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Sample records for acid particles identification

  1. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  2. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  3. Pileup per particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape α which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of α for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. As a result, we also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

  4. Pileup per particle identification

    DOE PAGES

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape α which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of α for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used tomore » rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. As a result, we also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.« less

  5. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Gregg, Charles T.; Grace, W. Kevin; Hiebert, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  6. The MICE Particle Identification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; MICE Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at the ISIS accelerator located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, will be the first experiment to study muon cooling at high precision. Demonstration of muon ionization cooling is a major technological step towards the construction of a neutrino factory or a muon collider. A muon beam is produced via pion decay in the MICE beam line within a range of emittances and momenta. Muon purity is assured by a system of detectors for particle identification (PID). We describe briefly the PID system here.

  7. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  8. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  9. Particle identification at an asymmetric B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, P.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Oddone, P.; Ratcliff, B.; Roe, N.; Va'vra, J.; Ypsilantis, T.

    1991-09-01

    Particle identification systems are an important component of any detector at a high-luminosity, asymmetric B Factory. In particular, excellent hadron identification is required to probe CP violation in B{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates. The particle identification systems discussed below also provide help in separating leptons from hadrons at low momenta. We begin this chapter with a discussion of the physics motivation for providing particle identification, the inherent limitations due to interactions and decays in flight, and the requirements for hermiticity and angular coverage. A special feature of an asymmetric B Factory is the resulting asymmetry in the momentum distribution as a function of polar angle; this will also be quantified and discussed. In the next section the three primary candidates, time-of-flight (TOF), energy loss (dE/dx), and Cerenkov counters, both ring-imaging and threshold, will be briefly described and evaluated. Following this, one of the candidates, a long-drift Cerenkov ring-imaging device, is described in detail to provide a reference design. Design considerations for a fast RICH are then described. A detailed discussion of aerogel threshold counter designs and associated R D conclude the chapter. 56 refs., 64 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Particle identification methods in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    2000-01-27

    This paper deals with two major particle identification methods: dE/dx and Cherenkov detection. In the first method, the authors systematically compare existing dE/dx data with various predictions available in the literature, such as the Particle Data group recommendation, and judge the overall consistency. To my knowledge, such comparison was not done yet in a published form for the gaseous detectors used in High-Energy physics. As far as the second method, there are two major Cherenkov light detection techniques: the threshold and the Ring imaging methods. The authors discuss the recent trend in these techniques.

  11. Decision Tree Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Quiller, Ryan

    2003-09-05

    Particle identification based on measurements such as the Cerenkov angle, momentum, and the rate of energy loss per unit distance (-dE/dx) is fundamental to the BaBar detector for particle physics experiments. It is particularly important to separate the charged forms of kaons and pions. Currently, the Neural Net, an algorithm based on mapping input variables to an output variable using hidden variables as intermediaries, is one of the primary tools used for identification. In this study, a decision tree classification technique implemented in the computer program, CART, was investigated and compared to the Neural Net over the range of momenta, 0.25 GeV/c to 5.0 GeV/c. For a given subinterval of momentum, three decision trees were made using different sets of input variables. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for varying kaon acceptance thresholds. This data was used to plot Receiver Operating Characteristic curves (ROC curves) to compare the performance of the classification methods. Also, input variables used in constructing the decision trees were analyzed. It was found that the Neural Net was a significant contributor to decision trees using dE/dx and the Cerenkov angle as inputs. Furthermore, the Neural Net had poorer performance than the decision tree technique, but tended to improve decision tree performance when used as an input variable. These results suggest that the decision tree technique using Neural Net input may possibly increase accuracy of particle identification in BaBar.

  12. Particle identification in ALICE: a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kostarakis, P.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shahzad, M. I.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Souza, R. D. de; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasin, Z.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to particle identification (PID) within the ALICE experiment. The aim is to more effectively combine the particle identification capabilities of its various detectors. After a brief explanation of the adopted methodology and formalism, the performance of the Bayesian PID approach for charged pions, kaons and protons in the central barrel of ALICE is studied. PID is performed via measurements of specific energy loss ( d E/d x) and time of flight. PID efficiencies and misidentification probabilities are extracted and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using high-purity samples of identified particles in the decay channels K0S → π-π+, φ→ K-K+, and Λ→ p π- in p-Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=5.02 TeV. In order to thoroughly assess the validity of the Bayesian approach, this methodology was used to obtain corrected pT spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and D0 mesons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV. In all cases, the results using Bayesian PID were found to be consistent with previous measurements performed by ALICE using a standard PID approach. For the measurement of D0 → K-π+, it was found that a Bayesian PID approach gave a higher signal-to-background ratio and a similar or larger statistical significance when compared with standard PID selections, despite a reduced identification efficiency. Finally, we present an exploratory study of the measurement of Λc+ → p K-π+ in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV, using the Bayesian approach for the identification of its decay products.

  13. Emergent system identification using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Mark S.; Feng, Xin

    2001-10-01

    Complex Adaptive Structures can be viewed as a combination of Complex Adaptive Systems and fully integrated autonomous Smart Structures. Traditionally when designing a structure, one combines rules of thumb with theoretical results to develop an acceptable solution. This methodology will have to be extended for Complex Adaptive Structures, since they, by definition, will participate in their own design. In this paper we introduce a new methodology for Emergent System Identification that is concerned with combining the methodologies of self-organizing functional networks (GMDH - Alexy G. Ivakhnenko), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO - James Kennedy and Russell C. Eberhart) and Genetic Programming (GP - John Koza). This paper will concentrate on the utilization of Particle Swarm Optimization in this effort and discuss how Particle Swarm Optimization relates to our ultimate goal of emergent self-organizing functional networks that can be used to identify overlapping internal structural models. The ability for Complex Adaptive Structures to identify emerging internal models will be a key component for their success.

  14. Progress in particle identification by ionization sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehraus, I.

    1983-11-01

    The present generation of large scale d E/d x detector was conceived in the mid-seventies. In fixed target physics applications (EPI, ISIS) the achieved particle identification efficiency allows for π/K separation in the relativistic rise region. In the family of compact colliding beam detectors (e.g. AFS, ARGUS, CLEO, JADE, TPC, UA1), only the LBL TPC performance was so far sufficient for operation beyond the minimum of ionization. New central detectors foreseen for experiments in near future (LEP) should be more performing and will require resolutions which are at the limits imposed by systematic higher order effects. Influence of various design parameters on the optimization of the d E/d x sampling performance is discussed, supported by recent result from measurements of full-scale detector segments and including tests using ionized tracks generated by pulsed UV lasers. Merits of longitudinal drift and fine sampling are compared to results obtained by classical charge integration.

  15. Identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Thiemann, Wolfram H.-P.

    Amino acids identified in the Murchison chondritic meteorite by molecular and isotopic analysis are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth by asteroids, comets, and interplanetary dust particles where they may have triggered the appearance of life by assisting in the synthesis of proteins via prebiotic polycondensation reactions [Oró, J. (1961) Nature 190, 389-390; Chyba, C. F. & Sagan, C. (1992) Nature 355, 125-132]. We report the identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite by new enantioselective GC-MS analyses. DL-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid, DL-2,4-diaminobutanoic acid, 4,4'-diaminoisopentanoic acid, 3,3'-diaminoisobutanoic acid, and 2,3-diaminobutanoic acid were detected in the parts per billion range after chemical transformation into N,N-diethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivatives. The chiral diamino acids show a racemic ratio. Laboratory data indicate that diamino acids support the formation of polypeptide structures under primitive Earth conditions [Brack, A. & Orgel, L. E. (1975) Nature 256, 383-387] and suggest polycondensation reactions of diamino acids into early peptide nucleic acid material as one feasible pathway for the prebiotic evolution of DNA and RNA genomes [Joyce, G. F. (2002) Nature 418, 214-221]. The results obtained in this study favor the assumption that not only amino acids (as the required monomers of proteins) form in interstellar/circumstellar environments, but also the family of diamino monocarboxylic acids, which might have been relevant in prebiotic chemistry.

  16. Fatty Acids as Surfactants on Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Niemi, J.

    2003-12-01

    Fatty acids (n-alcanoic acids) are common compounds in numerous anthropogenic and natural emissions. According to Rogge et al. (1993), catalyst-equipped automobiles emitted more than 600 μg km-1 of fatty acids which was over 50% of all identified organics in fine aerosol emissions. Coal burning produces fatty acids ranging from about 1700 mg kg-1 for bituminous coal to over 10000 mg kg-1 for lignite (Oros and Simoneit, 2000). Similarly, biomass burning is an important source for aerosol fatty acids. They are the major identified compound group in deciduous tree smoke, their total emission factor being measured as 1589 mg kg-1 which was 56% of all identified organic compounds (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a). Large amounts of fatty acid are also emitted from burning of conifer trees and grass (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a; Simoneit, 2002). Fatty acids have been reported to be major constituents of marine aerosols in many investigations (Barger and Garrett, 1976; Gagosian et. al, 1981; Sicre et al., 1990; Stephanou, 1992). It has been suggested that as the marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants (Blanchard, 1964; Gill et al., 1983; Middlebrook et al., 1998; Ellison et al., 1999). Amphiphilic molecules, including lipids, can be assembled as monomolecular layers at air/water interfaces as well as transported to a solid support. Recently, we could show by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the sea-salt aerosol particles (Tervahattu et al., 2002). In their TOF-SIMS studies on the surface composition of atmospheric aerosols, Peterson and Tyler (2002) found fatty acids on the surface of Montana forest fire particles. In this work we have studied by TOF-SIMS the surface chemical composition of aerosol particles emitted from field fires in the Baltic and other East European countries and transported to Finland as well as aerosol particles transported from

  17. Particle Identification in the ACCESS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. Z.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Kim, K. C.; Seo, E. S.

    2000-01-01

    ACCESS (Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures) is a planned Space Station mission to measure the elemental energy spectra of Galactic cosmic rays at energies above 100 GeV/nuc. ACCESS consists of a transition radiation detector (TRD) mounted on top of an ionization calorimeter (IC). A silicon matrix detector placed on top of the IC determines the elemental identity of each cosmic ray measured by the IC. The silicon matrix must be designed to identify each cosmic ray in the presence of backscatter from the calorimeter. Because the TRD is mounted above the IC, the matrix must also recognize cosmic rays that have interacted within the TRD before reaching the IC. We will report the results of detailed GEANT simulations of the silicon matrix in ACCESS. Results will be presented on backscatter interference with charge identification and the ability of the matrix to recognize cosmic rays that interacted in the TRD.

  18. Advantages and Limitations of the RICH Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, Blair N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-07

    The ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technique for hadronic particle identification (PID) is described. The advantages and limitations of RICH PID counters are compared with those of other classic PID techniques, such as threshold Cherenkov counters, ionization loss (dE/dx) in tracking devices, and time of flight (TOF) detectors.

  19. Particle Identification in the NIMROD-ISiS Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Wuenschel, S.; Hagel, K.; May, L. W.; Wada, R.; Yennello, S. J.

    2009-03-10

    Interest in the influence of the neutron-to-proton (N/Z) ratio on multifragmenting nuclei has demanded an improvement in the capabilities of multi-detector arrays as well as the companion analysis methods. The particle identification method used in the NIMROD-ISiS 4{pi} array is described. Performance of the detectors and the analysis method are presented for the reaction of {sup 86}Kr+{sup 64}Ni at 35 MeV/u.

  20. Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Hamamoto, Shiro; Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Yasuda, Hajime

    1995-04-01

    Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer fine particles were produced by reducing the copolymer particles-metal ion complexes or refluxing an ethanol solution of metal ions in the presence of copolymer particles. The size of metal particles formed by reduction of the complex is smaller than that by reflux of the metal ion solution and depends on the amount of metal ions immobilized.

  1. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  2. The efficient identification of relativistic particles by transition radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    A system of transition radiation detectors has been constructed and exposed to beams of electrons and pions in the energy range of 3 to 15 GeV at SLAC. Transition radiation was generated in a variety of stacks of mylar foils (radiators), and its intensity was detected with 7 multiwire proportional chambers. The raw data demonstrate a good separation between electron and pion induced signals. A more detailed analysis shows that a very efficient identification of individual particles is possible. Typically, a detection efficiency for electrons above 90%, combined with a pion-electron discrimination ratio of .001, has been achieved. Some conclusions with respect to the design of a practical detector for relativistic particles are drawn.

  3. Fatty acids on continental sulfate aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Vaida, V.; Tuck, A. F.; Niemi, J. V.; Kupiainen, K.; Kulmala, M.; VehkamäKi, H.

    2005-03-01

    Surface analyses of atmospheric aerosols from different continental sources, such as forest fires and coal and straw burning, show that organic surfactants are found on such aerosols. The predominant organic species detected by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry on the sulfate aerosols are fatty acids of different carbon chain length up to the C32 acid. These observations are consistent with literature accounts of functional group analysis of bulk samples, but this is the first direct evidence of fatty acid films on the surface of sulfate aerosols. Surface analysis leads to the conclusion that fatty acid films on continental aerosols may be more common than has been previously suggested.

  4. Genesis Concentrator Target Particle Contamination Mapping and Material Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of surface particles were found to be < 5 microns in diameter with increasing numbers close to the optical resolution limit of 0.3 microns. Acceleration grid EDS results show that the majority of materials appear to be from the SRC shell and SLA materials which include carbon-carbon fibers and Si-rich microspheres in a possible silicone binder. Other major debris material from the SRC included white paint, kapton, collector array fragments, and Al. Image analysis also revealed that SRC materials were also found mixed with the Utah mud and salt deposits. The EDS analysis of the acceleration grid showed that particles < 1 m where generally carbon based particles. Chemical cleaning techniques with Xylene and HF in an ultrasonic bath are currently being investigated for removal of small particles by the Genesis science team as well as ultra-pure water megasonic cleaning by the JSC team [4]. Removal of organic contamination from target materials is also being investigated by the science team with the use of UV-ozone cleaning devices at JSC and Open University [5]. In preparation for solar wind oxygen analyses at UCLA and Open University [1, 2], surface particle contamination on three Genesis concentrator targets was closely examined to evaluate cleaning strategies. Two silicon carbide (Genesis sample # 60001 and 60003) and one chemical vapor deposited (CVD) 13C concentrator target (60002) were imaged and mosaic mapped with optical microscopes. The resulting full target mosaic images and particle feature maps were subsequently compared with non-flight, but flight-like, concentrator targets and sample return capsule (SRC) materials. Contamination found on the flown concentrator acceleration grid was further examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for particle identification was subsequently compared with the optical images from the flown targets. Figure 1 show that all three targets imaged in this report

  5. Nucleic acid separations using superficially porous silica particles

    PubMed Central

    Close, Elizabeth D.; Nwokeoji, Alison O.; Milton, Dafydd; Cook, Ken; Hindocha, Darsha M.; Hook, Elliot C.; Wood, Helen; Dickman, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography has been widely employed for nucleic acid separations. A wide range of alternative stationary phases have been utilised in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase chromatography, including totally porous particles, non-porous particles, macroporous particles and monolithic stationary phases. In this study we have utilised superficially porous silica particles in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography for the analysis of nucleic acids. We have investigated a range of different pore-sizes and phases for the analysis of a diverse range of nucleic acids including oligonucleotides, oligoribonucleotides, phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and high molecular weight dsDNA and RNA. The pore size of the superficially porous silica particles was shown to significantly affect the resolution of the nucleic acids. Optimum separations of small oligonucleotides such as those generated in RNase mapping experiments were obtained with 80 Å pore sizes and can readily be interfaced with mass spectrometry analysis. Improved resolution of larger oligonucleotides (>19 mers) was observed with pore sizes of 150 Å. The optimum resolution for larger dsDNA/RNA molecules was achieved using superficially porous silica particles with pore sizes of 400 Å. Furthermore, we have utilised 150 Å pore size solid-core particles to separate typical impurities of a fully phosphorothioated oligonucleotide, which are often generated in the synthesis of this important class of therapeutic oligonucleotide. PMID:26948761

  6. Plasma polymerized allylamine coated quartz particles for humic acid removal.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Karyn L; Majewski, Peter

    2012-08-15

    Allylamine plasma polymerization has been used to modify the surface of quartz particles for humic acid removal via an inductively coupled rotating barrel plasma reactor. Plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAA) films were deposited at a power of 25 W, allylamine flow rate of 4.4 sccm and polymerization times of 5-60 min. The influence of polymerization time on surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrokinetic analysis. Acid orange 7 adsorption/desorption quantified the number of surface amine groups. Humic acid removal via ppAA quartz particles was examined by varying pH, removal time, humic acid concentration, and particle mass. Increasing the polymerization time increased the concentration of amine groups on the ppAA quartz surface, thus also increasing the isoelectric point. ToF-SIMS demonstrated uniform distribution of amine groups across the particle surface. Greatest humic acid removal was observed at pH 5 due to electrostatic attraction. At higher pH values, for longer polymerization times, humic acid removal was also observed due to hydrogen bonding. Increasing the initial humic acid concentration increased the mass of humic acid removed, with longer polymerization times exhibiting the greatest increases. Plasma polymerization using a rotating plasma reactor has shown to be a successful method for modifying quartz particles for the removal of humic acid. Further development of the plasma polymerization process and investigation of additional contaminants will aid in the development of a low cost water treatment system.

  7. Reflective particle technology for identification of critical components

    SciTech Connect

    Tolk, K M

    1992-01-01

    Reflective Particle Tags were developed for uniquely identifying individual strategic weapons that would be counted in order to verify arms control treaties. These tags were designed to be secure from copying and transfer even after being lift under the control of a very determined adversary for a number of years. This paper discusses how this technology can be applied in other applications requiring confidence that a piece of equipment, such as a seal or a component of a secure, has not been replaced with a similar item. The hardware and software needed to implement this technology is discussed, and guidelines for the sign of systems that rely on these or similar randomly formed features for security applications are presented. Substitution of identical components is one of the easiest ways to defeat security seals, secure containers, verification instrumentation, and similar equipment. This technology, when properly applied, provides a method to counter this defeat scenario. This paper presents a method for uniquely identifying critical security related equipment. Guidelines for implementing identification systems based on reflective particles or similar random features without compromising their intrinsic security are discussed.

  8. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4particles/kgFUEL (for 75 and 675 ppmm fuel-S). The sulfur (gas) to H2SO4 (particle) conversion efficiency is between 10% and 25%.

  9. Oleic acid coated magnetic nano-particles: Synthesis and characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Biswajit Goyal, P. S.

    2015-06-24

    Magnetic nano particles of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} coated with oleic acid were synthesized using wet chemical route, which involved co-precipitation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The nano particles were characterized using XRD, TEM, FTIR, TGA and VSM. X-ray diffraction studies showed that nano particles consist of single phase Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} having inverse spinel structure. The particle size obtained from width of Bragg peak is about 12.6 nm. TEM analysis showed that sizes of nano particles are in range of 6 to 17 nm with a dominant population at 12 - 14 nm. FTIR and TGA analysis showed that -COOH group of oleic acid is bound to the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles and one has to heat the sample to 278° C to remove the attached molecule from the surface. Further it was seen that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles exhibit super paramagnetism with a magnetization of about 53 emu/ gm.

  10. 1- and 2-particle Microrheology of Hyaluronic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Austin; Kearns, Sarah; Ross, David; Das, Moumita; Thurston, George; Franklin, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (also called HA or Hyaluronan) is a high molecular weight polysaccaride ubiquitous in the extracellular matrix of soft tissue such as cartilage, skin, the eye's vitreous gel and synovial fluid. It has been shown to play an important role in mechanotransduction, cell migration and proliferation, and in tissue morphodynamics. We present a confocal microrheology study of hyaluronic acid of varying concentrations. The mean squared displacement (MSD) of sub-micron colloidal tracer particles is tracked in two dimensions and shows a transition from diffusive motion at low concentrations to small-time trapping by the protein network as the concentration increases. Correlations between particle motion can be used to determine an effective mean-squared displacement which deviates from the single-particle MSD as the fluid becomes less homogeneous. The real and effective mean-squared displacements are used to probe the local and space-averaged frequency dependent rheological properties of the fluid as the concentration changes.

  11. Acid-degradable polyurethane particles for protein-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bachelder, Eric M.; Beaudette, Tristan T.; Broaders, Kyle E.; Paramonov, Sergey E.; Dashe, Jesse; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Acid-degradable particles containing a model protein antigen, ovalbumin, were prepared from a polyurethane with acetal moieties embedded throughout the polymer, and characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The small molecule degradation by-product of the particles was synthesized and tested in vitro for toxicity indicating an LC50 of 12,500 μg/ml. A new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique was developed to monitor the in vitro degradation of these particles. The degradation by-product inside RAW macrophages was at its highest level after 24 hours of culture and was efficiently exocytosed until it was no longer detectable after four days. When tested in vitro, these particles induced a substantial increase in the presentation of the immunodominant ovalbumin-derived peptide SIINFEKL in both macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition, vaccination with these particles generated a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response that was superior to both free ovalbumin and particles made from an analogous but slower-degrading acid-labile polyurethane polymer. Overall, we present a fully degradable polymer system with non-toxic by-products, which may find use in various biomedical applications including protein-based vaccines. PMID:18710254

  12. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  13. Classification and identification of amino acids based on THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ping J.; Ma, Ye H.; Li, Xian; Hou, Di B.; Cai, Jin H.; Zhang, Guang X.

    2015-11-01

    Amino acids are important nutrient substances for life, and many of them have several isomerides, while only L-type amino acids can be absorbed by body as nutrients. So it is certain worth to accurately classify and identify amino acids. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was used to detect isomers of various amino acids to obtain their absorption spectra, and their spectral characteristics were analyzed and compared. Results show that not all isomerides of amino acids have unique spectral characteristics, causing the difficulty of classification and identification. To solve this problem, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), firstly, was performed on extracting principal component of THz spectroscopy and classifying amino acids. Moreover, variable selection (VS) was employed to optimize spectral interval of feature extraction to improve analysis effect. As a result, the optimal classification model was determined and most samples can be accurately classified. Secondly, for each class of amino acids, PLS-DA combined with VS was also applied to identify isomerides. This work provides a suggestion for material classification and identification with THz spectroscopy.

  14. Amine bearing polymeric particles as acid neutralizers for engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, A.N.; Chattha, M.S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a lubricating oil composition consisting of a major proportion of a lubricating base oil and about 0.1 to 15 weight percent of an acid neutralizing additive which consists of polymer particles (a) bearing pendant amine groups, and (b) having a diameter of about 500 A and 10,000 A. The amine functional particles are formed by reacting polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups with a secondary amine in an amount so as to react essentially all of the epoxide groups on the epoxide bearing polymer particles with the secondary amine. The polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups are formed by the free radical addition polymerization of: (a) between about 50 and about 100 weight percent of an ethylenically unsaturated monomers bearing an epoxide group, and (b) 0 up to about 50 weight percent of other monoethylenically unsaturated monomers; in the presence of: (I) a non-polar organic liquid which is a solvent for the polymerizable monomers, but a non-solvent for the resultant polymer, and (II) polymeric dispersion stabilizer containing at least two segments, with one segment being solvated by the non-polar organic liquid and the second segment being of different polarity than the first segment and relatively insoluble in the non-polar organic liquid. The second segment of the stabilizer is chemically attached to the polymerized particle.

  15. Particle identification using time-of-flight technology for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.R.

    1995-07-15

    The large multiplicities expected for LHC Pb+Pb collisions require new development in particle identification techniques. Presently, Pestov Spark Counters, low pressure Parallel Plate Chambers and scintillators with photo multiplier readout are under consideration.

  16. Ozonolysis of Mixed Oleic-Acid/Stearic-Acid Particles: Reaction Kinetics and Chemical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Katrib, Y.; Biskos, G.; Buseck, P. R.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Mochida, M.; Wise, M. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric particles directly and indirectly affect global climate and have a primary role in regional issues of air pollution, visibility, and human health. Atmospheric particles have a variety of shapes, dimensions, and chemical compositions, and these physicochemical properties evolve (i.e., "age") during transport of the particles through the atmosphere, in part because of the chemical reactions of particle-phase organic molecules with gas-phase atmospheric oxidants. As a global average, hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O3) are responsible quantitatively for most oxidant aging of atmospheric particles. The reactions of the hydroxyl radical occur in the surface region of a particle because of the nearly diffusion-limited bimolecular rate constant of OH with a variety of organic molecules. Ozone, on the other hand, is a selective agent for the unsaturated bonds of organic molecules and may diffuse a considerable distance into particles prior to reaction. The reaction of oleic acid with ozone has recently emerged as a model system to better understand the atmospheric chemical oxidation processes affecting organic particles. The ozonolysis of mixed oleic-acid/stearic-acid (OL/SA) aerosol particles from 0/100 to 100/0 weight percent composition is studied. The magnitude of the divergence of the particle beam inside an aerosol mass spectrometer shows that, in the concentration range 100/0 to 60/40, the mixed OL/SA particles are liquid prior to reaction. Upon ozonolysis, particles with SA composition greater than 25% change shape, indicating that they have solidified. Transmission electron micrographs show that SA(s) forms needles. For SA compositions greater than 10%, the reaction kinetics exhibit an initial fast decay of OL for low O3 exposure with no further loss of OL at higher O3 exposures. For compositions from 50/50 to 10/90, the residual OL concentration remains at 28+/-2% of its initial value. The initial reactive uptake coefficient for O3, as determined by

  17. A rocket-borne energy spectrometer using multiple solid-state detectors for particle identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, K. L.; Smith, L. G.; Voss, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    A rocket-borne experiment using energy spectrometers that allows particle identification by the use of multiple solid-state detectors is described. The instrumentation provides information regarding the energy spectrum, pitch-angle distribution, and the type of energetic particles present in the ionosphere. Particle identification was accomplished by considering detector loss mechanisms and their effects on various types of particles. Solid state detectors with gold and aluminum surfaces of several thicknesses were used. The ratios of measured energies for the various detectors were compared against known relationships during ground-based analysis. Pitch-angle information was obtained by using detectors with small geometrical factors mounted with several look angles. Particle flux was recorded as a function of rocket azimuth angle. By considering the rocket azimuth, the rocket precession, and the location of the detectors on the rocket, the pitched angle of the incident particles was derived.

  18. Development of an expert system for amino acid sequence identification.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Saulinskas, E F; Johnson, P; Harrington, P B

    1996-08-01

    An expert system for amino acid sequence identification has been developed. The algorithm uses heuristic rules developed by human experts in protein sequencing. The system is applied to the chromatographic data of phenylthiohydantoin-amino acids acquired from an automated sequencer. The peak intensities in the current cycle are compared with those in the previous cycle, while the calibration and succeeding cycles are used as ancillary identification criteria when necessary. The retention time for each chromatographic peak in each cycle is corrected by the corresponding peak in the calibration cycle at the same run. The main improvement of our system compared with the onboard software used by the Applied Biosystems 477A Protein/Peptide Sequencer is that each peak in each cycle is assigned an identification name according to the corrected retention time to be used for the comparison with different cycles. The system was developed from analyses of ribonuclease A and evaluated by runs of four other protein samples that were not used in rule development. This paper demonstrates that rules developed by human experts can be automatically applied to sequence assignment. The expert system performed more accurately than the onboard software of the protein sequencer, in that the misidentification rates for the expert system were around 7%, whereas those for the onboard software were between 13 and 21%.

  19. Identification and application of keto acids transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Peiran; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-30

    Production of organic acids by microorganisms is of great importance for obtaining building-block chemicals from sustainable biomass. Extracellular accumulation of organic acids involved a series of transporters, which play important roles in the accumulation of specific organic acid while lack of systematic demonstration in eukaryotic microorganisms. To circumvent accumulation of by-product, efforts have being orchestrated to carboxylate transport mechanism for potential clue in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06. Six endogenous putative transporter genes, YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D24607g, YALI0D20108g and YALI0E32901g, were identified. Transport characteristics and substrate specificities were further investigated using a carboxylate-transport-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. These transporters were expressed in Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 to assess their roles in regulating extracellular keto acids accumulation. In a Y. lipolytica T1 line over expressing YALI0B19470g, α-ketoglutarate accumulated to 46.7 g·L(-1), whereas the concentration of pyruvate decreased to 12.3 g·L(-1). Systematic identification of these keto acids transporters would provide clues to further improve the accumulation of specific organic acids with higher efficiency in eukaryotic microorganisms.

  20. Identification and application of keto acids transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Peiran; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Production of organic acids by microorganisms is of great importance for obtaining building-block chemicals from sustainable biomass. Extracellular accumulation of organic acids involved a series of transporters, which play important roles in the accumulation of specific organic acid while lack of systematic demonstration in eukaryotic microorganisms. To circumvent accumulation of by-product, efforts have being orchestrated to carboxylate transport mechanism for potential clue in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06. Six endogenous putative transporter genes, YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D24607g, YALI0D20108g and YALI0E32901g, were identified. Transport characteristics and substrate specificities were further investigated using a carboxylate-transport-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. These transporters were expressed in Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 to assess their roles in regulating extracellular keto acids accumulation. In a Y. lipolytica T1 line over expressing YALI0B19470g, α-ketoglutarate accumulated to 46.7 g·L−1, whereas the concentration of pyruvate decreased to 12.3 g·L−1. Systematic identification of these keto acids transporters would provide clues to further improve the accumulation of specific organic acids with higher efficiency in eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:25633653

  1. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  2. Determination of dicarboxylic acids in tropospherical particles and cloudwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v. Pinxteren, D.; Brüggemann, E.; Herrmann, H.

    2003-04-01

    During two FEBUKO (field investigations of budgets and conversions of particle phase organics in troposheric cloud processes) field campaigns aerosol particle and cloudwater samples were taken in a forestal region in Germany (Thüringer Wald). Particle collection took place in fall 2001 and 2002 at two valley sites (luff and lee) of the mountain Schmücke. On top of this mountain cloudwater was sampled. The aim was to collect and physically and chemically characterize air masses before, while and after passing an orographic cloud in order to provide information about possible multiphase interactions and chemical processing of the aerosol. In this campaign capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been used to determine the dicarboxylic acids. CE has some important advantages for the analysis of ions in aerosol particles compared to the commonly used ion chromatography or gas chromatography. The absolute detection limits are very low (below 1 pmole) and it has a large range of signal-to-concentration linearity. Thus it suits to difficult matrices with strongly changing concentrations and compositions such as aerosol samples. The separation efficiency is usually much higher than in liquid chromatography and the required sample amount is low (down to <1 µL). For sampling of the particles a five-stage low-pressure cascade impactor was used. A humidity-controlled tube bundle served as the inlet device. Tedlar foil was used as an impaction substrate then used for ion analysis. For cloudwater sampling four cloudwater collectors from the California Institute of Technology (CASCC2) were used, which collect droplets with a 50% cut off diameter of 3,5 µm by inertial impaction on several rows of teflon strands. Upcoming results of the measurements are presented.

  3. Charged particle identification with modules of the plastic ball

    SciTech Connect

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Maier, M.R.; Ritter, H.G.; Warwick, A.I.; Weik, F.; Wieman, H.; Wolf, K.L.

    1980-10-01

    The low energy pion channel (LEP) at LAMPF was used to calibrate the response of modules of the Plastic Ball detector for positive pions and protons. The detection efficiency was measured at various energies. The resolution and efficiency were found to be independent of the point at which the particle entered the detector. Scattered out particles could be well detected by including neighbouring detectors in the analysis.

  4. Mass spectrometric screening and identification of acidic metabolites in fulvic acid fractions of contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Jobelius, Carsten; Frimmel, Fritz H; Zwiener, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The anaerobic microbial degradation of aromatic and heterocyclic compounds is a prevalent process in contaminated groundwater systems. The introduction of functional groups into the contaminant molecules often results in aromatic and heterocyclic and succinic acids. These metabolites can be used as indicators for prevailing degradation processes. Therefore, there is a strong interest in developing analytical methods for screening and identification of these metabolites. In this study, neutral loss scans (NLS) by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry with losses of CO2 (NL ∆m/z = 44) and C2H4(CO2)2 (NL ∆m/z = 116) were applied for the first time successfully to screen selectively for acidic and succinic metabolites of aromatic and heterocyclic contaminants in two fulvic acid fractions from a contaminated site and a downstream region of a tar oil-polluted groundwater. Identification of these preselected signals was performed by high-resolution mass spectrometry with a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry instrument. High-resolution mass and mass fragmentation data were then compared with a list of known metabolites from a literature search or matched with chemical databases supported with in silico fragmentation. Based on authentic analytical standards, several compounds from NLS were identified (e.g., 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid, benzylsuccinic acid, naphthyl-2-methylsuccinic acid, 2-carboxyindane, and 2-carboxybenzothiophene) and tentatively identified (e.g., benzofuranmethylsuccinic acid and dihydrocarboxybenzothiophene) as aromatic, phenolic, heterocyclic, and succinic acids. The acidic metabolites were found exclusively in the contaminated region of the aquifer which indicates active biodegradation processes and no relevant occurrence of acidic metabolites in the downstream region.

  5. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry and Radio Frequency Identification to gain insights into erosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. J.; Wainwright, J.; Cooper, J. R.; Onda, Y.; Long, E. J.; Hargrave, G.; Kitchener, B.

    2012-12-01

    Erosion is a particle-based phenomenon, yet most of current understanding and modelling of this process is based on bulk measurements rather than the movement of individual particles. However, the application of two new technologies allows improved insight into the entrainment, transport and deposition of individual particles and facilitates particle-based modelling of the particle-based process. In this presentation we provide insights into particle movement based upon laboratory experiments using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and radio frequency identification (RFID). PIV has been used in experiments in which single raindrops have fallen onto dry sand in order to track the trajectories of detached particles. By measuring the movement of individual particles our aim is to compute the proportion of rainfall energy that is used in particle detachment and transport, and the controls on this proportion. RFID tags embedded into resin to mimic sand-sized particles have been tracked under simulated rainfall applied to bare-soil plots. By covering and uncovering particles at different times during the experiments we have been able to produce distributions of travel distances of particles under conditions of rainfall detachment and transport, overland-flow detachment and transport and combined raindrop detachment and flow transport.

  6. COMPARATIVE IN VITRO CARDIAC TOXICITY OF PRIMARY COMBUSTION PARTICLES: IDENTIFICATION OF CAUSAL CONSTITUENTS AND MECHANISMS OF INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of causal particle characteristics and mechanisms of injury would allow linkage of particulate air pollution adverse health effects to sources. Research has examined the direct cardiovascular effects of air pollution particle constituents since previous studies dem...

  7. Energy straggling eliminated as a limitation to charge resolution of transmission detectors. [used for particle identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, G.; Ahlen, S. P.; Price, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that detectors of the energy loss of penetrating charged particles are widely used for particle identification. These measurements are hampered, however, by fluctuations in the amount of energy deposited within the detector. It is shown that this limitation can be overcome with a new nuclear track detector, CR-39(DOP), and that the charge resolution of this detector exceeds that of any other, including semiconductor diodes.

  8. Identification of volume phase transition of a single microgel particle using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthickeyan, D.; Gupta, Deepak K.; Tata, B. V. R.

    2016-10-01

    Poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPAM-co-Aac) microgel particles are pH responsive and exhibit volume phase transition (VPT) upon variation of pH. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used conventionally to identify VPT and requires a dilute suspension with particle concentration ˜107 particles cm-3 and if particles are polydisperse in nature, DLS data interpretation is relatively difficult. Here we show that optical tweezers allow one to measure the VPT of a single microgel particle by measuring the optical trap stiffness, κ of trapped particle as a function of pH. We report here a sudden change in κ at VPT, which is shown to arise from a sudden decrease in particle diameter with a concomitant increase in the refractive index of the particle at VPT.

  9. Infrared spectrum of nitric acid dihydrate: Influence of particle shape.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Stetzer, Olaf; Schurath, Ulrich

    2005-03-24

    In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra of airborne alpha-NAD microparticles generated by two different methods were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals obtained by shock freezing of a HNO3/H2O gas mixture could be accurately reproduced using Mie theory with published refractive indices of alpha-NAD as input. In contrast, Mie theory proved to be inadequate to properly reproduce the infrared extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals which were formed via homogeneous nucleation of supercooled HNO3/H2O solution droplets, evaporating slowly on a time scale of several hours at about 195 K. Much better agreement between measured and calculated extinction spectra was obtained by T-matrix calculations assuming oblate particles with aspect ratios greater than five. This indicates that strongly aspherical alpha-NAD crystals are obtained when supercooled nitric acid solution droplets freeze and grow slowly, a process which has been discussed as a potential pathway to the formation of crystalline polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. PMID:16833561

  10. Foamy Virus Protein—Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Martin V.; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  11. Foamy Virus Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Martin V; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  12. Biodiversity and identification of sourdough lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Luc; Vancanneyt, Marc

    2007-04-01

    This review deals with recent developments on the biodiversity of sourdough lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and the recent description of new sourdough LAB species. One of the outcomes of biodiversity studies of particular sourdough ecosystems throughout Europe is the description of new taxa of LAB. During the last 3 years, several new LAB species have been isolated from traditional sourdoughs: Lactobacillus mindensis, Lactobacillus spicheri, Lactobacillus rossiae, Lactobacillus zymae, Lactobacillus acidifarinae, Lactobacillus hammesii, and Lactobacillus nantensis. Some of these species have been described on one single isolate only. Isolation of novel taxa mainly depends on the cultivation approach used, i.e. (selective) incubation media and conditions. The distribution of the taxa of LAB is highly variable from one sourdough ecosystem to another. Therefore, it is difficult to define correlations between population composition and both the type of sourdough or the geographic location. Identification of isolated strains needs a polyphasic approach, including a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods, the latter often based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and encompassing 16S rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridizations. A main obstacle in current identification approaches of LAB strains is the lack of a robust and exchangeable identification system for all LAB species. Recent studies based on complete genomes have provided the basis for establishing sets of genes useful for multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA). Monitoring the population dynamics of sourdough ecosystems can be performed by both culture-dependent (plating and incubation) and culture-independent (e.g. PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) methods. Although highly valuable for community fingerprinting, culture-independent methods do not always yield precise quantitative information.

  13. Use of cluster counting technique for particle identification in a drift chamber with the cathode strip readout

    SciTech Connect

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir P.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility of using the clusters counting technique for particle identification in a drift chamber with the cathode strip readout is experimentally investigated. Results of counting of primary ionization clusters on a relativistic particle track, as well as results of computer simulation of pion, kaon, and proton identification in the momentum range of 1–8 GeV/c, are presented.

  14. Raman identification of drug of abuse particles collected with colored and transparent tapes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Victor Molina; López-López, María; Atoche, Juan-Carlos; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Raman microscopy is a useful tool for the analysis of drug particles collected with adhesive tapes. In this work, first, the spectra of thirty drugs of abuse, degradation products, metabolites, and common cutting agent standards were recorded and the Raman bands observed were summarized providing the forensic analyst useful information for the identification of drug evidence. Then, the collection of different drug particles by a fingerprint lifting tape commonly used to remove and store fingerprints and fibers, and a white and green packaging tape, followed by the subsequent identification of the drugs by confocal Raman spectroscopy was performed. The particles were analyzed on top of the tapes, trapped between glass slides and the tapes, trapped in the tape folded over itself in the case of the transparent tape, and after folding and unfolding the tape in the case of the colored tape. The results obtained by the different approaches show that both tapes did not compromise the drugs spectra. However, the use of transparent tape is preferred because this tape allows the previous visual detection of the particles. Finally, several drug and sugar particles were spread over a clean table and inside a pocket, and the particles were collected with transparent tape and then properly identified. Although good results were obtained in both cases, the amount of fibers and other substances present in the collection area made the previous detection of the particles difficult and increases the analysis time. PMID:24630328

  15. Raman identification of drug of abuse particles collected with colored and transparent tapes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Victor Molina; López-López, María; Atoche, Juan-Carlos; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Raman microscopy is a useful tool for the analysis of drug particles collected with adhesive tapes. In this work, first, the spectra of thirty drugs of abuse, degradation products, metabolites, and common cutting agent standards were recorded and the Raman bands observed were summarized providing the forensic analyst useful information for the identification of drug evidence. Then, the collection of different drug particles by a fingerprint lifting tape commonly used to remove and store fingerprints and fibers, and a white and green packaging tape, followed by the subsequent identification of the drugs by confocal Raman spectroscopy was performed. The particles were analyzed on top of the tapes, trapped between glass slides and the tapes, trapped in the tape folded over itself in the case of the transparent tape, and after folding and unfolding the tape in the case of the colored tape. The results obtained by the different approaches show that both tapes did not compromise the drugs spectra. However, the use of transparent tape is preferred because this tape allows the previous visual detection of the particles. Finally, several drug and sugar particles were spread over a clean table and inside a pocket, and the particles were collected with transparent tape and then properly identified. Although good results were obtained in both cases, the amount of fibers and other substances present in the collection area made the previous detection of the particles difficult and increases the analysis time.

  16. Single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey N; Farquar, George R; Frank, Matthias; Gard, Eric E; Fergenson, David P

    2007-08-15

    Single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was used for the real-time detection of liquid nerve agent simulants. A total of 1000 dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for micrometer-sized single particles each of dimethyl methyl phosphonate, diethyl ethyl phosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and diethyl phthalate using laser fluences between 0.58 and 7.83 nJ/microm2, and mass spectral variation with laser fluence was studied. The mass spectra obtained allowed identification of single particles of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants at each laser fluence used although lower laser fluences allowed more facile identification. SPAMS is presented as a promising real-time detection system for the presence of CWAs. PMID:17630721

  17. Single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey N; Farquar, George R; Frank, Matthias; Gard, Eric E; Fergenson, David P

    2007-08-15

    Single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was used for the real-time detection of liquid nerve agent simulants. A total of 1000 dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for micrometer-sized single particles each of dimethyl methyl phosphonate, diethyl ethyl phosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and diethyl phthalate using laser fluences between 0.58 and 7.83 nJ/microm2, and mass spectral variation with laser fluence was studied. The mass spectra obtained allowed identification of single particles of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants at each laser fluence used although lower laser fluences allowed more facile identification. SPAMS is presented as a promising real-time detection system for the presence of CWAs.

  18. Identification of Neutral Particle Sources in MST Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norval, Ryan; Munaretto, Stefano; Goetz, John; Schmitz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The plasma wall interaction (PWI) in the MST RFP has yet to be studied systematically to determine the effects of the edge plasma on overall plasma performance. Two imaging views of the MST plasma currently exist. The first views the outboard toroidal and poloidal belt limiters at the main poloidal gap limiter. The second views the inboard poloidal limiter, as well as a section of the outboard toroidal limiter away from the man gap limiter. Data from viewing outboard limiters reveals PWI structures correlate with the plasma conditions. In standard RFP plasmas at lower plasma currents the PWI is dominated by non-axisymmetric radiation belts. As the RFP plasma current rises, increasing axisymmetry is seen from the edge. When in the 3D equilibria of the quasi-single helicity (QSH) state the PWI correlates with the main magnetic mode of the plasma. The dominant source of light observed from the MST edge is from hydrogen recycling. This will be used to inform neutral particle sourcing in the EIRENE neutral transport code. EIRENE will be used to compare how variations in fueling could affect the neutral profile in MST. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Detection of Anthropogenic Particles in Fish Stomachs: An Isolation Method Adapted to Identification by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Collard, France; Gilbert, Bernard; Eppe, Gauthier; Parmentier, Eric; Das, Krishna

    2015-10-01

    Microplastic particles (MP) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Ingestion combined with food intake is generally reported. However, data interpretation often is circumvented by the difficulty to separate MP from bulk samples. Visual examination often is used as one or the only step to sort these particles. However, color, size, and shape are insufficient and often unreliable criteria. We present an extraction method based on hypochlorite digestion and isolation of MP from the membrane by sonication. The protocol is especially well adapted to a subsequent analysis by Raman spectroscopy. The method avoids fluorescence problems, allowing better identification of anthropogenic particles (AP) from stomach contents of fish by Raman spectroscopy. It was developed with commercial samples of microplastics and cotton along with stomach contents from three different Clupeiformes fishes: Clupea harengus, Sardina pilchardus, and Engraulis encrasicolus. The optimized digestion and isolation protocol showed no visible impact on microplastics and cotton particles while the Raman spectroscopic spectrum allowed the precise identification of microplastics and textile fibers. Thirty-five particles were isolated from nine fish stomach contents. Raman analysis has confirmed 11 microplastics and 13 fibers mainly made of cellulose or lignin. Some particles were not completely identified but contained artificial dyes. The novel approach developed in this manuscript should help to assess the presence, quantity, and composition of AP in planktivorous fish stomachs. PMID:26289815

  20. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H.; Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W.; Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K.

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  1. Studies of the acidic components of the Colorado Green River formation oil shale-Mass spectrometric identification of the methyl esters of extractable acids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, P.; Schnoes, H. K.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    Study of solvent extractable acidic constituents of oil shale from the Colorado Green River Formation. Identification of individual components is based on gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric data obtained for their respective methyl esters. Normal acids, isoprenoidal acids, alpha, omega-dicarboxylic acids, mono-alpha-methyl dicarboxylic acids and methyl ketoacids were identified. In addition, the presence of monocyclic, benzoic, phenylalkanoic and naphthyl-carboxylic acids, as well as cycloaromatic acids, is demonstrated by partial identification.

  2. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  3. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of ~700,000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  4. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe U. /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /SLAC /Toho U.

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  5. Troika of single particle tracking programing: SNR enhancement, particle identification, and mapping.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Bo; Chen, Jixin; Kisley, Lydia; Landes, Christy F

    2014-01-14

    Single particle tracking (SPT) techniques provide a microscopic approach to probe in vivo and in vitro structure and reactions. Automatic analysis of SPT data with high efficiency and accuracy spurs the development of SPT algorithms. In this perspective, we review a range of available techniques used in SPT analysis programs. In addition, we present an example SPT program step-by-step to provide a guide so that researchers can use, modify, and/or write a SPT program for their own purposes. PMID:24263676

  6. Identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash particles by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Huckele, Susanne; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph; Baumann, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We present for the first time the Raman microspectroscopic identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash (VA) particles. The particles were collected in April/May 2010 during research aircraft flights, which were performed by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt in the airspace near the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption and over Europe (between Iceland and Southern Germany). In addition, aerosol particles were sampled by an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor in Munich, Germany. As references for the Raman analysis, we used the spectra of VA collected at the ground near the place of eruption, of mineral basaltic rock, and of different minerals from a database. We found significant differences in the spectra of VA and other aerosol particles (e.g., soot, nitrates, sulfates, and clay minerals), which allowed us to identify VA among other atmospheric particulate matter. Furthermore, while the airborne VA shows a characteristic Raman pattern (with broad band from ca. 200 to ca. 700 cm(-1) typical for SiO₂ glasses and additional bands of ferric minerals), the differences between the spectra of aged and fresh particles were observed, suggesting differences in their chemical composition and/or structure. We also analyzed similarities between Eyjafjallajökull VA particles collected at different sampling sites and compared the particles with a large variety of glassy and crystalline minerals. This was done by applying cluster analysis, in order to get information on the composition and structure of volcanic ash. PMID:24121468

  7. Identification of an Arachidonic Acid-Producing Bacterium and Description of Kineococcus arachidonicus sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.

    2001-05-15

    The identification of bacterial with the ability to produce polyunsaturated fatty acids as been limited almost exclusively to gram-negative, psychrophilic, marine microorganisms. Here we describe a new gram-type-positive bactgerium, strain SRS30216T, that produces the polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, and is neither psychrophilic nor a marine isolate.

  8. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  9. Encapsulation of ployunsaturated fatty acid esters with solid lipid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as a-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are known to improve cardiovascular and nervous system health. These compounds are increasingly used in food and animal feed formulations. However, the high degree of unsaturation in these structures can...

  10. Identification and characterization of major lipid particle proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Athenstaedt, K; Zweytick, D; Jandrositz, A; Kohlwein, S D; Daum, G

    1999-10-01

    Lipid particles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated at high purity, and their proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Major lipid particle proteins were identified by mass spectrometric analysis, and the corresponding open reading frames (ORFs) were deduced. In silicio analysis revealed that all lipid particle proteins contain several hydrophobic domains but none or only few (hypothetical) transmembrane spanning regions. All lipid particle proteins identified by function so far, such as Erg1p, Erg6p, and Erg7p (ergosterol biosynthesis) and Faa1p, Faa4p, and Fat1p (fatty acid metabolism), are involved in lipid metabolism. Based on sequence homology, another group of three lipid particle proteins may be involved in lipid degradation. To examine whether lipid particle proteins of unknown function are also involved in lipid synthesis, mutants with deletions of the respective ORFs were constructed and subjected to systematic lipid analysis. Deletion of YDL193w resulted in a lethal phenotype which could not be suppressed by supplementation with ergosterol or fatty acids. Other deletion mutants were viable under standard conditions. Strains with YBR177c, YMR313c, and YKL140w deleted exhibited phospholipid and/or neutral lipid patterns that were different from the wild-type strain and thus may be further candidate ORFs involved in yeast lipid metabolism.

  11. Identification and Characterization of Major Lipid Particle Proteins of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Athenstaedt, Karin; Zweytick, Dagmar; Jandrositz, Anita; Kohlwein, Sepp Dieter; Daum, Günther

    1999-01-01

    Lipid particles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated at high purity, and their proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Major lipid particle proteins were identified by mass spectrometric analysis, and the corresponding open reading frames (ORFs) were deduced. In silicio analysis revealed that all lipid particle proteins contain several hydrophobic domains but none or only few (hypothetical) transmembrane spanning regions. All lipid particle proteins identified by function so far, such as Erg1p, Erg6p, and Erg7p (ergosterol biosynthesis) and Faa1p, Faa4p, and Fat1p (fatty acid metabolism), are involved in lipid metabolism. Based on sequence homology, another group of three lipid particle proteins may be involved in lipid degradation. To examine whether lipid particle proteins of unknown function are also involved in lipid synthesis, mutants with deletions of the respective ORFs were constructed and subjected to systematic lipid analysis. Deletion of YDL193w resulted in a lethal phenotype which could not be suppressed by supplementation with ergosterol or fatty acids. Other deletion mutants were viable under standard conditions. Strains with YBR177c, YMR313c, and YKL140w deleted exhibited phospholipid and/or neutral lipid patterns that were different from the wild-type strain and thus may be further candidate ORFs involved in yeast lipid metabolism. PMID:10515935

  12. Identification of secreted bacterial proteins by noncanonical amino acid tagging

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Szychowski, Janek; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Schneewind, Olaf; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved complex secretion systems to deliver virulence factors into host cells. Identification of these factors is critical for understanding the infection process. We report a powerful and versatile approach to the selective labeling and identification of secreted pathogen proteins. Selective labeling of microbial proteins is accomplished via translational incorporation of azidonorleucine (Anl), a methionine surrogate that requires a mutant form of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase for activation. Secreted pathogen proteins containing Anl can be tagged by azide-alkyne cycloaddition and enriched by affinity purification. Application of the method to analysis of the type III secretion system of the human pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica enabled efficient identification of secreted proteins, identification of distinct secretion profiles for intracellular and extracellular bacteria, and determination of the order of substrate injection into host cells. This approach should be widely useful for the identification of virulence factors in microbial pathogens and the development of potential new targets for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:24347637

  13. Particle Backtracking Improves Breeding Subpopulation Discrimination and Natal-Source Identification in Mixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Fraker, Michael E.; Anderson, Eric J.; Brodnik, Reed M.; Carreon-Martinez, Lucia; DeVanna, Kristen M.; Fryer, Brian J.; Heath, Daniel D.; Reichert, Julie M.; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a novel method to improve the use of natural tagging approaches for subpopulation discrimination and source-origin identification in aquatic and terrestrial animals with a passive dispersive phase. Our method integrates observed site-referenced biological information on individuals in mixed populations with a particle-tracking model to retrace likely dispersal histories prior to capture (i.e., particle backtracking). To illustrate and test our approach, we focus on western Lake Erie’s yellow perch (Perca flavescens) population during 2006–2007, using microsatellite DNA and otolith microchemistry from larvae and juveniles as natural tags. Particle backtracking showed that not all larvae collected near a presumed hatching location may have originated there, owing to passive drift during the larval stage that was influenced by strong river- and wind-driven water circulation. Re-assigning larvae to their most probable hatching site (based on probabilistic dispersal trajectories from the particle backtracking model) improved the use of genetics and otolith microchemistry to discriminate among local breeding subpopulations. This enhancement, in turn, altered (and likely improved) the estimated contributions of each breeding subpopulation to the mixed population of juvenile recruits. Our findings indicate that particle backtracking can complement existing tools used to identify the origin of individuals in mixed populations, especially in flow-dominated systems. PMID:25799555

  14. A Framework for Sediment Particle Tracking via Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakiris, Achilleas; Papanicolaou, Thanos; Abban, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The study of sedimentary and morphodynamic processes in riverine environments has recently been shifting from the traditional Eulerian, static perspective to a Lagrangian perspective, which considers the movement characteristics of the individual transported particles, such as their travel and resting distance and time. The Lagrangian framework, in turn allows to better study processes such as bedload particle diffusion, erosion and deposition within a river reach, to more accurately predict bedload fluxes especially through the use of stochastic Discrete Particle models. A technology that goes hand-in-hand with this Lagrangian perspective is Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID), which has been recently applied for tracking the movement of tagged sediment particles within the river continuum. RFID allows the wireless, bidirectional exchange of information between a base station, known as the reader, with a typically large number of transponders (or tags) via an (excitation) antenna. RFID allows essentially the unique, wireless detection and identification of a transponder over a distance. The goal of this study is to further enhance the utility of RFID in riverine applications by developing a framework that allows extracting the 3D location of RFID tagged sediment particles in nearly real-time. To address the goal of this coupled theoretical and experimental study, a semi-theoretical approach based on antenna inductive coupling was combined with experimental measurements for developing a relationship that provides an estimate of the distance between a tagged particle and the antenna using the Return Signal Strength Indication (RSSI). The RSSI quantifies the magnetic energy transmitted from the transponder to the antenna. The RFID system used in this study was a passive, Low-Frequency (LF) system, which ensured that the LF radio waves could penetrate through the river bed material. The RSSI of the signal transmitted from each transponder was measured with an

  15. Phase Identification of Individual Crystalline Particles by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    SciTech Connect

    SMALL,J.A.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-06-12

    Recently, an EBSD system was developed that uses a 1024 x 1024 CCD camera coupled to a thin phosphor. This camera has been shown to produce excellent EBSD patterns. In this system, crystallographic information is determined from the EBSD pattern and coupled with the elemental information from energy or wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Identification of the crystalline phase of a sample is then made through a link to a commercial diffraction database. To date, this system has been applied almost exclusively to conventional, bulk samples that have been polished to a flat surface. In this investigation, the authors report on the application of the EBSD system to the phase identification analysis (PIA) of individual micrometer and submicrometer particles rather than flat surfaces.

  16. Identification of tobacco smoke components in indoor breathable particles by SEM-EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slezakova, K.; Pires, J. C. M.; Martins, F. G.; Pereira, M. C.; Alvim-Ferraz, M. C.

    2011-02-01

    Tobacco smoke is one of the greatest sources of indoor particles, which has been linked with serious health effects. Consequently, there has been a widespread interest in analysing tobacco related indoor particulate matter (PM). Nevertheless, the majority of performed studies focused on bulk chemical composition of tobacco related PM, but the knowledge of individual tobacco smoke particles is still limited. Therefore, more information on PM should be provided, namely concerning morphological and chemical characterisation of individual particles. Aiming to further understand the impact of tobacco smoke on human health, this work studied the influence of tobacco smoke on chemical and morphological characteristics of PM 10 and PM 2.5, collected at one site influenced by smoking and at one reference (non-smoking) site. Chemical and morphological characteristics of 4000 individual particles were determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) combined with X-ray microanalysis (by Energy Dispersive Spectrometer - EDS). Cluster analysis (CA) was used to classify different particle groups that occurred in PM, aiming the identification of the respective emission sources. The results showed that tobacco smoke influenced the characteristics of both fine and coarse particles, this influence being stronger for fine fraction. The abundance of particles associated with tobacco smoke was 27% and 5% for PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10, respectively; as expected, those particles were not identified in PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 of the reference (non-smoking) site. The results showed that at both sites PM was also influenced by outdoor sources. For PM 2.5-10, outdoor particles essentially originated from natural sources accounting for 35% and 15% at the smoking and reference sites, respectively. For PM 2.5, outdoor particles account for 38% and 29% at the smoking and reference sites, respectively; these particles showed considerable contribution (13% and 17%) from anthropogenic sources (mainly from

  17. Particle size distribution of hydrocyanic acid in gari, a cassava-based product.

    PubMed

    Maduagwu, E N; Fafunso, M

    1980-12-01

    A reciprocal relationship was observed between the cyanide content of gari and particle size. Hydrocyanic acid (HCN) content was positively correlated (r = 0.62) with sugar content but the correlation with starch content was poor (r = 0.33). From both the nutritional and toxicological standpoints, it would appear that larger particles size in gari is beneficial.

  18. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Marcy, T. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Hudson, P. K.; Thompson, T. L.; Kaercher, B.; Ridley, B. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Baumgardner, D.; Garrett, T. J.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D. S.; Pittman, J. V.; Dhaniyala, S.; Bui, T. P.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward and downward facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197-224 K and pressures of 122-224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4 # 10(exp 14) molecules/ square cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 ?m and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  19. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during CRYSTAL-FACE were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward- and downward-facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197 K - 224 K and pressures of 122 hPa - 224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4- 10(exp 14) molecules/sq cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 pm and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  20. Particle identification using dE/dx in the Mark II detector at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarski, A.; Coupal, D.P.; Feldman, G.J.; Hanson, G.; Nash, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Rankin, P.; Van Kooten, R.

    1989-04-01

    The central drift chamber in the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider has been instrumented with 100-MHz Flash-ADCs. Pulse digitization provides particle identification through the measurement of average ionization loss in the chamber. We present the results of a study of system performance and outline the systematic corrections that optimize resolution. The data used are from a short test run at PEP with one-third of the FADCs installed and an extensive cosmic ray sample with the fully instrumented chamber. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Improved x-ray detection and particle identification with avalanche photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Diepold, Marc Franke, Beatrice; Götzfried, Johannes; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Krauth, Julian J.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Amaro, Fernando D.; Gouvea, Andrea L.; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Santos, Joaquim M. F. dos; Machado, Jorge; Amaro, Pedro; Santos, José Paulo; and others

    2015-05-15

    Avalanche photodiodes are commonly used as detectors for low energy x-rays. In this work, we report on a fitting technique used to account for different detector responses resulting from photoabsorption in the various avalanche photodiode layers. The use of this technique results in an improvement of the energy resolution at 8.2 keV by up to a factor of 2 and corrects the timing information by up to 25 ns to account for space dependent electron drift time. In addition, this waveform analysis is used for particle identification, e.g., to distinguish between x-rays and MeV electrons in our experiment.

  2. A case study of urban particle acidity and its influence on secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Jimenez, Jose L; Worsnop, Douglas R; Canagaratna, Manjula

    2007-05-01

    Size-resolved indicators of aerosol acidity, including H+ ion concentrations (H+Aer) and the ratio of stoichiometric neutralization are evaluated in submicrometer aerosols using highly time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) data from Pittsburgh. The pH and ionic strength within the aqueous particle phase are also estimated using the Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM). Different mechanisms that contribute to the presence of acidic particles in Pittsburgh are discussed. The largest H+Aer loadings and lowest levels of stoichiometric neutralization were detected when PM1 loadings were high and dominated by SO4(2-). The average size distribution of H+Aer loading shows an accumulation mode at Dva approximately 600 nm and an enhanced smaller mode that centers at Dva approximately 200 nm and tails into smaller sizes. The acidity in the accumulation mode particles suggests that there is generally not enough gas-phase NH3 available on a regional scale to completely neutralize sulfate in Pittsburgh. The lack of stoichiometric neutralization in the 200 nm mode particles is likely caused by the relatively slow mixing of gas-phase NH3 into SO2-rich plumes containing younger particles. We examined the influence of particle acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation by comparing the mass concentrations and size distributions of oxygenated organic aerosol (00A--surrogate for SOA in Pittsburgh) during periods when particles are, on average, acidic to those when particles are bulk neutralized. The average mass concentration of ODA during the acidic periods (3.1 +/- 1.7 microg m(-3)) is higher than that during the neutralized periods (2.5 +/- 1.3 microg m(-3)). Possible reasons for this enhancement include increased condensation of SOA species, acid-catalyzed SOA formation, and/or differences in air mass transport and history. However, even if the entire enhancement (approximately 0.6 microg m(-3)) can be attributed to acid catalysis, the upperbound increase of SOA mass

  3. Use of the gas-filled-magnet technique for particle identification at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.K.; Jiang, C.L.; Paul, M.

    1995-08-01

    Reaction studies of interest to astrophysics with radioactive ion beams will be done mainly in inverse reaction kinematics, i.e., heavy particles bombarding a hydrogen target. The low energy of the outgoing heavy reaction products makes particle identification with respect to mass and nuclear charge a major challenge. For the planned {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}) experiment one expects five different types of particles in the outgoing channels: {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O (from elastic scattering of {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O on {sup 12}C), {sup 15}O and {sup 15}N (from the {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O induced (p,{alpha}) reactions) and {sup 12}C recoils from the polypropylene target. While mass determination can be achieved easily by time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, a determination of the nuclear charge presents a challenge, especially if the energy of the particles is below 500 keV/u. We studied the gas-filled magnet technique for Z-identification of light ions between Z = 6-9. In a gas-filled magnet the particles move with an average charge state {bar q} which in one parameterization is given by {bar q} = Z ln(avZ{sup {alpha}})/ln(bZ{sup {beta}}) where Z is the nuclear charge of the ions and v their velocity. Introducing into the expression for the magnetic rigidity B{rho} = mv/{bar q} results in a Z dependence of B{rho} which is valid to very low velocities. As a magnet we used the Enge split-pole spectrograph which was filled with nitrogen gas at a pressure of 0.5 Torr. The particles were detected in the focal plane with a 50 x 10 cm{sup 2} parallel-grid-avalanche counter which measured TOF and magnetic rigidity. The mass and Z separation was tested with {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O beams at energies of about 600 keV/u and recoil particles ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 19}F. The Z-separation obtained at these energies was {triangle}Z/Z = 0.28 which is sufficient to separate individual elements for Z < 10.

  4. Parameters identification of Van der Pol-Duffing oscillators via particle swarm optimization and differential evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Monti, Giorgio; Marano, Giuseppe Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Many of the proposed approaches for non-linear systems control are developed under the assumption that all involved parameters are known in advance. Unfortunately, their estimation is not so simple because the nature of the non-linear behaviors is very complex in the most part of the cases. In view of this complication, parameters identification of non-linear oscillators has attracted increasing interests in various research fields: from a pure mathematical point-of-view, parameters identification can be formalized as a multi-dimensional optimization problem, typically over real bounded domains. In doing this, the use of the so-called non-classical methods based on soft computing theories seems to be promising because they do not require a priori information and the robustness of the identification against the noise contamination is satisfactory. However, further studies are required to evaluate the general effectiveness of these methodologies. In this sense, the paper addresses the consistency of two classes of soft computing based methods for the identification of Van der Pol-Duffing oscillators. A large numerical investigation has been conducted to evaluate the performances of six differential evolution algorithms (including a modified differential evolution algorithm proposed by the authors) and four swarm intelligence based algorithms (including a chaotic particle swarm optimization algorithm). Single well, double well and double-hump oscillators are identified and noisy system responses are considered in order to evaluate the robustness of the identification processes. The investigated soft computing techniques behave very well and thus they are suitable for practical applications.

  5. Field evaluation of nanofilm detectors for measuring acidic particles in indoor and outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Hazi, Yair; Gao, Hai; Peters, Paul; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-09-01

    This field evaluation study was conducted to assess new technology designed to measure number concentrations of strongly acidic ultrafine particles. Interest in these particles derives from their potential to cause adverse health effects. Current methods for counting and sizing airborne ultrafine particles cannot isolate those particles that are acidic. We hypothesized that the size-resolved number concentration of such particles to which people are exposed could be measured by newly developed iron nanofilm detectors on which sulfuric acid (H2SO4*) droplets produce distinctive ringed reaction sites visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We carried out field measurements using an array of samplers, with and without the iron nanofilm detectors, that allowed indirect comparison of particle number concentrations and size-resolved measures of acidity. The iron nanofilm detectors are silicon chips (5 mm x 5 mm x 0.6 mm) that are coated with iron by vapor deposition. The iron layer was 21.5 or 26 nm thick for the two batches used in these experiments. After exposure the detector surface was scanned topographically by AFM to view and enumerate the ringed acid reaction sites and deposited nonacidic particles. The number of reaction sites and particles per scan can be counted directly on the image displayed by AFM. Sizes can also be measured, but for this research we did not size particles collected in the field. The integrity of the surface of iron nanofilm detectors was monitored by laboratory analysis and by deploying blank detectors and detectors that had previously been exposed to H2SO4 calibration aerosols. The work established that the detectors could be used with confidence in temperate climates. Under extreme high humidity and high temperature, the surface film was liable to detach from the support, but remaining portions of the film still produced reliable data. Exposure to ambient gases in a filtered air canister during the field tests did not affect the film

  6. Field evaluation of nanofilm detectors for measuring acidic particles in indoor and outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Hazi, Yair; Gao, Hai; Peters, Paul; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-09-01

    This field evaluation study was conducted to assess new technology designed to measure number concentrations of strongly acidic ultrafine particles. Interest in these particles derives from their potential to cause adverse health effects. Current methods for counting and sizing airborne ultrafine particles cannot isolate those particles that are acidic. We hypothesized that the size-resolved number concentration of such particles to which people are exposed could be measured by newly developed iron nanofilm detectors on which sulfuric acid (H2SO4*) droplets produce distinctive ringed reaction sites visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We carried out field measurements using an array of samplers, with and without the iron nanofilm detectors, that allowed indirect comparison of particle number concentrations and size-resolved measures of acidity. The iron nanofilm detectors are silicon chips (5 mm x 5 mm x 0.6 mm) that are coated with iron by vapor deposition. The iron layer was 21.5 or 26 nm thick for the two batches used in these experiments. After exposure the detector surface was scanned topographically by AFM to view and enumerate the ringed acid reaction sites and deposited nonacidic particles. The number of reaction sites and particles per scan can be counted directly on the image displayed by AFM. Sizes can also be measured, but for this research we did not size particles collected in the field. The integrity of the surface of iron nanofilm detectors was monitored by laboratory analysis and by deploying blank detectors and detectors that had previously been exposed to H2SO4 calibration aerosols. The work established that the detectors could be used with confidence in temperate climates. Under extreme high humidity and high temperature, the surface film was liable to detach from the support, but remaining portions of the film still produced reliable data. Exposure to ambient gases in a filtered air canister during the field tests did not affect the film

  7. Identification of Hydroxybenzoic Acids as Selective Lactate Receptor (GPR81) Agonists with Antilipolytic Effects.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Curt A; Liu, Changlu; Shelton, Jonathan; Kuei, Chester; Sutton, Steven W; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Carruthers, Nicholas I

    2012-08-01

    Following the characterization of the lactate receptor (GPR81), a focused screening effort afforded 3-hydroxybenzoic acid 1 as a weak agonist of both GPR81 and GPR109a (niacin receptor). An examination of structurally similar arylhydroxy acids led to the identification of 3-chloro-5-hydroxybenzoic acid 2, a selective GPR81 agonist that exhibited favorable in vivo effects on lipolysis in a mouse model of obesity.

  8. Identification of Hydroxybenzoic Acids as Selective Lactate Receptor (GPR81) Agonists with Antilipolytic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Following the characterization of the lactate receptor (GPR81), a focused screening effort afforded 3-hydroxybenzoic acid 1 as a weak agonist of both GPR81 and GPR109a (niacin receptor). An examination of structurally similar arylhydroxy acids led to the identification of 3-chloro-5-hydroxybenzoic acid 2, a selective GPR81 agonist that exhibited favorable in vivo effects on lipolysis in a mouse model of obesity. PMID:24900524

  9. Identification of Characteristic Fatty Acids to Quantify Triacylglycerols in Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pei-Li; Wang, Hai-Tao; Pan, Yan-Fei; Meng, Ying-Ying; Wu, Pei-Chun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid profiles of lipids from microalgae are unique. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are generally enriched in polar lipids, whereas saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids constitute the majority of fatty acids in triacylglycerols (TAG). Each species has characteristic fatty acids, and their content is positively or negatively correlated with TAGs. The marine oleaginous diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was used as the paradigm to determine the quantitative relationship between TAG and characteristic fatty acid content. Fatty acid profiles and TAG content of Phaeodactylum tricornutum were determined in a time course. C16:0/C16:1 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n3) were identified as characteristic fatty acids in TAGs and polar lipids, respectively. The percentage of those characteristic fatty acids in total fatty acids had a significant linear relationship with TAG content, and thus, the correlation coefficient presenting r2 were 0.96, 0.94, and 0.97, respectively. The fatty acid-based method for TAG quantification could also be applied to other microalgae such as Nannochloropsis oceanica in which the r2 of C16:0 and EPA were 0.94 and 0.97, respectively, and in Chlorella pyrenoidosa r2-values for C18:1 and C18:3 with TAG content were 0.91 and 0.99, repectively. This characteristic fatty acid-based method provided a distinct way to quantify TAGs in microalgae, by which TAGs could be measured precisely by immediate transesterification from wet biomass rather than using conventional methods. This procedure simplified the operation and required smaller samples than conventional methods. PMID:26941747

  10. Identification of Characteristic Fatty Acids to Quantify Triacylglycerols in Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei-Li; Wang, Hai-Tao; Pan, Yan-Fei; Meng, Ying-Ying; Wu, Pei-Chun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid profiles of lipids from microalgae are unique. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are generally enriched in polar lipids, whereas saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids constitute the majority of fatty acids in triacylglycerols (TAG). Each species has characteristic fatty acids, and their content is positively or negatively correlated with TAGs. The marine oleaginous diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was used as the paradigm to determine the quantitative relationship between TAG and characteristic fatty acid content. Fatty acid profiles and TAG content of Phaeodactylum tricornutum were determined in a time course. C16:0/C16:1 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n3) were identified as characteristic fatty acids in TAGs and polar lipids, respectively. The percentage of those characteristic fatty acids in total fatty acids had a significant linear relationship with TAG content, and thus, the correlation coefficient presenting r (2) were 0.96, 0.94, and 0.97, respectively. The fatty acid-based method for TAG quantification could also be applied to other microalgae such as Nannochloropsis oceanica in which the r (2) of C16:0 and EPA were 0.94 and 0.97, respectively, and in Chlorella pyrenoidosa r (2)-values for C18:1 and C18:3 with TAG content were 0.91 and 0.99, repectively. This characteristic fatty acid-based method provided a distinct way to quantify TAGs in microalgae, by which TAGs could be measured precisely by immediate transesterification from wet biomass rather than using conventional methods. This procedure simplified the operation and required smaller samples than conventional methods. PMID:26941747

  11. Parameter identification of robot manipulators: a heuristic particle swarm search approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Levy, David

    2015-01-01

    Parameter identification of robot manipulators is an indispensable pivotal process of achieving accurate dynamic robot models. Since these kinetic models are highly nonlinear, it is not easy to tackle the matter of identifying their parameters. To solve the difficulty effectively, we herewith present an intelligent approach, namely, a heuristic particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, which we call the elitist learning strategy (ELS) and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller hybridized PSO approach (ELPIDSO). A specified PID controller is designed to improve particles' local and global positions information together with ELS. Parameter identification of robot manipulators is conducted for performance evaluation of our proposed approach. Experimental results clearly indicate the following findings: Compared with standard PSO (SPSO) algorithm, ELPIDSO has improved a lot. It not only enhances the diversity of the swarm, but also features better search effectiveness and efficiency in solving practical optimization problems. Accordingly, ELPIDSO is superior to least squares (LS) method, genetic algorithm (GA), and SPSO algorithm in estimating the parameters of the kinetic models of robot manipulators. PMID:26039090

  12. Parameter identification of robot manipulators: a heuristic particle swarm search approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Levy, David

    2015-01-01

    Parameter identification of robot manipulators is an indispensable pivotal process of achieving accurate dynamic robot models. Since these kinetic models are highly nonlinear, it is not easy to tackle the matter of identifying their parameters. To solve the difficulty effectively, we herewith present an intelligent approach, namely, a heuristic particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, which we call the elitist learning strategy (ELS) and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller hybridized PSO approach (ELPIDSO). A specified PID controller is designed to improve particles' local and global positions information together with ELS. Parameter identification of robot manipulators is conducted for performance evaluation of our proposed approach. Experimental results clearly indicate the following findings: Compared with standard PSO (SPSO) algorithm, ELPIDSO has improved a lot. It not only enhances the diversity of the swarm, but also features better search effectiveness and efficiency in solving practical optimization problems. Accordingly, ELPIDSO is superior to least squares (LS) method, genetic algorithm (GA), and SPSO algorithm in estimating the parameters of the kinetic models of robot manipulators.

  13. Submicrometer-Sized Thermometer Particles Exploiting Selective Nucleic Acid Stability.

    PubMed

    Puddu, Michela; Mikutis, Gediminas; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2016-01-27

    Encapsulated nucleic acid selective damage quantification by real-time polymerase chain reaction is used as sensing mechanism to build a novel class of submicrometer size thermometer. Thanks to the high thermal and chemical stability, and the capability of storing the read accumulated thermal history, the sensor overcomes some of current limitations in small scale thermometry.

  14. Water uptake of internally mixed ammonium sulfate and dicarboxylic acid particles probed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds in variable proportions, and the relative amount of organic fraction can influence the hygroscopic properties of the particles. Infrared spectra of submicrometer internally mixed dry particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) with various dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, maleic, glutaric and pimelic) have been measured in an aerosol flow tube at several solute mass ratios. The spectra show a notable broadening in the bandwidth of sulfate ion ν3 vibrational band near 1115 cm-1 with respect to pure AS. We attribute these perturbations, that are biggest at AS/organic acid mass ratio near unity, to intermolecular interactions between inorganic ions and organic acid molecules in the internally mixed solids. The water uptake behavior of internally mixed particles has been measured by recording the infrared integrated absorbance of liquid water as a function of relative humidity (RH). The amount of water present in the particles prior to deliquescence correlates partially with the water solubilities of the dicarboxylic acids, and also with the relative magnitudes of intermolecular interactions in the internally mixed dry solids. Phase change of ammonium sulfate in the internally mixed particles with RH has been spectrally monitored, and it is shown that water uptaken before full deliquescence produces structural changes in the particles that are revealed by their vibrational spectra.

  15. Water uptake properties of internally mixed sodium halide and succinic acid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2011-10-01

    Sea salt aerosols include appreciable fractions of organic material, that can affect properties such as hygroscopicity, phase transition or chemical reactivity. Although sodium chloride is the major component of marine salt, bromide and iodide ions tend to accumulate onto particle surfaces and influence their behaviour. The hygroscopic properties of internally mixed submicrometric particles composed of succinic acid (SA) and NaX (where X = F, Cl, Br or I) have been studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell at ambient temperature for different relative succinic acid/NaX compositions. The results show that deliquescence relative humidities of SA/NaF and SA/NaCl are equal to those of the pure sodium halides. SA/NaBr particles, on the other hand, deliquesce at lower relative humidities than pure NaBr particles, the effect being more marked as the SA/NaBr mass ratio approaches unity. The SA/NaI system behaves as a non-deliquescent system, absorbing liquid water at all relative humidities, as in pure NaI. Succinic acid phase in the particles has been spectroscopically monitored at given values of both RH and SA/NaX solute mass ratio. The different hygroscopic properties as the halogen ion is changed can be rationalized in terms of simple thermodynamic arguments and can be attributed to the relative contributions of ion-molecule interactions in the solid particles. The observed behaviour is of interest for tropospheric sea salt aerosols mixed with organic acids.

  16. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  17. Time-of-flight technique for particle identification at energies from 2 to 400 keV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The time of flight technique for particle identification was extended to 2 keV/nucleon and the size of the start-time detector was reduced considerably by the use of carbon foils of few micrograms/cm square in thickness combined with microchannel plates for detecting secondary electrons. Time of flight telescopes incorporating this start-time device were used to measure the stopping power of a number of low energy heavy ions in thin carbon foils and the charge states of these ions emerging from such foils. Applications for the detection and identification of low energy interplanetary and magnetospheric particles are suggested.

  18. Characterization and surface properties of amino-acid-modified carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite particles.

    PubMed

    Jack, Kevin S; Vizcarra, Timothy G; Trau, Matt

    2007-11-20

    The surface properties (nature, strength, and stability of interaction of functional groups) and bulk morphologies of a series of amino-acid-functionalized carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite (CHA) particles were investigated. It was found that the amino acids were both occluded in and presented on the surface of the CHA particles. Furthermore, their presence enhanced particle colloidal stability by retardation of Ostwald ripening and in some cases increasing the magnitude of the zeta-potential. Measurements of adsorption isotherms and zeta-potential titrations have shown that the amino-acid-surface interactions are weak and reversible at pH 9 and consistent with a model in which the carboxyl terminus interacts with calcium ions in the CHA lattice. Complexities in adsorption behavior are discussed in terms of different adsorption mechanisms that may be prevalent at different pHs.

  19. Size Distribution Studies on Sulfuric Acid-Water Particles in a Photolytic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, H. U.; Kunz, J. C.; Hanson, D. R.; Thao, S.; Vences, J.

    2015-12-01

    The size distribution of particles composed of sulfuric acid and water were measured in a Photolytic cylindrical Flow Reactor (PhoFR, inner diameter 5 cm, length ~ 100 cm). In the reactor, nitrous acid, water and sulfur dioxide gases along with ultraviolet light produced sulfuric acid. The particles formed from these vapors were detected with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer equipped with a diethylene glycol condensation particle counter (Jiang et al. 2011). For a set of standard conditions, particles attained a log-normal distribution with a peak diameter of 6 nm, and a total number of about 3x105 cm-3. The distributions show that ~70 % of the particles are between 4 and 8 nm diameter (lnσ ~ 0.37). These standard conditions are: 296 K, 25% relative humidity, total flow = 3 sLpm, ~10 ppbv HONO, SO2 in excess. With variations of relative humidity, the total particle number varied strongly, with a power relationship of ~3.5, and the size distributions showed a slight increase in peak diameter with relative humidity, increasing about 1 nm from 8 to 33 % relative humidity. Variations of HONO at a constant light intensity (wavelength of ~ 360 nm) were performed and particle size and total number changed dramatically. Size distributions also changed drastically with variations of light intensity, accomplished by turning on/off some of the black light flourescent bulbs that illuminated the flow reactor. Comparisons of these size distributions to recently published nucleation experiments (e.g. Zollner et al., Glasoe et al.) as well as to simulations of PhoFR reveal important details about the levels of sulfuric acid present in PhoFR as well as possible base contaminants.

  20. RICH counter for heavy-ion particle identification using multi-anode photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Shintaro; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Morita, Yusuke; Kanbe, Ryosuke; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu; Ohno, Junichi; Kamisho, Yasuto; Tanaka, Masaomi; Nishimura, Daiki; Yoshinaga, Kenta; Ohtsubo, Takashi; Takechi, Maya; Nagashima, Masayuki; Izumikawa, Takuji; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Sato, Shinji; Suzuki, Shinji; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In order to develop a new RICH counter (Ring Imaging CHerenkov counter) for heavy-ion particle identification, we have constructed a test system for measurement of a ring image of Cherenkov light using multi-anode photomultipliers that detect a photon incident position. For a test, a 58Ni(480 MeV/u) beam provided by the HIMAC heavy-ion synchrotron was used. As radiators, we have tested synthetic silica, polycarbonate, and BK7. We have selected a wavelength of Cherenkov light by using a band pass filter. As a result, the ring image of Cherenkov light was observed and the obtained resolution of velocity will be reported at the meeting.

  1. Improved x-ray detection and particle identification with avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Diepold, Marc; Fernandes, Luis M P; Machado, Jorge; Amaro, Pedro; Abdou-Ahmed, Marwan; Amaro, Fernando D; Antognini, Aldo; Biraben, François; Chen, Tzu-Ling; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas J; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Liu, Yi-Wei; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Naar, Boris; Nebel, Tobias; Nez, François; Santos, José Paulo; dos Santos, Joaquim M F; Schuhmann, Karsten; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Pohl, Randolf

    2015-05-01

    Avalanche photodiodes are commonly used as detectors for low energy x-rays. In this work, we report on a fitting technique used to account for different detector responses resulting from photoabsorption in the various avalanche photodiode layers. The use of this technique results in an improvement of the energy resolution at 8.2 keV by up to a factor of 2 and corrects the timing information by up to 25 ns to account for space dependent electron drift time. In addition, this waveform analysis is used for particle identification, e.g., to distinguish between x-rays and MeV electrons in our experiment. PMID:26026509

  2. Reduced Burst Release and Enhanced Oral Bioavailability in Shikimic Acid-Loaded Polylactic Acid Submicron Particles by Coaxial Electrospray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miaomiao; Wang, Yuanwen; Omari-Siaw, Emmanuel; Wang, Shengli; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Ximing

    2016-08-01

    In this study, using the coaxial electrospray method, we prepared submicron particles of the water-soluble drug shikimic acid (SA) with polylactic acid (PLA) as a polymer, to reduce the burst release and enhance the oral bioavailability. In vitro release study performed in HCl solution (pH 1.2) showed that the coaxial electrospray submicron particles could reduce burst release effect and presented a sustained release profile, compared with free SA and the particles prepared by electrospray method. The absorption of SA in the intestinal tract, studied using an in situ perfusion method in rats, also revealed jejunum as the main absorptive segment followed by duodenum and ileum. Moreover, the SA-loaded particles greatly enhanced the absorption of SA in the tested intestinal segments. The intestinal absorption rate was not enhanced with increasing drug concentration (5-15 μg/mL) which suggested that active transport or facilitated diffusion could play vital role in SA absorption. In addition, the SA-loaded PLA coaxial electrospray particle exhibited a prolonged plasma circulation with enhanced bioavailability after oral administration. In all, the coaxial electrospray technique could provide notable advantages for the oral delivery of SA, thereby enhancing its clinical application.

  3. Acidic reaction products of mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic acids were measured from PM2.5 aerosols at SMEAR II station (Station For Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The measured organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene. Due to lack of authentic standards caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesized at the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, University of Helsinki. The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during summer concomitant with the precursor mono- and sesquiterpenes. Of the acids β-caryophyllinic acid had highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected on the basis of emission calculations of precursor compounds and yields in oxidation experiments in smog chambers implicating that β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields are underestimated. Concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursor were clearly lower in summer than in winter indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were correlated with the accumulation mode particle number concentrations.

  4. Optimal Viscosity and Particle Shape of Hyaluronic Acid Filler as a Scaffold for Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Won, Chang-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The authors previously reported that cultured human fibroblasts suspended in a hyaluronic acid filler can produce human dermal matrices with extended in vivo stability in animal and clinical studies. The present study was undertaken to determine the optimal viscosity and particle shape of hyaluronic acid filler as a scaffold for cultured human dermal fibroblasts to enhance the maximal viability of injected cells. The fibroblasts were suspended in either 1 of 3 hyaluronic acid viscosities at 2 different particle shapes. The viscosities used in this study were low (600,000-800,000 centipoises), moderate (2,000,000-4,000,000 centipoises), and high (8,000,000-12,000,000 centipoises). The particle shape was evaluated by testing round and irregular shapes. The fibroblast mixed bioimplants were injected into the back of individual athymic nude mice. The levels of type I collagen were measured using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining at 16 weeks after the injections. Results of FACS demonstrated that the mean cell ratio with human collagens in the moderate viscosity group was greater than those of control, low, and high viscosity groups. An immunohistochemical study showed similar results. The moderate viscosity group demonstrated the highest positive staining of human collagens. However, there were no significant differences between groups of irregular and round shape particles. A hyaluronic acid bioimplant with moderate viscosity is superior to that with low or high viscosity in the viability for human fibroblasts. However, the particle shape does not influence the viability of the fibroblasts.

  5. Acidic reaction products of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-08-01

    Biogenic acids were measured in aerosols at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The analysed organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene, respectively. Due to a lack of authentic standards, the caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesised for this study. The mean, median, maximum and minimum concentrations (ng m-3) were as follows: limonic acid (1.26, 0.80, 16.5, below detection limit (< LOD)), pinic acid (5.53, 3.25, 31.4, 0.15), pinonic acid (9.87, 5.07, 80.1, < LOD), caric acid (5.52, 3.58, 49.8, < LOD), and caryophyllinic acid (7.87, 6.07, 86.1, < LOD). The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during the summer. Of the acids, β-caryophyllinic acid showed the highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected, based on the emission calculations of the precursor compounds and yields from oxidation experiments in smog chambers, implying that the β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields were underestimated. The concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursors were clearly lower in summer than in winter, indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during the cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were weakly correlated with the accumulation-mode particle number concentrations.

  6. Registered particles onboard identification in the various apertures of GAMMA-400 space gamma-telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene

    2016-07-01

    GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the gamma-telescope onboard international satellite gamma-observatory designed for particle registration in the wide energy band. Its parameters are optimized for detection of gamma-quanta with the energy ˜ 100 GeV in the main aperture. The main scientific goals of GAMMA-400 are to investigate fluxes of γ-rays and the electron-positron cosmic ray component possibly generated by dark matter particles decay or annihilation and to search for and study in detail discrete γ-ray sources, to investigate the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse γ-rays, and to study γ-ray bursts and γ-emission from the active Sun. This article presents analysis of detected events identification procedures and energy resolution in three apertures provide particles registration both from upper and lateral directions based on GAMMA-400 modeling due special designed software. Time and segmentation methods are used to reject backsplash (backscattering particles created when high energy γ-rays interact with the calorimeter's matter and move in the opposite direction) in the main aperture while only energy deposition analysis allows to reject this effect in the additional and lateral ones. The main aperture provides the best angular (all strip layers information analysis) and energy (energy deposition in the all detectors studying) resolution in the energy range 0.1 - 3 × 10^{3} GeV. The energy resolution in this band is 1%. Triggers in the main aperture will be formed using information about particle direction provided by time of flight system and presence of charged particle or backsplash signal formed according to analysis of energy deposition in combination of all two-layers anticoincidence systems individual detectors. In the additional aperture gamma-telescope allows to register events in the energy band 10 × 10^{-3} - 3 × 10^{3} GeV. The additional aperture energy resolution provides due to

  7. Analysis of caffeic acid derivatives in echinacea extracts by liquid chromatography particle beam mass spectrometry (LC-PB/MS) employing electron impact and glow discharge ionization sources.

    PubMed

    Castro, Joaudimir; Krishna, M V Balarama; Choiniere, John R; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2010-06-01

    A liquid chromatography-particle beam/mass spectrometry (LC-PB/MS) method with electron impact (EI) and glow discharge (GD) ionization sources is presented for the determination of caffeic acid derivatives in echinacea tinctures. In this work, two commercially available echinacea ethanolic extracts were used as the test samples for the separation, identification, and quantification of the caffeic acid derivatives (caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, cichoric acid, and caftaric acid), which are suggested to have beneficial medicinal properties. Detailed evaluations of the two primary controlling parameters for EI (electron energy and source block temperature) and GD (discharge current and pressure) sources were performed to determine optimal instrument operation conditions. The mass spectra obtained from both ion sources provide clear and simple molecular fragmentation patterns for each of the target analytes. The absolute detection limits for the caffeic acid derivatives were determined to be at subnanogram levels for both the EI and GD sources. The separation of the caffeic acid derivatives in echinacea was accomplished by reversed-phase chromatography using a C(18) column and a gradient elution system of water containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid and methanol, with an analysis time of less than 40 min. A standard addition method was employed for the quantification of each of the caffeic acid derivatives in the tincture. PMID:20349350

  8. Particle identification performance of the prototype aerogel RICH counter for the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, S.; Adachi, I.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Šantelj, L.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Tahirovic, E.; Yusa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a new type of particle identification device, called an aerogel ring imaging Cherenkov (ARICH) counter, for the Belle II experiment. It uses silica aerogel tiles as Cherenkov radiators. For detection of Cherenkov photons, hybrid avalanche photo-detectors (HAPDs) are used. The designed HAPD has a high sensitivity to single photons under a strong magnetic field. We have confirmed that the HAPD provides high efficiency for single-photon detection even after exposure to neutron and γ -ray radiation that exceeds the levels expected in the 10-year Belle II operation. In order to confirm the basic performance of the ARICH counter system, we carried out a beam test at the using a prototype of the ARICH counter with six HAPD modules. The results are in agreement with our expectations and confirm the suitability of the ARICH counter for the Belle II experiment. Based on the in-beam performance of the device, we expect that the identification efficiency at 3.5 GeV/c is 97.4% and 4.9% for pions and kaons, respectively. This paper summarizes the development of the HAPD for the ARICH and the evaluation of the performance of the prototype ARICH counter built with the final design components.

  9. Parameter Identification of Robot Manipulators: A Heuristic Particle Swarm Search Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Levy, David

    2015-01-01

    Parameter identification of robot manipulators is an indispensable pivotal process of achieving accurate dynamic robot models. Since these kinetic models are highly nonlinear, it is not easy to tackle the matter of identifying their parameters. To solve the difficulty effectively, we herewith present an intelligent approach, namely, a heuristic particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, which we call the elitist learning strategy (ELS) and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller hybridized PSO approach (ELPIDSO). A specified PID controller is designed to improve particles’ local and global positions information together with ELS. Parameter identification of robot manipulators is conducted for performance evaluation of our proposed approach. Experimental results clearly indicate the following findings: Compared with standard PSO (SPSO) algorithm, ELPIDSO has improved a lot. It not only enhances the diversity of the swarm, but also features better search effectiveness and efficiency in solving practical optimization problems. Accordingly, ELPIDSO is superior to least squares (LS) method, genetic algorithm (GA), and SPSO algorithm in estimating the parameters of the kinetic models of robot manipulators. PMID:26039090

  10. Identification of sulfonic acids as efficient ecto-5'-nucleotidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jamshed; Saeed, Aamer; Raza, Rabia; Matin, Abdul; Hameed, Abdul; Furtmann, Norbert; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) is well known for its implication in cancer. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidases is thought to provide an attractive approach to cancer therapy. This study identifies sulfonic acid compounds as efficient inhibitors of ecto-5'-nucleotidases. The compounds were tested against recombinant human and rat ecto-5'-nucleotidases. The most potent new sulfonic acid inhibitor 6-amino-4-hydroxynaphthalene-2-sulfonic acid (1) of ecto-5'-nucleotidase had an IC₅₀ of 1.32 ± 0.09 μM for the human and 10.4 ± 3.3 μM for the rat enzyme. Generally, all compounds were more active against the human enzyme. Plausible binding mode models were developed for this new class of inhibitors. Furthermore, several sulfonic acid inhibitors were efficient cytotoxic agents when tested on H157 cancer cell lines. Hence, new ecto-5'-nucleotidases inhibitors displayed significant potential for further development as compounds for anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  12. Identification of HIV-1-Based Virus-like Particles by Multifrequency Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Irene; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Cervera, Laura; Gòdia, Francesc; Domingo, Neus

    2016-09-20

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have become a promising platform for vaccine production. VLPs are formed by structural viral proteins that inherently self-assemble when expressed in a host cell. They represent a highly immunogenic and safe vaccine platform, due to the absence of the viral genome and its high protein density. One of the most important parameters in vaccine production is the quality of the product. A related bottleneck in VLP-based products is the presence of cellular vesicles as a major contaminant in the preparations, which will require the set up of techniques allowing for specific discrimination of VLPs from host vesicular bodies. In this work novel, to our knowledge, multifrequency (MF) atomic force microscopy (AFM) has permitted full structural nanophysical characterization by its access to the virus capsid of the HIV-based VLPs. The assessment of these particles by advanced amplitude modulation-frequency modulation (AM-FM) viscoelastic mapping mode has enhanced the imaging resolution of their nanomechanical properties, opening a new window for the study of the biophysical attributes of VLPs. Finally, the identification and differentiation of HIV-based VLPs from cellular vesicles has been performed under ambient conditions, providing, to our knowledge, novel methodology for the monitoring and quality control of VLPs. PMID:27653476

  13. Identification of HIV-1-Based Virus-like Particles by Multifrequency Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Irene; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Cervera, Laura; Gòdia, Francesc; Domingo, Neus

    2016-09-20

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have become a promising platform for vaccine production. VLPs are formed by structural viral proteins that inherently self-assemble when expressed in a host cell. They represent a highly immunogenic and safe vaccine platform, due to the absence of the viral genome and its high protein density. One of the most important parameters in vaccine production is the quality of the product. A related bottleneck in VLP-based products is the presence of cellular vesicles as a major contaminant in the preparations, which will require the set up of techniques allowing for specific discrimination of VLPs from host vesicular bodies. In this work novel, to our knowledge, multifrequency (MF) atomic force microscopy (AFM) has permitted full structural nanophysical characterization by its access to the virus capsid of the HIV-based VLPs. The assessment of these particles by advanced amplitude modulation-frequency modulation (AM-FM) viscoelastic mapping mode has enhanced the imaging resolution of their nanomechanical properties, opening a new window for the study of the biophysical attributes of VLPs. Finally, the identification and differentiation of HIV-based VLPs from cellular vesicles has been performed under ambient conditions, providing, to our knowledge, novel methodology for the monitoring and quality control of VLPs.

  14. Analysis and Identification of Acid-Base Indicator Dyes by Thin-Layer Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Daniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a very simple and effective technique that is used by chemists by different purposes, including the monitoring of the progress of a reaction. TLC can also be easily used for the analysis and identification of various acid-base indicator dyes.

  15. Diamonds in the rough: identification of individual napthenic acids in oil sands process water

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Steven J.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Jones, David; West, Charles E. ); Frank, Richard A.

    2011-03-10

    Expansion of the oil sands industry of Canada has seen a concomitant increase in the amount of process water produced and stored in large lagoons known as tailings ponds. Concerns have been raised, particularly about the toxic complex mixtures of water-soluble naphthenic acids (NA) in the process water. To date, no individual NA have been identified, despite numerous attempts, and while the toxicity of broad classes of acids is of interest, toxicity is often structure-specific, so identification of individual acids may also be very important. The chromatographic resolution and mass spectral identification of some individual NA from oil sands process water is described. The authors concluded that the presence of tricyclic diamondoid acids, never before even considered as NA, suggests an unprecedented degree of biodegradation of some of the oil in the oil sands. The identifications reported should now be followed by quantitative studies, and these used to direct toxicity assays of relevant NA and the method used to identify further NA to establish which, or whether all NA, are toxic. The two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method described may also be important for helping to better focus reclamation/remediation strategies for NA as well as in facilitating the identification of the sources of NA in contaminated surface waters (auth)

  16. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  17. Preclinical Evaluation of Bioabsorbable Polyglycolic Acid Spacer for Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Mukumoto, Naritoshi; Sulaiman, Nor Shazrina Binti; Nagata, Masaaki; Yamada, Shigeru; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Takumi

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) spacer through physical and animal experiments. Methods and Materials: The spacer was produced with surgical suture material made of PGA, forming a 3-dimensional nonwoven fabric. For evaluation or physical experiments, 150-MeV proton or 320-MeV carbon-ion beams were used to generate 60-mm width of spread-out Bragg peak. For animal experiments, the abdomens of C57BL/6 mice, with or without the inserted PGA spacers, were irradiated with 20 Gy of carbon-ion beam (290 MeV) using the spread-out Bragg peak. Body weight changes over time were scored, and radiation damage to the intestine was investigated using hematoxylin and eosin stain. Blood samples were also evaluated 24 days after the irradiation. Long-term thickness retention and safety were evaluated using crab-eating macaques. Results: No chemical or structural changes after 100 Gy of proton or carbon-ion irradiation were observed in the PGA spacer. Water equivalency of the PGA spacer was equal to the water thickness under wet condition. During 24 days' observation after 20 Gy of carbon-ion irradiation, the body weights of mice with the PGA spacer were relatively unchanged, whereas significant weight loss was observed in those mice without the PGA spacer (P<.05). In mice with the PGA spacer, villus and crypt structure were preserved after irradiation. No inflammatory reactions or liver or renal dysfunctions due to placement of the PGA spacer were observed. In the abdomen of crab-eating macaques, thickness of the PGA spacer was maintained 8 weeks after placement. Conclusions: The absorbable PGA spacer had water-equivalent, bio-compatible, and thickness-retaining properties. Although further evaluation is warranted in a clinical setting, the PGA spacer may be effective to stop proton or carbon-ion beams and to separate normal tissues from the radiation field.

  18. Identification of light charged particles and heavy ions in silicon detectors by means of pulse-shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Pausch, G.; Ortlepp, H.G.; Bohne, W.

    1996-06-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination with totally depleted Si-detectors in reverse mount has been investigated and shown to be an excellent method of charged-particle identification in the energy range of {approx}2 to 20 AMeV. In test experiments with heavy-ion beams the authors obtained element identification up to Ti and isotope resolution even for elements heavier than carbon. The promising results and the simplicity of the electronics recommend this technique for applications in multidetector arrays. In particular, small and compact 4{pi} Si balls with relatively low thresholds for charged-particle identification to be combined with 4{pi} neutron detectors or {gamma} arrays can be constructed.

  19. Extractant-coated magnetic particles for cobalt and nickel recovery from acidic solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Nunez, L.; Chemical Engineering

    1999-04-01

    Waste minimization and recycling practices can often constitute a significant fraction of industrial operating costs. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) is a simple, cost-effective process that utilizes micrometer-sized magnetic composite materials containing a sorbed layer of chelating or ion exchange material. This paper presents the use of MACS particles for recovering cobalt and nickel from acidic solution.

  20. Extractant-coated magnetic particles for cobalt and nickel recovery from acidic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Nuñez, L.

    1999-04-01

    Waste minimization and recycling practices can often constitute a significant fraction of industrial operating costs. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) is a simple, cost-effective process that utilizes micrometer-sized magnetic composite materials containing a sorbed layer of chelating or ion exchange material. This paper presents the use of MACS particles for recovering cobalt and nickel from acidic solution.

  1. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  2. Identification of genes regulated by UV/salicylic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Watson, C.; Milton, J.; Oryhon, J.; Salbego, D.; Milosavljevic, A.; Woloschak, G. E.; CuraGen Corp.

    2000-02-01

    Purpose : Previous work from the authors' group and others has demonstrated that some of the effects of UV irradiation on gene expression are modulated in response to the addition of salicylic acid to irradiated cells. The presumed effector molecule responsible for this modulation is NF-kappaB. In the experiments described here, differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify those cDNAs that are differentially modulated by UV radiation with and without the addition of salicylic acid. Materials and methods : Differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Results : Eight such cDNAs are presented: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-beta), nuclear encoded mitochondrial NADH ubiquinone reductase 24kDa (NDUFV2), elongation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B), nuclear dots protein SP100, nuclear encoded mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor (IF1), a cDNA similar to a subunit of yeast CCAAT transcription factor HAP5, and two expressed sequence tags (AA187906 and AA513156). Conclusions : Sequences of four of these genes contained NF-kappaB DNA binding sites of the type that may attract transrepressor p55/p55 NF-kappaB homodimers. Down-regulation of these genes upon UV irradiation may contribute to increased cell survival via suppression of p53 independent apoptosis.

  3. Solubility of methanol in low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid and implications for atmospheric particle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Knudsen cell techniques, we find well-behaved Henry's law uptake of methanol in aqueous 45 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions at temperatures between 197 and 231 K. Solubility of methanol increases with decreasing temperature and increasing acidity, with an effective Henry's law coefficient ranging from 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 8) M/atm. Equilibrium uptake of methanol into sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will not appreciably alter gas-phase concentrations of methanol. The observed room temperature reaction between methanol and sulfuric acid is too slow to provide a sink for gaseous methanol at the temperatures of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is also too slow to produce sufficient quantities of soluble reaction products to explain the large amount of unidentified organic material seen in particles of the upper troposphere.

  4. Identification of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl in human adipose tissue and serum.

    PubMed

    Sledzinski, Tomasz; Mika, Adriana; Stepnowski, Piotr; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Kaska, Lukasz; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Swierczynski, Julian

    2013-08-01

    Fatty acids containing a cyclopropane ring in their structure (cyclopropane FA) have been found in a wide variety of bacteria, a number of protozoa, and Myriapoda. Little is known about cyclopropane FA in mammal, especially in human tissues. The present study deals with the identification of cyclopropane FA in adipose tissue and serum of humans and rats. Fatty acids extracted from the adipose tissue and serum obtained from obese women during bariatric surgery were methylated and analyzed on GC-MS. We have identified: cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl, cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-octyl, cyclopropanenonanoic acid, and 2-[[2-[(2-ethylcyclopropyl)methyl]cyclopropyl]methyl] acid in human adipose tissue. We confirmed the presence of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl by derivatization of FA extracted from human adipose tissue to picolinyl esters. Cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl was the main cyclopropane FA (approximately 0.4 % of total fatty acids in human adipose tissue, and about 0.2 % of total fatty acids in the serum). In adipose tissue cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl was found mainly in triacylglycerols, whereas in serum in phospholipids and triacylglycerols. The cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl has also been found in serum, and adipose tissue of rats in amounts comparable to humans. The content of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl decreased in adipose tissue of rats maintained on a restricted diet for 1 month. In conclusion, we demonstrated that cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl is present in human adipose tissue and serum. Adipose tissue cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl is stored mainly in triacylglycerols and the storage of this cyclopropane FA is affected by food restriction.

  5. Effects of humic acid on physical and hydrodynamic properties of kaolin flocs by particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Runsheng; Zhang, Xihui; Xiao, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan; Cai, Zhonghua

    2011-07-01

    The physical and hydrodynamic properties of kaolin flocs including floc size, strength, regrowth, fractal structure and settling velocity were investigated by in situ particle image velocimetry technique at different humic acid concentration. Jar-test experimental results showed that the adsorbed humic acid had a significant influence on the coagulation process for alum and ferric chloride. Kaolin flocs formed with the ferric chloride were larger and stronger than those for alum at same humic acid concentration. Floc strength and regrowth were estimated by strength factor and recovery factor at different humic acid concentration. It was found that the increased humic acid concentration had a slight influence on the strength of kaolin flocs and resulted in much worse floc regrowth. In addition, the floc regrowth after breakage depended on the shear history and coagulants under investigation. The changes in fractal structure recorded continuously by in situ particle image velocimetry technique during the growth-breakage-regrowth processes provided a supporting information that the kaolin flocs exhibited a multilevel structure. It was proved that the increased humic acid concentration resulted in decrease in mass fractal dimension of kaolin flocs and consequently worse sedimentation performance through free-settling and microbalance techniques.

  6. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions.

  7. Adsorption of acids and bases from aqueous solutions onto silicon dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Huseyin; Erkan, Belgin

    2009-12-30

    The adsorption of acids and bases onto the surface of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) particles was systematically studied as a function of several variables, including activation conditions, contact time, specific surface area, particle size, concentration and temperature. The physical properties of SiO(2) particles were investigated, where characterizations were carried out by FT-IR spectroscopy, and morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM of samples showed good dispersion and uniform SiO(2) particles with an average diameter of about 1-1.5 microm. The adsorption results revealed that SiO(2) surfaces possessed effective interactions with acids and bases, and greatest adsorption capacity was achieved with NaOH, where the best fit isotherm model was the Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorption properties of raw SiO(2) particles were further improved by ultrasonication. Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity of NaOH adsorbate at 25 degrees C on sonicated SiO(2) (182.6 mg/g) was found to be greater than that of the unsonicated SiO(2) (154.3mg/g). The spontaneity of the adsorption process was established by decreases in DeltaG(ads)(0), which varied from -10.5 to -13.6 kJ mol(-1), in the temperature range 283-338K. PMID:19683387

  8. Acidic species and chloride depletion in coarse aerosol particles in the US east coast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Gao, Yuan

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the interactions of water-soluble acidic species associated with coarse mode aerosol particles (1.8-10 microm) and chlorine depletion, ten sets of size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Newark, New Jersey on the U.S. east coast. The samples were grouped into two categories according to the air-mass back trajectories and mass ratios of sodium to magnesium and calcium: Group I was primarily impacted by marine air mass and Group II was dominated by the continental air mass. In Group I, the concentrations of coarse mode nitrate and chloride depletion showed a strong correlation (R2=0.88). Without considering other cations, nitrate was found to account for all of the chloride depletion in coarse particles for most samples. The association of coarse mode nitrate with sea-salt particles is favored when the mass ratio of sodium to calcium is approximately equal to or greater than unity. Excess sulfate accounts for a maximum of 33% of chloride depletion in the coarse particles. Regarding chloride depletion in the different particle sizes, excess nitrate and sulfate account for 89% of the chloride depletion in the particle size range of 1.8-3.2 microm in the sample from July 13-14; all of the determined dicarboxylic acids and mono-carboxylic acids cannot compensate for the rest of the chloride depletion. In Group II, high percentages of chloride depletion were not observed. With nitrate being dominant in chlorine depletion observed at this location, N-containing species from pollution emissions may have profound impact on atmospheric composition through altering chlorine chemistry in this region. PMID:18973925

  9. Identification of Bidentate Salicylic Acid Inhibitors of PTP1B

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PTP1B is a master regulator in the insulin and leptin metabolic pathways. Hyper-activated PTP1B results in insulin resistance and is viewed as a key factor in the onset of type II diabetes and obesity. Moreover, inhibition of PTP1B expression in cancer cells dramatically inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we report the computationally guided optimization of a salicylic acid-based PTP1B inhibitor 6, identifying new and more potent bidentate PTP1B inhibitors, such as 20h, which exhibited a > 4-fold improvement in activity. In CHO-IR cells, 20f, 20h, and 20j suppressed PTP1B activity and restored insulin receptor phosphorylation levels. Notably, 20f, which displayed a 5-fold selectivity for PTP1B over the closely related PTPσ protein, showed no inhibition of PTP-LAR, PRL2 A/S, MKPX, or papain. Finally, 20i and 20j displayed nanomolar inhibition of PTPσ, representing interesting lead compounds for further investigation. PMID:26396684

  10. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  11. Identification of characteristic mass spectrometric markers for primary biological aerosol particles and comparison with field data from submicron pristine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freutel, F.; Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Martin, S. T.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to the total aerosol particle concentration is estimated to range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that PBA is a major source of particles in the supermicron range, and is also an important fraction of the submicron aerosol. PBA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. For this reason we have performed mass spectrometric laboratory measurements (Aerodyne C-ToF and W-ToF AMS, single particle laser ablation instrument SPLAT) on pure submicron aerosol particles containing typical PBA compounds in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds and to explain the observed fragmentation patterns on the basis of molecular structures. These laboratory data were compared to submicron particle mass spectra obtained during AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment, Brazil, February/March 2008). The results indicate that characteristic m/z ratios for carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, saccharose, levoglucosan, mannitol) can be identified, for example m/z = 60(C2H4O2+) or m/z = 61(C2H5O2+). Certain characteristic peaks for amino acids were also identified in the laboratory experiments. In the field data from AMAZE-08, these characteristic peaks for carbohydrates and amino acids were found, and their contribution to the total organic mass was estimated to about 5%. Fragment ions from peptides and small proteins were also identified in laboratory experiments. Larger proteins, however, seem to become oxidized to CO2+ to a large extend in the vaporizing process of the AMS. Thus, detection of proteins in atmospheric aerosol particles with the AMS appears to be difficult.

  12. Estimation and Identification of Time-Varying Long-Term Fading Channels via the Particle Filter and the EM Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiao; Olama, Mohammed M; Djouadi, Seddik M; Charalambous, Prof. Charalambos

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the estimation and identification of time-varying wireless long-term fading channels. The dynamics of the fading channels are captured using a mean-reverting linear stochastic differential equation driven by a Brownian motion. Recursive estimation and identification algorithms solely from received signal strength data are developed. These algorithms are based on combining the particle filter (PF) with the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm that estimate and identify the power path-loss of the channel and its parameters, respectively. Numerical results are provided to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

  13. Particle identification with the TOP and ARICH detectors at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torassa, E.

    2016-07-01

    The SuperKEKB e+e- collider will provide 40 times higher instantaneous luminosity than the KEKB collider. The Belle II detector, located at the collision point, is the upgrade of the Belle detector. The particle identification will be improved by replacing the aerogel threshold counter with two new high performance Cherenkov detectors: the time-of-propagation (TOP) in the barrel region and the focusing aerogel (ARICH) in the forward region. The time-of-propagation sub-detector consists of quartz radiator bars and micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes. The Cherenkov photons are produced and propagated through the quartz radiator, and after multiple internal reflections they are detected by the photomultiplier tubes. Photons with different Cherenkov angles reach different photomultiplier channels and arrive at different times. The time and the position convolution is used for the reconstruction of the Cherenkov angle. The focusing aerogel consists of a double layer aerogel radiator, an expansion volume and a photon detector. The aerogel thickness and the refractive indices of the two layers are optimized to focus the two light cones at the detection surface. The key features of these two detectors, the performance studies, and the construction progress are presented.

  14. Identification of Silver and Palladium in Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    van Rooyen, Y. J.; Lillo, T. M.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2014-03-01

    Evidence of the release of certain metallic fission product through intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles has been seen for decades around the world, as well as in the recent AGR-1 experiment at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). However, understanding the basic mechanism of transport is still lacking. This understanding is important because the TRISO coating is part of the high temperature gas reactor functional containment and critical for the safety strategy for licensing purposes. Our approach to identify fission products in irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM), has led to first-of-a-kind data at the nano-scale indicating the presence of silver at triple points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in the triple junctions. In this initial study, the silver was only identified in SiC grain boundaries and triple points on the edge of the SiC-IPyC interface up to a depth of approximately 0.5 um. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries. Additionally spherical nano-sized palladium rich precipitates were found inside the SiC grains. These nano-sized Pd precipitates were distributed up to a depth of 5 um away from the SiC-IPyC interlayer. No silver was found in the center of the micron-sized fission product precipitates using these techniques, although silver was found on the outer edge of one of the Pd-U-Si containing precipitates which was facing the IPyC layer. Only Pd-U containing precipitates were identified in the IPyC layer and no silver was identified in the IPyC layer. The identification of silver alongside the grain boundaries and the findings of Pd alongside grain boundaries as well as inside the grains, provide significant knowledge for understanding silver and palladium transport in TIRSO fuel, which has been

  15. Regional source identification using Lagrangian stochastic particle dispersion and HYSPLIT backward-trajectory models.

    PubMed

    Koracin, Darko; Vellore, Ramesh; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Watson, John G; Koracin, Julide; McCord, Travis; DuBois, David W; Chen, L W Antony; Kumar, Naresh; Knipping, Eladio M; Wheeler, Neil J M; Craig, Kenneth; Reid, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the capabilities of the receptor-oriented inverse mode Lagrangian Stochastic Particle Dispersion Model (LSPDM) with the 12-km resolution Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) wind field input for the assessment of source identification from seven regions impacting two receptors located in the eastern United States. The LSPDM analysis was compared with a standard version of the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) single-particle backward-trajectory analysis using inputs from MM5 and the Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) with horizontal grid resolutions of 12 and 80 km, respectively. The analysis included four 7-day summertime events in 2002; residence times in the modeling domain were computed from the inverse LSPDM runs and HYPSLIT-simulated backward trajectories started from receptor-source heights of 100, 500, 1000, 1500, and 3000 m. Statistics were derived using normalized values of LSPDM- and HYSPLIT-predicted residence times versus Community Multiscale Air Quality model-predicted sulfate concentrations used as baseline information. From 40 cases considered, the LSPDM identified first- and second-ranked emission region influences in 37 cases, whereas HYSPLIT-MM5 (HYSPLIT-EDAS) identified the sources in 21 (16) cases. The LSPDM produced a higher overall correlation coefficient (0.89) compared with HYSPLIT (0.55-0.62). The improvement of using the LSPDM is also seen in the overall normalized root mean square error values of 0.17 for LSPDM compared with 0.30-0.32 for HYSPLIT. The HYSPLIT backward trajectories generally tend to underestimate near-receptor sources because of a lack of stochastic dispersion of the backward trajectories and to overestimate distant sources because of a lack of treatment of dispersion. Additionally, the HYSPLIT backward trajectories showed a lack of consistency in the results obtained from different single vertical levels for starting the backward trajectories. To

  16. On the factors governing the abundance of oxalic acid in tropospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Neusuess, C.; Brüggemann, E.; Gnauk, T.; Müller, K.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Oxalic acid is frequently observed as one of the most abundant single organic compounds in tropospheric particles. Its sources are commonly believed to be of secondary nature. In state-of-the-art multiphase chemistry models, different pathways exist, which can lead to oxalic acid as final product. Anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions can be photochemically degraded to glyoxal and methyglyoxal, which - after partitioning into deliquescent particles or cloud droplets - are further oxidized via glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid [Herrmann et al., 2005]. A biogenic oxidation pathway starts with isoprene or monoterpene emissions and leads to glycolaldehyde and methylglyoxal via methacrolein and methylvinylketone, followed by aqueous phase oxalic acid formation [Lim et al., 2005]. As suggested by Warneck, 2003, a marine pathway might exist, starting from marine ethene emissions and leading via glycolaldehyde to oxalic acid. The aim of this study was to elucidate from field measurements the importance of each of these pathways. To this aim, oxalic acid concentrations from 144 size-resolved particle samples (5-stage Berner impactor) from different continental and coastal European sampling sites were statistically analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). Hourly back trajectories were calculated for each sampling interval using the HYSPLIT model [Draxler and Rolph, 2003] and combined in a novel way with global land cover data to yield “residence times” of the sampled air masses above urban, agricultural, forested, and oceanic areas. These residence times served as quantitative proxies for different emission regimes (anthropogenic, biogenic, marine) in the statistical analysis. Additionally, meteorological parameters such as sunflux along the trajectories or mixing layer depth at the sampling site were retrieved from the HYSPLIT output. PCA of the continental dataset retrieved two factors that were connected to the oxalic acid concentrations. A first one showed high

  17. Heterogeneous Reactivity of Nitric Acid with Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol: Large Differences Observed between and within Individual Particles.

    PubMed

    Ault, Andrew P; Guasco, Timothy L; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Ryder, Olivia S; Trueblood, Jonathan V; Collins, Douglas B; Ruppel, Matthew J; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2014-08-01

    Current climate and atmospheric chemistry models assume that all sea spray particles react as if they are pure NaCl. However, recent studies of sea spray aerosol particles have shown that distinct particle types exist (including sea salt, organic carbon, and biological particles) as well as mixtures of these and, within each particle type, there is a range of single-particle chemical compositions. Because of these differences, individual particles should display a range of reactivities with trace atmospheric gases. Herein, to address this, we study the composition of individual sea spray aerosol particles after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid. As expected, a replacement reaction of chloride with nitrate is observed; however, there is a large range of reactivities spanning from no reaction to complete reaction between and within individual sea spray aerosol particles. These data clearly support the need for laboratory studies of individual, environmentally relevant particles to improve our fundamental understanding as to the properties that determine reactivity.

  18. Particle acceleration for delivery deoxyribonucleic acid vaccine into skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinglong, Yu; Xiwen, Zhang; Yuan, Wang; Junshi, Xie; Pengfei, Hao

    2001-08-01

    Skin represents an important immunogenic inductive site, 3%-4% epidermis cells are special antigen-presenting cells. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine can elicit vigorous immune responses in epidermis cells. The means of delivering DNA vaccine into epidermis cells becomes an important step in DNA vaccine applications. This article presents a new type of gene gun based on the principle of two-stage injector acceleration. DNA coated particles are attached on an screen-type carrier located at the negative pressure inlet, the particles will be sucked into the accelerating channel by negative pressure and be accelerated at a great speed. FLUENT, a computation fluid dynamic application software is used to simulate the flow condition of the injector. Distribution of Mach number, total pressure on exit cross section, and negative pressure on negative pressure inlet are analyzed, by which the process of acceleration of particles is determined. We also measured these parameters in this study. The data show that the particle velocity can be up to 500 m/s and the particles distribute evenly over a circle of Φ 20 mm. The numerical simulation results coincide with experimental data well. Therefore, the results of numerical simulation can be served as guidance for an optimal design of the gene gun and for practical operations. When gene coated particles are distributed evenly, they can penetrate into or even through epidermis cells where the gene can be expressed and subsequently elicits host immune responses. This device may be evaluated in human objects in future.

  19. Free fatty acid particles in protein formulations, part 2: contribution of polysorbate raw material.

    PubMed

    Siska, Christine C; Pierini, Christopher J; Lau, Hollis R; Latypov, Ramil F; Fesinmeyer, R Matthew; Litowski, Jennifer R

    2015-02-01

    Polysorbate 20 (PS20) is a nonionic surfactant frequently used to stabilize protein biopharmaceuticals. During the development of mAb formulations containing PS20, small clouds of particles were observed in solutions stored in vials. The degree of particle formation was dependent on PS20 concentration. The particles were characterized by reversed-phase HPLC after dissolution and labeling with the fluorescent dye 1-pyrenyldiazomethane. The analysis showed that the particles consisted of free fatty acids (FFAs), with the distribution of types consistent with those found in the PS20 raw material. Protein solutions formulated with polysorbate 80, a chemically similar nonionic surfactant, showed a substantial delay in particle formation over time compared with PS20. Multiple lots of polysorbates were evaluated for FFA levels, each exhibiting differences based on polysorbate type and lot. Polysorbates purchased in more recent years show a greater distribution and quantity of FFA and also a greater propensity to form particles. This work shows that the quality control of polysorbate raw materials could play an important role in biopharmaceutical product quality.

  20. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic acids in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-10-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual organic acids were determined in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou. The δ 13C values of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 20-C 28) varied from -34.1‰ to -32.4‰ and tended to be heavier in summer and lighter in winter. These δ 13C values indicate that high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids were derived mainly from emission by C 3 plants. Reduced biological synthesis of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids in winter may be the reason for the light carbon isotopic composition. The δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 10-C 18) changed from -31.7‰ to -30.3‰ and exhibited a reverse seasonal trend, i.e., heavier in winter and lighter in summer. Slightly heavier δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids than those of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids suggested that they may be emitted from blended sources, e.g., anthropogenic sources and vegetation waxes. Lighter δ 13C values in summer may be attributed to relatively low anthropogenic sources and high botanic sources in summer. Dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids have been proposed as secondary products from photochemical degradation. The average δ 13C values of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were heavier, and ranged from -25.2‰ to -22.9‰ and from -30.0‰ to -27.6‰, respectively. Both dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids displayed the same temporal variations in the δ 13C values, i.e., negative δ 13C in the summer samples and positive in the winter samples, which may be controlled by photochemical reactions; they are generally severe in winter in Guangzhou under the monsoon weather system. The heaviest δ 13C values were observed in dicarboxylic acids, indicating that dicarboxylic acids were formed by fast and more complete oxidation reactions. These results indicate that the stable carbon isotopic composition of organic acids may provide important information about sources and

  1. Spectroscopic Evidence of Keto-enol Tautomerism in Deliquesced Malonic Acid Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Suman; Laskin, Alexander; Tivanski, Alexei V.

    2011-04-11

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy combined with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and optical microscopy coupled with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (micro-FTIR) have been applied to observe hygroscopic growth and chemical changes in malonic acid particles deposited on substrates. Extent of the hygroscopic growth of particles has been quantified in terms of the corresponding water-to-solute ratios (WSR) based on STXM/NEXAFS and micro-FTIR data sets. WSR values derived separately from two applied methods displayed a remarkable agreement with previous data reported in the literature. Comparison of NEXAFS and FTIR spectra acquired at different relative humidity (RH) shows efficient keto-enol tautomerization of malonic acid, with the enol form dominated at higher RH. The keto-enol equilibrium constants were calculated using relevant peak intensities in the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS spectra as a function of RH.

  2. Comparison of the composition and gas/particle partitioning of organic acids in monoterpene and isoprene dominated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Gas and particle-phase organic acids measurements from two different regions with different biogenic volatile organic compound emissions are used to understand gas/particle partitioning principles. A Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), with acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion was used to selectively detect acids. Hundreds of gas and particle-phase organic acids were measured in both locations, a monoterpene and MBO-dominated environment (ponderosa pine forest in Colorado, BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011) and isoprene and terpene-dominated environment (mixed deciduous and pine forest in Alabama, SOAS 2013). Time series of gas/particle partitioning for ions consistent with tracers for isoprene oxidation such as methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and tracers for α-pinene oxidation such as pinic and pinonic acid will be presented. Gas/particle partitioning, represented as the fraction of each species in the particle-phase, Fp, was calculated for C1-C18 alkanoic acids and biogenic VOC oxidation tracers and compared to an absorptive partitioning model. These results are compared with those of two other instruments that can also quantify gas/particle partitioning with high time resolution: a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG) and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS). Data from both environments were consistent with the values and trends predicted by the absorptive partitioning model for the tracer acids. However, for low carbon number alkanoic acids we report a higher fraction in the particle phase than predicted by the model. The Fp for the bulk-averaged acids and its relationship to the degree of oxidation and carbon number will also be presented. Temporal patterns and correlations with atmospheric conditions and composition will be explored for individual and bulk acids. We will discuss atmospheric implications of the gas/particle partitioning

  3. Molecular understanding of sulphuric acid-amine particle nucleation in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Praplan, Arnaud P; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Henschel, Henning; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kurtén, Theo; Kvashin, Alexander N; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Leppä, Johannes; Loukonen, Ville; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; McGrath, Matthew J; Nieminen, Tuomo; Olenius, Tinja; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Sarnela, Nina; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Seinfeld, John H; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjo; Virtanen, Annele; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kirkby, Jasper

    2013-10-17

    Nucleation of aerosol particles from trace atmospheric vapours is thought to provide up to half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Aerosols can cause a net cooling of climate by scattering sunlight and by leading to smaller but more numerous cloud droplets, which makes clouds brighter and extends their lifetimes. Atmospheric aerosols derived from human activities are thought to have compensated for a large fraction of the warming caused by greenhouse gases. However, despite its importance for climate, atmospheric nucleation is poorly understood. Recently, it has been shown that sulphuric acid and ammonia cannot explain particle formation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. It is thought that amines may enhance nucleation, but until now there has been no direct evidence for amine ternary nucleation under atmospheric conditions. Here we use the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN and find that dimethylamine above three parts per trillion by volume can enhance particle formation rates more than 1,000-fold compared with ammonia, sufficient to account for the particle formation rates observed in the atmosphere. Molecular analysis of the clusters reveals that the faster nucleation is explained by a base-stabilization mechanism involving acid-amine pairs, which strongly decrease evaporation. The ion-induced contribution is generally small, reflecting the high stability of sulphuric acid-dimethylamine clusters and indicating that galactic cosmic rays exert only a small influence on their formation, except at low overall formation rates. Our experimental measurements are well reproduced by a dynamical model based on quantum chemical calculations of binding energies of molecular clusters, without any fitted parameters. These results show that, in regions of the atmosphere near amine sources, both amines and sulphur dioxide should be considered when assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on particle formation. PMID:24097350

  4. Molecular understanding of sulphuric acid-amine particle nucleation in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Praplan, Arnaud P; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Henschel, Henning; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kurtén, Theo; Kvashin, Alexander N; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Leppä, Johannes; Loukonen, Ville; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; McGrath, Matthew J; Nieminen, Tuomo; Olenius, Tinja; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Sarnela, Nina; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Seinfeld, John H; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjo; Virtanen, Annele; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kirkby, Jasper

    2013-10-17

    Nucleation of aerosol particles from trace atmospheric vapours is thought to provide up to half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Aerosols can cause a net cooling of climate by scattering sunlight and by leading to smaller but more numerous cloud droplets, which makes clouds brighter and extends their lifetimes. Atmospheric aerosols derived from human activities are thought to have compensated for a large fraction of the warming caused by greenhouse gases. However, despite its importance for climate, atmospheric nucleation is poorly understood. Recently, it has been shown that sulphuric acid and ammonia cannot explain particle formation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. It is thought that amines may enhance nucleation, but until now there has been no direct evidence for amine ternary nucleation under atmospheric conditions. Here we use the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN and find that dimethylamine above three parts per trillion by volume can enhance particle formation rates more than 1,000-fold compared with ammonia, sufficient to account for the particle formation rates observed in the atmosphere. Molecular analysis of the clusters reveals that the faster nucleation is explained by a base-stabilization mechanism involving acid-amine pairs, which strongly decrease evaporation. The ion-induced contribution is generally small, reflecting the high stability of sulphuric acid-dimethylamine clusters and indicating that galactic cosmic rays exert only a small influence on their formation, except at low overall formation rates. Our experimental measurements are well reproduced by a dynamical model based on quantum chemical calculations of binding energies of molecular clusters, without any fitted parameters. These results show that, in regions of the atmosphere near amine sources, both amines and sulphur dioxide should be considered when assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on particle formation.

  5. Identification of a novel system L amino acid transporter structurally distinct from heterodimeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ellappan; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Kim, Do Kyung; Iribe, Yuji; Tangtrongsup, Sahatchai; Jutabha, Promsuk; Li, Yuewei; Ahmed, Nesar; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Anzai, Naohiko; Nagamori, Seishi; Endou, Hitoshi

    2003-10-31

    A cDNA that encodes a novel Na+-independent neutral amino acid transporter was isolated from FLC4 human hepatocarcinoma cells by expression cloning. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the encoded protein designated LAT3 (L-type amino acid transporter 3) transported neutral amino acids such as l-leucine, l-isoleucine, l-valine, and l-phenylalanine. The LAT3-mediated transport was Na+-independent and inhibited by 2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, consistent with the properties of system L. Distinct from already known system L transporters LAT1 and LAT2, which form heterodimeric complex with 4F2 heavy chain, LAT3 was functional by itself in Xenopus oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence of LAT3 was identical to the gene product of POV1 reported as a prostate cancer-up-regulated gene whose function was not determined, whereas it did not exhibit significant similarity to already identified transporters. The Eadie-Hofstee plots of LAT3-mediated transport were curvilinear, whereas the low affinity component is predominant at physiological plasma amino acid concentration. In addition to amino acid substrates, LAT3 recognized amino acid alcohols. The transport of l-leucine was electroneutral and mediated by a facilitated diffusion. In contrast, l-leucinol, l-valinol, and l-phenylalaninol, which have a net positive charge induced inward currents under voltage clamp, suggesting these compounds are transported by LAT3. LAT3-mediated transport was inhibited by the pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide, consistent with the property of system L2 originally characterized in hepatocyte primary culture. Based on the substrate selectivity, affinity, and N-ethylmaleimide sensitivity, LAT3 is proposed to be a transporter subserving system L2. LAT3 should denote a new family of organic solute transporters. PMID:12930836

  6. Ozonolysis of oleic acid adsorbed to polar and nonpolar aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Elias P; Garland, Eva R; Baer, Tomas

    2008-10-16

    Single-particle kinetic studies of the reaction between oleic acid and O 3 have been conducted on two different types of core particles: polystyrene latex (PSL) and silica. Oleic acid was found to adsorb to both particle types in multilayer islands that resulted in an adsorbed layer of a total volume estimated to be less than one monolayer. The rate of the surface reaction between surface-adsorbed oleic acid and O 3 has been shown for the first time to be influenced by the composition of the aerosol substrate in a mixed organic/inorganic particle. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism was applied to the observed dependence of the pseudo-first-order rate constant with [O 3], and the resulting fit parameters for the ozone partition coefficient ( K O 3 ) and maximum first order rate constant ( k 1,max ) suggest that the reaction proceeded faster on the less polar PSL core at lower [O 3] due to the increased residence time of O 3 on the PSL surface, but the reaction was ultimately more efficient on the silica surface at high [O 3]. Values for the uptake coefficient, gamma oleic , for reaction of oleic acid on PSL spheres decrease from 2.5 x 10 (-5) to 1 x 10 (-5) with increasing [O 3] from 4 to 25 ppm and overlap at high [O 3] with the estimated values for gamma oleic on silica, which decrease from 1.6 x 10 (-5) to 1.3 x 10 (-5). The relationship between gamma oleic and the more common expression for gamma O 3 is discussed.

  7. Acid-Degradable Cationic Dextran Particles for the Delivery of siRNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jessica L.; Schubert, Stephanie; Wich, Peter R.; Cui, Lina; Cohen, Joel A.; Mynar, Justin L.; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2011-01-01

    We report a new acid-sensitive, biocompatible and biodegradable microparticulate delivery system, spermine modified acetalated-dextran (Spermine-Ac-DEX), which can be used to efficiently encapsulate siRNA. These particles demonstrated efficient gene knockdown in HeLa-luc cells with minimal toxicity. This knockdown was comparable to that obtained using Lipofectamine, a commercially available transfection reagent generally limited to in vitro use due to its high toxicity. PMID:21539393

  8. Identification of Organic Sulfate Esters in d-Limonene Ozonolysis SOA Under Acidic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Y.; Mueller, C.; Boege, O.; Herrmann, H.

    2006-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) components from gas phase ozonolysis of d-limonene were investigated in a series of indoor chamber experiments. The compounds smaller than 300 Da were quantified using capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry (CE/ESI-ITMS). HPLC coupled to an ESI-TOFMS and an ESI-ITMS was used for structural study of dimmers and oligomers. Only 10% of the produced SOA could be attributed to low molecular weight carboxylic acids (Mw<300). The oxidation products which have molecular weights over 300 were detected regardless of the seed particle acidity but the concentrations of these compounds were much higher for acidic seed particle experiments. Strong signals of the compounds with mass to charge ratios (m/z) 281, 465 and 481 were detected when sulphuric acid was used in the seed particles. These compounds showed a strong fragment of m/z 97 in MS2 or MS3 spectra indicating the presence of sulfate in the structures. HPLC/ESI-TOFMS analysis suggests the elemental compositions of C10H17O7S-, C20H33O10S- and C20H33O11S- for m/z 281, 465 and 481, respectively. Based on MS^{n} and TOFMS results, they are most likely organic sulfate esters, possibly formed by a heterogeneous acid catalyzed reaction of a limonene oxidation product and sulfuric acid in the particle phase. The concentrations of the organic sulfate ester were as high as 3.7 μgm-3 for m/z 281.

  9. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  10. Identification of thermophilic proteins by incorporating evolutionary and acid dissociation information into Chou's general pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guo-Liang; Liu, Yan-Ling; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-21

    Thermophilic proteins can thrive stalely at the high temperatures. Identification of thermophilic protein could be helpful to learn the function of protein. Automated prediction of thermophilic protein is an important tool for genome annotation. In this work, a powerful predictor is proposed by combining amino acid composition, evolutionary information, and acid dissociation constant. The overall prediction accuracy of 93.53% was obtained for using the algorithm of support vector machine. In order to check the performance of our method, two low-similarity independent testing datasets are used to test the proposed method. Comparisons with other methods show that the prediction results were better than other existing methods in literature. This indicates that our approach was effective to predict thermophilic proteins. PMID:27396359

  11. Hygroscopic properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the boreal forest: diurnal variation, solubility and the influence of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Aufmhoff, H.; Aalto, P.; Hämeri, K.; Arnold, F.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Freshly formed atmospheric aerosol particles are neither large enough to efficiently scatter incoming solar radiation nor able to act as cloud condensation nuclei. As the particles grow larger, their hygroscopicity determines the limiting size after which they are important in both of the aforementioned processes. The condensing species resulting in growth alter the hygroscopicity of the particles. We have measured hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles present in a boreal forest, along with the very hygroscopic atmospheric trace gas sulfuric acid. The focus was on days with new particle formation by nucleation. The measured hygroscopic growth factors (GF) correlated positively with gaseous phase sulfuric acid concentrations. This correlation had a strong size dependency; the smaller the particle, the more condensing sulfuric acid is bound to alter the GF due to initially smaller mass. In addition, water uptake of nucleation mode particles was monitored during new particle formation events and followed during their growth to Aitken mode sizes. As the modal diameter increased, the solubility of the particles decreased. This indicated that initially more hygroscopic particles transformed into less hygroscopic or even hydrophobic particles. A similar behavior was seen also during days with no particle formation, with GF decreasing during the evenings and increasing during early morning. This can be tentatively explained by day- and nighttime differences in the hygroscopicity of condensable vapors.

  12. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles.

  13. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles. PMID:26302857

  14. Aerosol products, mechanisms, and kinetics of heterogeneous reactions of ozone with oleic acid in pure and mixed particles.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    Reactions of O3 with pure and mixed oleic acid particles and bulk solutions were investigated using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer. The results provide information on the effect of particle matrix on reaction products, mechanisms, and kinetics. The major aerosol products are alpha-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxides, secondary ozonides, alpha-alkoxyalkyl hydroperoxides, and oxocarboxylic acids formed primarily through reactions of Criegee intermediates with products or with particle matrix compounds. For example, it is estimated that for the reaction of pure oleic acid particles with O3 the aerosol products consist of approximately 68% organic peroxides, 28% 9-oxononanoic acid, and 4% azelaic acid. Although the reaction rate of pure oleic acid particles corresponds to an atmospheric lifetime of minutes, reactions in liquid/solid particle matrices can be orders of magnitude slower. The peroxide products are relatively stable when exposed to matrices typical of atmospheric particles, indicating that the lifetimes of these compounds in the atmosphere may be long enough to allow for long-range transport.

  15. Sialic Acid-Imprinted Fluorescent Core-Shell Particles for Selective Labeling of Cell Surface Glycans.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Sudhirkumar; El-Schich, Zahra; Malakpour, Atena; Wan, Wei; Dizeyi, Nishtman; Mohammadi, Reza; Rurack, Knut; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette; Sellergren, Börje

    2015-11-01

    The expression of cell surface glycans terminating with sialic acid (SA) residues has been found to correlate with various disease states there among cancer. We here report a novel strategy for specific fluorescence labeling of such motifs. This is based on sialic acid-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles equipped with nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) fluorescent reporter groups allowing environmentally sensitive fluorescence detection at convenient excitation and emission wavelengths. Imprinting was achieved exploiting a hybrid approach combining reversible boronate ester formation between p-vinylphenylboronic acid and SA, the introduction of cationic amine functionalities, and the use of an NBD-appended urea-monomer as a binary hydrogen-bond donor targeting the SA carboxylic acid and OH functionalities. The monomers were grafted from 200 nm RAFT-modified silica core particles using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linker resulting in a shell thickness of ca. 10 nm. The particles displayed strong affinity for SA in methanol/water mixtures (K = 6.6 × 10(5) M(-1) in 2% water, 5.9 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water, B(max) ≈ 10 μmol g(-1)), whereas binding of the competitor glucuronic acid (GA) and other monosaccharides was considerably weaker (K (GA) = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water). In cell imaging experiments, the particles selectively stained different cell lines in correlation with the SA expression level. This was further verified by enzymatic cleavage of SA and by staining using a FITC labeled SA selective lectin. PMID:26414878

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID BY ICP-MS AND IC-ESI-MS/MS IN RICE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, sulfur analogs of well known arsenicals have been identified in biological and dietary matrices. In this presentation, the detection and identification of dimethylthioarsinic acid (DMTA) will be reported in rice samples after an enzymatic extraction. The enzymatic ext...

  17. The search for and identification of amino acids, nucleobases and nucleosides in samples returned from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, Charles W.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril; Kuo, Kenneth C.; Stalling, David L.; Zumwalt, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the returned Mars samples for biologically important organic compounds, with emphasis on amino acid, the puring and pyrimidine bases, and nucleosides is proposed. These studies would be conducted on subsurface samples obtained by drilling past the surface oxidizing layer with emphasis on samples containing the larges quantities of organic carbon as determined by the rover gas chromatographic mass spectrometer (GCMS). Extraction of these molecules from the returned samples will be performed using the hydrothermal extraction technique described by Cheng and Ponnamperuma. More rigorous extraction methods will be developed and evaluated. For analysis of the extract for free amino acids or amino acids present in a bound or peptidic form, aliquots will be analyzed by capillary GCMS both before and after hydrolysis with 6N hydrochloric acid. Establishment of the presence of amino acids would then lead to the next logical step which would be the use of chiral stationary gas chromatography phases to determine the enatiomeic composition of the amino acids present, and thus potentially establish their biotic or abiotic origin. Confirmational analyses for amino acids would include ion-exchange and reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis. For analyses of the returned Mars samples for nucleobases and nucleosides, affinity and reversed-phase liquid chromatography would be utilized. This technology coupled with scanning UV detection for identification, presents a powerful tool for nucleobase and nucleoside analysis. Mass spectrometric analysis of these compounds would confirm their presence in samples returned form Mars.

  18. Unravelling the properties of supported copper oxide: can the particle size induce acidic behaviour?

    PubMed

    Zaccheria, Federica; Scotti, Nicola; Marelli, Marcello; Psaro, Rinaldo; Ravasio, Nicoletta

    2013-02-01

    There is a renewed interest in designing solid acid catalysts particularly due to the significance of Lewis acid catalyzed processes such as Friedel-Crafts acylation and alkylation and cellulose hydrolysis for the development of sustainable chemistry. This paper reports a new focus point on the properties of supported CuO on silica, a material that up to now has been considered only as the precursor of an effective hydrogenation catalyst. Thus, it deals with a re-interpretation of some of our results with supported copper oxide aimed to unveil the root of acidic activity exhibited by this material, e.g. in alcoholysis reactions. Several techniques were used to highlight the very high dispersion of the oxide phase on the support allowing us to ascribe the acidic behavior to coordinative unsaturation of the very small CuO particles. In turn this unsaturation makes the CuO particles prone to coordinate surrounding molecules present in the reaction mixture and to exchange them according to their nucleophilicity. PMID:23207422

  19. Gas/particle partitioning behavior of perfluorocarboxylic acids with terrestrial aerosols.

    PubMed

    Arp, Hans Peter H; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2009-11-15

    Experimentally determined gas/particle partitioning constants, K(ip), using inverse gas chromatography (IGC) are presented for perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), covering a diverse set of terrestrial aerosols over an ambient range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The results are compared to estimated K(ip) values using a recently developed model that has been validated for diverse neutral and ionizable organic compounds. The modeling results consistently underestimate the experimental results. This is likely due to additional partition mechanisms unique for surfactants not being accounted for in the model, namely aggregate formation and water surface adsorption. These processes likely also biased the IGC K(ip) measurements compared to ambient PFCA concentrations. Nevertheless, both the experimental and modeling results indicate that partitioning to terrestrial particles in ambient atmospheres is negligible, though sorption to condensed water can be substantial. This favors rain sequestration as a more important atmospheric removal mechanism than dry particle sequestration. PFCAs found on particle filters during ambient sampling are thus accountable to vapor-phase PFCAs or aqueous-phase PFCAs sorbing directly to the filters, or the trapping of perfluorocarboxylate-salt particles. Further work on understanding the partitioning and speciation of PFCAs in atmospheric water droplets is needed to further quantify and understand their atmospheric behavior. To aid in this, a general RH dependent K(ip) model for surfactants is presented.

  20. Particle oxidation model of synthetic FeS and sediment acid-volatile sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Toro, D.M. di |; Mahony, J.D.; Gonzalez, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    A model is proposed for the kinetics of the oxidation of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS). It is based on a surface oxidation reaction that erodes the particle surface until the particle disappears. A monodisperse particle size distribution is assumed with a reaction rate that is proportional to the surface area remaining and a dimensional exponent that related the surface area to the particle volume. The model is fit to time course data from a number of experiments conducted using synthetic FeS at various pHs, oxygen concentrations, and ionic strengths. The reaction rate constants are modeled using a surface complexation model. It is based upon the formation of two activated surface complexes with molecular oxygen, one of which is charged. The complexation model provides a good fit to the variation of the reaction rate constant with respect to O{sub 2}, pH, temperature, and ionic strength. The dimensional exponent {nu} increases with pH from values characteristic of plates and needles to values reflecting more spherical particles, presumably due to coagulation. However the increase in {nu} with respect to O{sub 2} at high concentrations is unexplained.

  1. Diamine-sulfuric acid reactions are a potent source of new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Bachman, Ryan; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nucleation from sulfuric acid depends on the concentrations and the stabilizing effect of other trace gases, such as ammonia and amines. Diamines are an understudied class of atmospherically relevant compounds, and we examine how they affect sulfuric acid nucleation in both flow reactor experiments and the atmosphere. The number of particles produced from sulfuric acid and diamines in the flow reactor was equal to or greater than the number formed from monoamines, implying that diamines are more effective nucleating agents. Upper limits of diamine abundance were also monitored during three field campaigns: Lamont, OK (2013); Lewes, DE (2012); and Atlanta, GA (2009). Mixing ratios were measured as high as tens of parts per trillion by volume (GA and OK). Laboratory results suggest that diamines at these levels are important for atmospheric nucleation. Diamines likely participate in atmospheric nucleation and should be considered in nucleation measurements and models.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  3. Interactions of meteoric smoke particles with sulphuric acid in the Earth's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R. W.; Dhomse, S.; Tian, W. S.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) with iron-magnesium silicate compositions, formed in the upper mesosphere as a result of meteoric ablation, may remove sulphuric acid from the gas-phase above 40 km and may also affect the composition and behaviour of supercooled H2SO4-H2O droplets in the global stratospheric aerosol (Junge) layer. This study describes a time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the evolution of the ferric (Fe3+) ion originating from amorphous ferrous (Fe2+)-based silicate powders dissolved in varying Wt % sulphuric acid (30-75%) solutions over a temperature range of 223-295 K. Complete dissolution of the particles was observed under all conditions. The first-order rate coefficient for dissolution decreases at higher Wt % and lower temperature, which is consistent with the increased solution viscosity limiting diffusion of H2SO4 to the particle surfaces. Dissolution under stratospheric conditions should take less than a week, and is much faster than the dissolution of crystalline Fe2+ compounds. The chemistry climate model UMSLIMCAT (based on the UKMO Unified Model) was then used to study the transport of MSPs through the middle atmosphere. A series of model experiments were performed with different uptake coefficients. Setting the concentration of 1.5 nm radius MSPs at 80 km to 3000 cm-3 (based on rocket-borne charged particle measurements), the model matches the reported Wt % Fe values of 0.5-1.0 in Junge layer sulphate particles, and the MSP optical extinction between 40 and 75 km measured by a satellite-borne spectrometer, if the global meteoric input rate is about 20 t d-1. The model indicates that an uptake coefficient ≥0.01 is required to account for the observed two orders of magnitude depletion of H2SO4 vapour above 40 km.

  4. Interactions of meteoric smoke particles with sulphuric acid in the Earth's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R. W.; Dhomse, S.; Tian, W. S.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2012-05-01

    Nano-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) with iron-magnesium silicate compositions, formed in the upper mesosphere as a result of meteoric ablation, may remove sulphuric acid from the gas-phase above 40 km and may also affect the composition and behaviour of supercooled H2SO4-H2O droplets in the global stratospheric aerosol (Junge) layer. This study describes a time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the evolution of the ferric (Fe3+) ion originating from amorphous ferrous (Fe2+)-based silicate powders dissolved in varying Wt % sulphuric acid (30-75 %) solutions over a temperature range of 223-295 K. Complete dissolution of the particles was observed under all conditions. The first-order rate coefficient for dissolution decreases at higher Wt % and lower temperature, which is consistent with the increased solution viscosity limiting diffusion of H2SO4 to the particle surfaces. Dissolution under stratospheric conditions should take less than a week, and is much faster than the dissolution of crystalline Fe2+ compounds. The chemistry climate model UMSLIMCAT (based on the UKMO Unified Model) was then used to study the transport of MSPs through the middle atmosphere. A series of model experiments were performed with different uptake coefficients. Setting the concentration of 1.5 nm radius MSPs at 80 km to 3000 cm-3 (based on rocket-borne charged particle measurements), the model matches the reported Wt % Fe values of 0.5-1.0 in Junge layer sulphate particles, and the MSP optical extinction between 40 and 75 km measured by a satellite-borne spectrometer, if the global meteoric input rate is about 20 tonnes per day. The model indicates that an uptake coefficient ≥0.01 is required to account for the observed two orders of magnitude depletion of H2SO4 vapour above 40 km.

  5. Teicoplanin bonded sub-2 μm superficially porous particles for enantioseparation of native amino acids.

    PubMed

    Min, Yi; Sui, Zhigang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-10-10

    Superficially porous particles (SPPs) demonstrate superior efficiency than totally porous particles in chiral separations. In order to obtain high efficiency and fast separation, sub-2 μm SPPs with high surface area are synthesized, and with teicoplanin bonded, such materials are successfully applied into the rapid enantioseparation of native amino acids. In brief, 1.27 ± 0.06 μm nonporous silica particles are prepared by a modified seeded growth method, followed by mesoporous shell fabrication via one-pot templated dissolution and redeposition strategy, and pore size expansion via acid-refluxing. The diameter of the formed SPPs is 1.49 ± 0.04 μm, with the shell thickness as 206 nm. Nitrogen physisorption experiments show that the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area is 213.6 m(2)/g and pore size is 9 nm. After teicoplanin derivatization with bonding capacity as 83.3 μmol/g, the prepared chiral stationary phase is packed into a stainless steel tube with the geometry of 50 mm × 2.1 mm i.d.. In less than 6.4 min, six native amino acids (norleucine, alanine, valine, methionine, leucine, norvaline) are enantioseparated with resolution factors ranging from 1.9 to 5.0. Besides, the resolution for chiral separation is improved with ethanol-water instead of methanol-water as the mobile phase. Moreover, the low temperature gives higher resolution, but longer retention time and higher backpressure. Finally, the effect of flow rate on enantiomeric separation is studied and fast chiral separation within 1 min is obtained with flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. All these results show that the synthesized teicoplanin bonded sub-2 μm SPPs have great potential to achieve the enantioseparation of native amino acids with high resolution and rapid speed. PMID:26073115

  6. Ameloglyphics: A possible forensic tool for person identification following high temperature and acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Manjushree; Juneja, Saurabh; Rakesh, Nagaraju; Bhoomareddy Kantharaj, Yashoda Devi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Forensic odontology is a branch that is evolving over time and has opened newer avenues that may help in the identification of individuals. Tooth prints are the enamel rod end patterns on tooth surface and they are considered as a hard tissue analog to fingerprints. Teeth have the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, and decomposition, and may be used as a forensic evidence. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate if the tooth prints could be used for an individual's identification and reproducibility and permanency of these tooth prints after exposing the teeth to acid and various degrees of temperature. Materials and Methods: 90 tooth prints from 20 freshly extracted maxillary premolar teeth were obtained. Cellophane tape technique was used to record enamel rod end patterns on tooth surface. Ten teeth (one from each patient) were immersed in 36.46% hydrochloric acid and the tooth prints were obtained at various intervals (5 min, 10 min, and 20 min). The other 10 teeth (one from each patient) were incinerated and impression was made at various intervals (80° C, 400° C, 600° C, and 750° C). Tooth prints obtained from different teeth (total of 90 tooth prints) were analyzed using Verifinger® standard SDK version 5.0 software. Results: All the 20 original tooth prints were distinct from each other and no inter-individual or intra-individual similarity was found. The tooth prints from the same tooth after it was exposed to acid or heat were reproducible and showed high to very high similarity with the original tooth print of that particular tooth stored in the database. Conclusion: Tooth prints may be used as an effective aid in person identification even in adverse conditions such as burn and acid attack injuries. PMID:27051220

  7. Aerosol pH buffering in the southeastern US: Fine particles remain highly acidic despite large reductions in sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Guo, H.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    pH is a critical aerosol property that impacts many atmospheric processes, including biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation, gas-particle phase partitioning, and mineral dust or redox metal mobilization. Particle pH has also been linked to adverse health effects. Using a comprehensive data set from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) as the basis for thermodynamic modeling, we have shown that particles are currently highly acidic in the southeastern US, with pH between 0 and 2. Sulfate and ammonium are the main acid-base components that determine particle pH in this region, however they have different sources and their concentrations are changing. Over 15 years of network data show that sulfur dioxide emission reductions have resulted in a roughly 70 percent decrease in sulfate, whereas ammonia emissions, mainly link to agricultural activities, have been largely steady, as have gas phase ammonia concentrations. This has led to the view that particles are becoming more neutralized. However, sensitivity analysis, based on thermodynamic modeling, to changing sulfate concentrations indicates that particles have remained highly acidic over the past decade, despite the large reductions in sulfate. Furthermore, anticipated continued reductions of sulfate and relatively constant ammonia emissions into the future will not significantly change particle pH until sulfate drops to clean continental background levels. The result reshapes our expectation of future particle pH and implies that atmospheric processes and adverse health effects linked to particle acidity will remain unchanged for some time into the future.

  8. One-Pot Procedure for Recovery of Gallic Acid from Wastewater and Encapsulation within Protein Particles.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2016-02-24

    A whey protein isolate solution was heat-denatured and treated with the enzyme transglutaminase, which cross-linked ≈26% of the amino groups and increased the magnitude of the ζ-potential value. The protein solution was microemulsified, and then the resulting water-in-oil microemulsion was dispersed within a gallic acid-rich model wastewater. Gallic acid extraction by the outlined microemulsion liquid membrane (MLM) from the exterior aqueous phase (wastewater) and accumulation within the internal aqueous nanodroplets induced protein cold-set gelation and resulted in the formation of gallic acid-enveloping nanoparticles. Measurements with a strain-controlled rheometer indicated a progressive increase in the MLM viscosity during gallic acid recovery corresponding to particle formation. The mean hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles made from the heat-denatured and preheated enzymatically cross-linked proteins was 137 and 122 nm, respectively. The enzymatic cross-linking of whey proteins led to a higher gallic acid recovery yield and increased the glass transition enthalpy and temperature. A similar impact on glass transition indices was observed by the gallic acid-induced nanoparticulation of proteins. Scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of numerous jammed/fused nanoparticles. It was suggested on the basis of the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the in situ nanoparticulation of proteins shifted the C-N stretching and C-H bending peaks to higher wavenumbers. X-ray diffraction results proposed a decreased β-sheet content for proteins because of the acid-induced particulation. The nanoparticles made from the enzymatically cross-linked protein were more stable against the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and retained almost 19% of the entrapped gallic acid after 300 min sequential gastric and intestinal digestions. PMID:26862880

  9. One-Pot Procedure for Recovery of Gallic Acid from Wastewater and Encapsulation within Protein Particles.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2016-02-24

    A whey protein isolate solution was heat-denatured and treated with the enzyme transglutaminase, which cross-linked ≈26% of the amino groups and increased the magnitude of the ζ-potential value. The protein solution was microemulsified, and then the resulting water-in-oil microemulsion was dispersed within a gallic acid-rich model wastewater. Gallic acid extraction by the outlined microemulsion liquid membrane (MLM) from the exterior aqueous phase (wastewater) and accumulation within the internal aqueous nanodroplets induced protein cold-set gelation and resulted in the formation of gallic acid-enveloping nanoparticles. Measurements with a strain-controlled rheometer indicated a progressive increase in the MLM viscosity during gallic acid recovery corresponding to particle formation. The mean hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles made from the heat-denatured and preheated enzymatically cross-linked proteins was 137 and 122 nm, respectively. The enzymatic cross-linking of whey proteins led to a higher gallic acid recovery yield and increased the glass transition enthalpy and temperature. A similar impact on glass transition indices was observed by the gallic acid-induced nanoparticulation of proteins. Scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of numerous jammed/fused nanoparticles. It was suggested on the basis of the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the in situ nanoparticulation of proteins shifted the C-N stretching and C-H bending peaks to higher wavenumbers. X-ray diffraction results proposed a decreased β-sheet content for proteins because of the acid-induced particulation. The nanoparticles made from the enzymatically cross-linked protein were more stable against the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and retained almost 19% of the entrapped gallic acid after 300 min sequential gastric and intestinal digestions.

  10. Sedimentation field-flow fractionation for characterization of citric acid-modified Hβ zeolite particles: Effect of particle dispersion and carrier composition.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Bai, Guoyi; Ding, Liang; Li, Yueqiu; Lee, Seungho

    2015-11-27

    In this study, sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was, for the first time, applied for determination of size distribution of Hβ zeolite particles modified by citric acid (CA-Hβ). Effects of the particle dispersion and the carrier liquid composition (type of dispersing reagent (surfactant) and salt added in the carrier liquid, ionic strength, and pH) on SdFFF elution behavior of CA-Hβ zeolite particles were systematically investigated. Also the SdFFF separation efficiency of the particles was discussed in terms of the forces such as van der Waals, hydrophobic, and induced-dipole interactions. Results reveal that the type of salt and pH of the carrier liquid significantly affect the SdFFF separation efficiency of the zeolite particles. It was found that addition of a salt (NaN3) into the carrier liquid affects the characteristic of the SdFFF channel surface. It was found that the use of an acidic medium (pH 3.2) leads to a particle-channel interaction, while the use of a basic medium (pH 10.6) promotes an inter-particle hydrophobic interaction. Result from SdFFF was compared with those from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). It seems that, once the experimental conditions are optimized, SdFFF becomes a valuable tool for size characterization of the zeolite particles.

  11. Contribution of ants in modifying of soil acidity and particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgun, Alexandra; Golichenkov, Maxim

    2015-04-01

    Being a natural body, formed by the influence of biota on the upper layers of the Earth's crust, the soil is the most striking example of biogenic-abiogenic interactions in the biosphere. Invertebrates (especially ants that build soil nests) are important agents that change soil properties in well developed terrestrial ecosystems. Impact of soil microorganisms on soil properties is particularly described in numerous literature and concerns mainly chemical properties and general indicators of soil biological activity. Influence of ants (as representatives of the soil mesofauna) mostly appears as mechanical movement of soil particles and aggregates, and chemical effects caused by concentration of organic matter within the ant's nest. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of ants on physical and chemical soil attributes such as particle size distribution and soil acidity. The samples were taken from aerial parts of Lasius niger nests, selected on different elements of the relief (summit position, slope, terrace and floodplain) in the Arkhangelsk region (north of the European part of Russia) and compared with the specimens of the upper horizons of the reference soils. Particle size distribution was determined by laser diffraction method using laser diffraction particle size analyzer «Analysette 22 comfort» (FRITSCH, Germany). The acidity (pH) was determined by potentiometry in water suspension. Particle size distribution of the samples from the nests is more variable as compared to the control samples. For example, the content of 5-10 μm fraction ranges from 9% to 12% in reference soils, while in the anthill samples the variation is from 8% to 15%. Similarly, for 50-250 μm fraction - it ranges from 15% to 18% in reference soils, whereas in anthills - from 6% to 29%. The results of particle size analysis showed that the reference sample on the terrace has silty loam texture and nests soil L. niger are medium loam. The reference soil on the slope is

  12. Particle concentration measurement of virus samples using electrospray differential mobility analysis and quantitative amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Kenneth D; Pease, Leonard F; Tsai, De-Hao; Singh, Tania; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt A; Wang, Lili

    2009-07-24

    Virus reference materials are needed to develop and calibrate detection devices and instruments. We used electrospray differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) and quantitative amino acid analysis (AAA) to determine the particle concentration of three small model viruses (bacteriophages MS2, PP7, and phiX174). The biological activity, purity, and aggregation of the virus samples were measured using plaque assays, denaturing gel electrophoresis, and size-exclusion chromatography. ES-DMA was developed to count the virus particles using gold nanoparticles as internal standards. ES-DMA additionally provides quantitative measurement of the size and extent of aggregation in the virus samples. Quantitative AAA was also used to determine the mass of the viral proteins in the pure virus samples. The samples were hydrolyzed and the masses of the well-recovered amino acids were used to calculate the equivalent concentration of viral particles in the samples. The concentration of the virus samples determined by ES-DMA was in good agreement with the concentration predicted by AAA for these purified samples. The advantages and limitations of ES-DMA and AAA to characterize virus reference materials are discussed.

  13. Photochemical reactions of divalent mercury with thioglycolic acid: formation of mercuric sulfide particles.

    PubMed

    Si, Lin; Ariya, Parisa A

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a key toxic global pollutant. Studies in aquatic environment have suggested that thiols could be important for mercury speciation. Thioglycolic acid has been detected in various natural water systems and used as a model compound to study the complicated interaction between mercury and polyfunctional dissolved organic matter (DOM). We herein presented the first evidence for mercury particle formation during kinetic and product studies on the photochemistry of divalent mercury (Hg(2+)) with thioglycolic acid at near environmental conditions. Mercuric sulfide (HgS) particles formed upon photolysis were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry and select area electron diffraction. Kinetic data were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometry and cold vapour atomic fluorescent spectrometry. The apparent first-order reaction rate constant under our experimental conditions was calculated to be (2.3±0.4)×10(-5) s(-1) at T=296±2 K and pH 4.0. It was found that (89±3)% of the reactants undergo photoreduction to generate elemental mercury (Hg(0)). The effects of ionic strengths, pH and potassium ion were also investigated. The formation of HgS particles pointed to the possible involvement of heterogeneous processes. Our kinetic results indicated the importance of weak binding sites on DOM to Hg in photoreduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0). The potential implications of our data on environmental mercury transformation were discussed.

  14. Identification of diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol containing 11,12,13-trihydroxy-9,14-octadecadienoic acid in castor oil.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiann-Tsyh; Chen, Grace Q

    2011-02-28

    Castor oil has many industrial uses. Molecular species of acylglycerols containing monohydroxy, dihydroxy and trihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil have been reported. We report here the identification of acylglycerols containing a triOH18:2 fatty acid in castor oil. The structure of this novel fatty acid was proposed as 11,12,13-trihydroxy-9,14-octadecadienoic acid by the mass spectrometry of the lithiated adducts of acylglycerols in the HPLC fractions of castor oil. The fragmentation pathways of the lithiated adduct of 11,12,13-trihydroxy-9,14-octadecadienoic acid were proposed. We also proposed the biosynthetic pathways of polyhydroxy fatty acids in castor.

  15. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  16. Qualitative identification of carboxylic acids, boronic acids, and amines using cruciform fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Schwaebel, Thimon; Lirag, Rio Carlo; Davey, Evan A; Lim, Jaebum; Bunz, Uwe H F; Miljanić, Ognjen Š

    2013-01-01

    Molecular cruciforms are X-shaped systems in which two conjugation axes intersect at a central core. If one axis of these molecules is substituted with electron-donors, and the other with electron-acceptors, cruciforms' HOMO will localize along the electron-rich and LUMO along the electron-poor axis. This spatial isolation of cruciforms' frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) is essential to their use as sensors, since analyte binding to the cruciform invariably changes its HOMO-LUMO gap and the associated optical properties. Using this principle, Bunz and Miljanić groups developed 1,4-distyryl-2,5-bis(arylethynyl)benzene and benzobisoxazole cruciforms, respectively, which act as fluorescent sensors for metal ions, carboxylic acids, boronic acids, phenols, amines, and anions. The emission colors observed when these cruciform are mixed with analytes are highly sensitive to the details of analyte's structure and - because of cruciforms' charge-separated excited states - to the solvent in which emission is observed. Structurally closely related species can be qualitatively distinguished within several analyte classes: (a) carboxylic acids; (b) boronic acids, and (c) metals. Using a hybrid sensing system composed from benzobisoxazole cruciforms and boronic acid additives, we were also able to discern among structurally similar: (d) small organic and inorganic anions, (e) amines, and (f) phenols. The method used for this qualitative distinction is exceedingly simple. Dilute solutions (typically 10(-6) M) of cruciforms in several off-the-shelf solvents are placed in UV/Vis vials. Then, analytes of interest are added, either directly as solids or in concentrated solution. Fluorescence changes occur virtually instantaneously and can be recorded through standard digital photography using a semi-professional digital camera in a dark room. With minimal graphic manipulation, representative cut-outs of emission color photographs can be arranged into panels which permit quick naked

  17. Qualitative identification of carboxylic acids, boronic acids, and amines using cruciform fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Schwaebel, Thimon; Lirag, Rio Carlo; Davey, Evan A; Lim, Jaebum; Bunz, Uwe H F; Miljanić, Ognjen Š

    2013-08-19

    Molecular cruciforms are X-shaped systems in which two conjugation axes intersect at a central core. If one axis of these molecules is substituted with electron-donors, and the other with electron-acceptors, cruciforms' HOMO will localize along the electron-rich and LUMO along the electron-poor axis. This spatial isolation of cruciforms' frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) is essential to their use as sensors, since analyte binding to the cruciform invariably changes its HOMO-LUMO gap and the associated optical properties. Using this principle, Bunz and Miljanić groups developed 1,4-distyryl-2,5-bis(arylethynyl)benzene and benzobisoxazole cruciforms, respectively, which act as fluorescent sensors for metal ions, carboxylic acids, boronic acids, phenols, amines, and anions. The emission colors observed when these cruciform are mixed with analytes are highly sensitive to the details of analyte's structure and - because of cruciforms' charge-separated excited states - to the solvent in which emission is observed. Structurally closely related species can be qualitatively distinguished within several analyte classes: (a) carboxylic acids; (b) boronic acids, and (c) metals. Using a hybrid sensing system composed from benzobisoxazole cruciforms and boronic acid additives, we were also able to discern among structurally similar: (d) small organic and inorganic anions, (e) amines, and (f) phenols. The method used for this qualitative distinction is exceedingly simple. Dilute solutions (typically 10(-6) M) of cruciforms in several off-the-shelf solvents are placed in UV/Vis vials. Then, analytes of interest are added, either directly as solids or in concentrated solution. Fluorescence changes occur virtually instantaneously and can be recorded through standard digital photography using a semi-professional digital camera in a dark room. With minimal graphic manipulation, representative cut-outs of emission color photographs can be arranged into panels which permit quick naked

  18. Identification and characterization of chlorogenic acids, chlorogenic acid glycosides and flavonoids from Lonicera henryi L. (Caprifoliaceae) leaves by LC-MSn.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Müller, Heiko; Müller, Anja; Karar, Mohamed Gamaleldin Elsadig; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2014-12-01

    The chlorogenic acids, chlorogenic acid glycosides and flavonoids of the leaves of Lonicera henryi L. (Caprifoliaceae) were investigated qualitatively by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Thirty-one chlorogenic acids and their glycosides were detected and characterized to their regioisomeric level on the basis of their unique fragmentation pattern in the negative ion mode tandem MS spectra. All of them were extracted for the first time from this source and thirteen of them were not reported previously in nature. For the positive identification of chlorogenic acid glycosides by LC-MS(n), multiple reaction monitoring and targeted MS(n) experiments were performed. We have developed an LC-MS(n) method for the systematic identification of chlorogenic acid glycosides and were also able to discriminate between chlorogenic acids and their isobaric glycosides. It was also possible to discriminate between 5-O-(3'-O-caffeoyl glucosyl)quinic acid and 5-O-(4'-O-caffeoyl glucosyl)quinic acid by LC-MS(n). This method can be applied for the rapid and positive identification of chlorogenic acids and their glycosides in plant materials, food and beverages.

  19. Identification of individual acids in a commercial sample of naphthenic acids from petroleum by two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Steven J; West, Charles E; Scarlett, Alan G; Jones, David

    2011-06-30

    The identification of most individual members of the complex mixtures of carboxylic acids found in petroleum ('naphthenic acids') has eluded chemists for over a century; they remain unresolved by conventional gas chromatographic methods. Recently, however, we successfully used two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify numerous individual diamondoid acids in the naphthenic acids of oil sands process water (OSPW). We have now applied the same methods to a study of a mixture of commercially available naphthenic acids originally refined from petroleum. The results confirm that OSPW and refined petroleum contain very different distributions of acids, as noted previously, although some of the diamondoid acids recently identified in OSPW were detectable in both. Rather, two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/ToF-MS) of the methyl esters of the petroleum acids and of numerous acids synthesised for comparison showed that the former comprised mainly C(8-18) straight-chain, methyl-branched, acyclic isoprenoid, cyclohexyl and isomeric octahydropentalene, perhydroindane and perhydronaphthalene (decalin) acids. Some of the latter bicyclic acids occurred as both the non-alkyl-substituted isomers and the bicyclic ethanoic and propanoic acids. Also present in minor quantities was a range of phenyl carboxylic and substituted phenyl alkanoic acids, and traces of non-acids, including trimethylnaphthalenes, again identified by comparison with the synthesised compounds. These results represent some of the first identifications of multiple individual naphthenic acids in commercial mixtures originating from petroleum and provide a basis for future studies of the petroleum geochemistry, toxicities and environmental impacts of the acids. Furthermore, characterisation of the acids will be important for improving the understanding of the role of naphthenic acids in petroleum engineering, particularly for

  20. Identification of the typical metal particles among haze, fog, and clear episodes in the Beijing atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunjie; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Suanqin; Kong, Lingdong; Fu, Hongbo; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-04-01

    For a better understanding of metal particle morphology and behaviors in China, atmospheric aerosols were sampled in the summer of 2012 in Beijing. The single-particle analysis shows various metal-bearing speciations, dominated by oxides, sulfates and nitrates. A large fraction of particles is soluble. Sources of Fe-bearing particles are mainly steel industries and oil fuel combustion, whereas Zn- and Pb-bearing particles are primarily contributed by waste incineration, besides industrial combustion. Other trace metal particles play a minor rule, and may come from diverse origins. Mineral dust and anthropogenic source like vehicles and construction activities are of less importance to metal-rich particles. Statistics of 1173 analyzed particles show that Fe-rich particles (48.5%) dominate the metal particles, followed by Zn-rich particles (34.9%) and Pb-rich particles (15.6%). Compared with the abundances among clear, haze and fog conditions, a severe metal pollution is identified in haze and fog episodes. Particle composition and elemental correlation suggest that the haze episodes are affected by the biomass burning in the southern regions, and the fog episodes by the local emission with manifold particle speciation. Our results show the heterogeneous reaction accelerated in the fog and haze episodes indicated by more zinc nitrate or zinc sulfate instead of zinc oxide or carbonate. Such information is useful in improving our knowledge of fine airborne metal particles on their morphology, speciation, and solubility, all of which will help the government introduce certain control to alleviate metal pollution.

  1. Particle growth by acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic carbonyls on preexisting aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoseon; Carroll, Brian; Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-01

    Aerosol growth by the heterogeneous reactions of different aliphatic and alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls in the presence/absence of acidified seed aerosols was studied in a 2 m long flow reactor (2.5 cm i.d.) and a 0.5-m3 Teflon film bag under darkness. For the flow reactor experiments, 2,4-hexadienal, 5-methyl-3-hexen-2-one, 2-cyclohexenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclopentenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclohexenone, and octanal were studied. The carbonyls were selected based on their reactivity for acid-catalyzed reactions, their proton affinity, and their similarity to the ring-opening products from the atmospheric oxidation of aromatics. To facilitate acid-catalyzed heterogeneous hemiacetal/acetal formation, glycerol was injected along with inorganic seed aerosols into the flow reactor system. Carbonyl heterogeneous reactions were accelerated in the presence of acid catalysts (H2SO4), leading to higher aerosol yields than in their absence. Aldehydes were more reactive than ketones for acid-catalyzed reactions. The conjugated functionality also resulted in higher organic aerosol yieldsthan saturated aliphatic carbonyls because conjugation with the olefinic bond increases the basicity of the carbonyl leading to increased stability of the protonated carbonyl. Aerosol population was measured from a series of sampling ports along the length of the flow reactor using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry of either an impacted liquid aerosol layer or direct reaction of carbonyls as a thin liquid layer on a zinc selenide FTIR disk was employed to demonstrate the direct transformation of chemical functional groups via the acid-catalyzed reactions. These results strongly indicate that atmospheric multifunctional organic carbonyls, which are created by atmospheric photooxidation reactions, can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation through acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions. Exploratory studies in 25- and 190-m3 outdoor chambers

  2. Correlation of Sulfuric Acid Hydrate Abundance with Charged Particle Flux at the Surface of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, James B.; Paranicas, C. P.; Cassidy, T. A.; Shirley, J. H.

    2010-10-01

    The trailing hemisphere of Jupiter's moon Europa is bombarded by charged particles trapped within Jupiter's magnetosphere. Sulfur ion implantation and impacting energetic electrons strongly affect the surface chemistry of Europa. Understanding these processes is important for disentangling the extrinsic and intrinsic components of Europa's surface chemistry. In the sulfur cycle model of Carlson et al. (Science 286, 97, 1999), hydrated sulfuric acid represents the dominant reaction product of radiolytic surface modification processes on Europa. In recent compositional investigations employing linear mixture modeling, Dalton et al. (LPSC XV, #2511, 2009) and Shirley et al. (Icarus, in press, 2010) document a well-defined gradient of hydrated sulfuric acid abundance for a study area spanning the leading side - trailing side boundary in Argadnel Regio. Sulfuric acid hydrate abundance in this region increases toward the trailing side apex. Here we compare the derived sulfuric acid hydrate abundances at 41 locations on Europa's surface with independent model results describing 1) the sulfur ion flux (Hendrix et al., 2010, in preparation), and 2) the energetic electron flux, at the same locations. We improve upon the prior calculation of electron energy into the surface of Paranicas et al. (2009, in Europa, U. Arizona, p529; Pappalardo, McKinnon, & Khurana eds.) by incorporating a realistic pitch angle dependence of the distribution. While the sulfur ion implantation and electron energy deposition model distributions differ in important details, both show trailing side gradients similar to that found for the sulfuric acid hydrate. Correlation coefficients exceed 0.9 in comparisons of each of these models with the sulfuric acid hydrate distribution. Our results support models in which the electron energy flux drives reactions that utilize implanted sulfur to produce sulfuric acid hydrate. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion

  3. Sample preparation for measurement of plasma mycophenolic acid concentrations using chromatographically functionalized magnetic micro-particles.

    PubMed

    König, Katrin; Vogeser, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing chromatographically modified magnetic micro-particles is an innovative principle of sample preparation for quantitative analysis of small molecules in complex biomedical samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Since no vacuum or pressure has to be applied-in contrast to cartridge based solid phase extraction protocols-the principle's main characteristics are potentially straightforward automation and a high extraction performance (in terms of µg of extraction material per µL of sample). Following first descriptions of the approach, this article reports, the validation of a magnetic particle-based, analytical method for the quantification of the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid in plasma. This sample preparation technology has shown a good performance for this clinically relevant analyte. As a result, we conclude that further work towards the implementation of this technology in a multi- analyte approach on robotic systems, aiming towards a fully automated process, is justified. PMID:23221116

  4. Ice Nucleation of Bare and Sulfuric Acid-coated Mineral Dust Particles and Implication for Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Sanders, Cassandra N.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-27

    Ice nucleation properties of different dust species coated with soluble material are not well understood. We determined the ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35 deg C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw). Five different mineral dust species: Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, montmorillonite, quartz and kaolinite were dry dispersed and size-selected at 150 nm and exposed to sulfuric acid vapors in the coating apparatus. The condensed sulfuric acid soluble mass fraction per particle was estimated from the cloud condensation nuclei activated fraction measurements. The fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw was determined using a compact ice chamber. In water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that only coated ATD particles showed suppression of ice nucleation ability while other four dust species did not showed the effect of coating on the fraction of particles nucleating ice. The results suggest that interactions between the dust surface and sulfuric acid vapor are important, such that interactions may or may not modify the surface via chemical reactions with sulfuric acid. At water-supersaturated conditions we did not observed the effect of coating, i.e. the bare and coated dust particles had similar ice nucleation behavior.

  5. Identification of sialic acids on the cell surface of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Soares, R M; de A Soares, R M; Alviano, D S; Angluster, J; Alviano, C S; Travassos, L R

    2000-04-01

    The cell-surface expression of sialic acids in two isolates of Candida albicans was analyzed by thin-layer and gas chromatography, binding of lectins, colorimetry, sialidase treatment and flow cytofluorimetry with fluorescein-labeled lectins. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) was the only derivative found in both strains of C. albicans grown in a chemically defined medium. Its identification was confirmed by mass spectrometry in comparison with an authentic standard. The density of sialic acid residues per cell ranged from 1. 6x10(6) to 2.8x10(6). The surface distribution of sialic acids over the entire C. albicans was inferred from labeling with fluorescein-Limulus polyphemus and Limax flavus agglutinins and directly observed by optical microscopy with (FITC)-Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), abrogated by previous treatment of yeasts with bacterial sialidase. Sialidase-treated yeasts generated beta-galactopyranosyl terminal residues that reacted with peanut agglutinin. In C. albicans N-acetyl-neuraminic acids are alpha2,6- and alpha2,3-linked as indicated by yeast binding to SNA and Maackia amurensis agglutinin. The alpha2,6-linkage clearly predominated in both strains. We also investigated the contribution of sialic acids to the electronegativity of C. albicans, an important factor determining fungal interactions in vivo. Adhesion of yeast cells to a cationic solid phase substrate (poly-L-lysine) was mediated in part by sialic acids, since the number of adherent cells was significantly reduced after treatment with bacterial sialidase. The present evidence adds C. albicans to the list of pathogenic fungi that synthesize sialic acids, which contribute to the negative charge of fungal cells and have a role in their specific interaction with the host tissue.

  6. Dominant Aerosol Particle Type/Mixture Identification at Worldwide Locations Using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol absorption results in atmospheric heating for various forms of particulate matter - we address means of partitioning mineral dust, pollution (e.g., black and brown carbon), and mixtures of the two using remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer measurements can be used to calculate the absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) at 440, 675, and 870 nm. The spectral change in AAOD with wavelength on logarithmic scales provides the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE). Recently, a few studies have shown that the relationship between aerosol absorption (i.e., AAE or SSA) and aerosol size [i.e., Angstrom exponent (AE) or fine mode fraction (FMF) of the AOD] can estimate the dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures (i.e., dust, pollution, and dust and pollution mixtures) [Bergstrom et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010; Lee et al. 2010; Giles et al., 2011]. To evaluate these methods, approximately 20 AERONET sites were grouped into various aerosol categories (i.e., dust, mixed, urban/industrial, and biomass burning) based on aerosol types/mixtures identified in previous studies. For data collected between 1999 and 2010, the long-term data set was analyzed to determine the magnitude of spectral AAOD, perform a sensitivity study on AAE by varying the spectral AOD and SSA, and identify dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures. An assessment of the spectral AAOD showed, on average, that the mixed (dust and pollution) category had the highest absorption (AAE ~1.5) followed by biomass burning (AAE~1.3), dust (AAE~1.7), and urban/industrial (AAE~1.2) categories with AAOD (440 nm) varying between 0.03 and 0.09 among these categories. Perturbing input parameters based on the expected uncertainties for AOD (±0.01) and SSA [±0.03; for cases where AOD(440 nm)>0.4], the sensitivity study showed the perturbed AAE mean varied from the unperturbed

  7. Simplified mechanism for new particle formation from methanesulfonic acid, amines, and water via experiments and ab initio calculations

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Matthew L.; Varner, Mychel E.; Perraud, Véronique; Ezell, Michael J.; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Airborne particles affect human health and significantly influence visibility and climate. A major fraction of these particles result from the reactions of gaseous precursors to generate low-volatility products such as sulfuric acid and high-molecular weight organics that nucleate to form new particles. Ammonia and, more recently, amines, both of which are ubiquitous in the environment, have also been recognized as important contributors. However, accurately predicting new particle formation in both laboratory systems and in air has been problematic. During the oxidation of organosulfur compounds, gas-phase methanesulfonic acid is formed simultaneously with sulfuric acid, and both are found in particles in coastal regions as well as inland. We show here that: (i) Amines form particles on reaction with methanesulfonic acid, (ii) water vapor is required, and (iii) particle formation can be quantitatively reproduced by a semiempirical kinetics model supported by insights from quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters. Such an approach may be more broadly applicable in models of outdoor, indoor, and industrial settings where particles are formed, and where accurate modeling is essential for predicting their impact on health, visibility, and climate. PMID:23090988

  8. Why sulfuric acid forms particles so extremely well, and how organics might still compete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurten, T.; Ehn, M.; Kupiainen, O.; Olenius, T.; Rissanen, M.; Thornton, J. A.; Nielsen, L.; Jørgensen, S.; Ortega Colomer, I. K.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is a well-known result in aerosol science that the single most important molecule for the first steps of new-particle formation in our atmosphere is sulfuric acid, H2SO4. From a chemical perspective, this seems somewhat counterintuitive: the atmosphere contains thousands of different organic compounds, many of which can potentially form oxidation products with even lower volatility than H2SO4. The unique role of sulfuric acid is due to its formation kinetics. The conversion of sulfur dioxide, SO2 to H2SO4 requires only a single oxidant molecule (e.g. OH), as subsequent steps are extremely rapid. Still, the saturation vapor pressure of H2SO4 is over 108 times lower than that of SO2. In contrast, the oxidation reactions of organic molecules typically lower their saturation vapor pressure by only a factor of 10-1000 per oxidation step. Therefore, organic compounds are usually lost to pre-existing aerosol surfaces before they have undergone sufficiently many oxidation reactions to nucleate on their own. The presence of strong nitrogen-containing base molecules such as amines enhances the particle-forming advantages of sulfuric acid even further. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the evaporation rate of sulfuric acid from key clusters containing two acid molecules may decrease by a factor of 108 in the presence of ppt-level concentrations of amines, implying a total decrease of up to 1016 in the effective vapor pressure going from SO2 to H2SO4. In some circumstances, this decrease causes the energy barrier for new-particle formation to disappear: the process is no longer nucleation, and some common applications of e.g. the nucleation theorem cease to apply. Cluster kinetic models combined with first-principles evaporation rates appear to describe this sulfuric acid - base clustering reasonably well, and result in cluster formation rates close to those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN. There may nevertheless exist exceptions to the general rule that

  9. Protein-gold nanoclusters for identification of amino acids by metal ions modulated ratiometric fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Mei, Qingsong; Zhang, Kui; Zhang, Zhongping

    2012-04-01

    Here we report that the dual fluorescence emissions from protein-gold (Au) nanoclusters can greatly be modulated by metal ions and the resultant fluorescence ratiometric responses provide a novel sensory method for the identification of amino acids. The protein-gold (Au) nanoclusters were simply synthesized by the reduction of chloroauric acid with bovine serum albumin (BSA), which exhibit dual emissions: the blue at 425 nm from the oxides of BSA, and the red at 635 nm from Au nanoclusters. It has been demonstrated that different metal ions react with BSA-Au nanoclusters and thus greatly affect the two emissions in different ways by fluorescence enhancement or quenching. Interestingly, the addition of amino acids leads to fluorescence ratiometric changes through the interactions with the bound metal ions. When BSA-Au nanocluster probes modulated by four different metal ions were used together to construct a sensor array, different amino acids were clearly discriminated by the distinctive patterns of four ratiometric fluorescence responses. Results and methods reported here provide a unique strategy for the determination of amino acids.

  10. Detection and identification of explosive particles in fingerprints using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yongyan; Rabalais, J Wayne

    2009-07-01

    The application of attenuated total reflection (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy for detection of explosive particles in fingerprints is described. The combined functions of ATR-FTIR spectromicroscopy are visual searching of particles in fingerprints and measuring the FTIR spectra of the particles. These functions make it possible to directly identify whether a suspect has handled explosives from the fingerprints alone. Particles in explosive contaminated fingerprints are either ingredients of the explosives, finger residues, or other foreign materials. These cannot normally be discriminated by their morphology alone. ATR-FTIR spectra can provide both particle morphology and composition. Fingerprints analyzed by ATR-FTIR can be used for further analysis and identification because of its non-destructive character. Fingerprints contaminated with three different types of explosives, or potential explosives, have been analyzed herein. An infrared spectral library was searched in order to identify the explosive residues. The acquired spectra are compared to those of finger residue alone, in order to differentiate such residue from explosive residue.

  11. Regulation of the arachidonic acid mobilization in macrophages by combustion-derived particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute exposure to elevated levels of environmental particulate matter (PM) is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. These adverse health effects, e.g. culminating in respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, have been demonstrated by a multitude of epidemiological studies. However, the underlying mechanisms relevant for toxicity are not completely understood. Especially the role of particle-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative stress and inflammatory responses is of particular interest. In this in vitro study we examined the influence of particle-generated ROS on signalling pathways leading to activation of the arachidonic acid (AA) cascade. Incinerator fly ash particles (MAF02) were used as a model for real-life combustion-derived particulate matter. As macrophages, besides epithelial cells, are the major targets of particle actions in the lung murine RAW264.7 macrophages and primary human macrophages were investigated. Results The interaction of fly ash particles with macrophages induced both the generation of ROS and as part of the cellular inflammatory responses a dose- and time-dependent increase of free AA, prostaglandin E2/thromboxane B2 (PGE2/TXB2), and 8-isoprostane, a non-enzymatically formed oxidation product of AA. Additionally, increased phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) JNK1/2, p38 and ERK1/2 was observed, the latter of which was shown to be involved in MAF02-generated AA mobilization and phosphorylation of the cytosolic phospolipase A2. Using specific inhibitors for the different phospolipase A2 isoforms the MAF02-induced AA liberation was shown to be dependent on the cytosolic phospholipase A2, but not on the secretory and calcium-independent phospholipase A2. The initiation of the AA pathway due to MAF02 particle exposure was demonstrated to depend on the formation of ROS since the presence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) prevented the MAF02-mediated enhancement of

  12. Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopic identification of dispersant/particle bonding mechanisms in functional inks.

    PubMed

    Deiner, L Jay; Farjami, Elaheh

    2015-05-08

    In additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, material is deposited drop by drop, to create micron to macroscale layers. A typical inkjet ink is a colloidal dispersion containing approximately ten components including solvent, the nano to micron scale particles which will comprise the printed layer, polymeric dispersants to stabilize the particles, and polymers to tune layer strength, surface tension and viscosity. To rationally and efficiently formulate such an ink, it is crucial to know how the components interact. Specifically, which polymers bond to the particle surfaces and how are they attached? Answering this question requires an experimental procedure that discriminates between polymer adsorbed on the particles and free polymer. Further, the method must provide details about how the functional groups of the polymer interact with the particle. In this protocol, we show how to employ centrifugation to separate particles with adsorbed polymer from the rest of the ink, prepare the separated samples for spectroscopic measurement, and use Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for accurate determination of dispersant/particle bonding mechanisms. A significant advantage of this methodology is that it provides high level mechanistic detail using only simple, commonly available laboratory equipment. This makes crucial data available to almost any formulation laboratory. The method is most useful for inks composed of metal, ceramic, and metal oxide particles in the range of 100 nm or greater. Because of the density and particle size of these inks, they are readily separable with centrifugation. Further, the spectroscopic signatures of such particles are easy to distinguish from absorbed polymer. The primary limitation of this technique is that the spectroscopy is performed ex-situ on the separated and dried particles as opposed to the particles in dispersion. However, results from attenuated total reflectance spectra of the wet separated

  13. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  14. Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopic identification of dispersant/particle bonding mechanisms in functional inks.

    PubMed

    Deiner, L Jay; Farjami, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    In additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, material is deposited drop by drop, to create micron to macroscale layers. A typical inkjet ink is a colloidal dispersion containing approximately ten components including solvent, the nano to micron scale particles which will comprise the printed layer, polymeric dispersants to stabilize the particles, and polymers to tune layer strength, surface tension and viscosity. To rationally and efficiently formulate such an ink, it is crucial to know how the components interact. Specifically, which polymers bond to the particle surfaces and how are they attached? Answering this question requires an experimental procedure that discriminates between polymer adsorbed on the particles and free polymer. Further, the method must provide details about how the functional groups of the polymer interact with the particle. In this protocol, we show how to employ centrifugation to separate particles with adsorbed polymer from the rest of the ink, prepare the separated samples for spectroscopic measurement, and use Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for accurate determination of dispersant/particle bonding mechanisms. A significant advantage of this methodology is that it provides high level mechanistic detail using only simple, commonly available laboratory equipment. This makes crucial data available to almost any formulation laboratory. The method is most useful for inks composed of metal, ceramic, and metal oxide particles in the range of 100 nm or greater. Because of the density and particle size of these inks, they are readily separable with centrifugation. Further, the spectroscopic signatures of such particles are easy to distinguish from absorbed polymer. The primary limitation of this technique is that the spectroscopy is performed ex-situ on the separated and dried particles as opposed to the particles in dispersion. However, results from attenuated total reflectance spectra of the wet separated

  15. Characterization and source identification of a fine particle episode in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Jarkko V.; Tervahattu, Heikki; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kulmala, Markku; Koskentalo, Tarja; Sillanpää, Markus; Rantamäki, Minna

    2004-09-01

    A strong long-range transported (LRT) fine particle (PM2.5) episode occurred from March 17-22, 2002 over large areas of Finland. Most of the LRT particle mass was in the submicrometre size fraction. The number of concentrations of 90-500 nm particles increased by a factor of 5.6 during the episode, but the concentrations of particles smaller than 90 nm decreased. This reduction of the smallest particles was caused by suppressed gas-to-particle conversion due to the vapour uptake of LRT particles. Individual particle analyses using SEM/EDX showed that the proportion of sulphur-rich particles rose strongly during the episode and that the relative weight percentage of potassium was unusually high in these particles. The median S/K ratios of S-rich particles were 2.1 at the beginning of the episode, 5.2 at the peak stage of the episode and 8.9 during the reference days. The high proportion of K is a clear indication of emissions from biomass burning, because K is a good tracer of biomass-burning aerosols. Trajectories and satellite detections of fire areas indicated that the main source of biomass-burning aerosols was large-scale agricultural field burning in the Baltic countries, Belarus, Ukraine and Russia. The higher S/K ratio of S-rich particles during the peak stage was obviously due to the increased proportion of fossil fuel-burning emissions in the LRT particle mass, since air masses arrived from the more polluted areas of Europe at that time. The concentrations of sulphate, total nitrate and total ammonium increased during the episode. Our results suggest that large-scale agricultural field burning may substantially affect PM2.5 concentrations under unfavourable meteorological conditions even at distances over 1000 km from the burning areas.

  16. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.

  17. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. PMID:26924312

  18. A streptavidin paramagnetic-particle based competition assay for the evaluation of the optical selectivity of quadruplex nucleic acid fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Largy, Eric; Hamon, Florian; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2012-05-01

    Although quadruplex nucleic acids are thought to be involved in many biological processes, they are massively overwhelmed by duplex DNA in the cell. Small molecules, able to probe quadruplex nucleic acids with high optical selectivity, could possibly achieve the visualization of these processes. The aim of the method described herein is to evaluate quickly the optical selectivity of quadruplex nucleic acid probes, in isothermal conditions, using widely available materials, small quantities of oligonucleotides and virtually any kind and quantity of biological competitor. The assay relies on the use of streptavidin-coated paramagnetic particles and biotinylated quadruplex forming oligonucleotides, allowing a quick and easy separation of the quadruplex target from the competitor. In the present study, two quadruplex nucleic acids (the DNA and RNA human telomeric repeats) have been used as targets while a duplex DNA oligonucleotide, total DNA, total RNA, another quadruplex nucleic acid and a protein have been used as competitors. The optical selectivity of various probes, displaying different photophysical properties and binding selectivities, has been successfully examined, allowing the identification of a best candidate for further cell microscopy experiments. This assay allows a quick and reliable assessment of the labeling properties of a quadruplex binder in cellular environment conditions. It is an interesting alternative to gel electrophoresis experiments since it is performed in solution, has a well-resolved separation system and allows easy quantifications.

  19. Phase identification of quasi-periodic flow measured by particle image velocimetry with a low sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chong; Wang, Hongping; Wang, Jinjun

    2013-05-01

    This work mainly deals with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) time coefficient method used for extracting phase information from quasi-periodic flow. The mathematical equivalence between this method and the traditional cross-correlation method is firstly proved. A two-dimensional circular cylinder wake flow measured by time-resolved particle image velocimetry within a range of Reynolds numbers is then used to evaluate the reliability of this method. The effect of both the sampling rate and Reynolds number on the identification accuracy is finally discussed. It is found that the POD time coefficient method provides a convenient alternative for phase identification, whose feasibility in low-sampling-rate measurement has additional advantages for experimentalists.

  20. Identification of inelastic parameters based on deep drawing forming operations using a global-local hybrid Particle Swarm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Miguel; Luersen, Marco A.; Muñoz-Rojas, Pablo A.; Trentin, Robson G.

    2016-04-01

    Application of optimization techniques to the identification of inelastic material parameters has substantially increased in recent years. The complex stress-strain paths and high nonlinearity, typical of this class of problems, require the development of robust and efficient techniques for inverse problems able to account for an irregular topography of the fitness surface. Within this framework, this work investigates the application of the gradient-based Sequential Quadratic Programming method, of the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex algorithm, of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), and of a global-local PSO-Nelder-Mead hybrid scheme to the identification of inelastic parameters based on a deep drawing operation. The hybrid technique has shown to be the best strategy by combining the good PSO performance to approach the global minimum basin of attraction with the efficiency demonstrated by the Nelder-Mead algorithm to obtain the minimum itself.

  1. Identification and Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Based Inhibitors of Replication Protein A.

    PubMed

    Patrone, James D; Pelz, Nicholas F; Bates, Brittney S; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Camper, Demarco V; Kuznetsov, Alexey G; Browning, Carrie F; Feldkamp, Michael D; Frank, Andreas O; Gilston, Benjamin A; Olejniczak, Edward T; Rossanese, Olivia W; Waterson, Alex G; Chazin, Walter J; Fesik, Stephen W

    2016-04-19

    Replication protein A (RPA) is an essential single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein that initiates the DNA damage response pathway through protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediated by its 70N domain. The identification and use of chemical probes that can specifically disrupt these interactions is important for validating RPA as a cancer target. A high-throughput screen (HTS) to identify new chemical entities was conducted, and 90 hit compounds were identified. From these initial hits, an anthranilic acid based series was optimized by using a structure-guided iterative medicinal chemistry approach to yield a cell-penetrant compound that binds to RPA70N with an affinity of 812 nm. This compound, 2-(3- (N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)sulfamoyl)-4-methylbenzamido)benzoic acid (20 c), is capable of inhibiting PPIs mediated by this domain. PMID:26748787

  2. Seasonal and spatial changes of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Bi, Xinhui; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations and compositions of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles from typical urban, suburban and forest park sites of Guangzhou were determined in this study. The free form of organic acids (solvent extractable) in aerosols in Guangzhou varied with site and season. The suburban samples contained the highest contents of alkanoic, alkenoic and dicarboxylic acids. These findings were consistent with a higher supply of hydrocarbons and NOx in the suburban area. However, concentrations of aromatic acids were similar in the urban, suburban and forest park sites. Generally, winter season samples of the acids from anthropogenic sources contained more organic acids than summer season samples due to stronger removal by wet deposition in the summer. For the acids from botanic sources, the summer season samples were higher. In addition to the free acids, bound acids (solvent non-extractable) mainly formed by esterification of free acids were also found in the samples. In general, bound acids were higher than free acids. Esterification is mainly controlled by the pKa of organic acids and the atmospheric pH value. This explains why aromatic and dicarboxylic acids occur mainly as bound forms and why the samples from urban sites contained high levels of bound acids as the pH of rain water can reach 4.53. Concentrations of alkanoic and alkenoic acids in the aerosols of Guangzhou were much higher than those in the other areas studied.

  3. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed. PMID:27043733

  4. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed.

  5. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes.

  6. Hygroscopic properties of internally mixed particles composed of NaCl and water-soluble organic acids.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Suman; Wang, Bingbing; Tivanski, Alexei; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric aging of naturally emitted marine aerosol often leads to formation of internally mixed particles composed of sea salts and water-soluble organic compounds of anthropogenic origin. Mixing of sea salt and organic components has profound effects on the evolving chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of the resulted particles, which are poorly understood. Here, we have studied chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated NaCl particles mixed with malonic acid (MA) and glutaric acid (GA) at different molar ratios using micro-FTIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray elemental microanalysis. Hygroscopic properties of internally mixed NaCl and organic acid particles were distinctly different from pure components and varied significantly with the type and amount of organic compound present. Experimental results were in a good agreement with the AIM modeling calculations of gas/liquid/solid partitioning in studied systems. X-ray elemental microanalysis of particles showed that Cl/Na ratio decreased with increasing organic acid component in the particles with MA yielding lower ratios relative to GA. We attribute the depletion of chloride to the formation of sodium malonate and sodium glutarate salts resulted by HCl evaporation from dehydrating particles. PMID:24437520

  7. Hygroscopic Properties of Internally Mixed Particles Composed of NaCl and Water-Soluble Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Suman; Wang, Bingbing; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric aging of naturally emitted marine aerosol often leads to formation of internally mixed particles composed of sea salts and water soluble organic compounds of anthropogenic origin. Mixing of sea salt and organic components has profound effects on the evolving chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of the resulted particles, which are poorly understood. Here, we have studied chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated NaCl particles mixed with malonic acid (MA) and glutaric acid (GA) at different molar ratios using micro-FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray elemental microanalysis.Hygroscopic properties of inte rnally mixed NaCl and organic acid particles were distinctly different from pure components and varied significantly with the type and amount of organic compound present. Experimental results were in a good agreement with the AIM modeling calculations of gas/liquid/solid partitioning in studied systems. X-ray elemental microanalysis of particles showed that Cl/Na ratio decreased with increasing organic acid component in the particles with MA yielding lower ratios relative to GA. We attribute the depletion of chloride to the formation of Na-malonate and Na-glutarate salts resulted by HCl evaporation from dehydrating particles.

  8. A critical evaluation of proxy methods used to estimate the acidity of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigan, C. J.; Izumi, J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.

    2015-03-01

    Given significant challenges with available measurements of aerosol acidity, proxy methods are frequently used to estimate the acidity of atmospheric particles. In this study, four of the most common aerosol acidity proxies are evaluated and compared: (1) the ion balance method, (2) the molar ratio method, (3) thermodynamic equilibrium models, and (4) the phase partitioning of ammonia. All methods are evaluated against predictions of thermodynamic models and against direct observations of aerosol-gas equilibrium partitioning acquired in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Objectives (MILAGRO) study. The ion balance and molar ratio methods assume that any deficit in inorganic cations relative to anions is due to the presence of H+ and that a higher H+ loading and lower cation / anion ratio both correspond to increasingly acidic particles (i.e., lower pH). Based on the MILAGRO measurements, no correlation is observed between H+ levels inferred with the ion balance and aerosol pH predicted by the thermodynamic models and NH3-NH4+ partitioning. Similarly, no relationship is observed between the cation / anion molar ratio and predicted aerosol pH. Using only measured aerosol chemical composition as inputs without any constraint for the gas phase, the E-AIM (Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model) and ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium models tend to predict aerosol pH levels that are inconsistent with the observed NH3-NH4+ partitioning. The modeled pH values from both E-AIM and ISORROPIA-II run with gas + aerosol inputs agreed well with the aerosol pH predicted by the phase partitioning of ammonia. It appears that (1) thermodynamic models constrained by gas + aerosol measurements and (2) the phase partitioning of ammonia provide the best available predictions of aerosol pH. Furthermore, neither the ion balance nor the molar ratio can be used as surrogates for aerosol pH, and previously published studies with conclusions based

  9. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  10. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  11. The Role Of FT-IR In The Identification Of Domoic Acid, A New Shellfish Toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Michael

    1989-12-01

    A brief but serious outbreak of poisoning by mussels occurred in Canada in December 1987. In a round-the-clock effort, the toxin that caused this outbreak was isolated in our laboratory and identified as domoic acid, a naturally-occurring substance that had not previously been reported to cause human poisoning. The identification of the toxin was achieved by the concerted use of spectroscopic methods, among them micro-FT-IR spectroscopy. The use of the FT-IR microscope allowed high-quality infrared spectra to be obtained on sub-microgram quantities of the early isolates of the toxin. The microscopic method had an additional advantage in that it enabled us to carry out a rough but rapid separation of the compound of interest from admixtures of unrelated substances by recording the spectra of a gradually dried out drop of solution on a microscope plate. Following the positive identification of the toxin as domoic acid, a detailed spectroscopic study was made of this important molecule in its several isomeric forms.

  12. Identification of 4-deoxythreonic acid present in human urine by combining HPLC and NMR techniques

    PubMed Central

    Appiah-Amponsah, Emmanuel; Shanaiah, Narasimhamurthy; Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Owusu-Sarfo, Kwadwo; Ye, Tao; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of urine exhibits a large number of detectable and quantifiable metabolites and hence urine metabolite profiling is potentially useful for the study of systems biology and the discovery of biomarkers for drug development or clinical applications. While a number of metabolites (50–100) are readily detectable in urine by NMR, a much larger number is potentially available if lower concentration species can be detected unambiguously. Lower concentration metabolites are thought to be more specific to certain disease states and thus it is important to detect these metabolites with certainty. We report the identification of 4-deoxythreonic acid, a relatively low concentration endogenous metabolite that has not been previously identified in the 1H NMR spectrum of human urine. The complimentary use of HPLC and NMR spectroscopy facilitated the unequivocal and non-invasive identification of the molecule in urine which is complicated by extensive peak overlap and multiple, similar resonances from other metabolites such as 3-hydroxybutanoic acid. High-resolution detection and good sensitivity were achieved by the combination of multiple chromatographic fraction collection, sample pre-concentration, and the use of a cryogenically cooled NMR probe. PMID:19615840

  13. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol. PMID:26226053

  14. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol.

  15. Nano-Diamonds in Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Joswiak, D. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Hill, H. G. M.

    2001-01-01

    In-situ acid etching of ultramicrotomed thin sections has lead to the identification of nano-diamonds in interplanetary dust particles. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

  17. Understanding mild acid pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse through particle scale modeling.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Ava A; Farrell, Troy W; O'Hara, Ian M

    2013-12-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is an abundant and sustainable resource, generated as a by-product of sugarcane milling. The cellulosic material within bagasse can be broken down into glucose molecules and fermented to produce ethanol, making it a promising feedstock for biofuel production. Mild acid pretreatment hydrolyses the hemicellulosic component of biomass, thus allowing enzymes greater access to the cellulosic substrate during saccharification. A particle-scale mathematical model describing the mild acid pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse has been developed, using a volume averaged framework. Discrete population-balance equations are used to characterise the polymer degradation kinetics, and diffusive effects account for mass transport within the cell wall of the bagasse. As the fibrous material hydrolyses over time, variations in the porosity of the cell wall and the downstream effects on the reaction kinetics are accounted for using conservation of volume arguments. Non-dimensionalization of the model equations reduces the number of parameters in the system to a set of four dimensionless ratios that compare the timescales of different reaction and diffusion events. Theoretical yield curves are compared to macroscopic experimental observations from the literature and inferences are made as to constraints on these "unknown" parameters. These results enable connections to be made between experimental data and the underlying thermodynamics of acid pretreatment. Consequently, the results suggest that data-fitting techniques used to obtain kinetic parameters should be carefully applied, with prudent consideration given to the chemical and physiological processes being modeled.

  18. Multivariable wavelet finite element-based vibration model for quantitative crack identification by using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingwu; Gao, Robert X.; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Sun, Chuang; Yang, Zhibo

    2016-08-01

    Crack is one of the crucial causes of structural failure. A methodology for quantitative crack identification is proposed in this paper based on multivariable wavelet finite element method and particle swarm optimization. First, the structure with crack is modeled by multivariable wavelet finite element method (MWFEM) so that the vibration parameters of the first three natural frequencies in arbitrary crack conditions can be obtained, which is named as the forward problem. Second, the structure with crack is tested to obtain the vibration parameters of first three natural frequencies by modal testing and advanced vibration signal processing method. Then, the analyzed and measured first three natural frequencies are combined together to obtain the location and size of the crack by using particle swarm optimization. Compared with traditional wavelet finite element method, MWFEM method can achieve more accurate vibration analysis results because it interpolates all the solving variables at one time, which makes the MWFEM-based method to improve the accuracy in quantitative crack identification. In the end, the validity and superiority of the proposed method are verified by experiments of both cantilever beam and simply supported beam.

  19. Effect of particle size reduction, hydrothermal and fermentation treatments on phytic acid content and some physicochemical properties of wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Majzoobi, Mahsa; Pashangeh, Safoora; Farahnaky, Asgar; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi; Jamalian, Jalal

    2014-10-01

    With the aim of reducing phytic acid content of wheat bran, particle size reduction (from 1,200 to 90 μm), hydrothermal (wet steeping in acetate buffer at pH 4.8 at 55 °C for 60 min) and fermentation (using bakery yeast for 8 h at 30 °C) and combination of these treatments with particle size reduction were applied and their effects on some properties of the bran were studied. Phytic acid content decreased from 50.1 to 21.6, 32.8 and 43.9 mg/g after particle size reduction, hydrothermal and fermentation, respectively. Particle size reduction along with these treatments further reduced phytic acid content up to 76.4 % and 57.3 %, respectively. Hydrothermal and fermentation decreased, while particle size reduction alone or in combination increased bran lightness. With reducing particle size, total, soluble and insoluble fiber content decreased from 69.7 to 32.1 %, 12.2 to 7.9 % and 57.4 to 24.3 %, respectively. The highest total (74.4 %) and soluble (21.4 %) and the lowest insoluble fiber (52.1 %) content were determined for the hydrothermaled bran. Particle size reduction decreased swelling power, water solubility and water holding capacity. Swelling power and water holding capacity of the hydrothermaled and fermented brans were lower, while water solubility was higher than the control. The amount of Fe(+2), Zn(+2) and Ca(+2) decreased with reducing particle size. Fermentation had no effect on Fe(+2)and Zn(+2) but slightly reduced Ca(+2). The hydrothermal treatment slightly decreased these elements. Amongst all, hydrothermal treatment along with particle size reduction resulted in the lowest phytic acid and highest fiber content. PMID:25328222

  20. Retrospective analysis for the identification of 4-aminocarminic acid photo-degradation products in beverages.

    PubMed

    Gosetti, Fabio; Chiuminatto, Ugo; Mastroianni, Rita; Mazzucco, Eleonora; Manfredi, Marcello; Marengo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the identification of the photo-degradation products of 4-aminocarminic acid potentially present in commercial beverages. Sixteen beverages of different composition but all containing the E120 dye were previously analysed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry to identify the common degradation products of the E120 dye. Since it is plausible to find unauthorised 4-aminocarminic acid in beverages which report generic E120 dye on the label, retrospective analysis was employed here not only to search for the possible presence of 4-aminocarminic acid but also to investigate the potential formation of photo-degradation products derived from this compound. For this purpose, a statistical approach based on Student's t-test was used to compare the degraded beverages containing 4-aminocarminic acid with all the others. Five degradation products were identified and their structures were elucidated on the basis of the high-accuracy and high-resolution of mass and mass/mass spectra. The toxicity of the degradation products was evaluated through the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. No evidence of mutagenicity was obtained for the beverages subjected or not to irradiation, whereas a toxic effect of the 4-aminocarminic acid standard solution already at 100.0 µg l(-1) was found. This leads, once again, to the conclusion that the toxicity study must be carried out on the beverages in order to take into account of all the possible masking/protection interactions among the ingredients. PMID:25562586

  1. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and nucleotide bases for target bacterial vibrational mode identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Argue, Leanne; Hyre, Aaron; Jacobson, Michele; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of bacteria have reported a wide range of vibrational mode assignments associated with biological material. We present Raman and SER spectra of the amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamine, cysteine, alanine, proline, methionine, asparagine, threonine, valine, glycine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid and the nucleic acid bases adenosine, guanosine, thymidine, and uridine to better characterize biological vibrational mode assignments for bacterial target identification. We also report spectra of the bacteria Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, and Yersinia rhodei along with band assignments determined from the reference spectra obtained.

  2. Competition between Displacement and Dissociation of a Strong Acid Compared to a Weak Acid Adsorbed on Silica Particle Surfaces: The Role of Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Tang, Mingjin; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-16

    The adsorption of nitric (HNO3) and formic (HCOOH) acids on silica particle surfaces and the effect of adsorbed water have been investigated at 296 K using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Under dry conditions, both nitric and formic acids adsorb reversibly on silica. Additionally, the FTIR spectra show that both of these molecules remain in the protonated form. At elevated relative humidities (RH), adsorbed water competes both for surface adsorption sites with these acids as well as promotes their dissociation to hydronium ions and the corresponding anions. Compared to HNO3, the extent of dissociation is much smaller for HCOOH, very likely because it is a weaker acid. This study provides valuable insights into the interaction of HNO3 and HCOOH with silica surface on the molecular level and further reveals the complex roles of surface-adsorbed water in atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust particles-many of these containing silica.

  3. Competition between Displacement and Dissociation of a Strong Acid Compared to a Weak Acid Adsorbed on Silica Particle Surfaces: The Role of Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Tang, Mingjin; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-16

    The adsorption of nitric (HNO3) and formic (HCOOH) acids on silica particle surfaces and the effect of adsorbed water have been investigated at 296 K using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Under dry conditions, both nitric and formic acids adsorb reversibly on silica. Additionally, the FTIR spectra show that both of these molecules remain in the protonated form. At elevated relative humidities (RH), adsorbed water competes both for surface adsorption sites with these acids as well as promotes their dissociation to hydronium ions and the corresponding anions. Compared to HNO3, the extent of dissociation is much smaller for HCOOH, very likely because it is a weaker acid. This study provides valuable insights into the interaction of HNO3 and HCOOH with silica surface on the molecular level and further reveals the complex roles of surface-adsorbed water in atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust particles-many of these containing silica. PMID:27220375

  4. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Steve J.; Stout, Jake M.; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2–C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity. PMID:22802619

  5. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  6. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  7. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from <2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3, and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]<0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on

  8. A direct comparison of nanosilver particles and nanosilver plates for the oxidation of ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Babak; Meskinfam, Masoumeh

    2012-11-01

    We study of spherical silver nanoparticles of different size and Ag nanoplates were grown at zinc tin oxide (ZTO) surface and characterized using SEM. The application of different electrodes in voltammetry for determination ascorbic acid indicated that oxidation of this biomolecule occurs at these electrodes in diffusion controlled process. Ag nanoplates modified zinc tin oxide electrodes exhibit at least two to three times higher current than spherical nanosilver particles. The observed behavior suggests that Ag nanoplates exhibit higher electrocatalytic activity than spherical silver nanoparticles. The reason for such behavior may be due to lattice plane as well as due to more available surface edges. As dimensions of nanoplates are increased surface area in the case of nanoplates also appears to play a significant role.

  9. Uptake of 13N-labeled N2O5 to citric acid aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, Goran; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Birrer, Mario; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Furthermore it's suspected of being a non negligible source of tropospheric Cl, even over continental areas [1,2]. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N delivered by PSI's PROTRAC facility [3] in conjunction with an aerosol flow tube reactor in order to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles. 13NO is mixed with non labeled NO and O3 in a gas reactor where N2O5 is synthesized under dry conditions to prevent hydrolysis on the reactor walls. The resulting N2O5 flow is fed into an aerosol flow tube reactor together with a humidified aerosol flow. By using movable inlets we can vary the length of the aerosol flow tube and thus the reaction time. The gas feed from the reactor is then directed into a narrow parallel plate diffusion denuder system that allows for selective separation of the gaseous species present in the gas phase. Aerosol particles are trapped on a particle filter placed at the end of the denuder system. The activity of 13N labeled species trapped on the denuder plates and in the particle filter can be monitored via scintillation counters. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 27-61.5% RH. The results obtained from our measurements have shown that the uptake coefficient increases with humidity from 1.65±0.3x10-3 (~27% RH) to 1.25±0.3x10-2 (45% RH) and 2.00±0.3x10-2 (61.5% RH). Comparison to literature data shows that this is similar to values reported for some polycarboxylic acids (like malonic acid), while being higher than some others [4]. The increase is likely related to the increasing amount of water associated

  10. Electrophoretic Mobility of Poly(acrylic acid)-Coated Alumina Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhosale, Prasad S.; Chun, Jaehun; Berg, John C.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) adsorption on the electrokinetic behavior of alumina dispersions under high pH conditions was investigated as a function of polymer concentration and molecular weight as well as the presence, concentration and ion type of background electrolyte. Systems of this type are relevant to nuclear waste treatment, in which PAA is known to be an effective rheology modifier. The presence of all but the lowest molecular weight PAA studied (1800) led to decreases in dynamic electrophoretic mobility at low polymer concentrations, attributable to bridging flocculation, as verified by measurements of particle size distribution. Bridging effects increased with polymer molecular weight, and decreased with polymer concentration. Increases in background electrolyte concentration enhanced dynamic electrophoretic mobility as the polymer layers were compressed and bridging was reduced. Such enhancements were reduced as the cation was changed from Na+ to K+ to Cs+.

  11. Identification of the fragmentation of brittle particles during compaction process by the acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Hégron, Lise; Sornay, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Some nuclear fuels are currently manufactured by a powder metallurgy process that consists of three main steps, namely preparation of the powders, powder compaction, and sintering of the compact. An optimum between size, shape and cohesion of the particles of the nuclear fuels must be sought in order to obtain a compact with a sufficient mechanical strength, and to facilitate the release of helium and fission gases during irradiation through pores connected to the outside of the pellet after sintering. Being simple to adapt to nuclear-oriented purposes, the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is used to control the microstructure of the compact by monitoring the compaction of brittle Uranium Dioxide (UO2) particles of a few hundred micrometers. The objective is to identify in situ the mechanisms that occur during the UO2 compaction, and more specifically the particle fragmentation that is linked to the open porosity of the nuclear matter. Three zones of acoustic activity, strongly related to the applied stress, can be clearly defined from analysis of the continuous signals recorded during the compaction process. They correspond to particle rearrangement and/or fragmentation. The end of the noteworthy fragmentation process is clearly defined as the end of the significant process that increases the compactness of the material. Despite the fact that the wave propagation strongly evolves during the compaction process, the acoustic signature of the fragmentation of a single UO2 particle and a bed of UO2 particles under compaction is well identified. The waveform, with a short rise time and an exponential-like decay of the signal envelope, is the most reliable descriptor. The impact of the particle size and cohesion on the AE activity, and then on the fragmentation domain, is analyzed through the discrete AE signals. The maximum amplitude of the burst signals, as well as the mean stress corresponding to the end of the recorded AE, increase with increasing mean diameter of

  12. Characterization and source identification of sub-micron particles at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheung, K; Ling, Z H; Wang, D W; Wang, Y; Guo, H; Lee, B; Li, Y J; Chan, C K

    2015-09-15

    Particle size distribution measurements were conducted continuously at a 30-second interval using the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) in August, September, November and December of 2011 at a coastal background site in Hong Kong. Concurrent measurements of CO, NOx, O3, SO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were used to determine the causes of high particle number concentration (PNC) events. In all sampling months, PNC were usually higher in the evening, likely resulting from the arrival of upwind air pollutants as wind direction changed in the late afternoon. On the more polluted days, the PNC were usually higher around noon, particularly in August, similar to the diurnal trend of O3. The mode diameter at noon was smaller than in other time periods in all sampling months, further highlighting the role of secondary formation at this urban background site. A prolonged period of pollution episode occurred in late August. High PNC resulted from the arrival of pollution laden air from the PRD region or super regions. In December, new particle formation followed by subsequent growth accounted for most of the polluted days. Overall, meteorology was the most important parameter affecting particle concentrations and formation at this Hong Kong background site.

  13. Characterization and source identification of sub-micron particles at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheung, K; Ling, Z H; Wang, D W; Wang, Y; Guo, H; Lee, B; Li, Y J; Chan, C K

    2015-09-15

    Particle size distribution measurements were conducted continuously at a 30-second interval using the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) in August, September, November and December of 2011 at a coastal background site in Hong Kong. Concurrent measurements of CO, NOx, O3, SO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were used to determine the causes of high particle number concentration (PNC) events. In all sampling months, PNC were usually higher in the evening, likely resulting from the arrival of upwind air pollutants as wind direction changed in the late afternoon. On the more polluted days, the PNC were usually higher around noon, particularly in August, similar to the diurnal trend of O3. The mode diameter at noon was smaller than in other time periods in all sampling months, further highlighting the role of secondary formation at this urban background site. A prolonged period of pollution episode occurred in late August. High PNC resulted from the arrival of pollution laden air from the PRD region or super regions. In December, new particle formation followed by subsequent growth accounted for most of the polluted days. Overall, meteorology was the most important parameter affecting particle concentrations and formation at this Hong Kong background site. PMID:25965042

  14. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  15. Application of secondary ion mass spectrometry to the identification of single particles of uranium and their isotopic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, Gabriele; Betti, Maria; Forcina, Vittorio; Hiernaut, Tania; Giovannone, Bruno; Koch, Lothar

    1998-08-01

    An instrumental method based on the use of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is presented for the identification of uranium particles, and the determination of their isotopic composition. The particles collected on swipe samples were transferred to a special adhesive support for analysis by SIMS. Charging effects during analysis were avoided by a coating with 20 nm carbon. For the measurements of the isotope ratios a mass resolution of 1000 was sufficient. At this resolution, flat-top peaks were obtained which greatly improve the accuracy of the measurement. A detection limit in the ng/g—pg/g range was obtained by optimizing different instrumental parameters, such as the acquisition time. Blank samples, consisting only of the adhesive support and of swipes collected in an environment where uranium was absent, were employed for the evaluation of the background signals in the mass range 233-240. The level of background was eliminated by applying a voltage offset. From the results obtained on simulated swipe samples containing certified enriched uranium, the approach used was found to be very promising and after further improvements has been applied for the routine analysis of uranium particles in swipe samples.

  16. QPSO-MD: A Quantum Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization for Consensus Pattern Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshoul, Souham; Al-Owaisheq, Tasneem

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has been successfully applied to a wide range of fields. The recent introduction of quantum mechanics principles into PSO has given rise to a Quantum behaviour PSO (QPSO) algorithm. This paper investigates its application into motif discovery, a challenging task in bioinformatics and molecular biology. Given a set of input DNA sequences, the proposed framework acts as a search process where a population of particles is depicted by a quantum behavior. Each particle represents a set of regulatory patterns from which a consensus pattern or motif model is derived. The corresponding fitness function is related to the total number of pairwise matches between nucleotides in the input sequences. Experiment results on synthetic and real data are very promising and prove the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  17. Identification of solar nebula condensates in interplanetary dust particles and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloeck, W.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    Orthopyroxene and olivine grains, low in FeO, but containing MnO contents up to 5 wt percent were found in interplanetary dust particles (IDP) collected in the stratosphere. The majority of olivines and pyroxenes in meteorites contain less than 0.5 wt percent MnO. Orthopyroxenes and olivines high in Mn and low in FeO have only been reported from a single coarse grained chondrule rim in the Allende meteorite and from a Tieschitz matrix augite grain. The bulk MnO contents of the extraterrestrial dust particles with high MnO olivines and pyroxenes are close to CI chondrite abundances. High MnO, low FeO olivines and orthopyroxenes were also found in the matrix of Semarkona, an unequilibrated ordinary chondrite. This may indicate a related origin for minerals in extraterrestrial dust particles and in the matrix of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  18. Influence of the active mass particle suspension in electrolyte upon corrosion of negative electrode of a lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Yu.; Shtompel, G.; Ostapenko, E.; Leonov, V.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the suspension of positive active mass particles in the electrolyte on the performance of the negative electrode in a lead-acid battery is studied. A significant increase in the rate of corrosion of the lead electrode is shown when slime particles get in contact with its surface, which may result in the rise of macro-defects on the lugs of the negative electrodes.

  19. Identification of a new sulfonic acid metabolite of metolachlor in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Yockel, M.E.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Williams, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    An ethanesulfonic acid metabolite of metolachlor (metolachlor ESA) was identified in soil-sample extracts by negative-ion, fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) and FAB tandem mass spectrometry (FAB-MS/MS). Production fragments from MS/MS analysis of the deprotonated molecular ion of metolachlor ESA in the soil extract can be reconciled with the structure of the synthesized standard. The elemental compositions of the (M - H)- ions of the metolachlor ESA standard and the soil-sample extracts were confirmed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. A dissipation study revealed that metolachlor ESA is formed in soil under field conditions corresponding to a decrease in the concentration of the parent herbicide, metolachlor. The identification of the sulfonated metabolite of metolachlor suggests that the glutathione conjugation pathway is a common detoxification pathway shared by chloroacetanilide herbicides.

  20. Modeling and parameters identification of 2-keto-L-gulonic acid fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jibin; Yuan, Jingqi

    2015-04-01

    This article presents a modeling approach for industrial 2-keto-L-gulonic acid (2-KGA) fed-batch fermentation by the mixed culture of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare (K. vulgare) and Bacillus megaterium (B. megaterium). A macrokinetic model of K. vulgare is constructed based on the simplified metabolic pathways. The reaction rates obtained from the macrokinetic model are then coupled into a bioreactor model such that the relationship between substrate feeding rates and the main state variables, e.g., the concentrations of the biomass, substrate and product, is constructed. A differential evolution algorithm using the Lozi map as the random number generator is utilized to perform the model parameters identification, with the industrial data of 2-KGA fed-batch fermentation. Validation results demonstrate that the model simulations of substrate and product concentrations are well in coincidence with the measurements. Furthermore, the model simulations of biomass concentrations reflect principally the growth kinetics of the two microbes in the mixed culture.

  1. Ice nucleation of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles and implication for cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Sanders, Cassandra; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-01

    Ice nucleation properties of atmospherically relevant dust minerals coated with soluble materials are not yet well understood. We determined ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw; 75 to 110%) for five different mineral dust types: (1) Arizona test dust, (2) illite, (3) montmorillonite, (4) K-feldspar, and (5) quartz. The particles were dry dispersed and size selected at 200 nm, and we determined the fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw. Under water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability. Under water-supersaturated conditions, however, we did not observe a significant coating effect (i.e., the bare and coated dust particles had nearly similar nucleating properties). X-ray diffraction patterns of the coated particles indicated that acid treatment altered the crystalline nature of the surface and caused structural disorder; thus, we concluded that the lack of such structured order reduced the ice nucleation efficiency of the coated particles in deposition ice nucleation mode. In addition, our single column model results show that coated particles significantly modify cloud properties such as ice crystal number concentration and ice water content compared to bare particles in water-subsaturated conditions. However, in water-supersaturated conditions, cloud properties differ only at warmer temperatures. These modeling results imply that future aged dust particle simulations should implement coating parameterizations to accurately predict cloud properties.

  2. Phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of mixed oleic acid/sodium chloride/water aerosol particles before and after ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Dennis-Smither, Benjamin J; Hanford, Kate L; Kwamena, Nana-Owusua A; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-06-21

    Aerosol optical tweezers are used to probe the phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of single aerosol particles consisting of an inorganic component, sodium chloride, and a water insoluble organic component, oleic acid. Coagulation of oleic acid aerosol with an optically trapped aqueous sodium chloride droplet leads to formation of a phase-separated particle with two partially engulfed liquid phases. The dependence of the phase and morphology of the trapped particle with variation in relative humidity (RH) is investigated by cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy over the RH range <5% to >95%. The efflorescence and deliquescence behavior of the inorganic component is shown to be unaffected by the presence of the organic phase. Whereas efflorescence occurs promptly (<1 s), the deliquescence process requires both dissolution of the inorganic component and the adoption of an equilibrium morphology for the resulting two phase particle, occurring on a time-scale of <20 s. Comparative measurements of the hygroscopicity of mixed aqueous sodium chloride/oleic acid droplets with undoped aqueous sodium chloride droplets show that the oleic acid does not impact on the equilibration partitioning of water between the inorganic component and the gas phase or the time response of evaporation/condensation. The oxidative aging of the particles through reaction with ozone is shown to increase the hygroscopicity of the organic component.

  3. Raman scattering investigations of the interaction of a COV with pure and acid doped ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, S.; Oancea, A.; Focsa, C.; Chazallon, B.

    2009-04-01

    Ice present in polar stratosphere is as well a common component of the troposphere, particularly in cirrus clouds widespread in tropopause and upper troposphere region. With water droplets, ice constitutes the condensed matter that can interact with atmospheric trace gases via many different trapping processes (co-deposition i.e; incorporation during growing ice conditions, adsorption, freezing etc). The incorporation of trace gases in ice surface/volume can both affect the atmospheric chemistry and the ice structure and reactivity. This can therefore modify the nature and composition of the incorporated species in ice, or in the gas phase. Recently, field measurements have demonstrated the presence of nitric acid in ice particles from cirrus clouds(1,2) (concentration between 0.63 wt% and 2.5 wt %). Moreover, laboratory experiments have shown that the uptake of atmospheric trace gases can be enhanced up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude in these doped ice particles. Among trace gases capable to interact with atmospheric condensed matter figure volatile organic compounds such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols (ex: ethanol and methanol). They play an important role in the upper troposphere (3,4) and snowpack chemistry (5) as they can be easily photolysed, producing free radicals and so influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone-budget of the atmosphere (3,4). The temperature range at which these physico-chemical processes occur extents between ~ 190 K and 273K. Interaction between ice and trace gases are therefore largely dependent on the ice surface properties as well as on the phase formation dynamic (crystalline or not). This study aims to examine and characterize the incorporation of a COV (ex: ethanol), at the surface or in the volume of ice formed by different growth mechanisms (vapour deposition or droplets freezing). Vibrational spectra of water OH and ethanol CH-spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy at different temperatures

  4. GPCR-styrene maleic acid lipid particles (GPCR-SMALPs): their nature and potential.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Mark; Charlton, Jack; Jamshad, Mohammed; Routledge, Sarah J; Bailey, Sian; La-Borde, Penelope J; Azam, Maria T; Logan, Richard T; Bill, Roslyn M; Dafforn, Tim R; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest class of membrane proteins and are an important target for therapeutic drugs. These receptors are highly dynamic proteins sampling a range of conformational states in order to fulfil their complex signalling roles. In order to fully understand GPCR signalling mechanisms it is necessary to extract the receptor protein out of the plasma membrane. Historically this has universally required detergents which inadvertently strip away the annulus of lipid in close association with the receptor and disrupt lateral pressure exerted by the bilayer. Detergent-solubilized GPCRs are very unstable which presents a serious hurdle to characterization by biophysical methods. A range of strategies have been developed to ameliorate the detrimental effect of removing the receptor from the membrane including amphipols and reconstitution into nanodics stabilized by membrane scaffolding proteins (MSPs) but they all require exposure to detergent. Poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) (SMA) incorporates into membranes and spontaneously forms nanoscale poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) lipid particles (SMALPs), effectively acting like a 'molecular pastry cutter' to 'solubilize' GPCRs in the complete absence of detergent at any stage and with preservation of the native annular lipid throughout the process. GPCR-SMALPs have similar pharmacological properties to membrane-bound receptor, exhibit enhanced stability compared with detergent-solubilized receptors and being non-proteinaceous in nature, are fully compatible with downstream biophysical analysis of the encapsulated GPCR. PMID:27068979

  5. Automated identification and classification of single particle serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Andreasson, Jakob; Martin, Andrew V; Liang, Meng; Timneanu, Nicusor; Aquila, Andrew; Wang, Fenglin; Iwan, Bianca; Svenda, Martin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max; Bielecki, Johan; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Erk, Benjamin; Rudek, Benedikt; Chapman, Henry N; Hajdu, Janos; Barty, Anton

    2014-02-10

    The first hard X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), produces 120 shots per second. Particles injected into the X-ray beam are hit randomly and in unknown orientations by the extremely intense X-ray pulses, where the femtosecond-duration X-ray pulses diffract from the sample before the particle structure is significantly changed even though the sample is ultimately destroyed by the deposited X-ray energy. Single particle X-ray diffraction experiments generate data at the FEL repetition rate, resulting in more than 400,000 detector readouts in an hour, the data stream during an experiment contains blank frames mixed with hits on single particles, clusters and contaminants. The diffraction signal is generally weak and it is superimposed on a low but continually fluctuating background signal, originating from photon noise in the beam line and electronic noise from the detector. Meanwhile, explosion of the sample creates fragments with a characteristic signature. Here, we describe methods based on rapid image analysis combined with ion Time-of-Flight (ToF) spectroscopy of the fragments to achieve an efficient, automated and unsupervised sorting of diffraction data. The studies described here form a basis for the development of real-time frame rejection methods, e.g. for the European XFEL, which is expected to produce 100 million pulses per hour.

  6. Automated identification and classification of single particle serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Andreasson, Jakob; Martin, Andrew V; Liang, Meng; Timneanu, Nicusor; Aquila, Andrew; Wang, Fenglin; Iwan, Bianca; Svenda, Martin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max; Bielecki, Johan; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Erk, Benjamin; Rudek, Benedikt; Chapman, Henry N; Hajdu, Janos; Barty, Anton

    2014-02-10

    The first hard X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), produces 120 shots per second. Particles injected into the X-ray beam are hit randomly and in unknown orientations by the extremely intense X-ray pulses, where the femtosecond-duration X-ray pulses diffract from the sample before the particle structure is significantly changed even though the sample is ultimately destroyed by the deposited X-ray energy. Single particle X-ray diffraction experiments generate data at the FEL repetition rate, resulting in more than 400,000 detector readouts in an hour, the data stream during an experiment contains blank frames mixed with hits on single particles, clusters and contaminants. The diffraction signal is generally weak and it is superimposed on a low but continually fluctuating background signal, originating from photon noise in the beam line and electronic noise from the detector. Meanwhile, explosion of the sample creates fragments with a characteristic signature. Here, we describe methods based on rapid image analysis combined with ion Time-of-Flight (ToF) spectroscopy of the fragments to achieve an efficient, automated and unsupervised sorting of diffraction data. The studies described here form a basis for the development of real-time frame rejection methods, e.g. for the European XFEL, which is expected to produce 100 million pulses per hour. PMID:24663542

  7. Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Acetaminophen, Acetylsalicylic Acid, and Caffeine in Commercial Analgesic Tablets by LC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenk, Christopher J.; Hickman, Nicole M.; Fincke, Melissa A.; Motry, Douglas H.; Lavine, Barry

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate LC-MS experiment is described for the identification and quantitative determination of acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, and caffeine in commercial analgesic tablets. This inquiry-based experimental procedure requires minimal sample preparation and provides good analytical results. Students are provided sufficient background…

  8. Integrated Particle Handling Methods for Multiplexed Microbial Identification and Characterization in Sediments and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Darrell P. Chandler; Ann E. Jarrell; Craig S. Criddle

    2004-03-17

    Molecular methods are still relatively ineffectual for monitoring community dynamics during bioremediation, due primarily to the cost, technical difficulty and retrospective nature of the analyses. For nucleic acid analyses to meaningfully contribute to bioremediation efforts they must not only contribute to the fundamental understanding of microbial ecology, but also be formatted in such a manner that infield analysis can be achieved. The objective of this project is therefore to develop an integrated microbial and nucleic acid detection method and prototype system for the characterization and analysis of subsurface sediments, focusing on the molecular detection of metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria and activity in sediments obtained from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center. We are meeting this objective by combining environmental molecular microbiology with renewable surface techniques, microfluidic systems and microparticle analytical chemistry. The fluidic systems are used to evaluate hypotheses on the integrated biochemistry that is necessary to directly detect 16S rRNA from metal-reducing microbial communities on a suspension microarray, without using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These investigations include the use of peptide nucleic acid capture and detection probes and 'tunable surface' concepts to increase nucleic acid capture and detection efficiency and/or mitigate interferences due to co-extracted humic acids. The unified microparticle sample preparation method and suspension array is then used to characterize the 16S rRNA metal- and sulfate-reducing microbial community in FRC sediments before and after biostimulation.

  9. LC/MS/MS identification of some folic acid degradation products after E-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, M. M.; Marchioni, E.; Zhao, M.; Kuntz, F.; Di Pascoli, T.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Bergaentzle, M.

    2012-08-01

    Folates belong to the B vitamin group based on the parental compound folic acid (FA). They are involved in important biochemical processes like DNA synthesis and repair. FA is composed of a pteridine ring, p-aminobenzoic acid and glutamate moieties. The human metabolism is not able to synthesize folates and therefore obtain them from diet. FA, a synthetic vitamin, is used as a food fortificant because of its low price, relative stability and increased bioavailability compared to natural folate forms. FA is known to be a sensitive compound easily degradable in aqueous solution by ultraviolet and visible light towards various by-products. Irradiation is a process for preservation of foods that uses accelerated electrons, gamma rays or X-rays. Irradiation is proposed for the treatment of various food products, eliminating or reducing pathogens and insects, increasing the storage time and replacing chemical fumigants. This study concerns the identification of degradation products of FA after E-beam irradiation. FA aqueous solutions were irradiated with a Van de Graaff electrons beam accelerator (2 MeV, 100 μA current, 20 cm scan width, dose rate about 2 kGy/s). Applied doses were between 0 (control) and 10.0 kGy. Absorbed doses were monitored with FWT 60.00 radiochromic dosimeters.

  10. Identification of the energetic-particle driven GAM in the LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Osakabe, M.; Shimizu, A.; Watari, T.; Nishiura, M.; Toi, K.; Ogawa, K.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kato, S.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2015-08-01

    n = 0 modes with frequency chirping have been observed by a heavy ion beam probe and Mirnov coils in the large helical device plasmas, where n is the toroidal mode number. The spatial structures of the electrostatic potential fluctuation and the density fluctuation correspond to those of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The modes are observed only during the tangential neutral beam injection with the energy of 175 keV. The energy spectra of fast ions measured by a neutral particle analyzer implies that the modes are excited by the fast ions through the inverse Landau damping. The absolute values and the temperature dependence of the frequency of the mode can be interpreted by the dispersion relation taking into account the measured energy spectra of the fast ions. Therefore, the observed n = 0 modes are identified as the energetic-particle driven GAM.

  11. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27113385

  13. Identification and biochemical characterization of two functional CMP-sialic acid synthetases in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Wiebke; Bentrop, Joachim; Ustinova, Jana; Blume, Linda; Kats, Elina; Tiralongo, Joe; Weinhold, Birgit; Bastmeyer, Martin; Münster-Kühnel, Anja-K

    2012-04-13

    Sialic acids (Sia) form the nonreducing end of the bulk of cell surface-expressed glycoconjugates. They are, therefore, major elements in intercellular communication processes. The addition of Sia to glycoconjugates requires metabolic activation to CMP-Sia, catalyzed by CMP-Sia synthetase (CMAS). This highly conserved enzyme is located in the cell nucleus in all vertebrates investigated to date, but its nuclear function remains elusive. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of two Cmas enzymes in Danio rerio (dreCmas), one of which is exclusively localized in the cytosol. We show that the two cmas genes most likely originated from the third whole genome duplication, which occurred at the base of teleost radiation. cmas paralogues were maintained in fishes of the Otocephala clade, whereas one copy got subsequently lost in Euteleostei (e.g. rainbow trout). In zebrafish, the two genes exhibited a distinct spatial expression pattern. The products of these genes (dreCmas1 and dreCmas2) diverged not only with respect to subcellular localization but also in substrate specificity. Nuclear dreCmas1 favored N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas the cytosolic dreCmas2 showed highest affinity for 5-deamino-neuraminic acid. The subcellular localization was confirmed for the endogenous enzymes in fractionated zebrafish lysates. Nuclear entry of dreCmas1 was mediated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal, which seemed irrelevant for other enzymatic functions. With the current demonstration that in zebrafish two subfunctionalized cmas paralogues co-exist, we introduce a novel and unique model to detail the roles that CMAS has in the nucleus and in the sialylation pathways of animal cells.

  14. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-20

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  15. Particle-facilitated lead and arsenic transport in abandoned mine sites soil influenced by simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Shaoping, Hu; Xincai, Chen; Jiyan, Shi; Yingxu, Chen; Qi, Lin

    2008-05-01

    The role of acid rain in affecting Pb and As transport from mine tailings was investigated by pumping simulated acid rain at a infiltration rate of 10.2 cm/h through soil columns. Simulated acid rain with pH of 3.0, 4.5 and 5.6 were used as leaching solutions. Results showed that 86.9-95.9% of Pb and 90-91.8% of As eluted from the columns were adsorbed by particles in the leachates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that particles released from the columns were mainly composed of flocculated aggregates and plate or rod shaped discrete grains. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) showed that these particles were predominantly silicate minerals. Results from our experiments demonstrated that when rapid infiltration conditions or a rainstorm exist, particle-facilitated transport of contaminants is likely to the dominant metal transport pathway influenced by acid rain.

  16. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  17. Multifunctional PLGA particles containing poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles and ascorbic acid with simultaneous antioxidative and prolonged antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, Magdalena; Bračko, Ines; Milenković, Marina; Filipović, Nenad; Nunić, Jana; Filipič, Metka; Uskoković, Dragan P

    2014-01-01

    A water-soluble antioxidant (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) was encapsulated together with poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNpPGA) within a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymeric matrix and their synergistic effects were studied. The PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles synthesized by a physicochemical method with solvent/non-solvent systems are spherical, have a mean diameter of 775 nm and a narrow size distribution with a polydispersity index of 0.158. The encapsulation efficiency of AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid within PLGA was determined to be >90%. The entire amount of encapsulated ascorbic acid was released in 68 days, and the entire amount of AgNpPGAs was released in 87 days of degradation. The influence of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid on cell viability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, as well as antimicrobial activity against seven different pathogens was investigated. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay indicated good biocompatibility of these PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles. We measured the kinetics of ROS formation in HepG2 cells by a DCFH-DA assay, and found that PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid caused a significant decrease in DCF fluorescence intensity, which was 2-fold lower than that in control cells after a 5h exposure. This indicates that the PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid microspheres either act as scavengers of intracellular ROS and/or reduce their formation. Also, the results of antimicrobial activity of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid obtained by the broth microdilution method showed superior and extended activity of these particles. The samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential and particle size analysis. This paper presents a new approach to the treatment of infection that at the same time offers a very pronounced antioxidant effect.

  18. Multifunctional PLGA particles containing poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles and ascorbic acid with simultaneous antioxidative and prolonged antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, Magdalena; Bračko, Ines; Milenković, Marina; Filipović, Nenad; Nunić, Jana; Filipič, Metka; Uskoković, Dragan P

    2014-01-01

    A water-soluble antioxidant (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) was encapsulated together with poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNpPGA) within a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymeric matrix and their synergistic effects were studied. The PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles synthesized by a physicochemical method with solvent/non-solvent systems are spherical, have a mean diameter of 775 nm and a narrow size distribution with a polydispersity index of 0.158. The encapsulation efficiency of AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid within PLGA was determined to be >90%. The entire amount of encapsulated ascorbic acid was released in 68 days, and the entire amount of AgNpPGAs was released in 87 days of degradation. The influence of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid on cell viability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, as well as antimicrobial activity against seven different pathogens was investigated. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay indicated good biocompatibility of these PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles. We measured the kinetics of ROS formation in HepG2 cells by a DCFH-DA assay, and found that PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid caused a significant decrease in DCF fluorescence intensity, which was 2-fold lower than that in control cells after a 5h exposure. This indicates that the PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid microspheres either act as scavengers of intracellular ROS and/or reduce their formation. Also, the results of antimicrobial activity of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid obtained by the broth microdilution method showed superior and extended activity of these particles. The samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential and particle size analysis. This paper presents a new approach to the treatment of infection that at the same time offers a very pronounced antioxidant effect. PMID:23988864

  19. Microplastic particles in sediments of Lagoon of Venice, Italy: First observations on occurrence, spatial patterns and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, A.; Boldrin, A.; Guerriero, P.; Moschino, V.; Rella, R.; Sturaro, A.; Da Ros, L.

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve knowledge of the identification, distribution and abundances of microplastic particles of 1 mm or less (S-MPPs) in the coastal area of the Mediterranean region, a preliminary monitoring survey was carried out in a transitional environment along the north-eastern Italian coasts, the Lagoon of Venice. S-MPPs were evaluated in sediments collected from 10 sites chosen in shallow areas variously affected by natural conditions and anthropogenic influences (i.e., landward stations influenced by freshwater inputs, seaward areas near sea inlets, and sites influenced by the presence of aquaculture farms, industry and city centers). S-MPPs, extracted from bulk sediments by density separation, were counted and identified by Fourier-Transform Infrared Micro-spectroscopy (μFT-IR). The μFT-IR process included automatic surface chemical mapping and references to an infrared library database to identify the compositional spectra of particles. S-MPPs were recovered from all samples - a fact which emphasizes their extensive distribution throughout the Lagoon. Total abundances varied from 2175 to 672 S-MPPs kg-1 d.w., higher concentrations generally being observed in landward sites. Of the ten polymer types identified, the most abundant, accounting for more than 82% of total S-MPPs, were polyethylene and polypropylene. The most frequent size (93% of observed microplastics) was in the range 30-500 μm. Total S-MPP values were significantly correlated with the finer sediment fraction and with the metal pollution index.

  20. Particle size conditions water repellency in sand samples hydrophobized with stearic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Peñaloza, F. A.; Jordán, A.; Bellinfante, N.; Bárcenas-Moreno, G.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Granged, A. J. P.; Gil, J.; Zavala, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of this research is to study the effects of particle size and soil moisture on water repellency (WR) from hydrophobized sand samples. Quartz sand samples were collected from the top 15 cm of sandy soils, homogenised and divided in different sieve fractions: 0.5 - 2 mm (coarse sand), 0.25 - 0.5 mm (medium sand), and 0.05 - 0.25 mm (fine sand). WR was artificially induced in sand samples using different concentrations of stearic acid (SA; 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 g kg-1). Sand samples were placed in Petri plates and moistened with distilled water until 10% water content in weight. After a period of 30 min, soil WR was determined using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) test. A set of sub-samples was placed in an oven (50 oC) during the experimental period, and the rest was left air-drying at standard laboratory conditions. Water repellent soil samples were used as control, and the same treatments were applied. WR was determined every 24 h. No changes in WR were observed after 6 days of treatment. As expected, air-dried fine sand samples showed WR increasing with SA concentration and decreasing with soil moisture. In contrast, oven-dried samples remained wettable at SA concentrations below 5 g kg-1. Fine sand oven-dried samples showed extreme WR after just one day of treatment, but air-dried samples did not show extreme repellency until three days after treatment. SA concentrations above 5 g kg-1 always induced extreme WR. Medium sand air-dried samples showed hydrophilic properties when moist and low SA concentration (£1 g kg-1), but strong to extreme WR was induced by higher SA concentrations. In the case of oven-dried samples, medium sand showed severe to extreme WR regardless of soil moisture. Coarse sand showed the longest WDPTs, independently of soil moisture content or SA concentration. This behaviour may be caused by super-hydrophobicity. Also, it is suggested that movements of sand particles during wetting, contribute to expose new

  1. Determination of free silica in dust particles: effect of particle size for the X-ray diffraction and phosphoric acid methods.

    PubMed

    Yabuta, Juji; Ohta, Hisayosi

    2003-07-01

    The X-ray diffraction method and the phosphoric acid method are widely used to determine the fraction of free silica (mainly quartz and other silica polymorphs) in respirable dust sampled in working environments in Japan. In this study, we clarified the size effect of quartz dust for the X-ray diffraction method and the phosphoric acid method using size controlled quartz samples. The quartz samples were classified into 6 fractions with different size ranges: 1 microm and smaller, 1 to 3 microm, 3 to 5 microm, 5 to 7 microm, 7 to 10 microm and 10 microm and larger. Both of the determination methods were affected by the particle size, and especially particles smaller than 3 microm fairly dissolved in hot phosphoric acid and reduced X-ray diffraction intensity remarkably. If the content of these fine particles in the standard quartz sample is lower than that of the test samples, the fraction of free silica may be underestimated by these methods. For this reason, the standard quartz sample should have a representative size distribution of the field samples. The dust samples containing quartz were collected at a foundry and dissolved by phosphoric acid to remove non-quartz materials. The size fractions of dissolved samples were 50% for 5-10 microm, 25% for 3-5 microm, 20% for 1-3 microm and 5% for 1 microm and smaller. As the size distribution is similar to the present standard sample widely used in Japan, we concluded that the standard sample is suitable for these determination methods. PMID:12916756

  2. Identification of Proteins in Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Particles: the HCMV Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Patricia; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Wang, Dai; Camp, David G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Wiley, H S.; Britt, William; Shenk, Thomas; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Jay

    2004-10-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the herpes virus family, is a large complex enveloped virus composed of both viral and cellular gene products. While the sequence of the HCMV genome has been known for over a decade, the full set of viral and cellular proteins that compose the HCMV virion are unknown. To approach this problem we have utilized gel-free two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS to identify and determine the relative abundances of viral and cellular proteins in purified HCMV AD169 virions and dense bodies. Analysis of the proteins from purified HCMV virion preparations has indicated that the particle contains significantly more viral proteins than previously known. In this study, we identified 71 HCMV-encoded proteins that included 12 proteins encoded by known viral open reading frames (ORFs) previously not associated with virions and 12 proteins from novel viral ORFs. Analysis of the relative abundance of HCMV proteins indicated that the predominant virion protein was the pp65 tegument protein and that gM rather than gB was the most abundant glycoprotein. We have also identified over 70 host cellular proteins in HCMV virions, which include cellular structural proteins, enzymes, and chaperones. In addition, analysis of HCMV dense bodies indicated that these viral particles are composed of 29 viral proteins with a reduced quantity of cellular proteins in comparison to HCMV virions. This study provides the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the viral and cellular proteins that compose infectious particles of a large complex virus.

  3. Construction of nanoscale protein particle using temperature-sensitive elastin-like peptide and polyaspartic acid chain.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshihiko; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2009-07-01

    Temperature-responsive monodisperse spheres are useful for various in vivo and in vitro applications. Size, response temperature and biocompatibility are particularly important consideration with in vivo applications. In this work, we constructed fusion proteins of low antigenic elastin-like peptide (ELP) and a polyaspartic acid chain, and studied the particles that had a favorable size and temperature of formation of particle. From DLS analysis, we confirmed that some of them formed particles with less than 100nm in diameter around 37 degrees C, while the diameter of ELPs alone is larger than 1microm in diameter. The (PGVGV)(160)D(22), which is composed of a short aspartic acid chain and a long ELP region, had a tendency to form large particles. The temperature of formation and collapse of the protein particle were dependent on the length of the ELP and the polyaspartic acid chain, and the concentration of proteins. The direct observation with TEM indicated that the morphologies of the particles were spherical except when (PGVGV)(160)D(22) was used. The intensities of the environment-sensitive hydrophobic fluorescence increased at 37 degrees C more than 1.5 times as much as at 25 degrees C both in free form and modified at the ELP region. These results indicated that the polarity of the environment surround the fluorescence decreased or the movement of fluorescence was limited, and thus, implied that the ELP formed a more hydrophobic or rigid region and could hold hydrophobic drugs. These results suggest that a temperature-responsive protein particle with favorable size and temperature of formation can be constructed that is suitable for any in vitro or in vivo application.

  4. Identification of Vibrio vulnificus by cellular fatty acid composition using the Hewlett-Packard 5898A Microbial Identification System: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Landry, W L

    1994-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method using a capillary column for rapid identification of Vibrio vulnificus was examined in a collaborative study. Identifications were performed by analysis of cellular fatty acid profiles which were automatically searched against reference profiles stored in a computer-generated library. Each of the 13 collaborators was sent 15 unknown isolates, which included 10 V. vulnificus isolates and 5 negative control isolates. Each collaborator was furnished with a computer-generated library, developed by the Dallas U.S. Food and Drug Administration laboratory, which contained entries for V. vulnificus, V. cholerae, V. fluvialis, V. parahaemolyticus, V. mimicus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Of the 195 isolates sent to the collaborators, results for 190 isolates were received. The other 5 isolates were nonviable before analyses began. Of the 126 V. vulnificus isolates analyzed, 118 (93.7%) were correctly identified. Of the 65 negative control isolates sent, one was nonviable, one was misidentified as V. vulnificus, and 2 were misidentified as V. parahaemolyticus. Of the 64 negative controls analyzed, 95.3% were correctly identified. Statistical analysis shows a sensitivity rate of 0.872, specificity rate of 0.982, false positive rate of 0.010, and false negative rate of 0.206. The gas chromatographic method for identification of Vibrio vulnificus by microbial fatty acid profile has been adopted first action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  5. Identification of robust adaptation gene regulatory network parameters using an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, X N; Ren, H P

    2016-01-01

    Robust adaptation is a critical ability of gene regulatory network (GRN) to survive in a fluctuating environment, which represents the system responding to an input stimulus rapidly and then returning to its pre-stimulus steady state timely. In this paper, the GRN is modeled using the Michaelis-Menten rate equations, which are highly nonlinear differential equations containing 12 undetermined parameters. The robust adaption is quantitatively described by two conflicting indices. To identify the parameter sets in order to confer the GRNs with robust adaptation is a multi-variable, multi-objective, and multi-peak optimization problem, which is difficult to acquire satisfactory solutions especially high-quality solutions. A new best-neighbor particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed to implement this task. The proposed algorithm employs a Latin hypercube sampling method to generate the initial population. The particle crossover operation and elitist preservation strategy are also used in the proposed algorithm. The simulation results revealed that the proposed algorithm could identify multiple solutions in one time running. Moreover, it demonstrated a superior performance as compared to the previous methods in the sense of detecting more high-quality solutions within an acceptable time. The proposed methodology, owing to its universality and simplicity, is useful for providing the guidance to design GRN with superior robust adaptation. PMID:27323043

  6. Formaldehyde Reactions with Amines and Ammonia: Particle Formation and Product Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Millage, K. D.; Rodriguez, A.; Sedehi, N.; Powelson, M. H.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    Aqueous phase reactions between carbonyls and amines or ammonium salts have recently been implicated in secondary organic aerosol and brown carbon formation processes. Formaldehyde is ubiquitous in the atmosphere, and is present in both the gas and aqueous phases. However, the reactions of formaldehyde in the aqueous phase have not been completely characterized. This study aims to determine the interactions between formaldehyde and amines or ammonium salts present in atmospheric droplets. Bulk phase reactions of formaldehyde with these reactive nitrogen-containing compounds were monitored with ESI-MS and NMR to determine reaction kinetics and for product characterization, while UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to monitor changes in light absorption over time. Hexamethylenetetramine was found to be a major product of the formaldehyde/ammonium sulfate reaction, appearing within minutes of mixing. No products were formed that absorbed light beyond 225 nm. Mono-disperse particles containing mixtures of formaldehyde and ammonium sulfate or an amine were dried and analyzed via SMPS to determine the non-volatile fraction of the reaction products. Similarly, aqueous droplets were dried in a humid atmosphere to determine residual aerosol sizes over time as a function of formaldehyde concentration. This work indicates that formaldehyde plays a key role in aqueous-phase organic processing, as it has been observed to contribute to both an increase and reduction in the diameter and volume of residual aerosol particles.

  7. Impurity identifications, concentrations and particle fluxes from spectral measurements of the EXTRAP T2R plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menmuir, S.; Kuldkepp, M.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-10-01

    An absolute intensity calibrated 0.5 m spectrometer with optical multi-channel analyser detector was used to observe the visible-UV radiation from the plasma in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Spectral lines were identified indicating the presence of oxygen, chromium, iron and molybdenum impurities in the hydrogen plasma. Certain regions of interest were examined in more detail and at different times in the plasma discharge. Impurity concentration calculations were made using the absolute intensities of lines of OIV and OV measured at 1-2 ms into the discharge generating estimates of the order of 0.2% of ne in the central region rising to 0.7% of ne at greater radii for OIV and 0.3% rising to 0.6% for OV. Edge electron temperatures of 0.5-5 eV at electron densities of 5-10×1011 cm-3 were calculated from the measured relative intensities of hydrogen Balmer lines. The absolute intensities of hydrogen lines and of multiplets of neutral chromium and molybdenum were used to determine particle fluxes (at 4-5 ms into the plasma) of the order 1×1016, 7×1013 and 3×1013 particles cm-2 s-1, respectively.

  8. Biochemical systems identification by a random drift particle swarm optimization approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Finding an efficient method to solve the parameter estimation problem (inverse problem) for nonlinear biochemical dynamical systems could help promote the functional understanding at the system level for signalling pathways. The problem is stated as a data-driven nonlinear regression problem, which is converted into a nonlinear programming problem with many nonlinear differential and algebraic constraints. Due to the typical ill conditioning and multimodality nature of the problem, it is in general difficult for gradient-based local optimization methods to obtain satisfactory solutions. To surmount this limitation, many stochastic optimization methods have been employed to find the global solution of the problem. Results This paper presents an effective search strategy for a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm that enhances the ability of the algorithm for estimating the parameters of complex dynamic biochemical pathways. The proposed algorithm is a new variant of random drift particle swarm optimization (RDPSO), which is used to solve the above mentioned inverse problem and compared with other well known stochastic optimization methods. Two case studies on estimating the parameters of two nonlinear biochemical dynamic models have been taken as benchmarks, under both the noise-free and noisy simulation data scenarios. Conclusions The experimental results show that the novel variant of RDPSO algorithm is able to successfully solve the problem and obtain solutions of better quality than other global optimization methods used for finding the solution to the inverse problems in this study. PMID:25078435

  9. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity.

  10. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity. PMID:25330256

  11. Comparison of charged particle identification using pulse shape discrimination and ΔE-E methods between front and rear side injection in silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Barlini, S.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Casini, G.; Chbihi, A.; Edelbruck, P.; Frankland, J. D.; Gruyer, D.; Legouée, E.; Lopez, O.; Marini, P.; Pârlog, M.; Pasquali, G.; Petcu, M.; Rivet, M. F.; Salomon, F.; Vient, E.; Alba, R.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bini, M.; Borcea, R.; Bruno, M.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Cruceru, I.; Degerlier, M.; Dueñas, J. A.; GaŞior, K.; Gramegna, F.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Kamuda, M.; Kozik, T.; Kravchuk, V.; Lombardo, I.; Maiolino, C.; Marchi, T.; Morelli, L.; Negoita, F.; Olmi, A.; Petrascu, H.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Rosato, E.; Santonocito, D.; Spadaccini, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Twaróg, T.; Vigilante, M.; Fazia Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    The response of silicon-silicon-CsI(Tl) telescopes, developed within the FAZIA collaboration, to fragments produced in nuclear reactions 84Kr+120-124Sn at 35 A MeV, has been used to study ion identification methods. Two techniques are considered for the identification of the nuclear products in the silicon stages. The standard ΔE-E one requires signals induced in two detection layers by ions punching through the first one. Conversely, the digital Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) allows the identification of ions stopped in the first silicon layer. The capabilities of these two identification methods have been compared for different mountings of the silicons, i.e. rear (particles entering through the low electric field side) or front (particles entering through the high electric field side) side injection. The ΔE-E identification method gives exactly the same results in both configurations. At variance, the pulse shape discrimination is very sensitive to the detector mounting. In case of rear side injection, the identification with the “energy vs. charge rise time” PSA method presents energy thresholds which are significantly lower than in the case of front side injection.

  12. Shape evolution of SrCO{sub 3} particles in the presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jiaguo . E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com; Guo Hua; Cheng Bei

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, strontium carbonate particles with different morphologies were prepared by a simple precipitation reaction of sodium carbonate with strontium nitrate in the absence and presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA). The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the concentration of PSMA on the morphologies and phase structures of strontium carbonate particles were investigated and discussed. The results showed that SrCO{sub 3} particles with various shapes, such as bundles, dumbbells, irregular aggregates and spheres could be obtained by varying the concentration of PSMA. A schematic illustration was proposed to account for the shape evolution of the as-prepared SrCO{sub 3} particles.

  13. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester abrogates bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, M S F; Perilli, E; Stansborough, R L; Marino, V; Cantley, M D; Xu, J; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Haynes, D R; Gibson, R J; Crotti, T N

    2015-06-01

    Particle-induced bone loss by osteoclasts is a common cause of aseptic loosening around implants. This study investigates whether caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a potent and specific inhibitor of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 and nuclear factor kappa B, at a low dose reduces bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis. The effects of particles and CAPE treatment on gastrointestinal tract (GIT) histopathology were also evaluated. Mice were scanned using in vivo animal micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a baseline measurement. PE particles (2.82 × 10(9) particles/mL) were implanted over the calvariae on day 0. CAPE was administered subcutaneously (1 mg/kg/day) at days 0, 4, 7 and 10. Mice were killed at day 14 and serum was analysed for Type-1 carboxyterminal collagen crosslinks (CTX)-1 and osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) levels. Ex vivo μCT scans were conducted to assess bone volume (BV) change and percentage area of calvarial surface resorbed. Calvarial and GIT tissue was processed for histopathology. By day 14, PE particles significantly induced calvarial bone loss compared with control animals as evidenced by resorption areas adjacent to the implanted PE in three-dimensional μCT images, an increase in percentage of resorbed area (p = 0.0022), reduction in BV (p = 0.0012) and increased Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells. Serum CTX-1 (p = 0.0495) and OSCAR levels (p = 0.0006) significantly increased in the PE implant group. CAPE significantly inhibited PE particle-induced calvarial osteolysis, as evidenced by a significant reduction in surface bone resorption (p = 0.0012) and volumetric change (p = 0.0154) compared with PE only, but had no effect on systemic CTX-1. Neither particles nor CAPE had an effect on GIT histopathology. PMID:25804981

  14. Simultaneous Identification of Spectral Properties and Sizes of Multiple Particles in Solution with Subnanometer Resolution.

    PubMed

    Karabudak, Engin; Brookes, Emre; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander; Walter, Johannes; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang; Wohlleben, Wendel; Demeler, Borries; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-09-19

    We report an unsurpassed solution characterization technique based on analytical ultracentrifugation, which demonstrates exceptional potential for resolving particle sizes in solution with sub-nm resolution. We achieve this improvement in resolution by simultaneously measuring UV/Vis spectra while hydrodynamically separating individual components in the mixture. By equipping an analytical ultracentrifuge with a novel multi-wavelength detector, we are adding a new spectral discovery dimension to traditional hydrodynamic characterization, and amplify the information obtained by orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the power of this technique by characterizing unpurified CdTe nanoparticle samples, avoiding tedious and often impossible purification and fractionation of nanoparticles into apparently monodisperse fractions. With this approach, we have for the first time identified the pure spectral properties and band-gap positions of discrete species present in the CdTe mixture. PMID:27461742

  15. Automated particle identification through regression analysis of size, shape and colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Luna, J. C.; Cooper, J. M.; Neale, S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Rapid point of care diagnostic tests and tests to provide therapeutic information are now available for a range of specific conditions from the measurement of blood glucose levels for diabetes to card agglutination tests for parasitic infections. Due to a lack of specificity these test are often then backed up by more conventional lab based diagnostic methods for example a card agglutination test may be carried out for a suspected parasitic infection in the field and if positive a blood sample can then be sent to a lab for confirmation. The eventual diagnosis is often achieved by microscopic examination of the sample. In this paper we propose a computerized vision system for aiding in the diagnostic process; this system used a novel particle recognition algorithm to improve specificity and speed during the diagnostic process. We will show the detection and classification of different types of cells in a diluted blood sample using regression analysis of their size, shape and colour. The first step is to define the objects to be tracked by a Gaussian Mixture Model for background subtraction and binary opening and closing for noise suppression. After subtracting the objects of interest from the background the next challenge is to predict if a given object belongs to a certain category or not. This is a classification problem, and the output of the algorithm is a Boolean value (true/false). As such the computer program should be able to "predict" with reasonable level of confidence if a given particle belongs to the kind we are looking for or not. We show the use of a binary logistic regression analysis with three continuous predictors: size, shape and color histogram. The results suggest this variables could be very useful in a logistic regression equation as they proved to have a relatively high predictive value on their own.

  16. Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Prudence O.; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Sheehy, Joshua J.; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Warren, Frederick J.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired. PMID:25799321

  17. Acid hydrolysis and molecular density of phytoglycogen and liver glycogen helps understand the bonding in glycogen α (composite) particles.

    PubMed

    Powell, Prudence O; Sullivan, Mitchell A; Sheehy, Joshua J; Schulz, Benjamin L; Warren, Frederick J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired.

  18. Identification of group B streptococcal antigen with lectin-bound polystyrene particles.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Cumbie, R

    1987-01-01

    The lectin of the tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, or of the potato, Solanum tuberosum, can be passively coupled to amide-modified polystyrene spheres to be used as a detection reagent for the specific identification of group B streptococcal cultures grown in selective or nonselective Todd-Hewitt broth for 5 and 4 h, respectively. Agglutination occurred when the lectin reagents were allowed to react with either the cell suspension, clarified broth, or antigen extracts from group B streptococci grown in Todd-Hewitt broth. No agglutination occurred when these lectins were allowed to react with strains of serogroup A, C, D, F, or G streptococci. False-negative agglutination responses may occur with certain serotype of group B streptococci grown on Columbia sheep blood agar. A 20-min staining time permitted the specific labeling of fixed smears of group B streptococci with fluorescein-conjugated Lycopersicon lectin. The lectin from the solanaceous plant Datura stramonium did not agglutinate group B streptococci or other clinically significant streptococcal serogroups. PMID:3301888

  19. Identification of quantitative trait loci(QTL) controlling important fatty acids in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids play important role in controlling oil quality of peanut. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80%, there are several minor fatty acids accounting for about 20% in peanut oil, such as palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), stearic (S...

  20. Identification and yield of carbonic acid and formaldehyde in irradiated ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellorusso, Neil; Khanna, R. K.; Moore, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Carbonic acid, (OH)2CO, was tentatively identified in the IR spectrum of a proton irradiated CO2 + H2O ice mixture. In this report, we present additional evidence for a more definitive identification of (OH)2CO with (1) the infrared spectrum of a residue obtained by proton irradiation of CO2 + D2O ice mixture, and (2) the IR spectra of solid phases of formaldehyde (H2CO), acetone (CH3)2CO, and dimethyl carbonate (OCH3)2CO, which are structurally similar to (OH)2CO. IR characteristics (peak frequencies and complex refractive indices of the compounds in point 2) are also reported. In particular, the integrated absorption coefficients for the C-O band for the compounds in point 2 do not vary by more than 20 percent. Based on these values, we estimate the yields of H2CO and (OH)2CO by proton irradiation or ice mixtures. Both H2CO and (OH)2CO are possible irradiation products of cometary and planetary ices.

  1. Identification and yield of carbonic acid and formaldehyde in irradiated ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellorusso, N.; Khanna, R. K.; Moore, M. H.

    1993-03-01

    Carbonic acid, (OH)2CO, was tentatively identified in the IR spectrum of a proton irradiated CO2 + H2O ice mixture. In this report, we present additional evidence for a more definitive identification of (OH)2CO with (1) the infrared spectrum of a residue obtained by proton irradiation of CO2 + D2O ice mixture, and (2) the IR spectra of solid phases of formaldehyde (H2CO), acetone (CH3)2CO, and dimethyl carbonate (OCH3)2CO, which are structurally similar to (OH)2CO. IR characteristics (peak frequencies and complex refractive indices of the compounds in point 2) are also reported. In particular, the integrated absorption coefficients for the C-O band for the compounds in point 2 do not vary by more than 20 percent. Based on these values, we estimate the yields of H2CO and (OH)2CO by proton irradiation or ice mixtures. Both H2CO and (OH)2CO are possible irradiation products of cometary and planetary ices.

  2. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  3. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  4. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary.

  5. Identification of the monobrominated derivative of Acid Red 52 (Food Red No. 106) in pickled vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Naoki; Okuda, Tetsuya; Fujii, Hisashi

    2016-09-01

    Two unknown dyes (purple and purplish-red) were detected by TLC in two pickled vegetable (sakura-zuke daikon) samples containing Acid Red 52 (AR) and New Coccine as food colorants. HPLC with diode-array detection and LC/MS analyses suggested that the purple dye is monobrominated AR and the purplish-red dye is its N-desethyl derivative, which would be generated mainly during sample preparation. For the identification of the purple dye, a reference compound was prepared by bromination of AR followed by isolation of the monobrominated AR, the structure of which was elucidated as 4'-brominated AR (4'BrAR) by LC/ToF-MS and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The purple dye was confirmed as 4'BrAR by comparison of its retention time, ultraviolet-visible spectrum and mass spectrum with those of the prepared reference compound. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the detection of 4'BrAR in foods. PMID:27662432

  6. Comparison of three phenotypic and deoxyribonucleic acid extraction methods for isolation and Identification of Nocardia spp

    PubMed Central

    Faghri, Jamshid; Bourbour, Samane; Moghim, Sharare; Meidani, Mohsen; Safaei, Hajiye Ghasemian; Hosseini, Nafise; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Fazeli, Hussein; Sedighi, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aerobic Actinomycetes are a large group of soil-indwelling bacteria that are distributed in world-wide. These Gram-positive bacteria are most commonly associated with opportunistic infections in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. Materials and Methods: In this study, three phenotypic and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction methods for isolation and identification of Nocardia genus were compared. Samples were taken in five different locations of Isfahan's suburb from hospitals area, parks, agricultural lands, gardens, arid lands with different soil temperature and pH. Results: In this study, showed that slip-buried-method was better than two other phenotypic methods; 14 out of 70 soil samples (20%) were positive for Nocardia spp. DNA of positive samples were extracted with three techniques and DNA extraction by microwave technique was better than others. This technique was confirmed with observation of DNA bands on 1% agarose gel. Conclusions: These bacteria are important in immune deficient patients such as cancer patients, transplant recipients, tuberculosis; acquired immunodeficiency syndrome etc., Their affluence is unsteady in different zones of the world. In this study, among the three phenotypic methods for the isolation of Nocardia slip-buried method was better than other methods. Among DNA extraction techniques, DNA extraction by microwave method would be selective method for DNA extraction of Nocardia spp. compared with others techniques. PMID:25221754

  7. Particle Size (Sieving) and Enthalpy (Acid Calorimetry) Analysis of Single-Pull K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    PR Bredt; CH Delegard; AJ Schmidt; KL Silvers; BM Thornton; S Gano

    2000-12-22

    This report presents the results of particle size analyses and calorimetry testing performed on selected single-pull sludge samples collected from the Hanford K East Basin between December 1998 and June 1999. The samples were collected as isolated cores predominantly from areas that had not been previously sampled (e.g., North Loadout Pit, Dummy Elevator Pit, Tech View Pit), or from areas in which the sludge composition had been altered since the last sampling (e.g., Weasel Pit). Particle size analyses were performed by washing wet sludge samples through a series of four sieves with openings of 250, 500, 1410, and 4000 {micro}m. The loaded sieves were weighed before and after drying to obtain wet and dry particle size distributions. Knowledge of the particle size distribution is needed to design and predict the performance of the systems that will be used to retrieve, transport, and recover sludge. Also, sieving provides an opportunity to observe the components in the sludge. For example, during sieving of the sludge sample from the North Loadout Pit, significant quantities of organic ion exchange beads were observed. The uranium metal content and the particle size of the uranium metal in the K Basin sludge will largely determine the chemical reactivity of the sludge. In turn, the designs for the sludge handling and storage systems must be compatible with the reactivity of the sludge. Therefore, acid calorimetry was performed to estimate the uranium metal content of the sludge. For this testing, sludge samples were dissolved in nitric acid within a calibrated adiabatic calorimeter. The resulting dissolution enthalpy data were then used to discriminate between metallic uranium ({minus}3750 J/g in nitric acid) and uranium oxide ({minus}394 J/g in nitric acid). Results from this testing showed that the single-pull sludge samples contained little or no uranium metal.

  8. (210)Pb as a tracer of soil erosion, sediment source area identification and particle transport in the terrestrial environment.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, Gerald

    2014-12-01

    Although (137)Cs has been used extensively to study soil erosion and particle transport in the terrestrial environment, there has been much less work using excess or unsupported (210)Pb ((210)Pbxs) to study the same processes. Furthermore, since (137)Cs activities in soils are decreasing because of radioactive decay, some locations have an added complication due to the addition of Chernobyl-derived (137)Cs, and the activities of (137)Cs in the southern hemisphere are low, there is a need to develop techniques that use (210)Pbxs to provide estimates of rates of soil erosion and particle transport. This paper reviews the current status of (210)Pbxs methods to quantify soil erosion rates, to identify and partition suspended sediment source areas, and to determine the transport rates of particles in the terrestrial landscape. Soil erosion rates determined using (210)Pbxs are based on the unsupported (210)Pb ((210)Pbxs) inventory in the soil, the depth distribution of (210)Pbxs, and a mass balance calibration ('conversion model') that relates the soil inventory to the erosion rate using a 'reference site' at which neither soil erosion nor soil deposition has occurred. In this paper several different models are presented to illustrate the effects of different model assumptions such as the timing, depth and rates of the surface soil mixing on the calculated erosion rates. The suitability of model assumptions, including estimates of the depositional flux of (210)Pbxs to the soil surface and the post-depositional mobility of (210)Pb are also discussed. (210)Pb can be used as one tracer to permit sediment source area identification. This sediment 'fingerprinting' has been extended far beyond using (210)Pb as a single radioisotope to include numerous radioactive and stable tracers and has been applied to identifying the source areas of suspended sediment based on underlying rock type, land use (roads, stream banks, channel beds, cultivated or uncultivated lands, pasture lands

  9. Cellular fatty acid composition as an adjunct to the identification of asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods.

    PubMed

    Bernard, K A; Bellefeuille, M; Ewan, E P

    1991-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (CFA) compositions of 561 asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography as an adjunct to their identification when grown on blood agar at 35 degrees C. The organisms could be divided into two groups. In the first group (branched-chain type), which included coryneform CDC groups A-3, A-4, and A-5; some strains of B-1 and B-3; "Corynebacterium aquaticum"; Brevibacterium liquefaciens; Rothia dentocariosa; and Listeria spp., the rods had sizable quantities of antiesopentadecanoic (Ca15:0) and anteisoheptadecanoic (Ca17:0) acids. Other species with these types of CFA included B. acetylicum, which contained large amounts of isotridecanoic (Ci13:0) and anteisotridecanoic (Ca13:0) acids. CFAs useful for distinguishing among Jonesia denitrificans, Oerskovia spp., some strains of CDC groups B-1 and B-3, Kurthia spp., and Propionibacterium avidum were hexadecanoic (C 16:0) acid, isopentadecanoic (Ci15:0) acid, and Ca15:0). The second group (straight-chained type), which included Actinomyces pyogenes; Arcanobacterium haemolyticum; C. bovis; C. cystitidis; C. diphtheriae; C. flavescens, "C. gentalium"; C. jeikeium; C. kutscheri; C. matruchotii; C .minutissimum; C. mycetoides; C. pilosum; C. pseudodiphtheriticum; "C. pseudogenitalium"; C. pseudotuberculosis; C. renale; CDC groups 1, 2, ANF-1, D-2, E, F-1, F-2, G-1, G-2, and I-2; C. striatum; "C. tuberculostearicum"; C. ulcerans; C. vitarumen; C. xerosis; and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, was typified by significant quantities of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and oleic acids (C18:cis9), with differences in the amounts of linoleic acid (C18:2), stearic acid (C18:0), an unnamed peak (equivalent chain length, 14.966), and small quantities of other known saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. CFA composition of these organisms was sufficiently discriminatory to assist in classification but could not be used as the sole means of identification.

  10. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF

  11. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These

  12. Very high Momentum Particle Identification detector for ALICE at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Edmundo

    2009-04-20

    The anomalies observed at RHIC for the baryon-meson ratios have prompted a number of theoretical works on the nature of the hadrochemistry in the hadronisation stage of the pp collisions and in the evolution of the dense system formed in heavy ion collisions. Although the predictions differ in the theoretical approach, generally a substantial increase in the baryon production is predicted in the range 10-30 GeV/c. This raises the problem of baryon identification to much higher momenta than originally planned in the LHC experiments. After a review of the present status of theoretical predictions we will present the possibilities of a gas ring imaging Cherenkov detector of limited acceptance which would be able to identify track-by-track protons until 26 GeV/c. The physics capabilities of such a detector in conjunction with the ALICE experiment will be contemplated as well as the triggering options to enrich the sample of interesting events with a dedicated trigger or/and using the ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter. The use of the electromagnetic calorimeter opens interesting possibility to distinguish quark and gluon jets in gamma--jet events and subsequently the study of the probability of fragmentation in proton, kaon and pion or triggering on jets in the EMCAL. Such a detector would be identify pions until 14 GeV/c kaons from 9 till 14 GeV/c and protons from 18 till 24/GeV/c in a positive way and by absence of signal from 9-18 GeV/c.

  13. Development of a high-rate ion counter for particle identification with GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Jones, K. L.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics can provide a wealth of data on the structure of exotic nuclei. Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber. GODDESS enables particle-gamma coincidence measurements to be performed for inelastic, stripping and pickup reactions with high resolution and high efficiency. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber was developed, built and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and with first in-beam tests during the GODDESS commissioning experiment at Argonne National Laboratory. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  14. Identification of Pauses during Formation of HIV-1 Virus Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Pei-I; Miller, Anna K.; Ballew, Jeff; Sandrin, Virginie; Adler, Frederick R.; Saffarian, Saveez

    2013-01-01

    HIV Gag polymerizes on the plasma membrane to form virus like particles (VLPs) that have similar diameters to wild-type viruses. We use multicolor, dual-penetration depth, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, which corrects for azimuthal movement, to image the assembly of individual VLPs from the time of nucleation to the recruitment of VPS4 (a component of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport, and which marks the final stage of VLP assembly). Using a mathematical model for assembly and maximum-likelihood comparison of fits both with and without pauses, we detect pauses during Gag polymerization in 60% of VLPs. Pauses range from 2 to 20 min, with an exponentially distributed duration that is independent of cytosolic Gag concentration. VLPs assembled with late domain mutants of Gag (which do not recruit the key endosomal sorting complexes required for transport proteins Alix or TSG101) exhibit similar pause distributions. These pauses indicate that a single rate-limiting event is required for continuation of assembly. We suggest that pauses are either related to incorporation of defects in the hexagonal Gag lattice during VLP assembly or are caused by shortcomings in interactions of Gag with essential and still undefined cellular components during formation of curvature on the plasma membrane. PMID:24268138

  15. Electrochemical model parameter identification of a lithium-ion battery using particle swarm optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Ashiqur; Anwar, Sohel; Izadian, Afshin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a gradient-free optimization technique, namely particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, is utilized to identify specific parameters of the electrochemical model of a Lithium-Ion battery with LiCoO2 cathode chemistry. Battery electrochemical model parameters are subject to change under severe or abusive operating conditions resulting in, for example, over-discharged battery, over-charged battery, etc. It is important for a battery management system to have these parameter changes fully captured in a bank of battery models that can be used to monitor battery conditions in real time. Here the PSO methodology has been successfully applied to identify four electrochemical model parameters that exhibit significant variations under severe operating conditions: solid phase diffusion coefficient at the positive electrode (cathode), solid phase diffusion coefficient at the negative electrode (anode), intercalation/de-intercalation reaction rate at the cathode, and intercalation/de-intercalation reaction rate at the anode. The identified model parameters were used to generate the respective battery models for both healthy and degraded batteries. These models were then validated by comparing the model output voltage with the experimental output voltage for the stated operating conditions. The identified Li-Ion battery electrochemical model parameters are within reasonable accuracy as evidenced by the experimental validation results.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Early Solar system Organic Matter Preserved in Chondritic Porous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George; Wirick, Sue; Keller, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    The chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, have experienced minimal aqueous or thermal alteration since their formation. These CP IDPs are the best preserved samples of the minerals and organic matter that was present in the primitive Solar Nebula that are currently available for laboratory analysis [1]. The ~10 μm CP IDPs are aggregates of tens-of-thousands of mostly sub-micron grains of diverse compositions and mineralogies. Many of the individual mineral grains are coated by a 50 to 200 nm thick rims of carbonaceous material, and other carbonaceous material occurs as larger, discrete subunits within the particles [2]. We characterize this carbonaceous material using two high-resolution, synchrotron-based instruments: a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) to locate and map the carbon and to identify its major functional groups by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and a micro-Fourier Transform Infrared (μ-FTIR) spectrometer to further characterize the functional groups by mid-infrared spectroscopy. Carbon-XANES spectroscopy identifies the rims coating the individual grains in CP IDPs as organic matter, dominated by the C=C, likely C-rings, and the C=O functional groups [3]. This structure, with the organic rims being the contact surfaces between the grains, implies a 3-step formation sequence: grain condensation, organic rim emplacement, and, finally, aggregation of the grains to form the dust particles. This suggests these organic rims formed very early in the evolution of the Solar Nebula, after grain condensation but before grain aggregation [3]. These organic rims coat grains of diverse compositions, including silicates, sulfides, and carbonates, which is inconsistent with formation by Fischer-Tropsch-like, mineral-specific catalysis, one of the mechanisms suggested for the formation of primitive organic matter. Our observations are consistent with an

  17. Identification of a Compound Spinel and Silicate Presolar Grain in a Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) have undergone minimal parent body alteration and contain an assemblage of highly primitive materials, including molecular cloud material, presolar grains, and material that formed in the early solar nebula [1-3]. The exact parent bodies of individual IDPs are not known, but IDPs that have extremely high abundances of presolar silicates (up to 1.5%) most likely have cometary origins [1, 4]. The presolar grain abundance among these minimally altered CP IDPs varies widely. "Isotopically primitive" IDPs distinguished by anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions, numerous 15N-rich hotspots, and some C isotopic anomalies have higher average abundances of presolar grains (375 ppm) than IDPs with isotopically normal bulk N (<10 ppm) [5]. Some D and N isotopic anomalies have been linked to carbonaceous matter, though this material is only rarely isotopically anomalous in C [1, 5, 6]. Previous studies of the bulk chemistry and, in some samples, the mineralogy of select anhydrous CP IDPs indicate a link between high C abundance and pyroxene-dominated mineralogy [7]. In this study, we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of samples that were analyzed by [7] to characterize isotopically anomalous materials and to establish possible correlations with C abundance.

  18. Identification of a two-component fatty acid kinase responsible for host fatty acid incorporation by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Joshua B.; Broussard, Tyler C.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Rosch, Jason W.; Jackson, Pamela; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular fatty acid incorporation into the phospholipids of Staphylococcus aureus occurs via fatty acid phosphorylation. We show that fatty acid kinase (Fak) is composed of two dissociable protein subunits encoded by separate genes. FakA provides the ATP binding domain and interacts with two distinct FakB proteins to produce acyl-phosphate. The FakBs are fatty acid binding proteins that exchange bound fatty acid/acyl-phosphate with fatty acid/acyl-phosphate presented in detergent micelles or liposomes. The ΔfakA and ΔfakB1 ΔfakB2 strains were unable to incorporate extracellular fatty acids into phospholipid. FakB1 selectively bound saturated fatty acids whereas FakB2 preferred unsaturated fatty acids. Affymetrix array showed a global perturbation in the expression of virulence genes in the ΔfakA strain. The severe deficiency in α-hemolysin protein secretion in ΔfakA and ΔfakB1 ΔfakB2 mutants coupled with quantitative mRNA measurements showed that fatty acid kinase activity was required to support virulence factor transcription. These data reveal the function of two conserved gene families, their essential role in the incorporation of host fatty acids by Gram-positive pathogens, and connects fatty acid kinase to the regulation of virulence factor transcription in S. aureus. PMID:25002480

  19. First Identification of Amino Acids In Simulated Interstellar Medium U.j. Meierhenrich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Schutte, W. A.; Barbier, B.; Arcones Segovia, A.; Rosenbauer, H.; Thiemann, W. H.-P.; Brack, A.; Greenberg, J. M.

    Interstellar dust particles in dense clouds accrete ice mantles. As seen in infrared (IR) observations, this ice layer consists mainly of water ice, but also carbon and nitro- gen containing molecules. In order to study the physico-chemical processes in in- terstellar ices, we simulated such conditions in the laboratory. We deposited a gas mixture consisting of H_2O, CO_2, CO, CH_3OH, and NH_3 onto an alu- minium surface at 12 K under high vacuum, 10(-7) mbar. During deposition the molecules were subjected to ultraviolet radiation with a microwave stimulated hydro- gen flow discharge lamp showing main emission at Lyman-alpha. After warm-up to room temperature, the refractory material was extracted from the aluminium block, hydrolysed for 24 h at 110 (o) C with 6 M HCl, derivatized with ethyl chlorofor- mate (ECF) and finally analysed by enantioselective gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer. We were able to identify 16 amino acids in the room temperature products of irradiation.([1]) These results were confirmed by parallel experiments using (13) C-labelled ices in order to exclude contamination. Dust particles coag- ulate forming larger bodies like comets. The photolysis products could be preserved in these bodies, and in term be delivered to the Earth during the heavy bombardment which ended about 3.8 Gyr ago. The cometary components were heated during the at- mospheric entry and impact with the planet surface. The remaining organic molecules might have played an important role on the appearance of primitive life on Earth. [1] G.M. Mu noz Caro, U.J. Meierhenrich, W.A. Schutte, B. Barbier, A. Arcones Ser- govia, H. Rosenbauer, W.H.-P. Thiemann, A. Brack, J.M. Greenberg: Nature (2002), accepted.

  20. Cloning and identification of the human LPAAT-zeta gene, a novel member of the lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase family.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Yu, Long; Wu, Hai; Shan, Yuxi; Guo, Jinhu; Dang, Yongjun; Wei, Youheng; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2003-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a naturally occurring component of phospholipid and plays a critical role in the regulation of many physiological and pathophysiological processes including cell growth, survival, and pro-angiogenesis. LPA is converted to phosphatidic acid by the action of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT). Five members of the LPAAT gene family have been detected in humans to date. Here, we report the identification of a novel LPAAT member, which is designated as LPAAT-zeta. LPAAT-zeta was predicted to encode a protein consisting of 456 amino acid residues with a signal peptide sequence and the acyltransferase domain. Northern blot analysis showed that LPAAT-zeta was ubiquitously expressed in all 16 human tissues examined, with levels in the skeletal muscle, heart, and testis being relatively high and in the lung being relatively low. The human LPAAT-zeta gene consisted of 13 exons and is positioned at chromosome 8p11.21. PMID:12938015

  1. Identification of Positively Charged Residues in Enterovirus 71 Capsid Protein VP1 Essential for Production of Infectious Particles

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shilin; Li, Guiming; Wang, Ying; Gao, Qianqian; Wang, Yizhuo; Cui, Rui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a positive-stranded RNA virus, is the major cause of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in children, which can cause severe central nervous system disease and death. The capsids of EV71 consist of 60 copies of each of four viral structural proteins (VP1 to VP4), with VP1, VP2, and VP3 exposed on the surface and VP4 arranged internally. VP1 plays a central role in particle assembly and cell entry. To gain insight into the role of positively charged residues in VP1 function in these processes, a charged-to-alanine scanning analysis was performed using an infectious cDNA clone of EV71. Twenty-seven mutants containing single charged-to-alanine changes were tested. Sixteen of them were not viable, seven mutants were replication defective, and the remaining four mutants were replication competent. By selecting revertants, second-site mutations which could at least partially restore viral infectivity were identified within VP1 for four defective mutations and two lethal mutations. The resulting residue pairs represent a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions of the VP1 protein which could serve as a potential novel drug target. Interestingly, mutation K215A in the VP1 GH loop led to a significant increase in thermal stability, demonstrating that conditional thermostable mutants can be generated by altering the charge characteristics of VP1. Moreover, all mutants were sensitive to the EV71 entry inhibitor suramin, which binds to the virus particle via the negatively charged naphthalenetrisulfonic acid group, suggesting that single charged-to-alanine mutation is not sufficient for suramin resistance. Taken together, these data highlight the importance of positively charged residues in VP1 for production of infectious particles. IMPORTANCE Infection with EV71 is more often associated with neurological complications in children and is responsible for the majority of fatalities. No licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies are

  2. Use of submitochondrial particle (SMP) assays for assessing wetlands constructed for sequestering acid mine runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Bettermann, A.D.; Haahr, J.E.; Lazorchak, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Use of constructed wetlands to sequester metals from acid mine drainage is part of a USEPA SITE demonstration at Burleigh Tunnel near Silverplume, Colorado. Samples are collected on a seasonal basis for toxicity evaluation of two different pilot treatment systems. Water samples were obtained from the outflow of two experimental wetland cells utilizing either upflow and downflow treatment, as well as upstream and downstream of the discharge of Burleigh Tunnel to Clear Creek. Submitochondrial Particle (SMP), Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas acute bioassays were used to evaluate the water quality. The SMP bioassay is based on the electron transfer complex derived from mitochondria. Toxic responses result from subcellular perturbations of various subsets of enzyme systems contained in the complex. In prior work, a 0.79 r{sup 2} was reported between the SMP bioassay and P. promelas for 11 inorganics on the EPA Priority Pollutant list. The SMP bioassay provided data consistent with the whole organism results. The two most toxic samples: the Burleigh outflow, and the Clear Creek Upstream sample, gave C. dubia LC50s of 1.01% and 8.41%, respectively. The Burleigh outflow P. promelas LC50 was 1.55%. SMP EC50s for the Burleigh outflow and the Clear Creek Upstream sample were 0.63% and 1.63%, respectively. As the SMP bioassay requires 1 hour to run and costs approximately 1/10th of whole organism assays, it was feasible to determine EC50 values for 7 samples vs. the two sample LC50s determined using whole organism assays. The SMP bioassays can provide sufficient sampling density, at low cost, allowing effective delineation of wetland performance over time.

  3. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhi; Daly, Michael; Clémence, Lopez; Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L.; Devine, Declan M.

    2016-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO3 thermoplastic composite's interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the "complex" process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the "complex" surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the "complex" treatment process, the CaCO3 particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the "dry" treated CaCO3 composites. Furthermore, "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites have a significantly higher tensile strength than the composites containing untreated and "dry" treated CaCO3. This is mainly because the "wet" and "complex" treatment processes have increased adsorption density of stearate, which enhances the interfacial interaction between matrix and filler. These results confirm that the chemical adsorption of the surfactant ions at the solid-liquid interface is higher than at other interface. From this study, it was concluded that the utilization of the "complex" method minimised the negative effects of void

  4. Gas/particle partitioning of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids at a suburban site in Saitama, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Linfa; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kubota, Tsutomu; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Wang, Qingyue; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids (diacids) exhibit semivolatile behavior in the atmosphere, but their partitioning between the gaseous and particulate phases is still unclear. An annular denuder-filter pack system with a cyclone PM 2.5 was employed to investigate the gaseous and particulate phase concentrations of diacids, with high collection efficiency of most target compounds. Saturated diacids, unsaturated diacids, ketocarboxylic acids, and dicarbonyls were determined in gaseous and particulate samples collected from a suburban site in Japan, during 2007 summer, 2008 late-winter and early-winter. The concentrations of gaseous and particulate diacids in early-winter were lower than those in summer, but higher than those in late-winter. Individual diacid in gaseous phase showed a relatively good correlation with ambient oxidants, but a low correlation with NO gas (a primary pollutant). Particulate fraction to the total amount ( FP) of individual acid was larger in winter than in summer, and also was larger at night than in the daytime. In the same sample, individual diacid and ketocarboxylic acid had higher particulate phase occurrence ( FP > 56% in summer), whereas unsaturated diacid had higher gaseous phase occurrence ( FP < 18% in summer). In summer, gas/particle partitioning of diacids varied diurnally; FP values of oxalic and glyoxylic acids increased from their lowest values in the morning to their highest values at night, exhibiting the similar diurnal variation of relative humidity in the atmosphere. The higher humidity at night may lead to the formation of droplets in which water-soluble gaseous phases can dissolve, thus promoting gas-to-particle conversion. These results suggest that gas/particle partitioning of diacids depends not only on the concentrations in the gaseous phase by photochemical oxidation, but also on the characteristics of the atmosphere (e.g., temperature, sunlight, and relative humidity) and the aerosols (e.g., acidity

  5. [Identification of causative agent of Brassica rapa bacterial diseases based on fatty acid composition of cellular lipids].

    PubMed

    Dankevych, L A; Votselko, S K; Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Patina, V P

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of cell lipids of 15 strains isolated from the affected plants of rape and five collection strains has been studied. According to the results of chemotaxonomic analysis it has been found that 9 isolated strains are similar to representatives of species Pseudomonas marginalis and Pseudomonas fluorescens, and 6 - to those of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. The authors have established the efficiency of certain methods for the extraction of fatty acids used for the identification of bacteria pathogenic for rape which belong to the genera Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas.

  6. Identification of 19-epi-okadaic acid, a new diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin, by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Paz, Beatriz; Daranas, Antonio H; Cruz, Patricia G; Franco, José M; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J

    2008-01-01

    Okadaic acid (1) (OA) and its congeners are mainly responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) syndrome. The presence of several OA derivatives have already been confirmed in Prorocentrum and Dinophysis spp. In this paper, we report on the detection and identification of a new DSP toxin, the OA isomer 19-epi-okadaic acid (2) (19-epi-OA), isolated from cultures of Prorocentrum belizeanum, by determining its retention time (RT) and fragmentation pattern using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

  7. Identification of 19-epi-okadaic Acid, a New Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning Toxin, by Liquid Chromatography with Mass Spectrometry Detection

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Beatriz; Daranas, Antonio H.; Cruz, Patricia G.; Franco, José M.; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J.

    2008-01-01

    Okadaic acid (1) (OA) and its congeners are mainly responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) syndrome. The presence of several OA derivatives have already been confirmed in Prorocentrum and Dinophysis spp. In this paper, we report on the detection and identification of a new DSP toxin, the OA isomer 19-epi-okadaic acid (2) (19-epi-OA), isolated from cultures of Prorocentrum belizeanum, by determining its retention time (RT) and fragmentation pattern using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). PMID:19005581

  8. Magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) in urban soils: Their source identification and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shenggao; Yu, Xiuling; Chen, Yuyin

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic measurement is an effective method to determine spatial distribution and the degree of heavy metal pollution and to identify various anthropogenic sources of heavy metals. The objectives of this investigation are to characterize the magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) in urban soils and to discuss their potential environmental implications. The TMPs are separated from the urban topsoils of Luoyang city, China. The magnetic properties, morphology, and mineral phase of TMPs are studied using mineral magnetic measurement, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), X-ray diffraction, and synchrotron-radiation-based microprobe. The content of TMPs in urban topsoils ranges from 0.05 to 1.95% (on average 0.32%). The magnetic susceptibility of TMPs ranges from 4559×10(-8) to 23,661×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1) (on average 13,637×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1)). Thermomagnetic and bulk X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that main magnetic minerals of TMPs are magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (α-Fe2O3). The morphology of TMPs observed by SEM includes three shape types: spherule, irregular-shaped, and aggregate particles. The size of spherical TMPs ranges from 30 to about 200 μm, with the largest percentage of 30-50 μm. Synchrotron-radiation-based microprobe (μ-XRF and μ-XRD) indicates that TMPs are enriched with heavy metals Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and Cr, which are incorporated into lattice or adsorbed on the surface of magnetite/hematite. The content of TMPs significantly relates with the Tomlinson Pollution Load Index (PLI) (R(2)=0.467), suggesting that it can be used as proxy indicator of degree of heavy metal contamination in urban soils. The magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of TMPs can serve as the identification of pollution sources in urban soils.

  9. Source identification of PM 2.5 particles measured in Gwangju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanlim; Park, Seung S.; Kim, Kyung W.; Kim, Young J.

    The UNMIX and Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor models were used to investigate sources of PM 2.5 aerosols measured between March 2001 and February 2002 in Gwangju, Korea. Measurements of PM 2.5 particles were used for the analysis of carbonaceous species (organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC)) using the thermal manganese dioxide oxidation (TMO) method, the investigation of seven ionic species using ion chromatography (IC), and the analysis of twenty-four metal species using Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP)-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (AES)/ICP-Mass Spectrometry (MS). According to annual average PM 2.5 source apportionment results obtained from CMB calculations, diesel vehicle exhaust was the major contributor, accounting for 33.4% of the measured PM 2.5 mass (21.5 μg m - 3 ), followed by secondary sulfate (14.6%), meat cooking (11.7%), secondary organic carbon (8.9%), secondary nitrate (7.6%), urban dust (5.5%), Asian dust (4.4%), biomass burning (2.8%), sea salt (2.7%), residual oil combustion (2.6%), gasoline vehicle exhaust (1.9%), automobile lead (0.5%), and components of unknown sources (3.4%). Seven PM 2.5 sources including diesel vehicles (29.6%), secondary sulfate (17.4%), biomass burning (14.7%), secondary nitrate (12.6%), gasoline vehicles (12.4%), secondary organic carbon (5.8%) and Asian dust (1.9%) were identified from the UNMIX analysis. The annual average source apportionment results from the two models are compared and the reasons for differences are qualitatively discussed for better understanding of PM 2.5 sources. Additionally, the impact of air mass pathways on the PM 2.5 mass was evaluated using air mass trajectories calculated with the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) backward trajectory model. Source contributions to PM 2.5 collected during the four air mass patterns and two event periods were calculated with the CMB model and analyzed. Results of source apportionment revealed that the contribution of

  10. Isotopic composition for source identification of mercury in atmospheric fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang; Chen, Jiubin; Huang, Weilin; Fu, Pingqing; Guinot, Benjamin; Feng, Xinbin; Shang, Lihai; Wang, Zhuhong; Wang, Zhongwei; Yuan, Shengliu; Cai, Hongming; Wei, Lianfang; Yu, Ben

    2016-09-01

    The usefulness of mercury (Hg) isotopes for tracing the sources and pathways of Hg (and its vectors) in atmospheric fine particles (PM2.5) is uncertain. Here, we measured Hg isotopic compositions in 30 potential source materials and 23 PM2.5 samples collected in four seasons from the megacity Beijing (China) and combined the seasonal variation in both mass-dependent fractionation (represented by the ratio 202Hg / 198Hg, δ202Hg) and mass-independent fractionation of isotopes with odd and even mass numbers (represented by Δ199Hg and Δ200Hg, respectively) with geochemical parameters and meteorological data to identify the sources of PM2.5-Hg and possible atmospheric particulate Hg transformation. All PM2.5 samples were highly enriched in Hg and other heavy metals and displayed wide ranges of both δ202Hg (-2.18 to 0.51 ‰) and Δ199Hg (-0.53 to 0.57 ‰), as well as small positive Δ200Hg (0.02 to 0.17 ‰). The results indicated that the seasonal variation in Hg isotopic composition (and elemental concentrations) was likely derived from variable contributions from anthropogenic sources, with continuous input due to industrial activities (e.g., smelting, cement production and coal combustion) in all seasons, whereas coal combustion dominated in winter and biomass burning mainly found in autumn. The more positive Δ199Hg of PM2.5-Hg in spring and early summer was likely derived from long-range-transported Hg that had undergone extensive photochemical reduction. The study demonstrated that Hg isotopes may be potentially used for tracing the sources of particulate Hg and its vectors in the atmosphere.

  11. Exosomes and Microvesicles: Identification and Targeting By Particle Size and Lipid Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Kastelowitz, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are two classes of submicroscopic vesicle released by cells into the extracellular space. Collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles, these membrane containers facilitate important cell-cell communication by carrying a diverse array of signaling molecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. Recently, the role of extracellular vesicle signaling in cancer progression has become a topic of significant interest. Methods to detect and target exosomes and microvesicles are needed to realize applications of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and, perhaps, therapeutic targets. Detection of exosomes and microvesicles is a complex problem as they are both submicroscopic and of heterogeneous cellular origins. In this Minireview, we highlight the basic biology of extracellular vesicles, and address available biochemical and biophysical detection methods. Detectible characteristics described here include lipid and protein composition, and physical properties such as the vesicle membrane shape and diffusion coefficient. In particular, we propose that detection of exosome and microvesicle membrane curvature with lipid chemical probes that sense membrane shape is a distinctly promising method for identifying and targeting these vesicles. PMID:24740901

  12. Identification of a Herbal Powder by Deoxyribonucleic Acid Barcoding and Structural Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Bhavisha P.; Thaker, Vrinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Authentic identification of plants is essential for exploiting their medicinal properties as well as to stop the adulteration and malpractices with the trade of the same. Objective: To identify a herbal powder obtained from a herbalist in the local vicinity of Rajkot, Gujarat, using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcoding and molecular tools. Materials and Methods: The DNA was extracted from a herbal powder and selected Cassia species, followed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the rbcL barcode locus. Thereafter the sequences were subjected to National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis, followed by the protein three-dimension structure determination of the rbcL protein from the herbal powder and Cassia species namely Cassia fistula, Cassia tora and Cassia javanica (sequences obtained in the present study), Cassia Roxburghii, and Cassia abbreviata (sequences retrieved from Genbank). Further, the multiple and pairwise structural alignment were carried out in order to identify the herbal powder. Results: The nucleotide sequences obtained from the selected species of Cassia were submitted to Genbank (Accession No. JX141397, JX141405, JX141420). The NCBI BLAST analysis of the rbcL protein from the herbal powder showed an equal sequence similarity (with reference to different parameters like E value, maximum identity, total score, query coverage) to C. javanica and C. roxburghii. In order to solve the ambiguities of the BLAST result, a protein structural approach was implemented. The protein homology models obtained in the present study were submitted to the protein model database (PM0079748-PM0079753). The pairwise structural alignment of the herbal powder (as template) and C. javanica and C. roxburghii (as targets individually) revealed a close similarity of the herbal powder with C. javanica. Conclusion: A strategy as used here, incorporating the integrated use of DNA

  13. Dynamic encapsulation of hydrophilic nisin in hydrophobic poly (lactic acid) particles with controlled morphology by a single emulsion process.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shaowen; Lu, Jue; Liu, Zhiguo; Srivastava, Devesh; Song, Anna; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ilsoon

    2014-06-01

    Hydrophilic nisin-loaded hydrophobic poly (lactic acid) (PLA) particles with controlled size and shape were successfully produced utilizing a one-step single emulsification method. Preliminary shear stress and temperature tests showed that there was no significant loss in the nisin inhibition activity during this process. PLA/nisin composite particles were prepared into solid nanocomposite spheres (50-200 nm) or hollow microcomposite spheres (1-5 μm) under the operative conditions developed in our previous study, in which the hydrophilic nisin in the aqueous phase solution could be entrapped in the hydrophobic polymer in the emulsification process generating either single or multiple emulsions. The incorporation of nisin in PLA had little effect on key processing conditions, which allows the dynamic control of the morphology and property of resulting particles. Microscopic and surface analyses suggested that nisin was dispersed uniformly inside the polymer matrix and adsorbed on the particle surface. The encapsulation amount and efficiency were enhanced with the increase in nisin loading in the aqueous solution. Unique reversible control of particle size and shape by this process was successfully applied in the nisin encapsulation. Alternating temperature in the repeating emulsification steps improved the encapsulation efficiency while generated particles in desired size and shape.

  14. Poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles as versatile carrier platforms for vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Pavot, Vincent; Berthet, Morgane; Rességuier, Julien; Legaz, Sophie; Handké, Nadège; Gilbert, Sarah C; Paul, Stéphane; Verrier, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    The development of safe and effective vaccines for cancer and infectious diseases remains a major goal in public health. Over the last two decades, controlled release of vaccine antigens and immunostimulant molecules has been achieved using nanometer or micron-sized delivery vehicles synthesized using biodegradable polymers. In addition to achieving a depot effect, enhanced vaccine efficacy using such delivery vehicles has been attributed to efficient targeting of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymers belong to one such family of polymers that have been a popular choice of material used in the design of these delivery vehicles. This review summarizes research findings from ourselves and others highlighting the promise of poly(lactic acid)- and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based vaccine carriers in enhancing immune responses.

  15. Computational Study on the Effect of Hydration on New Particle Formation in the Sulfuric Acid/Ammonia and Sulfuric Acid/Dimethylamine Systems.

    PubMed

    Henschel, Henning; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-03-24

    The formation of new particles through condensation from the gas phase is an important source of atmospheric aerosols. The properties of the electrically neutral clusters formed in the very first steps of the condensation process are, however, not directly observable by experimental means. We present here electronic structure calculations on the hydrates of clusters of three molecules of sulfuric acid and three molecules of ammonia or dimethylamine. On the basis of the results of these new calculations together with previously published material we simulate the influence of hydration on the dynamic processes involved in particle formation. Most strongly affected by hydration and most important as a mediator for the effect on particle formation rates are the evaporation rates of clusters. The results give an estimate of the sensitivity of the atmospheric particle formation rate for humidity. The particle formation rate can change approximately two orders of magnitude in either direction due to hydration; the net effect, however, is highly dependent on the exact conditions. PMID:26918813

  16. Computational Study on the Effect of Hydration on New Particle Formation in the Sulfuric Acid/Ammonia and Sulfuric Acid/Dimethylamine Systems.

    PubMed

    Henschel, Henning; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-03-24

    The formation of new particles through condensation from the gas phase is an important source of atmospheric aerosols. The properties of the electrically neutral clusters formed in the very first steps of the condensation process are, however, not directly observable by experimental means. We present here electronic structure calculations on the hydrates of clusters of three molecules of sulfuric acid and three molecules of ammonia or dimethylamine. On the basis of the results of these new calculations together with previously published material we simulate the influence of hydration on the dynamic processes involved in particle formation. Most strongly affected by hydration and most important as a mediator for the effect on particle formation rates are the evaporation rates of clusters. The results give an estimate of the sensitivity of the atmospheric particle formation rate for humidity. The particle formation rate can change approximately two orders of magnitude in either direction due to hydration; the net effect, however, is highly dependent on the exact conditions.

  17. Identification of Tazarotenic Acid as the First Xenobiotic Substrate of Human Retinoic Acid Hydroxylase CYP26A1 and CYP26B1.

    PubMed

    Foti, Robert S; Isoherranen, Nina; Zelter, Alex; Dickmann, Leslie J; Buttrick, Brian R; Diaz, Philippe; Douguet, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26A1 and 26B1 are heme-containing enzymes responsible for metabolizing all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA). No crystal structures have been solved, and therefore homology models that provide structural information are extremely valuable for the development of inhibitors of cytochrome P450 family 26 (CYP26). The objectives of this study were to use homology models of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 to characterize substrate binding characteristics, to compare structural aspects of their active sites, and to support the role of CYP26 in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Each model was verified by dockingat-RA in the active site and comparing the results to known metabolic profiles ofat-RA. The models were then used to predict the metabolic sites of tazarotenic acid with results verified by in vitro metabolite identification experiments. The CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 homology models predicted that the benzothiopyranyl moiety of tazarotenic acid would be oriented toward the heme of each enzyme and suggested that tazarotenic acid would be a substrate of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1. Metabolite identification experiments indicated that CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 oxidatively metabolized tazarotenic acid on the predicted moiety, with in vitro rates of metabolite formation by CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 being the highest across a panel of enzymes. Molecular analysis of the active sites estimated the active-site volumes of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 to be 918 Å(3)and 977 Å(3), respectively. Overall, the homology models presented herein describe the enzyme characteristics leading to the metabolism of tazarotenic acid by CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 and support a potential role for the CYP26 enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics. PMID:26937021

  18. Particle phase distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater--Using humic acid and iron nano-sized colloids as test particles.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Katrine; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Baun, Anders; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different particulate fractions in stormwater: Total, Particulate, Filtrated, Colloidal and Dissolved fractions, were examined and compared to synthetic suspensions of humic acid colloids and iron nano-sized particles. The distribution of low-molecular weight PAHs (LMW PAHs), middle-molecular weight PAHs (MMW PAHs) and high-molecular weight PAHs (HMW PAHs) among the fractions was also evaluated. The results from the synthetic suspensions showed that the highest concentrations of the PAHs were found in the Filtrated fractions and, surprisingly, high loads were found in the Dissolved fractions. The PAHs identified in stormwater in the Particulate fractions and Dissolved fractions follow their hydrophobic properties. In most samples >50% of the HMW PAHs were found in the Particulate fractions, while the LMW and MMW PAHs were found to a higher extent in the Filtrated fractions. The highest concentrations of PAHs were present in the stormwater with the highest total suspended solids (TSS); the relative amount of the HMW PAHs was highest in the Particulate fractions (particles>0.7 μm). The highest concentration of PAHs in the Colloidal fraction was found in the sample with occurrence of small nano-sized particles (<10nm). The results show the importance of developing technologies that both can manage particulate matter and effectively remove PAHs present in the Colloidal and Dissolved fractions in stormwater.

  19. Identification of the uranium speciation in an underground acid mine drainage environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Thuro; Baumann, Nils; Krawczyk-Bärsch, Evelyn; Brockmann, Sina; Zimmermann, Udo; Jenk, Ulf; Weiß, Stephan

    2011-04-01

    The subsurface acid mine drainage (AMD) environment of an abandoned underground uranium mine in Königstein/Saxony/Germany, currently in the process of remediation, is characterized by low pH, high sulfate concentrations and elevated concentrations of heavy metals, in particular uranium. Acid streamers thrive in the mine drainage channels and are heavily coated with iron precipitates. These precipitates are biologically mediated iron precipitates and related to the presence of Fe-oxidizing microorganisms forming copious biofilms in and on the Fe-precipitates. Similar biomineralisations were also observed in stalactite-like dripstones, called snottites, growing on the gallery ceilings. The uranium speciation in these solutions of underground AMD waters flowing in mine galleries as well as dripping from the ceiling and forming stalactite-like dripstones were studied by time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The fluorescence lifetime of uranium species in both AMD water environments were best described with a mono-exponential decay, indicating the presence of one major species. The detected positions of the emission bands and by comparing it in a fingerprinting procedure with spectra obtained for acid sulfate reference solutions, in particular Fe(III) - SO 42- - UO 22+ reference solutions, indicated that the uranium speciation in the AMD environment of Königstein is dominated in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 by the highly mobile aquatic uranium sulfate species UO 2SO 4(aq) and formation of uranium precipitates is rather unlikely as is retardation by sorption processes. The presence of iron in the AMD reduces the fluorescence lifetime of the UO 2SO 4(aq) species from 4.3 μs, found in iron-free uranium sulfate reference solutions, to 0.7 μs observed in both AMD waters of Königstein and also in the iron containing uranium sulfate reference solutions. Colloids were not observed in both drainage water and dripping snottite water as photon correlation

  20. Stress-Survival Gene Identification From an Acid Mine Drainage Algal Mat Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Fujishima, K.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Rothschild-Mancinelli, B.; Rothschild, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities from acid mine drainage environments are exposed to multiple stressors to include low pH, high dissolved metal loads, seasonal freezing, and desiccation. The microbial and algal communities that inhabit these niche environments have evolved strategies that allow for their ecological success. Metagenomic analyses are useful in identifying species diversity, however they do not elucidate the mechanisms that allow for the resilience of a community under these extreme conditions. Many known or predicted genes encode for protein products that are unknown, or similarly, many proteins cannot be traced to their gene of origin. This investigation seeks to identify genes that are active in an algal consortium during stress from living in an acid mine drainage environment. Our approach involves using the entire community transcriptome for a functional screen in an Escherichia coli host. This approach directly targets the genes involved in survival, without need for characterizing the members of the consortium.The consortium was harvested and stressed with conditions similar to the native environment it was collected from. Exposure to low pH (< 3.2), high metal load, desiccation, and deep freeze resulted in the expression of stress-induced genes that were transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA). These mRNA transcripts were harvested to build complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries in E. coli. The transformed E. coli were exposed to the same stressors as the original algal consortium to select for surviving cells. Successful cells incorporated the transcripts that encode survival mechanisms, thus allowing for selection and identification of the gene(s) involved. Initial selection screens for freeze and desiccation tolerance have yielded E. coli that are 1 order of magnitude more resistant to freezing (0.01% survival of control with no transcript, 0.2% survival of E. coli with transcript) and 3 orders of magnitude more resistant to desiccation (0.005% survival of

  1. Design and Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Specific Identification of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  2. Rapid detection and identification of beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria by microcolony method.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shizuka; Iijima, Kazumaru; Suzuki, Koji; Motoyama, Yasuo; Ogata, Tomoo; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2009-08-01

    We evaluated a microcolony method for the detection and identification of beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this approach, bacterial cells were trapped on a polycarbonate membrane filter and cultured on ABD medium, a medium that allows highly specific detection of beer-spoilage LAB strains. After short-time incubation, viable cells forming microcolonies were stained with carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and counted with muFinder Inspection System. In our study, we first investigated the growth behavior of various beer-spoilage LAB by traditional culture method, and Lactobacillus lindneri and several L. paracollinoides strains were selected as slow growers on ABD medium. Then the detection speeds were evaluated by microcolony method, using these slowly growing strains. As a result, all of the slowly growing beer-spoilage LAB strains were detected within 3 days of incubation. The specificity of this method was found to be exceptionally high and even discriminated intra-species differences in beer-spoilage ability of LAB strains upon detection. These results indicate that our microcolony approach allows rapid and specific detection of beer-spoilage LAB strains with inexpensive CFDA staining. For further confirmation of species status of detected strains, subsequent treatment with species-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes was shown as effective for identifying the CFDA-detected microcolonies to the species level. In addition, no false-positive results arising from noise signals were recognized for CFDA staining and FISH methods. Taken together, the developed microcolony method was demonstrated as a rapid and highly specific countermeasure against beer-spoilage LAB, and compared favorably with the conventional culture methods. PMID:19619859

  3. Identification of multiple salicylic acid-binding proteins using two high throughput screens

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Tian, Miaoying; Moreau, Magali; Park, Sang-Wook; Choi, Hyong Woo; Fei, Zhangjun; Friso, Giulia; Asif, Muhammed; Manosalva, Patricia; von Dahl, Caroline C.; Shi, Kai; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P.; O'Doherty, Inish; Schroeder, Frank C.; van Wijk, Klass J.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important hormone involved in many diverse plant processes, including floral induction, stomatal closure, seed germination, adventitious root initiation, and thermogenesis. It also plays critical functions during responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. The role(s) of SA in signaling disease resistance is by far the best studied process, although it is still only partially understood. To obtain insights into how SA carries out its varied functions, particularly in activating disease resistance, two new high throughput screens were developed to identify novel SA-binding proteins (SABPs). The first utilized crosslinking of the photo-reactive SA analog 4-AzidoSA (4AzSA) to proteins in an Arabidopsis leaf extract, followed by immuno-selection with anti-SA antibodies and then mass spectroscopy-based identification. The second utilized photo-affinity crosslinking of 4AzSA to proteins on a protein microarray (PMA) followed by detection with anti-SA antibodies. To determine whether the candidate SABPs (cSABPs) obtained from these screens were true SABPs, recombinantly-produced proteins were generated and tested for SA-inhibitable crosslinking to 4AzSA, which was monitored by immuno-blot analysis, SA-inhibitable binding of the SA derivative 3-aminoethylSA (3AESA), which was detected by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay, or SA-inhibitable binding of [3H]SA, which was detected by size exclusion chromatography. Based on our criteria that true SABPs must exhibit SA-binding activity in at least two of these assays, nine new SABPs are identified here; nine others were previously reported. Approximately 80 cSABPs await further assessment. In addition, the conflicting reports on whether NPR1 is an SABP were addressed by showing that it bound SA in all three of the above assays. PMID:25628632

  4. Humic Acid Effects on the Transport of Colloidal Particles in Unsaturated Porous Media: Humic Acid Dosage, pH, and Ionic Strength Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, V. L.; Gao, B.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Soil colloids and biocolloids can facilitate contaminant transport within the soil profile through the complexation of pollutants previously thought to have limited mobility. Dissolved organic substances are qualitatively known to alter the behavior of colloids and surface chemistry of soil particles in aquatic environments when adsorbed to their surfaces. Specifically, it has been observed that even small amounts of adsorbed humic acids result in a pronounced increase in colloid mobility in saturated porous systems, presumably by a combination of electrostatic and steric stabilization. However, the degree to which adsorbed humic acids stabilize colloidal suspension is highly sensitive to the system's solution chemistry; mainly in terms of pH, ionic strength, and metal ions present. The objective of this study is to expound quantitatively on the role that combined stabilizing and destabilizing solution chemistry components have on humic acid-colloid transport in unsaturated media by isolating experimentally some underlying mechanisms that regulate colloid transport in realistic aquatic systems. We hypothesize that in chemically heterogeneous porous media, with ionic strength values above 0 and pH ranges from 4 to 9, the effect of humic acid on colloid suspensions cannot be simply characterized by increased stability and mobility. That a critical salt concentration must exists for a given humic acid concentration and pH, above which the network of humic acid collapses by forming coordination complexes with other suspended or adsorbed humic acids, thus increasing greatly the retention of colloids in the porous medium by sweep flocculation. In addition, capillary forces in unsaturated media may contribute further to overcome repulsive forces that prevent flocculation of humic acid-colloid complexes. The experimental work in this study will include: jar tests to determine critical solution concentration combinations for desired coagulation/flocculation rates, column

  5. Identification and quantitative determination of eudesmane-type acids from the essential oil of Dittrichia viscosa sp. viscosa using 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Marie-Cécile; Bradesi, Pascale; Casanova, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    A procedure that allows the identification and quantitative determination of eudesmane-type acids in the acidic part of the essential oil of Dittrichia viscosa sp. viscosa is described. The method involves the computer-aided analysis of the 13C-NMR spectrum of the mixture without the requirement of previous separation or derivatisation. The quantitative procedure was verified with costic acid standard and applied to three other acids which possess the same eudesmane framework.

  6. Synthesis, Identification, and Structure Elucidation of Adducts Formed by Reactions of Hydroxycinnamic Acids with Glutathione or Cysteinylglycine.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Lima, Nayla; Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Mazauric, Jean-Paul; Sommerer, Nicolas; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T; Cheynier, Véronique; Le Guernevé, Christine

    2016-09-23

    Grape polyphenols, especially hydroxycinnamic acids such as caftaric and caffeic acid, are prone to enzymatic oxidation reactions during the winemaking process, forming o-quinones and leading to color darkening. Glutathione is capable of trapping these o-quinones and thus limiting juice browning. In this study, the addition of glutathione or cysteinylglycine onto caftaric or caffeic acid o-quinones formed by polyphenoloxidase-catalyzed reactions was investigated by UPLC-DAD-ESIMS and NMR data analyses. Complete identification of adducts has been achieved via NMR data. The results confirmed that the favored reaction is the substitution of the sulfanyl group of cysteine at C-2 of the aromatic ring. Several minor isomers, namely, the cis-isomer of the 2-S adduct and trans-isomers of the 5-S and 6-S adducts, and the 2,5-di-S-glutathionyl adducts were also identified and quantified by qNMR. With the exception of 2-(S-glutathionyl)- and 2,5-di(S-glutathionyl)-trans-caftaric acid, these products had never been formally identified. In particular, the 5-S and 6-S derivatives are reported here for the first time. The first formal identification of 2-S cis-derivatives is also provided. Moreover, NMR and UPLC-DAD-ESIMS analysis showed that signature UV and MS spectra can serve as markers of the conformation and substitution position in the aromatic ring for each of the isomers.

  7. Synthesis, Identification, and Structure Elucidation of Adducts Formed by Reactions of Hydroxycinnamic Acids with Glutathione or Cysteinylglycine.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Lima, Nayla; Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Mazauric, Jean-Paul; Sommerer, Nicolas; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T; Cheynier, Véronique; Le Guernevé, Christine

    2016-09-23

    Grape polyphenols, especially hydroxycinnamic acids such as caftaric and caffeic acid, are prone to enzymatic oxidation reactions during the winemaking process, forming o-quinones and leading to color darkening. Glutathione is capable of trapping these o-quinones and thus limiting juice browning. In this study, the addition of glutathione or cysteinylglycine onto caftaric or caffeic acid o-quinones formed by polyphenoloxidase-catalyzed reactions was investigated by UPLC-DAD-ESIMS and NMR data analyses. Complete identification of adducts has been achieved via NMR data. The results confirmed that the favored reaction is the substitution of the sulfanyl group of cysteine at C-2 of the aromatic ring. Several minor isomers, namely, the cis-isomer of the 2-S adduct and trans-isomers of the 5-S and 6-S adducts, and the 2,5-di-S-glutathionyl adducts were also identified and quantified by qNMR. With the exception of 2-(S-glutathionyl)- and 2,5-di(S-glutathionyl)-trans-caftaric acid, these products had never been formally identified. In particular, the 5-S and 6-S derivatives are reported here for the first time. The first formal identification of 2-S cis-derivatives is also provided. Moreover, NMR and UPLC-DAD-ESIMS analysis showed that signature UV and MS spectra can serve as markers of the conformation and substitution position in the aromatic ring for each of the isomers. PMID:27616743

  8. Anacardic Acids from Cashew Nuts Ameliorate Lung Damage Induced by Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Owen, Robert W.; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50 μg of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100 μL of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  9. Anacardic acids from cashew nuts ameliorate lung damage induced by exposure to diesel exhaust particles in mice.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50  μ g of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100  μ L of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs.

  10. Rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids including two new constituents from Tydemania expeditionis by LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Long; Kubanek, Julia; Hay, Mark E.; Aalbersberg, William; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tydemania expeditionis Weber-van Bosse (Udoteaceae) is a weakly calcified green alga. In the present paper, liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray mass spectrometry was developed to identify the fingerprint components. A total of four triterpenoid sulfates and three hydroxy fatty acids in the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract were structurally characterized on the basis of retention time, online UV spectrum and mass fragmentation pattern. Furthermore, detailed LC-MS analysis revealed two new hydroxy fatty acids, which were then prepared and characterized by extensive NMR analyses. The proposed method provides a scientific and technical platform for the rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids in similar marine algae and terrestrial plants. PMID:21915955

  11. Expansion of the Clavulanic Acid Gene Cluster: Identification and In Vivo Functional Analysis of Three New Genes Required for Biosynthesis of Clavulanic Acid by Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongfeng; Khaleeli, Nusrat; Townsend, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is a potent inhibitor of β-lactamase enzymes and is of demonstrated value in the treatment of infections by β-lactam-resistant bacteria. Previously, it was thought that eight contiguous genes within the genome of the producing strain Streptomyces clavuligerus were sufficient for clavulanic acid biosynthesis, because they allowed production of the antibiotic in a heterologous host (K. A. Aidoo, A. S. Paradkar, D. C. Alexander, and S. E. Jensen, p. 219–236, In V. P. Gullo et al., ed., Development in industrial microbiology series, 1993). In contrast, we report the identification of three new genes, orf10 (cyp), orf11 (fd), and orf12, that are required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis as indicated by gene replacement and trans-complementation analysis in S. clavuligerus. These genes are contained within a 3.4-kb DNA fragment located directly downstream of orf9 (cad) in the clavulanic acid cluster. While the orf10 (cyp) and orf11 (fd) proteins show homologies to other known CYP-150 cytochrome P-450 and [3Fe-4S] ferredoxin enzymes and may be responsible for an oxidative reaction late in the pathway, the protein encoded by orf12 shows no significant similarity to any known protein. The results of this study extend the biosynthetic gene cluster for clavulanic acid and attest to the importance of analyzing biosynthetic genes in the context of their natural host. Potential functional roles for these proteins are proposed. PMID:10869089

  12. Identification of Catechin, Syringic Acid, and Procyanidin B2 in Wine as Stimulants of Gastric Acid Secretion.

    PubMed

    Liszt, Kathrin Ingrid; Eder, Reinhard; Wendelin, Sylvia; Somoza, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    Organic acids of wine, in addition to ethanol, have been identified as stimulants of gastric acid secretion. This study characterized the influence of other wine compounds, particularly phenolic compounds, on proton secretion. Forty wine parameters were determined in four red wines and six white wines, including the contents of organic acids and phenolic compounds. The secretory activity of the wines was determined in a gastric cell culture model (HGT-1 cells) by means of a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye. Red wines stimulated proton secretion more than white wines. Lactic acid and the phenolic compounds syringic acid, catechin, and procyanidin B2 stimulated proton secretion and correlated with the pro-secretory effect of the wines. Addition of the phenolic compounds to the least active white wine sample enhanced its proton secretory effect by 65 ± 21% (p < 0.05). These results indicate that not only malic and lactic acid but also bitter and astringent tasting phenolic compounds in wine contribute to its stimulatory effect on gastric acid secretion.

  13. Reaction of oleic acid particles with NO3 radicals: Products, mechanism, and implications for radical-initiated organic aerosol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2006-03-16

    The heterogeneous reaction of liquid oleic acid aerosol particles with NO3 radicals in the presence of NO2, N2O5, and O2 was investigated in an environmental chamber using a combination of on-line and off-line mass spectrometric techniques. The results indicate that the major reaction products, which are all carboxylic acids, consist of hydroxy nitrates, carbonyl nitrates, dinitrates, hydroxydinitrates, and possibly more highly nitrated products. The key intermediate in the reaction is the nitrooxyalkylperoxy radical, which is formed by the addition of NO3 to the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent addition of O2. The nitrooxyalkylperoxy radicals undergo self-reactions to form hydroxy nitrates and carbonyl nitrates, and may also react with NO2 to form nitrooxy peroxynitrates. The latter compounds are unstable and decompose to carbonyl nitrates and dinitrates. It is noteworthy that in this reaction nitrooxyalkoxy radicals appear not to be formed, as indicated by the absence of the expected products of decomposition or isomerization of these species. This is different from gas-phase alkene-NO3 reactions, in which a large fraction of the products are formed through these pathways. The results may indicate that, for liquid organic aerosol particles in low NOx environments, the major products of the radical-initiated oxidation (including by OH radicals) of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds will be substituted forms of the parent compound rather than smaller decomposition products. These compounds will remain in the particle and can potentially enhance particle hygroscopicity and the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. PMID:16526637

  14. Gas-particle partitioning of organic acids during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS): measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. A. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-Particle partitioning measurements of organic acids were carried out during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS, June-July 2013) at the Centerville, AL Supersite in the Southeast US, a region with significant isoprene and terpene emissions. Organic acid measurements were made with a Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) and acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion. We investigate both individual species and bulk organic acids and partitioning to organic and water phases in the aerosol. Measured partitioning is compared to data from three other instruments that can also quantify gas-particle partitioning with high time resolution: another HRToF-CIMS using iodide (I-) as the reagent ion to ionize acids and other highly oxidized compounds, a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG), and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS The partitioning measurements for three of the instruments are generally consistent, with results in the same range for most species and following similar temporal trends and diurnal cycles. The TD-PTRMS measures on average ½ the partitioning to the particle phase of the acetate CIMS. Both the measurements and the model of partitioning to the organic phase respond quickly to temperature, and the model agrees with the measured partitioning within the error of the measurement for multiple compounds, although many compounds do not match the modeled partitioning, especially at lower m/z. This discrepancy may be due to thermal decomposition of larger molecules into smaller ones when heated.

  15. Magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) in urban soils: Their source identification and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shenggao; Yu, Xiuling; Chen, Yuyin

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic measurement is an effective method to determine spatial distribution and the degree of heavy metal pollution and to identify various anthropogenic sources of heavy metals. The objectives of this investigation are to characterize the magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) in urban soils and to discuss their potential environmental implications. The TMPs are separated from the urban topsoils of Luoyang city, China. The magnetic properties, morphology, and mineral phase of TMPs are studied using mineral magnetic measurement, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), X-ray diffraction, and synchrotron-radiation-based microprobe. The content of TMPs in urban topsoils ranges from 0.05 to 1.95% (on average 0.32%). The magnetic susceptibility of TMPs ranges from 4559×10(-8) to 23,661×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1) (on average 13,637×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1)). Thermomagnetic and bulk X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that main magnetic minerals of TMPs are magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (α-Fe2O3). The morphology of TMPs observed by SEM includes three shape types: spherule, irregular-shaped, and aggregate particles. The size of spherical TMPs ranges from 30 to about 200 μm, with the largest percentage of 30-50 μm. Synchrotron-radiation-based microprobe (μ-XRF and μ-XRD) indicates that TMPs are enriched with heavy metals Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and Cr, which are incorporated into lattice or adsorbed on the surface of magnetite/hematite. The content of TMPs significantly relates with the Tomlinson Pollution Load Index (PLI) (R(2)=0.467), suggesting that it can be used as proxy indicator of degree of heavy metal contamination in urban soils. The magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of TMPs can serve as the identification of pollution sources in urban soils. PMID:26588801

  16. Structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid allergen in penicillin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Jin, Yang; Mao, Hui; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Jiawei; Peng, Yan; Du, Shuhu; Zhang, Zhongping

    2014-08-15

    Trace penicilloic acid allergen frequently leads to various fatal immune responses to many patients, but it is still a challenge to directly discriminate and detect its residue in penicillin by a chemosensing way. Here, we report that silver-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs) exhibit a structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement capability for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid in penicillin. It has been demonstrated that penicilloic acid can very easily link Au@Ag NPs together by its two carboxyl groups, locating itself spontaneously at the interparticle of Au@Ag NPs to form strong Raman hot-spot. At the critical concentration inducing the nanoparticle aggregation, Raman-enhanced effect of penicilloic acid is ~60,000 folds higher than that of penicillin. In particular, the selective Raman enhancement to the two carboxyl groups makes the peak of carboxyl group at C6 of penicilloic acid appear as a new Raman signal due to the opening of β-lactam ring of penicillin. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle sensor reaches a sensitive limit lower than the prescribed 1.0‰ penicilloic acid residue in penicillin. The novel strategy to examine allergen is more rapid, convenient and inexpensive than the conventional separation-based assay methods.

  17. Identification and quantitation of unsaturated fatty acid isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry: a shotgun lipidomics approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui; Zhao, Zhongdan; Gross, Richard W; Han, Xianlin

    2011-06-01

    Identification and quantification of unsaturated fatty acid (FA) isomers in a biological system are significant in the study of lipid metabolism and catabolism, membrane biophysics, and pathogenesis of diseases but are challenging in lipidomics. We developed a novel approach for identification and quantitation of unsaturated FA isomers by exploiting two facts: (1) unsaturated FA anions yield fragment ion(s) from loss of CO(2) or H(2)O from the anions upon collision-induced dissociation; and (2) the fragment ions yielded from discrete FA isomers have distinct profiles of the fragment ion intensity vs. collision conditions. These distinct profiles likely result from the differential interactions of the negative charge of the fragment ion with the electron clouds of the double bonds due to their different distances in discrete FA isomers. The novel approach was also extended to analyze the double bond isomers of FA chains present in phospholipids by multistage tandem mass spectrometry. Collectively, we developed a new approach for identification and quantification of the double bond isomers of endogenous FA species or FA chains present in intact phospholipid species. We believe that this approach should further advance the lipidomic power for identification of the biochemical mechanisms underlying metabolic diseases.

  18. Automatic identification approach for high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring fatty acid global profiling.

    PubMed

    Tie, Cai; Hu, Ting; Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2015-08-18

    Fatty acids (FAs) are a group of lipid molecules that are essential to organisms. As potential biomarkers for different diseases, FAs have attracted increasing attention from both biological researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. A sensitive and accurate method for globally profiling and identifying FAs is required for biomarker discovery. The high selectivity and sensitivity of high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (HPLC-MRM) gives it great potential to fulfill the need to identify FAs from complicated matrices. This paper developed a new approach for global FA profiling and identification for HPLC-MRM FA data mining. Mathematical models for identifying FAs were simulated using the isotope-induced retention time (RT) shift (IRS) and peak area ratios between parallel isotope peaks for a series of FA standards. The FA structures were predicated using another model based on the RT and molecular weight. Fully automated FA identification software was coded using the Qt platform based on these mathematical models. Different samples were used to verify the software. A high identification efficiency (greater than 75%) was observed when 96 FA species were identified in plasma. This FAs identification strategy promises to accelerate FA research and applications.

  19. In situ air-water and particle-water partitioning of perfluorocarboxylic acids, perfluorosulfonic acids and perfluorooctyl sulfonamide at a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Vierke, Lena; Ahrens, Lutz; Shoeib, Mahiba; Palm, Wolf-Ulrich; Webster, Eva M; Ellis, David A; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Harner, Tom

    2013-08-01

    In situ measurements of air and water phases at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were used to investigate the partitioning behavior of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) and perfluorooctyl sulfonamide (HFOSA) and their conjugate bases (PFC(-)s, PFS(-)s, and FOSA(-), respectively). Particle-dissolved (Rd) and air-water (QAW) concentration ratios were determined at different tanks of a WWTP. Sum of concentrations of C4-12,14 PFC(A)s, C4,6,8,10 PFS(A)s and (H)FOSA were as high as 50 pg m(-3) (atmospheric gas phase), 2300 ng L(-1) (aqueous dissolved phase) and 2500 ng L(-1) (aqueous particle phase). Particle-dissolved concentration ratios of total species, log Rd, ranged from -2.9 to 1.3 for PFS(A)s, from -1.9 to 1.1 for PFC(A)s and was 0.71 for (H)FOSA. These field-based values agree well with equilibrium partitioning data reported in the literature, suggesting that any in situ generation from precursors, if they are present in this system, occurs at a slower rate than the rate of approach to equilibrium. Acid QAW were also estimated. Good agreement between the QAW and the air-water equilibrium partition coefficient for C8PFCA suggests that the air above the WWTP tanks is at or near equilibrium with the water. Uncertainties in these QAW values are attributed mainly to variability in pKa values reported in the literature. The WWTP provides a unique environment for investigating environmental fate processes of the PFCAs and PFSAs under 'real' conditions in order to better understand and predict their fate in the environment.

  20. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kate E.; Burton, Edward D.; Cook, Perran; Raven, Mark D.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.

  1. Fine-particle emissions from solid biofuel combustion studied with single-particle mass spectrometry: Identification of markers for organics, soot, and ash components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagels, Joakim; Dutcher, Dabrina D.; Stolzenburg, Mark R.; McMurry, Peter H.; GäLli, Markus E.; Gross, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of combustion phase and fuel on smoke particle emissions from a wood stove operated with three different wood fuels and from a corn stove were investigated. A single-particle mass spectrometer (aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS)) was used for time- and size-resolved chemical signatures and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used for online mobility size distributions. Markers of particle phase organics and elemental carbon, PM1.5, and CO emissions were strongly reduced for the corn stove compared to the wood stove. This is because the more controlled fuel and air supply in the corn stove result in more complete combustion. NOx emissions and particle phase phosphates showed the opposite trend. Marker ions and particle types associated with soot and alkali salts such as potassium chloride and potassium sulfates dominated during flaming combustion and were correlated with increased exhaust temperatures and reduced CO emissions. Marker ions of hydrocarbons and oxidized organics as well as a particle cluster type with a strong organic signature were associated with reduced combustion temperature and increased CO levels, observed during start up from cold stove, addition of fuel, and combustion with reduced air supply. Two different particle types were identified in corn experiments when particles were classified according to mobility before they were measured with the ATOFMS. "Less massive" particles contained mostly ash and soot and had vacuum aerodynamic diameters that were nearly independent of mobility diameter. "More massive" particles had aerodynamic diameters that increased linearly with mobility diameter, indicating approximately spherical shapes, and were hypothesized to consist of organics.

  2. Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, J.; Takahashi, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Yabushita, A.; Shimizu, A.; Matsui, I.; Sugimoto, N.

    2006-04-13

    Uptakes of sulfate and nitrate onto Asian dust particles during transport from the Asian continent to the Pacific Ocean were analyzed by using a single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Observation was conducted at Tsukuba in Japan in the springtime of 2004. Sulfate-rich dust particles made their largest contribution during the 'dust event' in the middle of April 2004. As a result of detailed analysis including backward trajectory calculations, it was confirmed that sulfate components originating from coal combustion in the continent were internally mixed with dust particles. Even in the downstream of the outflow far from the continental coastline, significant contribution of Asian dust to sulfate was observed. Asian dust plays critical roles as the carrier of sulfate over the Pacific Ocean.

  3. Identification of unknown impurity of azelaic acid in liposomal formulation assessed by HPLC-ELSD, GC-FID, and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Han, Stanisław; Karłowicz-Bodalska, Katarzyna; Potaczek, Piotr; Wójcik, Adam; Ozimek, Lukasz; Szura, Dorota; Musiał, Witold

    2014-02-01

    The identification of new contaminants is critical in the development of new medicinal products. Many impurities, such as pentanedioic acid, hexanedioic acid, heptanedioic acid, octanedioic acid, decanedioic acid, undecanedioic acid, dodecanedioic acid, tridecanedioic acid, and tetradecanedioic acid, have been identified in samples of azelaic acid. The aim of this study was to identify impurities observed during the stability tests of a new liposomal dosage form of azelaic acid that is composed of phosphatidylcholine and a mixture of ethyl alcohol and water, using high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD), gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods. During the research and development of a new liposomal formulation of azelaic acid, we developed a method for determining the contamination of azelaic acid using HPLC-ELSD. During our analytical tests, we identified a previously unknown impurity of a liposomal preparation of azelaic acid that appeared in the liposomal formulation of azelaic acid during preliminary stability studies. The procedure led to the conclusion that the impurity was caused by the reaction of azelaic acid with one of the excipients that was applied in the product. The impurity was finally identified as an ethyl monoester of azelaic acid. The identification procedure of this compound was carried out in a series of experiments comparing the chromatograms that were obtained via the following chromatographic methods: HPLC-ELSD, GC-FID, and GC-MS. The final identification of the compound was carried out by GC with MS. PMID:24166667

  4. Gold Nanoparticle Clusters in Quasinematic Layers of Liquid-Crystalline Dispersion Particles of Double-Stranded Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Yevdokimov, Yu.M.; Salyanov, V.I.; Katz, E.I.; Skuridin, S.G.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between gold nanoparticles and particles of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA and poly(I)×poly(C) molecules is considered. It is shown that small-sized (~ 2 nm) gold nanoparticles induce two different structural processes. First, they facilitate the reorganization of the spatial cholesteric structure of the particles into a nematic one. This process is accompanied by a fast decrease in the amplitude of an abnormal band in the CD spectrum. Second, they induce cluster formation in a “free space” between neighboring nucleic acid molecules fixed in the structure of the quasinematic layers of liquid-crystalline particles. This process is accompanied by slow development of the surface plasmon resonance band in the visible region of the absorption spectrum. Various factors influencing these processes are outlined. Some assumptions concerning the possible mechanism(s) of fixation of gold nanoparticles between the neighboring double-stranded nucleic acid molecules in quasinematic layers are formulated. PMID:23346383

  5. Synthesis of multifunctional Ag@Au@phenol formaldehyde resin particles loaded with folic acids for photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Xu, Qi-Zhi; Jin, Sheng-Yu; Lu, Yang; Zhao, Yang; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-07-23

    Multifunctional Ag@Au@ phenol formaldehyde resin (PFR) particles loaded with folic acids (FA) have been designed for killing tumor cells through photothermy conversion under the irradiation of near-infrared (NIR) light. Possessing the virtue of good fluorescence, low toxicity, and good targeting, the nanocomposite consists of an Ag core, an Au layer, a PFR shell, and folic acids on the PFR shell. The Ag@PFR core-shell structure can be prepared with a simple hydrothermal method after preheating. We then filled the PFR shell with a layer of Au by heating and modified the shell with polyelectrolyte to change its surface charge state. To capture tumor cells actively, FA molecules were attached onto the surface of the Ag@Au@PFR particles in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethly aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Owing to the excellent property of Au NPs and Ag NPs as photothermal conversion agents, the Ag@Au@ PFR@FA particles can be utilized to kill tumor cells when exposed to NIR light.

  6. Preparation and Identification of Benzoic Acids and Benzamides: An Organic "Unknown" Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, Douglass F.; Nelson, Jade D.; Northrop, John P.

    1999-06-01

    The reaction of an unknown substituted benzene derivative (illustrated by toluene) with oxalyl chloride and aluminum chloride gives the acid chloride. Hydrolysis of the acid chloride gives the acid, and reaction of the acid with concentrated aqueous ammonia gives the benzamide.

    The equivalent weight of the acid can be determined by titration with standardized aqueous sodium hydroxide. Given this information and the melting points of the acid and the benzamide, it is possible to deduce the structure of the initial unknown.

  7. Duplex DNA-Invading γ-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids Enable Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Infections in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Amburg, Joel I.; Crawford, Elizabeth M.; Prakash, Ranjit A.; Rabson, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early and targeted antimicrobial intervention is lifesaving, yet current diagnostic approaches fail to provide actionable information within a clinically viable time frame due to their reliance on blood culturing. Here, we present a novel pathogen identification (PID) platform that features the use of duplex DNA-invading γ-modified peptide nucleic acids (γPNAs) for the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens directly from blood, without culturing. The PID platform provides species-level information in under 2.5 hours while reaching single-CFU-per-milliliter sensitivity across the entire 21-pathogen panel. The clinical utility of the PID platform was demonstrated through assessment of 61 clinical specimens, which showed >95% sensitivity and >90% overall correlation to blood culture findings. This rapid γPNA-based platform promises to improve patient care by enabling the administration of a targeted first-line antimicrobial intervention. PMID:27094328

  8. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles with Nitric Acid. A Combined CCSEM/EDX, ESEM AND ICP-MS Study

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2005-05-26

    The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four authentic dust samples with gas-phase nitric acid was investigated in this study. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to investigate the hygroscopic behavior of mineral dust particles reacted with nitric acid. Differences in the reactivity of mineral dust particles from these four different dust source regions with nitric acid were observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, namely China loess dust and Saudi coastal dust, were found to react to the greatest extent.

  9. Gallic Acid Production with Mouldy Polyurethane Particles Obtained from Solid State Culture of Aspergillus niger GH1.

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Marco; Mussatto, Solange I; Rodríguez, Raul; Teixeira, Jose A; Martinez, Jose L; Hernandez, Ayerim; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2015-06-01

    Gallic acid production in a batch bioreactor was evaluated using as catalytic material the mouldy polyurethane solids (MPS) obtained from a solid-state fermentation (SSF) bioprocess carried out for tannase production by Aspergillus niger GH1 on polyurethane foam powder (PUF) with 5 % (v/w) of tannic acid as inducer. Fungal biomass, tannic acid consumption and tannase production were kinetically monitored. SSF was stopped when tannase activity reached its maximum level. Effects of washing with distilled water and drying on the tannase activity of MPS were determined. Better results were obtained with dried and washed MPS retaining 84 % of the tannase activity. Maximum tannase activity produced through SSF after 24 h of incubation was equivalent to 130 U/gS with a specific activity of 36 U/mg. The methylgallate was hydrolysed (45 %) in an easy, cheap and fast bioprocess (30 min). Kinetic parameters of tannase self-immobilized on polyurethane particles were calculated to be 5 mM and 04.1 × 10(-2) mM/min for K M and V max, respectively. Results demonstrated that the MPS, with tannase activity, can be successfully used for the production of the antioxidant gallic acid from methyl-gallate substrate. Direct use of PMS to produce gallic acid can be advantageous as no previous extraction of enzyme is required, thus reducing production costs.

  10. Identification of possible sources of atmospheric PM10 using particle size, SEM-EDS and XRD analysis, Jharia Coalfield Dhanbad, India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debananda; Singh, Gurdeep; Gosai, Nitin

    2015-11-01

    Identification of responsible sources of pollution using physical parameter particulate matter (PM)10 in a critically polluted area is discussed in this paper. Database was generated by Ambient Air Quality Monitoring (AAQM) with respect to PM10 and PM2.5 in 18 monitoring stations at Jharia coalfield as per the siting criteria (IS: 5182, Part XIV) during 2011 to 2012. Identification of the probable sources of PM10 was carried out through particle size, shape, morphology analysis (scanning electron microscopy (SEM)), suitable compounds (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) and elements (energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)). Monitoring stations nearby opencast mine were affected by the big-sized and irregular-shaped particles; on the other hand, monitoring stations nearby city were affected by the small-sized and regular-shaped particles. In a city area, additional sources like diesel generator (DG) set, construction activities, coal burning, etc., were identified. Blistering effects were also observed in the particles from mine fire-affected areas. Using the X-ray diffraction technique, presence of FeS2, CuO, FeSO4 and CuSO4 compounds was observed, which indicates the effects of mine fire on particulate emission due to presence of SO4(2-) and S2- ions.

  11. Products of the radical initiated oxidation of model solid and liquid organic acid particles in simulated "clean" and "polluted" environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum, L. H.; Smith, G. D.

    2009-05-01

    Using a flow tube reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, the Cl-initiated oxidation of solid and supercooled liquid organic acid particles were investigated at 293 K. In creating aerosols of species which are able to be supercooled or solid at room temperature, it is possible to distinguish the effect of phase on particle reactivity and product formation. In a clean atmosphere, where there are negligible concentrations of NOx, the primary fate of peroxy radicals (formed from H-abstraction by Cl and OH radicals in the presence of O2) are their reactions to form ketone and alcohol products. These products are then able to undergo further oxidation to form multiply oxidized products. The formation of low-molecular weight volatile species may also be important in the oxidative aging of organic aerosols, however neither the mechanism of their formation nor their formation yields are well understood. We have shown that, for equivalent Cl exposures, more multiply-oxidized species as well as more low-molecular-weight species were created from the oxidation of solid particles than from liquid particles. The findings from these studies suggest that slower diffusion of the oxidation products in solid particles confines them to the surface where they continue to react with Cl radicals producing more-highly- functionalized products which may decompose more readily. By introducing nitric oxide to the flow tube reaction system, we show that in a polluted atmosphere, where NOx is present in significant concentrations, organic nitrate formation may become important on the surface of solid particles but not liquid particles as the RO2 are confined to the surface of solid particles (causing a enhanced localized concentration of RO2) where they may then react with ambient nitric oxide through the reaction RO2 + NO → RO2NO* → RONO2. These experiments of these model systems indicate that particle phase could be important in determining how organic aerosols

  12. Reversible transformation between α-oxo acids and α-amino acids on ZnS particles: a photochemical model for tuning the prebiotic redox homoeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Yanqiang; Su, Wenhui

    2013-01-01

    How prebiotic metabolic pathways could have formed is an essential question for the origins of life on early Earth. From the abiogenetic point of view, the emergence of primordial metabolism may be postulated as a continuum from Earth's geochemical processes to chemoautotrophic biochemical procedures on mineral surfaces. In the present study, we examined in detail the reversible amination of α-ketoglutarate on UV-irradiated ZnS particles under variable reaction conditions such as pH, temperature, hole scavenger species and concentrations, and different amino acids. It was observed that the reductive amination of α-ketoglutarate and the oxidative amination of glutamate were both effectively performed on ZnS surfaces in the presence and absence of a hole scavenger, respectively. Accordingly, a photocatalytic mechanism was proposed. The reversible photochemical reaction was more efficient under basic conditions but independent of temperature in the range of 30-60 °C. SO3 2- was more effective than S2- as the hole scavenger. Finally, we extended the glutamate dehydrogenase-like chemistry to a set of other α-amino acids and their corresponding α-oxo acids and found that hydrophobic amino acid side chains were more conducive to the reversible redox reactions. Since the experimental conditions are believed to have been prevalent in shallow water hydrothermal vent systems of early Earth, the results of this work not only suggest that the ZnS-assisted photochemical reaction can regulate the redox equilibrium between α-amino acids and α-oxo acids, but also provide a model of how prebiotic metabolic homoeostasis could have been developed and regulated. These findings can advance our understanding of the establishment of archaic non-enzymatic metabolic systems and the origins of autotrophy.

  13. Clouds of venus: particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Knollenberg, R G; Hunten, D M

    1979-02-23

    Data from the Pioneer Venus cloud particle size spectrometer experiment has revealed the Venus cloud system to be a complicated mixture of particles of various chemical composition distinguishable by their multimodal size distributions. The appearance, disappearance, growth, and decay of certain size modes has aided the preliminary identification of both sulfuric acid and free sulfur cloud regions. The discovery of large particles > 30 micrometers, significant particle mass loading, and size spectral features suggest that precipitation is likely produced; a peculiar aerosol structure beneath the lowest cloud layer could be residue from a recent shower.

  14. Identification of novel rice low phytic acid mutations via TILLING by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate or InsP6) accounts for 75-85% of the total phosphorus in seeds. Low phytic acid (lpa) mutants exhibit decreases in seed InsP6 with corresponding increases in inorganic P which, unlike phytic acid P, is readily utilized by humans and monogastric ...

  15. Identification of ellagic acid conjugates and other polyphenolics in muscadine grapes by HPLC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hee; Johnson, Jodie V; Talcott, Stephen T

    2005-07-27

    Ellagic acid, ellagic acid glycosides, and ellagitannins found in various fruits and nuts, including muscadine grape, are reported to have potential health-promoting benefits and antioxidant properties. This study isolated and identified several ellagic acid derivatives present in muscadine grapes and determined their relative antioxidant properties (AOX). Compounds were extracted from grape skins and pulp using methanol, and the solvent was evaporated. Isolates were dissolved in citric acid buffer (pH 3.5) and absorbed onto C18 cartridges. Nonretained polyphenolics were collected separately and again partitioned from Sephadex LH-20, whereas retained polyphenolics were first eluted with ethyl acetate followed by methanol. Ellagic acid derivatives were identified on the basis of UV and mass spectra, and the presence of ellagitannins was confirmed by a significant increase in free ellagic acid with HPLC followed by acid hydrolysis. Muscadine grapes contained phenolic acids, flavonols, anthocyanins, ellagic acid, and numerous ellagic acid derivatives. AOX varied in the order ethyl acetate > methanol > C18 nonretained fractions; each correlated to both total phenolics (r = 0.90) and total ellagic acid (r = 0.99) contents. Results of this study revealed previously unidentified ellagic acid derivatives in muscadine grapes.

  16. Identification of acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricinoleate, a monohydroxy fatty acid, in castor oil has many industrial uses. Dihydroxy fatty acids can also be used in industry. The C18 HPLC fractions of castor oil were used for mass spectrometry of lithium addicts to identify the acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids. Four diacylglycer...

  17. Fluorescent boronic acid polymer grafted on silica particles for affinity separation of saccharides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhifeng; Uddin, Khan Mohammad Ahsan; Kamra, Tripta; Schnadt, Joachim; Ye, Lei

    2014-02-12

    Boronic acid affinity gels are important for effective separation of biological active cis-diols, and are finding applications both in biotech industry and in biomedical research areas. To increase the efficacy of boronate affinity separation, it is interesting to introduce repeating boronic acid units in flexible polymer chains attached on solid materials. In this work, we synthesize polymer brushes containing boronic acid repeating units on silica gels using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A fluorescent boronic acid monomer is first prepared from an azide-tagged fluorogenic boronic acid and an alkyne-containing acrylate by Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction (the CuAAC click chemistry). The boronic acid monomer is then grafted to the surface of silica gel modified with an ATRP initiator. The obtained composite material contains boronic acid polymer brushes on surface and shows favorable saccharide binding capability under physiological pH conditions, and displays interesting fluorescence intensity change upon binding fructose and glucose. In addition to saccharide binding, the flexible polymer brushes on silica also enable fast separation of a model glycoprotein based on selective boronate affinity interaction. The synthetic approach and the composite functional material developed in this work should open new opportunities for high efficiency detection, separation, and analysis of not only simple saccharides, but also glycopeptides and large glycoproteins. PMID:24444898

  18. Fluorescent Boronic Acid Polymer Grafted on Silica Particles for Affinity Separation of Saccharides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Boronic acid affinity gels are important for effective separation of biological active cis-diols, and are finding applications both in biotech industry and in biomedical research areas. To increase the efficacy of boronate affinity separation, it is interesting to introduce repeating boronic acid units in flexible polymer chains attached on solid materials. In this work, we synthesize polymer brushes containing boronic acid repeating units on silica gels using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A fluorescent boronic acid monomer is first prepared from an azide-tagged fluorogenic boronic acid and an alkyne-containing acrylate by Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction (the CuAAC click chemistry). The boronic acid monomer is then grafted to the surface of silica gel modified with an ATRP initiator. The obtained composite material contains boronic acid polymer brushes on surface and shows favorable saccharide binding capability under physiological pH conditions, and displays interesting fluorescence intensity change upon binding fructose and glucose. In addition to saccharide binding, the flexible polymer brushes on silica also enable fast separation of a model glycoprotein based on selective boronate affinity interaction. The synthetic approach and the composite functional material developed in this work should open new opportunities for high efficiency detection, separation, and analysis of not only simple saccharides, but also glycopeptides and large glycoproteins. PMID:24444898

  19. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P; Gurinov, Andrey; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity.

  20. Effect of 70-nm silica particles on the toxicity of acetaminophen, tetracycline, trazodone, and 5-aminosalicylic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Kondoh, M; Watari, A; Hasezaki, T; Isoda, K; Tsutsumi, Y; Yagi, K

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to nano-sized particles is increasing because they are used in a wide variety of industrial products, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Some animal studies indicate that such nanomaterials may have some toxicity, but their synergistic actions on the adverse effects of drugs are not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether 70-nm silica particles (nSP70), which are widely used in cosmetics and drug delivery, affect the toxicity of a drug for inflammatory bowel disease (5-aminosalicylic acid), an antibiotic drug (tetracycline), an antidepressant drug (trazodone), and an antipyretic drug (acetaminophen) in mice. Co-administration of nSP70 with trazodone did not increase a biochemical marker of liver injury. In contrast, co-administration increased the hepatotoxicity of the other drugs. Co-administration of nSP70 and tetracycline was lethal. These findings indicate that evaluation of synergistic adverse effects is important for the application of nano-sized materials.

  1. Hydrothermal in situ preparation of TiO2 particles onto poly(lactic acid) electrospun nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Kamal K.; Mishra, Pradeep K.; Srivastava, Pradeep; Gangwar, Mayank; Nath, Gopal; Maiti, Pralay

    2013-01-01

    The novel poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/TiO2 hybrid nanofibres are produced via electrospinning technique. Hydrolysed titanium precursor has been electrosprayed simultaneously on the continuous electrospun PLA nanofibres surface. The adhered amorphous titania has been transformed into TiO2 particle through hydrothermal treatment for different times. The phase structure has been worked out using XRD, FTIR, XPS and Raman spectroscopy. The predominant phase is anatase with a small extent of brookite phase after the hydrothermal treatment. The size and location of TiO2 particle have been determined using SEM micrographs. The orderness of the PLA crystallites has been checked using XRD patterns before and after hydrothermal treatment. UV absorption capability of the titania coated nanofibres has been enhanced to a significant level. The antimicrobial activity of the hybrids has been verified using two different microorganisms (gram negative Escherichia coli and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) and 70% reduction of antimicrobial activity has been reported.

  2. Thermolysis characteristics of salts of o-phthalic acid with the formation of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudanova, L. I.; Logvinenko, V. A.; Yudanov, N. F.; Rudina, N. A.; Ishchenko, A. V.; Korol'kov, I. V.; Semyannikov, P. P.; Sheludyakova, L. A.; Alferova, N. I.

    2016-06-01

    Studies of the thermolysis of ortho-[Ni(H2O)2(C8H4O4)](H2O)2, [Cu(H2O)(C8H4O4)], and acid [M(H2O)6](C8H5O4)2 (M(II) = Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II)), [Cu(H2O)2(C8H5O4)2] phthalates reveal that the solid products of their decomposition are composites with nanoparticles embedded in carbon-polymer matrices. Metallic nanoparticles with oxide nanoparticle impurities are detected in iron/cobalt polymer composites, while nickel/copper composites are composed of only metallic particles. It is found that nickel nanoparticles with the diameters of 6-8 nm are covered with disordered graphene layers, while the copperbased composite matrix contains spherical conglomerates (50-200 nm) with numerous spherical Cu particles (5-10 nm).

  3. Hierarchical scheme for liquid chromatography/multi-stage spectrometric identification of 3,4,5-triacyl chlorogenic acids in green Robusta coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2010-08-15

    Liquid chromatography/multi-stage spectrometry (LC/MS(n)) (n = 2-4) has been used to detect and characterize in green Robusta coffee beans eight quantitatively minor triacyl chlorogenic acids with seven of them not previously reported in nature. These comprise 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid (Mr 678); 3,5-dicaffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-feruloyl-4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 3,4-dicaffeoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid (Mr 692); 3-caffeoyl-4,5-diferuloylquinic acid and 3,4-diferuloyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid (Mr 706); and 3,4-dicaffeoyl-5-sinapoylquinic acid and 3-sinapoyl-4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (Mr 722). Structures have been assigned on the basis of LC/MS(n) patterns of fragmentation. A new hierarchical key for the identification of triacyl quinic acids is presented, based on previously established rules of fragmentation. Fifty-two chlorogenic acids have now been characterized in green Robusta coffee beans. In this study five samples of green Robusta coffee beans and fifteen samples of Arabica coffee beans were analyzed with triacyl chlorogenic acids only found in Robusta coffee bean extracts. These triacyl chlorogenic acids could be considered as useful phytochemical markers for the identification of Robusta coffee beans.

  4. Understanding Particle Formation: Solubility of Free Fatty Acids as Polysorbate 20 Degradation Byproducts in Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody Formulations.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Nidhi; Demeule, Barthélemy; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the aqueous solubilities at 2-8 °C of the major free fatty acids (FFAs) formed by polysorbate 20 (PS20) degradation and identify possible ways to predict, delay, or mitigate subsequent particle formation in monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. The FFA solubility limits at 2-8 °C were determined by titrating known amounts of FFA in monoclonal antibody formulations and identifying the FFA concentration leading to visible and subvisible particle formation. The solubility limits of lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids at 2-8 °C were 17 ± 1 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 1.5 ± 0.5 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.04% (w/v) PS20 at pH 5.4 and >22 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 0.75 ± 0.25 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.02% (w/v) PS20 at pH 6.0. For the first time, a 3D correlation between FFA solubility, PS20 concentration, and pH has been reported providing a rational approach for the formulator to balance these with regard to potential particle formation. The results suggest that the lower solubilities of the longer chain FFAs, generated from degradation of the stearate, palmitate, and myristate fraction of PS20, is the primary cause of seeding and subsequent FFA precipitation rather than the most abundant lauric acid. PMID:26419285

  5. Valproic acid and all trans retinoic acid differentially induce megakaryopoiesis and platelet-like particle formation from the megakaryoblastic cell line MEG-01.

    PubMed

    Schweinfurth, N; Hohmann, S; Deuschle, M; Lederbogen, F; Schloss, P

    2010-01-01

    Both, the activity of transcription factors as well as epigenetic alterations in defined DNA regions regulate cellular differentiation processes. Hence, neuronal differentiation from neural progenitor cells is promoted by the transcription factor all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA). VPA has also been shown to be involved in differentiation of tumor cells and to greatly improve the reprogramming of human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Here we have investigated the impact of ATRA and VPA on the differentiation of megakaryoctes and platelets from the megakaryocyte progenitor cell line MEG-01. Our results show that treatment with ATRA (10⁻¹¹ M) and VPA (2 × 10⁻³ M) induces megakaryopoiesis of MEG-01 cells as estimated by polyploidy, formation of characteristic proplatelets and elevated expression of the megakaryocytic markers CD41 and CD61. The resulting megakaryocytes stayed viable for more than 3 weeks and shed platelet-like particles positive for CD41, CD61 and CD42b into the supernatant. Platelet-like particles responded to thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6) with increased externalization of P-selectin. Thus, ATRA and VPA proved to be efficient agents for the gentle induction of megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis of MEG-01 cells providing the possibility to study molecular events underlying megakaryopoiesis and human platelet production over longer time periods. PMID:20942599

  6. Measurement of the water cycle in mixed ammonium acid sulfate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, J. F.; Richardson, C. B.

    A single ammonium-hydrogen-sulfate particle is levitated in an evacuated quadrupole trap at room temperature and the temperature of an attached tube containing bulk water is slowly cycled introducing then removing water vapor. With increasing pressure the particle dissolves in stages, then grows as a solution droplet by water absorption. With decreasing pressure the droplet supersaturates, crystallizes, then dehydrates completely to return to its initial state. Particle mass, and thus composition, is measured continuously with an electrostatic balance. Twenty-six cycles were studied as solute composition ranged from ammonium bisulfate through letovicite to ammonium sulfate in roughly equal steps. Composition was changed in situ by reaction with ammonia at low partial pressure. With solute composition characterized by x = [NH 4]/[SO 4], deliquescence was found to occur at water activity aw = 0.394-0.029 ( x- 1) for 1 ⩽ x < 1.5 and aw = 0.710-0.023( x-1.5) for 1.5 ⩽ x < 2. Particle growth occurs at deliquescence and subsequently is in excellent agreement with that predicted in a model proposed by Tang for dissolution of a two-component mixed solute. Water activities of the solution droplets are measured up to aw = 0.9. The results are compared with those predicted by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson method of interpolation from binary data and with those obtained using the mixing rule of Meissner and Kusik. Particle crystallization from supersaturated solution is analyzed thermodynamically using measured water activities, the Gibbs-Duhem equation, and classical nucleation theory. The specific free energy barrier to crystallization, ΔG/ n, is found to increase from near zero to 0.04 eV as composition ranges from x = 1 to 2, where n is the number of formula units in the critical nucleus. New phase diagrams are presented and used to discuss the dynamics of mixed sulfate particles in the atmosphere.

  7. Identification of self-growth-inhibiting compounds lauric acid and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinpei; Igarashi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Chigusa; Shitara, Tetsuo; Nomoto, Akio; Mizote, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori growth medium is usually supplemented with horse serum (HS) or FCS. However, cyclodextrin derivatives or activated charcoal can replace serum. In this study, we purified self-growth-inhibiting (SGI) compounds from H. pylori growth medium. The compounds were recovered from porous resin, Diaion HP-20, which was added to the H. pylori growth medium instead of known supplements. These SGI compounds were also identified from 2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which was supplemented in a pleuropneumonia-like organisms broth. The growth-inhibiting compounds were identified as lauric acid (LA) and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid [7-(Z)-TDA]. Although several fatty acids had been identified in H. pylori, these specific compounds were not previously found in this species. However, we confirmed that these fatty acids were universally present in the cultivation medium of the H. pylori strains examined in this study. A live/dead assay carried out without HS indicated that these compounds were bacteriostatic; however, no significant growth-inhibiting effect was observed against other tested bacterial species that constituted the indigenous bacterial flora. These findings suggested that LA and 7-(Z)-TDA might play important roles in the survival of H. pylori in human stomach epithelial cells. PMID:25767109

  8. A systems biology approach for the identification of target genes for the improvement of itaconic acid production in Aspergillus species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this paper, a clone based transcriptome analysis towards the identification of genes related to itaconic acid production in Aspergillus terreus was carried out as an extension of a previously published a clone-based transcriptome analysis from a set of batch fermentation experiments. Also a publically available A. niger transcriptome dataset from cultures similar to those of the A. terreus data set was analyzed to evaluate the specificity of the approach followed for A. terreus. Results Besides the itaconic acid gene cluster (cis-aconitate decarboxylase, mitochondrial tri-carboxylic acid transporter and major facilitator superfamily transporter) discovered previously, additional genes of interest were identified in the A. terreus transcriptome data correlating to itaconic acid production, including 6 genes encoding enzymes in glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway, 4 genes functioning in vitamins synthesis, and a gene encoding a copper transporter. Only three of the 83 low pH specific genes identified from the A. niger dataset corresponded to high itaconic acid / low pH expressed genes identified from the A. terreus data set. However, in all three cases, the regulation of pH dependent gene expression was completely different between the two species. Conclusions An extended clone based transcriptome analysis using a clone based transcription array to identify genes correlating with itaconic acid production revealed novel genes both in the central metabolism and in other more secondary pathways such as vitamin biosynthesis and Cu2+ transport, providing targets for further metabolic and process engineering to optimize itaconic acid production. PMID:24304666

  9. Identification of enzyme activity that conjugates indole-3-acetic acid to aspartate in immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the first identification of plant enzyme activity catalyzing the conjugation of indole-3-acetic acid to amino acids. Enzymatic synthesis of indole-3-acetylaspartate (IAA-Asp) by a crude enzyme preparation from immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) was observed. The reaction yielded a product with the same Rf as IAA-Asp standard after thin layer chromatography. The identity of IAA-Asp was verified by HPLC analysis. IAA-Asp formation was dependent on ATP and Mg2+, and was linear during a 60 min period. The enzyme preparation obtained after poly(ethylene glycol) 6000 fractionation showed optimum activity at pH 8.0, and the temperature optimum for IAA-Asp synthesis was 30 degrees C. PMID:17920159

  10. Genome-wide identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for tolerance to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetic acid is a byproduct of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation. Together with high concentrations of ethanol and other toxic metabolites, acetic acid may contribute to fermentation arrest and reduced ethanol productivity. This weak acid is also a present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, a highly interesting non-feedstock substrate in industrial biotechnology. Therefore, the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for the rational selection of optimal fermentation conditions and the engineering of more robust industrial strains to be used in processes in which yeast is explored as cell factory. Results The yeast genes conferring protection against acetic acid were identified in this study at a genome-wide scale, based on the screening of the EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection for susceptibility phenotypes to this weak acid (concentrations in the range 70-110 mM, at pH 4.5). Approximately 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid were identified. Clustering of these acetic acid-resistance genes based on their biological function indicated an enrichment of genes involved in transcription, internal pH homeostasis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall assembly, biogenesis of mitochondria, ribosome and vacuole, and in the sensing, signalling and uptake of various nutrients in particular iron, potassium, glucose and amino acids. A correlation between increased resistance to acetic acid and the level of potassium in the growth medium was found. The activation of the Snf1p signalling pathway, involved in yeast response to glucose starvation, is demonstrated to occur in response to acetic acid stress but no evidence was obtained supporting the acetic acid-induced inhibition of glucose uptake. Conclusions Approximately 490 of the 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid identified in this work are implicated, for the first time, in tolerance to this weak acid. These are

  11. Identification and quantitation of new glutamic acid derivatives in soy sauce by UPLC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Chen, Ting

    2013-10-01

    Glutamic acid is an abundant amino acid that lends a characteristic umami taste to foods. In fermented foods, glutamic acid can be found as a free amino acid formed by proteolysis or as a non-proteolytic derivative formed by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to identify different structures of glutamic acid derivatives in a typical fermented protein-based food product, soy sauce. An acidic fraction was prepared with anion-exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by UPLC/MS/MS and UPLC/TOF-MS. α-Glutamyl, γ-glutamyl, and pyroglutamyl dipeptides, as well as lactoyl amino acids, were identified in the acidic fraction of soy sauce. They were chemically synthesized for confirmation of their occurrence and quantified in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Pyroglutamyl dipeptides accounted for 770 mg/kg of soy sauce, followed by lactoyl amino acids (135 mg/kg) and γ-glutamyl dipeptides (70 mg/kg). In addition, N-succinoylglutamic acid was identified for the first time in food as a minor compound in soy sauce (5 mg/kg).

  12. Quantification and identification of particle-associated bacteria in unchlorinated drinking water from three treatment plants by cultivation-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Ling, F Q; Magic-Knezev, A; Liu, W T; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-06-15

    Water quality regulations commonly place quantitative limits on the number of organisms (e.g., heterotrophic plate count and coliforms) without considering the presence of multiple cells per particle, which is only counted as one regardless how many cells attached. Therefore, it is important to quantify particle-associated bacteria (PAB), especially cells per particle. In addition, PAB may house (opportunistic) pathogens and have higher resistance to disinfection than planktonic bacteria. It is essential to know bacterial distribution on particles. However, limited information is available on quantification and identification of PAB in drinking water. In the present study, PAB were sampled from the unchlorinated drinking water at three treatment plants in the Netherlands, each with different particle compositions. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total cell counts (TCC) with flow cytometry were used to quantify the PAB, and high-throughput pyrosequencing was used to identify them. The number and activity of PAB ranged from 1.0 to 3.5 × 10(3) cells ml(-1) and 0.04-0.154 ng l(-1) ATP. There were between 25 and 50 cells found to be attached on a single particle. ATP per cell in PAB was higher than in planktonic bacteria. Among the identified sequences, Proteobacteria were found to be the most dominant phylum at all locations, followed by OP3 candidate division and Nitrospirae. Sequences related to anoxic bacteria from the OP3 candidate division and other anaerobic bacteria were detected. Genera of bacteria were found appear to be consistent with the major element composition of the associated particles. The presence of multiple cells per particle challenges the use of quantitative methods such as HPC and Coliforms that are used in the current drinking water quality regulations. The detection of anoxic and anaerobic bacteria suggests the ecological importance of PAB in drinking water distribution systems.

  13. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  14. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area.

  15. [Identification of acid-stable carmine in imported apple syrup product].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Yoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sato, Kyoko; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Ishiwata, Hajimu; Maitani, Tamio

    2002-08-01

    An unknown red pigment was purified from an apple syrup product imported from Canada, using a DIAION HP-20 column with methanol as the eluent. By spectroscopic means and chemical synthesis, the isolated pigment was identified as 4-aminocarminic acid, which is the major pigment of acid-stable carmine (a red colorant illegal in Japan). In addition, HPLC and TLC methods were proposed to detect this illegal colorant. While the color of carminic acid changed from yellow to red in the pH range of McIlvaine buffer (3.0-7.0), the color of 4-aminocarminic acid was always red, and also the ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) spectra did not change. These characteristics are useful to distinguish 4-aminocarminic acid from carminic acid. PMID:12436709

  16. An NGS-Independent Strategy for Proteome-Wide Identification of Single Amino Acid Polymorphisms by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yun; Guo, Yufeng; Xiao, Weidi; Cao, Qichen; Li, Shanshan; Qi, Xianni; Zhang, Zhidan; Wang, Qinhong; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-03-01

    Detection of proteins containing single amino acid polymorphisms (SAPs) encoded by nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) can aid researchers in studying the functional significance of protein variants. Most proteogenomic approaches for large-scale SAPs mapping require construction of a sample-specific database containing protein variants predicted from the next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. Searching shotgun proteomic data sets against these NGS-derived databases allowed for identification of SAP peptides, thus validating the proteome-level sequence variation. Contrary to the conventional approaches, our study presents a novel strategy for proteome-wide SAP detection without relying on sample-specific NGS data. By searching a deep-coverage proteomic data set from an industrial thermotolerant yeast strain using our strategy, we identified 337 putative SAPs compared to the reference genome. Among the SAP peptides identified with stringent criteria, 85.2% of SAP sites were validated using whole-genome sequencing data obtained for this organism, which indicates high accuracy of SAP identification with our strategy. More interestingly, for certain SAP peptides that cannot be predicted by genomic sequencing, we used synthetic peptide standards to verify expression of peptide variants in the proteome. Our study has provided a unique tool for proteogenomics to enable proteome-wide direct SAP identification and capture nongenetic protein variants not linked to nsSNPs.

  17. A novel method based on physicochemical properties of amino acids and one class classification algorithm for disease gene identification.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Abdulaziz; Charkari, Nasrollah Moghadam

    2015-08-01

    Identifying the genes that cause disease is one of the most challenging issues to establish the diagnosis and treatment quickly. Several interesting methods have been introduced for disease gene identification for a decade. In general, the main differences between these methods are the type of data used as a prior-knowledge, as well as machine learning (ML) methods used for identification. The disease gene identification task has been commonly viewed by ML methods as a binary classification problem (whether any gene is disease or not). However, the nature of the data (since there is no negative data available for training or leaners) creates a major problem which affect the results. In this paper, sequence-based, one class classification method is introduced to assign genes to disease class (yes, no). First, to generate feature vector, the sequences of proteins (genes) are initially transformed to numerical vector using physicochemical properties of amino acid. Second, as there is no definite approach to define non-disease genes (negative data); we have attempted to model solely disease genes (positive data) to make a prediction by employing Support Vector Data Description algorithm. The experimental results confirm the efficiency of the method with precision, recall and F-measure of 79.3%, 82.6% and 80.9%, respectively. PMID:26146156

  18. Detection and identification of alkylphosphonic acids by positive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry using a tricationic reagent.

    PubMed

    Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Purohit, Ajay; Dubey, D K

    2011-11-30

    The retrospective detection and identification of degradation products of chemical warfare agents are of immense importance in order to prove their spillage and use. A highly sensitive liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method--using an imidazolium-based tricationic reagent--was developed for the detection and identification of the anionic degradation products of nerve agents. A commercially available solution of 1,3-imidazolium-bis-(1-hexylbenzylimidazolium) trifluoride (IBHBI) formed adducts with alkylphosphonic acids (APAs), allowing detection of the APAs by positive mode ESI-MS. Tandem mass spectrometry was used for the unambiguous identification of the APAs. Parameters influencing the formation and stability of these adduct during mass spectrometric analysis, such as solvent composition, concentration of IBHBI, effect of pH and interferences by salts, were optimized. The absolute limits of detection (0.1 ng) for achieved for the APAs were better than those previously reported, and linear dynamic ranges of 10-2000 ng mL(-1) were achieved. The method was repeatable with a relative standard deviation ≤7.3%. APAs present in aqueous samples provided by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons during the 22(nd) and 24(th) Official Proficiency tests were detected and identified as IBHBI adducts. The added advantage of this method is that low-mass analytes are detected at higher mass, thus obviating the problem with background noise at low mass. PMID:22002694

  19. A Selection for Assembly Reveals That a Single Amino Acid Mutant of the Bacteriophage MS2 Coat Protein Forms a Smaller Virus-like Particle.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Michael A; Morella, Norma M; Jakobson, Christopher M; Hartman, Emily C; Glasgow, Jeff E; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-09-14

    Virus-like particles are used to encapsulate drugs, imaging agents, enzymes, and other biologically active molecules in order to enhance their function. However, the size of most virus-like particles is inflexible, precluding the design of appropriately sized containers for different applications. Here, we describe a chromatographic selection for virus-like particle assembly. Using this selection, we identified a single amino acid substitution to the coat protein of bacteriophage MS2 that mediates a uniform switch in particle geometry from T = 3 to T = 1 icosahedral symmetry. The resulting smaller particle retains the ability to be disassembled and reassembled in vitro and to be chemically modified to load cargo into its interior cavity. The pair of 27 and 17 nm MS2 particles will allow direct examination of the effect of size on function in established applications of virus-like particles, including drug delivery and imaging. PMID:27549001

  20. Identification of novel secreted fatty acids that regulate nitrogen catabolite repression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoying; Hirai, Go; Ueki, Masashi; Hirota, Hiroshi; Wang, Qianqian; Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Hitora, Yuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Yashiroda, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of poor nitrogen sources such as branched-chain amino acids is repressed in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources such as NH4+ and glutamate (Glu), which is called nitrogen catabolite repression. Amino acid auxotrophic mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were unable to grow on minimal medium containing NH4Cl or Glu even when adequate amounts of required amino acids were supplied. However, growth of these mutant cells was recovered in the vicinity of colonies of the prototrophic strain, suggesting that the prototrophic cells secrete some substances that can restore uptake of amino acids by an unknown mechanism. We identified the novel fatty acids, 10(R)-acetoxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid and 10(R)-hydroxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid, as secreted active substances, referred to as Nitrogen Signaling Factors (NSFs). Synthetic NSFs were also able to shift nitrogen source utilization from high-quality to poor nitrogen sources to allow adaptive growth of the fission yeast amino acid auxotrophic mutants in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources. Finally, we demonstrated that the Agp3 amino acid transporter was involved in the adaptive growth. The data highlight a novel intra-species communication system for adaptation to environmental nutritional conditions in fission yeast. PMID:26892493

  1. Identification of novel secreted fatty acids that regulate nitrogen catabolite repression in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoying; Hirai, Go; Ueki, Masashi; Hirota, Hiroshi; Wang, Qianqian; Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Hitora, Yuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Yashiroda, Yoko

    2016-02-19

    Uptake of poor nitrogen sources such as branched-chain amino acids is repressed in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources such as NH4(+) and glutamate (Glu), which is called nitrogen catabolite repression. Amino acid auxotrophic mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were unable to grow on minimal medium containing NH4Cl or Glu even when adequate amounts of required amino acids were supplied. However, growth of these mutant cells was recovered in the vicinity of colonies of the prototrophic strain, suggesting that the prototrophic cells secrete some substances that can restore uptake of amino acids by an unknown mechanism. We identified the novel fatty acids, 10(R)-acetoxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid and 10(R)-hydroxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid, as secreted active substances, referred to as Nitrogen Signaling Factors (NSFs). Synthetic NSFs were also able to shift nitrogen source utilization from high-quality to poor nitrogen sources to allow adaptive growth of the fission yeast amino acid auxotrophic mutants in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources. Finally, we demonstrated that the Agp3 amino acid transporter was involved in the adaptive growth. The data highlight a novel intra-species communication system for adaptation to environmental nutritional conditions in fission yeast.

  2. Analytical Method for the Identification and Assay of Kojic Acid, Methylparaben, and Propylparaben in Cosmetic Products Using UPLC: Application of ISO 12787:2011 Standard.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Abdul; Ahmed, Mahmood; Shafiq, Muhammad Imtiaz; Ali, Amir; Sadiq, Asma

    2016-09-01

    A straightforward, fast UPLC method is developed for the identification and quantification of kojic acid (KA), methylparaben (MP), and propylparaben (PP) in 15 cosmetic products (skin whitening creams and lotions). Chromatographic separations for KA, MP, and PP were obtained in 3.5 min on an Acquity BEH-C18 column (100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm particle size) as the stationary phase at 260 nm (diode-array detector), with the mobile phase comprising a mixture of 0.01 M dibasic potassium phosphate and methanol-acetonitrile (50 + 50). Validation studies were performed according to in-house established criteria. There was a linear function of concentrations over the range of 0.4-1.6 μg/mL for KA, MP, and PP. The LOQ for all components was 0.2 μg/mL using the S/N method. Good separation of analytes was observed, with acceptable values of resolution and tailing. The analytical approach defined in the ISO 12787:2011 standard ("Cosmetics-Analytical methods-Validation criteria for analytical results using chromatographic techniques") was used for the assay of cosmetic samples. PMID:27329740

  3. Residual Host Cell Protein Promotes Polysorbate 20 Degradation in a Sulfatase Drug Product Leading to Free Fatty Acid Particles.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Nitin; Salamat-Miller, Nazila; Salinas, Paul A; Taylor, Katherine D; Basu, Sujit K

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the root cause behind an observed free fatty acid particle formation and resulting Polysorbate 20 (PS20) loss for a sulfatase drug product upon long-term storage at 5 ± 3°C. Reversed- phase chromatography with mass spectrometric analysis as well as charged aerosol detection was used to characterize the peaks associated with the intact and degraded PS20. Additionally, a proteomics study was undertaken to identify the residual host cell proteins in the sulfatase drug substance. PS20 stability studies were conducted in the presence of sulfatase, a sulfatase inhibitor, putative phospholipase B-like 2, and mock drug substance produced using a null cell line vector under experimental conditions optimized for PS20 degradation. This study provides the first published evidence where the residual host cell protein present in the drug substance was identified and experimentally shown to catalyze the breakdown of PS20 in a protein formulation over time, resulting in free fatty acid particles and PS20 loss. This study demonstrates the importance of early detection of potential impurities in the protein drug substance that may contribute to polysorbate degradation to make a judicious selection of the surfactant and its optimized concentration for the final drug product. PMID:27032893

  4. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period 2011 in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Kanawade, V. P.; You, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; Lee, Y.; McGraw, R. L.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period (July-August 2011) in Long Island, New York, we deployed a particle size magnifier (Airmodus A09) running at different working fluid saturation ratios and a TSI CPC3776 to extract the information of sub-3 nm particles formation. A scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), and a number of atmospheric trace gas analyzers were used to simultaneously measure aerosol size distributions, sulfuric acid, and other possible aerosol precursors, respectively. Our observation results show that sub-3 nm particles existed during both NPF and non-NPF events, indicating the formation of sub-3nm particle didn't always lead to NPF characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. However, sub-3 nm particles were much higher during NPF events. Sub-3 nm particles were well-correlated with sulfuric acid showing the same diurnal variations and noontime peaks, especially for NPF days. These results are consistent with laboratory studies showing that formation of sub-3 nm particles is very sensitive to sulfuric acid (than amines and ammonia) [Yu et al. GRL 2012]. HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis indicates that air masses from Great Lakes, containing more SO2, VOCs and secondary organics, may contribute to growth of sub-3 nm particles and NPF.

  5. Toxicity of 50-nm polystyrene particles co-administered to mice with acetaminophen, 5-aminosalicylic acid or tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Isoda, K; Nozawa, T; Tezuka, M; Ishida, I

    2014-09-01

    We investigated whether nano-sized polystyrene particles affect drug-induced toxicity. The particles, which are widely used industrially, had diameters of 50 (NPP50), 200 (NPP200) or 1000 (NPP1000) nm. The toxic chemicals tested were acetaminophen (APAP), 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), tetracycline (TC), and sodium valproate (VPA). All treatments in the absence of the nanoparticles were non-lethal and did not result in severe toxicity. However, when mice were injected with APAP, 5-ASA or TC together with polystyrene particles, synergistic, enhanced toxicity was observed in mice injected with NPP50. These synergic effects were not observed in mice co-injected with NPP200 or NPP1000. On the other hand, co-administration of VPA and NPP50, NPP200 or NPP1000 did not elevate toxicity. The results show that NPP50 differs in hepatotoxicity depending on the drug co-administered. These findings suggest that further evaluation of the interactions between polystyrene nanoparticles and drugs is a critical prerequisite to the pharmaceutical application of nanotechnology.

  6. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEONLA-BSA, which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEONLA-BSA particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEONLA-BSA changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  7. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-08-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEON(LA-BSA), which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEON(LA-BSA) particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEON(LA-BSA) changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment.

  8. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEON(LA-BSA), which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEON(LA-BSA) particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEON(LA-BSA) changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  9. Identification of furan fatty acids in the lipids of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Chvalová, Daniela; Špička, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed in muscle and gonad tissues of marketed common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The extracted lipids were separated into four fractions: polar lipids (PL), diacylglycerols, free fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TAG) using thin layer chromatography. FA content within the lipid fractions was determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). The muscle lipids consisted primarily of TAG (96.9% of total FA), while PL were the major component of both male (67.6%) and female gonad (58.6%) lipids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids predominated in PL of all tissues (52.2-55.8% of total FA); monounsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant FA group in TAG of muscle (51.8%) and female gonads (47.8%) whereas high proportion of furan fatty acids (F-acids) (38.2%) was detected in TAG of male gonads. Eight F-acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in male gonad samples, including less common 12,15-epoxy-13,14-dimethylnonadeca-12,14-dienoic acid with even-numbered alkyl moiety. PMID:26830577

  10. Identification of Acetobacter strains isolated from spoiled lactic acid fermented meat food for pets.

    PubMed

    Gosselé, F; Swings, J; Mossel, D A; de Ley, J

    1984-01-01

    Five Acetobacter isolates from lactic acid fermented meat food for pets were characterized by 177 morphological, physiological and biochemical traits. Four isolates were identified as A. pasteurianus, one as A. aceti. It is emphasized that access of such bacteria to lactic acid fermented foods should be avoided.

  11. Identification of Apolipoprotein A-I as a Retinoic Acid-binding Protein in the Eye.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jody A; Harper, Angelica R; Feasley, Christa L; Van-Der-Wel, Hanke; Byrum, Jennifer N; Hermann, Marcela; West, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid may be an important molecular signal in the postnatal control of eye size. The goal of this study was to identify retinoic acid-binding proteins secreted by the choroid and sclera during visually guided ocular growth. Following photoaffinity labeling with all-trans-[11,12-(3)H]retinoic acid, the most abundant labeled protein detected in the conditioned medium of choroid or sclera had an apparent Mr of 27,000 Da. Following purification and mass spectrometry, the Mr 27,000 band was identified as apolipoprotein A-I. Affinity capture of the radioactive Mr 27,000 band by anti-chick apolipoprotein A-I antibodies confirmed its identity as apolipoprotein A-I. Photoaffinity labeling and fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrated that binding of retinoic acid to apolipoprotein A-I is 1) concentration-dependent, 2) selective for all-trans-retinoic acid, and 3) requires the presence of apolipoprotein A-I-associated lipids for retinoid binding. Expression of apolipoprotein A-I mRNA and protein synthesis were markedly up-regulated in choroids of chick eyes during the recovery from induced myopia, and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA was significantly increased in choroids following retinoic acid treatment. Together, these data suggest that apolipoprotein A-I may participate in a regulatory feedback mechanism with retinoic acid to control the action of retinoic acid on ocular targets during postnatal ocular growth.

  12. Identification of Apolipoprotein A-I as a Retinoic Acid-binding Protein in the Eye.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jody A; Harper, Angelica R; Feasley, Christa L; Van-Der-Wel, Hanke; Byrum, Jennifer N; Hermann, Marcela; West, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid may be an important molecular signal in the postnatal control of eye size. The goal of this study was to identify retinoic acid-binding proteins secreted by the choroid and sclera during visually guided ocular growth. Following photoaffinity labeling with all-trans-[11,12-(3)H]retinoic acid, the most abundant labeled protein detected in the conditioned medium of choroid or sclera had an apparent Mr of 27,000 Da. Following purification and mass spectrometry, the Mr 27,000 band was identified as apolipoprotein A-I. Affinity capture of the radioactive Mr 27,000 band by anti-chick apolipoprotein A-I antibodies confirmed its identity as apolipoprotein A-I. Photoaffinity labeling and fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrated that binding of retinoic acid to apolipoprotein A-I is 1) concentration-dependent, 2) selective for all-trans-retinoic acid, and 3) requires the presence of apolipoprotein A-I-associated lipids for retinoid binding. Expression of apolipoprotein A-I mRNA and protein synthesis were markedly up-regulated in choroids of chick eyes during the recovery from induced myopia, and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA was significantly increased in choroids following retinoic acid treatment. Together, these data suggest that apolipoprotein A-I may participate in a regulatory feedback mechanism with retinoic acid to control the action of retinoic acid on ocular targets during postnatal ocular growth. PMID:27402828

  13. Using chiral identification of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid as a groundwater dating tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have studied the hydrologic fate of metolachlor and its two predominant metabolites, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid, in groundwater and base flows of streams for several years. These two metabolites are excellent markers for groundwater processes related to...

  14. Reactivity of NaCl with Secondary Organic Acids: An Important Mechanism of the Chloride Depletion in Sea Salt Particles Mixed with Organic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Kelly, S.; Gilles, M. K.; Shilling, J. E.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sea salt particles, one of the major sources of atmospheric aerosols, undergo complex multi-phase reactions and have profound consequences on their physical and chemical properties, thus on climate. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of sea salt chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Some studies have also showed that the chloride deficit cannot be fully compensated for this mechanism. We present an important pathway contributing to this chloride depletion: reactions of weak organic acids with sea salt particles. NaCl particles internally mixed with secondary organic materials generated from the reactions of limonene and alpha-pinene with ozone served as surrogates for sea salt particles mixed with organic materials. Chemical imaging analysis of these particles was conducted using complementary techniques including computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). Substantial chloride depletion and formation of organic salts were observed along with distinctive changes in particle morphology after hydration/dehydration processes. The results indicate that secondary organic acids can effectively react with NaCl particles resulting in displacement of chloride and release of gaseous HCl. This is consistent with a recent field study showing chloride depletion in sea salt particles mixed with organic materials which cannot be fully compensated by inorganic acid displacement. Although the formation of the organic salts is not thermodynamically favored in bulk aqueous solution, these reactions are driven by the high volatility and evaporation of gaseous HCl in particles, especially during hydration/dehydration processes. The

  15. Identification of Delta5-fatty acid desaturase from the cellular slime mold dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-01

    cDNA fragments putatively encoding amino acid sequences characteristic of the fatty acid desaturase were obtained using expressed sequence tag (EST) information of the Dictyostelium cDNA project. Using this sequence, we have determined the cDNA sequence and genomic sequence of a desaturase. The cloned cDNA is 1489 nucleotides long and the deduced amino acid sequence comprised 464 amino acid residues containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain. The whole sequence was 38.6% identical to the initially identified Delta5-desaturase of Mortierella alpina. We have confirmed its function as Delta5-desaturase by over expression mutation in D. discoideum and also the gain of function mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the lipids from transformed D. discoideum and yeast demonstrated the accumulation of Delta5-desaturated products. This is the first report concering fatty acid desaturase in cellular slime molds.

  16. Identification, quantitative determination, and antioxidative activities of chlorogenic acid isomers in prune (Prunus domestica L. ).

    PubMed

    Nakatani, N; Kayano, S; Kikuzaki, H; Sumino, K; Katagiri, K; Mitani, T

    2000-11-01

    Neochlorogenic acid (3-CQA) and cryptochlorogenic acid (4-CQA), isolated from prune (Prunus domestica L.), were identified by NMR and MS analyses. In addition, the quantity of chlorogenic acid isomers in prune were measured by HPLC. These isomers, 3-CQA, 4-CQA, and chlorogenic acid (5-CQA), were contained in the ratio 78.7:18. 4:3.9, respectively. 4-CQA was identified and quantified in prune for the first time, and relatively high amounts of this isomer were characteristic. Antioxidative activities of the chlorogenic acid isomers, such as scavenging activity on superoxide anion radicals and inhibitory effect against oxidation of methyl linoleate, were also evaluated. Each isomer showed antioxidative activities which were almost the same.

  17. Phenolics of Arbutus unedo L. (Ericaceae) fruits: identification of anthocyanins and gallic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Agata Maria; De Leo, Marinella; Braca, Alessandra

    2006-12-27

    Arbutus unedo L., the strawberry tree (Ericaceae family), is an evergreen shrub or small tree, typical of the Mediterranean fringe and climate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the profile of the phenolic constituents of A. unedo fruits. Seven compounds were purified by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography of the MeOH extract followed by HPLC and were characterized as arbutin, beta-D-glucogalline, gallic acid 4-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-galloylquinic acid, 5-O-galloylquinic acid, 3-O-galloylshikimic acid, and 5-O-galloylshikimic acid, by means of NMR and ESI-MS analyses. Moreover, LC-PDA-MS analysis of the red pigment of A. unedo fruits revealed the presence of three anthocyanins recognized as cyanidin 3-O-beta-D-galactopyranoside, delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and cyanidin 3-O-beta-D-arabinopyranoside. These pigments were also quantified. PMID:17177565

  18. Identification of Delta5-fatty acid desaturase from the cellular slime mold dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-01

    cDNA fragments putatively encoding amino acid sequences characteristic of the fatty acid desaturase were obtained using expressed sequence tag (EST) information of the Dictyostelium cDNA project. Using this sequence, we have determined the cDNA sequence and genomic sequence of a desaturase. The cloned cDNA is 1489 nucleotides long and the deduced amino acid sequence comprised 464 amino acid residues containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain. The whole sequence was 38.6% identical to the initially identified Delta5-desaturase of Mortierella alpina. We have confirmed its function as Delta5-desaturase by over expression mutation in D. discoideum and also the gain of function mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the lipids from transformed D. discoideum and yeast demonstrated the accumulation of Delta5-desaturated products. This is the first report concering fatty acid desaturase in cellular slime molds. PMID:10504413

  19. Identification of Acidic pH-dependent Ligands of Pentameric C-reactive Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, David J.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Thompson, James A.; Beeler, Bradley W.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Agrawal, Alok

    2010-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a phylogenetically conserved protein; in humans, it is present in the plasma and at sites of inflammation. At physiological pH, native pentameric CRP exhibits calcium-dependent binding specificity for phosphocholine. In this study, we determined the binding specificities of CRP at acidic pH, a characteristic of inflammatory sites. We investigated the binding of fluid-phase CRP to six immobilized proteins: complement factor H, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, complement C3b, IgG, amyloid β, and BSA immobilized on microtiter plates. At pH 7.0, CRP did not bind to any of these proteins, but, at pH ranging from 5.2 to 4.6, CRP bound to all six proteins. Acidic pH did not monomerize CRP but modified the pentameric structure, as determined by gel filtration, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid-binding fluorescence, and phosphocholine-binding assays. Some modifications in CRP were reversible at pH 7.0, for example, the phosphocholine-binding activity of CRP, which was reduced at acidic pH, was restored after pH neutralization. For efficient binding of acidic pH-treated CRP to immobilized proteins, it was necessary that the immobilized proteins, except factor H, were also exposed to acidic pH. Because immobilization of proteins on microtiter plates and exposure of immobilized proteins to acidic pH alter the conformation of immobilized proteins, our findings suggest that conformationally altered proteins form a CRP-ligand in acidic environment, regardless of the identity of the protein. This ligand binding specificity of CRP in its acidic pH-induced pentameric state has implications for toxic conditions involving protein misfolding in acidic environments and favors the conservation of CRP throughout evolution. PMID:20843812

  20. Identification of sulfoglycolipid bioactivities and characteristic fatty acids of marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Jung; Sun Pan, Bonnie

    2012-08-29

    The fatty acid compositions of 21 species of marine macroalgae, including 5 species of Chlorophyta (green algae), 13 of Rhodophyta (red algae), and 3 of Heterokontophyta (brown algae), were collected from northeastern Taiwan to survey their functional lipids. The lipid contents of green algae ranged from 15.36 to 20.15 mg/g, dry basis (db), and were characterized by a high content of C18:2 and C18:3, red algae (18.57-28.34 mg/g db) were high in C20:4 and C20:5, and brown algae (13.11-19.56 mg/g db) were high in C18:4, C20:4, and C:20:5. All algal lipids contained fatty acids of odd-number carbons, C17:0, and C17:1. Red algae had relatively higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and were richer in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) than green and brown algae. A red alga, Porphyra crispata , was extracted with ethanol and separated on a hydrophobic column (Diaion HP-20 column) to obtain sulfoglycolipids (sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols, SQDGs). The main fatty acids in SQDGs were palmitic acid (C16:0), 33.3%; EPA (C20:5), 30.0%; arachidonic acid (C20:4), 12.7%; oleic acid (C18:1), 7.52%; and stearic acid (C18:0), 6.83%. The n-3/n-6 ratio was 1.9, whereas the authentic standard, spinach SQDG, did not contain n-3 fatty acids. Sulfoglycolipids inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2). The IC50 was 126 μg/mL, which is lower than that of the spinach SQDG (255 μg/mL).

  1. Raman spectroscopic identification of usnic acid in hydrothermal minerals as a potential Martian analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterrothová, Kateřina; Jehlička, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy using 785 nm excitation was tested as a nondestructive method for determining the presence of the potential biomarker, usnic acid, in experimentally prepared mineral matrices. Investigated samples consisting of usnic acid mixed with powdered hydrothermal minerals, gypsum and calcite were studied. Various concentrations of usnic acid in the mineral matrix were studied to determine the detection limits of this biomarker. Usnic acid was mixed with gypsum (respectively, calcite) and covered by a UV-transparent crystal of gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O), thereby creating artificial inclusions similar to those which could be present in Martian minerals. A Raman usnic acid signal at the concentration level as low as 1 g kg -1 was obtained in the powdered mineral matrix and 5 g kg -1 when analyzed through the monocrystal. The number of registered usnic acid key Raman bands was dependent on the particular mineral matrix. If a similar concentration of usnic acid could persist in Martian samples, then Raman spectroscopy will be able to identify it. Obtained results will aid both in situ Raman analyses on Mars and on Earth.

  2. Identification and heterologous expression of a Δ4-fatty acid desaturase gene from Isochrysis sphaerica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bing; Jiang, Mulan; Wan, Xia; Gong, Yangmin; Liang, Zhuo; Hu, Chuanjiong

    2013-10-28

    The marine microalga Isochrysis sphaerica is rich in the very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5ω-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6ω-3) that are important to human health. Here, we report a functional characterization of a Δ4-fatty acid desaturase gene (FAD4) from I. sphaerica. IsFAD4 contains a 1,284 bp open reading frame encoding a 427 amino acid polypeptide. The deduced amino sequence comprises three conserved histidine motifs and a cytochrome b5 domain at its N-terminus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that IsFad4 formed a unique Isochrysis clade distinct from the counterparts of other eukaryotes. Heterologous expression of IsFAD4 in Pichia pastoris showed that IsFad4 was able to desaturate docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) to form DHA, and the rate of converting DPA to DHA was 79.8%. These results throw light on the potential industrial production of specific polyunsaturated fatty acids through IsFAD4 transgenic yeast or oil crops.

  3. Identification of acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiann-Tsyh; Arcinas, Arthur; Harden, Leslie A

    2009-04-01

    Ricinoleate, a monohydroxy fatty acid, in castor oil has many industrial uses. Dihydroxy fatty acids can also be used in industry. The C(18) HPLC fractions of castor oil were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of lithium adducts to identify the acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids and the dihydroxy fatty acids. Four diacylglycerols identified were diOH18:1-diOH18:1, diOH18:2-OH18:1, diOH18:1-OH18:1 and diOH18:0-OH18:1. Eight triacylglycerols identified were diOH18:1-diOH18:1-diOH18:1, diOH18:1-diOH18:1-diOH18:0, diOH18:2-diOH18:1-OH18:1, diOH18:1-diOH18:1-OH18:1, diOH18:1-diOH18:0-OH18:1, diOH18:2-OH18:1-OH18:1, diOH18:1-OH18:1-OH18:1 and diOH18:0-OH18:1-OH18:1. The locations of fatty acids on the glycerol backbone were not determined. The structures of these three newly identified dihydroxy fatty acids were proposed as 11,12-dihydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid, 11,12-dihydroxy-9,13-octadecadienoic acid and 11,12-dihydroxyoctadecanoic acid. These individual acylglycerols were at the levels of about 0.5% or less in castor oil and can be isolated from castor oil or overproduced in a transgenic oil seed plant for future industrial uses.

  4. Environmental remediation by an integrated microwave/UV illumination technique. 8. Fate of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, alkoxycarbonyl and phenolic substrates in a microwave radiation field in the presence of TiO2 particles under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Hojo, Fukuyo; Hidaka, Hisao; Serpone, Nick

    2004-04-01

    Thermal and nonthermal effects originating when a system is subjected to a microwave radiation field in the TiO2-photocatalyzed transformation of model substances containing various functional groups (e.g., benzoic acid, phthalic acid, o-formylbenzoic acid, phthalaldehyde, succinic acid, dimethyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate, and phenol) have been examined under simultaneous irradiation by ultraviolet (UV) and microwave (MW) radiations. Characteristics of the microwave effects and the fate of each substrate during the microwave-assisted photocatalytic process were monitored by UV absorption spectroscopy, HPLC methods, total organic carbon assays, and identification of intermediates using electrospray mass spectral techniques. Microwave thermal and nonthermal effects were delineated by comparing results from MW-generated internal heat versus conventional external heating, and at constant ambient temperature under a microwave field. Factors involved in the nonthermal component of the microwave radiation were inferred for the initial adsorption of the substrate and its subsequent degradation occurring on the surface of TiO2 particles. Microwave effects bear on the mechanism through which a model substrate undergoes oxidative degradation. A characteristic feature of these effects was briefly examined by considering the behavior of polar (dipole moments) substrates in a microwave radiation field.

  5. Identification of 19 phthalic acid esters in dairy products by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pinggu; Cai, Chenggang; Yang, Dajin; Wang, Liyuan; Zhou, Yan; Shen, Xianghong; Ma, Bingjie; Tang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    A detection method for 19 kinds of phthalic acid ester compounds analyzed by n-hexane/ether/acetonitrile 1:7:8 v/v/v mixed solvent extraction, quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe purification and internal standard method of quantitative gas chromatography with mass spectrometry was established. This method can effectively remove interfering materials, such as lipids, fatty acids, and pigments, from dairy products. The 19 kinds of phthalic acid ester compounds were within a 0.025-0.2 mg/kg range, the recovery rate was 65.2-125.7%, relative standard deviation was 7.9-15.4% (n = 6), and the limit of detection was 0.005-0.02 mg/kg. Concentrations of the 19 kinds of phthalic acid ester compounds ranged between 0.01 and 0.12 mg/kg in ten dairy materials and 20 dairy products. The established method is simple, rapid, accurate, and highly sensitive.

  6. [Identification of rat and human hemoglobin acetilation sites after its interaction with acetylsalicylic acid].

    PubMed

    Shreĭner, E V; Murashko, E A; Dubrovskiĭ, Ia D; Krasnov, N V; Podol'skaia, E P; Babakov, V N

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of interaction of 0.1 mg/mL acetylsalicylic acid with purified human and rat globin in vitro during 24 h at 37 degrees C was investigated. The rat globin can be modified with acetylsalicylic acid on aminoacid residues K-17, K-57, K-91, K-140 in alpha subunit as well as on K-18, K-77 in beta subunit. The human globin can be modified with acetylsalicylic acid on aminoacid residues K-17, K-41, K-57 and K-91 in alpha subunit as well as on K-18, K-96 and K- 133 in beta subunit. We identified of acetetylated lysines K-17 and K-57 in alpha subunit of human hemoglobin after incubation whole blood with 0.1 mg/mL acetylsalicylic acid during 3 h.

  7. Identification of geranic acid, a tyrosinase inhibitor in lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus).

    PubMed

    Masuda, Toshiya; Odaka, Yuka; Ogawa, Natsuko; Nakamoto, Katsuo; Kuninaga, Hideki

    2008-01-23

    Lemongrass is a popular Asian herb having a lemon-like flavor. Very recently, potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity has been found in lemongrass in addition to various biological activities reported in the literature. The aim of the present study is to identify the active compounds in the lemongrass. An assay-guided purification revealed that one of the active substances was geranic acid. Geranic acid has two stereoisomers, which are responsible for the trans and cis geometry on the conjugated double bond. Both isomers are present in the active ethyl acetate-soluble extract of the lemongrass, and their IC50 values were calculated to be 0.14 and 2.3 mM, respectively. The structure requirement of geranic acid for the potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity was investigated using geranic acid-related compounds.

  8. Lip Injection Techniques Using Small-Particle Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Annie; Fabi, Sabrina; Dayan, Steven; Nogueira, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    The shape and fullness of the lips have a significant role in facial aesthetics and outward appearance. The corrective needs of a patient can range from a subtle enhancement to a complete recontouring including correction of perioral rhytides. A comprehensive understanding of the lower face anatomical features and injection site techniques are foundational information for injectors. Likewise, the choice of filler material contributes to the success of the injection techniques used, and facilitates a safe, effective, and natural appearing outcome. The small-particle HA 20 mg/mL with lidocaine 0.3% (SP-HAL, Restylane® Silk; Galderma Laboratories, Fort Worth, Texas) is indicated for submucosal implantation for lip augmentation and dermal implantation for correction of perioral rhytides. Due to its rheological properties and smaller particle size, SP-HAL is a well-suited filler for the enhancement and correction of lip shape and volume, as well as for the correction of very fine perioral rhytides. This work is a combined overview of techniques found in the current literature and recommendations provided by contributing authors.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1076-1082. PMID:27602969

  9. Source identification of Indian opium based on chromatographic fingerprinting of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M M Krishna; Ghosh, Priyankar; Rasool, S N; Sarin, R K; Sashidhar, R B

    2005-09-23

    Total and free pool of amino acids was determined in Indian opium samples using liquid chromatography (LC) with post-column opthalaldehyde derivatization followed by its fluorimetric detection. The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be in the range of 2-10 pmol with a signal to noise ratio of 3:1 and limit of quantitation (LOQ) was found to be in the range of 7-31 pmol with a signal to noise ratio of 10:1. The recovery of amino acids was found to be in the range of 86-103%. A total of 124 Indian opium samples were collected from the states of Madhya Pradesh (MP), Uttar Pradesh (UP) and Rajasthan (Raj), covering 14 licit opium growing divisions of India were chromatographically fingerprinted for the presence of various amino acids. The amino acids identified in sample hydrosylate included D, T, S, S, G, A, V, I, L, Y, F, H, K and R, while the analysis of free pool of amino acids (80% aqueous ethanol extract) indicated the presence of D, T, S, E, A, V, I, L, Y, H, K respectively. Multiple discriminant analysis was applied to the quantitative total amino acid data to determine an optimal classifier in order to evaluate the source of Indian opium. The foremost amino acid variables that accounted for the true discrimination were identified as D, E, G, A, F and K in evaluating the geographical origin of Indian opium and the predictive value based on the discriminant analysis was found to be 90% in relation to the source of opium samples. Chemometrics performed with amino acid analytical data was used successfully in discriminating the licit opium growing divisions of India into three major groups, viz. groups I, II and III. The methodology developed may find wide application in forensic analysis.

  10. Identification of hydroxycinnamic acid-maillard reaction products in low-moisture baking model systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Deshou; Chiaro, Christopher; Maddali, Pranav; Prabhu, K Sandeep; Peterson, Devin G

    2009-11-11

    The chemistry and fate of hydroxycinnamic acids (ferulic, p-coumeric, caffeic, sinapic, and cinnamic acid) in a glucose/glycine simulated baking model (10% moisture at 200 degrees C for 15 min) were investigated. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of glucose/glycine and glucose/glycine/hydroxycinnamic acid model systems confirmed the phenolics reacted with Maillard intermediates; two main reaction product adducts were reported. On the basis of isotopomeric analysis, LC-MS, and NMR spectroscopy, structures of two ferulic acid-Maillard reaction products were identified as 6-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-(hydroxymethyl)-8-oxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one (adduct I) and 2-(6-(furan-2-yl)-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-methyl-3-oxo-2,5-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-en-2-yl)acetic acid (adduct II). In addition, a pyrazinone-type Maillard product, 2-(5-(furan-2-yl)-6-methyl-2-oxopyrazin-1(2H)-yl) acetic acid (IIa), was identified as an intermediate for reaction product adduct II, whereas 3-deoxy-2-hexosulose was identified as an intermediate of adduct I. Both adducts I and II were suggested to be generated by pericyclic reaction mechanisms. Quantitative gas chromatography (GC) analysis and liquid chromatography (LC) also indicated that the addition of ferulic acid to a glucose/glycine model significantly reduced the generation of select Maillard-type aroma compounds, such as furfurals, methylpyrazines, 2-acetylfuran, 2-acetylpyridine, 2-acetylpyrrole, and cyclotene as well as inhibited color development in these Maillard models. In addition, adducts I and II suppressed the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated expression of two prototypical pro-inflammatory genes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, in an in vitro murine macrophage model; ferulic acid reported negligible activity.

  11. Development of Criteria and Identification of Particle Cluster Size Based on Measurements of Void Fraction in Gas-Solid Systems

    SciTech Connect

    David Roelant; Seckin Gokaltun

    2009-06-30

    A circulating fluidized bed (CFB) built at FIU was used to study particle motion in the riser in order to simulate flow regimes in a cold gasifier. High speed imaging was used in order to capture the dynamics of the particles flowing in the riser. The imaging method used here is called the shadow sizing technique which allowed the determination of particle areas and trajectories at various flow rates in the riser. The solid volume fraction and particle velocities calculated using the images acquired during the experiments can be related to granular temperature in order to detect formations of clusters in the riser section of the CFB. The shadow sizing technique was observed to be an effective method in detecting dynamics of particles in motion and formation of clusters when supported with high-speed imaging.

  12. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-05-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  13. Identification of a Desaturase Involved in Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Albel; Varela, Cristian; Bhatt, Kiranmai; Veerapen, Natacha; Lee, Oona Y. C.; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Minnikin, David E.; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Teramoto, Kanae; Bhatt, Apoorva

    2016-01-01

    Mycolic acids are unique long chain fatty acids found in the cell walls of mycobacteria including the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The introduction of double bonds in mycolic acids remains poorly understood, however, genes encoding two potential aerobic desaturases have been proposed to be involved in this process. Here we show that one of these genes, desA1, is essential for growth of the saprophytic Mycobacterium smegmatis. Depletion of desA1 in a M. smegmatis conditional mutant led to reduction of mycolic acid biosynthesis and loss of viability. The DesA1-depleted cells exhibited two other phenotypes: using 14[C]-labelling, we detected the accumulation of minor mycolic acid-related species that migrated faster in a silver TLC plate. Spiral Time of Flight Mass Spectroscopic analysis suggested the presence of species with sizes corresponding to what were likely monoenoic derivatives of α-mycolic acids. Additionally, conditional depletion led to the presence of free fatty acyl species of lengths ~C26-C48 in the lysing cells. Cell viability could be rescued in the conditional mutant by Mycobacterium tuberculosis desA1, highlighting the potential of desA1 as a new drug target in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:27741286

  14. Identification of C18 intermediates formed during stearidonic acid biohydrogenation by rumen microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alves, S P; Maia, M R G; Bessa, R J B; Fonseca, A J M; Cabrita, A R J

    2012-02-01

    In vitro batch incubations were used to study the rumen biohydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids. An earlier study using increasing supplementation levels of stearidonic acid (18:4n-3), revealed that the rumen microbial population extensively biohydrogenates 18:4n-3 after 72 h of in vitro incubation, though several intermediates formed were not completely characterized. Therefore, in the present study, samples were reanalyzed in order to identify the 18:2, 18:3 and 18:4 biohydrogenation intermediates of 18:4n-3. Gas-liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to characterize these intermediates. The acetonitrile chemical ionization mass spectrometry of the fatty acid methyl esters derivatives enabled the discrimination of fatty acids as non-conjugated or conjugated biohydrogenation intermediates. In addition, the acetonitrile covalent adduct chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry yielded prominent ions indicative of the double bond position of the major 18:3 isomers, i.e. Δ5,11,15 18:3. Furthermore, the 4,4-dimethyloxazoline derivatives prepared from the fatty acid methyl esters enabled the structure of novel 18:2, 18:3 and 18:4 biohydrogenation intermediates to be elucidated. The intermediates accumulated in the fermentation media after 72 h of incubation of 18:4n-3 suggest that similar to the biohydrogenation pathways of linoleic (18:2n-6) and α-linolenic (18:3n-3) acids, the pathway of the 18:4n-3 also proceeds with the formation of conjugated fatty acids followed by hydrogenation, although no conjugated dienes were found. The formation of the novel biohydrogenation intermediates of 18:4n-3 seems to follow an uncommon isomerization pattern with distinct double bond migrations.

  15. Identification and characterization of an amino acid transporter expressed differentially in liver

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sumin; Roderick, Hywel Llewelyn; Camacho, Patricia; Jiang, Jean X.

    2000-01-01

    Cellular metabolic needs are fulfilled by transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane by means of specialized transporter proteins. Although many of the classical amino acid transporters have been characterized functionally, less than half of these proteins have been cloned. In this report, we identify and characterize a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane amino acid transporter. The deduced amino acid sequence is 505 residues and is highly hydrophobic with the likely predicted structure of 9 transmembrane domains, which putatively place the amino terminus in the cytoplasm and the carboxy terminus on the cell surface. Expression of the cRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed strong transport activities specific for histidine and glutamine. This protein is a Na+- and pH-dependent transporter and tolerates substitution of Na+ by Li+. Furthermore, this transporter is not an obligatory exchanger because efflux occurs in the absence of influx. This transporter is expressed predominantly in the liver, although it is also present in the kidney, brain, and heart. In the liver, it is located in the plasma membrane of hepatocytes, and the strongest expression was detected in those adjacent to the central vein, gradually decreasing towards the portal tract. Because this protein displays functional similarities to the N-system amino acid transport, we have termed it mNAT, for murine N-system amino acid transporter. This is the first transporter gene identified within the N-system, one of the major amino acid transport systems in the body. The expression pattern displayed by mNAT suggests a potential role in hepatocyte physiology. PMID:10716701

  16. Identification of a Transcription Factor Controlling pH-Dependent Organic Acid Response in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Lars; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Thykaer, Jette

    2012-01-01

    Acid formation in Aspergillus niger is known to be subjected to tight regulation, and the acid production profiles are fine-tuned to respond to the ambient pH. Based on transcriptome data, putative trans-acting pH responding transcription factors were listed and through knock out studies, mutants exhibiting an oxalate overproducing phenotype were identified. The yield of oxalate was increased up to 158% compared to the wild type and the corresponding transcription factor was therefore entitled Oxalic Acid repression Factor, OafA. Detailed physiological characterization of one of the ΔoafA mutants, compared to the wild type, showed that both strains produced substantial amounts of gluconic acid, but the mutant strain was more efficient in re-uptake of gluconic acid and converting it to oxalic acid, particularly at high pH (pH 5.0). Transcriptional profiles showed that 241 genes were differentially expressed due to the deletion of oafA and this supported the argument of OafA being a trans-acting transcription factor. Furthermore, expression of two phosphoketolases was down-regulated in the ΔoafA mutant, one of which has not previously been described in fungi. It was argued that the observed oxalate overproducing phenotype was a consequence of the efficient re-uptake of gluconic acid and thereby a higher flux through glycolysis. This results in a lower flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, demonstrated by the down-regulation of the phosphoketolases. Finally, the physiological data, in terms of the specific oxygen consumption, indicated a connection between the oxidative phosphorylation and oxalate production and this was further substantiated through transcription analysis. PMID:23251373

  17. Two novel Physcomitrella patens fatty acid elongases (ELOs): identification and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Eiamsa-Ard, Pradinunt; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit; Cahoon, Edgar B; Chodok, Pichit; Kaewsuwan, Sireewan

    2013-04-01

    The lower plant Physcomitrella patens synthesizes several long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) by a series of desaturation and elongation reactions. In the present study, the full-length cDNAs for two novel fatty acid elongases designated PpELO1 and PpELO2 were isolated from P. patens using a PCR-based cloning strategy. These cDNAs encoding proteins of 335 and 280 amino acids with predicted molecular masses of 38.7 and 32.9 kDa, respectively, are predicted to contain seven transmembrane domains with a possible localization in the subcellular endoplasmic reticulum. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that they are closely related to other LC-PUFA elongases of the lower eukaryotes such as the Δ(5)- and Δ(6)-elongases of Marchantia polymorpha as well as the Δ(6)-elongase of P. patens. Heterologous expression of the PpELO1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae led to the elongation of Δ(9)-, Δ(6)-C18, and Δ(5)-C20 LC-PUFAs, whereas only Δ(9)- and Δ(6)-C18 LC-PUFA substrates were used by PpELO2. Chimeric proteins were constructed to identify the amino acid regions most likely to be involved in the determination of the fatty acid substrate specificity. The expression of eight chimeric proteins in yeast revealed that substitution of the C-terminal 50 amino acids from PpELO1 into PpELO2 resulted in a high specificity for C20 fatty acid substrates. As a result, we suggest that the C-terminal region of PpELO1 is sufficient for C20 substrate elongation. Overall, these results provide important insights into the structural basis for substrate specificity of PUFA-generating ELO enzymes.

  18. Raman microspectroscopy of noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissues. Identification and phase transitions of linoleic and oleic acids by Raman low-temperature studies.

    PubMed

    Brozek-Pluska, Beata; Kopec, Monika; Surmacki, Jakub; Abramczyk, Halina

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of Raman studies in the temperature range of 293-77 K on vibrational properties of linoleic and oleic acids and Raman microspectroscopy of human breast tissues at room temperature. Our results confirmed the significant role of unsaturated fatty acids in differentiation of noncancerous and cancerous breast tissues and the role of vibrational spectroscopy in phase transition identification. We have found that vibrational properties are very sensitive indicators to specify phases and phase transitions typical of unsaturated fatty acids at the molecular level. Using Raman spectroscopy we have identified high-temperature, middle-temperature and low-temperature phases of linoleic acid. Results obtained for linoleic acid were compared with parameters characteristic of α and γ phases of oleic acid - the parent compound of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  19. Acid composition of particles and gases in a ponderosa pine forest during the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Yatavelli, L.; Thompson, S.; Kimmel, J. R.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Cubison, M. J.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Thornton, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the high mass-resolution analysis of gas-phase and aerosol spectra collected with a chemical ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer, equipped with a micro-orifice volatilization impactor ("MOVI-HRToF-CIMS", Yatavelli and Thornton AS&T, 2010; Yatavelli et al., AS&T, 2012) during the 2011 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study ("BEACHON-RoMBAS"). The study was conducted during July - August 2011 in a ponderosa pine forest in Colorado. Choosing acetate (CH3C(O)O-) as the reagent ion and developing analysis tools for formula identification and elemental analysis allowed us to identify hundreds of individual acids in aerosol spectra. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the ion time series is useful to account for backgrounds in the different modes of operation and to separate several gas-phase and particulate factors with different volatility and composition. Results on aerosol composition, including nitrogen- and sulfur-containing species as well as information about elemental ratios (e.g. O:C, H:C) and average carbon oxidation state are presented. Most of the acids detected have between 1 and 10 carbons and average carbon oxidation states (OsC) between -1 and 1. This suggests the importance of monoterpenes and MBO as precursors of the measured acids. We will discuss these results with special consideration of fragmentation on the heated surfaces of the instrument.

  20. Identification of a Taraxacum brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor protein that is localized on rubber particles and promotes rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Laibach, Natalie; Hillebrand, Andrea; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Two protein families required for rubber biosynthesis in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum have recently been characterized, namely the cis-prenyltransferases (TbCPTs) and the small rubber particle proteins (TbSRPPs). The latter were shown to be the most abundant proteins on rubber particles, where rubber biosynthesis takes place. Here we identified a protein designated T. brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor (TbREF) by using mass spectrometry to analyze rubber particle proteins. TbREF is homologous to the TbSRPPs but has a molecular mass that is atypical for the family. The promoter was shown to be active in laticifers, and the protein itself was localized on the rubber particle surface. In TbREF-silenced plants generated by RNA interference, the rubber content was significantly reduced, correlating with lower TbCPT protein levels and less TbCPT activity in the latex. However, the molecular mass of the rubber was not affected by TbREF silencing. The colloidal stability of rubber particles isolated from TbREF-silenced plants was also unchanged. This was not surprising because TbREF depletion did not affect the abundance of TbSRPPs, which are required for rubber particle stability. Our findings suggest that TbREF is an important component of the rubber biosynthesis machinery in T. brevicorniculatum, and may play a role in rubber particle biogenesis and influence rubber production. PMID:25809497

  1. Identification of a Taraxacum brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor protein that is localized on rubber particles and promotes rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Laibach, Natalie; Hillebrand, Andrea; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Two protein families required for rubber biosynthesis in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum have recently been characterized, namely the cis-prenyltransferases (TbCPTs) and the small rubber particle proteins (TbSRPPs). The latter were shown to be the most abundant proteins on rubber particles, where rubber biosynthesis takes place. Here we identified a protein designated T. brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor (TbREF) by using mass spectrometry to analyze rubber particle proteins. TbREF is homologous to the TbSRPPs but has a molecular mass that is atypical for the family. The promoter was shown to be active in laticifers, and the protein itself was localized on the rubber particle surface. In TbREF-silenced plants generated by RNA interference, the rubber content was significantly reduced, correlating with lower TbCPT protein levels and less TbCPT activity in the latex. However, the molecular mass of the rubber was not affected by TbREF silencing. The colloidal stability of rubber particles isolated from TbREF-silenced plants was also unchanged. This was not surprising because TbREF depletion did not affect the abundance of TbSRPPs, which are required for rubber particle stability. Our findings suggest that TbREF is an important component of the rubber biosynthesis machinery in T. brevicorniculatum, and may play a role in rubber particle biogenesis and influence rubber production.

  2. A history of the isolation and identification of folic acid (folate).

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Irwin H

    2012-01-01

    In the 1930s, Lucy Wills identified a 'new hemopoietic factor' in yeast and liver which cured tropical macrocytic anemia in humans and experimental anemia in monkeys. Janet Watson and William B. Castle named the unknown substance, which would ultimately become a form of folate, 'Wills' factor'. Further studies with this unknown substance showed that it was active against nutritional pancytopenia in monkeys and experimental anemia in chicks, leading to various designations such as vitamin M (monkey) and vitamin B(c) (chick). Other factors with growth-promoting activity for microorganisms such as Lactobacillus casei were given the interim names including folic acid - in recognition of extracts from leafy greens. Competing pharmaceutical research groups headed by Robert Stokstad at Lederle Laboratories and Joseph John Pfiffner at Parke-Davis Research Laboratory independently isolated factors bearing the biological properties of Wills' factor and other unknown related factors including folic acid, Lederle Laboratories from a bacterial culture and Parke-Davis Laboratory from yeast and liver as a conjugate of folate. The new vitamin then was crystallized, chemically identified, and synthesized as pteroylglutamic acid and named folic acid between 1943 and 1945. Further studies of the monoglutamic folic acid and the yeast isolate polyglutamyl folate followed through the 1950s and to the present.

  3. A history of the isolation and identification of folic acid (folate).

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Irwin H

    2012-01-01

    In the 1930s, Lucy Wills identified a 'new hemopoietic factor' in yeast and liver which cured tropical macrocytic anemia in humans and experimental anemia in monkeys. Janet Watson and William B. Castle named the unknown substance, which would ultimately become a form of folate, 'Wills' factor'. Further studies with this unknown substance showed that it was active against nutritional pancytopenia in monkeys and experimental anemia in chicks, leading to various designations such as vitamin M (monkey) and vitamin B(c) (chick). Other factors with growth-promoting activity for microorganisms such as Lactobacillus casei were given the interim names including folic acid - in recognition of extracts from leafy greens. Competing pharmaceutical research groups headed by Robert Stokstad at Lederle Laboratories and Joseph John Pfiffner at Parke-Davis Research Laboratory independently isolated factors bearing the biological properties of Wills' factor and other unknown related factors including folic acid, Lederle Laboratories from a bacterial culture and Parke-Davis Laboratory from yeast and liver as a conjugate of folate. The new vitamin then was crystallized, chemically identified, and synthesized as pteroylglutamic acid and named folic acid between 1943 and 1945. Further studies of the monoglutamic folic acid and the yeast isolate polyglutamyl folate followed through the 1950s and to the present. PMID:23183294

  4. Identification of new triarylethylene oxyalkanoic acid analogues as bone selective estrogen mimetics.

    PubMed

    Rubin, V N; Ruenitz, P C; Boudinot, F D; Boyd, J L

    2001-06-01

    Previously, the estrogen receptor (ER) ligand 4-[1-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylethyl]phenoxyacetic acid (5) was found to have differential bone loss suppressive effects in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat approaching those of selective ER modulators (SERMs) such as tamoxifen. In an effort to improve efficacy, analogues of this compound were prepared which incorporated features designed to reduce polarity/ionizability. Thus, the acetic acid side chain of 5 was replaced by n-butanoic acid and 1H-tetrazol-4-ylmethyl moieties, to give 8 and 10, respectively. Also, the phenolic hydroxyl of 5 was replaced, giving deoxy analogue 9. We also developed new methods for the synthesis of triarylethylene variants of 5 and 9, namely 4-([1-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenyl-1-butenyl]phenoxy)-n-butanoic acid (6) and its des-hydroxy counterpart (7), because the former of these had in vitro antiestrogenic effects characteristic of known SERMs. In the OVX rat, 6 and 7 were as effective as 17 beta-estradiol in suppressing serum markers of bone resorption/turnover, namely osteocalcin and deoxypyridinoline, but had only 30% of the uterotrophic efficacy of 17 beta-estradiol. This study has thus identified two triarylethylene oxybutyric acids, 6 and 7, that have differential bone/uterus effects like those of known SERMs.

  5. [Screening and identification of indoleacetic acid producing endophytic bacterium in Panax ginseng].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Tian, Lei; Chen, Chang-qing; Zhang, Guan-jun; Li, Tong; Chen, Jing-xiu; Wang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria which was producing indoleacetic acid was screened from Panax ginseng by using the Salkowski method. The active strain was also tested for its ability of nitrogen fixation by using the Ashby agar plates, the PKV plates and quantitative analysis of Mo-Sb-Ascrobiology acid colorimetry was used to measure its ability of phosphate solubilization, for its ability of potassium solubilization the silicate medium and flame spectrophotometry was used, for its ability of producing siderophores the method detecting CAS was used, for its ability of producing ACC deaminase the Alpha ketone butyric acid method was applied. And the effect on promoting growth of seed by active strain was tested. The results showed that the indoleacetic acid producing strain of JJ5-2 was obtained from 118 endophytes, which the content of indoleacetic acid was 10.2 mg x L(-1). The JJ5-2 strain also had characteristics of phosphate and potassium solubilization, nitrogen fixation, producing siderophores traits, and the promoting germination of ginseng seeds. The JJ5-2 strain was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis by analyzing morphology, physiological and biochemical properties and 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:26080547

  6. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  7. SEROTONIN BINDING TO NERVE-ENDING PARTICLES OF THE RAT BRAIN AND ITS INHIBITION BY LYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE.

    PubMed

    MARCHBANKS, R M; ROSENBLATT, F; O'BRIEN, R D

    1964-05-29

    The binding of serotonin to nerve-ending particles and other preparations from rat brain has been examined. By investigating the amount bound as a function of serotonin concentration from 10(-7)M to 1O(-2)M, it was possible to identify three major components having K(assoc) (association constant) values of 2 x 10(6), 5 x 10(4), and 5 x 10(2). The component having the highest binding constant was not present in liver and appeared to be confined to the cortex and midbrain regions. This component is inhibited by d-lysergic acid diethylamide at low concentrations. Solubilization of this binding component has been achieved.

  8. Amino acid composition of suspended particles, sediment-trap material, and benthic sediment in the Potomac Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigleo, A.C.; Shultz, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Sediment trap deployments in estuaries provide a method for estimating the amount of organic material transported to the sediments from the euphotic zone. The amino acid composition of suspended particles, benthic sediment, and sediment-trap material collected at 2.4 m, 5.8 m, and 7.9 m depths in the Potomac Estuary was determined in stratified summer waters, and in well-mixed oxygenated waters (DO) in late fall. The total vertical flow, or flux, of material into the top traps ranged from 3 g m-2 d-1 in August to 4.9 g m-2 d-1 in October. The carbon and nitrogen fluxes increased in the deepest traps relative to the surface traps during both sampling periods, along with that of the total material flux (up to 47.3 g m-2 d-1 in the deepest trap), although the actual weight percent of organic carbon and organic nitrogen decreased with depth. Amino acid concentrations ranged from 129 mg g-1 in surface water particulate material to 22 mg g-1 in particulate material in 9-m-deep waters and in the benthic sediment. Amino acid concentrations from 2.4-mg-depth sediment traps averaged 104??29 mg g-1 in stratified waters and 164??81 mg g-1 in well-mixed waters. The deep trap samples averaed, 77.3??4.8 mg g-1 amino acids in summer waters and 37??16 mg g-1 in oxygenated fall waters. Amino acids comprised 13% to 39% of the organic carbon and 12% to 89% of the orgnaic nitrogen in these samples. Analysis of the flux results suggest that resuspension combined with lateral advection from adjacent slopes can account for up to 27% of the material in the deep traps when the estuary was well-mixed and unstratified. When the estuary was stratified in late summer, the amino acid carbon produced by primary productivity in the euphotic zone decreased by 85% (86% for total organic carbon) at the pycnocline at 6 m depth, leaving up to 15% of the vertical organic flux available for benthic sediment deposition. ?? 1993 Estuarine Research Federation.

  9. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Fruit Pulp Processing Byproducts and Potential Probiotic Properties of Selected Lactobacillus Strains.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Estefânia F; Luciano, Winnie A; Xavier, Danilo E; da Costa, Whyara C A; de Sousa Oliveira, Kleber; Franco, Octávio L; de Morais Júnior, Marcos A; Lucena, Brígida T L; Picão, Renata C; Magnani, Marciane; Saarela, Maria; de Souza, Evandro L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in byproducts of fruit (Malpighia glabra L., Mangifera indica L., Annona muricata L., and Fragaria vesca L.) pulp processing. Fifty strains of LAB were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and 16S rRNA gene sequence (16S rRNA) analysis. Species belonging to Lactobacillus genus were the predominant LAB in all fruit pulp processing byproducts. The average congruency between the MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA in LAB species identification reached 86%. Isolates of L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. pentosus, L. lactis and L. mesenteroides were identified with 100% congruency. MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis presented 86 and 100% efficiency of LAB species identification, respectively. Further, five selected Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis 59, L. pentosus 129, L. paracasei 108, L. plantarum 49, and L. fermentum 111) were evaluated for desirable probiotic-related properties and growth behavior on two different cultivation media. The exposure to pH 2.0 sharply decreased the counts of the different Lactobacillus strains after a 1 or 2 h incubation, while varied decreases were noted after 3 h of exposure to pH 3.0. Overall, the exposure to pH 5.0 and to bile salts (0.15, 0.30, and 1.00%) did not decrease the counts of the Lactobacillus strains. All tested Lactobacillus strains presented inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli, and presented variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. The selected Lactobacillus strains presented satisfactory and reproducible growth behavior. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis revealed high efficiency and congruency for LAB species identification, and the selected Lactobacillus strains may be candidates for further investigation of novel probiotic strains.

  10. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Fruit Pulp Processing Byproducts and Potential Probiotic Properties of Selected Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Estefânia F.; Luciano, Winnie A.; Xavier, Danilo E.; da Costa, Whyara C. A.; de Sousa Oliveira, Kleber; Franco, Octávio L.; de Morais Júnior, Marcos A.; Lucena, Brígida T. L.; Picão, Renata C.; Magnani, Marciane; Saarela, Maria; de Souza, Evandro L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in byproducts of fruit (Malpighia glabra L., Mangifera indica L., Annona muricata L., and Fragaria vesca L.) pulp processing. Fifty strains of LAB were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and 16S rRNA gene sequence (16S rRNA) analysis. Species belonging to Lactobacillus genus were the predominant LAB in all fruit pulp processing byproducts. The average congruency between the MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA in LAB species identification reached 86%. Isolates of L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. pentosus, L. lactis and L. mesenteroides were identified with 100% congruency. MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis presented 86 and 100% efficiency of LAB species identification, respectively. Further, five selected Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis 59, L. pentosus 129, L. paracasei 108, L. plantarum 49, and L. fermentum 111) were evaluated for desirable probiotic-related properties and growth behavior on two different cultivation media. The exposure to pH 2.0 sharply decreased the counts of the different Lactobacillus strains after a 1 or 2 h incubation, while varied decreases were noted after 3 h of exposure to pH 3.0. Overall, the exposure to pH 5.0 and to bile salts (0.15, 0.30, and 1.00%) did not decrease the counts of the Lactobacillus strains. All tested Lactobacillus strains presented inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli, and presented variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. The selected Lactobacillus strains presented satisfactory and reproducible growth behavior. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis revealed high efficiency and congruency for LAB species identification, and the selected Lactobacillus strains may be candidates for further investigation of novel probiotic strains.

  11. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Fruit Pulp Processing Byproducts and Potential Probiotic Properties of Selected Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Estefânia F.; Luciano, Winnie A.; Xavier, Danilo E.; da Costa, Whyara C. A.; de Sousa Oliveira, Kleber; Franco, Octávio L.; de Morais Júnior, Marcos A.; Lucena, Brígida T. L.; Picão, Renata C.; Magnani, Marciane; Saarela, Maria; de Souza, Evandro L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in byproducts of fruit (Malpighia glabra L., Mangifera indica L., Annona muricata L., and Fragaria vesca L.) pulp processing. Fifty strains of LAB were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and 16S rRNA gene sequence (16S rRNA) analysis. Species belonging to Lactobacillus genus were the predominant LAB in all fruit pulp processing byproducts. The average congruency between the MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA in LAB species identification reached 86%. Isolates of L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. pentosus, L. lactis and L. mesenteroides were identified with 100% congruency. MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis presented 86 and 100% efficiency of LAB species identification, respectively. Further, five selected Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis 59, L. pentosus 129, L. paracasei 108, L. plantarum 49, and L. fermentum 111) were evaluated for desirable probiotic-related properties and growth behavior on two different cultivation media. The exposure to pH 2.0 sharply decreased the counts of the different Lactobacillus strains after a 1 or 2 h incubation, while varied decreases were noted after 3 h of exposure to pH 3.0. Overall, the exposure to pH 5.0 and to bile salts (0.15, 0.30, and 1.00%) did not decrease the counts of the Lactobacillus strains. All tested Lactobacillus strains presented inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli, and presented variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. The selected Lactobacillus strains presented satisfactory and reproducible growth behavior. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis revealed high efficiency and congruency for LAB species identification, and the selected Lactobacillus strains may be candidates for further investigation of novel probiotic strains. PMID:27625647

  12. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Fruit Pulp Processing Byproducts and Potential Probiotic Properties of Selected Lactobacillus Strains.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Estefânia F; Luciano, Winnie A; Xavier, Danilo E; da Costa, Whyara C A; de Sousa Oliveira, Kleber; Franco, Octávio L; de Morais Júnior, Marcos A; Lucena, Brígida T L; Picão, Renata C; Magnani, Marciane; Saarela, Maria; de Souza, Evandro L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in byproducts of fruit (Malpighia glabra L., Mangifera indica L., Annona muricata L., and Fragaria vesca L.) pulp processing. Fifty strains of LAB were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and 16S rRNA gene sequence (16S rRNA) analysis. Species belonging to Lactobacillus genus were the predominant LAB in all fruit pulp processing byproducts. The average congruency between the MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA in LAB species identification reached 86%. Isolates of L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. pentosus, L. lactis and L. mesenteroides were identified with 100% congruency. MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis presented 86 and 100% efficiency of LAB species identification, respectively. Further, five selected Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis 59, L. pentosus 129, L. paracasei 108, L. plantarum 49, and L. fermentum 111) were evaluated for desirable probiotic-related properties and growth behavior on two different cultivation media. The exposure to pH 2.0 sharply decreased the counts of the different Lactobacillus strains after a 1 or 2 h incubation, while varied decreases were noted after 3 h of exposure to pH 3.0. Overall, the exposure to pH 5.0 and to bile salts (0.15, 0.30, and 1.00%) did not decrease the counts of the Lactobacillus strains. All tested Lactobacillus strains presented inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli, and presented variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. The selected Lactobacillus strains presented satisfactory and reproducible growth behavior. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis revealed high efficiency and congruency for LAB species identification, and the selected Lactobacillus strains may be candidates for further investigation of novel probiotic strains. PMID:27625647

  13. [Identification of the optimal requirement of growing animals for polyunsaturated fatty acids].

    PubMed

    Mostovaia, L A

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained from studying eight groups of animals of a growing age showed their food rations to ensure proper growth and development when they contain optimal amounts of all food ingredients, including polyunsaturated fatty acids. Therefore, the fatty component in the food rations of test animals should contain both animal and vegetable fats, the latter comprising quantitatively 15 to 25 per cent of diurnal fat allowance. Such an amount of vegetable oil fully provides the rattlings with polyunsaturated fatt acids in a proportion comprising 4.3-5.8 per cent of the diurnal calorific value of the ration. For this reason, in investigations involving animal tests, or experimental substantiation of various problems pertaining to baby alimentation the authors recommend to use in feeding rattlings rations balanced in all the ingredients, including also the fatty acids composition.

  14. Chip-based device for parallel sorting, amplification, detection, and identification of nucleic acid subsequences

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Colston, Jr, Billy W.

    2016-08-09

    An apparatus for chip-based sorting, amplification, detection, and identification of a sample having a planar substrate. The planar substrate is divided into cells. The cells are arranged on the planar substrate in rows and columns. Electrodes are located in the cells. A micro-reactor maker produces micro-reactors containing the sample. The micro-reactor maker is positioned to deliver the micro-reactors to the planar substrate. A microprocessor is connected to the electrodes for manipulating the micro-reactors on the planar substrate. A detector is positioned to interrogate the sample contained in the micro-reactors.

  15. Identification and Characterization of FabA from the Type II Fatty Acid Synthase of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; Reynolds, Kevin A

    2016-01-22

    FabA is proposed to catalyze the dehydration step of chain elongation in fatty acid and undecylprodiginine biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor. Analysis of the S. coelicolor genome has revealed a fabA gene (SCO4636-SCO4637, encoding a heterodimer 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase). Herein, we report the identification and characterization of the corresponding gene products. Kinetic analysis has demonstrated that FabA is capable of utilizing various chain lengths of straight- and branched-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-NAC substrates. Additionally, FabA does not discriminate between acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) from primary and secondary metabolism. These data provide the first experimental evidence that FabA has 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase activity and processes intermediates for both biosynthetic pathways.

  16. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, J. Saúl; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P.; Arévalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Iqbal, Hafiz M. N.; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (CoS), four treatments (T) were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min), followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min). Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c), α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) and stearic acid (C18:0) differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica. PMID:27626416

  17. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, J Saúl; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P; Arévalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (CoS), four treatments (T) were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min), followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min). Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c), α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) and stearic acid (C18:0) differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica. PMID:27626416

  18. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Shan; Li, Ke; Shuai, Jiangbing; Dong, Qiang; Fang, Weihuan

    2012-07-01

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method in conjunction with fluorescin-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes (PNA-FISH) for detection of Listeria species was developed. In silico analysis showed that three PNA probes Lis-16S-1, Lm-16S-2 and Liv-16S-5 were suitable for specific identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii, respectively. These probes were experimentally verified by their reactivity against 19 strains of six Listeria species (excluding newly described species Listeria marthii and Listeria rocourtiae) and eight other bacterial species. The PNA-FISH method was optimized as 30 min of hybridization with 0.2% Triton X-100 in the solution and used to identify 85 Listeria strains from individual putative Listeria colonies on PALCAM agar plates streaked from selectively enriched cultures of 780 food or food-related samples. Of the 85 Listeria strains, thirty-seven were identified as L. monocytogenes with the probe Lm-16S-2 and two as L. ivanovii with the probe Liv-16S-5 which was in agreement with the results obtained by the API LISTERIA method. Thus, the PNA-FISH protocol has the potential for identification of pathogenic Listeria spp. from food or food-related samples.

  19. Detection and identification of specific bacteria in wound biofilms using peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH).

    PubMed

    Malic, Sladjana; Hill, Katja E; Hayes, Anthony; Percival, Steven L; Thomas, David W; Williams, David W

    2009-08-01

    Biofilms provide a reservoir of potentially infectious micro-organisms that are resistant to antimicrobial agents, and their importance in the failure of medical devices and chronic inflammatory conditions is increasingly being recognized. Particular research interest exists in the association of biofilms with wound infection and non-healing, i.e. chronic wounds. In this study, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to detect and characterize the spatial distribution of biofilm-forming bacteria which predominate within human chronic skin wounds (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp. and Micrococcus sp.). In vitro biofilms were prepared using a constant-depth film fermenter and a reconstituted human epidermis model. In vivo biofilms were also studied using biopsy samples from non-infected chronic venous leg ulcers. The specificity of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for the target organisms was confirmed using mixed preparations of planktonic bacteria and multiplex PNA probing. Identification and location of individual bacterial species within multi-species biofilms demonstrated that P. aeruginosa was predominant. CLSM revealed clustering of individual species within mixed-species biofilms. FISH analysis of archive chronic wound biopsy sections showed bacterial presence and allowed bacterial load to be determined. The application of this standardized procedure makes available an assay for identification of single- or multi-species bacterial populations in tissue biopsies. The technique provides a reliable tool to study bacterial biofilm formation and offers an approach to assess targeted biofilm disruption strategies in vivo. PMID:19477903

  20. Detection and identification of specific bacteria in wound biofilms using peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH).

    PubMed

    Malic, Sladjana; Hill, Katja E; Hayes, Anthony; Percival, Steven L; Thomas, David W; Williams, David W

    2009-08-01

    Biofilms provide a reservoir of potentially infectious micro-organisms that are resistant to antimicrobial agents, and their importance in the failure of medical devices and chronic inflammatory conditions is increasingly being recognized. Particular research interest exists in the association of biofilms with wound infection and non-healing, i.e. chronic wounds. In this study, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to detect and characterize the spatial distribution of biofilm-forming bacteria which predominate within human chronic skin wounds (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp. and Micrococcus sp.). In vitro biofilms were prepared using a constant-depth film fermenter and a reconstituted human epidermis model. In vivo biofilms were also studied using biopsy samples from non-infected chronic venous leg ulcers. The specificity of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for the target organisms was confirmed using mixed preparations of planktonic bacteria and multiplex PNA probing. Identification and location of individual bacterial species within multi-species biofilms demonstrated that P. aeruginosa was predominant. CLSM revealed clustering of individual species within mixed-species biofilms. FISH analysis of archive chronic wound biopsy sections showed bacterial presence and allowed bacterial load to be determined. The application of this standardized procedure makes available an assay for identification of single- or multi-species bacterial populations in tissue biopsies. The technique provides a reliable tool to study bacterial biofilm formation and offers an approach to assess targeted biofilm disruption strategies in vivo.

  1. Separation and Identification of Phenolic Acid and Flavonoids from Nerium indicum Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, A.; Sudha, P. N.

    2015-01-01

    Four major compounds were separated and identified from the methanol extracts of Nerium indicum flowers (Arali) using HPLC and mass spectral data. Through mass data, the chemical structures were elucidated as: trans5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (1), quercetin-3-O- rutinoside (2), luteolin-5-O-rutinoside (3) and luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (4). In addition, the cis isomers of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid in Nerium indicum flowers were confirmed by Mass, HPLC and UV. The structures of these compounds confirmed with the help of liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. PMID:25767323

  2. Quantifying solubility enhancement due to particle size reduction and crystal habit modification: case study of acetyl salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Robert B; Pencheva, Klimentina; Roberts, Kevin J; Auffret, Tony

    2007-08-01

    The poor solubility of potential drug molecules is a significant problem in the design of pharmaceutical formulations. It is well known, however, that the solubility of crystalline materials is enhanced when the particle size is reduced to submicron levels and this factor can be expected to enhance drug product bioavailability. Direct estimation of solubility enhancement, as calculated via the Gibbs-Thompson relationship, demands reasonably accurate values for the particle/solution interfacial tension and, in particular, its anisotropy with respect to the crystal product's habit and morphology. In this article, an improved, more molecule-centered, approach is presented towards the calculation of solubility enhancement factors in which molecular modeling techniques are applied, and the effects associated with both crystal habit modification and solvent choice are examined. A case study for facetted, acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) crystals in equilibrium with saturated aqueous ethanol solution reveals that their solubility will be enhanced in the range (7-58%) for a crystal size of 0.02 microm, with significantly higher enhancement for crystal morphologies in which the hydrophobic crystal faces are more predominant than the hydrophilic faces and for solvents in which the solubility is smaller.

  3. Characterization and Antimicrobial Property of Poly(Acrylic Acid) Nanogel Containing Silver Particle Prepared by Electron Beam

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Bae; Park, Jong-Seok; Khil, Myung-Seob; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung-In; Shin, Young-Min; Nho, Young-Chang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a one step process to synthesize nanogel containing silver nanoparticles involving electron beam irradiation. Water-soluble silver nitrate powder is dissolved in the distilled water and then poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) and hexane are put into this silver nitrate solution. These samples are irradiated by an electron beam to make the PAAc nanogels containing silver nanoparticles (Ag/PAAc nanogels). The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In addition, the particle size and zeta-potential were confirmed by a particle size analyzer (PSA). The antibacterial properties of the nanogels were evaluated by paper diffusion test. The Ag/PAAc nanogels had an antibacterial effect against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The nanogels also demonstrated a good healing effect against diabetic ulcer. The size of the Ag/PAAc nanogels decreased with increasing irradiation doses, and the absolute value of the zeta potential increased with increasing irradiation doses. Also, the Ag/PAAc nanogels exhibited good antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In in vivo wound healing, the Ag/PAAc nanogels have a good healing effect. PMID:23708101

  4. ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles as fluorescent probe for sensing of folic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Dan; Liu, Yanhuan; Li, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A novel fluorescent nanosensor for detecting folic acid (FA) in aqueous media has been developed based on 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (ANTS) anchored to the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-layered double hydroxides (LDH) particles. The nanosensor showed high fluorescence intensity and good photostability due to a strong coordination interaction between surface Zn2+ ions of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH and N atoms of ANTS, which were verified by result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). ANTS-anchored on the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH restricted the intra-molecular rotation leading to ANTS-anchored J-type aggregation emission enhancement. ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles exhibited highly sensitive and selective response to FA over other common metal ions and saccharides present in biological fluids. The proposed mechanism was that oxygen atoms of -SO3 groups in ANTS-anchored on the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH were easily collided by FA molecules to form potential hydrogen bonds between ANTS-anchored and FA molecules, which could effectively quench the ANTS-anchored fluorescence. Under the simulated physiological conditions (pH of 7.4), the fluorescence quenching was fitted to Stern-Volmer equation with a linear response in the concentration range of 1 μM to 200 μM with a limit of detection of 0.1 μM. The results indicate that ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles can afford a very sensitive system for the sensing FA in aqueous solution.

  5. Source term identification of environmental radioactive Pu/U particles by their characterization with non-destructive spectrochemical analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, M.; Osán, J.; Jernström, J.; Wegrzynek, D.; Simon, R.; Chinea-Cano, E.; Markowicz, A.; Bamford, S.; Tamborini, G.; Török, S.; Falkenberg, G.; Alsecz, A.; Dahlgaard, H.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.; Zoeger, N.; Betti, M.

    2005-04-01

    Six radioactive particles stemming from Thule area (NW-Greenland) were investigated by gamma-ray and L X-ray spectrometry based on radioactive disintegration, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer, synchrotron radiation based techniques as microscopic X-ray fluorescence, microscopic X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μ-XANES) as well as combined X-ray absorption and fluorescence microtomography. Additionally, one particle from Mururoa atoll was examined by microtomography. From the results obtained, it was found out that the U and Pu were mixed in the particles. The U/Pu intensity ratios in the Thule particles varied between 0.05 and 0.36. The results from the microtomography showed that U/Pu ratio was not homogeneously distributed. The 241Am/ 238 + 239 + 240 Pu activity ratios varied between 0.13 and 0.17, indicating that the particles originate from different source terms. The oxidation states of U and Pu as determined by μ-XANES showed that U(IV) is the preponderant species and for Pu, two types of particles could be evidenced. One set had about 90% Pu(IV) while in the other the ratio Pu(IV)/Pu(VI) was about one third.

  6. A model for heterogeneous chemical processes on the surfaces of ice and nitric acid trihydrate particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Turco, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    The study presents a model that incorporates the physics and physical chemistry of ice surfaces relevant to polar stratospheric clouds. Surface concentrations of H2O, HCl, HOCl, ClONO2, and N2O5 on ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) crystals are computed, and surface reaction rates and reaction probabilities (sticking coefficients) are determined. For gas pressures of about 10 exp -7 torr and temperatures in the range of 180-200 K, HCl completely coats ice and water-rich NAT surfaces, while HOCl, ClOHO2, and N2O5 may cover 0.01-1 percent of these surfaces. The energy parameters are used to calculate surface temperatures such as adsorption and desorption constants, surface coverages, reaction rate coefficients, surface diffusion coefficients, and reaction probabilities for various species and chemical interactions on ice and NAT surfaces. Implications for chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds are discussed.

  7. A Bayesian-based Method for Particle Track Identification in Low-energy Pair-creation Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Zoglauer, Andreas; Andritschke, Robert; Kanbach, Gottfried; Boggs, Steven E.

    2007-07-12

    A critical step during the data analysis of pair creation telescopes is the correct identification of the electron and positron tracks. For MEGA, an electron-tracking Compton and pair telescope optimized for energies up to 50 MeV, we describe a low-energy pair event reconstruction approach partly based on Bayesian statistics.

  8. Identification of acid-base catalytic residues of high-Mr thioredoxin reductase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Paul J; Arscott, L David; Ballou, David P; Becker, Katja; Williams, Charles H; Müller, Sylke

    2006-11-01

    High-M(r) thioredoxin reductase from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfTrxR) contains three redox active centers (FAD, Cys-88/Cys-93, and Cys-535/Cys-540) that are in redox communication. The catalytic mechanism of PfTrxR, which involves dithiol-disulfide interchanges requiring acid-base catalysis, was studied by steady-state kinetics, spectral analyses of anaerobic static titrations, and rapid kinetics analysis of wild-type enzyme and variants involving the His-509-Glu-514 dyad as the presumed acid-base catalyst. The dyad is conserved in all members of the enzyme family. Substitution of His-509 with glutamine and Glu-514 with alanine led to TrxR with only 0.5 and 7% of wild type activity, respectively, thus demonstrating the crucial roles of these residues for enzymatic activity. The H509Q variant had rate constants in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions that were dramatically less than those of wild-type enzyme, and no thiolateflavin charge-transfer complex was observed. Glu-514 was shown to be involved in dithiol-disulfide interchange between the Cys-88/Cys-93 and Cys-535/Cys-540 pairs. In addition, Glu-514 appears to greatly enhance the role of His-509 in acid-base catalysis. It can be concluded that the His-509-Glu-514 dyad, in analogy to those in related oxidoreductases, acts as the acid-base catalyst in PfTrxR.

  9. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  10. CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE REACTION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is of biological significance and may be implicated in the overall toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic. The course of the reaction in aqueous phase was monitored and an initial product, dimethylthioarsin...

  11. Identification of soybean purple acid phosphatase genes and their expression responses to phosphorus availability and symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are members of the metallo-phosphoesterase family and have been known to play important roles in phosphorus (P) acquisition and recycling in plants. Low P availability is a major constraint to growth and production of soybean, Glycine max. Comparat...

  12. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized. PMID:25345524

  13. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-10-27

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized.

  14. The isolation, identification and determination of dehydrotumulosic acid in Poria cocos.

    PubMed

    Song, Zonghua; Bi, Kaishun; Luo, Xu; Chan, Kelvin

    2002-05-01

    Poria cocos (Fuling), a popular Chinese medicinal (CM) herb of fungal origin, has been included in many combinations with other CM herbs for its traditionally claimed activities of inducing diuresis, excreting dampness, invigorating the spleen and tranquilizing the mind and its modern pharmacological use of modulating the immune system of the body. Dehydrotumulosic acid, one of the effective constituents of Fuling, was isolated from the chloroform-soluble material of ethanol extract of the fungus. After further purification by a high-performance liquid chromatographic method on a C18 column, the purified constituent was identified using modern analytical techniques, such as UV, 13C-NMR and EI-MS. A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the determination of dehydrotumulosic acid in Poria cocos. The determination can be accomplished in less than 50 min using methanol-acetonitrile-2% glacial acetic acid as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, with a UV detector setting at 242 nm and testosterone propionate used as an internal standard. This assay for dehydrotumulosic acid is simple, rapid and with good reproducibility. PMID:12036119

  15. Identification of amino acid residues in Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases influencing the structure of the glucan product.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, A; Nakano, Y J; Mukasa, H; Kuramitsu, H K

    1994-08-01

    The glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of mutans streptococci are important virulence factors in the sucrose-dependent colonization of tooth surfaces by these organisms. To investigate the structure-function relationship of the GTFs, an approach was initiated to identify amino acid residues of the GTFs which affect the incorporation of glucose residues into the glucan polymer. Conserved amino acid residues were identified in the GTF-S and GTF-I enzymes of the mutans streptococci and were selected for site-directed mutagenesis in the corresponding enzymes from Streptococcus mutans GS5. Conversion of six amino acid residues of the GTF-I enzyme to those present at the corresponding positions in GTF-S, either singly or in multiple combinations, resulted in enzymes synthesizing increased levels of soluble glucans. The enzyme containing six alterations synthesized 73% water-soluble glucan in the absence of acceptor dextran T10, while parental enzyme GTF-I synthesized no such glucan product. Conversely, when residue 589 of the GTF-S enzyme was converted from Thr to either Asp or Glu, the resulting enzyme synthesized primarily water-insoluble glucan in the absence of the acceptor. Therefore, this approach has identified several amino acid positions which influence the nature of the glucan product synthesized by GTFs.

  16. Isolation, characterisation and identification of lactic acid bacteria from bushera: a Ugandan traditional fermented beverage.

    PubMed

    Muyanja, C M B K; Narvhus, J A; Treimo, J; Langsrud, T

    2003-02-15

    One hundred and thirteen strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were selected from 351 isolates from 15 samples of traditionally fermented household bushera from Uganda and also from laboratory-prepared bushera. Isolates were phenotypically characterised by their ability to ferment 49 carbohydrates using API 50 CHL kits and additional biochemical tests. Coliforms, yeasts and LAB were enumerated in bushera. The pH, volatile organic compounds and organic acids were also determined. The LAB counts in household bushera varied between 7.1 and 9.4 log cfu ml(-1). The coliform counts varied between < 1 and 5.2 log cfu ml(-1). The pH of bushera ranged from 3.7 to 4.5. Ethanol (max, 0.27%) was the major volatile organic compound while lactic acid (max, 0.52%) was identified as the dominant organic acid in household bushera. The initial numbers of LAB and coliforms in laboratory-fermented bushera were similar; however, the LAB numbers increased faster during the first 24 h. LAB counts increased from 5.5 to 9.0 log cfu ml(-1) during the laboratory fermentation. Coliform counts increased from 5.9 to 7.8 log cfu ml(-1) at 24 h, but after 48 h, counts were less 4 log cfu ml(-1). Yeasts increased from 4.3 to 7.7 log cfu ml(-1) at 48 h, but thereafter decreased slightly. The pH declined from 7.0 to around 4.0. Lactic acid and ethanol increased from zero to 0.75% and 0.20%, respectively. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from household bushera belonged to Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Enterococcus genera. Tentatively, Lactobacillus isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, L. paracasei subsp. paracasei, L. fermentum, L. brevis and L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii. Streptococcus thermophilus strains were also identified in household bushera. LAB isolated from bushera produced in the laboratory belonged to five genera (Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, Weissella and Enterococcus. Eight isolates were able to produce acid from starch and were identified as Lactococcus

  17. Anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: 1. Identification of 1-amino-1-cycloalkyl carboxylic acid headgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Steven M.; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, David M.; Carter, H. Luke; Clancy, Daphne C.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Dwornik, Kate A.; Garrido, Dulce M.; Golden, Pamela L.; Nolte, Robert T.; Peat, Andrew J.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Tavares, Francis X.; Thomson, Stephen A.; Wang, Liping; Weiel, James E.

    2009-05-15

    Optimization of the amino acid residue within a series of anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors is described. These studies culminated in the identification of anthranilimides 16 and 22 which displayed potent in vitro inhibition of GPa in addition to reduced inhibition of CYP2C9 and excellent pharmacokinetic properties.

  18. Assessment of impact of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the absence of antimicrobial stewardship intervention.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Carol; Whitney, Dana; Barlam, Tamar; Miller, Nancy S

    2011-04-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) was instituted at Boston Medical Center for the rapid identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Without active notification or antimicrobial stewardship intervention, a pre- and postimpact analysis showed no benefit of this assay with respect to the length of hospital stay or vancomycin use.