactions suffered by the olefins produced from the amines. The relationships among all these reactions and the effect of reaction conditions on them are discussed. This knowledge should contribute to better control food processing in order to favor the formation of desirable beneficial compounds and to inhibit the production of compounds with deleterious properties. PMID:25748518

  18. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in Aerosol Particles by Hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This research explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1011 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI). Detailed kinetic measurements show that the reactive uptake coefficient is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. Reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 plays a role in secondary chemistry. In the absence of O2 the reactive uptake coefficient increases to ~ 8, 5 and 3 for LNA, LA, and OA, respectively. The reactive uptake coefficient approaches values of 6, 4 and 2 for LNA, LA, and OA respectively when 18% of the total nitrogen flow is replaced with O2. Mechanistic pathways and products will also be presented herein.

  19. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Methimazole by Chlorite in Slightly Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Chipiso, Kudzanai; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of methimazole (1-methyl-3H-imidazole), MMI, by chlorite in mildly acidic environments were studied. It is a complex reaction that gives oligo-oscillations in chlorine dioxide concentrations in excess chlorite conditions. The stoichiometry is strictly 2:1, with the sulfur center being oxidized to sulfate and the organic moiety being hydrolyzed to several indeterminate species. In excess MMI conditions over chlorite, the sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid were observed as major intermediates. The sulfenic acid, which was observed in the electrochemical oxidation of MMI, was not observed with chlorite oxidations. Initial reduction of chlorite produced HOCl, an autocatalytic species in chlorite oxidations. HOCl rapidly reacts with chlorite to produce chlorine dioxide, which, in turn, reacts rapidly with MMI to produce more chlorite. The reaction of chlorine dioxide with MMI is competitive, in rate, with the chlorite-MMI and HOCl-ClO2(-) reactions. This explains the oligo-oscillations in ClO2 concentrations. PMID:27126471

  20. Notch1 deficiency decreases hepatic lipid accumulation by induction of fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Song, No-Joon; Yun, Ui Jeong; Yang, Sunghee; Wu, Chunyan; Seo, Cho-Rong; Gwon, A-Ryeong; Baik, Sang-Ha; Choi, Yuri; Choi, Bo Youn; Bahn, Gahee; Kim, Suji; Kwon, So-Mi; Park, Jin Su; Baek, Seung Hyun; Park, Tae Joo; Yoon, Keejung; Kim, Byung-Joon; Mattson, Mark P; Lee, Sung-Joon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling pathways modulate various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and communication. Recent studies have demonstrated that Notch1 signaling also regulates hepatic glucose production and lipid synthesis. However, the effect of Notch1 signaling on hepatic lipid oxidation has not yet been directly investigated. To define the function of Notch1 signaling in hepatic lipid metabolism, wild type mice and Notch1 deficient antisense transgenic (NAS) mice were fed a high-fat diet. High-fat diet -fed NAS mice exhibited a marked reduction in hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation compared with wild type obese mice. The improved fatty liver was associated with an increased expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. However, lipogenic genes were not differentially expressed in the NAS liver, suggesting lipolytic-specific regulatory effects by Notch1 signaling. Expression of fatty acid oxidative genes and the rate of fatty acid oxidation were also increased by inhibition of Notch1 signaling in HepG2 cells. In addition, similar regulatory effects on lipid accumulation were observed in adipocytes. Taken together, these data show that inhibition of Notch1 signaling can regulate the expression of fatty acid oxidation genes and may provide therapeutic strategies in obesity-induced hepatic steatosis. PMID:26786165

  1. Notch1 deficiency decreases hepatic lipid accumulation by induction of fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Song, No-Joon; Yun, Ui Jeong; Yang, Sunghee; Wu, Chunyan; Seo, Cho-Rong; Gwon, A-Ryeong; Baik, Sang-Ha; Choi, Yuri; Choi, Bo Youn; Bahn, Gahee; Kim, Suji; Kwon, So-Mi; Park, Jin Su; Baek, Seung Hyun; Park, Tae Joo; Yoon, Keejung; Kim, Byung-Joon; Mattson, Mark P.; Lee, Sung-Joon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling pathways modulate various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and communication. Recent studies have demonstrated that Notch1 signaling also regulates hepatic glucose production and lipid synthesis. However, the effect of Notch1 signaling on hepatic lipid oxidation has not yet been directly investigated. To define the function of Notch1 signaling in hepatic lipid metabolism, wild type mice and Notch1 deficient antisense transgenic (NAS) mice were fed a high-fat diet. High-fat diet -fed NAS mice exhibited a marked reduction in hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation compared with wild type obese mice. The improved fatty liver was associated with an increased expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. However, lipogenic genes were not differentially expressed in the NAS liver, suggesting lipolytic-specific regulatory effects by Notch1 signaling. Expression of fatty acid oxidative genes and the rate of fatty acid oxidation were also increased by inhibition of Notch1 signaling in HepG2 cells. In addition, similar regulatory effects on lipid accumulation were observed in adipocytes. Taken together, these data show that inhibition of Notch1 signaling can regulate the expression of fatty acid oxidation genes and may provide therapeutic strategies in obesity-induced hepatic steatosis. PMID:26786165

  2. Acidic Ultrafine Tungsten Oxide Molecular Wires for Cellulosic Biomass Conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Sadakane, Masahiro; Hiyoshi, Norihito; Yoshida, Akihiro; Hara, Michikazu; Ueda, Wataru

    2016-08-22

    The application of nanocatalysis based on metal oxides for biomass conversion is of considerable interest in fundamental research and practical applications. New acidic transition-metal oxide molecular wires were synthesized for the conversion of cellulosic biomass. The ultrafine molecular wires were constructed by repeating (NH4 )2 [XW6 O21 ] (X=Te or Se) along the length, exhibiting diameters of only 1.2 nm. The nanowires dispersed in water and were observed using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Acid sites were created by calcination without collapse of the molecular wire structure. The acidic molecular wire exhibited high activity and stability and promoted the hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond. Various biomasses including cellulose were able to be converted to hexoses as main products. PMID:27482857

  3. Mechanistic study of electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at platinum in acidic solution by time-resolved surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samjeské, Gabor; Miki, Atsushi; Ye, Shen; Osawa, Masatoshi

    2006-08-24

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) combined with cyclic voltammetry or chronoamperometry has been utilized to examine kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid on a polycrystalline Pt surface at the molecular scale. Formate is adsorbed on the electrode in a bridge configuration in parallel to the adsorption of linear and bridge CO produced by dehydration of formic acid. A solution-exchange experiment using isotope-labeled formic acids (H(12)COOH and H(13)COOH) reveals that formic acid is oxidized to CO(2) via adsorbed formate and the decomposition (oxidation) of formate to CO(2) is the rate-determining step of the reaction. The adsorption/oxidation of CO and the oxidation/reduction of the electrode surface strongly affect the formic acid oxidation by blocking active sites for formate adsorption and also by retarding the decomposition of adsorbed formate. The interplay of the involved processes also affects the kinetics and complicates the cyclic voltammograms of formic acid oxidation. The complex voltammetric behavior is comprehensively explained at the molecular scale by taking all these effects into account. PMID:16913790

  4. Texture-dependent anaerobic microsites constrain soil carbon oxidation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Soil texture, which is a product of parent material, climate and other soil forming factors, is a predictor for long-term storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) storage in many soil ecosystems. Positive correlation between texture (particularly clay content) and SOC storage have long been attributed to protective associations between clay minerals and organic compounds that prevent microbial and enzymatic access - a mechanism commonly referred to as 'mineral protection'. Texture therefore acts as the primary proxy for mineral protection in terrestrial ecosystem models used to assess SOC storage and its sensitivity to global change impacts. Here we show that this protective effect of texture is not only due to mineral protection, but also to the formation of anaerobic microsites. Combining micro-scale laboratory experiments with field-scale observations, we find that oxygen diffusion limitations within clay-rich domains create anaerobic microsites within seemingly well-aerated soils, shifting microbial metabolism to less efficient anaerobic SOC oxidation pathways. Kinetic and thermodynamic constraints reduce SOC oxidation rates within these anaerobic microsites by an order of magnitude relative to aerobic rates, and caused the preservation of bioavailable, polymeric and reduced organic compounds. Lifting these metabolic constraints through increased soil aeration (e.g., through changes in precipitation patterns or land use) may stimulate microbial oxidation of this inherently bioavailable SOC pool. Models that attribute the effects of texture merely to 'mineral protection' may therefore underestimate the vulnerability of soil C to global change impacts.

  5. Gas Adsorption Properties of Graphene-Oxide-Frameworks and Nanoporous Benzene-Boronic Acid Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burress, Jacob; Simmons, Jason; Ford, Jamie; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-03-01

    There has been a recent resurgence in graphene oxide research as a potential route to large scale graphene synthesis. Recent research has also used dehydration reactions of boronic acids for the formation of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) and other new nanoporous materials. We are trying to synthesize graphene-oxide-frameworks (GOFs) by linking the OH groups on graphene oxide with benzene-boronic acids. Our initial x-ray studies indicate that the benzene-boronic acids are successfully incorporated into graphene-oxide (GO) layers expanding the interlayer spacing up to 12 Ang. We also found that the amorphous phases of bare dehydrated benzene-boronic acid polymers (amorphous borocarbons, ABCs) show quite interesting and unusual hydrogen adsorption behavior. The diffusion of hydrogen into the sample is thermally activated. While there is no adsorption at 30 K, the rate of excess adsorption increases with increasing temperature up to 70 K. We will present detailed high-pressure isotherms of H2/CO2/Methane at different temperatures of these interesting new GOF materials and dehydrated boronic acid polymers.

  6. Incomplete free fatty acid oxidation by ascites tumor cells under low oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Ookhtens, M; Baker, N

    1983-01-01

    We tried to understand why our earlier estimates of fatty acid (FA) oxidation rates under the nearly anaerobic state of the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) in vivo were even greater than those found in vitro under aerobic conditions. Using tracers [1-14C]linoleate, [1-14C]-, and [9,10-3H]palmitate, and NaH14CO3, we estimated essential and nonessential FA oxidation rates to CO2 + H2O by EAT in living mice and in vitro under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Sequestration of intraperitoneally (ip)-injected 14C-FFA allowed a selective labeling of the tumor versus the host; thus, breath 14CO2 could be used to estimate the maximum rate of FA oxidation in vivo by the tumor. Initially, we measured breath 14CO2 following NaH14CO3 injections and developed a multicompartmental model to simulate the tumor-host HCO-3-CO2 system. This model was integrated with our earlier model for tumor FA turnover. The integrated model was fitted to breath 14CO2 data from mice injected ip with 14C-FFA to compute tumor FA oxidation rates. Both essential and nonessential FA were oxidized to CO2 at similar rates. The maximum rate of total FA oxidation to CO2 was 5-6 nmol FA X min-1 X 7-ml tumor-1, about 5-10 times lower than all previous estimates obtained in vitro and in vivo. To resolve this dilemma we used doubly labeled [1-14C; 9,10-3H]palmitate and found that under aerobic conditions, in vitro, EAT formed 3H2O and 14CO2 at nearly equal rates. These rates were suppressed markedly but unequally at low PO2. Anaerobic suppression of 14CO2 formation greatly exceeded that of 3H2O formation. As a result 3H2O/14CO2 reached a value of congruent to 10 at low PO2. Our data indicate that under the nearly anaerobic conditions of a growing EAT in vivo, the partial beta-oxidation of FA to 2C + H2O takes place at a 5 to 10 times faster rate than the complete oxidation of FA to CO2 + H2O. This finding can account for earlier apparent inconsistencies in the literature, since aerobic studies of 14C-FA oxidation

  7. Induction of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and fatty acid oxidation by retinoic acid in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Amengual, Jaume; Petrov, Petar; Bonet, M Luisa; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2012-11-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) is an important regulator of mammalian adiposity and lipid metabolism, primarily acting at the gene expression level through nuclear receptors of the RA receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamilies. Here, we studied cell-autonomous effects of RA on fatty acid metabolism, particularly fatty acid oxidation, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Exposure to all-trans RA (ATRA) up-regulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT1-L) in HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and increased cellular oxidation rate of exogenously added radiolabeled palmitate. The effect of ATRA on gene expression of CPT1-L was: dependent on ongoing transcription, reproduced by both 9-cis RA and a pan-RXR agonist (but not a pan-RAR agonist) and abolished following RXRα partial siRNA-mediated silencing. CPT1-L gene expression was synergistically induced in HepG2 cells simultaneously exposed to ATRA and a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist. We conclude that ATRA treatment enhances fatty acid catabolism in hepatocytes through RXR-mediated mechanisms that likely involve the transactivation of the PPARα:RXR heterodimer. Knowledge of agents and nutrient-derivatives capable of enhancing substrate oxidation systemically and specifically in liver, and their mechanisms of action, may contribute to new avenues of prevention and treatment of fatty liver, obesity and other metabolic syndrome-related disorders. PMID:22871568

  8. Decomposition of phenylarsonic acid by AOP processes: degradation rate constants and by-products.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, K; Czaplicka, M; Bratek, Ł

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents results of the studies photodegradation, photooxidation, and oxidation of phenylarsonic acid (PAA) in aquatic solution. The water solutions, which consist of 2.7 g dm(-3) phenylarsonic acid, were subjected to advance oxidation process (AOP) in UV, UV/H2O2, UV/O3, H2O2, and O3 systems under two pH conditions. Kinetic rate constants and half-life of phenylarsonic acid decomposition reaction are presented. The results from the study indicate that at pH 2 and 7, PAA degradation processes takes place in accordance with the pseudo first order kinetic reaction. The highest rate constants (10.45 × 10(-3) and 20.12 × 10(-3)) and degradation efficiencies at pH 2 and 7 were obtained at UV/O3 processes. In solution, after processes, benzene, phenol, acetophenone, o-hydroxybiphenyl, p-hydroxybiphenyl, benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, and biphenyl were identified. PMID:24824504

  9. Oxidation of benzene with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with ferrocene in the presence of pyrazine carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shul'pina, L. S.; Durova, E. L.; Kozlov, Yu. N.; Kudinov, A. R.; Strelkova, T. V.; Shul'pin, G. B.

    2013-12-01

    It is found that ferrocene in the presence of small amounts of pyrazine carboxylic acid (PCA) effectively catalyzes the oxidation of benzene to phenol with hydrogen peroxide. Two main differences upon the oxidation of two different substrates, i.e., cyclohexane and benzene, with the same H2O2-ferrocene-PCA catalytic system are revealed: the rates of benzene oxidation and hydrogen peroxide decomposition are several times lower than the rate of cyclohexane oxidation at close concentrations of both substrates, and the rate constant ratios for the reactions of oxidizing particles with benzene and acetonitrile are significantly lower than would be expected for reactions involving free hydroxyl radicals. The overall rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition, including both the catalase and oxidase routes, is lower in the presence of benzene than in the presence of cyclohexane. It is suggested on the grounds of these data that a catalytically active particle different from the one generated in the absence of benzene is formed in the presence of benzene. This particle catalyzes hydrogen peroxide decomposition less efficiently than the initial complex and generates a dissimilar oxidizing particle that exhibits higher selectivity. It is shown that reactivity of the system at higher concentrations of benzene differs from that of an initial system not containing an aromatic component with the capability of π-coordination with metal ions.

  10. Role of CoA and acetyl-CoA in regulating cardiac fatty acid and glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Abo Alrob, Osama; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    CoA (coenzyme A) and its derivatives have a critical role in regulating cardiac energy metabolism. This includes a key role as a substrate and product in the energy metabolic pathways, as well as serving as an allosteric regulator of cardiac energy metabolism. In addition, the CoA ester malonyl-CoA has an important role in regulating fatty acid oxidation, secondary to inhibiting CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) 1, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial fatty acid uptake. Alterations in malonyl-CoA synthesis by ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and degradation by MCD (malonyl-CoA decarboxylase) are important contributors to the high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, obesity and diabetes. Additional control of fatty acid oxidation may also occur at the level of acetyl-CoA involvement in acetylation of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes. We find that acetylation of the fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes, LCAD (long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and β-HAD (β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) is associated with an increase in activity and fatty acid oxidation in heart from obese mice with heart failure. This is associated with decreased SIRT3 (sirtuin 3) activity, an important mitochondrial deacetylase. In support of this, cardiac SIRT3 deletion increases acetylation of LCAD and β-HAD, and increases cardiac fatty acid oxidation. Acetylation of MCD is also associated with increased activity, decreases malonyl-CoA levels and an increase in fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these data suggest that malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA have an important role in mediating the alterations in fatty acid oxidation seen in heart failure. PMID:25110000

  11. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-28

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (E(p), 1.10 ≤ E(p) ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (t(p), 10(0) ≤ t(p) ≤ 10(4) s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (d(ox)). Because X1 > d(ox) for the entire range of E(p), t(p), and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Pt(δ+)-O(δ-) surface dipole (μ(PtO)), and the potential drop (V(ox)) and electric field (E(ox)) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide. PMID:25362330

  12. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  13. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Scafidi, Susanna; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2016-06-28

    The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2(L-/-)), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2(L-/-) mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2(L-/-) mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting. PMID:27320917

  14. Electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at an ordered intermetallic PtBi surface.

    PubMed

    Casado-Rivera, Emerilis; Gál, Zoltán; Angelo, A C D; Lind, Cora; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2003-02-17

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at a PtBi ordered intermetallic electrode surface has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). The results are compared to those at a polycrystalline platinum electrode surface. The PtBi electrode exhibits superior properties when compared to polycrystalline platinum in terms of oxidation onset potential, current density, and a much diminished poisoning effect by CO. Using the RDE technique, a value of 1.4 x 10(-4) cm s-1 was obtained for the heterogeneous charge transfer rate constant. The PtBi surface did not appear to be poisoned when exposed to a CO saturated solution for periods exceeding 0.5 h. The results for PtBi are discussed within the framework of the dual-path mechanism for the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid, which involves formation of a reactive intermediate and a poisoning pathway. PMID:12619419

  15. Magnesium Oxide Carbonation Rate Law in Saturated Brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemer, M. B.; Allen, C.; Deng, H.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) is the only engineered barrier certified by the EPA for emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a U.S. Department of Energy repository for transuranic waste in southeast New Mexico. MgO reduces actinide solubility by sequestering CO2 generated by the biodegradation of cellulosic, plastic, and rubber materials. Demonstration of the effectiveness of MgO is essential for WIPP recertification. In order to be an effective barrier, the rate of CO2 sequestration should be fast compared to the rate CO2 production, over the entire 10,000 year regulatory period. While much research has been conducted on the kinetics of magnesium oxide carbonation in waters with salinity up to that of sea water, we are not aware of any work on determining the carbonation rate law in saturated brines at low partial pressures of CO2 (PCO2 as low as 10-5.5 atm), which is important for performing safety assessments of bedded salt waste repositories. Using a Varian ion-trap gas- chromatograph/mass-spectrometer (GC/MS) we experimentally followed the CO2 sequestration kinetics of magnesium oxide in salt-saturated brines down to a PCO2 as low as 10-5.5 atm. This was performed in a closed reactor with a known initial PCO2. The results of this study show that carbonation is approximately first order in PCO2, in saturated brines. We believe that this method will benefit the study of the detailed kinetics of other similar processes.

  16. Surface acidity of silica-titania mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Odenbrand, C.U.I.; Brandin, J.G.M. ); Busca, G. )

    1992-06-01

    A study of the acidity of coprecipitated SiO[sub 2]-TiO[sub 2] oxides is presented. The amount of acidity has been determined by ammonia adsorption at 150 C. The acidity was also characterized by TPD of adsorbed ammonia and by infrared spectroscopy of various adsorbed probes, such as pivalonitrile, pyridine, ammonia, and n-butylamine. From the quantitative measurements of adsorption of ammonia and from TPD it was concluded that the SiO[sub 2]-TiO[sub 2] mixture can be regarded as a mechanical mixture of silica and titania. However, the IR investigation showed that Ti enters in small amounts into the silica framework. This results in formation of very strong Lewis acid sites, caused by incomplete tetrahedral coordination of Ti[sup 4[minus

  17. Intrinsic activity and poisoning rate for HCOOH oxidation on platinum stepped surfaces.

    PubMed

    Grozovski, Vitali; Climent, Víctor; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2010-08-21

    Pulsed voltammetry has been used to study formic acid oxidation on platinum stepped surfaces to determine the kinetics of the reaction and the role of the surface structure in the reactivity. From the current transients at different potentials, the intrinsic activity of the electrode through the active intermediate reaction path (j(theta = 0)), as well as the rate constant for the CO formation (k(ads)) have been calculated. The kinetics for formic acid oxidation through the active intermediate reaction path is strongly dependent on the surface structure of the electrode, with the highest activity found for the Pt(100) surface. The presence of steps, both on (100) and (111) terraces, does not increase the activity of these surfaces. CO formation only takes place in a narrow potential window very close to the local potential of zero total charge. The extrapolation of the results obtained with stepped surfaces with (111) terraces to zero step density indicates that CO formation should not occur on an ideal Pt(111) electrode. Additionally, the analysis of the Tafel slopes obtained for the different electrodes suggests that the oxidation of formic acid is strongly affected by the presence of adsorbed anions, hydrogen and water. PMID:20539876

  18. Microbial Methane Oxidation Rates in Guandu Wetland of northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling; Lin, Li-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Wetland is one of the major sources of atmospheric methane. The exact magnitude of methane emission is essentially controlled by microbial processes. Besides of methanogenesis, methanotrophy oxidizes methane with the reduction of various electron acceptors under oxic or anoxic conditions. The interplay of these microbial activities determines the final methane flux under different circumstances. In a tidal wetland, the cyclic flooding and recession of tide render oxygen and sulfate the dominant electron acceptors for methane oxidation. However, the details have not been fully examined, especially for the linkage between potential methane oxidation rates and in situ condition. In this study, a sub-tropical wetland in northern Taiwan, Guandu, was chosen to examine the tidal effect on microbial methane regulation. Several sediment cores were retrieved during high tide and low tide period and their geochemical profiles were characterized to demonstrate in situ microbial activities. Incubation experiments were conducted to estimate potential aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in surface and core sediments. Sediment cores collected in high tide and low tide period showed different geochemical characteristics, owning to tidal inundation. Chloride and sulfate concentration were lower during low tide period. A spike of enhanced sulfate at middle depth intervals was sandwiched by two sulfate depleted zones above and underneath. Methane was accumulated significantly with two methane depletion zones nearly mirroring the sulfate spike zone identified. During the high tide period, sulfate decreased slightly with depth with methane production inhibited at shallow depths. However, a methane consumption zone still occurred near the surface. Potential aerobic methane oxidation rates were estimated between 0.7 to 1.1 μmole/g/d, showing no difference between the samples collected at high tide or low tide period. However, a lag phase was widely observed and the lag phase

  19. Nitroaromatic amino acids as inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Cowart, M; Kowaluk, E A; Daanen, J F; Kohlhaas, K L; Alexander, K M; Wagenaar, F L; Kerwin, J F

    1998-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO.) is an important biomodulator of many physiological processes. The inhibition of inappropriate production of NO. by the isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of stroke, inflammation, and other processes. In this study, certain 2-nitroaryl-substituted amino acid analogues were discovered to inhibit NOS. Analogues bearing a 5-methyl substituent on the aromatic ring demonstrated maximal inhibitory potency. For two selected inhibitors, investigation of the kinetics of the enzyme showed the inhibition to be competitive with l-arginine. Additionally, functional NOS inhibition in tissue preparations was demonstrated. PMID:9651169

  20. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA. PMID:26662863

  1. Antioxidant modulation of oxidant-stimulated uptake and release of arachidonic acid in eicosapentaenoic acid-supplemented human lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, Oluwakemi; Black, Kenneth D; Glen, Iain; Ross, Brian M

    2007-02-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are increasingly finding use as treatments for a variety of medical conditions. PUFA supplementation can, however, result in increased oxidative stress causing elevated turnover rate of membrane phospholipids, impairment of membrane integrity and increased formation of inflammatory mediators. The aim of this study was to determine which antioxidant compounds were most effective in ameliorating the stimulation of phospholipid turnover by oxidative stress. U937 cells were supplemented with eicosapentaenoic acid and either ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene or astaxanthin prior to being challenged with oxidant. Although all antioxidants were found to be effective in decreasing oxidant-stimulated peroxide formation, only alpha-tocopherol significantly decreased oxidant-stimulated release of 3H-labeled arachidonic acid (AA), while ascorbic acid markedly increased release. All antioxidants except alpha-tocopherol decreased oxidant-stimulated 3H-AA uptake. Our data suggest that antioxidants are not equally effective in combating the effects of oxidative stress upon membrane phospholipid turnover, and that optimal protection will require mixtures of antioxidants. PMID:17198751

  2. Interactions of humic acid with nanosized inorganic oxides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2009-04-01

    Adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on nanoparticles (NPs) is important for evaluating their transport, transfer, and fate in the environment, which will also affect sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) by NPs and thereby potentially alter the toxicity of NPs and the fate, transport, and bioavailability of HOCs in the environment. Therefore, the adsorption behavior of humic acids (HA) by four types of nano-oxides (i.e., TiO2, SiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO) was examined in this study to explore their interaction mechanisms using techniques including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and elemental, zeta potential, and surface area analyses. Adsorption of HA was observed on nanosized TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO but not on nano-SiO2. Furthermore, HA adsorption was pH-dependent. HA adsorption by nano-oxides was mainly induced by electrostatic attraction and ligand exchange between HA and nano-oxide surfaces. Surface hydrophilicity and negative charges of nano-oxides affected their adsorption of HA. However, the maxima of HA adsorption on nano-oxides were limited by the surface area of nano-oxides. HA phenolic OH and COOH groups were responsible for its ligand exchange with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO, respectively, while either HA COOH or HA phenolic/aliphatic OH was responsible for its ligand exchange with nano-Al2O3. HA adsorption decreased the micropore surface area of nano-oxides but not the external surface area because of the micropore blockage. HA adsorption also decreased the zeta potential of nano-oxides, indicating that HA-coated nano-oxides could be more easily dispersed and suspended and more stable in solution than uncoated ones because of their enhanced electrostatic repulsion. PMID:19708146

  3. Hepatic alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid. A revised pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Veldhoven, P P; Mannaerts, G P; Casteels, M; Croes, K

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic 3-methyl-branched chain fatty acids were used to decipher the breakdown of phytanic acid. Based on results obtained in intact or permeabilized rat hepatocytes, rat liver homogenates or subcellular fractions, a revised alpha-oxidation pathway is proposed which appears to be functioning in man as well. In a first step, the 3-methyl-branched chain fatty acid is activated by an acyl-CoA synthetase. This reaction requires CoA, ATP and Mg2+. Subsequently, the acyl-CoA ester is hydroxylated at position 2 by a peroxisomal dioxygenase. This step is dependent on alpha-oxoglutarate, ascorbate (or glutathione), Fe2+ and O2. The 2-hydroxy-3-methylacyl-CoA intermediate is cleaved by a peroxisomal lyase to formyl-CoA and a 2-methyl-branched fatty aldehyde. Formyl-CoA is (partly enzymically) hydrolyzed to formate, which is then converted, most likely in the cytosol, to CO2. In the presence of NAD+, the aldehyde is dehydrogenated to a 2-methyl-branched fatty acid, presumably by a peroxisomal aldehyde dehydrogenase. This acid can--after activation--be degraded via a D-specific peroxisomal beta-oxidation system. PMID:10709654

  4. Effects of intravenous methyl palmoxirate on the turnover and oxidation of fatty acids in conscious dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.; Jensen, M.D.; Miles, J.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Methyl palmoxirate (MP) is a member of a class of hypoglycemic agents that inhibit fatty acid oxidation in vitro. The studies presented here were undertaken to determine the effects of intravenous (IV) MP on tracer-determined rates of fatty acid oxidation and systemic adipose tissue lipolysis in dogs. MP (40 mg/kg) was administered IV to five mongrel dogs using a primed continuous infusion of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitate to determine palmitate kinetics. Palmitate concentration and rate of appearance decreased rapidly (from 155 +/- 25 to 47 +/- 6 mumol/L and 2.9 +/- 0.5 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1, respectively, at 15 minutes, both P less than .05). Palmitate oxidation also decreased, from 1.5 +/- 0.4 to 0.3 +/- 0.1 mumol.kg-1.min-1, P less than .05. Oxidative clearance decreased by approximately 50% 90 minutes after MP administration (P less than .05). Fractional oxidation of palmitate also decreased by approximately 40% (P less than .05). Plasma insulin increased from 45 +/- 6 to 240 +/- 93 pmol/L at 15 minutes (P less than .05). Plasma glucose decreased over the course of study by approximately 20% (P less than .05). In summary, MP has a specific inhibitory effect on plasma free fatty acid (FFA) oxidation in dogs, confirming previous in vitro observations in an in vivo model. In addition, it has a potent antilipolytic effect when administered IV, an effect likely mediated by stimulation of insulin secretion. The observation that systemic FFA oxidation was only partially suppressed at this relatively high dose of MP is consistent with previous studies suggesting that MP may exert its major effect in the liver, and may be less potent in extrahepatic tissues.

  5. Enhanced formic acid oxidation on Cu-Pd nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin; Zou, Shouzhong

    Developing catalysts with high activity and high resistance to surface poisoning remains a challenge in direct formic acid fuel cell research. In this work, copper-palladium nanoparticles were formed through a galvanic replacement process. After electrochemically selective dissolution of surface Cu, Pd-enriched Cu-Pd nanoparticles were formed. These particles exhibit much higher formic acid oxidation activities than that on pure Pd nanoparticles, and they are much more resistant to the surface poisoning. Possible mechanisms of catalytic activity enhancement are briefly discussed.

  6. Roles of urea production, ammonium excretion, and amino acid oxidation in acid-base balance.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, W

    1986-02-01

    Atkinson and colleagues recently proposed several concepts that contrast with traditional views: first, that acid-base balance is regulated chiefly by the reactions leading to urea production in the liver; second, that ammonium excretion by the kidney plays no role in acid-base homeostasis; and third, that ammonium does not stimulate ureagenesis (except indirectly). To examine these concepts, plasma ions other than bicarbonate are categorized as 1) fixed cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, symbolized M+) and anions (Cl-), 2) buffer anions (A-), 3) other anions (X-), and 4) ammonium plus charged amino groups (N+). Since electroneutrality dictates that M+ + N+ = Cl- + HCO3- + A- + X-, it follows that delta HCO3- = delta(M+ - Cl-) - delta A- - delta X- + delta N+. Therefore acid-base disturbances (changes in HCO3-) can be categorized as to how they affect bodily content and hence plasma concentration of each of these four types of ions. The stoichiometry of ureagenesis, glutamine hydrolysis, ammonium and titratable acid excretion, oxidation of neutral, acidic, and basic amino acids, and oxidation of methionine, phosphoserine, and protein are examined to see how they alter these quantities. It is concluded that 1) although ureagenesis is pH dependent and also counteracts a tendency of amino acid oxidation to cause alkalosis, this tendency is inherently limited by the hyperammonemia (delta N+) that necessarily accompanies it, 2) ammonium excretion is equivalent to hydrogen excretion in its effects on acid-base balance if, and only if, it occurs in exchange for sodium or is accompanied by chloride excretion and only when the glutamate generated by glutamine hydrolysis is oxidized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3511732

  7. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M S; Larsen, F; Postma, D

    2001-10-15

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4 x 10(-10) mol FeS2/g x s are measured, and the rates are only weakly correlated with the sediment pyrite content. The reactivity of pyrite, including the inhibition by FeOOH layers formed on its surface, apparently has a major effect on the rate of oxidation. The code PHREEQC 2.0 was used to calculate the reaction stoichiometry and partitioning of gases between the solution and the gas phase. Pyrite oxidation with concurrent calcite dissolution was found to be consistent with the experimental data while organic carbon oxidation was not. The reaction involves changes in the total volume of the gas phase. The reaction scheme predicts the volume of O2 gas consumed to be larger than of CO2 produced. In addition the solubility of CO2 in water is about 30 times larger than of O2 causing a further decrease in total gas volume. The change in total gas volume therefore also depends on the gas/water volume ratio and the lower the ratio the more pronounced the loss of volume will be. Under field conditions the change in total volume may amount up to 20% in the absence of calcite and over 10% in the presence of calcite. Such changes in gas volume during the oxidation of pyrite are expected to result in pressure gradients causing advective transport of gaseous oxygen. PMID:11686369

  8. Long-chain fatty acid combustion rate is associated with unique metabolite profiles in skeletal muscle mitochondria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incomplete or limited long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) combustion in skeletal muscle has been associated with insulin resistance. Signals that are responsive to shifts in LCFA beta-oxidation rate or degree of intramitochondrial catabolism are hypothesized to regulate second messenger systems downstream...

  9. Biological reactivity and biomarkers of the neutrophil oxidant, hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C

    2002-12-27

    Free radicals or reactive oxygen species are thought to contribute to the pathology of many diseases. These include inflammatory conditions, where neutrophils accumulate in large numbers and are stimulated to produce superoxide and other reactive oxidants. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by myeloperoxidase-catalysed oxidation of chloride by hydrogen peroxide, is the major strong oxidant generated by these cells. Neutrophil-mediated injury may also be important in toxicology when an initial insult is followed by an inflammatory response. It is important to characterize the inflammatory component of such injury and the extent to which it involves reactive oxidants. On the one hand, this requires an understanding of how neutrophil oxidants react with cells and tissue constituents. On the other, specific biomarkers are needed so that oxidative damage can be quantified in clinical material and related to disease severity. This presentation considers biologically relevant reactions of HOCl and the biomarker assays that can be applied to probing the pathological role of myeloperoxidase and its products. PMID:12505315

  10. The Aerobic Oxidation of Bromide to Dibromine Catalyzed by Homogeneous Oxidation Catalysts and Initiated by Nitrate in Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Partenheimer, Walt; Fulton, John L.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Pham, Van Thai; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-06-01

    A small amount of nitrate, ~0.002 molal, initiates the Co/Mn catalyzed aerobic oxidation of bromide compounds (HBr,NaBr,LiBr) to dibromine in acetic acid at room temperature. At temperatures 40oC or less , the reaction is autocatalytic. Co(II) and Mn(II) themselves and mixed with ionic bromide are known homogeneous oxidation catalysts. The reaction was discovered serendipitously when a Co/Br and Co/Mn/Br catalyst solution was prepared for the aerobic oxidation of methyaromatic compounds and the Co acetate contained a small amount of impurity i.e. nitrate. The reaction was characterized by IR, UV-VIS, MALDI and EXAFS spectroscopies and the coordination chemistry is described. The reaction is inhibited by water and its rate changed by pH. The change in these variables, as well as others, are identical to those observed during homogeneous, aerobic oxidation of akylaromatics. A mechanism is proposed. Accidental addition of a small amount of nitrate compound into a Co/Mn/Br/acetic acid mixture in a large, commercial feedtank is potentially dangerous.

  11. Formation of phenol under conditions of the reaction of oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinovsky, I.O.; Leshcheva, A.N.; Pogorelov, V.V.; Gelbshtein, A.I.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes conditions for the oxidation of benzene to phenol. It is shown that a reaction mixture of water, carbon monoxide, and oxygen are essential to the oxidation. The oxidation is a side reaction found to occur during the oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid in a medium of trifluoroacetic acid.

  12. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-12-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable.

  13. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable. PMID:24310650

  14. Proteomics-Based Metabolic Modeling Reveals That Fatty Acid Oxidation (FAO) Controls Endothelial Cell (EC) Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T.; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J.; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability. PMID:25573745

  15. Proteomics-based metabolic modeling reveals that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) controls endothelial cell (EC) permeability.

    PubMed

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability. PMID:25573745

  16. Influence of oxidation on fulvic acids composition and biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Kozyatnyk, Ivan; Świetlik, Joanna; Raczyk-Stanisławiak, Ursula; Dąbrowska, Agata; Klymenko, Nataliya; Nawrocki, Jacek

    2013-08-01

    Oxidation is well-known process of transforming natural organic matter during the treatment of drinking water. Chlorine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide are common oxidants used in water treatment technologies for this purpose. We studied the influence of different doses of these oxidants on by-products formation and changes in biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of fulvic acids (FA) with different BDOC content. Chlorination did not significantly change the MWD of FA and disinfection by-products formation. However, higher molecular weight compounds, than those in the initial FA, were formed. It could be a result of chlorine substitution into the FA structure. Chlorine dioxide oxidized FA stronger than chlorine. During ozonation of FA, we found the highest increase of BDOD due to the formation of a high amount of organic acids and aldehydes. FA molecules were transformed into a more biodegradable form. Ozonation is the most preferable process among those observed for pre-treatment of FA before biofiltration. PMID:23746389

  17. Electro-oxidation of methanol on Pt(111) in acid solutions: effects of electrolyte anions during electrocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Ito, Masatoki

    1995-10-01

    The electro-oxidation of methanol on a Pt(111) surface in both sulfuric and perchloric acid solutions was investigated by combined apparatus under both ultra-high vacuum and electrochemical environments. In sulfuric acid solution, a strong lateral interaction was observed between adsorbed bisulfate and CO derived from methanol. Coadsorption of CO derived from methanol with bisulfate ion yielded a (√7 × √7)-R19.1°-CO-bisulfate structure. In perchloric acid solution, however, no lateral interaction between adsorbed CO and perchlorate was seen. The difference in reaction rates of methanol oxidation in both solutions was explained by these specific anion adsorption effects.

  18. Rosiglitazone increases fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) but not carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in rat muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Carley R; Holloway, Graham P; Campbell, S E; Yoshida, Yuko; Tandon, Narendra N; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) alter the expression of genes involved in regulating lipid metabolism. Rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, induces tissue-specific effects on lipid metabolism; however, its mode of action in skeletal muscle remains unclear. Since fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) was recently identified as a possible regulator of skeletal muscle fatty acid transport and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, we examined in this tissue the effects of rosiglitazone infusion (7 days, 1 mg day−1) on FAT/CD36 mRNA and protein, its plasmalemmal content and fatty acid transport. In addition, in isolated subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria we examined rates of fatty acid oxidation, FAT/CD36 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) protein, and CPTI and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activities. Rosiglitazone did not alter FAT/CD36 mRNA or protein expression, FAT/CD36 plasmalemmal content, or the rate of fatty acid transport into muscle (P > 0.05). In contrast, rosiglitazone increased the rates of fatty acid oxidation in both SS (+21%) and IMF mitochondria (+36%). This was accompanied by concomitant increases in FAT/CD36 in subsarcolemmal (SS) (+43%) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria (+46%), while SS and IMF CPTI protein content, and CPTI submaximal and maximal activities (P > 0.05) were not altered. Similarly, citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD activities were also not altered by rosiglitazone in SS and IMF mitochondria (P > 0.05). These studies provide another example whereby changes in mitochondrial fatty oxidation are associated with concomitant changes in mitochondrial FAT/CD36 independent of any changes in CPTI. Moreover, these studies identify for the first time a mechanism by which rosiglitazone stimulates fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, namely the chronic, subcellular relocation of FAT/CD36 to mitochondria. PMID:18238811

  19. Field rates for natural attenuation of arsenic in Tinto Santa Rosa acid mine drainage (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Asta, Maria P; Ayora, Carlos; Acero, Patricia; Cama, Jordi

    2010-05-15

    Reactive transport modelling of the main processes related to the arsenic natural attenuation observed in the acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted stream of Tinto Santa Rosa (SW Spain) was performed. Despite the simplicity of the kinetic expressions used to deal with arsenic attenuation processes, the model reproduced successfully the major chemical trends observed along the acid discharge. Results indicated that the rate of ferrous iron oxidation was similar to the one obtained in earlier field studies in which microbial catalysis is reported to occur. With regard to the scaled arsenic oxidation rate, it is one order of magnitude faster than the values obtained under laboratory conditions suggesting the existence of a catalytic agent in the natural system. Schwertmannite precipitation rate, which was represented by a simple kinetic expression relying on Fe(III) and pH, was in the range calculated for other AMD impacted sites. Finally, the obtained distribution coefficients used for representing arsenic sorption onto Fe(III) precipitates were lower than those deduced from reported laboratory data. This discrepancy is attributed to a decrease in the schwertmannite arsenate sorption capacity as sulphate increases in the solution. PMID:20153577

  20. Production of oxalic acid from sugar beet molasses by formed nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Gürü, M; Bilgesü, A Y; Pamuk, V

    2001-03-01

    Production of oxalic acid from sugar beet molasses was developed in a series of three reactors. Nitrogen oxides formed were used to manufacture oxalic acid in the second and third reactor. Parameters affecting the reaction were determined to be, air flow rate, temperature, the amount of V2O5 catalyst and the concentrations of molasses and H2SO4. The maximum yields in the second and third reactors were 78.9% and 74.6% of theoretical yield, respectively. Also, kinetic experiments were performed and the first-order rate constants were determined for the glucose consumption rate. Nitrogen oxides in off-gases from the final reactor were absorbed in water and concentrated sulphuric acid and reused in the following reactors giving slightly lower yields under similar conditions. In this novel way, it was possible to recover NO(x) and to prevent air pollution. Meanwhile, it was possible to reduce the unit cost of reactant for oxalic acid production. A maximum 77.5% and 74.1% of theoretical yield was obtained by using the absorption solutions with NO(x). PMID:11211079

  1. Pro-oxidant actions of alpha-lipoic acid and dihydrolipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Cakatay, Ufuk

    2006-01-01

    There is strong accumulating evidence that a alpha-lipoic acid (LA) supplement is good insurance, and would markedly improve human health. LA is readily absorbed from the diet, transported to cells and reduced to dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). Of the two compounds, DHLA evidently has greater antioxidant activity. Much research has focused on the antioxidant properties of these compounds. Aside from its antioxidant role, in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that LA and its reduced form DHLA also act as a pro-oxidant properties. Limited number of studies concerning the pro-oxidant potential of LA and DHLA were performed only in recent years. The ability of LA and/or DHLA to function as either anti- or pro-oxidants, at least in part, is determined by the type of oxidant stress and the physiological circumstances. These pro-oxidant actions suggest that LA and DHLA act by multiple mechanisms, many of which are only now being explored. LA has been reported to have a number of potentially beneficial effects in both prevention and treatment of oxygen-related diseases. Selection of appropriate pharmacological doses of LA for use in oxygen-related diseases is critical. On the other hand, much of the discussion in clinical studies has been devoted to the pro-oxidant role of LA. This aspect remains to be elucidated. In further studies, careful evaluation will be necessary for the decision in the biological system whether LA administration is beneficial or harmful. PMID:16165311

  2. Decoding Nitric Oxide Release Rates of Amine-Based Diazeniumdiolates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Ni; Collins, Jack; Holland, Ryan J.; Keefer, Larry K.; Ivanic, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Amine-based diazeniumdiolates (NONOates) have garnered widespread use as nitric oxide (NO) donors and their potential for nitroxyl (HNO) release has more recently been realized. While NO release rates can vary significantly with the type of amine, half-lives of seconds to days under physiological conditions, there is as yet no way to determine a priori the NO or HNO production rates of a given species and no discernible trends have manifested other than that secondary amines produce only NO (i.e., no HNO). As a step to understanding these complex systems, here we describe a procedure for modeling amine-based NONOates in water solvent that provides an excellent correlation (R2 = 0.94) between experimentally measured dissociation rates of seven secondary amine species and their computed NO release activation energies. The significant difference in behavior of NONOates in the gas and solvent phases is also rigorously demonstrated via explicit additions of quantum mechanical water molecules. The presented results suggest that the as-yet unsynthesized simplest amine-based NONOate, the diazeniumdiolated ammonia anion [H2N-N(O)=NO−], could serve as an unperturbed HNO donor. These results provide a step forward toward the accurate modeling of general NO and/or HNO donors as well as for the identification of tailored prodrug candidates. PMID:23834533

  3. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  4. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. PMID:27474618

  5. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  6. Volatile fatty acid impacts on nitrite oxidation and carbon dioxide fixation in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Merve T; Robinson, Kevin G; Layton, Alice C; Sayler, Gary S

    2006-02-01

    Batch test were performed to assess nitrite removal, nitrate formation, CO2 fixation, gaseous nitrogen production and microbial density in activated sludge exposed to volatile fatty acid (VFA) mixtures. Nitrite removal and nitrate formation were both affected by the presence of VFAs, but to different degrees. Nitrate formation rates were reduced to a greater extent (79%) than nitrite removal rates (36%) resulting in an apparent unbalanced nitrite oxidation reaction. Since the total bacterial density and the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB, Nitrospira) concentration remained essentially constant under all test conditions, the reduction in rates was not due to heterotrophic uptake of nitrogen or to a decrease in the NOB population. In contrast to the nitrogen results, VFAs were not found to impact CO2 fixation efficiency. It appeared that nitrite oxidation occurred when VFAs were present since the oxidation of nitrite provides energy for CO2 fixation. However, nitrate produced from the oxidation of nitrite was reduced to gaseous nitrogen products. N2O gas was detected in the presence of VFAs which was a clear indication that VFAs stimulated an alternative pathway, such as aerobic denitrification, during biotransformation of nitrogen in activated sludge. PMID:16436292

  7. Use of radiolabeled acetate to evaluate the rate of clearance of cerebral oxidative metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, J.L.; Kasliwal, R.; Duryea, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    Radiolabel derived from glucose (GLC) has been shown to have different cerebral retention kinetics than radiolabel derived from deoxyglucose (DG). In particular, activated structures with high metabolic rates have more rapid loss of GLC-derived radiolabel than DG-derived radiolabel. Because GLC-derived radiolabel can be lost from the brain glycolytically through lactate or oxidatively through CO{sub 2}, the cause of the difference between GLC and FDG is uncertain. We investigated the isolated oxidative pathway using radiolabeled acetate, which is only metabolized through the Krebs cycle. Male albino rats were anesthetized with halothane and femoral vein and artery catheters were placed. The rats were allowed to awaken for two hours prior to the studies. 100 uCi of {sup 14}C-acetate was administered as a 30 second IV infusion to each rat. Arterial samples were obtained at regular intervals. Groups of rats were killed at 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 minutes. Brains were rapidly removed, sectioned, and used to produce autoradiograms. The extracted and retained radiolabel was calculated as the brain concentration at time of death divided by the integral of the arterial tracer concentration. No detectable loss of radiolabel was found over the initial 10 minutes. Thereafter the rate of loss gradually increased reaching a maximum of 1.2% per minute by 60 minutes. This corresponds to a k4 rate constant of 0.012 min{sup -1}. The rate of loss of oxidative metabolites from rat brain was found to be very slow. This probably results from exchange of radiolabel with amino acid pools as the tracer is metabolized through the Krebs cycle. Therefore in conditions were glycolysis is increased out of proportion to oxidation and cerebral lactate concentration rises, radiolabel loss through lactate efflux can be a substantial fraction of overall loss.

  8. Relationship between training status and maximal fat oxidation rate.

    PubMed

    Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Romulo C M; Pires, Flavio O; Gagliardi, Joao F L; Barros, Ronaldo V; Hammond, John; Kiss, Maria A P D M

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare maximal fat oxidation rate parameters between moderate- and low-performance runners. Eighteen runners performed an incremental treadmill test to estimate individual maximal fat oxidation rate (Fatmax) based on gases measures and a 10,000-m run on a track. The subjects were then divided into a low and moderate performance group using two different criteria: 10,000-m time and VO2max values. When groups were divided using 10,000-m time, there was no significant difference in Fatmax (0.41 ± 0.16 and 0.27 ± 0.12 g.min(-1), p = 0.07) or in the exercise intensity that elicited Fatmax (59.9 ± 16.5 and 68.7 ± 10.3 % O2max, p = 0.23) between the moderate and low performance groups, respectively (p > 0.05). When groups were divided using VO2max values, Fatmax was significantly lower in the low VO2max group than in the high VO2max group (0. 29 ± 0.10 and 0.47 ± 0.17 g.min(-1), respectively, p < 0.05) but the intensity that elicited Fatmax did not differ between groups (64.4 ± 14.9 and 61.6 ± 15.4 %VO2max). Fatmax or %VO2max that elicited Fatmax was not associated with 10,000 m time. The only variable associated with 10,000-m running performance was %VO2max used during the run (p < 0.01). In conclusion, the criteria used for the division of groups according to training status might influence the identification of differences in Fatmax or in the intensity that elicits Fatmax. Key pointsThe results of the present study suggest that the criteria used to categorize aerobic training status of subjects can influence the magnitude of differences in Fatmax.The Fatmax is similar between groups with similar 10,000-m running performance.The 10,000-m running performance seems to be associated with an increased ability to oxidize carbohydrate. PMID:24149383

  9. Reactivity of aminophosphonic acids. Oxidative dephosphonylation of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids by aqueous halogens.

    PubMed

    Drabowicz, Józef; Jordan, Frank; Kudzin, Marcin H; Kudzin, Zbigniew H; Stevens, Christian V; Urbaniak, Paweł

    2016-02-01

    The reactions of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids with bromine-water, chlorine-water and iodine-water were investigated. The formation of phosphoric(v) acid, as a result of a halogen-promoted cleavage of the Cα-P bond, accompanied by nitrogen release, was observed. The dephosphonylation of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids was found to occur quantitatively. In the reactions of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids with other halogen-water reagents investigated by (31)P NMR, scission of the Cα-P bond was also observed, the reaction rates being comparable for bromine and chlorine, but much slower for iodine. PMID:26631424

  10. Relative importance of nitrite oxidation by hypochlorous acid under chloramination conditions.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E

    2012-06-01

    Nitrification can occur in water distribution systems where chloramines are used as the disinfectant. The resulting product, nitrite, can be oxidized by monochloramine and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), potentially leading to rapid monochloramine loss. This research characterizes the importance of the HOCl reaction, which has typically been ignored because of HOCl's low concentration. Also, the general acid-assisted rate constants for carbonic acid and bicarbonate ion were estimated for the monochloramine reaction. The nitrite oxidation reactions were incorporated into a widely accepted chloramine autodecomposition model, providing a comprehensive model that was implemented in AQUASIM. Batch kinetic experiments were conducted to evaluate the significance of the HOCl reaction and to estimate carbonate buffer rate constants for the monochloramine reaction. The experimental data and model simulations indicated that HOCl may be responsible for up to 60% of the nitrite oxidation, and that the relative importance of the HOCl reaction for typical chloramination conditions peaks between pH 7.5 and 8.5, generally increasing with (1) decreasing nitrite concentration, (2) increasing chlorine to nitrogen mass ratio, and (3) decreasing monochloramine concentration. Therefore, nitrite's reaction with HOCl may be important during chloramination and should be included in water quality models to simulate nitrite and monochloramine's fate. PMID:22571335

  11. Nitro-linolenic acid is a nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Carreras, Alfonso; Padilla, María N; Melguizo, Manuel; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-07-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs), which are the result of the interaction between reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and non-saturated fatty acids, constitute a new research area in plant systems, and their study has significantly increased. Very recently, the endogenous presence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) has been reported in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this regard, the signaling role of this molecule has been shown to be key in setting up a defense mechanism by inducing the chaperone network in plants. Here, we report on the ability of NO2-Ln to release nitric oxide (NO) in an aqueous medium with several approaches, such as by a spectrofluorometric probe with DAF-2, the oxyhemoglobin oxidation method, ozone chemiluminescence, and also by confocal laser scanning microscopy in Arabidopsis cell cultures. Jointly, this ability gives NO2-Ln the potential to act as a signaling molecule by the direct release of NO, due to its capacity to induce different changes mediated by NO or NO-related molecules such as nitration and S-nitrosylation or by the electrophilic capacity of these molecules through a nitroalkylation mechanism. PMID:27164295

  12. Oxidative stability of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enriched eggs.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Perez, Tulia I; Zuidhof, Martin J; Renema, Robert A; Wu, Jianping

    2013-11-27

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) enriched eggs have a growing market share in the egg industry. This study examined the stability of n-3 PUFA enriched eggs fortified with antioxidants (vitamin E or organic Selenium [Sel-Plex] or both) following cooking and storage. The total fat content was not affected by cooking or simulated retail storage conditions, whereas, n-3 fatty acids were reduced. The content of n-3 fatty acids in boiled eggs was higher than in fried eggs. Lipid oxidation was significantly affected by the different cooking methods. Fried eggs contained higher levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, 2.02 μg/kg) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs, 13.58 μg/g) compared to boiled (1.44 and 10.15 μg/kg) and raw eggs (0.95 and 9.03 μg/kg, respectively, for MDA and COPs). Supplementation of antioxidants reduced the formation of MDA by 40% and COPs by 12% in fried eggs. Although the content of MDA was significantly increased after 28 days of storage, COPs were not affected by storage. Our study indicated that the n-3 PUFA in enriched eggs was relatively stable during storage and home cooking in the presence of antioxidants. PMID:24164329

  13. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  14. Removal of arsenious acid from sulfuric acidic solution using ultrasound oxidation and goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Ryota; Hangui, Shinji; Kawamura, Youhei; Sugawara, Katsuyasu

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the properties of synthetic goethite for the adsorption of As from strongly acidic solutions in ambient atmosphere under ultrasound irradiation. The goethite was successfully synthesized from iron-containing sulfuric acidic solution (1271 ppm) using an autoclave apparatus for 1 h at 0.12 MPa and 121 °C. The ratio of the iron eluted from the synthetic goethite to the acidic solution was only 0.58% at pH 2.1. Ultrasound irradiation (200 kHz, 200 W) was applied to oxidize 10 ppm of As(III) to As(V) at pH 2.2 for 60 min under various atmospheric conditions. Remarkably, the oxidation ratio of As(III) to As(V) is quite high (89.7%) at pH 2.2 in ambient atmosphere and is close to those obtained for Ar (95.3%) and O2 (95.9%) atmospheres. The As(III) removal ratio reached 94.5% after 60 min of irradiation. Therefore, goethite is a promising material for As adsorption using ultrasound oxidation in the acidic region in ambient atmosphere.

  15. Nitric Oxide Diffusion Rate is Reduced in the Aortic Wall☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoping; Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Collard, Eric; Grajdeanu, Paula; Zweier, Jay L.; Friedman, Avner

    2008-01-01

    Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) plays important physiological roles in the body. As a small diatomic molecule, NO has been assumed to freely diffuse in tissues with a diffusion rate similar to that in water. However, this assumption has not been tested experimentally. In this study, a modified Clark-type NO electrode attached with a customized aorta holder was used to directly measure the flux of NO diffusion across the aortic wall at 37°C. Experiments were carefully designed for accurate measurements of the apparent NO diffusion coefficient D and the partition coefficient α in the aortic wall. A mathematical model was presented for analyzing experimental data. It was determined that α = 1.15 ± 0.11 and D = 848 ± 45 μm2/s (n = 12). The NO diffusion coefficient in the aortic wall is nearly fourfold smaller than the reported diffusion coefficient in solution at 37°C, indicating that NO diffusion in the vascular wall is no longer free, but markedly dependent on the environment in the tissue where these NO molecules are. These results imply that the NO diffusion rate in the vascular wall may be upregulated and downregulated by certain physiological and/or pathophysiological processes affecting the composition of tissues. PMID:18032554

  16. The plasma flux and oxidation rate of ornithine adaptively decline with restricted arginine intake.

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, L; Sánchez, M; Chapman, T E; Ajami, A; Burke, J F; Young, V R

    1994-01-01

    We hypothesized recently that arginine homeostasis is achieved in humans largely by modulating the rate of arginine degradation. We have tested this hypothesis further by measuring in vivo the whole body rate of conversion of arginine to ornithine and ornithine oxidation in six healthy young adults. Subjects received for 6 days an L-amino acid-based diet supplying an arginine-rich or arginine-free intake and on day 7, following an overnight fast, an 8-h tracer protocol (first 3 h, fast state; next 5 h, fed state) was conducted; L-[guanidino-15N2; 5,5-2H]arginine and L-[5-13C]ornithine were given as primed, constant intravenous tracers; measurements of the abundances of various isotopologs of arginine, ornithine, and citrulline in plasma were made, and from these the various kinetic parameters of the metabolism of these amino acids were derived. Arginine and ornithine fluxes were significantly (P < 0.001) reduced in the fed state with arginine-free feeding. The rates of conversion (mumol.kg-1.h-1; mean +/- SD) of plasma arginine to ornithine for arginine-rich were 12.9 +/- 2.6 and 24.7 +/- 4.8 for fast and fed states. These values were 11.1 +/- 3.5 and 9.6 +/- 1.2 (P > 0.05 and P < 0.001), respectively, with an arginine-free diet. [13C]Ornithine oxidation was reduced (P < 0.001) by 46% during the fed state when the arginine-free diet was given. The findings strengthen our hypothesis that homeostasis of arginine metabolism in the human host depends importantly upon a regulation in the rate of arginine degradation with, perhaps, little involvement in the de novo net rate of arginine synthesis. PMID:8022794

  17. Electrochemical determination of activation energies for methanol oxidation on polycrystalline platinum in acidic and alkaline electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jamie L; Volpe, David J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation pathways of methanol (MeOH) have been the subject of intense research due to its possible application as a liquid fuel in polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The design of improved catalysts for MeOH oxidation requires a deep understanding of these complex oxidation pathways. This paper will provide a discussion of the literature concerning the extensive research carried out in acidic and alkaline electrolytes. It will highlight techniques that have proven useful in the determination of product ratios, analysis of surface poisoning, anion adsorption, and oxide formation processes, in addition to the effects of temperature on the MeOH oxidation pathways at bulk polycrystalline platinum (Pt(poly)) electrodes. This discussion will provide a framework with which to begin the analysis of activation energy (E(a)) values. This kinetic parameter may prove useful in characterizing the rate-limiting step of the MeOH oxidation at an electrode surface. This paper will present a procedure for the determination of E(a) values for MeOH oxidation at a Pt(poly) electrode in acidic and alkaline media. Values from 24-76 kJ mol(-1) in acidic media and from 36-86 kJ mol(-1) in alkaline media were calculated and found to be a function of applied potential and direction of the potential sweep in a voltammetric experiment. Factors that influence the magnitude of the calculated E(a) include surface poisoning from MeOH oxidation intermediates, anion adsorption from the electrolyte, pH effects, and oxide formation processes. These factors are all potential, and temperature, dependent and must clearly be addressed when citing E(a) values in the literature. Comparison of E(a) values must be between systems of comparable electrochemical environment and at the same potential. E(a) values obtained on bulk Pt(poly), compared with other catalysts, may give insight into the superiority of other Pt-based catalysts for MeOH oxidation and lead to the development of new catalysts

  18. Oleic acid-grafted chitosan/graphene oxide composite coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Fayyad, Eman M; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Al-Maadeed, Mariam Al Ali

    2016-10-20

    An anticorrosion coating film based on the formation of nanocomposite coating is reported in this study. The composite consisted of chitosan (green matrix), oleic acid, and graphene oxide (nano filler). The nanocomposite coating was arranged on the surface of carbon steel, and the corrosion resistance was monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP). Compared to the pure chitosan (CS) coating, the corrosion resistance of oleic acid-modified chitosan/graphene oxide film (CS/GO-OA) is increased by 100 folds. Since the well-dispersed smart grafted nanolayers delayed the penetration rate of corrosive species and thus maintained long term anticorrosive stability which is correlated with hydrophobicity and permeability. PMID:27474635

  19. Oxidation kinetics of crystal violet by potassium permanganate in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sameera Razi; Ashfaq, Maria; Mubashir; Masood, Summyia

    2016-05-01

    The oxidation kinetics of crystal violet (a triphenylmethane dye) by potassium permanganate was focused in an acidic medium by the spectrophotometric method at 584 nm. The oxidation reaction of crystal violet by potassium permanganate is carried out in an acidic medium at different temperatures ranging within 298-318 K. The kinetic study was carried out to investigate the effect of the concentration, ionic strength and temperature. The reaction followed first order kinetics with respect to potassium permanganate and crystal violet and the overall rate of the reaction was found to be second order. Thermodynamic activation parameters like the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H*), free energy change (Δ G*), and entropy change (Δ S*) have also been evaluated.

  20. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C L; Pattison, D I; Davies, M J

    2003-12-01

    Activated phagocytes generate the potent oxidant hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is known to react with a number of biological targets including proteins, DNA, lipids and cholesterol. Proteins are likely to be major targets for reaction with HOCl within a cell due to their abundance and high reactivity with HOCl. This review summarizes information on the rate of reaction of HOCl with proteins, the nature of the intermediates formed, the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and the products of these reactions. The predicted targets for reaction with HOCl from kinetic modeling studies and the consequences of HOCl-induced protein oxidation are also discussed. PMID:14661089

  1. Oxidation of PAHs in a simplified system using peroxy-acid and glass beads: Identification of oxidizing species.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Norman S; Nyman, Marianne C

    2009-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic contaminants of concern due to their ubiquity, persistence in the natural environment and adverse health effects. Numerous studies have looked into the removal and treatment of these contaminants, with mixed results. High molecular weight PAHs have been particularly problematic due to their hydrophobicity and high affinity for organics, resulting in mass transfer limitations for even the fastest advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The peroxy-acid process has been used to successfully treat PAH contaminated matrices. Experiments were conducted on benzo[a]pyrene contaminated glass beads in order to elucidate the reaction mechanisms responsible for the effectiveness of this process. For the first time peracetic acid (PAA) was identified as the important oxidant in this reaction. Different v/v/v ratios of hydrogen peroxide/acetic acid/DI water were studied which illustrated the importance of reaction ratio on oxidant concentration and rate of formation. Approximately 60% degradation of benzo[a]pyrene was achieved in 24 hours with 1.7% PAA. Observations of the reaction kinetics suggest that the slow desorption/dissolution of benzo[a]pyrene limits the efficiency of the peroxy-acid process. Modifications of the reaction setup supported this observation as treatment efficiencies increased with reactive surface area, and an increase in system agitation. These limitations were also overcome by increasing the concentration of PAA delivered to the contaminated matrix. Greater than 80% degradation of benzo[a]pyrene was achieved in 24 hours with approximately 9.2% PAA. PMID:19847697

  2. Responses of oxidation rate and microbial communities to methane in simulated landfill cover soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Ruan, Aidong; Jiang, Chenjing; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2008-10-01

    CH4 oxidation capacities and microbial community structures developed in response to the presence of CH4 were investigated in two types of landfill cover soil microcosms, waste soil (fine material in stabilized waste) and clay soil. CH4 emission fluxes were lower in the waste soil cover over the course of the experiment. After exposure to CH4 flow for 120 days, the waste soil developed CH4 oxidation capacity from 0.53 to 11.25-13.48micromol CH4gd.w.(-1)h(-1), which was ten times higher than the clay soil. The topsoils of the two soil covers were observed dried and inhibited CH4 oxidation. The maximum CH4 oxidation rate occurred at the depth of 10-20cm in the waste soil cover (the middle layer), whereas it took place mainly at the depth of 20-30cm in the clay soil cover (the bottom layer). The amounts of the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarks 16:1omega8c and 18:1omega8c for type I and II methanotrophs, respectively, showed that type I methanotrophic bacteria predominated in the clay soil, while the type II methanotrophic bacteria were abundant in the waste soil, and the highest population in the middle layer. The results also indicated that a greater active methanotrophic community was developed in the waste soil relative to the clay soil. PMID:18294841

  3. Phosphonic Acids for Interfacial Engineering of Transparent Conductive Oxides.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Sergio A; Giordano, Anthony J; Smith, O'Neil L; Barlow, Stephen; Li, Hong; Armstrong, Neal R; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Ginger, David; Marder, Seth R

    2016-06-22

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), such as indium tin oxide and zinc oxide, play an important role as electrode materials in organic-semiconductor devices. The properties of the inorganic-organic interface-the offset between the TCO Fermi level and the relevant transport level, the extent to which the organic semiconductor can wet the oxide surface, and the influence of the surface on semiconductor morphology-significantly affect device performance. This review surveys the literature on TCO modification with phosphonic acids (PAs), which has increasingly been used to engineer these interfacial properties. The first part outlines the relevance of TCO surface modification to organic electronics, surveys methods for the synthesis of PAs, discusses the modes by which they can bind to TCO surfaces, and compares PAs to alternative organic surface modifiers. The next section discusses methods of PA monolayer deposition, the kinetics of monolayer formation, and structural evidence regarding molecular orientation on TCOs. The next sections discuss TCO work-function modification using PAs, tuning of TCO surface energy using PAs, and initiation of polymerizations from TCO-tethered PAs. Finally, studies that examine the use of PA-modified TCOs in organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics are compared. PMID:27227316

  4. Reactivation of a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst by acid washing.

    PubMed

    Galisteo, Francisco Cabello; Mariscal, Rafael; Granados, Manuel López; Fierro, José Luis García; Brettes, Pilar; Salas, Oscar

    2005-05-15

    The catalytic activity of samples taken from an oxidation catalyst mounted on diesel-driven automobiles and aged under road conditions was recovered to a significant extent by washing with a dilute solution of citric acid. The characterization of samples arising from a fresh, a vehicle-aged, and a regenerated catalyst was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively high levels of S and P, in the form of aluminum sulfate and phosphate, respectively, together with contaminant Si were detected in the used catalyst. Washing of the vehicle-aged catalytic oxidation converter revealed high efficiency in the extraction of the main contaminants detected (S and P) by this nondestructive methodology. The results of the experiments reported here should encourage the development of a technology based on this reactivation procedure for the rejuvenation of the catalytic device mounted on diesel exhaust pipes. PMID:15952394

  5. Iron Photoreduction and Oxidation in an Acidic Mountain Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Kimball, B. A.; Bencala, K. E.

    1988-04-01

    In a small mountain stream in Colorado that receives acidic mine drainage, photoreduction of ferric iron results in a well-defined increase in dissolved ferrous iron during the day. To quantify this process, an instream injection of a conservative tracer was used to measure discharge at the time that each sample was collected. Daytime production of ferrous iron by photoreduction was almost four times as great as nighttime oxidation of ferrous iron. The photoreduction process probably involves dissolved or colloidal ferric iron species and limited interaction with organic species because concentrations of organic carbon are low in this stream.

  6. Low molecular weight carboxylic acids in oxidizing porphyry copper tailings.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard; Blowes, David W; Dickhout, Ralph; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2005-04-15

    The distribution of low molecular weight carboxylic acids (LMWCA) was investigated in pore water profiles from two porphyry copper tailings impoundments in Chile (Piuquenes at La Andina and Cauquenes at El Teniente mine). The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the distribution of LMWCA, which are interpreted to be the metabolic byproducts of the autotroph microbial community in this low organic carbon system, and (2) to infer the potential role of these acids in cycling of Fe and other elements in the tailings impoundments. The speciation and mobility of iron, and potential for the release of H+ via hydrolysis of the ferric iron, are key factors in the formation of acid mine drainage in sulfidic mine wastes. In the low-pH oxidation zone of the Piuquenes tailings, Fe(III) is the dominant iron species and shows high mobility. LMWCA, which occur mainly between the oxidation front down to 300 cm below the tailings surface at both locations (e.g., max concentrations of 0.12 mmol/L formate, 0.17 mmol/L acetate, and 0.01 mmol/L pyruvate at Piuquenes and 0.14 mmol/L formate, 0.14 mmol/L acetate, and 0.006 mmol/L pyruvate at Cauquenes), are observed at the same location as high Fe concentrations (up to 71.2 mmol/L Fe(II) and 16.1 mmol/L Fe(III), respectively). In this zone, secondary Fe(III) hydroxides are depleted. Our data suggest that LMWCA may influence the mobility of iron in two ways. First, complexation of Fe(III), through formation of bidentate Fe(III)-LMWCA complexes (e.g., pyruvate, oxalate), may enhance the dissolution of Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides or may prevent precipitation of Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides. Soluble Fe(III) chelate complexes which may be mobilized downward and convert to Fe(II) by Fe(III) reducing bacteria. Second, monodentate LMWCA (e.g., acetate and formate) can be used by iron-reducing bacteria as electron donors (e.g., Acidophilum spp.), with ferric iron as the electron acceptor. These processes may, in part, explain the low abundances

  7. Photo-Fenton-like treatment of K-acid: assessment of treatability, toxicity and oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Olmez-Hanci, Tugba; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Gelegen, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Photo-Fenton-like treatment of the commercially important naphthalene sulphonate K-acid (2-naphthylamine-3,6,8-trisulphonic acid) was investigated using UV-C, UV-A and visible light irradiation. Changes in toxicity patterns were followed by the Vibrio fischeri bioassay. Rapid and complete degradation of K-acid accompanied with nearly complete oxidation and mineralization rates (>90%) were achieved for all studied irradiation types. On the other hand, detoxification was rather limited and did not change significantly during photo-Fenton-like treatment. Several oxidation products could be identified via liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer analyses, such as desulphonated and hydroxylated naphthalene derivatives, quinones, and ring-opening as well as dimerization products. Photo-Fenton-like treatment of K-acid with UV-C, UV-A and visible light irradiation occurred through a series of hydroxylation and desulphonation reactions, followed by ring cleavage. A common degradation pathway for photo-Fenton-like treatment of K-acid using different irradiation types was proposed. PMID:25259495

  8. Oxidation and textural characteristics of butter and ice cream with modified fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, S; Duncan, S E; O'Keefe, S F; Sumner, S S; Herbein, J H

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate oxidation and firmness of butter and ice cream made with modified milkfat containing enhanced amounts of linoleic acid or oleic acid. The influence of the fatty acid profile of the HO milkfat relating to product properties as compared with the influence the fatty acid profile of the HL milkfat was the main focus of the research. Altering the degree of unsaturation in milkfat may affect melting characteristics and oxidation rates, leading to quality issues in dairy products. Three milkfat compositions (high-oleic, high-linoleic, and control) were obtained by modifying the diets of Holstein cows. Ice cream and butter were processed from milkfat obtained from cows in each dietary group. Butter and ice cream samples were analyzed to determine fatty acid profile and firmness. High-oleic milkfat resulted in a softer butter. Solid fat index of high-oleic and high-linoleic milkfat was lower than the control. Control ice cream mix had higher viscosity compared with high-oleic and high-linoleic, but firmness of all ice creams was similar when measured between -17 and -13 degrees C. Nutritional and textural properties of butter and ice cream can be improved by modifying the diets of cows. PMID:12613850

  9. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  11. Nitrogen mineralization rates of the acidic, xeric soils of the New Jersey Pinelands: field rates

    SciTech Connect

    Poovarodom, S.; Tate, R.L. III; Bloom, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Using the buried-bag procedure, the authors quantified nitrogen mineralization rates in the xeric, acidic Lakehurst, and Atsion sands of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Average annual nitrogen yields in the upper 15 cm for the Lakehurst and the Atsion sands were 38.4 and 53.0 kg N/ha, corresponding to 4.5 and 2.5% of the total nitrogen, respectively. Net nitrogen mineralization in both soils exhibited distinct seasonal patterns with maxima in summer and minimum rates in the winter. Nitrification accounted for only 5% of the total N mineralized in both soils. This is consistent with the finding of low populations of autotrophic nitrifiers in these soils.

  12. Combined defects in oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid β-oxidation in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah-Sefaa, Abena; McKenzie, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria provide the main source of energy to eukaryotic cells, oxidizing fats and sugars to generate ATP. Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are two metabolic pathways which are central to this process. Defects in these pathways can result in diseases of the brain, skeletal muscle, heart and liver, affecting approximately 1 in 5000 live births. There are no effective therapies for these disorders, with quality of life severely reduced for most patients. The pathology underlying many aspects of these diseases is not well understood; for example, it is not clear why some patients with primary FAO deficiencies exhibit secondary OXPHOS defects. However, recent findings suggest that physical interactions exist between FAO and OXPHOS proteins, and that these interactions are critical for both FAO and OXPHOS function. Here, we review our current understanding of the interactions between FAO and OXPHOS proteins and how defects in these two metabolic pathways contribute to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:26839416

  13. Mineralization of salicylic acid in acidic aqueous medium by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes using platinum and boron-doped diamond as anode and cathodically generated hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Guinea, Elena; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Garrido, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Centellas, Francesc; Brillas, Enric

    2008-01-01

    Solutions containing 164 mg L(-1) salicylic acid of pH 3.0 have been degraded by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes such as anodic oxidation, anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H(2)O(2), electro-Fenton, photoelectro-Fenton and solar photoelectro-Fenton at constant current density. Their oxidation power has been comparatively studied in a one-compartment cell with a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a graphite or O(2)-diffusion cathode. In the three latter procedures, 0.5mM Fe(2+) is added to the solution to form hydroxyl radical (()OH) from Fenton's reaction between Fe(2+) and H(2)O(2) generated at the O(2)-diffusion cathode. Total mineralization is attained for all methods with BDD and for photoelectro-Fenton and solar photoelectro-Fenton with Pt. The poor decontamination achieved in anodic oxidation and electro-Fenton with Pt is explained by the slow removal of most pollutants by ()OH formed from water oxidation at the Pt anode in comparison to their quick destruction with ()OH produced at BDD. ()OH generated from Fenton's reaction oxidizes rapidly all aromatic pollutants, but it cannot destroy final Fe(III)-oxalate complexes. Solar photoelectro-Fenton treatments always yield quicker degradation rate due to the very fast photodecarboxylation of these complexes by UVA irradiation supplied by solar light. The effect of current density on the degradation rate, efficiency and energy cost of all methods is examined. The salicylic acid decay always follows a pseudo-first-order kinetics. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic, 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic, alpha-ketoglutaric, glycolic, glyoxylic, maleic, fumaric, malic, tartronic and oxalic acids are detected as oxidation products. A general reaction sequence for salicylic acid mineralization considering all these intermediates is proposed. PMID:17692891

  14. Manganese(II) catalyzes the bicarbonate-dependent oxidation of amino acids by hydrogen peroxide and the amino acid-facilitated dismutation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Berlett, B S; Chock, P B; Yim, M B; Stadtman, E R

    1990-01-01

    In bicarbonate/CO2 buffer, Mn(II) and Fe(II) catalyze the oxidation of amino acids by H2O2 and the dismutation of H2O2. As the Mn(II)/Fe(II) ratio is increased, the yield of carbonyl compounds per mole of leucine oxidized is essentially constant, but the ratio of alpha-ketoisocaproate to isovaleraldehyde formed increases, and the fraction of H2O2 converted to O2 increases. In the absence of Fe(II), the rate of Mn(II)-catalyzed leucine oxidation is directly proportional to the H2O2, Mn(II), and amino acid concentrations and is proportional to the square of the HCO3- concentration. The rate of Mn(II)-catalyzed O2 production in the presence of 50 mM alanine or leucine is about 4-fold the rate observed in the absence of amino acids and accounts for about half of the H2O2 consumed; the other half of the H2O2 is consumed in the oxidation of the amino acids. In contrast, O2 production is increased nearly 18-fold by the presence of alpha-methylalanine and accounts for about 90% of the H2O2 consumed. The data are consistent with the view that H2O2 decomposition is an inner sphere (cage-like) process catalyzed by a Mn coordination complex of the composition Mn(II), amino acid, (HCO3-)2. Oxidation of the amino acid in this complex most likely proceeds by a free radical mechanism involving hydrogen abstraction from the alpha-carbon as a critical step. The results demonstrate that at physiological concentrations of HCO3- and CO2, Mn(II) is able to facilitate Fenton-type reactions. PMID:2296594

  15. Dose rate dependence of the speciation of neptunium in irradiated solutions of nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Precek, M.; Paulenova, A.; Mincher, B.J.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2013-07-01

    The effects of radiation on the redox speciation of neptunium are of interest due to their impact on the performance of separation of neptunium from highly radioactive solutions of dissolved used nuclear fuel. In this study, the influence of dose rate change from 0.4 kGy/h to 6 kGy/h was examined during irradiation of solutions of initially hexavalent 2.0-2.5 mM neptunium in nitric acid of two different concentrations (0.5 and 1 M). Results indicate that the immediate radiolytic steady-state concentration of neptunium(V) were depressed and its initial radiolytic yield was up to 2-times lower (in 1 M HNO{sub 3} solutions)during irradiations with the higher dose rate. The finding is explained on the basis of the enhancement of the role of oxidizing radicals during the radiolytic process. (authors)

  16. Mitochondrial long chain fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid translocase/CD36 content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I activity in human skeletal muscle during aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Graham P; Bezaire, Veronic; Heigenhauser, George J F; Tandon, Narendra N; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Bonen, Arend; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid transport is a rate-limiting step in long chain fatty acid (LCFA) oxidation. In rat skeletal muscle, the transport of LCFA at the level of mitochondria is regulated by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) activity and the content of malonyl-CoA (M-CoA); however, this relationship is not consistently observed in humans. Recently, fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36 was identified on mitochondria isolated from rat and human skeletal muscle and found to be involved in LCFA oxidation. The present study investigated the effects of exercise (120 min of cycling at ∼60% V̇O2peak) on CPTI palmitoyl-CoA and M-CoA kinetics, and on the presence and functional significance of FAT/CD36 on skeletal muscle mitochondria. Whole body fat oxidation rates progressively increased during exercise (P < 0.05), and concomitantly M-CoA inhibition of CPTI was progressively attenuated. Compared to rest, 120 min of cycling reduced (P < 0.05) the inhibition of 0.7, 2, 5 and 10 μm M-CoA by 16%, 21%, 30% and 34%, respectively. Whole body fat oxidation and palmitate oxidation rates in isolated mitochondria progressively increased (P < 0.05) during exercise, and were positively correlated (r = 0.78). Mitochondrial FAT/CD36 protein increased by 63% (P < 0.05) during exercise and was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with mitochondrial palmitate oxidation rates at all time points (r= 0.41). However, the strongest (P < 0.05) correlation was observed following 120 min of cycling (r= 0.63). Importantly, the addition of sulfo-N-succimidyloleate, a specific inhibitor of FAT/CD36, reduced mitochondrial palmitate oxidation to ∼20%, indicating FAT/CD36 is functionally significant with respect to LCFA oxidation. We hypothesize that exercise-induced increases in fatty acid oxidation occur as a result of an increased ability to transport LCFA into mitochondria. We further suggest that decreased CPTI M-CoA sensitivity and increased mitochondrial FAT/CD36 protein are both

  17. Kinetics of oxidation of pentavalent neptunium by pentavalent vanadium in solutions of nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2010-03-01

    Management of the oxidation state of neptunium in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by solvent extraction is very important. The kinetics of the oxidation of neptunium(V) by vanadium(V) in solutions of nitrate acid was investigated at constant ionic strength 4M. The reaction rate is first order with respect to Np(V) and V(V). The effects of proton concentration on the apparent second order rate constant k1" was determined for temperature 25°C as k1" = (0.99±0.03)·[H+]1.21M-1s-1. Activation parameters associated with the overall reaction have been calculated; the standard reaction enthalpy and entropy were 52.6±0.9 kJ/mol and -55.8±0.9 J/K/mol respectively.

  18. Effects of trimetazidine in ethanol- and acetic acid-induced colitis: oxidant/anti-oxidant status.

    PubMed

    Girgin; Karaoglu; Tüzün; Erkus; Ozütemiz; Dinçer; Batur; Tanyalçin

    1999-11-01

    There is overwhelming evidence in favour of a significant role of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in man and in experimental animal models. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible protective effects of pretreatment with trimetazidine (TMZ) on the oxidant-anti-oxidant balance in ethanol- and acetic acid-induced colonic damage in rats. TMZ was chosen because of its various cytoprotective features (preserving cellular ATP levels, limiting intracellular acidosis and limiting inorganic phosphate, Na(+) and Ca(2+) accumulation) and anti-oxy characteristics which were previously reported. A total of 80 rats were randomized into eight major groups each consisting of 10 animals. Animals in groups 1, 2 and 3 served as models of ethanol-induced colitis (0.25 ml of 30% (v/v) ethanol), while group 4 served as their control. Animals in groups 5, 6 and 7 served as models of acetic acid-induced colitis (1 ml of 4% (v/v) acetic acid), while group 8 served as their control. TMZ was administered 5 mg/kg by intrarectal (i.r.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes to groups 1, 2, 5 and 6. Intraperitoneal administration of TMZ was used in order to evaluate its systemic effect while i.r. administration was used to determine its local effect. After decapitation, colon mucosa samples were obtained and evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities as markers for inflammation, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as markers for oxidant stress and reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels as markers for anti-oxidant status were determined. Acute colitis was observed in macroscopic and microscopic evaluation in ethanol- and acetic acid-administered groups compared with controls (P = 0.000). The macroscopic and microscopic scores in colitis groups were correlated with MPO activities (r = 0.5365, P = 0.000 and r = 0.5499, P = 0.000, respectively). MDA

  19. A stencil printed, high energy density silver oxide battery using a novel photopolymerizable poly(acrylic acid) separator.

    PubMed

    Braam, Kyle; Subramanian, Vivek

    2015-01-27

    A novel photopolymerized poly(acrylic acid) separator is demonstrated in a printed, high-energy-density silver oxide battery. The printed battery demonstrates a high capacity of 5.4 mA h cm(-2) at a discharge current density of 2.75 mA cm(-2) (C/2 rate) while delivering good mechanical flexibility and robustness. PMID:25475759

  20. Soot Nanostructure And Its Impact Upon The O2 Oxidation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Tomasek, Aaron J.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of soot oxidation have ranged from in situ flame studies to shock tubes to flow reactors. Each of these systems possesses particular advantages and limitations related to temperature, time and chemical environments. Despite the aforementioned differences, these soot oxidation investigations share three striking features. First and foremost is the wide variation in the rates of oxidation. Reported oxidation rates vary by factors of +6 to - 20 relative to the Nagle Strickland-Constable (NSC) rate for graphite oxidation [3]. Rate variations are not surprising, as the temperatures, residence times, types of oxidants and methods of oxidation differ from study to study. Nevertheless, a valid explanation for rate differences of this magnitude has yet to be presented.

  1. Monohydroxamic acids and bridging dihydroxamic acids as chelators to ruthenium(III) and as nitric oxide donors: syntheses, speciation studies and nitric oxide releasing investigations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Darren; Krot, Krystyna; Comiskey, Jedd; Nolan, Kevin B; Marmion, Celine J

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and spectroscopic characterisation of novel mononuclear Ru(III)(edta)(hydroxamato) complexes of general formula [Ru(H2edta)(monoha)] (where monoha = 3- or 4-NH2, 2-, 3- or 4-C1 and 3-Me-phenylhydroxamato), as well as the first example of a Ru(III)-N-aryl aromatic hydroxamate, [Ru(H2edta)(N-Me-bha)].H2O (N-Me-bha = N-methylbenzohydroxamato) are reported. Three dinuclear Ru(III) complexes with bridging dihydroxamato ligands of general formula [{Ru(H2edta)}2(mu-diha)] where diha = 2,6-pyridinedihydroxamato and 1,3- or 1,4-benzodihydroxamato, the first of their kind with Ru(III), are also described. The speciation of all of these systems (with the exception of the Ru-1,4-benzodihydroxamic acid and Ru-N-methylbenzohydroxamic systems) in aqueous solution was investigated. We previously proposed that nitrosyl abstraction from hydroxamic acids by Ru(III) involves initial formation of Ru(III)-hydroxamates. Yet, until now, no data on the rate of nitric oxide (NO) release from hydroxamic acids has been published. We now describe a UV-VIS spectroscopic study, where we monitored the decrease in the ligand-to-metal charge-transfer band of a series of Ru(III)-monohydroxamates with time, with a view to gaining an insight into the NO-releasing properties of hydroxamic acids. PMID:18399240

  2. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  3. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I during fasting in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) promotes increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Morash, Andrea J; McClelland, Grant B

    2011-01-01

    Periods of fasting, in most animals, are fueled principally by fatty acids, and changes in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation must exist to meet this change in metabolic substrate use. We examined the regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I, to help explain changes in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with fasting. After fasting rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for 5 wk, the mitochondria were isolated from red muscle and liver to determine (1) mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation rate, (2) CPT I activity and the concentration of malonyl-CoA needed to inhibit this activity by 50% (IC(50)), (3) mitochondrial membrane fluidity, and (4) CPT I (all five known isoforms) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα and PPARβ) mRNA levels. Fatty acid oxidation in isolated mitochondria increased during fasting by 2.5- and 1.75-fold in liver and red muscle, respectively. Fasting also decreased sensitivity of CPT I to malonyl-CoA (increased IC(50)), by two and eight times in red muscle and liver, respectively, suggesting it facilitates the rate of fatty acid oxidation. In the liver, there was also a significant increase CPT I activity per milligram mitochondrial protein and in whole-tissue PPARα and PPARβ mRNA levels. However, there were no changes in mitochondrial membrane fluidity in either tissue, indicating that the decrease in CPT I sensitivity to malonyl-CoA is not due to bulk fluidity changes in the membrane. However, there were significant differences in CPT I mRNA levels during fasting. Overall, these data indicate some important changes in the regulation of CPT I that promote the increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation that occurs during fasting in trout. PMID:22030855

  4. BACE1 activity impairs neuronal glucose oxidation: rescue by beta-hydroxybutyrate and lipoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, John A.; Hamilton, David L.; Ashford, Michael L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial function in neurons have been suggested to play early and perhaps causative roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Activity of the aspartic acid protease, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), responsible for beta amyloid peptide generation, has recently been demonstrated to modify glucose metabolism. We therefore examined, using a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell line, whether increased BACE1 activity is responsible for a reduction in cellular glucose metabolism. Overexpression of active BACE1, but not a protease-dead mutant BACE1, protein in SH-SY5Y cells reduced glucose oxidation and the basal oxygen consumption rate, which was associated with a compensatory increase in glycolysis. Increased BACE1 activity had no effect on the mitochondrial electron transfer process but was found to diminish substrate delivery to the mitochondria by inhibition of key mitochondrial decarboxylation reaction enzymes. This BACE1 activity-dependent deficit in glucose oxidation was alleviated by the presence of beta hydroxybutyrate or α-lipoic acid. Consequently our data indicate that raised cellular BACE1 activity drives reduced glucose oxidation in a human neuronal cell line through impairments in the activity of specific tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Because this bioenergetic deficit is recoverable by neutraceutical compounds we suggest that such agents, perhaps in conjunction with BACE1 inhibitors, may be an effective therapeutic strategy in the early-stage management or treatment of AD. PMID:26483636

  5. Synthesis kinetics of CdSe quantum dots in trioctylphosphine oxide and in stearic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, B. D.; Irving, D. M.; Herz, E.; Claus, R. O.; Spillman, W. B.; Meissner, K. E.

    2005-04-01

    A diffusion-barrier model described the early evolution of size-dependent photoluminescence emission from CdSe quantum dots formed by organometallic synthesis. Emission peak widths, emission redshift rates, and nanocrystal growth rates all decreased to a minimum at a reaction completion time. Growth after the completion time by Ostwald ripening was marked by a doubling of the activation energy. The temperature dependence of both reaction completion rates and photoluminescence redshift rates followed Arrhenius behavior governed by activation energies that increased with solvent molecular weight, in this limited case. In stearic acid and in trioctylphosphine oxide, the typical activation energies were 0.6±0.1 and 0.92±0.26eV/molecule, respectively.

  6. Genetic Variation of Fatty Acid Oxidation and Obesity, A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Freitag Luglio, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of fat metabolism is an important component of the etiology of obesity as well as individual response to weight loss program. The influence of lipolysis process had receives many attentions in recent decades. Compared to that, fatty acid oxidation which occurred after lipolysis seems to be less exposed. There are limited publications on how fatty acid oxidation influences predisposition to obesity, especially the importance of genetic variations of fatty acid oxidation proteins on development of obesity. The aim of this review is to provide recent knowledge on how polymorphism of genes related fatty acid oxidation is obtained. Studies in human as well as animal model showed that disturbance of genes related fatty acid oxidation process gave impact on body weight and risks to obesity. Several polymorphisms on CD36, CPT, ACS and FABP had been shown to be related to obesity either by regulating enzymatic activity or directly influence fatty acid oxidation process. PMID:27127449

  7. Omega-9 Oleic Acid Induces Fatty Acid Oxidation and Decreases Organ Dysfunction and Mortality in Experimental Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Flora Magno de Jesus; Burth, Patrícia; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Castro Faria, Mauro Velho; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by inflammatory and metabolic alterations, which lead to massive cytokine production, oxidative stress and organ dysfunction. In severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome, plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) are increased. Several NEFA are deleterious to cells, activate Toll-like receptors and inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase, causing lung injury. A Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil is beneficial. The main component of olive oil is omega-9 oleic acid (OA), a monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA). We analyzed the effect of OA supplementation on sepsis. OA ameliorated clinical symptoms, increased the survival rate, prevented liver and kidney injury and decreased NEFA plasma levels in mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). OA did not alter food intake and weight gain but diminished reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NEFA plasma levels. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT1A) mRNA levels were increased, while uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) liver expression was enhanced in mice treated with OA. OA also inhibited the decrease in 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) expression and increased the enzyme expression in the liver of OA-treated mice compared to septic animals. We showed that OA pretreatment decreased NEFA concentration and increased CPT1A and UCP2 and AMPK levels, decreasing ROS production. We suggest that OA has a beneficial role in sepsis by decreasing metabolic dysfunction, supporting the benefits of diets high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). PMID:27078880

  8. Omega-9 Oleic Acid Induces Fatty Acid Oxidation and Decreases Organ Dysfunction and Mortality in Experimental Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Medeiros-de-Moraes, Isabel Matos; Oliveira, Flora Magno de Jesus; Burth, Patrícia; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Castro Faria, Mauro Velho; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire de

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by inflammatory and metabolic alterations, which lead to massive cytokine production, oxidative stress and organ dysfunction. In severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome, plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) are increased. Several NEFA are deleterious to cells, activate Toll-like receptors and inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase, causing lung injury. A Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil is beneficial. The main component of olive oil is omega-9 oleic acid (OA), a monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA). We analyzed the effect of OA supplementation on sepsis. OA ameliorated clinical symptoms, increased the survival rate, prevented liver and kidney injury and decreased NEFA plasma levels in mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). OA did not alter food intake and weight gain but diminished reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NEFA plasma levels. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT1A) mRNA levels were increased, while uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) liver expression was enhanced in mice treated with OA. OA also inhibited the decrease in 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) expression and increased the enzyme expression in the liver of OA-treated mice compared to septic animals. We showed that OA pretreatment decreased NEFA concentration and increased CPT1A and UCP2 and AMPK levels, decreasing ROS production. We suggest that OA has a beneficial role in sepsis by decreasing metabolic dysfunction, supporting the benefits of diets high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). PMID:27078880

  9. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines. PMID:25263417

  10. Comparative Oxidative Stability of Fatty Acid Alkyl Esters by Accelerated Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several fatty acid alkyl esters were subjected to accelerated methods of oxidation, including EN 14112 (Rancimat method) and pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC). Structural trends elucidated from both methods that improved oxidative stability included decreasing the number of doubl...

  11. Respiratory and eye irritation from boron oxide and boric acid dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Garabrant, D.H.; Bernstein, L.; Peters, J.M.; Smith, T.J.

    1984-08-01

    Boron oxide has been shown in animals to irritate the respiratory mucosa and conjuctiva. The present study was undertaken to determine whether exposures to boron oxide and its hydration product, boric acid, cau

  12. Characterization of phosphonic acid binding to zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Malicki, Michał; Giordano, Anthony J.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Marder, Seth R.

    2011-01-24

    Radio Frequency (RF) sputter-deposited zinc oxide (ZnO) films have been modified with alkylphosphonic acids in order to study both the binding of the phosphonic acid (PA) group to the ZnO surface and the packing of the alkyl chain. The characterization of these PA-modified ZnO substrates by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements is presented herein. The surface modification procedure is straightforward and was adapted from earlier work. XPS analysis shows that oxygen plasma (OP) treatment creates reactive oxygen species on the surface of ZnO, allowing for a more robust binding of PAs to the ZnO surface. IRRAS analysis indicates that octadecylphosphonic acid binds to the ZnO surface in a predominantly tridentate fashion, forming dense, well-packed monolayers with alkyl chains in a fully anti-conformation. AFM and contact angle measurements indicate good surface coverage of the PAs with little to no multilayer formation.

  13. Catalytic air oxidation of biomass-derived carbohydrates to formic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Ding, Dao-Jun; Deng, Li; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2012-07-01

    An efficient catalytic system for biomass oxidation to form formic acid was developed. The conversion of glucose to formic acid can reach up to 52% yield within 3 h when catalyzed by 5 mol% of H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) at only 373 K using air as the oxidant. Furthermore, the heteropolyacid can be used as a bifunctional catalyst in the conversion of cellulose to formic acid (yield=35%) with air as the oxidant. PMID:22499553

  14. Comparison of the sputter rates of oxide films relative to the sputter rate of SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, D. R.; Engelhard, M. H.; Lea, A. S.; Nachimuthu, P.; Droubay, T. C.; Kim, J.; Lee, B.; Mathews, C.; Opila, R. L.; Saraf, L. V.; Stickle, W. F.; Wallace, R. M.; Wright, B. S.

    2010-09-15

    There is a growing interest in knowing the sputter rates for a wide variety of oxides because of their increasing technological importance in many different applications. To support the needs of users of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, as well as our research programs, the authors made a series of measurements of the sputter rates from oxide films that have been grown by oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, pulsed laser deposition, atomic layer deposition, electrochemical oxidation, or sputter deposition. The sputter rates for these oxide films were determined in comparison with those from thermally grown SiO{sub 2}, a common reference material for sputter rate determination. The film thicknesses and densities for most of these oxide films were measured using x-ray reflectivity. These oxide films were mounted in an x-ray photoelectron or Auger electron spectrometer for sputter rate measurements using argon ion sputtering. Although the primary objective of this work was to determine relative sputter rates at a fixed angle, the measurements also examined (i) the angle dependence of the relative sputter rates, (ii) the energy dependence of the relative sputter rates, and (iii) the extent of ion beam induced reduction for some oxides. Oxide films examined include SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, In-Sn oxide, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2} (anatase, rutile, and amorphous), and ZnO. The authors found that the sputter rates for the oxides can vary up to a factor of 2 (usually lower) from that observed for SiO{sub 2}. The ratios of sputter rates relative to those of SiO{sub 2} appear to be relatively independent of ion beam energy in the range of 1-4 kV and for incident angles <50 deg. As expected, the extent of ion beam induced reduction of the oxides varies with the sputter angle.

  15. Ascorbic acid and rates of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gene L; Dodge, Hiroko; Frei, Balz; Calabrese, Carlo; Oken, Barry S; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Quinn, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The brain maintains high levels of ascorbic acid (AA) despite a concentration gradient favoring diffusion from brain to peripheral tissues. Dietary antioxidants, including AA, appear to modify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that neurodegeneration in AD is modified by brain levels of AA. Thirty-two patients with mild to moderate AD participated in a biomarker study involving standardized clinical assessments over one year. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were collected at baseline for AA and albumin content. Cognitive measures were collected at baseline and one year. CSF and plasma AA failed to predict cognitive decline independently, however, CSF: plasma AA ratio did. After adding CSF Albumin Index (an established marker of blood-brain barrier integrity) to the regression models the effect of CSF: plasma AA ratio as a predictor of cognitive decline was weakened. CSF: plasma AA ratio predicts rate of decline in AD. This relationship may indicate that the CSF: plasma AA ratio is an index of AA availability to the brain or may be an artifact of a relationship between blood-brain barrier impairment and neurodegeneration. PMID:19158425

  16. Degradation of trans-ferulic acid in acidic aqueous medium by anodic oxidation, electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton.

    PubMed

    Flores, Nelly; Sirés, Ignasi; Garrido, José Antonio; Centellas, Francesc; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Brillas, Enric

    2016-12-01

    Solutions of pH 3.0 containing trans-ferulic acid, a phenolic compound in olive oil mill wastewater, have been comparatively degraded by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Trials were performed with a BDD/air-diffusion cell, where oxidizing OH was produced from water discharge at the BDD anode and/or in the solution bulk from Fenton's reaction between cathodically generated H2O2 and added catalytic Fe(2+). The substrate was very slowly removed by AO-H2O2, whereas it was very rapidly abated by EF and PEF, at similar rate in both cases, due to its fast reaction with OH in the bulk. The AO-H2O2 process yielded a slightly lower mineralization than EF, which promoted the accumulation of barely oxidizable products like Fe(III) complexes. In contrast, the fast photolysis of these latter species under irradiation with UVA light in PEF led to an almost total mineralization with 98% total organic carbon decay. The effect of current density and substrate concentration on the performance of all treatments was examined. Several solar PEF (SPEF) trials showed its viability for the treatment of wastewater containing trans-ferulic acid at larger scale. Four primary aromatic products were identified by GC-MS analysis of electrolyzed solutions, and final carboxylic acids like fumaric, acetic and oxalic were detected by ion-exclusion HPLC. A reaction sequence for trans-ferulic acid mineralization involving all the detected products is finally proposed. PMID:26691522

  17. Fatty Acid Composition as a Predictor for the Oxidation Stability of Korean Vegetable Oils with or without Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Surh, Jeonghee

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the fatty acid composition could make a significant contribution to the oxidation stability of vegetable oils marketed in Korea. Ten kinds, 97 items of vegetable oils that were produced in either an industrialized or a traditional way were collected and analyzed for their fatty acid compositions and lipid oxidation products, in the absence or presence of oxidative stress. Peroxidability index (PI) calculations based on the fatty acid composition ranged from 7.10 to 111.87 with the lowest value found in olive oils and the highest in perilla oils. In the absence of induced oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA), the secondary lipid oxidation product, was generated more in the oils with higher PI (r=0.890), while the tendency was not observed when the oils were subjected to an oxidation-accelerating system. In the presence of the oxidative stress, the perilla oils produced in an industrialized manner generated appreciably higher amounts of MDA than those produced in a traditional way, although both types of oils presented similar PIs. The results implicate that the fatty acid compositions could be a predictor for the oxidation stability of the vegetable oils at the early stage of oil oxidation, but not for those at a later stage of oxidation. PMID:24471078

  18. Iron sulfide oxidation and the chemistry of acid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Patrick J.; Yelton, Jennifer L.; Reddy, K. J.

    1988-06-01

    Acid mine drainage, produced from the oxidation of iron sulfides, often contains elevated levels of dissolved aluminum (AI), iron (Fe), and sulfate (SO4) and low pH. Understanding the interactions of these elements associated with acid mine drainage is necessary for proper solid waste management planning. Two eastern oil shales were leached using humidity cell methods. This study used a New Albany Shale (4.6 percent pyrite) and a Chattanooga Shale (1.5 percent pyrite). The leachates from the humidity cells were filtered, and the filtrates were analyzed for total concentrations of cations and anions. After correcting for significant solution species and complexes, ion activities were calculated from total concentrations. The results show that the activities of Fe3+, Fe2+, Al3+, and SO4 2- increased due to the oxidation of pyrite. Furthermore, the oxidation of pyrite resulted in a decreased pH and an increased pe+pH (redox-potential). The Fe3+ and Fe2+ activities appeared to be controlled by amorphous Fe(OH)3 solid phase above a pH of 6.0 and below pe+pH 11.0. The Fe3+, Fe2+, and SO4 2- activities reached saturation with respect to FeOHSO4 solid phase between pH 3.0 and 6.0 and below pe+pH 11.0 Below a pH of 3.0 and above a pe+pH of 11.0, Fe2+, Fe3+, and SO4 2- activities are supported by FeSO4·7H2O solid phase. Above a pH of 6.0, the Al3+ activity showed an equilibrium with amorphous Al(OH)3 solid phase. Below pH 6.0, Al3+ and SO4 2- activities are regulated by the AlOHSO4 solid phase, irrespective of pe+pH. The results of this study suggest that under oxidizing conditions with low to high leaching potential, activities of Al and Fe can be predicted on the basis of secondary mineral formation over a wide range of pH and redox. As a result, the long-term chemistry associated with disposal environments can be largely predicted (including trace elements).

  19. Vanillic acid prevents the deregulation of lipid metabolism, endothelin 1 and up regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in nitric oxide deficient hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subramanian; Prahalathan, Pichavaram; Saravanakumar, Murugesan; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-11-15

    Hypertension is one of the main factors causing cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of vanillic acid against nitric oxide deficient rats. Hypertension was induced in adult male albino rats of Wistar strain, weighing 180-220g, by oral administration of N(ω)-nitro-l arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) 40mg/kg in drinking water for 4 weeks. Vanillic acid was administered orally at a dose of 50mg/kg b.w. Nitric oxide deficient rats showed increased levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and decreased heart nitric oxide metabolites (NOx). A significant increase in the levels of plasma cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), phospholipids (PL), 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in the plasma, liver and kidney and decreased level of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) are observed, whereas there is a decrease in the activities of plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) in nitric oxide deficient rats. l-NAME rats also showed an increase in TC, TG, FFA and PL levels in the liver and kidney tissues. Vanillic acid treatment brought the above parameters towards near normal level. Moreover the down regulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and up regulated expression of endothelin 1 (ET1) components was also attenuated by vanillic acid treatment. All the above outcomes were confirmed by the histopathological examination. These results suggest that vanillic acid has enough potential to attenuate hypertension, dyslipidemia and hepatic and renal damage in nitric oxide deficient rats. PMID:25239071

  20. Comparison of the Sputter Rates of Oxide Films Relative to the Sputter Rate of SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, Alan S.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Droubay, Timothy C.; Kim, J.; Lee, B.; Mathews, C.; Opila, R. L.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Stickle, William F.; Wallace, Robert; Wright, B. S.

    2010-09-02

    Because of the increasing technological importance of oxide films for a variety of applications, there is a growing interest in knowing the sputter rates for a wide variety of oxides. To support needs of users of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User facility as well as our research programs, we have made a series of measurements of the sputter rates for oxide films that have been grown by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE), pulsed laser deposition (PLD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), electrochemical oxidation, or sputter deposition. The sputter rates for these oxide films were determined in comparison to the sputter rates for thermally grown SiO2, a common sputter rate reference material. The film thicknesses and densities of these films were usually measured using x-ray reflectivity (XRR). These samples were mounted in an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system or an Auger electron spectrometer for sputtering measurements using argon ion sputtering. Although the primary objective was to determine relative sputter rates at a fixed angle, the measurements were also used to determine: i) the angle dependence of the relative sputter rates; ii) the energy dependence of the relative sputter rates; and iii) the extent of ion beam reduction for the various oxides. Materials examined include: SiO2 (reference films), Al2O3, CeO2, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, HfO2, ITO (In-Sn-oxide) Ta2O5, TiO2 (anatase and rutile) and ZnO. We find that the sputter rates for the oxides can vary up to a factor of two (usually slower) from that observed for SiO2. The ratios of sputter rates to SiO2 appear to be relatively independent of ion beam energy for the range of 1kV to 4 kV and for incident angles of less than 50º. As expected, the ion beam reduction of the oxides varies with the sputter angle. These studies demonstrate that we can usually obtain sputter rate reproducibility better than 5% for similar oxide films.

  1. Impairment of ascorbic acid's anti-oxidant properties in confined media: inter and intramolecular reactions with air and vanadate at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Crans, Debbie C; Baruah, Bharat; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Lemons, Brant G; Lorenz, Bret B; Johnson, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    The anti-oxidant properties of L-ascorbic acid were investigated in the confined medium produced by a sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (aerosol-OT, AOT) self-assembled reverse micelle. Using 1H-1H NOESY (proton-proton 2D nuclear overhauser enhancement correlation spectroscopy) NMR spectroscopy, the location of ascorbic acid was investigated and found to be at the AOT-interface in contrast to earlier studies where the ascorbate was assumed to be in the water pool in these microemulsions. The reaction of ascorbic acid with oxygen was investigated using EPR spectroscopy. A delocalized monoanionic ascorbate radical was observed in microemulsions prepared from pH 5.6 stock solutions. This is in contrast to studies carried out in aqueous media where no radical formation was observed. The oxidation of ascorbic acid by aqueous V(V) was investigated in reverse micelles. Modest changes in the kinetic parameters were observed for this system compared to that in water. Details of these reactions were examined and can be summarized as the microemulsion solvating and stabilizing reactive intermediates via rate inhibition or enhancement. The inhibition of the oxidation is due to solvation stabilization of ascorbic acid in microemulsion media. Since ascorbate is a valuable marker of oxidative stress, our results suggest that compartmentization can modify the stabilization of the ascorbate radical and the changes in properties could be important in biological systems. PMID:18331759

  2. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Combustion Rate Is Associated with Unique Metabolite Profiles in Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Erin L.; Fiehn, Oliver; Bezaire, Véronic; Bickel, David R.; Wohlgemuth, Gert; Adams, Sean H.; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim Incomplete or limited long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) combustion in skeletal muscle has been associated with insulin resistance. Signals that are responsive to shifts in LCFA β-oxidation rate or degree of intramitochondrial catabolism are hypothesized to regulate second messenger systems downstream of the insulin receptor. Recent evidence supports a causal link between mitochondrial LCFA combustion in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance. We have used unbiased metabolite profiling of mouse muscle mitochondria with the aim of identifying candidate metabolites within or effluxed from mitochondria and that are shifted with LCFA combustion rate. Methodology/Principal Findings Large-scale unbiased metabolomics analysis was performed using GC/TOF-MS on buffer and mitochondrial matrix fractions obtained prior to and after 20 min of palmitate catabolism (n = 7 mice/condition). Three palmitate concentrations (2, 9 and 19 µM; corresponding to low, intermediate and high oxidation rates) and 9 µM palmitate plus tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and electron transport chain inhibitors were each tested and compared to zero palmitate control incubations. Paired comparisons of the 0 and 20 min samples were made by Student's t-test. False discovery rate were estimated and Type I error rates assigned. Major metabolite groups were organic acids, amines and amino acids, free fatty acids and sugar phosphates. Palmitate oxidation was associated with unique profiles of metabolites, a subset of which correlated to palmitate oxidation rate. In particular, palmitate oxidation rate was associated with distinct changes in the levels of TCA cycle intermediates within and effluxed from mitochondria. Conclusions/Significance This proof-of-principle study establishes that large-scale metabolomics methods can be applied to organelle-level models to discover metabolite patterns reflective of LCFA combustion, which may lead to identification of molecules linking muscle fat

  3. Ammonium-oxidizing bacteria facilitate aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2014-01-01

    Sulfanilic acid (SA) is a toxic sulfonated aromatic amine commonly found in anaerobically treated azo dye contaminated effluents. Aerobic acclimatization of SA-degrading mixed microbial culture could lead to co-enrichment of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) because of the concomitant release of ammonium from SA oxidation. To what extent the co-enriched AOB would affect SA oxidation at various ammonium concentrations was unclear. Here, a series of batch kinetic experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of AOB on aerobic SA degradation in an acclimatized activated sludge culture capable of oxidizing SA and ammonium simultaneously. To account for the effect of AOB on SA degradation, allylthiourea was used to inhibit AOB activity in the culture. The results indicated that specific SA degradation rate of the mixed culture was negatively correlated with the initial ammonium concentration (0-93 mM, R²= 0.99). The presence of AOB accelerated SA degradation by reducing the inhibitory effect of ammonium (≥ 10 mM). The Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to correlate substrate concentration (SA and ammonium) and oxygen uptake rate. This study revealed, for the first time, that AOB could facilitate SA degradation at high concentration of ammonium (≥ 10 mM) in an enriched activated sludge culture. PMID:25259503

  4. An injectable oxidated hyaluronic acid/adipic acid dihydrazide hydrogel as a vitreous substitute.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Yu; Chen, Ko-Hua; Chen, Yu-Chun; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Tseng, Ching-Li; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Vitrectomy is a common procedure for treating ocular-related diseases. The surgery involves removing the vitreous humor from the center of the eye, and vitreous substitutes are needed to replace the vitreous humor after vitrectomy. In the present study, we developed a colorless, transparent and injectable hydrogel with appropriate refractive index as a vitreous substitute. The hydrogel is formed by oxidated hyaluronic acid (oxi-HA) cross-linked with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH). Hyaluronic acid (HA) was oxidized by sodium periodate to create aldehyde functional groups, which could be cross-linked by ADH. The refractive index of this hydrogel ranged between 1.3420 and 1.3442, which is quite similar to human vitreous humor (1.3345). The degradation tests demonstrated that the hydrogel could maintain the gel matrix over 35 days, depending on the ADH concentration. In addition, the cytotoxicity was evaluated on retina pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells cultivated following the ISO standard (tests for in vitro cytotoxicity), and the hydrogel was found to be non-toxic. In a preliminary animal study, the oxi-HA/ADH hydrogel was injected into the vitreous cavity of rabbit eyes. The evaluations of slit-lamp observation, intraocular pressure, cornea thickness and histological examination showed no significant abnormal biological reactions for 3 weeks. This study suggests that the injectable oxi-HA/ADH hydrogel should be a potential vitreous substitute. PMID:20843434

  5. Injectable oxidized hyaluronic acid/adipic acid dihydrazide hydrogel for nucleus pulposus regeneration.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chun; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-08-01

    Injectable hydrogel allows irregular surgical defects to be completely filled, lessens the risk of implant migration, and minimizes surgical defects due to the solution-gel state transformation. Here, we first propose a method for preparing oxidized hyaluronic acid/adipic acid dihydrazide (oxi-HA/ADH) injectable hydrogel by chemical cross-linking under physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and trinitrobenzene sulfonate assay were used to confirm the oxidation of hyaluronic acid. Rheological properties were measured to evaluate the working ability of the hydrogel for further clinical application. The oxi-HA/ADH in situ forming hydrogel can transform from liquid form into a gel-like matrix within 3-8 min, depending on the operational temperature. Furthermore, hydrogel degradation and cell assessment is also a concern for clinical application. Injectable oxi-HA/ADH8 hydrogel can maintain its gel-like state for at least 5 weeks with a degradation percentage of 40%. Importantly, oxi-HA/ADH8 hydrogel can assist in nucleus pulposus cell synthesis of type II collagen and aggrecan mRNA gene expression according to the results of real-time PCR analysis, and shows good biocompatibility based on cell viability and cytotoxicity assays. Based on the results of the current study, oxi-HA/ADH hydrogel may possess several advantages for future application in nucleus pulposus regeneration. PMID:20193782

  6. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulphuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich Plant-Atmosphere Simulation Chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulphuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulphuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOC). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulphuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapor mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulphuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulphuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  7. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant-atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  8. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  9. Lack of phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase in mice does not promote fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tasseva, Guergana; van der Veen, Jelske N; Lingrell, Susanne; Jacobs, René L; Vance, Dennis E; Vance, Jean E

    2016-02-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) converts phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the liver. Mice lacking PEMT are protected from high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, and exhibit increased whole-body energy expenditure and oxygen consumption. Since skeletal muscle is a major site of fatty acid oxidation and energy utilization, we determined if rates of fatty acid oxidation/oxygen consumption in muscle are higher in Pemt(-/-) mice than in Pemt(+/+) mice. Although PEMT is abundant in the liver, PEMT protein and activity were undetectable in four types of skeletal muscle. Moreover, amounts of PC and PE in the skeletal muscle were not altered by PEMT deficiency. Thus, we concluded that any influence of PEMT deficiency on skeletal muscle would be an indirect consequence of lack of PEMT in liver. Neither the in vivo rate of fatty acid uptake by muscle nor the rate of fatty acid oxidation in muscle explants and cultured myocytes depended upon Pemt genotype. Nor did PEMT deficiency increase oxygen consumption or respiratory function in skeletal muscle mitochondria. Thus, the increased whole body oxygen consumption in Pemt(-/-) mice, and resistance of these mice to diet-induced weight gain, are not primarily due to increased capacity of skeletal muscle for utilization of fatty acids as an energy source. PMID:26603903

  10. Triiodothyronine activates lactate oxidation without impairing fatty acid oxidation and improves weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a rescue for children with severe cardiac failure. We previously showed that triiodothyronine (T3) improves cardiac function by modulating pyruvate oxidation during weaning. This study was focused on fatty acid (FA) metabolism modulated by T3 for weaning from ECMO after cardiac injury. Methods: Nineteen immature piglets (9.1-15.3 kg) were separated into 3 groups with ECMO (6.5 hours) and wean: normal circulation (Group-C);transient coronary occlusion (10 minutes) followed by ECMO (Group-IR); and IR with T3 supplementation (Group-IR-T3). 13-Carbon labeled lactate, medium-chain and long-chain FAs were infused as oxidative substrates. Substrate fractional contribution to the citric acid cycle (FC) was analyzed by 13-Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: ECMO depressed circulating T3 levels to 40% baseline at 4 hours and were restored in Group-IR-T3. Group-IR decreased cardiac power, which was not fully restorable and 2 pigs were lost because of weaning failure. Group-IR also depressed FC-lactate, while the excellent contractile function and energy efficiency in Group-IR-T3 occurred along with a marked FC-lactate increase and [ATP]/[ADP] without either decreasing FC-FAs or elevating myocardial oxygen consumption over Group-C or -IR. Conclusions: T3 releases inhibition of lactate oxidation following ischemia-reperfusion injury without impairing FA oxidation. These findings indicate that T3 depression during ECMO is maladaptive, and that restoring levels improves metabolic flux and enhances contractile function during weaning.

  11. Lewis Acid Catalysis in the Oxidative Cycloaddition of Thiophenes(1).

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanqiang; Thiemann, Thies; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Mataka, Shuntaro; Tashiro, Masashi

    1997-11-14

    Thiophenes 1 were treated with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (m-CPBA) under BF(3).Et(2)O catalysis to afford thiophene S-monoxides. These could be reacted in situ as intermediary species with a number of dienophiles to provide arenes (with alkynes as dienophiles) or 7-thiabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene 7-oxides (with alkenes as dienophiles). It was also possible to isolate thiophene S-monoxides in solution and to cycloadd them in a second step. In either way it could be shown that the use of BF(3).Et(2)O enhances the yields of the oxidative cycloaddition of thiophenes considerably. Moreover a greater variety of dienophiles (29a, 29b, 29c) could be reacted with thiophenes than in the case of the noncatalyzed reaction. All cycloadditions catalyzed by BF(3).Et(2)O give only a single diastereoisomer as cycloadduct. The reactions show a high pi-facial selectivity, a fact that can be explained by the Cieplak-effect. Without added dienophiles, 2-methylthiophene (1e) gave a single dimer (36) of 2-methylthiophene S-monoxide, whereas 2,5-dimethylthiophene (1a) gave three dimers (32a-c). In the case of tetrasubstituted thiophenes, thiophene S-monoxides (e.g., 31b and 31c) could be isolated in substance. PMID:11671894

  12. Enhanced charge trapping in bipolar spacer oxides during low-dose-rate irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Reber, R.A. Jr.; Winokur, P.S.; Kosier, S.L.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Nowlin, R.N.; Pease, R.L.; DeLaus, M.

    1994-03-01

    Thermally-stimulated-current and capacitance-voltage measurements reveal enhanced hole trapping in bipolar spacer-oxide capacitors irradiated at 0 V at low dose rates. Possible mechanisms and implications for bipolar low-rate response are discussed.

  13. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  14. Thermal-oxidation of biodiesel by pressurized-differential scanning calorimetry: Effects of heating ramp rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils or animal fats with methanol or ethanol, is a mixture of relatively stable (saturated) and oxidatively unstable (unsaturated) long-chain fatty acid alkyl esters. During storage, oxidative degradation caused by contact with air is of utm...

  15. Low Phytic Acid Barley Responses to Phosphorus Rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low phytic acid (LPA) barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars partition phosphorus in seed tissue differently than conventional barley cultivars through a reduction in seed phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexkisphosphate) coupled with an increase in inorganic phosphorus. The response of the LPA...

  16. Increasing dietary palmitic acid decreases fat oxidation and daily energy expenditure123

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, Janice Y; Ugrasbul, Figen

    2005-01-01

    Background Oleic acid (OA) is oxidized more rapidly than is palmitic acid (PA). Objective We hypothesized that changing the dietary intakes of PA and OA would affect fatty acid oxidation and energy expenditure. Design A double-masked trial was conducted in 43 healthy young adults, who, after a 28-d, baseline, solid-food diet (41% of energy as fat, 8.4% as PA, and 13.1% as OA), were randomly assigned to one of two 28-d formula diets: high PA (40% of energy as fat, 16.8% as PA, and 16.4% as OA; n = 21) or high OA (40% of energy as fat, 1.7% as PA, and 31.4% as OA; n = 22). Differences in the change from baseline were evaluated by analysis of covariance. Results In the fed state, the respiratory quotient was lower (P = 0.01) with the high OA (0.86 ± 0.01) than with the high-PA (0.89 ± 0.01) diet, and the rate of fat oxidation was higher (P = 0.03) with the high-OA (0.0008 ± 0.0001) than with the high-PA (0.0005 ± 0.0001 mg · kg fat-free mass−1 · min−1) diet. Resting energy expenditure in the fed and fasting states was not significantly different between groups. Change in daily energy expenditure in the high-OA group (9 ± 60 kcal/d) was significantly different from that in the high-PA group (−214 ±69 kcal/d; P = 0.02 or 0.04 when expressed per fat-free mass). Conclusions Increases in dietary PA decrease fat oxidation and daily energy expenditure, whereas decreases in PA and increases in OA had the opposite effect. Increases in dietary PA may increase the risk of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:16087974

  17. Photochemical oxidation of chloride ion by ozone in acid aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Levanov, Alexander V; Isaykina, Oksana Ya; Amirova, Nazrin K; Antipenko, Ewald E; Lunin, Valerii V

    2015-11-01

    The experimental investigation of chloride ion oxidation under the action of ozone and ultraviolet radiation with wavelength 254 nm in the bulk of acid aqueous solution at pH 0-2 has been performed. Processes of chloride oxidation in these conditions are the same as the chemical reactions in the system O3 - OH - Cl(-)(aq). Despite its importance in the environment and for ozone-based water treatment, this reaction system has not been previously investigated in the bulk solution. The end products are chlorate ion ClO3(-) and molecular chlorine Cl2. The ions of trivalent iron have been shown to be catalysts of Cl(-) oxidation. The dependencies of the products formation rates on the concentrations of O3 and H(+) have been studied. The chemical mechanism of Cl(-) oxidation and Cl2 emission and ClO3(-) formation has been proposed. According to the mechanism, the dominant primary process of chloride oxidation represents the complex interaction with hydroxyl radical OH with the formation of Cl2(-) anion-radical intermediate. OH radical is generated on ozone photolysis in aqueous solution. The key subsequent processes are the reactions Cl2(-) + O3 → ClO + O2 + Cl(-) and ClO + H2O2 → HOCl + HO2. Until the present time, they have not been taken into consideration on mechanistic description and modelling of Cl(-) oxidation. The final products are formed via the reactions 2ClO → Cl2O2, Cl2O2 + H2O → 2H(+) + Cl(-) + ClO3(-) and HOCl + H(+) + Cl(-) ⇄ H2O + Cl2. Some portion of chloride is oxidized directly by O3 molecule with the formation of molecular chlorine in the end. PMID:26077317

  18. RATES OF HYDROUS FERRIC OXIDE CRYSTALLIZATION AND THE INFLUENCE ON COPRECIPITATED ARSENATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate coprecipitated with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was stabilized against dissolution during transformation of HFO to more crystalline iron (hydr)oxides. The rate of arsenate stabilization approximately coincided with the rate of HFO transformation at pH 6 and 40 ?C. Compa...

  19. Electrochemical protection of zirconium in oxidizing hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuu, T-L.; Maguire, M.

    1984-06-01

    An electrochemical protection technique using cathodic polarization to maintain zirconium below its critical repassivation potential was used to avoid pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hydrochloric acid (HCI) containing ferric ions (Fe/sup +3/). Corrosion and pit penetration rates are reported for pickled, abraded, and as-received surface conditions in 10, 20, and 37% HCI containing 50, 100, or 500 ppm Fe/sup +3/ at temperatures to boiling. The pickled surface was the least susceptible to pitting in the 64 day tests. Electrochemical protection is then evaluated for total immersion, partial immersion, U-bend, and constant strain rate tensile tests. Protection is effective in eliminating pitting and SCC in 10 and 20% HCI containing Fe/sup +3/.

  20. Oxidation of flavonoids by hypochlorous acid: reaction kinetics and antioxidant activity studies.

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Stawowska, Katarzyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2016-08-01

    Flavonoids, plant polyphenols, ubiquitous components of human diet, are excellent antioxidants. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by activated neutrophils, is highly reactive chlorinating and oxidizing species. It has been reported earlier that flavonoids are chlorinated by HOCl. Here we show that flavonoids from flavonol subclass are also oxidized by HOCl, but only if the latter is in a large molar excess (≥ 10). The kinetics of this reaction was studied by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, at different pH. We found that flavonols were oxidized by HOCl with the rate constants of the order of 10(4)-10(5) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.5. Antioxidant activity of HOCl-modified flavonoids was measured by 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) method. Slightly higher antioxidant activity, compared to parent compounds, was observed for flavonols after their reaction with equimolar or moderate excess of HOCl whereas flavonols treated with high molar excess of HOCl exhibited decrease in antioxidant activity. The mechanism of flavonoid reaction with HOCl at physiological pH is proposed, and biological consequences of this reaction are discussed. PMID:27225705

  1. A new syndrome with ethylmalonic aciduria and normal fatty acid oxidation in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Burlina, A B; Dionisi-Vici, C; Bennett, M J; Gibson, K M; Servidei, S; Bertini, E; Hale, D E; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Sabetta, G; Zacchello, F

    1994-01-01

    We describe four Italian male infants with a novel clinical phenotype characterized by orthostatic acrocyanosis, relapsing petechiae, chronic diarrhea, progressive pyramidal signs, mental retardation, and brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. The first symptoms appeared after the termination of breast-feeding and introduction of formula feeding. Marked persistent 2-ethylmalonic aciduria was associated with abnormal excretion of C4-C5(n-butyryl-, isobutyryl-, isovaleryl-, and 2-methylbutyryl-)acylglycines and acylcarnitines and with intermittent lactic acidosis. Short- and branched-chain plasma acylcarnitine levels were also elevated. 2-Ethylmalonic aciduria is generally regarded as being indicative of a defect in fatty acid oxidation. Extensive studies of cultured fibroblasts failed to reveal such a defect. The observation of intermittent urinary excretion of 2-ethylhydracrylic acid pointed to involvement of the isoleucine R pathway in ethylmalonate biosynthesis. This hypothesis was tentatively corroborated by the biochemical responses to an oral isoleucine challenge in two patients. However, fibroblast studies showed normal oxidation rates of (14C)isoleucine (ul), indicating that this is not a defect of isoleucine oxidation expressed in skin fibroblasts. In one of two patients tested, cytochrome c oxidase activity was partially reduced (45%) in cultured fibroblasts. This unique clinical and biochemical phenotype identifies a new metabolic encephalopathy of yet undetermined cause. PMID:8283379

  2. Thrombin-activated human platelets acutely generate oxidized docosahexaenoic-acid-containing phospholipids via 12-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lloyd T; Thomas, Christopher P; Kühn, Hartmut; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2010-10-01

    Arachidonate-containing oxidized phospholipids are acutely generated by 12-LOX (12-lipoxygenase) in agonist-activated platelets. In the present study, formation of structurally related lipids by oxidation of DHA (docosahexaenoic acid)-containing phospholipids is demonstrated using lipidomic approaches. Precursor scanning reverse-phase LC (liquid chromatography)-MS/MS (tandem MS) identified a new family of lipids that comprise phospholipid-esterified HDOHE (hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid). Two diacyl and two plasmalogen PEs (phosphatidylethanolamines) containing predominantly the 14-HDOHE positional isomer (18:0p/14-HDOHE-PE, 18:0a/14-HDOHE-PE, 16:0a/14-HDOHE-PE and 16:0p/14-HDOHE-PE) were structurally characterized using MS/MS and by comparison with biogenic standards. An involvement of 12-LOX was indicated as purified recombinant human 12-LOX also generated the 14-HDOHE isomer from DHA. Pharmacological studies using inhibitors and recombinant platelet 12-LOX indicate that they form via esterification of newly formed non-esterified HDOHE. HDOHE-PEs formed at significant rates (2-4 ng/4×10(7) cells) within 2-180 min of thrombin stimulation, and their formation was blocked by calcium chelation. In summary, a new family of oxidized phospholipid was identified in thrombin-activated human platelets. PMID:20653566

  3. High fat intake lowers hepatic fatty acid synthesis and raises fatty acid oxidation in aerobic muscle in Shetland ponies.

    PubMed

    Geelen, S N; Blázquez, C; Geelen, M J; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M; Beynen, A C

    2001-07-01

    The metabolic effects of feeding soyabean oil instead of an isoenergetic amount of maize starch plus glucose were studied in ponies. Twelve adult Shetland ponies were given a control diet (15 g fat/kg DM) or a high-fat diet (118 g fat/kg DM) according to a parallel design. The diets were fed for 45 d. Plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations decreased by 55 % following fat supplementation. Fat feeding also reduced glycogen concentrations significantly by up to 65 % in masseter, gluteus and semitendinosus muscles (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 respectively). The high-fat diet significantly increased the TAG content of semitendinosus muscle by 80 % (P < 0.05). Hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase activities were 53 % (P < 0.01) and 56 % (P < 0.01) lower respectively in the high-fat group, but diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity was unaffected. Although carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I (CPT-I) activity in liver mitochondria was not influenced, fat supplementation did render CPT-I less sensitive to inhibition by malonyl-CoA. There was no significant effect of diet on the activity of phosphofructokinase in the different muscles. The activity of citrate synthase was raised significantly (by 25 %; P < 0.05) in the masseter muscle of fat-fed ponies, as was CPT-I activity (by 46 %; P < 0.01). We conclude that fat feeding enhances both the transport of fatty acids through the mitochondrial inner membrane and the oxidative capacity of highly-aerobic muscles. The higher oxidative ability together with the depressed rate of de novo fatty acid synthesis in liver may contribute to the dietary fat-induced decrease in plasma TAG concentrations in equines. PMID:11432762

  4. Electrophoretic deposition and electrochemical behavior of novel graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Qian; Jia, Zhaojun; Xu, Xuchen; Shi, Yuying; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-11-01

    Novel ternary graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite (GO-HY-HA) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Ti substrate using anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Hyaluronic acid was employed as charging additive and dispersion agent during EPD. The kinetics and mechanism of the deposition, and the microstructure of the coated samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and microscopic Fourier transform infrared analysis. The results showed that the addition of GO sheets into the HY-HA suspensions could increase the deposition rate and inhibit cracks creation and propagation in the coatings. The corrosion resistant of the resulting samples were evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization method in simulated body fluid, and the GO-HY-HA coatings could effectively improve the anti-corrosion property of the Ti substrate.

  5. Carboxylic acids in secondary aerosols from oxidation of cyclic monoterpenes by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Glasius, M.; Lahaniati, M.; Calogirou, A.; Di Bella, D.; Jensen, N.R.; Hjorth, J.; Kotzias, D.; Larsen, B.R.

    2000-03-15

    A series of smog chamber experiments have been conducted in which five cyclic monoterpenes were oxidized by ozone. The evolved secondary aerosol was analyzed by GC-MS and HPLC-MS for nonvolatile polar oxidation products with emphasis on the identification of carboxylic acids. Three classes of compounds were determined at concentration levels corresponding to low percentage molar yields: i.e., dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and hydroxyketocarboxylic acids. Carboxylic acids are highly polar and have lower vapor pressures than their corresponding aldehydes and may thus play an important role in secondary organic aerosol formation processes. The most abundant carboxylic acids were the following: cis-pinic acid AB1(cis-3-carboxy-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) from {alpha} and {beta}-pinene; cis-pinonic acid A3 (cis-3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) and cis-10-hydroxypinonic acid Ab6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxyacetylcyclobutyl-ethanoic acid) from {alpha}-pinene and {beta}-pinene; cis-3-caric acid C1 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-cyclopropyldiethanoic acid), cis-3-caronic acid C3 (2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid), and cis-10-hydroxy-3-caronic acid C6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3(hydroxy-2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid) from 3-carene; cis-sabinic acid S1 (cis-2-carboxy-1-isopropylcyclopropylethanoic acid) from sabinene; limonic acid L1 (3-isopropenylhexanedioic acid), limononic acid L3 (3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanoic acid), 7-hydroxy-limononic acid L6 (3-isopropenyl-7-hydroxy-6-oxoheptanoic acid), and 7-hydroxylimononic acid Lg{prime} (7-hydroxy-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoic acid) from limonene.

  6. Neuropsychological Outcomes in Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders: 85 Cases Detected by Newborn Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waisbren, Susan E.; Landau, Yuval; Wilson, Jenna; Vockley, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders include conditions in which the transport of activated acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) into the mitochondria or utilization of these substrates is disrupted or blocked. This results in a deficit in the conversion of fat into energy. Most patients with fatty acid oxidation defects are now identified through…

  7. The Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation with Trifluoroacetic Acid and Household Sodium Percarbonate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Clemons, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    A method for carrying out the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of cyclopentanone to [delta]-valerolactone in a large-section introductory organic chemistry laboratory course is reported. The oxidizing agent is trifluoroperoxyacetic acid generated in situ from trifluoroacetic acid and household sodium percarbonate such as OxiClean, Oxi Magic, or…

  8. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ester with pentaerythritol. 721.3680 Section 721.3680 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ester with pentaerythritol. 721.3680 Section 721.3680 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  10. Optimization of Lipase-Mediated Synthesis of 1-Nonene Oxide Using Phenylacetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmalek, Emilia; Arumugam, Mahashanon; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Herein, an efficient epoxidation of 1-nonene is described. In a simple epoxidation system, commercially available Novozym 435, an immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were utilized to facilitate the in situ oxidation of phenylacetic acid to the corresponding peroxy acid which then reacted with 1-nonene to give 1-nonene oxide with high yield and selectivity. The aliphatic terminal alkene was epoxidised efficiently in chloroform to give an excellent yield (97%–99%) under the optimum reaction conditions, including temperature (35 °C), initial H2O2 concentration (30%), H2O2 amount (4.4 mmol), H2O2 addition rate (one step), acid amount (8.8 mmol), and stirring speed (250 rpm). Interestingly, the enzyme was stable under the single-step addition of H2O2 with a catalytic activity of 190.0 Ug−1. The entire epoxidation process was carried out within 12 h using a conventional water bath shaker. PMID:23202943

  11. Comparison of degradation reactions of Acid Yellow 61 in both oxidation processes of H2O2/UV and O3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Z; Yedeler, A; Kettrup, A

    2001-07-01

    The comparison of degradation of Acid Yellow 61 as a model dye compound in both oxidation processes of H2O2/UV and O3 has been studied. When the decolorization rate of Acid Yellow 61 in both reactions presented similar, it was found there are some differences from the results of AOX removal and production of inorganic ions and organic acids. The results reveal that the H2O2/UV has beneficial effect on mineralization than O3 only for degradation of Acid Yellow 61 solution and it is possible for enhancement of method efficiency by taking longer reaction time and addition of high concentration of oxidants. PMID:11590760

  12. Excess processing of oxidative damaged bases causes hypersensitivity to oxidative stress and low dose rate irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Y; Yamasaki, A; Takatori, K; Suzuki, M; Kobayashi, J; Takao, M; Zhang-Akiyama, Q-M

    2015-10-01

    Ionizing radiations such as X-ray and γ-ray can directly or indirectly produce clustered or multiple damages in DNA. Previous studies have reported that overexpression of DNA glycosylases in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and human lymphoblast cells caused increased sensitivity to γ-ray and X-ray irradiation. However, the effects and the mechanisms of other radiation, such as low dose rate radiation, heavy-ion beams, or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are still poorly understood. In the present study, we constructed a stable HeLaS3 cell line overexpressing human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) protein. We determined the survival of HeLaS3 and HeLaS3/hOGG1 cells exposed to UV, heavy-ion beams, γ-rays, and H2O2. The results showed that HeLaS3 cells overexpressing hOGG1 were more sensitive to γ-rays, OH(•), and H2O2, but not to UV or heavy-ion beams, than control HeLaS3. We further determined the levels of 8-oxoG foci and of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by detecting γ-H2AX foci formation in DNA. The results demonstrated that both γ-rays and H2O2 induced 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) foci formation in HeLaS3 cells. hOGG1-overexpressing cells had increased amounts of γ-H2AX foci and decreased amounts of 8-oxoG foci compared with HeLaS3 control cells. These results suggest that excess hOGG1 removes the oxidatively damaged 8-oxoG in DNA more efficiently and therefore generates more DSBs. Micronucleus formation also supported this conclusion. Low dose-rate γ-ray effects were also investigated. We first found that overexpression of hOGG1 also caused increased sensitivity to low dose rate γ-ray irradiation. The rate of micronucleus formation supported the notion that low dose rate irradiation increased genome instability. PMID:26059740

  13. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-20

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology. PMID:22012395

  14. The smoking-associated oxidant hypothiocyanous acid induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Kwan, Jair; Suryo Rahmanto, Aldwin; Witting, Paul K; Davies, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Considerable evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid) formation. We hypothesized that this thiol-specific oxidant may target the Zn(2+)-thiol cluster of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), resulting in enzyme dysfunction and reduced formation of the critical signalling molecule NO•. Decreased NO• bioavailability is an early and critical event in atherogenesis, and HOSCN-mediated damage to eNOS may contribute to smoking-associated disease. In the present study it is shown that exposure of isolated eNOS to HOSCN or MPO/H2O2/SCN(-) decreased active dimeric eNOS levels, and increased inactive monomer and Zn(2+) release, compared with controls, HOCl (hypochlorous acid)- or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-treated samples. eNOS activity was increasingly compromised by MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-) concentrations. Exposure of HCAEC (human coronary artery endothelial cell) lysates to pre-formed HOSCN, or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-), increased eNOS monomerization and Zn(2+) release, and decreased activity. Intact HCAECs exposed to HOCl and HOSCN had decreased eNOS activity and NO2(-)/NO3(-) formation (products of NO• decomposition), and increased free Zn(2+). Exposure of isolated rat aortic rings to HOSCN resulted in thiol loss, and decreased eNOS activity and cGMP levels. Overall these data indicate that high SCN(-) levels, as seen in smokers, can increase HOSCN formation and enhance eNOS dysfunction in human endothelial cells, with this potentially contributing to increased atherogenesis in smokers. PMID:24112082

  15. Water oxidation catalysis with nonheme iron complexes under acidic and basic conditions: homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    PubMed

    Hong, Dachao; Mandal, Sukanta; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Llobet, Antoni; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-08-19

    Thermal water oxidation by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) was catalyzed by nonheme iron complexes, such as Fe(BQEN)(OTf)2 (1) and Fe(BQCN)(OTf)2 (2) (BQEN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, BQCN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)cyclohexanediamine, OTf = CF3SO3(-)) in a nonbuffered aqueous solution; turnover numbers of 80 ± 10 and 20 ± 5 were obtained in the O2 evolution reaction by 1 and 2, respectively. The ligand dissociation of the iron complexes was observed under acidic conditions, and the dissociated ligands were oxidized by CAN to yield CO2. We also observed that 1 was converted to an iron(IV)-oxo complex during the water oxidation in competition with the ligand oxidation. In addition, oxygen exchange between the iron(IV)-oxo complex and H2(18)O was found to occur at a much faster rate than the oxygen evolution. These results indicate that the iron complexes act as the true homogeneous catalyst for water oxidation by CAN at low pHs. In contrast, light-driven water oxidation using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) as a photosensitizer and S2O8(2-) as a sacrificial electron acceptor was catalyzed by iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from the iron complexes under basic conditions as the result of the ligand dissociation. In a buffer solution (initial pH 9.0) formation of the iron hydroxide nanoparticles with a size of around 100 nm at the end of the reaction was monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS) in situ and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements. We thus conclude that the water oxidation by CAN was catalyzed by short-lived homogeneous iron complexes under acidic conditions, whereas iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from iron complexes act as a heterogeneous catalyst in the light-driven water oxidation reaction under basic conditions. PMID:23895380

  16. Acidity variations across the cloud drop size spectrum and their influence on rates of atmospheric sulfate production

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, J.L. Jr.; Bator, A.; Rao, Xin; Demoz, B.

    1994-11-01

    Measurements of pH variations within natural cloud drop populations reveal that small drops are often more acidic than large drops. Cloud samples collected from coastal stratus clouds, frontal clouds, and radiation fogs, from heavily polluted and pristine locations, had pH values ranging from below three to more than seven. Differences between small and large cloud drop acidities as large as two pH units were observed, although differences were generally below one pH unit. This chemical heterogenity can significantly enhance oxidation of sulfur dioxide to sulfate within clouds, relative to oxidation rates predicted from the average cloudwater composition. One-third of the sampled clouds were estimated to experience an increase of at least 20% in the rate of sulfur oxidation by ozone (8% of the clouds had increases exceeding 100%) as a result of acidity differences between large and small cloud drops. These findings suggest that sulfate production within clouds, a critical component of the global sulfur cycle, may be more rapid than previously though. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  18. Interference by morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and related buffers in phenolic oxidation by peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the 4-morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer being used. In the presence of MES, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H2O2, was uti...

  19. Selective Aerobic Oxidation of 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural to 5-Formyl-2-furancarboxylic Acid in Water.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Maria; Aresta, Michele; Dibenedetto, Angela

    2016-05-23

    A simple, cheap, and selective catalyst based on copper/cerium oxides is described for the oxidation of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (5-HMF) in water. An almost quantitative conversion (99 %) with excellent (90 %) selectivity towards the formation of 5-formyl-2-furancarboxylic acid, a platform molecule for other high value chemicals, is observed. The catalyst does not require any pretreatment or additives, such as bases, to obtain high yield and selectivity in water as solvent and using oxygen as oxidant. When a physical mixture of the oxides is used, low conversion and selectivity are observed. Air can be used instead of oxygen, but a lower conversion rate is observed if the same overall pressure is used, and the selectivity remains high. The catalyst can be recovered almost quantitatively and reused. Deactivation of the catalyst, observed in repeated runs, is due to the deposition of humins on its surface. Upon calcination the catalyst almost completely recovers its activity and selectivity, proving that the catalyst is robust. PMID:27101568

  20. Preparation and characterization of a composite hydrogel with graphene oxide as an acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting; Sui, Zhu-Yin; Yang, Quan-Sheng; Zhang, Xuetong; Han, Bao-Hang

    2015-04-28

    In this study, a facile method for synthesizing a novel graphene oxide/pyrrole-formaldehyde (GOP-1) composite hydrogel was developed via in situ polymerization of pyrrole and formaldehyde in the presence of graphene oxide sheets without any additional catalyst. During the polymerization, graphene oxide can act as a two-dimensional template to regulate the aggregation state of polymer and as an acid catalyst to accelerate the reaction rate of pyrrole and formaldehyde. The morphology and microstructure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The chemical properties were analyzed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The freeze-dried GOP-1 composite hydrogel exhibited a large specific surface area, high nitrogen content, and three-dimensional network structure. Based on the above features, the freeze-dried GOP-1 composite hydrogel used as a gas adsorbent showed a high carbon dioxide uptake capacity at 1.0 bar and 273 K (11.1 wt%), in sharp contrast to that of graphene oxide (7.4 wt%). Furthermore, the as-prepared composite hydrogel may possess attractive potential in the fields of electrode material, tissue engineering, and water treatment. PMID:25760407

  1. Biochemical properties of porcine white adipose tissue mitochondria and relevance to fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koekemoer, T C; Oelofsen, W

    2001-07-01

    The capacity of white adipose tissue mitochondria to support a high beta-oxidative flux was investigated by comparison to liver mitochondria. Based on marker enzyme activities and electron microscopy, the relative purity of the isolated mitochondria was similar thus allowing a direct comparison on a protein basis. The results confirm the comparable capacity of adipose tissue and liver mitochondria for palmitoyl-carnitine oxidation. Relative to liver, both citrate synthase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were increased 7.87- and 10.38-fold, respectively. In contrast, adipose tissue NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase was decreased (2.85-fold). Such modifications in the citric acid cycle are expected to severely restrict citrate oxidation in porcine adipose tissue. Except for cytochrome c oxidase, activities of the enzyme complexes comprising the electron transport chain were not significantly different. The decrease in adipose cytochrome c oxidase activity could partly be attributed to a decreased inner membrane as suggested by lipid and enzyme analysis. In addition, Western blotting indicated that adipose and liver mitochondria possess similar quantities of cytochrome c oxidase protein. Taken together these results indicate that not only is the white adipose tissue protoplasm relatively rich in mitochondria, but that these mitochondria contain comparable enzymatic machinery to support a relatively high beta-oxidative rate. PMID:11435134

  2. A Finite Rate Chemical Analysis of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination Effects on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen F.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. A finite rate chemical analysis was performed to determine the levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility at conditions corresponding to Mach 6 to 8 flight simulations. Results indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, corroborating previously obtained measurements. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate the effects of nitric oxide on scramjet performance. Results indicate that nitric oxide in the test gas causes a small increase in heat release and thrust performance for the test conditions investigated. However, a rate constant uncertainty analysis suggests that the effect of nitric oxide ranges from no net effect, to an increase of about 10 percent in thrust performance.

  3. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride and [1,2- 14C]dichloroethene to 14CO2 under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  4. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-08-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-{sup 14}C]vinyl chloride and [1,2-{sup 14}C]dichloroethene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  5. Substantial high-affinity methanotroph populations in Andisols effect high rates of atmospheric methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Maxfield, Pete J; Hornibrook, Ed R C; Evershed, Richard P

    2009-10-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria in soils derived from volcanic ash (Andisols) were characterized via time series (13) C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) labelling. Three Andisols were incubated under 2 ppmv (13) CH4 for up to 18 weeks, thus enabling high-affinity methanotrophs to be selectively characterized and quantified. PLFA profiles from all soils were broadly similar, but the magnitude of the high-affinity methanotrophic populations determined through (13) C-PLFA-stable isotope probing displayed sizeable differences. Substantial incorporation of (13) C indicated very large high-affinity methanotrophic populations in two of the soils. Such high values are far in excess (10×) of those observed for a range of mineral soils incubated under similar conditions (Bull et al., 2000; Maxfield et al., 2006; 2008a, b). Two of the three Andisols studied also displayed high but variable CH4 oxidation rates ranging from 0.03 to 1.58 nmol CH4 g(-1) d.wt. h(-1) . These findings suggest that Andisols, a previously unstudied soil class with respect to high-affinity methanotrophic bacteria, may oxidize significant amounts of atmospheric methane despite their low areal coverage globally. PMID:23765899

  6. Current issues regarding treatment of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders.

    PubMed

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Bastin, Jean; Gillingham, Melanie; Morris, Andrew; Wijburg, Frits; Wilcken, Bridget

    2010-10-01

    Treatment recommendations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) defects are diverse. With implementation of newborn screening and identification of asymptomatic patients, it is necessary to define whom to treat and how strictly. We here discuss critical questions that are currently under debate. For some asymptomatic long-chain defects, long-chain fat restriction plays a minor role, and a normal diet may be introduced. For patients presenting only with myopathic symptoms, e.g., during exercise, treatment may be adapted to energy demand. As a consequence, patients with exercise-induced myopathy may be able to return to normal activity when provided with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) prior to exercise. There is no need to limit participation in sports. Progression of retinopathy in disorders of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein complex is closely associated with hydroxyacylcarnitine accumulation. A strict low-fat diet with MCT supplementation is recommended to slow or prevent progression of chorioretinopathy. Additional docosahexanoic acid does not prevent the decline in retinal function but does promote nonspecific improvement in visual acuity and is recommended. There is no evidence that L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial. Thus, supplementation with L-carnitine in a newborn identified by screening with either a medium-chain or long-chain defect is not supported. With respect to the use of the odd-chain medium-chain triglyceride triheptanoin in myopathic phenotypes, randomized trials are needed to establish whether triheptanoin is more effective than even-chain MCT. With increasing pathophysiological knowledge, new treatment options have been identified and are being clinically evaluated. These include the use of bezafibrates in myopathic long-chain defects. PMID:20830526

  7. Reaction rate constant for dry air oxidation of K Basin fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, D.J.

    1998-04-29

    The rate of oxidation of spent nuclear fuel stored in the K Basin water is an important parameter when assessing the processes and accident scenarios for preparing the fuel for dry storage. The literature provides data and rate laws for the oxidation of unirradiated uranium in various environments. Measurement data for the dry air oxidation of K Basin fuel is compared to the literature data for linear oxidation in dry air. Equations for the correlations and statistical bounds to the K Basin fuel data and the literature data are selected for predicting nominal and bounding rates for the dry air oxidation of the K Basin fuel. These rate equations are intended for use in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Technical Data book.

  8. Anesthesia with halothane and nitrous oxide alters protein and amino acid metabolism in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Horber, F.F.; Krayer, S.; Rehder, K.; Haymond, M.W.

    1988-09-01

    General anesthesia in combination with surgery is known to result in negative nitrogen balance. To determine whether general anesthesia without concomitant surgery decreases whole body protein synthesis and/or increases whole body protein breakdown, two groups of dogs were studied: Group 1 (n = 6) in the conscious state and Group 2 (n = 8) during general anesthesia employing halothane (1.5 MAC) in 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. Changes in protein metabolism were estimated by isotope dilution techniques employing simultaneous infusions of (4,53H)leucine and alpha-(1-14C)-ketoisocaproate (KIC). Total leucine carbon flux was unchanged or slightly increased in the anesthetized animals when compared to the conscious controls, indicating only a slight increase in the rate of proteolysis. However, leucine oxidation was increased (P less than 0.001) by more than 80% in the anesthetized animals when compared with their conscious controls, whereas whole body nonoxidative leucine disappearance, an indicator of whole body protein synthesis, was decreased. The ratio of leucine oxidation to the nonoxidative rate of leucine disappearance, which provides an index of the catabolism of at least one essential amino acid in the postabsorptive state, was more than twofold increased (P less than 0.001) in the anesthetized animals regardless of the tracer employed. These studies suggest that the administration of anesthesia alone, without concomitant surgery, is associated with a decreased rate of whole body protein synthesis and increased leucine oxidation, resulting in increased leucine and protein catabolism, which may be underlying or initiating some of the protein wasting known to occur in patients undergoing surgery.

  9. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide stress derived from fatty acid beta-oxidation improves fatty acid utilization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hidetaka; Hoshino, Yasushi; Nakase, Kentaro; Usuda, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are a promising raw material for substance production because of their highly reduced and anhydrous nature, which can provide higher fermentation yields than sugars. However, they are insoluble in water and are poorly utilized by microbes in industrial fermentation production. We used fatty acids as raw materials for L-lysine fermentation by emulsification and improved the limited fatty acid-utilization ability of Escherichia coli. We obtained a fatty acid-utilizing mutant strain by laboratory evolution and demonstrated that it expressed lower levels of an oxidative-stress marker than wild type. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) concentration of a fatty acid-utilizing wild-type E. coli strain was higher than that of a glucose-utilizing wild-type E. coli strain. The novel mutation rpsA(D210Y) identified in our fatty acid-utilizing mutant strain enabled us to promote cell growth, fatty-acid utilization, and L-lysine production from fatty acid. Introduction of this rpsA(D210Y) mutation into a wild-type strain resulted in lower H₂O₂ concentrations. The overexpression of superoxide dismutase (sodA) increased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations and inhibited E. coli fatty-acid utilization, whereas overexpression of an oxidative-stress regulator (oxyS) decreased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations and promoted E. coli fatty acid utilization and L-lysine production. Addition of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger thiourea promoted L-lysine production from fatty acids and decreased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations. Among the ROS generated by fatty-acid β-oxidation, H₂O₂ critically affected E. coli growth and L-lysine production. This indicates that the regression of ROS stress promotes fatty acid utilization, which is beneficial for fatty acids used as raw materials in industrial production. PMID:24169950

  10. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate pool size: functional importance for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Marwood, Simon; Bruce, Mark; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major final common pathway for oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids and some amino acids, which produces reducing equivalents in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide that result in production of large amounts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via oxidative phosphorylation. Although regulated primarily by the products of ATP hydrolysis, in particular adenosine diphosphate, the rate of delivery of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain is also a potential regulatory step of oxidative phosphorylation. The TCA cycle is responsible for the generation of approximately 67% of all reducing equivalents per molecule of glucose, hence factors that influence TCA cycle flux will be of critical importance for oxidative phosphorylation. TCA cycle flux is dependent upon the supply of acetyl units, activation of the three non-equilibrium reactions within the TCA cycle, and it has been suggested that an increase in the total concentration of the TCA cycle intermediates (TCAi) is also necessary to augment and maintain TCA cycle flux during exercise. This article reviews the evidence of the functional importance of the TCAi pool size for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle. In parallel with increased oxidative metabolism and TCA cycle flux during exercise, there is an exercise intensity-dependent 4- to 5-fold increase in the concentration of the TCAi. TCAi concentration reaches a peak after 10-15 minutes of exercise, and thereafter tends to decline. This seems to support the suggestion that the concentration of TCAi may be of functional importance for oxidative phosphorylation. However, researchers have been able to induce dissociations between TCAi pool size and oxidative energy provision using a variety of nutritional, pharmacological and exercise interventions. Brief periods of endurance training (5 days or 7 weeks) have been found to result in reduced TCAi pool

  11. Oxidative degradation of bis (2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid in nitric acid studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Groenewold; D. R. Peterman

    2012-10-01

    Samples of bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex-301) were analyzed using direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Positive ion spectra of standard and stereo-pure acids displayed ions typical of the unmodified compound, cationized monomeric and dimeric cluster ion species. In addition, a significant ions 2 u less than the dimeric clusters were seen, that correspond to an oxidatively coupled species designated Cyx2 that is observed as H- or Na-cationized species in the electrospray analyses. Based on uncorrected ion intensities, Cyx2 is estimated to account for about 20% of the total in the standard materials. When samples that were contacted with 3 M HNO3 were analyzed, the positive ion spectrum consisted nearly entirely of ions derived from the oxidatively coupled product, indicating that the acid promotes coupling. The negative ion spectra of the standard acids consisted nearly entirely of the conjugate base that is formed by deprotonation of the acids, and cluster ions containing multiple acid molecules. The negative spectra of the HNO3-contacted samples also contained the conjugate base of the unmodified acid, but also two other species that correspond to the dioxo- and perthio- derivatives. It is concluded that HNO3 contact causes significant oxidation, forming at least three major products, Cyx2, the perthio-acid, and the dioxo-acid.

  12. Oxalic acid capped iron oxide nanorods as a sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Bohidar, H B; Solanki, Pratima R

    2015-08-01

    A label free impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated using protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) functionalized oxalic acid (OA) capped iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods for V. cholerae detection. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, OA-Fe3O4 nanorods were obtained as about 29±1 and 39±1nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of nanorods is found as 116nm (OA-Fe3O4) and 77nm (Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4 nanorods has been investigated in the presence of human epithelial kidney (HEK) cell line 293 using MTT assay. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the OA-Fe3O4 nanorods facilitate cell growth. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/OA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits good linearity in the range of 12.5-500ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.5ng mL(-1), sensitivity 0.1Ωng(-1)ml(-1)cm(-2) and reproducibility more than 11 times. PMID:26048074

  13. Oxidation reaction of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Moriya, Takehiko; Enomoto, Heiji

    2003-07-15

    Stearic acid, being a model compound of high molecular weight carboxylic acids, was oxidized in a batch reactor by changing the oxygen supply with an insufficient oxygen supply at a constant reaction time at 420 degrees C. On the basis of the intermediate products identified by GC/MS, NMR, and HPLC analyses and the free-radical reaction mechanism, the oxidation pathways of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water are discussed. The reaction of carboxylic acids in supercritical water proceeds with the consecutive oxidation of higher molecular weight carboxylic acids to lower molecular weight carboxylic acids through several major pathways. The attack of the hydroxyl radical occurs not only at the carbons in alpha-, beta-, gamma-positions to a --COOH group but also at the carbons ((omega-1)-carbon and/or omega-carbon) far in the alkyl chain from a --COOH group, which may lead to the formation of dicarboxylic acids. PMID:12901673

  14. Acidic properties of supported niobium oxide catalysts: An infrared spectroscopy investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Datka, J.; Turek, A.M.; Jehng, J.M.; Wachs, I.E. )

    1992-05-01

    Chemisorption of pyridine was applied as a method for studying the acidic properties of niobium pentoxide supported on silica, magnesia, alumina, titania, and zirconia. The infrared spectra of adsorbed pyridine were used to evaluate the concentration and the relative strength of Broensted and Lewis acid sites. Lewis acidity was found in all the supported niobium oxide systems, while Broensted acid sites were only detected for niobia supported on the alumina and silica supports. The origin and characteristics of the surface acid sites present in supported niobium oxide catalysts are discussed in the present study.

  15. Micelle-assisted signaling of peracetic acid by the oxidation of pyreneboronic acid via monomer-excimer switching.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyoung; Lee, Hyo Jin; Cho, Min Jeoung; Chang, Suk-Kyu

    2015-08-15

    A simple fluorescent probe for the industrial oxidant peracetic acid (PAA) was investigated. PAA-assisted oxidative conversion of pyrene-1-boronic acid into 1-hydroxypyrene was used as the signaling tool. Pyreneboronic acid was found to display selective signaling behavior, being more responsive to PAA than to other commonly used practical oxidants such as H2O2 and HOCl. The changes in pyrene monomer fluorescence to excimer were used in the quantitative analysis of PAA. When using the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as a micellar additive, the signaling of PAA was markedly enhanced. Selective fluorescence signaling of PAA by pyrene-1-boronic acid with a detection limit of 1.5×10(-6)M in aqueous environment was successfully achieved. PMID:25966389

  16. TREATOGENIC ACTIVITY OF TRICHOLORACETIC ACID IN THE RATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. t is detectable in finished drinking water at levels comparable to the trihalomethanes (930-160 ug/L). CA is also formed in vivo after ingestion of hypochelorite ...

  17. A novel system combining biocatalytic dephosphorylation of L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Homma, Toshimasa; Kondo, Mizuki; Shimomura, Masato

    2011-03-15

    An enzyme electrode was prepared with acid phosphatase (ACP) for development of a new electric power generation system using ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P) as a fuel. The properties of the electrode were investigated with respect to biocatalytic dephosphorylation of AA2P and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid (AA). The enzyme electrode was fabricated by immobilization of ACP through amide linkage onto a self-assembled monolayer of 3-mercaptopropionic acid on a gold electrode. AA2P was not oxidized on a bare gold electrode in the potential sweep range from -0.1 to +0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. However, the enzyme electrode gave an oxidation current in citric buffer solution of pH 5 containing 10 mM of AA2P. The oxidation current began to increase at +0.2V, and reached to 5.0 μA cm(-2) at +0.5 V. The potential +0.2 V corresponded to the onset of oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA). These results suggest that the oxidation current observed with the enzyme electrode is due to AA resulting from dephosphorylation of AA2P. The oxidation current increased with increasing concentration of AA2P and almost leveled off at around the concentration of 5mM. Thus the enzyme electrode brought about biocatalytic conversion of AA2P to AA, followed by electrochemical oxidation of the AA. The oxidation current is likely to be controlled by the biocatalytic reaction. PMID:21247749

  18. [Glucose-fatty acids cycle in cobalt chloride-induced oxidative stress in rats].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Okhrimenko, S M

    2005-01-01

    It was found that the glucose-fatty acids cycle functioned under the oxidative stress, caused by injection of cobalt chloride solution in albino rats. This cycle promoted the adaptation of metabolism and rehabilitated the homeostasis under extreme conditions. Its functioning was regulated by prolonged (during 2-24 hours) rise in activity of amino acids catabolism enzymes (e.g. tyrosine aminotransferase, arginase) and activation of glyconeogenesis after the mobilisation of liver glycogen. This contributed to increase in glucose and free fatty acids contents in blood. The latter is additionally provided by lipid mobilisation under stress. Tyrosine aminotransferase activation occurred both on the transcription level and by enabling of other mechanisms, which probably concerned the stabilisation of this enzyme. Preliminary injection of alpha-tocopherol in vivo significantly decreased the rise in tyrosine aminotransferase and arginase activities and the rate of erythrocyte hemolysis but did not disable them in full. This made evident that in regulation of the glucose-fatty acids cycle not only active metabolites of oxygen but also Co ions were directly enabled. PMID:16335249

  19. Syntheses of hydroxamic acid-containing bicyclic β-lactams via palladium-catalyzed oxidative amidation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Jobbins, Maria O; Miller, Marvin J

    2014-02-21

    Palladium-catalyzed oxidative amidation has been used to synthesize hydroxamic acid-containing bicyclic β-lactam cores. Oxidative cleavage of the pendant alkene provides access to the carboxylic acid in one step. PMID:24483144

  20. The Use of Ascorbate as an Oxidation Inhibitor in Prebiotic Amino Acid Synthesis: A Cautionary Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Hideharu; Eto, Midori; Kawamoto, Yukinori; Kurihara, Hironari; Kaneko, Takeo; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2012-12-01

    It is generally thought that the terrestrial atmosphere at the time of the origin of life was CO2-rich and that organic compounds such as amino acids would not have been efficiently formed abiotically under such conditions. It has been pointed out, however, that the previously reported low yields of amino acids may have been partially due to oxidation by nitrite/nitrate during acid hydrolysis. Specifically, the yield of amino acids was found to have increased significantly (by a factor of several hundred) after acid hydrolysis with ascorbic acid as an oxidation inhibitor. However, it has not been shown that CO2 was the carbon source for the formation of the amino acids detected after acid hydrolysis with ascorbic acid. We therefore reinvestigated the prebiotic synthesis of amino acids in a CO2-rich atmosphere using an isotope labeling experiment. Herein, we report that ascorbic acid does not behave as an appropriate oxidation inhibitor, because it contributes amino acid contaminants as a consequence of its reactions with the nitrogen containing species and formic acid produced during the spark discharge experiment. Thus, amino acids are not efficiently formed from a CO2-rich atmosphere under the conditions studied.

  1. Generation of organic acids and monosaccharides by hydrolytic and oxidative transformation of food processing residues.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Klaus; Bipp, Hans-Peter

    2005-05-01

    Carbohydrate-rich biomass residues, i.e. sugar beet molasses, whey powder, wine yeast, potato peel sludge, spent hops, malt dust and apple marc, were tested as starting materials for the generation of marketable chemicals, e.g. aliphatic acids, sugar acids and mono-/disaccharides. Residues were oxidized or hydrolyzed under acidic or alkaline conditions applying conventional laboratory digestion methods and microwave assisted techniques. Yields and compositions of the oxidation products differed according to the oxidizing agent used. Main products of oxidation by 30% HNO(3) were acetic, glucaric, oxalic and glycolic acids. Applying H(2)O(2)/CuO in alkaline solution, the organic acid yields were remarkably lower with formic, acetic and threonic acids as main products. Gluconic acid was formed instead of glucaric acid throughout. Reaction of a 10% H(2)O(2) solution with sugar beet molasses generated formic and lactic acids mainly. Na(2)S(2)O(8) solutions were very inefficient at oxidizing the residues. Glucose, arabinose and galactose were formed during acidic hydrolysis of malt dust and apple marc. The glucose content reached 0.35 g per gram of residue. Important advantages of the microwave application were lower reaction times and reduced reagent demands. PMID:15607197

  2. Glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferase Isoform-4 (GPAT4) Limits Oxidation of Exogenous Fatty Acids in Brown Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Daniel E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2015-06-12

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4 (GPAT4) null pups grew poorly during the suckling period and, as adults, were protected from high fat diet-induced obesity. To determine why Gpat4(-/-) mice failed to gain weight during these two periods of high fat feeding, we examined energy metabolism. Compared with controls, the metabolic rate of Gpat4(-/-) mice fed a 45% fat diet was 12% higher. Core body temperature was 1 ºC higher after high fat feeding. Food intake, fat absorption, and activity were similar in both genotypes. Impaired weight gain in Gpat4(-/-) mice did not result from increased heat loss, because both cold tolerance and response to a β3-adrenergic agonist were similar in both genotypes. Because GPAT4 comprises 65% of the total GPAT activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT), we characterized BAT function. A 45% fat diet increased the Gpat4(-/-) BAT expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR) target genes, Cpt1α, Pgc1α, and Ucp1, and BAT mitochondria oxidized oleate and pyruvate at higher rates than controls, suggesting that fatty acid signaling and flux through the TCA cycle were enhanced. To assess the role of GPAT4 directly, neonatal BAT preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes. Compared with controls, Gpat4(-/-) brown adipocytes incorporated 33% less fatty acid into triacylglycerol and 46% more into the pathway of β-oxidation. The increased oxidation rate was due solely to an increase in the oxidation of exogenous fatty acids. These data suggest that in the absence of cold exposure, GPAT4 limits excessive fatty acid oxidation and the detrimental induction of a hypermetabolic state. PMID:25918168

  3. Dietary fatty acid composition changes mitochondrial phospholipids and oxidative capacities in rainbow trout red muscle.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Kraffe, E; Bureau, W; Bureau, D P

    2008-03-01

    Dietary conditioning of juvenile trout changed the acyl chain composition of mitochondrial phospholipids and the oxidative capacities of muscle mitochondria. Trout were fed three diets differing only in fatty acid (FA) composition. The highly unsaturated 22:6 n-3 (DHA) accounted for 0.4, 14, and 30% of fatty acids in Diets 1, 2 and 3. After 10 weeks of growth, the dietary groups differed markedly in FA composition of mitochondrial phospholipids, with significant dietary effects for virtually all FA. Mean mitochondrial DHA levels were 19, 40 and 33% in trout fed Diets 1, 2 and 3. Mitochondrial oxidative capacities changed with diet, while mitochondrial concentrations of cytochromes and of the adenylate nucleotide translocase (nmol mg(1) protein) did not. Mitochondria from fish fed Diet 1 had higher non-phosphorylating (state 4) rates at 5 degrees C than those fed other diets. When phosphorylating (state 3) rates differed between dietary groups, rates at 5 and 15 degrees C were higher for fish fed the more unsaturated diets. Stepwise multiple regressions indicated that FA composition could explain much (42-70%) of the variability of state 4 rates, particularly at 5 degrees C. At 15 degrees C, FA composition explained 16-42% of the variability of states 3 and 4 rates. Similar conclusions were obtained for the complete data set (trout fed diets 1, 2 and 3) and for the data from trout achieving similar growth rates (e.g. those fed Diets 1 and 2). Neither general characteristics of membrane FA, such as % saturates, unsaturation index, n-3, n-6 or n-3/n-6 nor levels of abundant unsaturated FA such as DHA or 18:1(n-9 + n-7), were systematically correlated with mitochondrial capacities even though they differed considerably between trout fed the different diets. Relatively minor FA (20:5n-3, 20:0, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 18:0 and 15:0) showed better correlations with mitochondrial oxidative capacities. This supports the concept that acyl chain composition modulates mitochondrial

  4. Modeling Low-Dose-Rate Effects in Irradiated Bipolar-Base Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Cirba, C.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Graves, R.J.; Michez, A.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Witczak, S.C.

    1998-10-26

    A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Multiple-trapping simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for low-dose-rate enhancement. At low dose rates, more holes are trapped near the silicon-oxide interface than at high dose rates, resulting in larger midgap voltage shifts at lower dose rates. The additional trapped charge near the interface may cause an exponential increase in excess base current, and a resultant decrease in current gain for some NPN bipolar technologies.

  5. Imbalance of heterologous protein folding and disulfide bond formation rates yields runaway oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The protein secretory pathway must process a wide assortment of native proteins for eukaryotic cells to function. As well, recombinant protein secretion is used extensively to produce many biologics and industrial enzymes. Therefore, secretory pathway dysfunction can be highly detrimental to the cell and can drastically inhibit product titers in biochemical production. Because the secretory pathway is a highly-integrated, multi-organelle system, dysfunction can happen at many levels and dissecting the root cause can be challenging. In this study, we apply a systems biology approach to analyze secretory pathway dysfunctions resulting from heterologous production of a small protein (insulin precursor) or a larger protein (α-amylase). Results HAC1-dependent and independent dysfunctions and cellular responses were apparent across multiple datasets. In particular, processes involving (a) degradation of protein/recycling amino acids, (b) overall transcription/translation repression, and (c) oxidative stress were broadly associated with secretory stress. Conclusions Apparent runaway oxidative stress due to radical production observed here and elsewhere can be explained by a futile cycle of disulfide formation and breaking that consumes reduced glutathione and produces reactive oxygen species. The futile cycle is dominating when protein folding rates are low relative to disulfide bond formation rates. While not strictly conclusive with the present data, this insight does provide a molecular interpretation to an, until now, largely empirical understanding of optimizing heterologous protein secretion. This molecular insight has direct implications on engineering a broad range of recombinant proteins for secretion and provides potential hypotheses for the root causes of several secretory-associated diseases. PMID:22380681

  6. Water evaporation rates across hydrophobic acid monolayers at equilibrium spreading pressure.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Minami; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Moroi, Yoshikiyo; Shibata, Osamu

    2008-02-15

    The effect of alkanoic acid [CH(3)(CH(2))(n-2)COOH; HCn] and perfluoroalkanoic acid [CF(3)(CF(2))(n-2)COOH; FCn] monolayers on the water evaporation rate was investigated by thermogravimetry tracing the decrease in amount of water with time. The evaporation rate from the surface covered by a monolayer was measured as a function of temperature and hydrophobic chain length of the acids, where the monolayer was under an equilibrium spreading pressure. From thermal behavior of the crystallized acids, their solid states are C-type in crystalline state over the temperature range from 298.2 to 323.2 K. The dry air was flowed through a furnace tube of a thermogravimetry apparatus at the flow rate of 80 mL min(-1), where the evaporation rate becomes almost constant irrespective of the flow rate. The temperature dependence of the evaporation rate was analyzed kinetically to evaluate the activation energy and thermodynamics values for the activated complex, which demonstrated that these values were almost the same for both alkanoic acids and perfluoroalkanoic acids, although the effect of perfluoroalkanoic acids on the evaporation rate was smaller than that of corresponding hydrogenated fatty acids. The difference in the evaporation rate between FCn and HCn was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), surface potential (DeltaV) at equilibrium spreading pressure, and Langmuir curve (pi-A isotherm), and their results were consistent and supported the difference. PMID:18048050

  7. Relationship between the electrochemical activity of Raney nickel and the rate of hydrogenation of maleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pervii, E.N.; Sofronkov, A.N.; Fedyshina, N.M.

    1986-02-10

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the conditions in which a direct correlation exists between the rate of hydrogenation of maleic acid and the electrochemical activity of catalysts of hydrogen ionization. The rate of maleic acid hydrogenation in presence of Raney nickel catalyst was studied by a combination of volumetric and potentiometric methods.

  8. Links between Ammonia Oxidizer Community Structure, Abundance, and Nitrification Potential in Acidic Soils ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huaiying; Gao, Yangmei; Nicol, Graeme W.; Campbell, Colin D.; Prosser, James I.; Zhang, Limei; Han, Wenyan; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). However, the environmental drivers controlling the abundance, composition, and activity of AOA and AOB communities are not well characterized, and the relative importance of these two groups in soil nitrification is still debated. Chinese tea orchard soils provide an excellent system for investigating the long-term effects of low pH and nitrogen fertilization strategies. AOA and AOB abundance and community composition were therefore investigated in tea soils and adjacent pine forest soils, using quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequence analysis of respective ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. There was strong evidence that soil pH was an important factor controlling AOB but not AOA abundance, and the ratio of AOA to AOB amoA gene abundance increased with decreasing soil pH in the tea orchard soils. In contrast, T-RFLP analysis suggested that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure, but a significant relationship between community abundance and nitrification potential was observed only for AOA. High potential nitrification rates indicated that nitrification was mainly driven by AOA in these acidic soils. Dominant AOA amoA sequences in the highly acidic tea soils were all placed within a specific clade, and one AOA genotype appears to be well adapted to growth in highly acidic soils. Specific AOA and AOB populations dominated in soils at particular pH values and N content, suggesting adaptation to specific niches. PMID:21571885

  9. Kinetics of cytochrome P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid via acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Bell-Parikh, L C; Guengerich, F P

    1999-08-20

    The P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde is characterized by a kinetic deuterium isotope effect that increases K(m) with no effect on k(cat), and rate-limiting product release has been proposed to account for the lack of an isotope effect on k(cat) (Bell, L. C., and Guengerich, F. P. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 29643-29651). Acetaldehyde is also a substrate for P450 2E1 oxidation to acetic acid, and k(cat)/K(m) for this reaction is at least 1 order of magnitude greater than that for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde. Acetic acid accounts for 90% of the products generated from ethanol in a 10-min reaction, and the contribution of this second oxidation has been overlooked in many previous studies. The noncompetitive intermolecular kinetic hydrogen isotope effects on acetaldehyde oxidation to acetic acid ((H)(k(cat)/K(m))/(D)(k(cat)/K(m)) = 4.5, and (D)k(cat) = 1.5) are comparable with the isotope effects typically observed for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, and k(cat) is similar for both reactions, suggesting a possible common catalytic mechanism. Rapid quench kinetic experiments indicate that acetic acid is formed rapidly from added acetaldehyde (approximately 450 min(-1)) with burst kinetics. Pulse-chase experiments reveal that, at a subsaturating concentration of ethanol, approximately 90% of the acetaldehyde intermediate is directly converted to acetic acid without dissociation from the enzyme active site. Competition experiments suggest that P450 2E1 binds acetic acid and acetaldehyde with relatively high K(d) values, which preclude simple tight binding as an explanation for rate-limiting product release. The existence of a rate-determining step between product formation and release is postulated. Also proposed is a conformational change in P450 2E1 occurring during the course of oxidation and the discrimination of P450 2E1 between acetaldehyde and its hydrated form, the gem-diol. This multistep P450 reaction is characterized by kinetic

  10. Impact of acid and oxidative modifications, single or dual, of sorghum starch on biodegradable films.

    PubMed

    Biduski, Bárbara; Silva, Francine Tavares da; Silva, Wyller Max da; Halal, Shanise Lisie de Mello El; Pinto, Vania Zanella; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acid and oxidation modifications on sorghum starch, as well as the effect of dual modification of starch on the physical, morphological, mechanical, and barrier properties of biodegradable films. The acid modification was performed with 3% lactic acid and the oxidation was performed with 1.5% active chlorine. For dual modification, the acid modification was performed first, followed by oxidation under the same conditions as above. Both films of the oxidized starches, single and dual, had increased stiffness, providing a higher tensile strength and lower elongation when compared to films based on native and single acid modified starches. However, the dual modification increased the water vapor permeability of the films without changing their solubility. The increase in sorghum starch concentration in the filmogenic solution increased the thickness, water vapor permeability, and elongation of the films. PMID:27507447

  11. The effect of linoleic acid on the whole body synthesis rates of polyunsaturated fatty acids from α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid in free-living rats.

    PubMed

    Domenichiello, Anthony F; Kitson, Alex P; Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Stavro, P Mark; Bazinet, Richard P

    2016-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is thought to be important for brain function. The main dietary source of DHA is fish, however, DHA can also be synthesized from precursor omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), the most abundantly consumed being α-linolenic acid (ALA). The enzymes required to synthesize DHA from ALA are also used to synthesize longer chain omega-6 (n-6) PUFA from linoleic acid (LNA). The large increase in LNA consumption that has occurred over the last century has led to concern that LNA and other n-6 PUFA outcompete n-3 PUFA for enzymes involved in DHA synthesis, and therefore, decrease overall DHA synthesis. To assess this, rats were fed diets containing LNA at 53 (high LNA diet), 11 (medium LNA diet) or 1.5% (low LNA diet) of the fatty acids with ALA being constant across all diets (approximately 4% of the fatty acids). Rats were maintained on these diets from weaning for 8 weeks, at which point they were subjected to a steady-state infusion of labeled ALA and LNA to measure DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) synthesis rates. DHA and ARA synthesis rates were generally highest in rats fed the medium and high LNA diets, while the plasma half-life of DHA was longer in rats fed the low LNA diet. Therefore, increasing dietary LNA, in rats, did not impair DHA synthesis; however, low dietary LNA led to a decrease in DHA synthesis with tissue concentrations of DHA possibly being maintained by a longer DHA half-life. PMID:27012633

  12. Distribution and rate of methane oxidation in sediments of the Florida everglades

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.M.; Roslev, P.; Skovgaard, H. )

    1990-09-01

    Rates of methane emission from intact cores were measured during anoxic dark and oxic light and dark incubations. Rates of methane oxidation were calculated on the basis of oxic incubations by using the anoxic emissions as an estimate of the maximum potential flux. This technique indicated that methane oxidation consumed up to 91% of the maximum potential flux in peat sediments but that oxidation was negligible in marl sediments. Oxygen microprofiles determined for intact cores were comparable to profiles measured in situ. Thus, the laboratory incubations appeared to provide a reasonable approximation of in situ activities. The magnitude of root-associated oxidation rates indicated that belowground plant surfaces may not markedly increase the total capacity for methane consumption. However, the data collectively support the notion that the distribution and activity of methane oxidation have a major impact on the magnitude of atmospheric fluxes from the Everglades.

  13. Metal ion adsorption to complexes of humic acid and metal oxides: Deviations from the additivity rule

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeer, A.W.P.; McCulloch, J.K.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.; Koopal, L.K.

    1999-11-01

    The adsorption of cadmium ions to a mixture of Aldrich humic acid and hematite is investigated. The actual adsorption to the humic acid-hematite complex is compared with the sum of the cadmium ion adsorptivities to each of the isolated components. It is shown that the sum of the cadmium ion adsorptivities is not equal to the adsorption to the complex. In general, the adsorption of a specific metal ion to the complex can be understood and qualitatively predicted using the adsorptivities to each of the pure components and taking into account the effect of the pH on the interaction between humic acid and iron oxide on the metal ion adsorption. Due to the interaction between the negatively charged humic acid and the positively charged iron oxide, the adsorption of metal ions on the mineral oxide in the complex will increase as compared to that on the isolated oxide, whereas the adsorption to the humic acid will decrease as compared to that on the isolated humic acid. As a result, the overall adsorption of a specific metal ion to the complex will be smaller than predicted by the additivity rule when this metal ion has a more pronounced affinity for the humic acid than for the mineral oxide, whereas it will be larger than predicted by the additivity rule when the metal ion has a higher affinity for the oxide than for the humic acid.

  14. The effect of organic acids on plagioclase dissolution rates and stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Susan A.; Ullman, William J.

    1993-06-01

    The rates of plagioclase dissolution in solutions containing organic acids are up to ten times greater than the rates determined in solutions containing inorganic acids at the same acidity. Initial rates of dissolution are poorly reproduced in replicate experiments. After a day, however, the rates of plagioclase dissolution calculated from the rates of silicon release are reproducible and constant for up to nineteen days. Steady-state rates of dissolution are highest (up to 1.3 × 10 -8 mol/m 2/sec) in acidic solutions (pH ≈ 3) and decrease (to 1 × 10 -11 mol/m 2/sec) as acidity decreases toward neutral pH. The polyfunctional acids, oxalate, citrate, succinate, pyruvate, and 2-ketoglutarate, are the most effective at promoting dissolution. Acetate and propionate are not as effective as the other organic acids but are nonetheless more effective than solutions containing only inorganic acids. The degree of ligand-promoted enhancement of dissolution rate (rate in organic-containing solution/rate in inorganic solution at the same pH) decreases as acidity increases, indicating that the ligand-promoted dissolution mechanism becomes relatively more important as the rate of proton-promoted dissolution decreases. The stoichiometry of release to solution indicates that dissolution is selective even after the rates of dissolution become constant. As in previously published studies, Na and Ca are rapidly released from the plagioclase feldspar, leaving a surface enriched in Si and/or Al. The ratio of Al/Si released to solution indicates that the stoichiometry of the residual plagioclase surface is a function of pH and the nature of the organic ligand. The ligands which remove Al in preference to Si from the dissolving mineral surface are also those which enhance overall plagioclase dissolution rates.

  15. Oxidation-Resistant Coating For Bipolar Lead/Acid Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolstad, James J.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode side of bipolar substrate coated with nonoxidizable conductive layer. Coating prepared as water slurry of aqueous dispersion of polyethylene copolymer plus such conductive fillers as tin oxide, titanium, tantalum, or tungsten oxide. Applied easily to substrate of polyethylene carbon plastic. As slurry dries, conductive, oxidation-resistant coating forms on positive side of substrate.

  16. kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium(iv) by persulfate ions in perchloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakov, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of uranium(IV) by persulfate ions in perchloric acid solutions was studied by a spectrophotometric method. It was established that the oxidation of uranium(IV) ions occurs along three pathways: directly by S/sub 2/O /SUP 2/8/ /sup -/ ions, by products of their thermal decomposition, and intramolecularly in a persulfate complex. It was shown that the contribution of each of the three pathways to the overall rate of oxidation of uranium(IV) depends on the initial reagent concentrations, the hydrogen ion concentration, and the temperature. The activation energies of the oxidation of uranium(IV) directly by persulfate ions, by products of their thermal decomposition, as well as in a persulfate complex, were determined.

  17. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  18. Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein NS5 Interacts with Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein and Impairs Fatty Acid β-Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Yu-Ting; Chang, Bi-Lan; Liang, Jian-Jong; Tsai, Hang-Jen; Lee, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can induce the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cause acute encephalitis in humans. β-oxidation breaks down fatty acids for ATP production in mitochondria, and impaired β-oxidation can induce pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. To address the role of fatty-acid β-oxidation in JEV infection, we measured the oxygen consumption rate of mock- and JEV-infected cells cultured with or without long chain fatty acid (LCFA) palmitate. Cells with JEV infection showed impaired LCFA β-oxidation and increased interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression. JEV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) interacted with hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase α and β subunits, two components of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) involved in LCFA β-oxidation, and NS5 proteins were detected in mitochondria and co-localized with MTP. LCFA β-oxidation was impaired and higher cytokines were induced in cells overexpressing NS5 protein as compared with control cells. Deletion and mutation studies showed that the N-terminus of NS5 was involved in the MTP association, and a single point mutation of NS5 residue 19 from methionine to alanine (NS5-M19A) reduced its binding ability with MTP. The recombinant JEV with NS5-M19A mutation (JEV-NS5-M19A) was less able to block LCFA β-oxidation and induced lower levels of IL-6 and TNF-α than wild-type JEV. Moreover, mice challenged with JEV-NS5-M19A showed less neurovirulence and neuroinvasiveness. We identified a novel function of JEV NS5 in viral pathogenesis by impairing LCFA β-oxidation and inducing cytokine expression by association with MTP. PMID:25816318

  19. [Photocatalytic Oxidation of p-arsanilic Acid by TiO2].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-ze; Yang, Chun-feng; Li, Jing; Li, Jian-fei; Liu, Hui-fang; Hu, Cheng-zhi

    2016-01-15

    The p-arsanilic acid (ASA) is an important organoarsenical compound and its removal is more difficult compared to inorganic arsenic, however, little attention has been paid to the removal of ASA in aqueous environment. The influence of P25 on the adsorption of ASA, effect of P25 dosage, pH and illumination intensity on the photo-catalysis, the production analysis and main mechanism of photo-degradation were investigated in this study. The results showed that in the P25 catalysis process, simulated natural light could degrade ASA into As (V) by oxidation. The total As was reduced to about 0.34 mg x L(-1) within 0.5 h under the following condition: the initial concentration of ASA was 2 mg x L(-1) and the dosage of TiO2 was 1 g x L(-1). The result showed that the removal rate of ASA in acidic conditions was much higher than that in alkaline conditions. The optimal strength of light was 68.5 mW x Cm(-2). Hydroxide radical played a major role in photocatalytic oxidation of ASA by P25. PMID:27078958

  20. Fatty Acid Oxidation is Impaired in An Orthologous Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Luis F.; Lin, Cheng-Chao; Zhou, Fang; Germino, Gregory G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was first identified over 20 years ago, yet its function remains poorly understood. We have used a systems-based approach to examine the effects of acquired loss of Pkd1 in adult mouse kidney as it transitions from normal to cystic state. Methods We performed transcriptional profiling of a large set of male and female kidneys, along with metabolomics and lipidomics analyses of a subset of male kidneys. We also assessed the effects of a modest diet change on cyst progression in young cystic mice. Fatty acid oxidation and glycolytic rates were measured in five control and mutant pairs of epithelial cells. Results We find that females have a significantly less severe kidney phenotype and correlate this protection with differences in lipid metabolism. We show that sex is a major determinant of the transcriptional profile of mouse kidneys and that some of this difference is due to genes involved in lipid metabolism. Pkd1 mutant mice have transcriptional profiles consistent with changes in lipid metabolism and distinct metabolite and complex lipid profiles in kidneys. We also show that cells lacking Pkd1 have an intrinsic fatty acid oxidation defect and that manipulation of lipid content of mouse chow modifies cystic disease. Interpretation Our results suggest PKD could be a disease of altered cellular metabolism. PMID:27077126

  1. Oxidation of Fe III porphyrins by peroxyl radicals derived from 2-propanol and methanol. Evidence for acid-dependent and acid-independent pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brault, D.; Neta, P.

    1985-11-01

    Iron(III) deuteroporphyrin dimethyl ester is oxidized to the radical cation form by the peroxyl radicals CH 2(OH)O 2- and (CH 3) 2C(OH)O 2- generated by pulse radiolysis of air saturated aqueous solutions of methanol and 2-propanol, respectively. Oxidation by CH 2(OH)O 2- radicals proceeds with k = 1×10 7 M -1 s -1 independent of pH. In contrast, the electron-transfer reaction of (CH 3) 2C(OH)O 2-1 is pH-dependent. A reaction scheme, which may apply to all peroxyl radicals depending on relative rate constants, is proposed. It involves the formation of an iron porphyrin peroxyl radical adduct that decays by acid-dependent and acid-independent routes.

  2. The rationale for preventing cancer cachexia: targeting excessive fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chao-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia commonly occurs at the terminal stage of cancer and has largely unclear molecular mechanisms. A recent study published in Nature Medicine, entitled "Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia," reveals that cachectic cancer cells can secrete multiple cytokines that induce excessive fatty acid oxidation, which is responsible for muscle loss in cancer cachexia. Inhibition of fatty acid oxidation using etomoxir can increase muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia animal models. The usage of stable cachexia animal models is also discussed in this research highlight. PMID:27443316

  3. Evaluation of Humic Acid and Tannic Acid Fouling in Graphene Oxide-Coated Ultrafiltration Membranes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Huang, Yi; Yu, Miao; Her, Namguk; Flora, Joseph R V; Park, Chang Min; Kim, Suhan; Cho, Jaeweon; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-08-31

    Three commercially available ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (poly(ether sulfone), PES) that have nominal molecular weight cut-offs (5, 10, and 30 kDa) were coated with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, water contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to determine the changed physicochemical properties of the membranes after GO coating. The water permeability and single-solute rejection of GO-coated (GOC) membranes for humic acid (HA) molecules were significantly higher by approximately 15% and 55%, respectively, compared to those of pristine UF membranes. However, the GOc membranes for single-solute tannic acid (TA) rejection showed similar trends of higher flux decline versus pristine PES membranes, because the relatively smaller TA molecules were readily adsorbed onto the membrane pores. When the mixed-solute of HA and TA rejection tests were performed, in particular, the adsorbed small TA molecules resulted in irreversible membrane fouling due to cake formation and membrane pore blocking on the membrane surface for the HA molecules. Although both membranes showed significantly higher flux declines for small molecules rejection, the GOc membranes showed better performance than the pristine UF membranes in terms of the rejection of various mixed-solute molecules, due to higher membrane recovery and antifouling capabilities. PMID:27517308

  4. Oxidation of L-ascorbic acid to dehydroascorbic acid on the surface of the red blood cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.; Jennings, M.; Bennett, K.

    1986-05-01

    L-ascorbic acid-1-/sup 14/C when incubated with human blood did not bind irreversibly to any of the protein components of plasma but did migrate irreversibly into erythrocytes. Isolation and characterization via IR of the moiety trapped within the cell established its identity as apparently, unchanged L-ascorbic acid. When dehydroascorbic acid-1-/sup 14/C was incubated with human blood, the results were identical including the identity of the entrapped moiety, L-ascorbic acid. It was found that L-ascorbic acid was enzymatically oxidized on the surface of the red blood cell to dehydroascorbic acid which diffused through the lipid soluble portion of the cell membrane and was enzymatically reduced back to ascorbic acid within the cell.

  5. Oxidation of alginate and pectate biopolymers by cerium(IV) in perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions: A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Ahmed

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of alginate (Alg) and pectate (Pec) carbohydrate biopolymers was studied by spectrophotometry in aqueous perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions at fixed ionic strengths and temperature. In both acids, the reactions showed a first order dependence on [Ce(IV)], whereas the orders with respect to biopolymer concentrations are less than unity. In perchloric acid, the reactions exhibited less than unit orders with respect to [H(+)] whereas those proceeded in sulfuric acid showed negative fractional-first order dependences on [H(+)]. The effect of ionic strength and dielectric constant was studied. Probable mechanistic schemes for oxidation reactions were proposed. In both acids, the final oxidation products were characterized as mono-keto derivatives of both biopolymers. The activation parameters with respect to the slow step of the mechanisms were computed and discussed. The rate laws were derived and the reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanisms were calculated. PMID:26794772

  6. RATES OF HYDROUS FERRIC OXIDE CRYSTALLIZATION AND THE INFLUENCE ON COPRECIPITATED ARSENATE: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-02101 Ford*, R. Rates of Hydrous Ferric Oxide Crystallization and the Influence on Coprecipitated Arsenate. Environmental Science & Technology 36 (11):2459-2463 (2002). EPA/600/J-02/240. Arsenate coprecipitated with hydrous fer...

  7. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C-50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO₄(-)• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO₄(-)•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF₂-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn-1F2n-1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  8. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  9. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  10. Nitric oxide and salicylic acid signaling in plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Klessig, Daniel F.; Durner, Jörg; Noad, Robert; Navarre, Duroy A.; Wendehenne, David; Kumar, Dhirendra; Zhou, Jun Ma; Shah, Jyoti; Zhang, Shuqun; Kachroo, Pradeep; Trifa, Youssef; Pontier, Dominique; Lam, Eric; Silva, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical signaling role in the activation of plant defense responses after pathogen attack. We have identified several potential components of the SA signaling pathway, including (i) the H2O2-scavenging enzymes catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, (ii) a high affinity SA-binding protein (SABP2), (iii) a SA-inducible protein kinase (SIPK), (iv) NPR1, an ankyrin repeat-containing protein that exhibits limited homology to IκBα and is required for SA signaling, and (v) members of the TGA/OBF family of bZIP transcription factors. These bZIP factors physically interact with NPR1 and bind the SA-responsive element in promoters of several defense genes, such as the pathogenesis-related 1 gene (PR-1). Recent studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is another signal that activates defense responses after pathogen attack. NO has been shown to play a critical role in the activation of innate immune and inflammatory responses in animals. Increases in NO synthase (NOS)-like activity occurred in resistant but not susceptible tobacco after infection with tobacco mosaic virus. Here we demonstrate that this increase in activity participates in PR-1 gene induction. Two signaling molecules, cGMP and cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), which function downstream of NO in animals, also appear to mediate plant defense gene activation (e.g., PR-1). Additionally, NO may activate PR-1 expression via an NO-dependent, cADPR-independent pathway. Several targets of NO in animals, including guanylate cyclase, aconitase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (e.g., SIPK), are also modulated by NO in plants. Thus, at least portions of NO signaling pathways appear to be shared between plants and animals. PMID:10922045

  11. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-11-13

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered. PMID:25363781

  12. Dissolution rates of carbonated hydroxyapatite in hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Hankermeyer, Christine R; Ohashi, Kevin L; Delaney, David C; Ross, John; Constantz, Brent R

    2002-02-01

    Osteoclasts have been shown to dissolve efficiently and effectively the mineral phase of bone by locally controlling the environment surrounding the cell. Although this mineral phase has been identified and well characterized as carbonated hydroxyapatite, there is little understanding of the factors that affect the dissolution properties of this mineral phase. Mimicking the mechanism by which osteoclasts dissolve the mineral phase of bone may provide insight into methods for the decalcification of atherosclerotic mineral deposits in the vascular system. Accordingly, a detailed characterization of the effects of various chemical and mechanical parameters on the dissolution of carbonated hydroxyapatite mineral was investigated in this study. Increases in the mineral dissolution rate (2-10 times) were associated with increases in dissolving solution [H+], osmolality, temperature, and flow rate. Mineral dissolution rate increases (5-8 times) were associated with greater surface area of the mineral and mechanical agitation of the dissolving solution. PMID:11771694

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  14. OXIDATION OF NITROPYRIN TO 6-CHOLORPICOLINIC ACID BY THE AMMONIA-OXIDIZING BACTERIUM NOSTROSOMAS EUROPAEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Suspensions of Nitrosomonas europaea catalyzed the oxidation of the commercial nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin [2-chloro-6-(trichloromethyl)-pyridine]. apid oxidation of nitrapyrin (at a concentration of 10 uM) required the concomitant oxidation of ammonia, hydroxylamine, or h...

  15. [Studies on high temperature oxidation of noble metal alloys for dental use (I). Formation of oxide layers and oxidation rate (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ohno, H

    1976-11-01

    Eight commercial and two experimental alloys were examined. The cast specimens were polished metallographically and oxidized at 700 degrees and 800 degrees C in air. An electron probe X-ray microanalyser and a microthermobalance were employed to investigate the oxidation behavior of the alloys. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The copper in the alloys was selectively oxidized and the scales formed on the alloys consisted of two layers, CuO overlying Cu2O. 2. The oxide particles in the internal oxidation zone (subscale) on the alloys containing only Cu as the base metal were Cu2O and on the alloys containing Zn, Cd, and Ni with Cu were ZnO, CdO, and NiO, respectively. 3. The size of the ZnO and CdO particles in the subscale increased with the penetration into the specimen. 4. The ZnO particles in the metal-subscale interface showed preferential precipitation at the grain boundaries. 5. When the oxide particles in the subscale did not develop remarkably, the oxidation rate at constant temperature conformed with the parabolic law. 6. In the 18 carat gold alloy, the oxidation rate at 800 degrees C was about 10 times that at 700 degrees C. 7. Owing to preferential oxidation of the Cu in the alloys, Cu concentration in the outer layer of the metal decreased remarkably and Au, Pt, Ag and Pd concentration increased. PMID:1069823

  16. Preferential Oxidation of Triacylglyceride-Derived Fatty Acids in Heart is Augmented by the Nuclear Receptor PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Banke, Natasha H.; Wende, Adam R.; Leone, Teresa C.; O’Donnell, J. Michael; Abel, E. Dale; Kelly, Daniel P.; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) are the preferred substrate for energy provision in hearts. However, the contribution of endogenous triacylglyceride (TAG) turnover to LCFA oxidation and the overall dependence of mitochondrial oxidation on endogenous lipid is largely unstudied. Objective We sought to determine the role of TAG turnover in supporting LCFA oxidation and the influence of the lipid-activated nuclear receptor, PPARα, on this balance. Methods and Results Palmitoyl turnover within TAG and palmitate oxidation rates were quantified in isolated hearts, from normal mice (non-transgenic, NTG) and mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of PPARα (MHC-PPARα). Turnover of palmitoyl units within TAG, and thus palmitoyl-CoA recycling, in NTG (4.5± 2.3 μmoles/min/gdw) was 3.75-fold faster than palmitate oxidation (1.2 ±0.4). This high rate of palmitoyl unit turnover indicates preferential oxidation of palmitoyl units derived from TAG in normal hearts. PPARα overexpression augmented TAG turnover 3-fold over NTG hearts, despite similar fractions of acetyl-CoA synthesis from palmitate and oxygen use at the same workload. Palmitoyl turnover within TAG of MHC-PPARα hearts (16.2 ± 2.9, P<0.05) was 12.5-fold faster than oxidation (1.3 ± 0.2). Elevated TAG turnover in MHC-PPARα correlated with increased mRNA for enzymes involved in both TAG synthesis, Gpam, Dgat1, and Agpat3, and lipolysis, Pnliprp1. Conclusions The role of endogenous TAG in supporting β-oxidation in the normal heart is much more dynamic than previously thought, and lipolysis provides the bulk of LCFA for oxidation. Accelerated palmitoyl turnover in TAG, due to chronic PPARα activation, results in near requisite oxidation of LCFA from TAG. PMID:20522803

  17. Eicosapentaenoic acid but not docosahexaenoic acid restores skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity in old mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew L; Lalia, Antigoni Z; Dasari, Surendra; Pallauf, Maximilian; Fitch, Mark; Hellerstein, Marc K; Lanza, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is often observed in aging skeletal muscle and is implicated in age-related declines in physical function. Early evidence suggests that dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) improve mitochondrial function. Here, we show that 10 weeks of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation partially attenuated the age-related decline in mitochondrial function in mice, but this effect was not observed with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The improvement in mitochondrial function with EPA occurred in the absence of any changes in mitochondrial abundance or biogenesis, which was evaluated from RNA sequencing, large-scale proteomics, and direct measurements of muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis rates. We find that EPA improves muscle protein quality, specifically by decreasing mitochondrial protein carbamylation, a post-translational modification that is driven by inflammation. These results demonstrate that EPA attenuated the age-related loss of mitochondrial function and improved mitochondrial protein quality through a mechanism that is likely linked with anti-inflammatory properties of n-3 PUFAs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EPA and DHA exert some common biological effects (anticoagulation, anti-inflammatory, reduced FXR/RXR activation), but also exhibit many distinct biological effects, a finding that underscores the importance of evaluating the therapeutic potential of individual n-3 PUFAs. PMID:26010060

  18. Fluorine-Doped and Partially Oxidized Tantalum Carbides as Nonprecious Metal Electrocatalysts for Methanol Oxidation Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xin; He, Chunyong; Zhong, Chengyong; Chen, Yuanping; Jiang, San Ping; Shen, Pei Kang

    2016-03-16

    A nonprecious metal electrocatalyst based on fluorine-doped tantalum carbide with an oxidative surface on graphitized carbon (TaCx FyOz/(g)C) is developed by using a simple one-pot in situ ion exchange and adsorption method, and the TaCxFyOz/(g)C shows superior performance and durability for methanol oxidation reaction and extreme tolerance to CO poisoning in acidic media. PMID:26779940

  19. Changes in lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability during Cantonese sausage processing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chaoying; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Zhou, Feibai; Cui, Chun

    2013-03-01

    Lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability were evaluated during Cantonese sausage processing. Free fatty acids increased with concomitant decrease of phospholipids. Total content of free fatty acids at 72 h in muscle and adipose tissue was 7.341 mg/g and 3.067 mg/g, respectively. Total amount of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (SFA, MUFA, and PUFA) in neutral lipid exhibited a little change during processing, while the proportion of PUFA significantly decreased in the PL fraction. The main triacylglycerols were POO+SLO+OOO, PSO (P = palmitic acid, O = oleic acid, L = linoleic acid, S = stearic acid), and a preferential hydrolysis of palmitic, oleic and linoleic acid was observed. Phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) were the main components of phospholipids and PE exhibited the most significant degradation during processing. Thiobarbituric acid values (TBARS) increased while peroxide values and hexanal contents varied during processing. PMID:23273460

  20. Ozonization of humic acids in brown coal oxidized in situ

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Semenova; Yu.F. Patrakov; M.V. Batina

    2008-10-15

    The effect of the ozonization of humic acids in chloroform and glacial acetic acid media on the yield and component composition of the resulting products was studied. The high efficiency of ozonization in acetic acid was found. Water-soluble low-molecular-weight substances were predominant among the ozonization products.

  1. AMP kinase activation with AICAR further increases fatty acid oxidation and blunts triacylglycerol hydrolysis in contracting rat soleus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Angela C; Bruce, Clinton R; Dyck, David J

    2005-01-01

    Muscle contraction increases glucose uptake and fatty acid (FA) metabolism in isolated rat skeletal muscle, due at least in part to an increase in AMP-activated kinase activity (AMPK). However, the extent to which AMPK plays a role in the regulation of substrate utilization during contraction is not fully understood. We examined the acute effects of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR; 2 mm), a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on FA metabolism and glucose oxidation during high intensity tetanic contraction in isolated rat soleus muscle strips. Muscle strips were exposed to two different FA concentrations (low fatty acid, LFA, 0.2 mm; high fatty acid, HFA, 1 mm) to examine the role that FA availability may play in both exogenous and endogenous FA metabolism with contraction and AICAR. Synergistic increases in AMPK α2 activity (+45%; P < 0.05) were observed after 30 min of contraction with AICAR, which further increased exogenous FA oxidation (LFA: +71%, P < 0.05; HFA: +46%, P < 0.05) regardless of FA availability. While there were no changes in triacylglycerol (TAG) esterification, AICAR did increase the ratio of FA partitioned to oxidation relative to TAG esterification (LFA: +65%, P < 0.05). AICAR significantly blunted endogenous TAG hydrolysis (LFA: −294%, P < 0.001; HFA: −117%, P < 0.05), but had no effect on endogenous oxidation rates, suggesting a better matching between TAG hydrolysis and subsequent oxidative needs of the muscle. There was no effect of AICAR on the already elevated rates of glucose oxidation during contraction. These results suggest that FA metabolism is very sensitive to AMPK α2 stimulation during contraction. PMID:15774529

  2. Acid-base and catalytic properties of the products of oxidative thermolysis of double complex compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.; Ivanov, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base properties of the products of thermal decomposition of [M(A)6] x; [M1(L)6] y (where M is Co, Cr, Cu, Ni; M1 is Fe, Cr, Co; A is NH3, 1/2 en, 1/2 pn, CO(NH2)2; and L is CN, 1/2C2O4) binary complexes in air and their catalytic properties in the oxidation reaction of ethanol with atmospheric oxygen are studied. It is found that these thermolysis products are mixed oxides of the central atoms of complexes characterized by pH values of the zero charge point in the region of 4-9, OH-group sorption limits from 1 × 10-4 to 4.5 × 10-4 g-eq/g, OH-group surface concentrations of 10-50 nm-2 in 0.1 M NaCl solutions, and S sp from 3 to 95 m2/g. Their catalytic activity is estimated from the apparent rate constant of the conversion of ethanol in CO2. The values of constants are (1-6.5) × 10-5 s-1, depending on the gas flow rate and the S sp value.

  3. Effects of air oxidation on the dissolution rate of LWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.J.; Thomas, L.E.; Einziger, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Dissolution rates for air-oxidized spent fuel were measured in flowthrough tests where U concentrations were kept well below the solubility limit. Results from two types of specimens, separated grains and coarse particles, both in oxidized (U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x}) and unoxidized (UO{sub 2}) conditions indicated only minor effects of oxidation on the surface-area-normalized rates. Similar results were obtained for unirradiated specimens in three different oxidation states (UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). These observations have important practical implications for disposal of spent fuel in a geologic repository as well as implications regarding the oxidative dissolution mechanism of UO{sub 2} fuel.

  4. Iron Catalysis for Room-Temperature Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingguo; Zhang, Jiasheng; Ma, Shengming

    2016-07-13

    Oxidation from alcohols to carboxylic acids, a class of essential chemicals in daily life, academic laboratories, and industry, is a fundamental reaction, usually using at least a stoichiometric amount of an expensive and toxic oxidant. Here, an efficient and practical sustainable oxidation technology of alcohols to carboxylic acids using pure O2 or even O2 in air as the oxidant has been developed: utilizing a catalytic amount each of Fe(NO3)3·9H2O/TEMPO/MCl, a series of carboxylic acids were obtained from alcohols (also aldehydes) in high yields at room temperature. A 55 g-scale reaction was demonstrated using air. As a synthetic application, the first total synthesis of a naturally occurring allene, i.e., phlomic acid, was accomplished. PMID:27304226

  5. Fatty acids and oxidative stability of meat from lambs fed carob-containing diets.

    PubMed

    Gravador, Rufielyn S; Luciano, Giuseppe; Jongberg, Sisse; Bognanno, Matteo; Scerra, Manuel; Andersen, Mogens L; Lund, Marianne N; Priolo, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Male Comisana lambs were individually stalled and, for 56 days, were fed concentrates with 60% barley (n = 8 lambs), or concentrates in which barley was partially replaced by 24% or 35% carob pulp (n = 9 lambs in each group). The intramuscular fatty acids were analyzed and the color stability, lipid and protein oxidation were measured in fresh meat overwrapped with polyvinyl chloride film at 0, 3 or 6 days of storage at 4 °C in the dark. Carob pulp increased the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in muscle, including the rumenic acid (P < 0.01), and reduced the saturated fatty acids (P < 0.01) and the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (P = 0.01). The meat did not undergo extensive oxidative deterioration and the diet did not affect the oxidative stability parameters. Therefore, carob in lamb diet could increase PUFA in muscle without compromising meat oxidative stability. PMID:25842304

  6. Isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage as measure of bacterial oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.E.; Wheeler, M.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of acid waters by oxidation of pyrite-bearing ore deposits, mine tailing piles, and coal measures is a complex biogeochemical process and is a serious environmental problem. We have studied the oxygen and sulphur isotope geochemistry of sulphides, sulphur, sulphate and water in the field and in experiments to identify sources of oxygen and reaction mechanisms of sulphate formation. Here we report that the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage shows a large variation due to differing proportions of atmospheric- and water-derived oxygen from both chemical and bacterially-mediated oxidation. 18O-enrichment of sulphate results from pyrite oxidation facilitated by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in aerated environments. Oxygen isotope analysis may therefore be useful in monitoring the effectiveness of abatement programmes designed to inhibit bacterial oxidation. Sulphur isotopes show no significant fractionation between pyrite and sulphate, indicating the quantitative insignificance of intermediate oxidation states of sulphur under acid conditions. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by etiolated and green corn tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Reinecke, D. )

    1989-04-01

    Etiolated corn tissues oxidase indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to oxindole-3-acetic acid (OxIAA). This oxidation results in loss of auxin activity and may plant a role in regulating IAA-stimulated growth. The enzyme has been partially purified and characterized and shown to require O{sub 2}, and a heat-stable lipid-soluble corn factor which can be replaced by linolenic or linoleic acids in the oxidation of IAA. Corn oil was tested as a cofactor in the IAA oxidation reaction. Corn oil stimulated enzyme activity by 30% while trilinolein was inactive. The capacity of green tissue to oxidize IAA was examined by incubating leaf sections from 2 week old light-grown corn seedlings with {sup 14}C-IAA. OxIAA and IAA were separated from other IAA metabolites on a 3 ml anion exchange column. Of the IAA taken up by the sections, 13% was oxidized to OxIAA. This is the first evidence that green tissue of corn may also regulate IAA levels by oxidizing IAA to OxIAA.

  8. Electrochemical oxidation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid by metal-oxide-coated Ti electrodes.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Dusmant; Xu, Zesheng; Niu, Junfeng; Rao, Neti Nageswara

    2015-10-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) over metal-oxide-coated Ti anodes, i.e., Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2, Ti/SnO2-Sb and Ti/RuO2, was examined. The degradation efficiency of over 90% was attained at 20 min at different initial concentrations (0.5-20 mg L(-1)) and initial pH values (3.1-11.2). The degradation efficiencies of 2,4,5-T on Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2, Ti/SnO2-Sb and Ti/RuO2 anodes were higher than 99.9%, 97.2% and 91.5% at 30 min, respectively, and the respective total organic carbon removal ratios were 65.7%, 54.6% and 37.2%. The electrochemical degradation of 2,4,5-T in aqueous solution followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The compounds, i.e., 2,5-dichlorohydroquinone and 2,5-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone, have been identified as the main aromatic intermediates by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that the energy efficiencies of 2,4,5-T (20 mg L(-1)) degradation with Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2 anode at the optimal current densities from 2 to 16 mA cm(-2) ranged from 8.21 to 18.73 kWh m(-3). PMID:25981800

  9. Evidence for Physical Association of Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation and Oxidative Phosphorylation Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yudong; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Mihalik, Stephanie J.; Goetzman, Eric S.; Vockley, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are key pathways involved in cellular energetics. Reducing equivalents from FAO enter OXPHOS at the level of complexes I and III. Genetic disorders of FAO and OXPHOS are among the most frequent inborn errors of metabolism. Patients with deficiencies of either FAO or OXPHOS often show clinical and/or biochemical findings indicative of a disorder of the other pathway. In this study, the physical and functional interactions between these pathways were examined. Extracts of isolated rat liver mitochondria were subjected to blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BNGE) to separate OXPHOS complexes and supercomplexes followed by Western blotting using antisera to various FAO enzymes. Extracts were also subjected to sucrose density centrifugation and fractions analyzed by BNGE or enzymatic assays. Several FAO enzymes co-migrated with OXPHOS supercomplexes in different patterns in the gels. When palmitoyl-CoA was added to the sucrose gradient fractions containing OXPHOS supercomplexes in the presence of potassium cyanide, cytochrome c was reduced. Cytochrome c reduction was completely blocked by myxothiazol (a complex III inhibitor) and 3-mercaptopropionate (an inhibitor of the first step of FAO), but was only partially inhibited by rotenone (a complex I inhibitor). Although palmitoyl-CoA and octanoyl-CoA provided reducing equivalents to OXPHOS-containing supercomplex fractions, no accumulation of their intermediates was detected. In contrast, short branched acyl-CoA substrates were not metabolized by OXPHOS-containing supercomplex fractions. These data provide evidence of a multifunctional FAO complex within mitochondria that is physically associated with OXPHOS supercomplexes and promotes metabolic channeling. PMID:20663895

  10. Vanillic and syringic acids from biomass burning: Behaviour during Fenton-like oxidation in atmospheric aqueous phase and in the absence of light.

    PubMed

    Santos, Gabriela T A D; Santos, Patrícia S M; Duarte, Armando C

    2016-08-01

    Biomass combustion is a threat to the environment since it emits to the atmosphere organic compounds, which may react and originate others more aggressive. This work studied the behaviours of vanillic and syringic acids, small aromatic tracers of biomass burning, during Fenton-like oxidation in aqueous phase and absence of light. For both compounds, the extent of oxidation increased with pH decrease from neutral to acid in atmospheric waters, but for vanillic acid the neutral pH was not able of promoting the oxidation. With the oxidation of both acids were formed chromophoric compounds, and the formation rate increased with the degree of electron-donator substituents in benzene ring. The initial and produced compounds were not totally degraded up to 24h of reaction at pH 4.5, suggesting that the night period may be not sufficient for their full degradation in atmospheric waters. The major compounds formed were the 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid for vanillic acid, and the 1,4-dihydroxy-2,6-dimethoxybenzene for syringic acid. These findings suggest the occurrence of an ipso attack by the hydroxyl radical preferential to the methoxy and carboxyl groups of vanillic and syringic acids, respectively. It is important to highlight that for both aromatic acids the main compounds produced are also small aromatic compounds. PMID:27085101

  11. Phagocytosis of hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing oxidized dextrans conjugated with isonicotinic acid hydrazide by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shkurupy, V A; Arkhipov, S A; Troitsky, A V; Luzgina, N G; Zaikovskaja, M V; Ufimceva, E G; Iljine, D A; Akhramenko, E S; Gulyaeva, E P; Bistrova, T N

    2009-12-01

    We studied phagocytic activity of macrophages towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions consisting of 150-800-nm nanoliposomes containing oxidized dextrans with a molecular weight of 35 and 60 kDa obtained by chemical ("permanganate") and radiochemical oxidation of dextran conjugated with isonicotinic acid hydrazide (dextrazides, intracellular prolonged antituberculous drugs). Phagocytic activity of macrophages towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing dextrazides obtained by chemical oxidation of dextrans is higher than activity towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing dextrazides prepared by radiochemical oxidation and depends on the size of hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions and molecular weight of oxidized dextrans. PMID:21116494

  12. Novel amino acids: synthesis of furoxan and sydnonimine containing amino acids and peptides as potential nitric oxide releasing motifs.

    PubMed

    Nortcliffe, Andrew; Botting, Nigel P; O'Hagan, David

    2013-07-28

    The incorporation of furoxan and sydnonimine ring systems into amino acid side chains is demonstrated with the preparation of four novel amino acids which carry these nitric oxide-releasing motifs. N-((4-Nitrophenoxy)carbonyl)-3-phenylsydnonimine 9 and bis(phenylsulfonyl)furoxan 10 are the key intermediates for introducing the heterocycle side chains onto appropriate amine and alcohol functionalities respectively. Furoxan 5 and 7 both displayed NO release based on determination of nitrite production. Orthogonal amino acid protecting group strategies were deployed to demonstrate that the amino acids could be incorporated into peptide frameworks. By way of demonstration the amino acids were placed centrally into several tripeptide motifs. Griess test assays showed that these amino acids released NO in the presence of γ-glutathione (GST). PMID:23753002

  13. Omega-3 fatty acids differentially modulate enzymatic anti-oxidant systems in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    da Silva, E P; Nachbar, R T; Levada-Pires, A C; Hirabara, S M; Lambertucci, R H

    2016-01-01

    During physical activity, increased reactive oxygen species production occurs, which can lead to cell damage and in a decline of individual's performance and health. The use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a supplement to protect the immune system has been increasing; however, their possible benefit to the anti-oxidant system is not well described. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) can be beneficial to the anti-oxidant system in cultured skeletal muscle cells. C2C12 myocytes were differentiated and treated with either eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid for 24 h. Superoxide content was quantified using the dihydroethidine oxidation method and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity, and expression was quantified. We observed that the docosahexaenoic fatty acids caused an increase in superoxide production. Eicosapentaenoic acid induced catalase activity, while docosahexaenoic acid suppressed superoxide dismutase activity. In addition, we found an increased protein expression of the total manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes when cells were treated with eicosapentaenoic acid. Taken together, these data indicate that the use of eicosapentaenoic acid may present both acute and chronic benefits; however, the treatment with DHA may not be beneficial to muscle cells. PMID:26386577

  14. Oxidation rate of graphitic matrix material in the kinetic regime for VHTR air ingress accident scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jo Jo; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2014-08-01

    Data on oxidation rates of matrix-grade graphite in the kinetically-controlled temperature regime of graphite oxidation are needed for safety analysis of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors and Very High Temperature Reactors. In this work, the oxidation rate of graphitic matrix material GKrS was measured thermogravimetrically for various oxygen concentrations and with temperatures from 873 to 1873 K. A semi-empirical Arrhenius rate equation was also developed for this temperature range. The activation energy of the graphitic material is found to be about 111.5 kJ/mol. The order of reaction was found to be about 0.89. The surface of oxidized GKrS was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  15. Energetics of methanol and formic acid oxidation on Pt(111): Mechanistic insights from adsorption calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbaugh, Trent L.; Karp, Eric M.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2016-08-01

    The catalytic and electrocatalytic oxidation and reforming of methanol and formic acid have received intense interest due to potential use in direct fuel cells and as prototype models for understanding electrocatalysis. Consequently, the reaction energy diagram (energies of all the adsorbed intermediates and activation energies of all the elementary steps) have been estimated for these reactions on Pt(111) by density functional theory (DFT) in several studies. However, no experimental measurement of these energy diagrams have been reported, nor is there a consensus on the mechanisms. Here, we use energies of key intermediates on Pt(111) from single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) to build a combined energy diagram for these reactions. It suggests a new pathway involving monodentate formate as a key intermediate, with bidentate formate only being a spectator species that slows the rate. This helps reconcile conflicting proposed mechanisms.

  16. Use of a respirometer to measure oxidation rates of polymeric materials at ambient temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Harris, Douglas Jeffrey; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Skutnik, Julie Michelle

    2005-06-01

    The use of a respirometer is introduced as a novel technique for measuring the oxidation rates of thermally degrading polymers. A dual channel respirometer with fuel cell detectors demonstrates sufficient sensitivity to measure the oxidation rates of low-density polymeric samples at ambient temperatures in a relatively short period of time. Samples of low-density polyurethane foam were aged for various lengths of time in sealed chambers at temperatures ranging from 23 to 110 C. The extent of oxygen depletion was measured by flushing the chamber with air and comparing the oxygen concentration in the chamber flow to that of a reference flow. Oxidation rates of the 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} polyurethane foam could be measured in less than 600 h of aging time at 23 C. This corresponds to approximately 2 ppm oxidation by weight. Oxidation rates of the foam were used to calculate acceleration factors over a wide temperature range, including ambient conditions. Acceleration factors for the compressive force of the polyurethane foam were determined at elevated temperatures. Assuming that the aging behavior of compressive force of the foam is correlated to its oxidation rate, it is possible to calculate acceleration factors for the compressive force and predict the performance of the foam at ambient temperatures.

  17. Oxidation of lactose to lactobionic acid by a Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase: kinetics and operational stability.

    PubMed

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Nielsen, Per Munk; Villadsen, John

    2007-07-01

    Oxidation of lactose to lactobionic acid by a Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was studied. The K(m)-value for lactose, obtained by a traditional enzymatic assay, was 0.066 mM at pH 6.4 and 38 degrees C. The effect of oxygen on the enzymatic rate of reaction as well as the operational stability of the enzyme was studied by performing reactions at constant pH and temperature in a stirred tank reactor. Catalase was included in all reactions to avoid inhibition and deactivation of the oxidase by hydrogen peroxide. At pH 6.4 and 38 degrees C, K(m) for oxygen was 0.97 mM, while the catalytical rate constant, k(cat), was 94 s(-1). Furthermore, we found that the operational stability of the oxidase was dependent on the type of base used for neutralization of the acid produced. Thus, when 2 M NaOH was used for neutralization of a reaction medium containing 50 mM phosphate buffer, significant deactivation of the oxidase was observed. Also, we found that the oxidase was protected against deactivation by base at high lactose concentrations. A simple model is proposed to explain the obtained results. PMID:17154316

  18. Lichen acids as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation of mouse-liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Abo-Khatwa, A N; al-Robai, A A; al-Jawhari, D A

    1996-01-01

    Three lichen acids-namely, (+)usnic acid, vulpinic acid, and atranorin-were isolated from three lichen species (Usnea articulata, Letharia vulpina, and Parmelia tinctorum, respectively). The effects of these lichen products on mice-liver mitochondrial oxidative functions in various respiratory states and on oxidative phosphorylation were studied polarographically in vitro. The lichen acids exhibited characteristics of the 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a classical uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, they released respiratory control and oligomycin inhibited respiration, hindered ATP synthesis, and enhanced Mg(+2)-ATPase activity. (+)Usnic acid at a concentration of 0.75 microM inhibited ADP/O ratio by 50%, caused maximal stimulation of both state-4 respiration (100%) and ATPase activity (300%). Atranorin was the only lichen acid with no significant effect on ATPase. The uncoupling effect was dose-dependent in all cases. The minimal concentrations required to cause complete uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation were as follows: (+)usnic acid (1 microM), vulpinic acid, atranorin (5 microM) and DNP (50 microM). It was postulated that the three lichen acids induce uncoupling by acting on the inner mitochondrial membrane through their lipophilic properties and protonophoric activities. PMID:8726330

  19. Seasonal Oxygen Dynamics in a Thermokarst Bog in Interior Alaska: Implications for Rates of Methane Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Moorberg, C.; Wong, A.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and wetlands represent the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere. However, much of the methane generated in anoxic wetlands never gets emitted to the atmosphere; up to >90% of generated methane can get oxidized to carbon dioxide. Thus, oxidation is an important methane sink and changes in the rate of methane oxidation can affect wetland methane emissions. Most methane is aerobically oxidized at oxic-anoxic interfaces where rates of oxidation strongly depend on methane and oxygen concentrations. In wetlands, oxygen is often the limiting substrate. To improve understanding of belowground oxygen dynamics and its impact on methane oxidation, we deployed two planar optical oxygen sensors in a thermokarst bog in interior Alaska. Previous work at this site indicated that, similar to other sites, rates of methane oxidation decrease over the growing season. We used the sensors to track spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentrations over the growing season. We coupled these in-situ oxygen measurements with periodic oxygen injection experiments performed against the sensor to quantify belowground rates of oxygen consumption. We found that over the season, the thickness of the oxygenated water layer at the peatland surface decreased. Previous research has indicated that in sphagnum-dominated peatlands, like the one studied here, rates of methane oxidation are highest at or slightly below the water table. It is in these saturated but oxygenated locations that both methane and oxygen are available. Thus, a seasonal reduction in the thickness of the oxygenated water layer could restrict methane oxidation. The decrease in thickness of the oxygenated layer coincided with an increase in the rate of oxygen consumption during our oxygen injection experiments. The increase in oxygen consumption was not explained by temperature; we infer it was due to an increase in substrate availability for oxygen consuming reactions and

  20. Phytoagents for Cancer Management: Regulation of Nucleic Acid Oxidation, ROS, and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized nucleic acids causes genomic instability leading to senescence, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Phytoagents are known to reduce the risk of cancer development; whether such effects are through regulating the extent of nucleic acid oxidation remains unclear. Here, we outlined the role of reactive oxygen species in nucleic acid oxidation as a driving force in cancer progression. The consequential relationship between genome instability and cancer progression highlights the importance of modulation of cellular redox level in cancer management. Current epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrate the effects and modes of action of phytoagents in nucleic acid oxidation and provide rationales for the use of phytoagents as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents. Vitamins and various phytoagents antagonize carcinogen-triggered oxidative stress by scavenging free radicals and/or activating endogenous defence systems such as Nrf2-regulated antioxidant genes or pathways. Moreover, metal ion chelation by phytoagents helps to attenuate oxidative DNA damage caused by transition metal ions. Besides, the prooxidant effects of some phytoagents pose selective cytotoxicity on cancer cells and shed light on a new strategy of cancer therapy. The “double-edged sword” role of phytoagents as redox regulators in nucleic acid oxidation and their possible roles in cancer prevention or therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:24454991

  1. Phytoagents for cancer management: regulation of nucleic acid oxidation, ROS, and related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Leng; Huang, Jing-Ying; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized nucleic acids causes genomic instability leading to senescence, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Phytoagents are known to reduce the risk of cancer development; whether such effects are through regulating the extent of nucleic acid oxidation remains unclear. Here, we outlined the role of reactive oxygen species in nucleic acid oxidation as a driving force in cancer progression. The consequential relationship between genome instability and cancer progression highlights the importance of modulation of cellular redox level in cancer management. Current epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrate the effects and modes of action of phytoagents in nucleic acid oxidation and provide rationales for the use of phytoagents as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents. Vitamins and various phytoagents antagonize carcinogen-triggered oxidative stress by scavenging free radicals and/or activating endogenous defence systems such as Nrf2-regulated antioxidant genes or pathways. Moreover, metal ion chelation by phytoagents helps to attenuate oxidative DNA damage caused by transition metal ions. Besides, the prooxidant effects of some phytoagents pose selective cytotoxicity on cancer cells and shed light on a new strategy of cancer therapy. The "double-edged sword" role of phytoagents as redox regulators in nucleic acid oxidation and their possible roles in cancer prevention or therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:24454991

  2. Synergistic interaction between oxides of copper and iron for production of fatty alcohols from fatty acids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kandel, Kapil; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas C.; Slowing, Igor I.

    2015-10-08

    In this study, the selective hydrogenation of fatty acids to fatty alcohols can be achieved under moderate conditions (180 °C, 30 bar H2) by simultaneously supporting copper and iron oxides on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The activity of the cosupported oxides is significantly higher than that of each supported metal oxide and of a physical mixture of both individually supported metal oxides. A strong interaction between both metal oxides is evident from dispersion, XRD, TPR, and acetic acid TPD measurements, which is likely responsible for the synergistic behavior of the catalyst. Copper oxide is reduced in situ to its metallic formmore » and thereby activates hydrogen.« less

  3. Synergistic interaction between oxides of copper and iron for production of fatty alcohols from fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kandel, Kapil; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas C.; Slowing, Igor I.

    2015-10-08

    In this study, the selective hydrogenation of fatty acids to fatty alcohols can be achieved under moderate conditions (180 °C, 30 bar H2) by simultaneously supporting copper and iron oxides on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The activity of the cosupported oxides is significantly higher than that of each supported metal oxide and of a physical mixture of both individually supported metal oxides. A strong interaction between both metal oxides is evident from dispersion, XRD, TPR, and acetic acid TPD measurements, which is likely responsible for the synergistic behavior of the catalyst. Copper oxide is reduced in situ to its metallic form and thereby activates hydrogen.

  4. Effects of toluene and benzoic acid on the kinetics of ferrous oxidation on Pt and nafion-coated Pt electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, J.H.; Fedkiw, P.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The electrochemical kinetics of Fe[sup 2+] oxidation to Fe[sup 3+] have been investigated by cyclic and ring disk electrode voltammetry in the absence and presence of the contaminants toluene (7 mM, saturated solution) or benzoic acid (16 mM) in 1M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] electrolyte on (1) smooth Pt electrodes, (2) Nafion-coated smooth Pt electrodes, and (3) Pt electrodes electrodeposited within a Nafion film coated onto a glassy carbon (GC) substrate. On uncoated Pt, the kinetics are adversely affected by these two organics: both the anodic transfer coefficient and the apparent standard rate constant are decreased. A 3.7 [mu]m Nafion coating, however, effectively buffers the smooth Pt electrode from toluene, but, nevertheless, benzoic acid still affects the reaction rate. In contrast, the transfer coefficient and rate constant for Fe[sup 2+] oxidation on the Pt/Nafion/GC electrode are essentially unaffected by either toluene or benzoic acid. Qualitative features of the voltammograms also indicate that the Nafion film protects the Pt from contamination by these aromatics: two current plateaus are observed using an uncoated Pt electrode in the presence of toluene or benzoic acid with a ratio which increased with rotation rate; with the Nafion coating on a smooth Pt electrode and in the presence of toluene, however, there is only one current plateau; in the presence of benzoic acid, two current plateaus remain, but the ratio is nearer unity and less sensitive to rotation rate. In contrast, only a single plateau current is observed using the Pt/Nafion/GC electrode. The Nafion coating is apparently an effective buffer layer against these two aromatics, but concurrently affects a decrease in the mass-transfer limited current due to the diffusional resistance of the film.

  5. Reduced graphene oxide aerogel with high-rate supercapacitive performance in aqueous electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide aerogel (RGOA) is synthesized successfully through a simultaneous self-assembly and reduction process using hypophosphorous acid and I2 as reductant. Nitrogen sorption analysis shows that the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of RGOA could reach as high as 830 m2 g−1, which is the largest value ever reported for graphene-based aerogels obtained through the simultaneous self-assembly and reduction strategy. The as-prepared RGOA is characterized by a variety of means such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrochemical tests show that RGOA exhibits a high-rate supercapacitive performance in aqueous electrolytes. The specific capacitance of RGOA is calculated to be 211.8 and 278.6 F g−1 in KOH and H2SO4 electrolytes, respectively. The perfect supercapacitive performance of RGOA is ascribed to its three-dimensional structure and the existence of oxygen-containing groups. PMID:23692674

  6. Method of dissolving metal oxides with di- or polyphosphonic acid and a redundant

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1996-01-01

    A method of dissolving metal oxides using a mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

  7. Graphene oxide as an acid catalyst for the room temperature ring opening of epoxides.

    PubMed

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Alvaro, Mercedes; Concepción, Patricia; Fornés, Vicente; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2012-06-01

    The minute amount of hydrogen sulfate groups introduced into the graphene oxide (GO) obtained by Hummers oxidation of graphite renders this material as a highly efficient, recyclable acid catalyst for the ring opening of epoxides with methanol and other primary alcohols as nucleophile and solvent. PMID:22534622

  8. SALICYLIC ACID- AND NITRIC OXIDE-MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION IN DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current advances in plant defense signaling is discussed, with emphasis on the role of nitric oxide and salicylic acid in the development of disease resistance. Nitric Oxide has recently been shown to have an important role in plant disease resistance. We show an increase in NOS-like activity in TMV...

  9. Augmenting antifungal activity of oxidizing agent with kojic acid: Control of Penicillium strains infecting crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative treatment is a strategy for preventing Penicillium contamination in foods or crops. Antifungal efficacy of oxidant [hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)], biotic effector [kojic acid (KA)] and abiotic stress (heat), alone or in combination, was investigated in Penicillium. The levels of antifungal int...

  10. Oxidative decarboxylation of free and peptide-linked amino acids in phagocytizing guinea pig granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi-Jones, S K; Karnovsky, M L

    1981-01-01

    The oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids by a system consisting of myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride has been demonstrated previously by others and the process has been considered to be part of the microbicidal armamentarium of some phagocytic leukocytes. We were able to translate these earlier observations, made on model systems, to intact guinea pig granulocytes. We could demonstrate differences in the cellular handling of peptide-linked amino acids as particles, compared with free amino acids. Specific inhibitors were used to explore two routes of oxidative decarboxylation: (a) the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed direct decarboxylation-deamination reaction, and (b) oxidation of alpha-keto acids after transamination of amino acids. These inhibitors were cyanide, azide, and tapazole for the former pathway, and amino-oxyacetate for the latter. Amino-oxyacetate profoundly inhibited the decarboxylation of free 14C-amino acids (alanine and aspartate) in both resting and stimulated cells, but had only a minimal effect on 14CO2 production from ingested insoluble 14C-protein. On the other hand, the peroxidase inhibitors cyanide, azide, and tapazole dramatically inhibited the production of 14CO2 from ingested particulate 14C-protein, but had only small effects on the decarboxylation of free amino acid. Soluble, uniformly labeled 14C-protein was not significantly converted to 14CO2 even in the presence of phagocytizable polystyrene beads. These observation suggest that the amino acids taken up by phagocytosis (e.g., as denatured protein particles) are oxidatively decarboxylated and deaminated in the phagosomes by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system; soluble free amino acids that enter the cytoplasm by diffusion or transport are oxidatively decarboxylated after transamination by the normal cellular amino acid oxidative pathway. PMID:6267101

  11. FABP4 reversed the regulation of leptin on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in mice adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Liu, Zhenjiang; Cao, Weina; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), plays key role in fatty acid transportation and oxidation, and increases with leptin synergistically during adipose inflammation process. However, the regulation mechanism between FABP4 and leptin on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation remains unclear. In this study, we found that FABP4 reduced the expression of leptin, CPT-1 and AOX1 in mice adipocytes. Conversely, FABP4 was down-regulated in a time-dependent manner by leptin treatment. Additionally, forced expression of FABP4 attenuated the expression of PGC1-α, UCP2, CPT-1, AOX1 and COX2 compared with leptin incubation. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential, fatty acid oxidation enzyme medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) and Cyt C levels were reduced in response to the overexpression of FABP4. These reductions correspond well with the reduced release of free fatty acid and the inactivation of mitochondrial complexes I and III by FABP4 overexpression. Furthermore, addition of the Akt/mTOR pathway-specific inhibitor (MK2206) blocked the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and respiration factors, whereas interference of FABP4 overcame these effects. Taken together, FABP4 could reverse the activation of the leptin-induced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, and the inhibition of Akt/mTOR signal pathway played a key role in this process. PMID:26310911

  12. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D. , Hopital Beaujon, Clichy )

    1990-11-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid but not that of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)octanoic acid and (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids.

  13. Volatility and oxidative aging of aqueous maleic acid aerosol droplets and the dependence on relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Dennis-Smither, Benjamin J; Marshall, Frances H; Miles, Rachael E H; Preston, Thomas C; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-07-31

    The microphysical structure and heterogeneous oxidation by ozone of single aerosol particles containing maleic acid (MA) has been studied using aerosol optical tweezers and cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The evaporation rate of MA from aqueous droplets has been measured over a range of relative humidities and the pure component vapor pressure determined to be (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10(-3) Pa. Variation in the refractive index (RI) of an aqueous MA droplet with relative humidity (RH) allowed the subcooled liquid RI of MA to be estimated as 1.481 ± 0.001. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth are shown to be consistent with equilibrium model predictions from previous studies. Simultaneous measurements of the droplet composition, size, and refractive index have been made during ozonolysis at RHs in the range 50-80%, providing insight into the volatility of organic products, changes in the droplet hygroscopicity, and optical properties. Exposure of the aqueous droplets to ozone leads to the formation of products with a wide range of volatilities spanning from involatile to volatile. Reactive uptake coefficients show a weak dependence on ozone concentration, but no dependence on RH or salt concentration. The time evolving RI depends significantly on the RH at which the oxidation proceeds and can even show opposing trends; while the RI increases with ozone exposure at low relative humidity, the RI decreases when the oxidation proceeds at high relative humidity. The variations in RI are broadly consistent with a framework for predicting RIs for organic components published by Cappa et al. ( J. Geophys. Res. 2011 , 116 , D15204 ). Once oxidized, particles are shown to form amorphous phases on drying rather than crystallization, with slow evaporation kinetics of residual water. PMID:25003240

  14. Uranium Oxide Rate Summary for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-09-20

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the uranium oxidation reaction rate information developed by the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and describe the basis for selecting reaction rate correlations used in system design. The selection basis considers the conditions of practical interest to the fuel removal processes and the reaction rate application during design studies. Since the reaction rate correlations are potentially used over a range of conditions, depending of the type of evaluation being performed, a method for transitioning between oxidation reactions is also documented. The document scope is limited to uranium oxidation reactions of primary interest to the SNF Project processes. The reactions influencing fuel removal processes, and supporting accident analyses, are: uranium-water vapor, uranium-liquid water, uranium-moist air, and uranium-dry air. The correlation selection basis will consider input from all available sources that indicate the oxidation rate of uranium fuel, including the literature data, confirmatory experimental studies, and fuel element observations. Trimble (2000) summarizes literature data and the results of laboratory scale experimental studies. This document combines the information in Trimble (2000) with larger scale reaction observations to describe uranium oxidation rate correlations applicable to conditions of interest to the SNF Project.

  15. Differential effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids upon oxidant-stimulated release and uptake of arachidonic acid in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, Oluwakemi; Black, Kenneth D; MacDonald, Donald J; Boyle, Rose M; Glen, Iain; Ross, Brian M

    2005-08-01

    The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, as found in fish-oil derived dietary supplements, as anti-inflammatory agents is supported by a variety of biochemical and physiological data. Recent studies investigating the therapeutic potential of long chain (>C20) n-3 fatty acids in mental illness have lead to the conclusion, however, that not all n-3 fatty acid types are equally efficacious. In particular eicosapentaeoic acid (EPA) appears to possess antidepressant and antipsychotic activity, while docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) does not, an effect suggested to be due to a differential ability to antagonize arachidonic acid (AA)-dependent cell signalling. In this study, we examine the effect of EPA and DHA supplementation upon uptake and release of arachidonic acid stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide/Fe2+ in U937 cells. Oxidant-stimulated 3H-AA release from cells was enhanced by pre-treatment with EPA, DHA and AA, but not stearic or oleic acids for 18 days, with the order of effect magnitude being EPA > DHA = AA. Supplementation of cells for 1 day gave qualitatively similar results, although the effect magnitude was smaller. To determine whether enhanced release was due to decreased reuptake of AA, cells were cultured in the presence of 10 microM fatty acids. Pre-treatment of cells with EPA, and to a lesser extent AA, but not DHA, inhibited uptake of 3H-AA measured subsequent to the removal of unesterified fatty acids. This study suggests that, in U937 cells, EPA can alter the rate of uptake and release of AA from phospholipids in an exposure time-dependent manner, whereas DHA has no or little effect. Our results predict that EPA will have a more pronounced effect upon AA-dependent processes compared to DHA, and suggests that the relative amounts of EPA and DHA in fish oil supplements may modify their biochemical, and potentially, behavioural effects. PMID:15967385

  16. Surface crystallographic dependence of voltammetric oxidation of polyhydric alcohols and related systems at monocrystalline gold-acidic aqueous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, Antoinette; Ho, Yeunghaw; Chang, Si-Chung; Gao, Xiaoping; Weaver, Michael J.

    1992-02-01

    The voltammetric oxidation in aqueous 0.1 Molar perchloric acid of four polyhydric alcohols, ethylene glycol, glycerol, meso-erythritol, and d-mannitol, on seven oriented gold surfaces is reported with the objective of assessing the role of surface crystallographic orientation on the catalytic electrooxidation of such poly-functional reactants. The automatically well-ordered nature of these gold surfaces has been scrutinized by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, the Au(221) and (533) faces were selected since they provide stepped surfaces, 4(111)-(111) and 4(111)-(100), respectively. The results are compared with corresponding data for simple unifunctional reactants, specifically for formic acid oxidation and with results reported previously for carbon monoxide oxidation. In contrast to the last reaction, the electrooxidation rates for both the polyhydric alcoholic and formic acid are greatest on Au(111), with Au(110) displaying unusually low activity. While formic acid electrooxidation is insensitive to the presence of monoatomic surface steps, the polyhydric alcohols (especially mannitol) are substantially less reactive on AU(221) and (533) relative to Au(111).

  17. A novel mechanism for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a graphite electrode in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjun; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei; Zeng, Chaoliu

    2014-09-01

    With the consideration of optimizing the performance of the all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), the oxidation reaction mechanism of VO2+ on a rotating graphite disk electrode has been investigated by potentiodynamic polarization in sulfuric acid solutions with various pH and vanadium concentrations. Furthermore, the reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ have been calculated from the polarization results and compared with the theoretical results according to the possible reaction mechanisms available in the literature. However, a new oxidation reaction mechanism has been proposed to describe the oxidation of VO2+ at last, and the theoretic reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ based on the new mechanism are consistent with the experimental results when the electrochemical reaction is the rate-limited process. Moreover, a corresponding kinetic equation has been established for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a spectroscopically pure graphite electrode, and can be well used to predict the polarization behavior in V (IV) acidic solutions.

  18. Electrochemical determination of hydrochlorothiazide and folic acid in real samples using a modified graphene oxide sheet paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Beitollahi, Hadi; Hamzavi, Mozhdeh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    A new ferrocene-derivative compound, 2-chlorobenzoyl ferrocene, was synthesized and used to construct a modified graphene oxide sheet paste electrode. The electrooxidation of hydrochlorothiazide at the surface of the modified electrode was studied. Under optimized conditions, the square wave voltammetric (SWV) peak current of hydrochlorothiazide increased linearly with hydrochlorothiazide concentration in the range of 5.0 × 10(-8) to 2.0 × 10(-4) M and a detection limit of 20.0 nM was obtained for hydrochlorothiazide. The diffusion coefficient and kinetic parameters (such as electron transfer coefficient and the heterogeneous rate constant) for hydrochlorothiazide oxidation were also determined. The prepared modified electrode exhibits a very good resolution between the voltammetric peaks of hydrochlorothiazide and folic acid which makes it suitable for the detection of hydrochlorothiazide in the presence of folic acid in real samples. PMID:25953571

  19. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21...

  20. Palladium(II)/Brønsted Acid-Catalyzed Enantioselective Oxidative Carbocyclization-Borylation of Enallenes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tuo; Bartholomeyzik, Teresa; Mazuela, Javier; Willersinn, Jochen; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2015-05-11

    An enantioselective oxidative carbocyclization-borylation of enallenes that is catalyzed by palladium(II) and a Brønsted acid was developed. Biphenol-type chiral phosphoric acids were superior co-catalysts for inducing the enantioselective cyclization. A number of chiral borylated carbocycles were synthesized in high enantiomeric excess. PMID:25808996

  1. Palladium(II)/Brønsted Acid-Catalyzed Enantioselective Oxidative Carbocyclization–Borylation of Enallenes**

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tuo; Bartholomeyzik, Teresa; Mazuela, Javier; Willersinn, Jochen; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2015-01-01

    An enantioselective oxidative carbocyclization–borylation of enallenes that is catalyzed by palladium(II) and a Brønsted acid was developed. Biphenol-type chiral phosphoric acids were superior co-catalysts for inducing the enantioselective cyclization. A number of chiral borylated carbocycles were synthesized in high enantiomeric excess. PMID:25808996

  2. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  7. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents ...

  8. Implications of modifying membrane fatty acid composition on membrane oxidation, integrity, and storage viability of freeze-dried probiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marie-Louise R W; Petersen, Mikael A; Risbo, Jens; Hümmer, Magdalena; Clausen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of altering the fatty acid profile of the lipid membrane on storage survival of freeze-dried probiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5, as well as study the membrane integrity and lipid oxidation. The fatty acid composition of the lipid membrane of L. acidophilus La-5 was significantly different upon growth in MRS (containing Tween 80, an oleic acid source), or in MRS with Tween 20 (containing C12:0 and C14:0), linoleic, or linolenic acid supplemented. Bacteria grown in MRS showed the highest storage survival rates. No indications of loss of membrane integrity could be found, and membrane integrity could therefore not be connected with loss of viability. Survival of bacteria grown with linoleic or linolenic acid was more negatively affected by the presence of oxygen, than bacteria grown in MRS or with Tween 20 supplemented. A small, but significant, loss of linolenic acid during storage could be identified, and an increase of volatile secondary oxidation products during storage was found for bacteria grown in MRS, or with linoleic, or linolenic acid supplemented, but not for bacteria grown with Tween 20. Overall, the results indicate that lipid oxidation and loss of membrane integrity are not the only or most important detrimental reactions which can occur during storage. By altering the fatty acid composition, it was also found that properties of oleic acid gave rise to more robust bacteria than more saturated or unsaturated fatty acids did. PMID:25823709

  9. Protodeboronation of Heteroaromatic, Vinyl, and Cyclopropyl Boronic Acids: pH-Rate Profiles, Autocatalysis, and Disproportionation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Paul A; Leach, Andrew G; Campbell, Andrew D; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C

    2016-07-27

    pH-rate profiles for aqueous-organic protodeboronation of 18 boronic acids, many widely viewed as unstable, have been studied by NMR and DFT. Rates were pH-dependent, and varied substantially between the boronic acids, with rate maxima that varied over 6 orders of magnitude. A mechanistic model containing five general pathways (k1-k5) has been developed, and together with input of [B]tot, KW, Ka, and KaH, the protodeboronation kinetics can be correlated as a function of pH (1-13) for all 18 species. Cyclopropyl and vinyl boronic acids undergo very slow protodeboronation, as do 3- and 4-pyridyl boronic acids (t0.5 > 1 week, pH 12, 70 °C). In contrast, 2-pyridyl and 5-thiazolyl boronic acids undergo rapid protodeboronation (t0.5 ≈ 25-50 s, pH 7, 70 °C), via fragmentation of zwitterionic intermediates. Lewis acid additives (e.g., Cu, Zn salts) can attenuate (2-pyridyl) or accelerate (5-thiazolyl and 5-pyrazolyl) fragmentation. Two additional processes compete when the boronic acid and the boronate are present in sufficient proportions (pH = pKa ± 1.6): (i) self-/autocatalysis and (ii) sequential disproportionations of boronic acid to borinic acid and borane. PMID:27355973

  10. Monocarboxylic acids from oxidation of acyclic isoprenoid alkanes by Mycobacterium fortuitum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. E.; Maxwell, J. R.; Myers, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum utilizes certain stereoisomeric mixtures of individual multimethyl branched alkanes as sole carbon source, including 2,6(R), 10(S), 14(RS)-tetramethylhexadecane; 2,6(R), 10(S), 14(RS)-tetramethylheptadecane; 2,6(RS), 10(RS)-trimethyltetradecane, and 2,6(R), 10(S)-trimethylpentadecane. Products of oxidation isolated from the bacterial lipids were acids derived predominantly from oxidation of the isopropyl terminus of each alkane, except in the case of 2,6(RS), 10(RS)-trimethyltetradecane. With the latter, acids from oxidation at either terminus were detected in comparable proportions.

  11. Oxidative carbonylation - A new syngas route to sebacic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kesling, H.S.

    1986-03-01

    Conventional technology for sebacic acid manufacture involves caustic soda decomposition of ricinoleic acid at high temperature. Principal co-products include 2-octanol and glycerine. Castor oil, which is the natural source for ricinoleic acid, is subject to price fluctuation due to cyclic crop production and protectionist policies by foreign governments. Castor oil technology is also at disadvantage because the overall product yield is low (<80%) and co-product 2-octanol must compete with cheap 2-ethylhexanol in plasticizer applications. These and other factors have resulted in a significant decline in the sebacic acid market from about 30 MM lbs. per year in the 70's to less that 5 MM lbs. in the 80's. Thus, there is a clear need for a new process to produce sebacic acid from cheap and readily available petrochemicals. In Japan, the need for new technology was answered by the development of an electrolytic route to sebacic acid. The Kolbe type electrolytic process involves dimerization of adipic acid half methyl ester salt to give dimethyl sebacate. The dimerization proceeds in 92% yield with 90% selectivity based on the adipate half ester. The main drawbacks of this process are the cost of energy utilized by the electrolytic process and the cost of adipic acid. A recent Chem Systems report indicates a small advantage for the Asahi electrolytic process with ample room for new technology development.

  12. Intrinsic activity and poisoning rate for HCOOH oxidation at Pt(100) and vicinal surfaces containing monoatomic (111) steps.

    PubMed

    Grozovski, Vitali; Climent, Víctor; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2009-08-01

    Pulsed voltammetry is used to study formic acid oxidation on Pt(2n-1,1,1) surfaces and determine the effects of the size of the (100) terrace and the (111) step density on the reaction mechanism. The intrinsic activity of the electrode through the active intermediate reaction path (j(theta=) (0)), as well as the rate constant for the CO formation (k(ads)), are calculated from the current transients obtained at different potentials. For surfaces with wide terraces, j(theta=) (0) and k(ads) are almost insensitive to the step density, which suggests that step and terrace sites have a similar activity for this reaction. For narrow terraces (n<6), the intrinsic activity diminishes. The dependence of the reaction rates on the electrode potential is also elucidated. The CO formation only takes place in a narrow potential window, very close to the potential of zero total charge, while the direct oxidation takes place even when the surface is covered by anions. The different behavior for both reactions suggests that the adsorption mode of formic acid is different for each path. PMID:19569091

  13. Micromechanical properties of intercalated compounds of graphite oxide with dodecahydro- closо-dodecaboric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, A. A.; Saldin, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    The micromechanical properties (Young's modulus, deformation, and adhesion) of the intercalated compound of graphite oxide with dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid were studied by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy and compared with the same characteristics of the starting graphite oxide. The significant difference in the micromechanical properties of the materials under study is dictated by differences in the topography and properties of their film surface, which, in turn, can be determined by their chemical composition. The introduction of dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid in the interplanar space of graphite oxide affects the structuring of the latter. A considerable increase in the adhesion of the intercalated compound relative to that of oxide graphite is explained by high adhesive properties of the introduced acid, the Young's modulus of graphite oxide being higher than that of the intercalated compound. This was attributed to the high hydrophilicity of dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid and the difficulty of water removal from the interplanar space; water plasticizes the material, which becomes softer than graphite oxide. The difference in the structure of the coating of the intercalated compounds and the starting graphite oxide was found to be also reflected by their Raman spectra, namely, by the increased intensity of the D line with the preserved position of the G line, which points to the impurity nature of the intercalate and the unchanged hexagonal lattice of graphite.

  14. Phytochemicals in regulating fatty acid β-oxidation: Potential underlying mechanisms and their involvement in obesity and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Mantso, Theodora; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I

    2016-09-01

    Excessive accumulation of fat as the result of more energy intake and less energy expenditure is known as obesity. Lipids are essential components in the human body and are vital for maintaining homeostasis and physiological as well as cellular metabolism. Fatty acid synthesis and catabolism (by fatty acid oxidation) are normal part of basic fuel metabolism in animals. Fatty acids are degraded in the mitochondria by a biochemical process called β-oxidation in which two-carbon fragments are produced in each cycle. The increase in fatty acid β-oxidation is negatively correlated with body mass index. Although healthy life style, avoiding Western diet, dieting and strenuous exercise are the commonly used methods to lose weight, they are not considered a permanent solution in addition to risk attenuation of basal metabolic rate (BMR). Pharmacotherapy offers benefits of weight loss by altering the satiety and lowering absorption of fat from the food; however, its side effects may outweigh the benefits of weight loss. Alternatively, dietary phytochemicals and natural health products offer great potential as an efficient weight loss strategy by modulating lipid metabolism and/or increasing BMR and thermogenesis. Specifically, polyphenols such as citrus flavonoids, green tea epigallocatechin gallate, resveratrol, capsaicin and curcumin, have been reported to increase lipolysis and induce fatty acid β-oxidation through modulation of hormone sensitive lipase, acetyl-coA carboxylase, carnitine acyl transferase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1. In this review article, we discuss selected phytochemicals in relation to their integrated functionalities and specific mechanisms for weight loss. PMID:27288729

  15. Reflectometry-Ellipsometry Reveals Thickness, Growth Rate, and Phase Composition in Oxidation of Copper.

    PubMed

    Diaz Leon, Juan J; Fryauf, David M; Cormia, Robert D; Zhang, Min-Xian Max; Samuels, Kathryn; Williams, R Stanley; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P

    2016-08-31

    The oxidation of copper is a complicated process. Copper oxide develops two stable phases at room temperature and standard pressure (RTSP): cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and cupric oxide (CuO). Both phases have different optical and electrical characteristics that make them interesting for applications such as solar cells or resistive switching devices. For a given application, it is necessary to selectively control oxide thickness and cupric/cuprous oxide phase volume fraction. The thickness and composition of a copper oxide film growing on the surface of copper widely depend on the characteristics of as-deposited copper. In this Research Article, two samples, copper films prepared by two different deposition techniques, electron-beam evaporation and sputtering, were studied. As the core part of the study, the formation of the oxidized copper was analyzed routinely over a period of 253 days using spectroscopic polarized reflectometry-spectroscopic ellipsometry (RE). An effective medium approximation (EMA) model was used to fit the RE data. The RE measurements were complemented and validated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Our results show that the two samples oxidized under identical laboratory ambient conditions (RTSP, 87% average relative humidity) developed unique oxide films following an inverse-logarithmic growth rate with thickness and composition different from each other over time. Discussion is focused on the ability of RE to simultaneously extract thickness (i.e., growth rate) and composition of copper oxide films and on plausible physical mechanisms responsible for unique oxidation habits observed in the two copper samples. It appears that extended surface characteristics (i.e., surface roughness and grain boundaries) and preferential crystalline orientation of as-deposited polycrystalline copper films control the growth kinetics of the copper oxide film. Analysis based on a noncontact

  16. From thiol to sulfonic acid: modeling the oxidation pathway of protein thiols by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Laura A H; Roos, Goedele; De Proft, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a natural oxidant that can oxidize protein thiols (RSH) via sulfenic acid (RSOH) and sulfinic acid (RSO2H) to sulfonic acid (RSO3H). In this paper, we study the complete anionic and neutral oxidation pathway from thiol to sulfonic acid. Reaction barriers and reaction free energies for all three oxidation steps are computed, both for the isolated substrates and for the substrates in the presence of different model ligands (CH4, H2O, NH3) mimicking the enzymatic environment. We found for all three barriers that the anionic thiolate is more reactive than the neutral thiol. However, the assistance of the environment in the neutral pathway in a solvent-assisted proton-exchange (SAPE) mechanism can lower the reaction barrier noticeably. Polar ligands can decrease the reaction barriers, whereas apolar ligands do not influence the barrier heights. The same holds for the reaction energies: they decrease (become more negative) in the presence of polar ligands whereas apolar ligands do not have an influence. The consistently negative consecutive reaction energies for the oxidation in the anionic pathway when going from thiolate over sulfenic and sulfinic acid to sulfonic acid are in agreement with biological reversibility. PMID:25036614

  17. Lipid and protein oxidation in hepatic homogenates and cell membranes exposed to bile acids.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Martínez-Ballarín, Enrique; Miana-Mena, Javier; Berzosa, Cesar; Piedrafita, Eduardo; Cebrián, Igor; Reiter, Russel J; García, Joaquín J

    2009-01-01

    Cholestasis occurs in a variety of hepatic diseases and causes damage due to accumulation of bile acids in the liver. The aim was to investigate the effect of several bile acids, i.e. chenodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, lithocholic and taurolithocholic (TLC), in inducing oxidative damage. Hepatic tissue of male Sprague-Dawley rats was incubated with or without 1 mM of each bile acid, with or without 0.1 mM FeCl(3) and 0.1 mM ascorbic acid for the purpose of generating free radicals. Several bile acids increased lipid and protein oxidation, with TLC being the most pro-oxidative (657% and 175% in homogenates and 350% and 311% in membranes, respectively). TLC also enhanced iron-induced oxidative stress to lipids (21% in homogenates and 29% in membranes) and to proteins (74% in membranes). This enhancement was dose- and time-dependent and was reduced by melatonin. These results suggest that bile acids differentially mediate hepatic oxidative stress and may be involved in the physiopathology of cholestasis. PMID:19669996

  18. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formate with Nickel Diphosphane Dipeptide Complexes. Effect of Ligands Modified with Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Brandon R.; Reback, Matthew L.; Jain, Avijita; Appel, Aaron M.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-09-03

    A series of nickel bis-diphosphine complexes with dipeptides appended to the ligands were investigated for the catalytic oxidation of formate. Typical rates of ~7 s-1 were found, similar to the parent complex (~8 s-1), with amino acid size and positioning contributing very little to rate or operating potential. Hydroxyl functionalities did result in lower rates, which were recovered by protecting the hydroxyl group. The results suggest that the overall dielectric introduced by the dipeptides does not play an important role in catalysis, but free hydroxyl groups do influence activity suggesting contributions from intra- or intermolecular interactions. These observations are important in developing a fundamental understanding of the affect that an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere can have upon molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (BRG, AJ, AMA, WJS), the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Physical Bioscience program (MLR). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase catalyzes a key 3 step oxidation to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid in Catharanthus roseus iridoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Salim, Vonny; Wiens, Brent; Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Iridoids are key intermediates required for the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), as well as quinoline alkaloids. Although most iridoid biosynthetic genes have been identified, one remaining three step oxidation required to form the carboxyl group of 7-deoxyloganetic acid has yet to be characterized. Here, it is reported that virus-induced gene silencing of 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase (7DLS, CYP76A26) in Catharanthus roseus greatly decreased levels of secologanin and the major MIAs, catharanthine and vindoline in silenced leaves. Functional expression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed its function as an authentic 7DLS that catalyzes the 3 step oxidation of iridodial-nepetalactol to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid. The identification of CYP76A26 removes a key bottleneck for expression of iridoid and related MIA pathways in various biological backgrounds. PMID:24594312

  20. Growth behavior of anodic oxide formed by aluminum anodizing in glutaric and its derivative acid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Daiki; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-12-01

    The growth behavior of anodic oxide films formed via anodizing in glutaric and its derivative acid solutions was investigated based on the acid dissociation constants of electrolytes. High-purity aluminum foils were anodized in glutaric, ketoglutaric, and acetonedicarboxylic acid solutions under various electrochemical conditions. A thin barrier anodic oxide film grew uniformly on the aluminum substrate by glutaric acid anodizing, and further anodizing caused the film to breakdown due to a high electric field. In contrast, an anodic porous alumina film with a submicrometer-scale cell diameter was successfully formed by ketoglutaric acid anodizing at 293 K. However, the increase and decrease in the temperature of the ketoglutaric acid resulted in non-uniform oxide growth and localized pitting corrosion of the aluminum substrate. An anodic porous alumina film could also be fabricated by acetonedicarboxylic acid anodizing due to the relatively low dissociation constants associated with the acid. Acid dissociation constants are an important factor for the fabrication of anodic porous alumina films.

  1. Dietary ellagic acid attenuates oxidized LDL uptake and stimulates cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hye; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Sook; Han, Seon-Young; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2011-11-01

    Foam cell formation is the hallmark of early atherosclerosis. Lipid uptake by scavenger receptors (SR) in macrophages initiates chronic proinflammatory cascades linked to atherosclerosis. It has been reported that the upregulation of cholesterol efflux may be protective in the development of atherosclerosis. Ellagic acid, a polyphenolic compound mostly found in berries, walnuts, and pomegranates, possesses antioxidative, growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-promoting activities in cancer cells. However, the antiatherogenic actions of ellagic acid are not well defined. The current study elucidated oxidized LDL handling of ellagic acid in J774A1 murine macrophages. Noncytotoxic ellagic acid suppressed SR-B1 induction and foam cell formation within 6 h after the stimulation of macrophages with oxidized LDL, confirmed by Oil red O staining of macrophages. Ellagic acid at ≤5 μmol/L upregulated PPARγ and ATP binding cassette transporter-1 in lipid-laden macrophages, all responsible for cholesterol efflux. In addition, 5 μmol/L ellagic acid accelerated expression and transcription of the nuclear receptor of liver X receptor-α highly implicated in the PPAR signaling. Furthermore, ellagic acid promoted cholesterol efflux in oxidized LDL-induced foam cells. These results provide new information that ellagic acid downregulated macrophage lipid uptake to block foam cell formation of macrophages and boosted cholesterol efflux in lipid-laden foam cells. Therefore, dietary and pharmacological interventions with berries rich in ellagic acid may be promising treatment strategies to interrupt the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21940512

  2. Impact of Association Colloids on Lipid Oxidation in Triacylglycerols and Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Suzuki, Karin; Cui, Leqi; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-11-25

    The impact of association colloids on lipid oxidation in triacylglycerols and fatty acid ethyl esters was investigated. Association colloids did not affect lipid oxidation of high oleic safflower and high linoleic safflower triacylglycerols, but were prooxidative in fish triacylglycerols. Association colloids retarded aldehyde formation in stripped ethyl oleate, linoleate, and fish oil ethyl esters. Interfacial tension revealed that lipid hydroperoxides were surface active in the presence of the surfactants found in association colloids. The lipid hydroperoxides from ethyl esters were less surface active than triacylglycerol hydroperoxides. Stripping decreased iron and copper concentrations in all oils, but more so in fatty acid ethyl esters. The combination of lower hydroperoxide surface activity and low metal concentrations could explain why association colloids inhibited lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters. This research suggests that association colloids could be used as an antioxidant technology in fatty acid ethyl esters. PMID:26506263

  3. Fatty Acid Oxidation and Cardiovascular Risk during Menopause: A Mitochondrial Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Paulo J.; Carvalho, Rui A.; Portincasa, Piero; Bonfrate, Leonilde; Sardao, Vilma A.

    2012-01-01

    Menopause is a consequence of the normal aging process in women. This fact implies that the physiological and biochemical alterations resulting from menopause often blur with those from the aging process. It is thought that menopause in women presents a higher risk for cardiovascular disease although the precise mechanism is still under discussion. The postmenopause lipid profile is clearly altered, which can present a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Due to the role of mitochondria in fatty acid oxidation, alterations of the lipid profile in the menopausal women will also influence mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation fluxes in several organs. In this paper, we propose that alterations of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the heart, consequence from normal aging and/or from the menopausal process, result in decreased fatty acid oxidation and accumulation of fatty acid intermediates in the cardiomyocyte cytosol, resulting in lipotoxicity and increasing the cardiovascular risk in the menopausal women. PMID:22496981

  4. Oxidation and hydrolysis of lactic acid in near-critical water

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Vallejo, D.; Gloyna, E.F.; Portela, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    Hydrothermal reactions (oxidation and hydrolysis) involving lactic acid (LA) were studied at temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 C and a nominal pressure of 27.6 MPa. Kinetic models were developed with respect to concentrations of LA and total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. On the basis of identified liquid and gaseous products, pathways for hydrothermal reactions involving lactic acid were proposed. Acetic acid and acetaldehyde were confirmed as the major liquid intermediates for oxidation and hydrolysis reactions, respectively. Carbon monoxide and methane were identified as the major gaseous byproducts from these reactions. These results demonstrate the potential of completely oxidizing, as well as converting, lactic acid into other organic products, in high-temperature water.

  5. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.52b Section 60.52b Protection of Environment... § 60.52b Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a... (total mass), corrected to 7 percent oxygen. (d) The limits for nitrogen oxides are specified...

  6. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 62.14103 Section 62.14103 Protection of... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste... nitrogen oxides in excess of the emission limits listed in table 2 of this subpart for affected...

  7. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.52b Section 60.52b Protection of Environment... § 60.52b Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a... (total mass), corrected to 7 percent oxygen. (d) The limits for nitrogen oxides are specified...

  8. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.33b Section 60.33b Protection of Environment..., acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals... limits for nitrogen oxides at least as protective as the emission limits listed in table 1 of...

  9. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.33b Section 60.33b Protection of Environment..., acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals... limits for nitrogen oxides at least as protective as the emission limits listed in table 1 of...

  10. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 62.14103 Section 62.14103 Protection of... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste... nitrogen oxides in excess of the emission limits listed in table 2 of this subpart for affected...

  11. Structure-Activity Relationships for Rates of Aromatic Amine Oxidation by Manganese Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J; Bylaska, Eric J; Lyon, Molly A; Ness, Stuart C; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-05-17

    New energetic compounds are designed to minimize their potential environmental impacts, which includes their transformation and the fate and effects of their transformation products. The nitro groups of energetic compounds are readily reduced to amines, and the resulting aromatic amines are subject to oxidation and coupling reactions. Manganese dioxide (MnO2) is a common environmental oxidant and model system for kinetic studies of aromatic amine oxidation. In this study, a training set of new and previously reported kinetic data for the oxidation of model and energetic-derived aromatic amines was assembled and subjected to correlation analysis against descriptor variables that ranged from general purpose [Hammett σ constants (σ(-)), pKas of the amines, and energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (EHOMO)] to specific for the likely rate-limiting step [one-electron oxidation potentials (Eox)]. The selection of calculated descriptors (pKa, EHOMO, and Eox) was based on validation with experimental data. All of the correlations gave satisfactory quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), but they improved with the specificity of the descriptor. The scope of correlation analysis was extended beyond MnO2 to include literature data on aromatic amine oxidation by other environmentally relevant oxidants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and phosphate and carbonate radicals) by correlating relative rate constants (normalized to 4-chloroaniline) to EHOMO (calculated with a modest level of theory). PMID:27074054

  12. Empirical Modeling of Iron Oxide Dissolution in Sulphuric and Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmelmann, Jan C.; Xu, Hao; Krumm, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    A new approach is presented to an empirical modeling of chemical pickling processes, based on the activation energy of oxide dissolution in hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). The model allows us to calculate pickling times as a function of definite parameters. The main oxide layers on hot-rolled materials are magnetite (Fe3O4), hematite (Fe2O3), and wustite (FeO). On the laboratory scale, the activation energy of each oxide has been determined. FeO is a metastable oxide and has been produced based on magnetite powder in a H2/H2O atmosphere. The oxide powders used for the experimental procedure have been analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction to insure the proper stoichiometry and composition. The model allows us to calculate the time of oxide dissolution based on the parameters temperature, acid concentration, and the composition of the oxide layer. Calculated values are verified by surface potential measurement on industrial oxide layers. The hot-rolled material used for verification is low carbon steel. A comparison between calculated pickling times and experimental data will be presented.

  13. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  14. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  15. Copper-catalyzed tandem phosphination-decarboxylation-oxidation of alkynyl acids with H-phosphine oxides: a facile synthesis of β-ketophosphine oxides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengbo; Zhang, Liangliang; Gao, Yuzhen; Xu, Jian; Fang, Hua; Tang, Guo; Zhao, Yufen

    2015-05-01

    The general method for the tandem phosphination-decarboxylation-oxidation of alkynyl acids under aerobic conditions has been developed. In the presence of CuSO4·5H2O and TBHP, the reactions provide a novel access to β-ketophosphine oxides in good to excellent yields. This transformation allows the direct formation of a P-C bond and the construction of a keto group in one reaction. PMID:25855268

  16. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma; Iacobazzi, Francesco; Liu, Aiping; Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP{sup +}) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP{sup +} accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [{sup 14}C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [{sup 14}C]O{sub 2} release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency.

  17. Solid-State 17O NMR Study of Benzoic Acid Adsorption On Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Chen, Banghao; Jiao, Jian; Parsons, Williams

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state 17O NMR spectra of 17O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry-mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the 17O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. 27Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles.

  18. [Oxidative homeostasis and functional parameters of rats at high altitudes with alpha-lipoic acid correction].

    PubMed

    Vishnevskiĭ, A A; Dzhantaeva, G A; Zhaparalieva, Ch O

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative and functional effects of alpha-lipoic acid (a-LA) were studied in the course of 45-day adaptation to high altitudes (3200 m in the Central Tien Shan, June - August). Comparison of a-LA with mildronate stated similarity of their antioxidant and membrane effects on the third (stable) phase of adaptation (day 45), as both substances demonstrated a distinct lyso-PL-limiting effect and did not change dramatically concentration of diene conjugates (primary products of lipid peroxidation) in brain tissue. a-LA surpassed mildronate in the rate of the compensating effect in respect of behavior disorders and anxiety in rats. Besides, the substances contributed equally to physical performance increment by the end of adaptation. The positive effect of a-LA on the functional characteristics was hand in hand with minimization of the consequences of oxidative stress. These experimental data imply that a-LA can be effective in controlling the long process of adaptation to high altitude conditions. PMID:21916251

  19. Rapid oxidation and immobilization of arsenic by contact glow discharge plasma in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Hu, Ping; Zheng, Xing; Zheng, Jingtang; Tan, Minghui; Wu, Mingbo; Xue, Qinzhong

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is a priority pollutant in aquatic ecosystem and therefore the remediation of arsenic-bearing wastewater is an important environmental issue. This study unprecedentedly reported simultaneous oxidation of As(III) and immobilization of arsenic can be achieved using contact glow discharge process (CGDP). CGDP with thinner anodic wire and higher energy input were beneficial for higher As(V) production efficiency. Adding Fe(II) in CGDP system significantly enhanced the oxidation rate of As(III) due to the generations of additional OH and Fe(IV) species, accompanied with which arsenic can be simultaneously immobilized in one process. Arsenic immobilization can be favorably obtained at solution pH in the range of 4.0-6.0 and Fe(II) concentration from 250 to 1000 μM. The presence of organics (i.e., oxalic acid, ethanol and phenol) retarded the arsenic immobilization by scavenging OH or complexing Fe(III) in aqueous solution. On the basis of these results, a mechanism was proposed that the formed ionic As(V) rapidly coprecipitated with Fe(III) ions or was adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxides with the formation of amorphous ferric arsenate-bearing ferric oxyhydroxides. This CGDP-Fenton system was of great interest for engineered systems concerned with the remediation of arsenic containing wastewater. PMID:25600320

  20. All-trans retinoic acid induces oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondria biogenesis in adipocytes[S

    PubMed Central

    Tourniaire, Franck; Musinovic, Hana; Gouranton, Erwan; Astier, Julien; Marcotorchino, Julie; Arreguin, Andrea; Bernot, Denis; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M. Luisa; Ribot, Joan; Landrier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    A positive effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on white adipose tissue (WAT) oxidative and thermogenic capacity has been described and linked to an in vivo fat-lowering effect of ATRA in mice. However, little is known about the effects of ATRA on mitochondria in white fat. Our objective has been to characterize the effect of ATRA on mitochondria biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in mature white adipocytes. Transcriptome analysis, oxygraphy, analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and flow cytometry-based analysis of mitochondria density were performed in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes after 24 h incubation with ATRA (2 µM) or vehicle. Selected genes linked to mitochondria biogenesis and function and mitochondria immunostaining were analyzed in WAT tissues of ATRA-treated as compared with vehicle-treated mice. ATRA upregulated the expression of a large set of genes linked to mtDNA replication and transcription, mitochondrial biogenesis, and OXPHOS in adipocytes, as indicated by transcriptome analysis. Oxygen consumption rate, mtDNA content, and staining of mitochondria were increased in the ATRA-treated adipocytes. Similar results were obtained in WAT depots of ATRA-treated mice. We conclude that ATRA impacts mitochondria in adipocytes, leading to increased OXPHOS capacity and mitochondrial content in these cells. PMID:25914170

  1. Extraction of benzene and naphthalene carboxylic acids using quaternary ammonium salts as a model study for the separation of coal oxidation products

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Nagano, H.; Okuwaki, A.

    2005-07-01

    The ion-pair solvent extraction of benzene- and naphthalene-carboxylic acids has been investigated as a model study for the separation of coal oxidation products, which are formed by treatment with alkaline solutions at high temperatures. It was possible that benzene- and naphthalene-dicarboxylic acids are extracted into several types of organic solvents with quaternary ammonium ions. The extraction equilibrium constants (K{sub ex}) for benzoic acid, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 1-naphthoic acid, 2-naphthoic acid, 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid, and 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid into chloroform were determined at 20{sup o}C. The difference of K{sub ex} among the aromatic acids was sufficiently large for designing a separation method for these aromatic acids. It was unexpected that the extraction of dicarboxylic acids was slower than that of monocarboxylic acids, although the ion-pair formation of aromatic carboxylate ion with quaternary ammonium ion is normally considered as a diffusion control reaction in aqueous phase. Thus, this fact suggests that the phase transfer of the ion-pair from aqueous to organic phase is the rate-determining step. Liner-free-energy relationship was observed for the monocarboxylic acids using different quaternary ammonium salts while that was ambiguous for the dicarboxylic acids. This is due to the steric influence of the counter ions for the magnitude of K{sub ex}.

  2. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on memory, oxidation, and lifespan in SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    Farr, Susan A; Price, Tulin O; Banks, William A; Ercal, Nuran; Morley, John E

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage is associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid has been found to improve memory in mouse models of AD. Here, we administered alpha-lipoic acid daily to SAMP8 mice starting at 11 months of age and continuing until death. We found that treatment with alpha-lipoic acid decreased survival from 34 weeks in those receiving vehicle to 20 weeks. A subset of 18 month old mice given alpha-lipoic acid for two weeks and then tested in an object-place recognition paradigm had improved memory. A second subset of 18 month old mice given alpha-lipoic acid for two weeks and tested in the Barnes maze had improved learning. After testing, the mice were sacrificed and indices of oxidative damage were measured in the brain tissue. The mice that received alpha-lipoic acid had significantly increased glutathione and decreased glutathione peroxidase and malondialdehyde indicating reversal of oxidative stress. These results indicate that alpha-lipoic acid improves memory and reverses indices of oxidative stress in extremely old SAMP8 mice, but decreases lifespan. These findings are similar to studies using other types of antioxidants. PMID:22785389

  3. Effects of varying media, temperature, and growth rates on the intracellular concentrations of yeast amino acids.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Force, E; Benítez, T

    1995-01-01

    Variations of the yeast free amino acid pool under different culture conditions were studied in two Saccharomyces strains, the laboratory haploid strain S288C and the industrial fermentative yeast IFI256. The internal amino acid pool of both strains was measured when grown in laboratory (minimal and complete) versus semiindustrial (molasses with or without added biotin and/or diammonium phosphate) media, in fermentable (glucose, fructose, sucrose) versus respirable (glycerol) carbon sources, in different temperatures (22, 30, and 37 degrees C), pHs (2.0-4.75), and growth rates (0.018-0.24 h-1) in continuous culture, and at different phases of the growth curve in batch culture (lag, exponential, early and late stationary). Results indicated that environmental conditions, particularly the presence of amino acids in the media, enormously influenced the intracellular amino acid concentration. Higher values were detected in molasses than in laboratory media and in fermentable carbon sources (glucose, fructose, sucrose) than in glycerol. Variations in the amino acid pool along the growth curve were greater at 37 degrees C than at other temperatures; in all cases, the highest values were measured at the beginning of the exponential phase. In continuous culture and at different growth rates, intracellular free amino acid concentrations increased by 3-10-fold when the growth rate was lower than 0.05 h-1, representing 20-35% of the total (free plus protein) amino acid content and indicating that amino acid yield was a partly growth-linked parameter. PMID:7654310

  4. Oxidation rate of iron sulfides as affected by surface area, morphology, oxygen concentration and autotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.

    1984-05-01

    The relationship between surface area and rate of oxidation of Fe sulphides (pyrite and marcasite) separated from Texas lignite was studied. The reaction kinetics with respect to Fe sulphide morphology and particle size were evaluated. The oxygen concentration and the presence of autotrophic Fe and S-oxidizing bacteria (thiobacillus ferro-oxidans) on the rate of oxidation were also evaluated. The formation of sulphate from Fe sulphide was selected to measure the rate of oxidation. Relative reaction rates for different morphological forms of Fe sulphide were: marcasite > framboidal pyrite > massive pyrite. As the surface area of pyrite doubled, reaction rate increased by a factor of 1.5. Sulphate production for the 5 to 2 ..mu..m fraction was twice that of the 50 to 20 ..mu..m fraction. Reaction rate was approximately fivefold greater for non-inoculated treatments at 20% O/sub 2/ compared with 0% O/sub 2/ and was approximately ninefold greater for the same treatment inoculated with T. ferro-oxidans.

  5. Fenton-like oxidation of small aromatic acids from biomass burning in water and in the absence of light: implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Santos, Patrícia S M; Duarte, Armando C

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of organic compounds from biomass burning in the troposphere is worthy of concern due to the uncertainty of chemical transformations that occur during the reactions and to the possibility of such compounds producing others more aggressive to the environment in general. In this work was studied the oxidation of relevant atmospheric organic compounds resulting from biomass burning, three small aromatic acids with similar molecular structures (benzoic, 4-hydroxybenzoic and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acids), in aqueous phase and in the absence of light. The oxidation process used was the Fenton-like reaction and it was evaluated by ultraviolet-visible and molecular fluorescence spectroscopies. The extent of oxidation of the acids depended on the pH of the solution, and the rate of reaction increased as the pH decreased from neutral (5) to acid (4) in atmospheric waters. Even in the absence of light, Fenton-like oxidation of the three acids originated new chromophoric compounds, which tended to be more complex than the reactants. However, after the formation of new compounds they were totally oxidized for 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and only partially degraded for benzoic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids, at least after 48 h of reaction at pH 4.5. Furthermore, the night period may be sufficient for a full degradation of the 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and of their oxidation products in atmospheric waters. Thus, the results obtained in this study highlight that organic compounds from biomass burning with similar molecular structures may have different behavior regarding to their reactivity and persistence in atmospheric waters, even without light. PMID:25201586

  6. Uric acid correlates to oxidation and inflammation in opposite directions in women

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng Hui; Shu, Xiao Ou; Milne, Ginger; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zhang, Xianglan; Cai, Qiuyin; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae F; Chen, Honglei; Purdue, Mark; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of uric acid (UA) levels with a panel of markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Methods Plasma UA levels, along with a panel of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, were measured in 755 Chinese women. Results Plasma UA levels were inversely associated with urinary levels of the oxidative stress marker F2-isoprostanes and positively correlated to levels of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein and some proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) in blood as well as prostaglandin E2 metabolites in urine. Conclusions Plasma UA levels correlate to oxidation and inflammation biomarkers in opposite directions in women. PMID:26301880

  7. Influence of soil pH and application rate on the oxidation of calcium sulfite derived from flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.B.; Bigham, J.M.; Dick, W.A.; Jones, E.S.; Ramsier, C.

    2007-01-15

    Calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.5H{sub 2}O), a common byproduct of coal-fired utilities, is fairly insoluble and can decompose to release toxic SO{sub 2} under highly acidic soil conditions; however, it can also oxidize to form gypsum. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of application rate and soil pH on the oxidation of calcium sulfite under laboratory conditions. Oxidation rates measured by release of SO{sub 4}-S to solution decreased with increasing application rate. Leachate SO{sub 4}-S from soils amended with 1.0 to 3.0 g kg{sup -1} CaSO{sub 3} increased over a 21 to 28 d period before reaching a plateau. At 4 g kg{sup -1}, maximum SO{sub 4}-S release was delayed until Week 7. Oxidation and release of SO{sub 4}-S from soil amended with 3.0 g kg{sup -1} calcium sulfite increased markedly with decreasing soil pH. After only 3 d incubation, the concentrations of SO{sub 4}-S in aqueous leachates were 77, 122, 1709 220, and 229 mg L{sup -1} for initial soil pH values of 7.8, 6.5, 5.5, 5.1, and 4.0, respectively. At an initial soil pH value of 4.0, oxidation/dissolution did not increase much after 3 d. At higher pH values, oxidation was maximized after 21 d. These results suggest that autumn surface applications of calcium sulfite in no-till systems should permit ample time for oxidation/dissolution reactions to occur without introducing biocidal effects related to oxygen scavenging. Soil and annual crops can thus benefit from additions of soluble Ca and SO{sub 4} if calcium sulfite is applied in advance of spring planting.

  8. Arabidopsis INCURVATA2 Regulates Salicylic Acid and Abscisic Acid Signaling, and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Micol-Ponce, Rosa; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Xu, Qian; Barrero, José María; Micol, José Luis; Ponce, María Rosa

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic regulatory states can persist through mitosis and meiosis, but the connection between chromatin structure and DNA replication remains unclear. Arabidopsis INCURVATA2 (ICU2) encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase α, and null alleles of ICU2 have an embryo-lethal phenotype. Analysis of icu2-1, a hypomorphic allele of ICU2, demonstrated that ICU2 functions in chromatin-mediated cellular memory; icu2-1 strongly impairs ICU2 function in the maintenance of repressive epigenetic marks but does not seem to affect ICU2 polymerase activity. To better understand the global function of ICU2 in epigenetic regulation, here we performed a microarray analysis of icu2-1 mutant plants. We found that the genes up-regulated in the icu2-1 mutant included genes encoding transcription factors and targets of the Polycomb Repressive Complexes. The down-regulated genes included many known players in salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and accumulation, ABA signaling and ABA-mediated responses. In addition, we found that icu2-1 plants had reduced SA levels in normal conditions; infection by Fusarium oxysporum induced SA accumulation in the En-2 wild type but not in the icu2-1 mutant. The icu2-1 plants were also hypersensitive to salt stress and exogenous ABA in seedling establishment, post-germination growth and stomatal closure, and accumulated more ABA than the wild type in response to salt stress. The icu2-1 mutant also showed high tolerance to the oxidative stress produced by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT). Our results uncover a role for ICU2 in the regulation of genes involved in ABA signaling as well as in SA biosynthesis and accumulation. PMID:26423959

  9. Lipid oxidation stability of omega-3- and conjugated linoleic acid-enriched sous vide chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Narciso-Gaytán, C; Shin, D; Sams, A R; Keeton, J T; Miller, R K; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X

    2011-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is known to occur rather rapidly in cooked chicken meat containing relatively high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. To assess the lipid oxidation stability of sous vide chicken meat enriched with n-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids, 624 Cobb × Ross broilers were raised during a 6-wk feeding period. The birds were fed diets containing CLA (50% cis-9, trans-11 and 50% trans-10, cis-12 isomers), flaxseed oil (FSO), or menhaden fish oil (MFO), each supplemented with 42 or 200 mg/kg of vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl acetate). Breast or thigh meat was vacuum-packed, cooked (74°C), cooled in ice water, and stored at 4.4°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 30 d. The lipid oxidation development of the meat was estimated by quantification of malonaldehyde (MDA) values, using the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. Fatty acid, nonheme iron, moisture, and fat analyses were performed as well. Results showed that dietary CLA induced deposition of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers, increased the proportion of saturated fatty acids, and decreased the proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Flaxseed oil induced higher deposition of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:4 fatty acids, whereas MFO induced higher deposition of n-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; P < 0.05). Meat lipid oxidation stability was affected by the interaction of either dietary oil or vitamin E with storage day. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were found in the CLA treatment than in the MFO and FSO treatments. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were detected in meat samples from the 200 mg/kg of vitamin E than in meat samples from the 42 mg/kg of vitamin E. Nonheme iron values did not affect (P > 0.05) lipid oxidation development. In conclusion, dietary CLA, FSO, and MFO influenced the fatty acid composition of chicken muscle and the lipid oxidation stability of meat over the storage time. Supranutritional

  10. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Tantalum Oxide Nanoparticles Conjugating Doxorubicin for Targeted Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yushen; Ma, Xibo; Feng, Shanshan; Liang, Xiao; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie; Yue, Xiuli

    2015-12-16

    Theranostic tantalum oxide nanoparticles (TaOxNPs) of about 40 nm were successfully developed by conjugating functional molecules including polyethylene glycol (PEG), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, doxorubicin (DOX), and hyaluronic acid (HA) onto the surface of the nanoparticles (TaOx@Cy7-DOX-PEG-HA NPs) for actively targeting delivery, pH-responsive drug release, and NIR fluorescence/X-ray CT bimodal imaging. The obtained nanoagent exhibits good biocompatibility, high cumulative release rate in the acidic microenvironments, long blood circulation time, and superior tumor-targeting ability. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments show that it can serve as an excellent contrast agent to simultaneously enhance fluorescence imaging and CT imaging greatly. Most importantly, such a nanoagent could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of the tumor greatly and the tumor growth inhibition was evaluated to be 87.5%. In a word, multifunctional TaOx@Cy7-DOX-PEG-HA NPs can serve as a theranostic nanomedicine for fluorescence/X-ray CT bimodal imaging, remote-controlled therapeutics, enabling personalized detection, and treatment of cancer with high efficacy. PMID:26554699

  11. Effect of silver oxide/trichloroisocyanuric acid antimicrobial urinary drainage system on catheter-associated bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, A J; Story, K O; Johnson, S M

    1988-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of silver oxide coating of the indwelling urethral catheter and catheter adapter, and instillation of trichloroisocyanuric acid into the urinary drainage bag in the prevention of catheter-associated bacteriuria in a prospective and randomized study of 74 patients. Bacteriuria was documented in 29 of the 74 patients (39 per cent). There was a significant difference between the attack rates, with 11 of 41 patients (27 per cent) in the test group and 18 of 33 (55 per cent) in the control group having bacteriuria (p equals 0.02) after a median time to bacteriuria of 36 and 8 days, respectively (p equals 0.01). Urethral meatal colonization was implicated as the source of bladder bacteriuria in 12 of 18 patients (67 per cent) in the control group and 5 of 11 (45 per cent) in the test group. Trichloroisocyanuric acid significantly reduced drainage bag contamination but bag contamination with the same microorganism responsible for bacteriuria preceded infection in only 2 of the 29 patients (7 per cent), 1 in each group. Patients who received systemic antimicrobial agents acquired bacteriuria less frequently than those who did not. The apparent protective effect of systemic antimicrobials was strongest during the first 4 days of catheterization. The data indicate that episodes of bacteriuria arising from the urethral meatus are common among catheterized patients and that the antimicrobial catheter is effective in reducing the incidence of catheter-associated bacteriuria. PMID:3336109

  12. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  13. Carotenoids, Birdsong and Oxidative Status: Administration of Dietary Lutein Is Associated with an Increase in Song Rate and Circulating Antioxidants (Albumin and Cholesterol) and a Decrease in Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Casagrande, Stefania; Pinxten, Rianne; Zaid, Erika; Eens, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the appealing hypothesis that carotenoid-based colouration signals oxidative status, evidence supporting the antioxidant function of these pigments is scarce. Recent studies have shown that lutein, the most common carotenoid used by birds, can enhance the expression of non-visual traits, such as birdsong. Nevertheless, the underlying physiological mechanisms remain unclear. In this study we hypothesized that male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) fed extra lutein increase their song rate as a consequence of an improved oxidative status. Although birdsong may be especially sensitive to the redox status, this has, to the best of our knowledge, never been tested. Together with the determination of circulating oxidative damage (ROMs, reactive oxygen metabolites), we quantified uric acid, albumin, total proteins, cholesterol, and testosterone, which are physiological parameters potentially sensitive to oxidation and/or related to both carotenoid functions and birdsong expression. We found that the birds fed extra lutein sang more frequently than control birds and showed an increase of albumin and cholesterol together with a decrease of oxidative damage. Moreover, we could show that song rate was associated with high levels of albumin and cholesterol and low levels of oxidative damage, independently from testosterone levels. Our study shows for the first time that song rate honestly signals the oxidative status of males and that dietary lutein is associated with the circulation of albumin and cholesterol in birds, providing a novel insight to the theoretical framework related to the honest signalling of carotenoid-based traits. PMID:25549336

  14. Effect of Reacting Surface Density on the Overall Graphite Oxidation Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung Kim; Jong Lim; Richard Schultz; David Petti

    2009-05-01

    Graphite oxidation in an air-ingress accident is presently a very important issue for the reactor safety of the very high temperature gas cooled-reactor (VHTR), the concept of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) because of its potential problems such as mechanical degradation of the supporting graphite in the lower plenum of the VHTR might lead to core collapse if the countermeasure is taken carefully. The oxidation process of graphite has known to be affected by various factors, including temperature, pressure, oxygen concentration, types of graphite, graphite shape and size, flow distribution, etc. However, our recent study reveals that the internal pore characteristics play very important roles in the overall graphite oxidation rate. One of the main issues regarding graphite oxidation is the potential core collapse problem that may occur following the degradation of graphite mechanical strength. In analyzing this phenomenon, it is very important to understand the relationship between the degree of oxidization and strength degradation. In addition, the change of oxidation rate by graphite oxidation degree characterization by burn-off (ratio of the oxidized graphite density to the original density) should be quantified because graphite strength degradation is followed by graphite density decrease, which highly affects oxidation rates and patterns. Because the density change is proportional to the internal pore surface area, they should be quantified in advance. In order to understand the above issues, the following experiments were performed: (1)Experiment on the fracture of the oxidized graphite and validation of the previous correlations, (2) Experiment on the change of oxidation rate using graphite density and data collection, (3) Measure the BET surface area of the graphite. The experiments were performed using H451 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation) and IG-110 (Toyo Tanso Co., Ltd) graphite. The reason for the use of those graphite materials is because

  15. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  16. Engineering cytochrome P450 BM3 of Bacillus megaterium for terminal oxidation of palmitic acid.

    PubMed

    Brühlmann, Fredi; Fourage, Laurent; Ullmann, Christophe; Haefliger, Olivier P; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Dubois, Cédric; Wahler, Denis

    2014-08-20

    Directed evolution via iterative cycles of random and targeted mutagenesis was applied to the P450 domain of the subterminal fatty acid hydroxylase CYP102A1 of Bacillus megaterium to shift its regioselectivity towards the terminal position of palmitic acid. A powerful and versatile high throughput assay based on LC-MS allowed the simultaneous detection of primary and secondary oxidation products, which was instrumental for identifying variants with a strong preference for the terminal oxidation of palmitic acid. The best variants identified acquired up to 11 amino acid alterations. Substitutions at F87, I263, and A328, relatively close to the bound substrate based on available crystallographic information contributed significantly to the altered regioselectivity. However, non-obvious residues much more distant from the bound substrate showed surprising strong contributions to the increased selectivity for the terminal position of palmitic acid. PMID:24833423

  17. Increased Hepatic Fatty Acids Uptake and Oxidation by LRPPRC-Driven Oxidative Phosphorylation Reduces Blood Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shi; Sun, Run-zhu; Wang, Di; Gong, Mei-zhen; Su, Xiang-ping; Yi, Fei; Peng, Zheng-wu

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is one of the major risk factors of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of leucine rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC)-driven hepatic oxidative phoshorylation on blood lipid levels. The hepatic LRPPRC level was modulated by liver-specific transgenic or adeno-associated virus 8 carried shRNA targeting Lrpprc (aav-shLrpprc). Mice were fed with a high fat diet to induce obesity. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and / or western blot. The hepatic ATP level, hepatic and serum lipids contents, and mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) complex activities were measured using specific assay kits. The uptake and oxidation of fatty acid by hepatocytes were assessed using 14C-palmitate. LRPPRC regulated the expression of genes encoded by mitochondrial genome but not those by nuclear genome involved in mitochondria biogenesis, OxPhos, and lipid metabolism. Increased OxPhos in liver mediated by LRPPRC resulted in the increase of hepatic ATP level. Lrpprc promoted palmitate uptake and oxidation by hypatocytes. The hepatic and serum triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were inversely associated with the hepatic LRPPRC level. These data demonstrated that LRPPRC-driven hepatic OxPhos could promote fatty acids uptake and oxidation by hepatocytes and reduce both hepatic and circulating triglyceride and cholesterol levels. PMID:27462273

  18. Increased Hepatic Fatty Acids Uptake and Oxidation by LRPPRC-Driven Oxidative Phosphorylation Reduces Blood Lipid Levels.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shi; Sun, Run-Zhu; Wang, Di; Gong, Mei-Zhen; Su, Xiang-Ping; Yi, Fei; Peng, Zheng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is one of the major risk factors of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of leucine rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC)-driven hepatic oxidative phoshorylation on blood lipid levels. The hepatic LRPPRC level was modulated by liver-specific transgenic or adeno-associated virus 8 carried shRNA targeting Lrpprc (aav-shLrpprc). Mice were fed with a high fat diet to induce obesity. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and / or western blot. The hepatic ATP level, hepatic and serum lipids contents, and mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) complex activities were measured using specific assay kits. The uptake and oxidation of fatty acid by hepatocytes were assessed using (14)C-palmitate. LRPPRC regulated the expression of genes encoded by mitochondrial genome but not those by nuclear genome involved in mitochondria biogenesis, OxPhos, and lipid metabolism. Increased OxPhos in liver mediated by LRPPRC resulted in the increase of hepatic ATP level. Lrpprc promoted palmitate uptake and oxidation by hypatocytes. The hepatic and serum triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were inversely associated with the hepatic LRPPRC level. These data demonstrated that LRPPRC-driven hepatic OxPhos could promote fatty acids uptake and oxidation by hepatocytes and reduce both hepatic and circulating triglyceride and cholesterol levels. PMID:27462273

  19. The myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant hypothiocyanous acid inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases via oxidation of key cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Cook, Naomi L; Moeke, Cassidy H; Fantoni, Luca I; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues is critical to cellular processes, and is regulated by kinases and phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs contain a redox-sensitive active site Cys residue, which is readily oxidized. Myeloperoxidase, released from activated leukocytes, catalyzes thiocyanate ion (SCN(-)) oxidation by H2O2 to form hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN), an oxidant that targets Cys residues. Dysregulated phosphorylation and elevated MPO levels have been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases where HOSCN can be generated. Previous studies have shown that HOSCN inhibits isolated PTP1B and induces cellular dysfunction in cultured macrophage-like cells. The present study extends this previous work and shows that physiologically-relevant concentrations of HOSCN alter the activity and structure of other members of the wider PTP family (including leukocyte antigen-related PTP, PTP-LAR; T-cell PTP, TC-PTP; CD45 and Src homology phosphatase-1, Shp-1) by targeting Cys residues. Isolated PTP activity, and activity in lysates of human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) was inhibited by 0-100 µM HOSCN with this being accompanied by reversible oxidation of Cys residues, formation of sulfenic acids or sulfenyl-thiocyanates (detected by Western blotting, and LC-MS as dimedone adducts), and structural changes. LC-MS/MS peptide mass-mapping has provided data on the modified Cys residues in PTP-LAR. This study indicates that inflammation-induced oxidants, and particularly myeloperoxidase-derived species, can modulate the activity of multiple members of the PTP superfamily via oxidation of Cys residues to sulfenic acids. This alteration of the balance of PTP/kinase activity may perturb protein phosphorylation and disrupt cell signaling with subsequent induction of apoptosis at sites of inflammation. PMID:26616646

  20. Rate law of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaki, Yoshiki; Murakami, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Despite intensive studies on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, the oxidation rate law has not been established under low O2 conditions. The importance of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions has been recently recognized; for instance, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) compositions of paleosols, ancient soils formed by weathering, can produce a quantitative pattern of the atmospheric oxygen increase during the Paleoproterozoic. The effects of partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (PO2) on the Fe(II) oxidation rate were investigated to establish the Fe(II) oxidation rate - PO2 relationships under low O2 conditions. All oxidation experiments were carried out in a glove box by introducing Ar gas at ∼10-5-∼10-4 atm of PO2, pH 7.57-8.09 and 22 °C. Luminol chemiluminescence was adopted to measure low Fe(II) concentrations (down to ∼2 nM). Combining previous data under higher PO2 conditions (10-3-0.2 atm) with the present data, the rate law for Fe(II) oxidation over a wide range of PO2 (10-5-0.2 atm) was found to be written as: d[Fe(II)]/dt=-k[Fe(II)][[]2 where the exponent of [O2], x, and the rate constant, k, change from x = 0.98 (±0.04) and log k = 15.46 (±0.06) at ∼6 × 10-3-0.2 atm of PO2 to x = 0.58 (±0.02) and log k = 13.41 (±0.03) at 10-5-∼6 × 10-3 atm of PO2. The most plausible mechanism that explains the change in x under low O2 conditions is that, instead of O2, oxygen-derived oxidants, H2O2 and to some extent, O2rad -, dominate the oxidation reactions at <∼10-3 atm of PO2. The rate law found in the present study requires us to reconsider distributions of Fe redox species at low PO2 in natural environments, especially in paleoweathering profiles, and may provide a deeper understanding of the evolution of atmospheric oxygen in the Precambrian.

  1. Peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and inhibitors of the mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Skorin, C; Necochea, C; Johow, V; Soto, U; Grau, A M; Bremer, J; Leighton, F

    1992-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation was studied in the presence of inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), in normal and in peroxisome-proliferated rat hepatocytes. The oxidation decreased in mitochondria, as expected, but in peroxisomes it increased. These two effects were seen, in variable proportions, with (+)-decanoylcarnitine, 2-tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA) and etomoxir. The decrease in mitochondrial oxidation (ketogenesis) affected saturated fatty acids with 12 or more carbon atoms, whereas the increase in peroxisomal oxidation (H2O2 production) affected saturated fatty acids with 8 or more carbon atoms. The peroxisomal increase was sensitive to chlorpromazine, a peroxisomal inhibitor. To study possible mechanisms, palmitoyl-, octanoyl- and acetyl-carnitine acyltransferase activities were measured, in homogenates and in subcellular fractions from control and TDGA-treated cells. The palmitoylcarnitine acyltransferase was inhibited, as expected, but the octanoyltransferase activity also decreased. The CoA derivative of TDGA was synthesized and tentatively identified as being responsible for inhibition of the octanoylcarnitine acyltransferase. These results show that inhibitors of the mitochondrial CPT I may also inhibit the peroxisomal octanoyl transferase; they also support the hypothesis that the octanoyltransferase has the capacity to control or regulate peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. PMID:1736904

  2. EFFECT OF TRACE METALS AND SULFITE OXIDATION OF ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION IN FGD SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the ...

  3. The Campylobacter jejuni Ferric Uptake Regulator Promotes Acid Survival and Cross-Protection against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Askoura, Momen; Sarvan, Sabina; Couture, Jean-François; Stintzi, Alain

    2016-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The mechanisms by which C. jejuni survives stomach acidity remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that the C. jejuni ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays an important role in C. jejuni acid survival and acid-induced cross-protection against oxidative stress. A C. jejuni Δfur mutant was more sensitive to acid than the wild-type strain. Profiling of the acid stimulon of the C. jejuni Δfur mutant allowed us to uncover Fur-regulated genes under acidic conditions. In particular, Fur was found to upregulate genes involved in flagellar and cell envelope biogenesis upon acid stress, and mutants with deletions of these genes were found to be defective in surviving acid stress. Interestingly, prior acid exposure of C. jejuni cross-protected against oxidative stress in a catalase (KatA)- and Fur-dependent manner. Western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of KatA upon acid stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that the binding affinity between Fur and the katA promoter is reduced in vitro under conditions of low pH, rationalizing the higher levels of expression of katA under acidic conditions. Strikingly, the Δfur mutant exhibited reduced virulence in both human epithelial cells and the Galleria mellonella infection model. Altogether, this is the first study showing that, in addition to its role in iron metabolism, Fur is an important regulator of C. jejuni acid responses and this function cross-protects against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results clearly demonstrate Fur's important role in C. jejuni pathogenesis. PMID:26883589

  4. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. )

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  5. Mechanistic Details and Reactivity Descriptors in Oxidation and Acid Catalysis of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Carr, Robert T.; Chai, Song-Hai; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-02-06

    Acid and redox reaction rates of CH₃OH-O₂ mixtures on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters, together with isotopic, spectroscopic, and theoretical assessments of catalyst properties and reaction pathways, were used to define rigorous descriptors of reactivity and to probe the compositional effects for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) and dehydration reactions. ³¹P-MAS NMR, transmission electron microscopy and titrations of protons with di-tert-butylpyridine during catalysis showed that POM clusters retained their Keggin structure upon dispersion on SiO₂ and after use in CH₃OH reactions. The effects of CH₃OH and O₂ pressures and of D-substitution on ODH rates show that C-H activation in molecularly adsorbed CH₃OH is the sole kinetically relevant step and leads to reduced centers as intermediates present at low coverages; their concentrations, measured from UV-vis spectra obtained during catalysis, are consistent with the effects of CH₃OH/O₂ ratios predicted from the elementary steps proposed. First-order ODH rate constants depend strongly on the addenda atoms (Mo vs W) but weakly on the central atom (P vs Si) in POM clusters, because C-H activation steps inject electrons into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) of the clusters, which are the d-orbitals at Mo⁶⁺ and W⁶⁺ centers. H-atom addition energies (HAE) at O-atoms in POM clusters represent the relevant theoretical probe of the LUMO energies and of ODH reactivity. The calculated energies of ODH transition states at each O-atom depend linearly on their HAE values with slopes near unity, as predicted for late transition states in which electron transfer and C-H cleavage are essentially complete. HAE values averaged over all accessible O-atoms in POM clusters provide the appropriate reactivity descriptor for oxides whose known structures allow accurate HAE calculations. CH₃OH dehydration proceeds via parallel pathways mediated by late carbenium-ion transition states; effects of

  6. Improvement of Pro-Oxidant Capacity of Protocatechuic Acid by Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Zeraik, Maria Luiza; Petrônio, Maicon S.; Coelho, Dyovani; Regasini, Luis Octavio; Silva, Dulce H. S.; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Machado, Sergio A. S.; Bolzani, Vanderlan S.; Ximenes, Valdecir F.

    2014-01-01

    Pro-oxidant effects of phenolic compounds are usually correlated to the one-electron redox potential of the phenoxyl radicals. Here we demonstrated that, besides their oxidizability, hydrophobicity can also be a decisive factor. We found that esterification of protocatechuic acid (P0) provoked a profound influence in its pro-oxidant capacity. The esters bearing alkyl chains containing two (P2), four (P4) and seven (P7) carbons, but not the acid precursor (P0), were able to exacerbate the oxidation of trolox, α-tocopherol and rifampicin. This effect was also dependent on the catechol moiety, since neither gallic acid nor butyl gallate showed any pro-oxidant effects. A comparison was also made with apocynin, which is well-characterized regarding its pro-oxidant properties. P7 was more efficient than apocynin regarding co-oxidation of trolox. However, P7 was not able to co-oxidize glutathione and NADH, which are targets of the apocynin radical. A correlation was found between pro-oxidant capacity and the stability of the radicals, as suggested by the intensity of the peak current in the differential pulse voltammetry experiments. In conclusion, taking into account that hydroquinone and related moieties are frequently found in biomolecules and quinone-based chemotherapeutics, our demonstration that esters of protocatechuic acid are specific and potent co-catalysts in their oxidations may be very relevant as a pathway to exacerbate redox cycling reactions, which are usually involved in their biological and pharmacological mechanisms of action. PMID:25340774

  7. Improvement of pro-oxidant capacity of protocatechuic acid by esterification.

    PubMed

    Zeraik, Maria Luiza; Petrônio, Maicon S; Coelho, Dyovani; Regasini, Luis Octavio; Silva, Dulce H S; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Machado, Sergio A S; Bolzani, Vanderlan S; Ximenes, Valdecir F

    2014-01-01

    Pro-oxidant effects of phenolic compounds are usually correlated to the one-electron redox potential of the phenoxyl radicals. Here we demonstrated that, besides their oxidizability, hydrophobicity can also be a decisive factor. We found that esterification of protocatechuic acid (P0) provoked a profound influence in its pro-oxidant capacity. The esters bearing alkyl chains containing two (P2), four (P4) and seven (P7) carbons, but not the acid precursor (P0), were able to exacerbate the oxidation of trolox, α-tocopherol and rifampicin. This effect was also dependent on the catechol moiety, since neither gallic acid nor butyl gallate showed any pro-oxidant effects. A comparison was also made with apocynin, which is well-characterized regarding its pro-oxidant properties. P7 was more efficient than apocynin regarding co-oxidation of trolox. However, P7 was not able to co-oxidize glutathione and NADH, which are targets of the apocynin radical. A correlation was found between pro-oxidant capacity and the stability of the radicals, as suggested by the intensity of the peak current in the differential pulse voltammetry experiments. In conclusion, taking into account that hydroquinone and related moieties are frequently found in biomolecules and quinone-based chemotherapeutics, our demonstration that esters of protocatechuic acid are specific and potent co-catalysts in their oxidations may be very relevant as a pathway to exacerbate redox cycling reactions, which are usually involved in their biological and pharmacological mechanisms of action. PMID:25340774

  8. Dehydration and oxidation of cellulose hydrolysis products in acidic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Garves, K.

    1981-01-01

    The dehydration of cotton cellulose in aqueous solutions in the presence of Ac/sub 2/O, AcOH, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or HBr proceeded by hydrolysis to carbohydrates with acetate groups, followed by conversion to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (I) and then, to levulinic acid (II) accompanied by humic acids. For the formation of I, HCl was a more efficient and selective catalyst than H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the formation of II was promoted by high acid and H/sub 2/O concentrations in the medium. The addition of FeCl/sub 3/ to the dehydration mixture with HCl and continuous distillation led to the isolation of furfural.

  9. Protective effects of gallic acid against spinal cord injury-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Hong; Wang, Zao; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of gallic acid in oxidative stress induced during spinal cord injury (SCI). In order to measure oxidative stress, the levels of lipid peroxide, protein carbonyl, reactive oxygen species and nitrates/nitrites were determined. In addition, the antioxidant status during SCI injury and the protective role of gallic acid were investigated by determining glutathione levels as well as the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. Adenosine triphophatase (ATPase) enzyme activities were determined to evaluate the role of gallic acid in SCI-induced deregulation of the activity of enzymes involved in ion homeostasis. The levels of inflammatory markers such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB and cycloxygenase (COX)-2 were determined by western blot analysis. Treatment with gallic acid was observed to significantly mitigate SCI-induced oxidative stress and the inflammatory response by reducing the oxidative stress, decreasing the expression of NF-κB and COX-2 as well as increasing the antioxidant status of cells. In addition, gallic acid modulated the activity of ATPase enzymes. Thus the present study indicated that gallic acid may have a role as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent against SCI. PMID:25955644

  10. Flip-flop of oleic acid in a phospholipid membrane: rate and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-11-13

    Flip-flop of protonated oleic acid molecules dissolved at two different concentrations in membranes made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine is studied with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations at a time scale of several microseconds. Direct, single-molecule flip-flop events are observed at this time scale, and the flip-flop rate is estimated at 0.2-0.3 μs(-1). As oleic acid molecules move toward the center of the bilayer during flip-flop, they undergo gradual, correlated translational, and rotational motion. Rare, double-flipping events of two hydrogen-bonded oleic acid molecules are also observed. A two-dimensional free energy surface is obtained for the translational and rotational degree of freedom of the oleic acid molecule, and the minimum energy path on this surface is determined. A barrier to flip-flop of ~4.2 kcal/mol is found at the center of the bilayer. A two-dimensional diffusion model is found to provide a good description of the flip-flop process. The fast flip-flop rate lends support to the proposal that fatty acids permeate membranes without assistance of transport proteins. It also suggests that desorption rather than flip-flop is the rate-limiting step in fatty acid transport through membranes. The relation of flip-flop rates to the evolution of ancestral cellular systems is discussed. PMID:25319959

  11. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  12. Mechanisms of Docosahexaenoic and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Loss from Pacific Saury and Comparison of Their Retention Rates after Various Cooking Methods.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Lennie K Y; Tomita, Haruo; Takemori, Toshikazu

    2016-08-01

    The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) contents of Pacific saury (Cololabis saira), a fatty fish and staple of the Japanese diet, have been reported to decrease after cooking. This study compared the DHA and EPA contents remaining in saury after grilling, pan-frying or deep-frying to center temperatures of 75, 85, or 95 °C, and examined physical loss, lipid oxidation, and thermal degradation as mechanisms of DHA and EPA loss. Temperature changes inside the saury were monitored using thermocouples, while DHA and EPA contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and measurements of lipid oxidation (that is, carbonyl value and thiobarbituric acid value) were determined chemically. Visualization of temperature distribution inside fish samples during cooking revealed large differences in heat transfer among cooking methods. True retention rates in grilled (DHA: 84 ± 15%; EPA: 87 ± 14%) and pan-fried samples (DHA: 85 ± 16%; EPA: 77 ± 17%) were significantly higher than deep-fried samples (DHA: 58 ± 17%; EPA: 51 ± 18%), but were not affected by final center temperatures despite differences in cooking times. Physical loss via cooking losses (grilling and pan-frying) or migration into frying oil (deep-frying) accounted for large quantities of DHA and EPA loss, while lipid oxidation and thermal degradation did not appear to be major mechanisms of loss. The antioxidant capacity of saury was not significantly affected by cooking treatments. The results of this study suggest that minimization of physical losses during cooking may increase DHA and EPA contents retained in cooked Pacific saury. PMID:27305642

  13. Biomineralization of lepidocrocite and goethite by nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria: Effect of pH, bicarbonate, phosphate, and humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larese-Casanova, Philip; Haderlein, Stefan B.; Kappler, Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Fe(III) solid phases are the products of Fe(II) oxidation by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, but the Fe(III) phases reported to form within growth experiments are, at times, poorly crystalline and therefore difficult to identify, possibly due to the presence of ligands (e.g., phosphate, carbonate) that complex iron and disrupt iron (hydr)oxide precipitation. The scope of this study was to investigate the influences of geochemical solution conditions (pH, carbonate, phosphate, humic acids) on the Fe(II) oxidation rate and Fe(III) mineralogy. Fe(III) mineral characterization was performed using 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy and μ-X-ray diffraction after oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) within Mops-buffered cell suspensions of Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1, a nitrate-reducing, Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium. Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) (90%), which also forms after chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by dissolved O 2, and goethite (α-FeOOH) (10%) were produced at pH 7.0 in the absence of any strongly complexing ligands. Higher solution pH, increasing concentrations of carbonate species, and increasing concentrations of humic acids promoted goethite formation and caused little or no changes in Fe(II) oxidation rates. Phosphate species resulted in Fe(III) solids unidentifiable to our methods and significantly slowed Fe(II) oxidation rates. Our results suggest that Fe(III) mineralogy formed by bacterial Fe(II) oxidation is strongly influenced by solution chemistry, and the geochemical conditions studied here suggest lepidocrocite and goethite may coexist in aquatic environments where nitrate-reducing, Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are active.

  14. Lycopene synergistically inhibits LDL oxidation in combination with vitamin E, glabridin, rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, or garlic.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, B; Volkova, N; Rosenblat, M; Aviram, M

    2000-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is atherogenic, and that atherosclerosis can be attenuated by natural antioxidants, which inhibit LDL oxidation. This study was conducted to determine the effect of tomato lycopene alone, or in combination with other natural antioxidants, on LDL oxidation. LDL (100 microg of protein/ml) was incubated with increasing concentrations of lycopene or of tomato oleoresin (lipid extract of tomatoes containing 6% lycopene, 0.1% beta-carotene, 1% vitamin E, and polyphenols), after which it was oxidized by the addition of 5 micromol/liter of CuSO4. Tomato oleoresin exhibited superior capacity to inhibit LDL oxidation in comparison to pure lycopene, by up to five-fold [97% vs. 22% inhibition of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, and 93% vs. 27% inhibition of lipid peroxides formation, respectively]. Because tomato oleoresin also contains, in addition to lycopene, vitamin E, flavonoids, and phenolics, a possible cooperative interaction between lycopene and such natural antioxidants was studied. A combination of lycopene (5 micromol/liter) with vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) in the concentration range of 1-10 micromol/liter resulted in an inhibition of copper ion-induced LDL oxidation that was significantly greater than the expected additive individual inhibitions. The synergistic antioxidative effect of lycopene with vitamin E was not shared by gamma-to-cotrienol. The polyphenols glabridin (derived from licorice), rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid (derived from rosemary), as well as garlic (which contains a mixture of natural antioxidants) inhibited LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. When lycopene (5 micromol/liter) was added to LDL in combination with glabridin, rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, or garlic, synergistic antioxidative effects were obtained against LDL oxidation induced either by copper ions or by the radical generator AAPH. Similar interactive

  15. Rate Equations and Kinetic Parameters of the Reactions Involved in Pyrite Oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Lizama, H M; Suzuki, I

    1989-11-01

    Rate equations and kinetic parameters were obtained for various reactions involved in the bacterial oxidation of pyrite. The rate constants were 3.5 muM Fe per min per FeS(2) percent pulp density for the spontaneous pyrite dissolution, 10 muM Fe per min per mM Fe for the indirect leaching with Fe, 90 muM O(2) per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans oxidation of washed pyrite, and 250 muM O(2) per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the T. ferrooxidans oxidation of unwashed pyrite. The K(m) values for pyrite concentration were similar and were 1.9, 2.5, and 2.75% pulp density for indirect leaching, washed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, and unwashed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, respectively. The last reaction was competitively inhibited by increasing concentrations of cells, with a K(i) value of 0.13 mg of wet cells per ml. T. ferrooxidans cells also increased the rate of Fe production from Fe plus pyrite. PMID:16348054

  16. Experimental evaluation of the effects of quench rate and quartz surface area on homogeneous mercury oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fry; Brydger Cauch; Geoffrey D. Silcox; JoAnn S. Lighty; Constance L. Senior

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a mercury oxidation data set suitable for validation of fundamental kinetic models of mercury chemistry and for mechanism development. Experimental facilities include a mercury reactor fitted with a 300-W, quartz-glass burner and a quartz reaction chamber. While operated with a temperature profile representative of a typical boiler, a residence time of 6 s was achieved. Participating reacting species (chlorine, mercury) were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. Speciated mercury measurements were performed using a Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a conditioning system. Homogeneous mercury reactions involving chlorine have been investigated under two different temperature profiles producing quench rates of -210 K/s and -440 K/s. The larger quench rate produced 52% greater total oxidation than the lower quench at chlorine concentrations of 200 ppm. The effect of reactor surface area on oxidation was also investigated. The quartz surfaces interacted with mercury only in the presence of chlorine and their overall effect was to weakly inhibit oxidation. The extent of oxidation was predicted using a detailed kinetic model. The model predicted the effects of quench rate and chlorine concentration shown in experimentation. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effects of nitrogen flow rate on the properties of indium oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Cho, Shinho; Kim, Moonhwan

    2013-11-01

    Indium oxide thin films are deposited on glass substrates at nitrogen flow rates of 0-50% by rf reactive magnetron sputtering and are characterized for their structural, morphological, electrical, and optical properties. The experimental results showed that the control of nitrogen flow rate has a significant effect on the properties of the In2O3 thin films. The change in the preferred growth orientation from (222) to (400) planes is observed above a nitrogen flow rate of 10%. The average optical transmittance in the wavelength range of 400-1100 nm is increased from 85.4% at 0% to 86.7% at 50%, where the smallest value of the optical band gap energy is obtained. In addition to the improvement in crystallinity of the films, the nitrogen flow rate plays a crucial role in the fabrication of high-quality indium oxide films and devices. PMID:24245335

  18. Fusaric acid induction of programmed cell death modulated through nitric oxide signalling in tobacco suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Zhou, Benguo; Zhu, Xiaoping; Gao, Zhengliang; Liang, Yuancun

    2013-10-01

    Fusaric acid (FA) is a nonhost-selective toxin mainly produced by Fusarium oxysporum, the causal agent of plant wilt diseases. We demonstrate that FA can induce programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells and the FA-induced PCD is modulated by nitric oxide (NO) signalling. Cells undergoing cell death induced by FA treatment exhibited typical characteristics of PCD including cytoplasmic shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, membrane plasmolysis, and formation of small cytoplasmic vacuoles. In addition, caspase-3-like activity was activated upon the FA treatment. The process of FA-induced PCD was accompanied by a rapid accumulation of NO in a FA dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of cells with NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-arginine monoacetate (L-NMMA) significantly reduced the rate of FA-induced cell death. Furthermore, the caspase-3-like activity and the expression of PAL and Hsr203J genes were alleviated by application of cPTIO or L-NMMA to FA-treated tobacco cells. This indicates that NO is an important factor involved in the FA-induced PCD. Our results also show that pre-treatment of tobacco cells with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Ac-DEVD-CHO, can reduce the rate of FA-induced cell death. These results demonstrate that the FA-induced cell death is a PCD and is modulated by NO signalling through caspase-3-like activation. PMID:23838885

  19. The fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway is important for decidualization of endometrial stromal cells in both humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-He; Chi, Maggie M-Y; Schulte, Maureen B; Moley, Kelle H

    2014-02-01

    Embryo implantation and development requires the endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) to undergo decidualization. This differentiation process requires glucose utilization, and blockade of the pentose phosphate pathway inhibits decidualization of ESCs both in vitro and in vivo. Glucose and fatty acids are energy substrates for many cell types, and fatty acid beta-oxidation is critical for embryo implantation. Here, we investigated whether beta-oxidation is required for decidualization of ESCs. As assessed by marker gene expression, decidualization of human primary ESCs was blocked by reducing activity of carnitine calmitoyltransferase I, the rate-limiting enzyme in beta-oxidation, either by short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing or by treatment with the inhibitor etomoxir. Ranolazine (RAN), a partial beta-oxidation inhibitor, blocked early decidualization of a human ESC line. However, decidualization resumed after several days, most likely due to a compensatory up-regulation of GLUT1 expression and an increase in glucose metabolism. Simultaneous inhibition of the beta-oxidation pathway with RAN and the pentose phosphate pathway with glucosamine (GlcN) impaired in vitro decidualization of human ESCs more strongly than inhibition of either pathway alone. These findings were confirmed in murine ESCs in vitro, and exposure to RAN plus GlcN inhibited decidualization in vivo in a deciduoma model. Finally, intrauterine implantation of time-release RAN and GlcN pellets reduced pup number. Importantly, pup number returned to normal after the end of the pellet-active period. This work indicates that both fatty acids and glucose metabolism pathways are important for ESC decidualization, and suggests novel pathways to target for the design of future nonhormonal contraceptives. PMID:24403548

  20. Effect of cooling rate on achieving thermodynamic equilibrium in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C.; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Hodaj, Fiqiri

    2016-02-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the structural changes occurring in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x with y = 0.15; 0.28 and 0.45 during cooling from 1773 K to room-temperature under He + 5% H2 atmosphere. We compare the fastest and slowest cooling rates allowed by our apparatus i.e. 2 K s-1 and 0.005 K s-1, respectively. The promptly cooled samples evidenced a phase separation whereas samples cooled slowly did not due to their complete oxidation in contact with the atmosphere during cooling. Besides the composition of the annealing gas mixture, the cooling rate plays a major role on the control of the Oxygen/Metal ratio (O/M) and then on the crystallographic properties of the U1-yPuyO2-x uranium-plutonium mixed oxides.

  1. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: a kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation. PMID:23501718

  2. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: A kinetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K.; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation.

  3. Effects of dose, flow rate, and bile acid on diclofenac disposition in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Uraki, Misato; Kawase, Atsushi; Matsushima, Yuka; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    An in situ perfused rat liver system is useful for studying the hepatic disposition of drugs and their metabolites. However, the effects of the perfusion conditions on drug disposition are unclear. We examined the effects of conditions such as flow rate (13 or 26 mL/min) and bile acid on disposition of diclofenac (DF) as a model drug and DF metabolites [diclofenac-1-O-acyl glucuronide (DF-Glu) or 4'-hydroxydiclofenac (DF-4'OH)] in the absence of albumin. DF, DF-Glu, and DF-4'OH concentrations in the perfusate and cumulative amounts of DF-Glu excreted in bile were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography methods. DF in the perfusate was rapidly eliminated as the perfusate flow rate increased. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0-60) for DF-Glu and DF-4'OH in a perfusate containing bile acid was lower at a flow rate of 26 and 13 mL/min, respectively. The bile flow rate at 26 mL/min with 24 μM of bile acid in the perfusate was significantly higher (ca. 3.5 times) compared with that at 13 mL/min without bile acid. Cumulative biliary DF-Glu excretion was also dramatically affected by the flow rate and addition of bile acid. This study indicated that the flow rate and bile acid in the perfused rat liver were key factors for bile flow rate and DF, DF-Glu, and DF-4'OH disposition in the absence of albumin. PMID:25656736

  4. Survival of the fittest: overcoming oxidative stress at the extremes of Acid, heat and metal.

    PubMed

    Maezato, Yukari; Blum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The habitat of metal respiring acidothermophilic lithoautotrophs is perhaps the most oxidizing environment yet identified. Geothermal heat, sulfuric acid and transition metals contribute both individually and synergistically under aerobic conditions to create this niche. Sulfuric acid and metals originating from sulfidic ores catalyze oxidative reactions attacking microbial cell surfaces including lipids, proteins and glycosyl groups. Sulfuric acid also promotes hydrocarbon dehydration contributing to the formation of black "burnt" carbon. Oxidative reactions leading to abstraction of electrons is further impacted by heat through an increase in the proportion of reactant molecules with sufficient energy to react. Collectively these factors and particularly those related to metals must be overcome by thermoacidophilic lithoautotrophs in order for them to survive and proliferate. The necessary mechanisms to achieve this goal are largely unknown however mechanistics insights have been gained through genomic studies. This review focuses on the specific role of metals in this extreme environment with an emphasis on resistance mechanisms in Archaea. PMID:25371104

  5. Survival of the Fittest: Overcoming Oxidative Stress at the Extremes of Acid, Heat and Metal

    PubMed Central

    Maezato, Yukari; Blum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The habitat of metal respiring acidothermophilic lithoautotrophs is perhaps the most oxidizing environment yet identified. Geothermal heat, sulfuric acid and transition metals contribute both individually and synergistically under aerobic conditions to create this niche. Sulfuric acid and metals originating from sulfidic ores catalyze oxidative reactions attacking microbial cell surfaces including lipids, proteins and glycosyl groups. Sulfuric acid also promotes hydrocarbon dehydration contributing to the formation of black “burnt” carbon. Oxidative reactions leading to abstraction of electrons is further impacted by heat through an increase in the proportion of reactant molecules with sufficient energy to react. Collectively these factors and particularly those related to metals must be overcome by thermoacidophilic lithoautotrophs in order for them to survive and proliferate. The necessary mechanisms to achieve this goal are largely unknown however mechanistics insights have been gained through genomic studies. This review focuses on the specific role of metals in this extreme environment with an emphasis on resistance mechanisms in Archaea. PMID:25371104

  6. Catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid over manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shengtao; Lu, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Lin; Ma, Zichuan; Wu, Yinsu

    2016-02-01

    Manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria was prepared and used as catalyst for catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid (SA). Characterization results indicated that the manganese oxide was mostly incorporated into the pores of ceria. The synthesized catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for the mineralization of SA in aqueous solution by ozone, and more than 95% of total organic carbon was removed in 30 min under various conditions. Mechanism studies indicated that SA was mainly degraded by ozone molecules, and hydroxyl radical reaction played an important role for the degradation of its ozonation products (small molecular organic acids). The manganese oxide in the pores of CeO2 improved the adsorption of small molecular organic acids and the generation of hydroxyl radicals from ozone decomposition, resulting in high TOC removal efficiency. PMID:26344143

  7. Chlorogenic and Caftaric Acids in Liver Toxicity and Oxidative Stress Induced by Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Koriem, Khaled M. M.; Soliman, Rowan E.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine intoxication can cause acute hepatic failure. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids are the major dietary polyphenols present in various foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of chlorogenic and caftaric acids in liver toxicity and oxidative stress induced by methamphetamine in rats. Thirty-two male albino rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Group 1, which was control group, was injected (i.p) with saline (1 mL/kg) twice a day over seven-day period. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were injected (i.p) with methamphetamine (10 mg/kg) twice a day over seven-day period, where groups 3 and 4 were injected (i.p) with 60 mg/kg chlorogenic acid and 40 mg/kg caftaric acid, respectively, one day before methamphetamine injections. Methamphetamine increased serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. Also, malondialdehyde in serum, liver, and brain and plasma and liver nitric oxide levels were increased while methamphetamine induced a significant decrease in serum total protein, albumin, globulin, albumin/globulin ratio, brain serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, blood and liver superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids prior to methamphetamine injections restored all the above parameters to normal values. In conclusion, chlorogenic and caftaric acids before methamphetamine injections prevented liver toxicity and oxidative stress where chlorogenic acid was more effective. PMID:25136360

  8. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, D. U.; Nam, K. C.

    2004-09-01

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% α-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+α-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid.

  9. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  10. Erythrocyte Sialic Acid Content during Aging in Humans: Correlation with Markers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Mohammad Murtaza; Singh, Prabhakar; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are substituted neuraminic acid derivatives which are typically found at the outermost end of glycan chains on the membrane in all cell types. The role of erythrocyte membrane sialic acids during aging has been established however the relationship between sialic acid and oxidative stress is not fully understood. The present work was undertaken to analyze the relationship between erythrocyte membrane sialic acid with its plasma level, membrane and plasma lipid hydroperoxide levels and plasma total antioxidant capacity. Results show that sialic acid content decreases significantly (P < 0.001) in RBC membrane (r = −0.901) and increases in plasma (r = 0.860) as a function of age in humans. Lipid peroxidation measured in the form of hydroperoxides increases significantly (P < 0.001) in plasma (r = 0.830) and RBC membranes (r = 0.875) with age in humans. The Trolox Equivalent Total Antioxidant Capacity (TETAC) of plasma was found to be significantly decreased (P < 0.001, r = −0.844). We observe significant correlations between decrease of erythrocyte membrane sialic acid and plasma lipid hydroperoxide and TETAC. Based on the observed correlations, we hypothesize that increase in oxidative stress during aging may influence the sialic acid decomposition from membrane thereby altering the membrane configuration affecting many enzymatic and transporter activities. Considering the importance of plasma sialic acid as a diagnostic parameter, it is important to establish age-dependent reference. PMID:22377734

  11. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, I C; Levine, J S

    1986-05-01

    Biogenic emissions of nitric and nitrous oxides have important impacts on the photochemistry and chemistry of the atmosphere. Although biogenic production appears to be the overwhelming source of N(2)O, the magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is very uncertain. In soils, possible sources of NO and N(2)O include nitrification by autotrophic and heterotrophic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. The availability of oxygen determines to a large extent the relative activities of these various groups of organisms. To better understand this influence, we investigated the effect of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) on the production of NO and N(2)O by a wide variety of common soil nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The production of NO per cell was highest by autotrophic nitrifiers and was independent of pO(2) in the range tested (0.5 to 10%), whereas N(2)O production was inversely proportional to pO(2). Nitrous oxide production was highest in the denitrifier Pseudomonas fluorescens, but only under anaerobic conditions. The molar ratio of NO/N(2)O produced was usually greater than unity for nitrifiers and much less than unity for denitrifiers. Chemodenitrification was the major source of both the NO and N(2)O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of NO and N(2)O in nitrifier cultures but only when high concentrations of nitrite had accumulated or were added to the medium. Although most of the denitrifiers produced NO and N(2)O only under anaerobic conditions, chemostat cultures of Alcaligenes faecalis continued to emit these gases even when the cultures were sparged with air. Based upon these results, we predict that aerobic soils are primary sources of NO and that N(2)O is produced only when there is sufficient soil moisture to provide the anaerobic microsites

  12. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  13. Nitric Oxide Regulates Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Metabolism through Reversible Protein S-Nitrosylation **

    PubMed Central

    Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas; Tenopoulou, Margarita; Greene, Jennifer L.; Raju, Karthik; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine S-nitrosylation is a posttranslational modification by which nitric oxide regulates protein function and signaling. Studies of individual proteins have elucidated specific functional roles for S-nitrosylation, but knowledge of the extent of endogenous S-nitrosylation, the sites that are nitrosylated, and the regulatory consequences of S-nitrosylation remains limited. We used mass spectrometry-based methodologies to identify 1011 S-nitrosocysteine residues in 647 proteins in various mouse tissues. We uncovered selective S-nitrosylation of enzymes participating in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation, indicating that this posttranslational modification may regulate metabolism and mitochondrial bioenergetics. S-nitrosylation of the liver enzyme VLCAD (very long acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) at Cys238, which was absent in mice lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase, improved its catalytic efficiency. These data implicate protein S-nitrosylation in the regulation of β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. PMID:23281369

  14. S-oxygenation of thiocarbamides V: oxidation of tetramethylthiourea by chlorite in slightly acidic media.

    PubMed

    Chigwada, Tabitha; Mbiya, Wilbes; Chipiso, Kudzanai; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2014-08-01

    The reaction between tetramethylthiourea (TTTU) and slightly acidic chlorite has been studied. The reaction is much faster than comparable oxidations of the parent thiourea compound as well as other substituted thioureas. The stoichiometry of the reaction in excess oxidant showed a complete desulfurization of the thiocarbamide to yield the corresponding urea and sulfate: 2ClO2(-) + (Me2N)2C ═ S + H2O → (Me2N)2C ═ O + SO4(2-) + 2Cl(-) + 2H(+). The reaction mechanism is unique in that the most stable metabolite before formation of the corresponding urea is the S-oxide. This is one of the rare occasions in which a low-molecular-weight S-oxide has been stabilized without the aid of large steric groups. ESI-MS data show almost quantitative formation of the S-oxide and negligible formation of the sulfinic and sulfonic acids. TTTU, in contrast to other substituted thioureas, can only stabilize intermediate oxoacids, before formation of sulfate, in the form of zwitterions. With a stoichiometric excess of TTTU over oxidant, the TTTU dimer is the predominant product. Chlorine dioxide, which is formed from the reaction of excess chlorite and HOCl, is a very important reactant in the overall mechanism. It reacts rapidly with TTTU to reform ClO2(-). Oxidation of TTTU by chlorite has a complex dependence on acid as a result of chlorous acid dissociation and protonation of the thiol group on TTTU in high-acid conditions, which renders the thiol center a less effective nucleophile. PMID:24922053

  15. Peracetic acid oxidation of saline waters in the absence and presence of H ₂O ₂: secondary oxidant and disinfection byproduct formation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amisha D; Liu, Zheng-Qian; Salhi, Elisabeth; Höfer, Thomas; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-02-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfectant considered for use in ballast water treatment, but its chemical behavior in such systems (i.e., saline waters) is largely unknown. In this study, the reactivity of PAA with halide ions (chloride and bromide) to form secondary oxidants (HOCl, HOBr) was investigated. For the PAA-chloride and PAA-bromide reactions, second-order rate constants of (1.47 ± 0.58) × 10(-5) and 0.24 ± 0.02 M(-1) s(-1) were determined for the formation of HOCl or HOBr, respectively. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which is always present in PAA solutions, reduced HOCl or HOBr to chloride or bromide, respectively. As a consequence, in PAA-treated solutions with [H2O2] > [PAA], the HOBr (HOCl) steady-state concentrations were low with a limited formation of brominated (chlorinated) disinfection byproducts (DBPs). HOI (formed from the PAA-iodide reaction) affected this process because it can react with H2O2 back to iodide. H2O2 is thus consumed in a catalytic cycle and leads to less efficient HOBr scavenging at even low iodide concentrations (<1 μM). In PAA-treated solutions with [H2O2] < [PAA] and high bromide levels, mostly brominated DBPs are formed. In synthetic water, bromate was formed from the oxidation of bromide. In natural brackish waters, bromoform (CHBr3), bromoacetic acid (MBAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), and tribromoacetic acid (TBAA) formed at up to 260, 106, 230, and 89 μg/L, respectively for doses of 2 mM (ca. 150 mg/L) PAA and [H2O2] < [PAA]. The same brackish waters, treated with PAA with [H2O2] ≫ [PAA], similar to conditions found in commercial PAA solutions, resulted in no trihalomethanes and only low haloacetic acid concentrations. PMID:25611970

  16. A high linoleic acid diet increases oxidative stress in vivo and affects nitric oxide metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Turpeinen, A M; Basu, S; Mutanen, M

    1998-09-01

    Evidence from in vitro studies shows that increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids leads to increased oxidative stress, which may be associated with endothelial damage. We measured the urinary levels of 8-iso-PGF2alpha and nitric oxide metabolites as well as plasma sICAM-1 levels from healthy subjects after strictly controlled diets rich in either linoleic acid (LA, C18:2 n-6) or oleic acid (OA, C18:1 n-9). Thirty-eight volunteers (20 women and 18 men, mean age 27 years) consumed a baseline diet rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA) for 4 weeks and were then switched to either a high LA diet (11.5 en%) or a high OA diet (18.0 en%) also for 4 weeks. During the LA and OA diets, nearly all food was provided for the whole day. A control group of 13 subjects consumed their habitual diet throughout the study. Urinary excretion of 8-iso-PGF2alpha was significantly increased after the LA diet (170 vs 241 ng/mmol creatinine, P=0.04), whereas the urinary concentration of nitric oxide metabolites decreased (4.2 vs 2.6 mg/mmol creatinine, P=0.03). No significant changes were seen in the OA group. Significant differences between the LA and control group were found for both 8-oxo-PGF2alpha (P=0.03) and NO (P=0.02), whereas the OA and LA groups did not differ with respect to any parameter. Also plasma sICAM-1 remained unchanged in both groups throughout the study. In conclusion, the high-LA diet increased oxidative stress and affected endothelial function in a way which may in the long-term predispose to endothelial dysfunction. PMID:9844997

  17. Relative Reaction Rates of Sulfamic Acid and Hydroxylamine with Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes a study of comparative reaction rates where the reductant is in excess, as in the 1B bank in the Purex process. The results of this work apply to planned plant tests to partially substitute HAN for the ferrous sulfamate reductant in the Purex 1B bank.

  18. Oxidative stability of milk influenced by fatty acids, antioxidants, and copper derived from feed.

    PubMed

    Havemose, M S; Weisbjerg, M R; Bredie, W L P; Poulsen, H D; Nielsen, J H

    2006-06-01

    Differences in the oxidative stability of milk from cows fed grass-clover silage or hay were examined in relation to fatty acid composition and contents of antioxidants and copper in the milk. The oxidation processes were induced by exposing the milk to fluorescent light. Protein oxidation was measured as an accumulation of dityrosine, whereas lipid oxidation was measured as an accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides as the primary oxidation product, and as the secondary oxidation products, pentanal, hexanal, and heptanal. No differences were found in the protein oxidation of the 2 types of milk measured as accumulation of dityrosine, but there was an increased accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides and hexanal in milk from cows fed grass-clover silage, compared with milk from cows fed hay. The higher degree of lipid oxidation in milk from cows fed grass-clover silage could not be explained from the concentration of alpha-tocopherol, carotenoids, uric acid, and copper in the milk. However, it was thought to be highly influenced by the significantly higher concentration of linolenic acid present in milk from cows fed grass-clover silage. A larger part of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene was transferred from the feed to the milk when cows were fed grass-clover silage than when cows were fed hay as roughage. The significantly higher concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk from cows fed grass-clover silage may be important for the better transfer of alpha-tocopherol from the feed to the milk. Other circumstances, as the different conditions in the rumen may also play a role, due to the different types of roughages and their digestibility, or be related to the mechanisms during milk production for the higher yielding cows fed grass-clover silage. PMID:16702260

  19. Electro-oxidation of perfluorooctanoic acid by carbon nanotube sponge anode and the mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xue, An; Yuan, Zi-Wen; Sun, Yan; Cao, An-Yuan; Zhao, Hua-Zhang

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging persistent organic pollutant (POPs), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) exists widely in natural environment. It is of particular significance to develop efficient techniques to remove low-concentration PFOA from the contaminated waters. In this work, we adopted a new material, carbon nanotube (CNT) sponge, as electrode to enhance electro-oxidation and achieve high removal efficiency of low-concentration (100μgL(-1)) PFOA from water. CNT sponge was pretreated by mixed acids to improve the surface morphology, hydrophilicity and the content of carbonyl groups on the surface. The highest removal efficiencies for low-concentration PFOA electrolyzed by acid-treated CNT sponge anode proved higher than 90%. The electro-oxidation mechanism of PFOA on CNT sponge anode was also discussed. PFOA is adsorbed on the CNT sponge rapidly increasing the concentration of PFOA on anode surface. When the potential on the anode is adjusted to more than 3.5V, the adsorbed PFOA undergoes electrochemically oxidation and hydrolysis to produce shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids with less CF2 unit. The efficient electro-oxidation of PFOA by CNT sponge anode is due to the combined effect of adsorption and electrochemical oxidation. These findings provide an efficient method to remove actual concentration PFOA from water. PMID:26172515

  20. Selective inhibition of fatty acid oxidation in colonocytes by ibuprofen: a cause of colitis?

    PubMed Central

    Roediger, W E; Millard, S

    1995-01-01

    Ibuprofen is associated with initiation or exacerbation of ulcerative colitis. As ibuprofen selectively inhibited fatty acid oxidation in the liver or caused mitochondrial damage in intestinal cells, its effect on substrate oxidation by isolated colonocytes of man and rat was examined. Ibuprofen dose dependently (2.0-7.5 mmol/l) and selectively inhibited 14CO2 production from labelled n-butyrate in colonocytes from the proximal and distal human colon (n = 12, p = < 0.001). Glucose oxidation was either unaltered or increased. Because short chain fatty acid oxidation is the main source of acetyl-CoA for long chain fatty acid synthesis, the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by ibuprofen in the colonic mucosa could also occur at this level. Because the concentrations of ibuprofen that can be attained in the human colon are not known, conclusions drawn from current dosages are tentative. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by ibuprofen may be biochemically implicated in the initiation and exacerbation of ulcerative colitis, manifestation of which would depend on the ibuprofen concentrations reached in the colon. PMID:7890237

  1. Environmental factors influencing the rate of hydrocarbon oxidation in temperate lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, D M; Brock, T D

    1976-01-01

    Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation were estimated by following oxygen uptake during mineral oil oxidation or oxidation of [1-14C]hexadecane to 14CO2, when these substrates were added to natural water samples from Wisconsin lakes. A lag phase preceded hydrocarbon oxidation, the length of which depended on population density or on factors influencing growth rate and on the presence of nonhydrocarbon organic compounds. Hydrocarbon oxidation was coincident with growth and presumably represented the development of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in response to hydrocarbon additions. In detailed studies in Lake Mendota, it was found that, despite the continued presence of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in water samples, seasonal variations in the rates of mineral oil and hexadecane oxidation occurred which correlated with seasonal changes in temperature and dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus. The temperature optimum for oil biodegradation remained at 20 to 25 C throughout the year, so that temperature was the main limiting factor during winter, spring, and fall. During summer, when temperatures were optimal, nutrient deficiencies limited oil biodegradation, and higher rates could be obtained by addition of nitrogen and phosphorus. The rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation were thus high only for about 1 month of the ice-free period, when temperature and nutrient supply were optimal. Nutrient limitation of oil biodegradation was also demonstrated in 25 nutrient-poor lakes of northern Wisconsin, although in almost every case oil-degrading bacteria were detected. Knowledge of temperature and nutrient limitations thus will help in predicting the fate of hydrocarbon pollutants in freshwater. PMID:1275495

  2. Inhibition by acetyl-CoA of hepatic carnitine acyltransferase and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, K; Notar-Francesco, V J; Sriwatanakul, K

    1983-01-01

    At micromolar concentrations, acetyl-CoA inhibited hepatic carnitine acyltransferase activity and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The inhibitory effects were not nearly as potent on a molar basis as those of malonyl-CoA; nevertheless, the cytosolic concentrations of acetyl-CoA, as yet unknown, may be sufficient (greater than 30 microM) to curtail appreciably the mitochondrial transfer of long-chain acyl-CoA units and fatty acid oxidation. Hence acetyl-CoA may also partially regulate hepatic ketogenesis. PMID:6661211

  3. Mössbauer and magnetic studies of nanocomposites containing iron oxides and humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Shapkin, A. A.; Gubaidulina, T. V.; Matsnev, M. E.; Sirazhdinov, R. R.; Rusakov, V. S.

    2014-04-01

    Nanocomposites containing iron oxides and humic acids were studied by Mössbauer and magnetic measurements. The concentrations of humic acids as the precursor in nanocomposites were varied. Mössbauer investigations were carried out at temperature range from room temperature to 5 K. The magnetization M( T, H) was measured in the temperature interval 80-300 K and magnetic field up to 10 kOe. It was found that particles of investigated nanocomposites exhibit superparamagnetic properties. The core of the nanocomposite was a mixture of non-stoichiometric magnetite and maghemite. The "iron-polymer" interface was formed on the surface of the iron oxide particles.

  4. Prevention of chromate induced oxidative stress by alpha-lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Budhwar, Roli; Kumar, Sushil

    2005-06-01

    The parenteral administration of alpha-lipoic acid (LA) protected against chromate induced oxidative stress in mouse liver. A shift in Cr induced pro-oxidant state to antioxidant-state by LA was noteworthy. The degree of protection was significant and similar in different LA administration regimens (prior-, co- and post- parenteral Cr exposure) explored. An improved status of the tissue antioxidants by LA appeared to be the mechanism of mitigation. The results are of chemopreventive value and suggest a possible alternative to ascorbic acid for abrogation of Cr toxicity. PMID:15997482

  5. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline nickel oxide using NaOH and oxalic acid as oxide sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathishkumar, K.; Shanmugam, N.; Kannadasan, N.; Cholan, S.; Viruthagiri, G.

    2014-04-01

    Precursors of nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were synthesized through a simple chemical precipitation method by changing the oxide source used for the synthesis. The synthesized precursors were subjected to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the temperature at which the precursors decompose into nickel oxide. The obtained results of TGA suggest that precursor NiO prepared using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) showed NiO formation at 600 °C, whereas, when oxalic acid was used as oxide source the formation of NiO took place at 400 °C. After calcinations of the precursors at respective temperatures, NiO nanocrystals have been harvested. The synthesized NiO powders were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. An FE-TEM image of NiO prepared using oxalic acid showed spherical and elliptical particles with sizes in the range of 15 nm. The Williamson-Hall (W-H) plots were drawn for the annealed products to study their lattice strain and crystallite size. The sizes of NiO nanocrystals obtained from W-H analysis are well correlated with sizes estimated using Scherrer’s formula. The relatively low saturation magnetization of NiO confirms its super paramagnetic behavior.

  6. In situ fourier transform infrared study of crotyl alcohol, maleic acid, crotonic acid, and maleic anhydride oxidation on a V-P-O industrial catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wenig, R.W.; Schrader, G.L.

    1987-10-22

    Crotyl alcohol, maleic acid, crotonic (2-butenoic) acid, and maleic anhydride were fed to an in situ infrared cell at 300/sup 0/C containing a P/V = 1.1 vanadium-phosphorous-oxide (V-P-O) catalyst used for the selective oxidation of n-butane. Crotyl alcohol was used as a mechanistic probe for the formation of reactive olefin species observed during previous n-butane and 1-butene studies. Crotonic acid, maleic acid, and maleic anhydride were fed as probes for the existence of other possible adsorbed intermediates. Olefin species and maleic acid are proposed as possible reaction intermediates in n-butane selective oxidation to maleic anhydride. The involvement of peroxide species in the oxidation of butadiene to maleic acid is also discussed.

  7. Alkylamine-Dependent Amino-Acid Oxidation by Lysine Monooxygenase—Fragmented Substrate of Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shozo; Yamauchi, Takashi; Hayaishi, Osamu

    1972-01-01

    Lysine monooxygenase catalyzes the oxygenative decarboxylation of L-lysine and produces a corresponding acid amide. L-Alanine was inactive as substrate. However, when propylamine was present, oxidation, but not oxygenation, of alanine was demonstrated with the oxygenase. Alanine was converted to pyruvate, with the liberation of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide, but propylamine remained unchanged. Other α-monoamino acids were also oxidized in the presence of alkylamines with various carbon chain lengths. The highest oxidase activity was observed when the total chain length of both amino acid and amine was nearly identical with that of lysine. Available evidence indicates that the amine-dependent amino-acid oxidase activity is associated with the lysine oxygenase activity. PMID:4509334

  8. 1H NMR spectra of humic and fulvic acids and their peracetic oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, P.; Interesse, F. S.; Cassidei, L.; Sciacovelli, O.

    1980-04-01

    1H NMR spectra of humic (HA) and fulvic (FA) acids and their oxidative degradation products are reported. The HA shows the presence of -( CH2) n - CH3 ( n > 6) chemical fragments belonging to n-alkanes and/or n-fatty acids physically adsorbed onto the macromolecule structure. These fragments are absent in the FA fraction. Both humic fractions reveal the presence of similar amounts of aromatic protons which partly undergo exchange phenomena. The importance of this experimental observation is discussed. Oxidative degradation seems to cause partial cleavage of aromatic rings, more pronounced in the FA than in the HA. The degraded FA shows a higher total acidity and a higher phenolic OH content than the degraded HA. Both degraded fractions display some sharp singlet signals at 1.9 and 3.9 ppm arising from protons belonging to repetitive chemical fragments probably formed during the oxidation reaction. Tentative assignments of these signals are given. A general analysis of the HA and FA degraded spectra seems to indicate that the chemical fragments which undergo peracetic oxidation are substantially similar. The extent of oxidation of the two humic fractions is different. The HA degradation products reveal the presence of oligomeric structures, whereas the degraded FA appears less resistant to the oxidizing agent.

  9. Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid metabolism in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Evidence for peroxisomal beta-oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J A; Figard, P H; Spector, A A

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether the peroxisome is responsible for hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) oxidation, 12- and 15-HETE oxidation was measured in normal and peroxisomal deficient skin fibroblasts from patients with Zellweger's (cerebrohepatorenal) syndrome. When incubated for 1 h with normal fibroblasts, reverse phase HPLC indicated that 24% of the 12-HETE radioactivity was converted to one major polar metabolite. Chemical derivatization followed by reverse phase HPLC and TLC indicated that this metabolite is 8-hydroxyhexadecatrienoic acid [16:3(8-OH)]. Similarly, 33% of the added 15-HETE was also converted to a more polar metabolite. Neither 12- nor 15-HETE were converted to any metabolites by the peroxisomal deficient (Zellweger) cells. No defect in HETE oxidation was found in other human fibroblast cell lines with diverse metabolic abnormalities. Zellweger fibroblasts accumulated increased amounts of 12-HETE, compared with normal fibroblasts. As in the normal cells, most of the 12-HETE incorporated into Zellweger fibroblasts was present in the choline and ethanolamine phosphoglycerides. Protein synthesis, lysosomal acid lipase activity, and mitochondrial butyrate oxidation were not impaired in the Zellweger fibroblasts. Since the Zellweger cells do not convert 12- and 15-HETE to oxidative metabolites, peroxisomes appear to be the cellular organelle responsible for HETE oxidation. Images PMID:2318972

  10. Large discharge capacity from carbon electrodes in sulfuric acid with oxidant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, M.; Iwashita, N.

    The discharge performance of the graphite intercalation compounds in sulfuric acid containing nitric acid (H 2SO 4-GICs) was studied by focusing on the effects of oxidant and carbon nanotexture. A large discharge capacity from H 2SO 4-GICs synthesized by using an excess amount of HNO 3, more than 150 times of the theoretical value (93 mAh/g carbon), was obtained depending on the amount of oxidant added, the discharge current, and the nanotexture of carbon electrode. The experimental results are explained in terms of competition between the de-intercalation of sulfuric acid due to galvanostatic reduction and the re-intercalation due to chemical oxidation by HN03 during discharging. However, a subsidiary reaction decreases the effective amount of HNO 3 on the discharge by a small current and also on the cycle of chemical charging and electrochemical discharging. The oxidant KMnO 4 gave only a little larger capacity for discharge than the theoretical one, because it was reduced to the manganese oxide precipitates during the oxidation of the carbon electrode.

  11. The contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Bensalah, Nasr; Dbira, Sondos; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes was investigated in different electrolytes. A complete mineralization of cyanuric acid was obtained in NaCl; however lower degrees of mineralization of 70% and 40% were obtained in Na2SO4 and NaClO4, respectively. This can be explained by the nature of the oxidants electrogenerated in each electrolyte. It is clear that the contribution of active chlorine (Cl2, HClO, ClO(-)) electrogenerated from oxidation of chlorides on BDD is much more important in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid than the persulfate and hydroxyl radicals produced by electro-oxidation of sulfate and water on BDD anodes. This could be explained by the high affinity of active chlorine towards nitrogen compounds. No organic intermediates were detected during the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid in any the electrolytes, which can be explained by their immediate depletion by hydroxyl radicals produced on the BDD surface. Nitrates and ammonium were the final products of electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid on BDD anodes in all electrolytes. In addition, small amounts of chloramines were formed in the chloride medium. Low current density (≤10mA/cm(2)) and neutral medium (pH in the range 6-9) should be used for high efficiency electrolytic degradation and negligible formation of hazardous chlorate and perchlorate. PMID:27372125

  12. Biogeophysical interactions control the formation of iron oxide microbial biofilms in acidic geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beam, J.; Berstein, H. C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, M. A.; Jennings, R. D.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    during the initial stages of Fe (III)-oxide mat formation (< 28 days) and become more abundant after ~28 days, which likely coincides with a higher abundance of organic carbon from autotrophs. Aerobic microorganisms have been detected in greater abundance at the mat/water interface where oxygen microelectrode measurements reveal steep gradients in oxygen consumption (i.e., niche partitioning). A mature microbial mat is typically formed after ~2-4 months and reaches a pseudo-steady state depth of ~7-10 mm. Flow rates had a significant affect on Fe(III)-oxide deposition and community structure. These results suggest that dynamic biological, geochemical, and physical processes control the formation and cycling of Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats in acidic geothermal springs.

  13. Citric Acid Effects on Brain and Liver Oxidative Stress in Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Eman R.; Mohammed, Nadia A.; Morsy, Safaa M. Youssef; Omara, Enayat A.; Sleem, Amany A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in the greatest amounts in citrus fruits. This study examined the effect of citric acid on endotoxin-induced oxidative stress of the brain and liver. Mice were challenged with a single intraperitoneal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg). Citric acid was given orally at 1, 2, or 4 g/kg at time of endotoxin injection and mice were euthanized 4 h later. LPS induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver tissue, resulting in marked increase in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and nitrite, while significantly decreasing reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) showed a pronounced increase in brain tissue after endotoxin injection. The administration of citric acid (1–2 g/kg) attenuated LPS-induced elevations in brain MDA, nitrite, TNF-α, GPx, and PON1 activity. In the liver, nitrite was decreased by 1 g/kg citric acid. GPx activity was increased, while PON1 activity was decreased by citric acid. The LPS-induced liver injury, DNA fragmentation, serum transaminase elevations, caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were attenuated by 1–2 g/kg citric acid. DNA fragmentation, however, increased after 4 g/kg citric acid. Thus in this model of systemic inflammation, citric acid (1–2 g/kg) decreased brain lipid peroxidation and inflammation, liver damage, and DNA fragmentation. PMID:24433072

  14. A role for 2,4-enoyl-CoA reductase in mitochondrial beta-oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Effects of treatment with clofibrate on oxidation of polyunsaturated acylcarnitines by isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Osmundsen, H; Cervenka, J; Bremer, J

    1982-01-01

    1. beta-Oxidation of gamma-linolenoylcarnitine, arachidonoylcarnitine and docosahexaenoylcarnitine by isolated rat liver mitochondria is inhibited by uncoupling conditions. Partial re-activation is obtained with added ATP. With mitochondria from clofibrate-treated rats ATP-stimulated rates of beta-oxidation of docosahexaenoylcarnitine are higher than ADP-stimulated rates. This is not observed with the beta-oxidation of oleoylcarnitine. 2. beta-Oxidation of docosahexaenoylcarnitine, in the presence of rotenone, is inhibited by added oxaloacetate, analogous to previous findings with pent-4-enoylcarnitine [see Osmundsen (1978) FEBS Lett. 88, 219-222]. In the absence of rotenone added oxaloacetate stimulates the beta-oxidation of docosahexaenoylcarnitine, but has the opposite effect on the beta-oxidation of palmitoylcarnitine. 3. beta-Oxidation of polyunsaturated acylcarnitines by isolated rat liver mitochondria is selectively increased after treatment of the animals with a low dietary dose (0.2%, w/w) of clofibrate. Treatment with a higher dose of clofibrate (0.5%, w/w) resulted in a general stimulation of beta-oxidation. 4. The results presented suggest that long-chain fatty acids possessing a delta 4-double bond are not readily beta-oxidized unless the 2,4-enoyl-CoA reductase (EC 1.3.1.-) is operating. PMID:7165730

  15. Field-Measured Oxidation Rates of Biologically Reduced Selenium in Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Sally M.; Daggett, John; Zawislansi, Peter

    1999-05-01

    Sludge generated during surface-water transport or biological treatment of selenium laden agricultural drainage water contains high concentrations (20-100 mg/kg) of selenium. Finding safe and economical sludge disposal methods requires understanding of the biogeochemical processes that change selenium speciation (after placed at a disposal site). Two experiments, each comparing 3 treatments for sludge disposal has resulted in data on changes in selenium speciation spanning an eight year period. Treatments included direct application to upland soils and application with tillage to depths of 15 cm and 30 cm. Soil cores, soil water samples and groundwater monitoring were used to track changes in selenium speciation and transport of re-oxidized forms of selenium. Measurements demonstrate the slow re-oxidation of reduced forms of selenium, largely elemental and organically associated forms, to selenate and selenite. Downward transport of these re-oxidized forms of selenium are driven by winter rains. Field measured re-oxidation rates for these field trials are presented and compared to selenium re-oxidation rates in formerly ponded areas at Kesterson Reservoir, California.

  16. Thermal oxidation rates of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As in H(2)O vapor and oxide-defined vertical cavity surface emitting laser characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Mari

    The incorporation of oxides into semiconductor structures formed by the thermal oxidation of Alsb{x}Gasb{1-x}As in water vapor has resulted in a marked improvement in device performance. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL's), in particular, have benefited from this technology, demonstrating record operating characteristics. This study focuses on the following areas with respect to oxide defined VCSEL's: the establishment of rate laws for the lateral oxidation of AlAs, the fabrication of VCSEL's, and the characterization of VCSEL's designed for high speed operation. An oxidation rate study was conducted on structures with AlAs oxidation layers. At low temperatures and short oxidation times, oxidation was found to be reaction rate limited. Conversely, diffusion across the oxide was determined to be the rate limiting mechanism at high temperature or long oxidation times. The observed rates can be modeled by rate equations by which the two component mechanisms can be separated. An activation energy of 1.6 eV and 0.8 eV was determined for the reaction and diffusion limited mechanism, respectively. A reduction in oxidation rates was observed with decreasing oxidation layer thickness and increasing doping concentration. The thickness dependence can be incorporated into the rate equations by assuming an oxidation reaction rate which is inhibited by the presence of strain in thin layers. The reaction rate can be characterized by a threshold thickness for which a value of 20 nm was determined for Alsb{x}Gasb{1-x}As. Oxide defined GaAs VCSEL's varying in size and oxidation layer composition were fabricated. Threshold currents of 450 muA and external differential quantum efficiencies of 0.5 were obtained. Finally, the large signal modulation characteristics of oxide defined VCSEL's were investigated. A threshold carrier lifetime of 1.6 nanoseconds VCSEL's was determined from laser turn-on delay measurements. The laser turn-on delay was also measured under various

  17. High rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in freshwater wetlands reduce potential atmospheric methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Segarra, K E A; Schubotz, F; Samarkin, V; Yoshinaga, M Y; Hinrichs, K-U; Joye, S B

    2015-01-01

    The role of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in wetlands, the largest natural source of atmospheric methane, is poorly constrained. Here we report rates of microbially mediated AOM (average rate=20 nmol cm(-3) per day) in three freshwater wetlands that span multiple biogeographical provinces. The observed AOM rates rival those in marine environments. Most AOM activity may have been coupled to sulphate reduction, but other electron acceptors remain feasible. Lipid biomarkers typically associated with anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea were more enriched in (13)C than those characteristic of marine systems, potentially due to distinct microbial metabolic pathways or dilution with heterotrophic isotope signals. On the basis of this extensive data set, AOM in freshwater wetlands may consume 200 Tg methane per year, reducing their potential methane emissions by over 50%. These findings challenge precepts surrounding wetland carbon cycling and demonstrate the environmental relevance of an anaerobic methane sink in ecosystems traditionally considered strong methane sources. PMID:26123199

  18. Heteroatom-directed reverse Wacker oxidations. Synthesis of the reported structure of (-)-herbaric acid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Peter J; Sperry, Jonathan; Brimble, Margaret A

    2010-11-01

    A microwave-assisted chemoenzymatic resolution has been used to install the C3 stereocenter of the reported structure of the fungal metabolite herbaric acid in high enantiomeric excess. The synthesis and stereochemical assignment was accomplished using a completely regioselective anti-Markovnikov addition of water to vinylphthalide 3, achieved using a heteroatom-directed Wacker oxidation that proceeds with retention of stereochemistry. These results establish that so-called "reverse" Wacker oxidations are a viable alternative to hydroboration/oxidation procedures. PMID:20873747

  19. Direct synthesis of graphene nanosheets support Pd nanodendrites for electrocatalytic formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Su-Dong; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    We report a solvothermal method preparation of dendritic Pd nanoparticles (DPNs) and spherical Pd nanoparticles (SPNs) supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Drastically different morphologies of Pd NPs with nanodendritic structures or spherical structures were observed on graphene by controlling the reduction degree of graphene oxide (GO) under mild conditions. In addition to being a commonplace substrate, GO plays a more important role that relies on its surface groups, which serves as a shape-directing agent to direct the dendritic growth. As a result, the obtained DPNs/RGO catalyst exhibits a significantly enhanced electro-catalytic behavior for the oxidation of formic acid compared to the SPNs/RGO catalyst.

  20. Potential in vitro Protective Effect of Quercetin, Catechin, Caffeic Acid and Phytic Acid against Ethanol-Induced Oxidative Stress in SK-Hep-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ki-Mo; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Yun, Chul-Ho; Kwak, Hahn-Shik

    2012-01-01

    Phytochemicals have been known to exhibit potent antioxidant activity. This study examined cytoprotective effects of phytochemicals including quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid, and phytic acid against oxidative damage in SK-Hep-1 cells induced by the oxidative and non-oxidative metabolism of ethanol. Exposure of the cells to excess ethanol resulted in a significant increase in cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid hydroperoxide (LPO), and antioxidant enzyme activity. Excess ethanol also caused a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the quantity of reduced glutathione (GSH). Co-treatment of cells with ethanol and quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid and phytic acid significantly inhibited oxidative ethanol metabolism-induced cytotoxicity by blocking ROS production. When the cells were treated with ethanol after pretreatment of 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP), increased cytotoxicity, ROS production, antioxidant enzyme activity, and loss of MMP were observed. The addition of quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid and phytic acid to these cells showed suppression of non-oxidative ethanol metabolism-induced cytotoxicity, similar to oxidative ethanol metabolism. These results suggest that quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid and phytic acid have protective effects against ethanol metabolism-induced oxidative insult in SK-Hep-1 cells by blocking ROS production and elevating antioxidant potentials. PMID:24009840