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Sample records for acid particles identification

  1. Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid particles: Identification of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Rebecca M.; Elrod, Matthew J.; Kincaid, Kristi; Beaver, Melinda R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    While it is well established that organics compose a large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol mass, the mechanisms through which organics are incorporated into atmospheric aerosols are not well understood. Acid-catalyzed reactions of compounds with carbonyl groups have recently been suggested as important pathways for transfer of volatile organics into acidic aerosols. In the present study, we use the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to probe the uptake of gas-phase hexanal into ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols. While both deliquesced and dry non-acidic ammonium sulfate aerosols showed no organic uptake, the acidic aerosols took up substantial amounts of organic material when exposed to hexanal vapor. Further, we used 1H-NMR, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and GC-MS to identify the products of the acid-catalyzed reaction of hexanal in acidic aerosols. Both aldol condensation and hemiacetal products were identified, with the dominant reaction products dependent upon the initial acid concentration of the aerosol. The aldol condensation product was formed only at initial concentrations of 75-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. The hemiacetal was produced at all sulfuric acid concentrations studied, 30-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. Aerosols up to 88.4 wt% organic/11.1 wt% H 2SO 4/0.5 wt% water were produced via these two dimerization reaction pathways. The UV-VIS spectrum of the isolated aldol condensation product, 2-butyl 2-octenal, extends into the visible region, suggesting these reactions may impact aerosol optical properties as well as aerosol composition. In contrast to previous suggestions, no polymerization of hexanal or its products was observed at any sulfuric acid concentration studied, from 30 to 96 wt% in water.

  2. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  3. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  4. Pileup per particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape α which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of α for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. As a result, we also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

  5. Pileup per particle identification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape α which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of α for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used tomore » rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. As a result, we also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.« less

  6. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Gregg, Charles T.; Grace, W. Kevin; Hiebert, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  7. Particle identification for beauty physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, T.

    1987-01-01

    We look briefly at the requirements for particle identification for possible beauty experiments at the Tevatron, both in the fixed target and the collider mode. Techniques presently in use in high energy physics experiments, and under development, should make sensitive experiments feasible. However, in all cases the present state of the art must be advanced to meet the necessary requirements for segmentation andor rate capability. The most fundamentally difficult challenges appear to be the efficient tagging of soft electrons (for the collider experiment) and the need to handle interaction rates up to /approximately/ 10/sub 9/ HZ in the fixed target mode. In both cases we can find ''in principle'' demonstrations that the requirements can be met. We have considered only the most basic prooperties of detectors, however, and the real answers will come from careful studies of details. 20 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  9. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  10. Particle identification via Cherenkov correlated timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honscheid, K.; Selen, M.; Sivertz, M.

    1994-04-01

    We describe a new particle-identification technique based on precision timing measurements to determine the Cherenkov angle of photons emitted by particles passing through a quartz radiator. A Monte Carlo simulation indicates that good π-K separation can be obtained for a large range of particle momenta and incident angles. A prototype detector to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept is under construction.

  11. Particle identification at an asymmetric B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, P.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Oddone, P.; Ratcliff, B.; Roe, N.; Va'vra, J.; Ypsilantis, T.

    1991-09-01

    Particle identification systems are an important component of any detector at a high-luminosity, asymmetric B Factory. In particular, excellent hadron identification is required to probe CP violation in B{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates. The particle identification systems discussed below also provide help in separating leptons from hadrons at low momenta. We begin this chapter with a discussion of the physics motivation for providing particle identification, the inherent limitations due to interactions and decays in flight, and the requirements for hermiticity and angular coverage. A special feature of an asymmetric B Factory is the resulting asymmetry in the momentum distribution as a function of polar angle; this will also be quantified and discussed. In the next section the three primary candidates, time-of-flight (TOF), energy loss (dE/dx), and Cerenkov counters, both ring-imaging and threshold, will be briefly described and evaluated. Following this, one of the candidates, a long-drift Cerenkov ring-imaging device, is described in detail to provide a reference design. Design considerations for a fast RICH are then described. A detailed discussion of aerogel threshold counter designs and associated R D conclude the chapter. 56 refs., 64 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Comments on particle identification at the B factory

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, B.N.

    1992-07-01

    The importance of particle identification at an asymmetric B factory is discussed and the general status of a number of particle identification technologies which might be included in B factory detectors is briefly reviewed.

  13. Decision Tree Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Quiller, Ryan

    2003-09-05

    Particle identification based on measurements such as the Cerenkov angle, momentum, and the rate of energy loss per unit distance (-dE/dx) is fundamental to the BaBar detector for particle physics experiments. It is particularly important to separate the charged forms of kaons and pions. Currently, the Neural Net, an algorithm based on mapping input variables to an output variable using hidden variables as intermediaries, is one of the primary tools used for identification. In this study, a decision tree classification technique implemented in the computer program, CART, was investigated and compared to the Neural Net over the range of momenta, 0.25 GeV/c to 5.0 GeV/c. For a given subinterval of momentum, three decision trees were made using different sets of input variables. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for varying kaon acceptance thresholds. This data was used to plot Receiver Operating Characteristic curves (ROC curves) to compare the performance of the classification methods. Also, input variables used in constructing the decision trees were analyzed. It was found that the Neural Net was a significant contributor to decision trees using dE/dx and the Cerenkov angle as inputs. Furthermore, the Neural Net had poorer performance than the decision tree technique, but tended to improve decision tree performance when used as an input variable. These results suggest that the decision tree technique using Neural Net input may possibly increase accuracy of particle identification in BaBar.

  14. Particle identification in ALICE: a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.

    2016-05-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to particle identification (PID) within the ALICE experiment. The aim is to more effectively combine the particle identification capabilities of its various detectors. After a brief explanation of the adopted methodology and formalism, the performance of the Bayesian PID approach for charged pions, kaons and protons in the central barrel of ALICE is studied. PID is performed via measurements of specific energy loss ( d E/d x) and time of flight. PID efficiencies and misidentification probabilities are extracted and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using high-purity samples of identified particles in the decay channels K0S → π-π+, φ→ K-K+, and Λ→ p π- in p-Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=5.02 TeV. In order to thoroughly assess the validity of the Bayesian approach, this methodology was used to obtain corrected pT spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and D0 mesons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV. In all cases, the results using Bayesian PID were found to be consistent with previous measurements performed by ALICE using a standard PID approach. For the measurement of D0 → K-π+, it was found that a Bayesian PID approach gave a higher signal-to-background ratio and a similar or larger statistical significance when compared with standard PID selections, despite a reduced identification efficiency. Finally, we present an exploratory study of the measurement of Λc+ → p K-π+ in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV, using the Bayesian approach for the identification of its decay products.

  15. Identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Thiemann, Wolfram H.-P.

    2004-01-01

    Amino acids identified in the Murchison chondritic meteorite by molecular and isotopic analysis are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth by asteroids, comets, and interplanetary dust particles where they may have triggered the appearance of life by assisting in the synthesis of proteins via prebiotic polycondensation reactions [Oró, J. (1961) Nature 190, 389–390; Chyba, C. F. & Sagan, C. (1992) Nature 355, 125–132]. We report the identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite by new enantioselective GC-MS analyses. dl-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid, dl-2,4-diaminobutanoic acid, 4,4′-diaminoisopentanoic acid, 3,3′-diaminoisobutanoic acid, and 2,3-diaminobutanoic acid were detected in the parts per billion range after chemical transformation into N,N-diethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivatives. The chiral diamino acids show a racemic ratio. Laboratory data indicate that diamino acids support the formation of polypeptide structures under primitive Earth conditions [Brack, A. & Orgel, L. E. (1975) Nature 256, 383–387] and suggest polycondensation reactions of diamino acids into early peptide nucleic acid material as one feasible pathway for the prebiotic evolution of DNA and RNA genomes [Joyce, G. F. (2002) Nature 418, 214–221]. The results obtained in this study favor the assumption that not only amino acids (as the required monomers of proteins) form in interstellar/circumstellar environments, but also the family of diamino monocarboxylic acids, which might have been relevant in prebiotic chemistry. PMID:15194825

  16. Identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Thiemann, Wolfram H.-P.

    Amino acids identified in the Murchison chondritic meteorite by molecular and isotopic analysis are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth by asteroids, comets, and interplanetary dust particles where they may have triggered the appearance of life by assisting in the synthesis of proteins via prebiotic polycondensation reactions [Oró, J. (1961) Nature 190, 389-390; Chyba, C. F. & Sagan, C. (1992) Nature 355, 125-132]. We report the identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite by new enantioselective GC-MS analyses. DL-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid, DL-2,4-diaminobutanoic acid, 4,4'-diaminoisopentanoic acid, 3,3'-diaminoisobutanoic acid, and 2,3-diaminobutanoic acid were detected in the parts per billion range after chemical transformation into N,N-diethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivatives. The chiral diamino acids show a racemic ratio. Laboratory data indicate that diamino acids support the formation of polypeptide structures under primitive Earth conditions [Brack, A. & Orgel, L. E. (1975) Nature 256, 383-387] and suggest polycondensation reactions of diamino acids into early peptide nucleic acid material as one feasible pathway for the prebiotic evolution of DNA and RNA genomes [Joyce, G. F. (2002) Nature 418, 214-221]. The results obtained in this study favor the assumption that not only amino acids (as the required monomers of proteins) form in interstellar/circumstellar environments, but also the family of diamino monocarboxylic acids, which might have been relevant in prebiotic chemistry.

  17. Oxodicarboxylic acids in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römpp, Andreas; Winterhalter, Richard; Moortgat, Geert K.

    Fine mode aerosol was collected on quartz fiber filters at several sites across Europe. These samples were analyzed for carboxylic acids by liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid (quadrupole and time-of-flight) mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS-TOF). A series of oxodicarboxylic acids (C 7-C 11) was detected. Oxodicarboxylic acids are linear dicarboxylic acids with an additional carbonyl group. Previous measurements of these acids are scarce and their sources are largely unknown. Several structural isomers (different positions of the carbonyl group within the molecule) could be identified and differentiated by the combination of laboratory experiments and high mass accuracy measurements. The homologs with 9-11 carbon atoms were identified for the first time in atmospheric aerosol particles. The concentrations of oxodicarboxylic acids in ambient aerosol samples frequently exceeded those of the corresponding unsubstituted dicarboxylic acids. Oxodicarboxylic acids have been shown to be products of the reaction of dicarboxylic acids with OH radicals in chamber experiments and a reaction mechanism is proposed. Good correlation of oxodicarboxylic acid and hydroxyl radical concentrations was found at two measurement sites (Finland and Crete) of different geographic location and meteorological conditions. The ratios of individual isomers from the field samples are comparable to those of the laboratory experiments. The results of this study imply that the reaction of OH radicals and dicarboxylic acids is an important pathway for the production of oxodicarboxylic acids in the atmosphere. Oxodicarboxylic acids seem to be important intermediates in atmospheric oxidation processes of organic compounds.

  18. Fatty Acids as Surfactants on Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Niemi, J.

    2003-12-01

    Fatty acids (n-alcanoic acids) are common compounds in numerous anthropogenic and natural emissions. According to Rogge et al. (1993), catalyst-equipped automobiles emitted more than 600 μg km-1 of fatty acids which was over 50% of all identified organics in fine aerosol emissions. Coal burning produces fatty acids ranging from about 1700 mg kg-1 for bituminous coal to over 10000 mg kg-1 for lignite (Oros and Simoneit, 2000). Similarly, biomass burning is an important source for aerosol fatty acids. They are the major identified compound group in deciduous tree smoke, their total emission factor being measured as 1589 mg kg-1 which was 56% of all identified organic compounds (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a). Large amounts of fatty acid are also emitted from burning of conifer trees and grass (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a; Simoneit, 2002). Fatty acids have been reported to be major constituents of marine aerosols in many investigations (Barger and Garrett, 1976; Gagosian et. al, 1981; Sicre et al., 1990; Stephanou, 1992). It has been suggested that as the marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants (Blanchard, 1964; Gill et al., 1983; Middlebrook et al., 1998; Ellison et al., 1999). Amphiphilic molecules, including lipids, can be assembled as monomolecular layers at air/water interfaces as well as transported to a solid support. Recently, we could show by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the sea-salt aerosol particles (Tervahattu et al., 2002). In their TOF-SIMS studies on the surface composition of atmospheric aerosols, Peterson and Tyler (2002) found fatty acids on the surface of Montana forest fire particles. In this work we have studied by TOF-SIMS the surface chemical composition of aerosol particles emitted from field fires in the Baltic and other East European countries and transported to Finland as well as aerosol particles transported from

  19. Identification and collection of particles with optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etcheverry, Sebastián.; Sudirman, Aziza; Margulis, Walter; Laurell, Fredrik

    2015-07-01

    A micro-structured fiber-based system for identification and collection of fluorescent particles is demonstrated. An optical fiber probe with longitudinal holes in the cladding is used to retrieve fluorescent particles by exerting microfluidics forces. Laser induced fluorescent (LIF) is carried out by the fiber probe and an optical setup. When a particle with a previously chosen fluorescence wavelength is identified, a vacuum pump is activated collecting the particle into a hole. Green and red fluorescent polystyrene particles were detected and selectively retrieved.

  20. Fast Probabilistic Particle Identification algorithm using silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fino, L.; Zaconte, V.; Ciccotelli, A.; Larosa, M.; Narici, L.

    2012-08-01

    Active detectors used as radiation monitors in space are not usually able to perform Particle Identification (PID). Common techniques need energy loss spectra with high statistics to estimate ion abundances. The ALTEA-space detector system is a set of silicon strip particle telescopes monitoring the radiation environment on board the International Space Station since July 2006 with real-time telemetry capabilities. Its large geometrical factor due to the concurrent use of six detectors permits the acquisition of good energy loss spectra even in a short period of observation. In this paper we present a novel Fast Probabilistic Particle Identification (FPPI) algorithm developed for the ALTEA data analysis in order to perform nuclear identification with low statistics and, with some limitations, also in real time.

  1. Particle Identification in the ACCESS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. Z.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Kim, K. C.; Seo, E. S.

    2000-01-01

    ACCESS (Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures) is a planned Space Station mission to measure the elemental energy spectra of Galactic cosmic rays at energies above 100 GeV/nuc. ACCESS consists of a transition radiation detector (TRD) mounted on top of an ionization calorimeter (IC). A silicon matrix detector placed on top of the IC determines the elemental identity of each cosmic ray measured by the IC. The silicon matrix must be designed to identify each cosmic ray in the presence of backscatter from the calorimeter. Because the TRD is mounted above the IC, the matrix must also recognize cosmic rays that have interacted within the TRD before reaching the IC. We will report the results of detailed GEANT simulations of the silicon matrix in ACCESS. Results will be presented on backscatter interference with charge identification and the ability of the matrix to recognize cosmic rays that interacted in the TRD.

  2. Advantages and Limitations of the RICH Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, Blair N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-07

    The ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technique for hadronic particle identification (PID) is described. The advantages and limitations of RICH PID counters are compared with those of other classic PID techniques, such as threshold Cherenkov counters, ionization loss (dE/dx) in tracking devices, and time of flight (TOF) detectors.

  3. Particle Identification in the NIMROD-ISiS Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Wuenschel, S.; Hagel, K.; May, L. W.; Wada, R.; Yennello, S. J.

    2009-03-10

    Interest in the influence of the neutron-to-proton (N/Z) ratio on multifragmenting nuclei has demanded an improvement in the capabilities of multi-detector arrays as well as the companion analysis methods. The particle identification method used in the NIMROD-ISiS 4{pi} array is described. Performance of the detectors and the analysis method are presented for the reaction of {sup 86}Kr+{sup 64}Ni at 35 MeV/u.

  4. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  5. Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Hamamoto, Shiro; Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Yasuda, Hajime

    1995-04-01

    Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer fine particles were produced by reducing the copolymer particles-metal ion complexes or refluxing an ethanol solution of metal ions in the presence of copolymer particles. The size of metal particles formed by reduction of the complex is smaller than that by reflux of the metal ion solution and depends on the amount of metal ions immobilized.

  6. DIRC, a new type of particle identification system For BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiening, J.; BABAR-DIRC Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    The DIRC, a new type of Cherenkov imaging device, has been selected as the primary particle identification system for the BABAR detector at the asymmetric B-factory, PEP-II. It is based on total internal reflection and uses long, rectangular bars made from synthetic fused silica as Cherenkov radiators and light guides. In this paper, the principles of the DIRC ring imaging Cherenkov technique are explained and results from the prototype program are presented. The studies of the optical properties and radiation hardness of the quartz radiators are described, followed by a discussion of the detector design.

  7. TOP counter for particle identification at the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Ring imaging Cherenkov counter, named TOP counter, utilizing precise photon detection timing has been developed as a particle identification detector for the Belle II experiment. The real size prototype has been produced and tested with 2 GeV positrons at Spring-8 LEPS beam line. The quartz radiator production and assembling with microchannel plate photomultipliers was successfully carried out. The beam test data shows good agreement with full Monte-Carlo simulation results in the ring image and the distribution of number of detected photons and timing information.

  8. Identification of Backlash Type Hysteretic Systems Based on Particle Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Sugie, Toshiharu

    This paper considers the system identification problem for hysteresis systems. This problem plays an important role in achieving better control performance, because many actuators have hysteresis property. This paper proposes a method to identify linear dynamical systems having input hysteresis property of backlash type. The method is based on particle filter, which is known for its applicability to a wide class of nonlinear systems. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in detail. Furthermore, experimental validation is performed for a DC servo motor system.

  9. The efficient identification of relativistic particles by transition radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    A system of transition radiation detectors has been constructed and exposed to beams of electrons and pions in the energy range of 3 to 15 GeV at SLAC. Transition radiation was generated in a variety of stacks of mylar foils (radiators), and its intensity was detected with 7 multiwire proportional chambers. The raw data demonstrate a good separation between electron and pion induced signals. A more detailed analysis shows that a very efficient identification of individual particles is possible. Typically, a detection efficiency for electrons above 90%, combined with a pion-electron discrimination ratio of .001, has been achieved. Some conclusions with respect to the design of a practical detector for relativistic particles are drawn.

  10. Stability of lipid encapsulated phenolic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and p-coumaric acids are potential bioactive additives for use in animal feeds to replace current antioxidants and antimicrobial compounds. These compounds are ubiquitous in plants and may be obtained from commodity grain crops and waste biomass. Encapsulation...

  11. DIRC - The Particle Identification System for BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, David

    2002-08-19

    I have the pleasure of reporting on the status of the DIRC particle identification sub-system(2) of the BaBar Detector, running at the asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. The acronym DIRC stands for ''Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov Light.'' This device grows out of our group's experience with ring-imaging Cherenkov devices founded on a long partnership with Tom Ypsilantis and in particular with the CRID device for the SLD experiment. Blair Ratcliff had the brilliant idea of using the totally internally reflected Cherenkov light created in quartz bars, and transported out to the photon detectors by those same quartz bars, to provide excellent {pi}, K, p particle identification in the momentum range important for the B Factory. His naming of this new instrument was aptly ''CRID'' spelled backwards. The detailed design, building and commissioning of the DIRC sub-system was the work of a large international collaboration of French and U.S. groups. The device has proven to be a very robust detector, with the promised performance essentially fully realized, and is being effectively utilized in almost all of the current BaBar physics analysis.

  12. Genesis Concentrator Target Particle Contamination Mapping and Material Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of surface particles were found to be < 5 microns in diameter with increasing numbers close to the optical resolution limit of 0.3 microns. Acceleration grid EDS results show that the majority of materials appear to be from the SRC shell and SLA materials which include carbon-carbon fibers and Si-rich microspheres in a possible silicone binder. Other major debris material from the SRC included white paint, kapton, collector array fragments, and Al. Image analysis also revealed that SRC materials were also found mixed with the Utah mud and salt deposits. The EDS analysis of the acceleration grid showed that particles < 1 m where generally carbon based particles. Chemical cleaning techniques with Xylene and HF in an ultrasonic bath are currently being investigated for removal of small particles by the Genesis science team as well as ultra-pure water megasonic cleaning by the JSC team [4]. Removal of organic contamination from target materials is also being investigated by the science team with the use of UV-ozone cleaning devices at JSC and Open University [5]. In preparation for solar wind oxygen analyses at UCLA and Open University [1, 2], surface particle contamination on three Genesis concentrator targets was closely examined to evaluate cleaning strategies. Two silicon carbide (Genesis sample # 60001 and 60003) and one chemical vapor deposited (CVD) 13C concentrator target (60002) were imaged and mosaic mapped with optical microscopes. The resulting full target mosaic images and particle feature maps were subsequently compared with non-flight, but flight-like, concentrator targets and sample return capsule (SRC) materials. Contamination found on the flown concentrator acceleration grid was further examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for particle identification was subsequently compared with the optical images from the flown targets. Figure 1 show that all three targets imaged in this report

  13. Nucleic acid separations using superficially porous silica particles

    PubMed Central

    Close, Elizabeth D.; Nwokeoji, Alison O.; Milton, Dafydd; Cook, Ken; Hindocha, Darsha M.; Hook, Elliot C.; Wood, Helen; Dickman, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography has been widely employed for nucleic acid separations. A wide range of alternative stationary phases have been utilised in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase chromatography, including totally porous particles, non-porous particles, macroporous particles and monolithic stationary phases. In this study we have utilised superficially porous silica particles in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography for the analysis of nucleic acids. We have investigated a range of different pore-sizes and phases for the analysis of a diverse range of nucleic acids including oligonucleotides, oligoribonucleotides, phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and high molecular weight dsDNA and RNA. The pore size of the superficially porous silica particles was shown to significantly affect the resolution of the nucleic acids. Optimum separations of small oligonucleotides such as those generated in RNase mapping experiments were obtained with 80 Å pore sizes and can readily be interfaced with mass spectrometry analysis. Improved resolution of larger oligonucleotides (>19 mers) was observed with pore sizes of 150 Å. The optimum resolution for larger dsDNA/RNA molecules was achieved using superficially porous silica particles with pore sizes of 400 Å. Furthermore, we have utilised 150 Å pore size solid-core particles to separate typical impurities of a fully phosphorothioated oligonucleotide, which are often generated in the synthesis of this important class of therapeutic oligonucleotide. PMID:26948761

  14. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  15. Particle identification algorithms for the HARP forward spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanesi, M. G.; Radicioni, E.; Edgecock, R.; Ellis, M.; Robbins, S.; Soler, F. J. P.; Gößling, C.; Bunyatov, S.; Chelkov, G.; Chukanov, A.; Dedovitch, D.; Gostkin, M.; Guskov, A.; Khartchenko, D.; Klimov, O.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kroumchtein, Z.; Kustov, D.; Nefedov, Y.; Popov, B.; Serdiouk, V.; Tereshchenko, V.; Zhemchugov, A.; Di Capua, E.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Artamonov, A.; Arce, P.; Giani, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Grant, A.; Grossheim, A.; Gruber, P.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pasternak, J.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsukerman, I.; Veenhof, R.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.; Blondel, A.; Borghi, S.; Campanelli, M.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Morone, M. C.; Prior, G.; Schroeter, R.; Kato, I.; Nakaya, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Ueda, S.; Gastaldi, U.; Mills, G. B.; Graulich, J. S.; Grégoire, G.; Bonesini, M.; De Min, A.; Ferri, F.; Paganoni, M.; Paleari, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Bagulya, A.; Grichine, V.; Polukhina, N.; Palladino, V.; Coney, L.; Schmitz, D.; Barr, G.; De Santo, A.; Pattison, C.; Zuber, K.; Bobisut, F.; Gibin, D.; Guglielmi, A.; Laveder, M.; Menegolli, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Dumarchez, J.; Vannucci, F.; Ammosov, V.; Koreshev, V.; Semak, A.; Zaets, V.; Dore, U.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Booth, C.; Buttar, C.; Hodgson, P.; Howlett, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Chizhov, M.; Kolev, D.; Tsenov, R.; Piperov, S.; Temnikov, P.; Apollonio, M.; Chimenti, P.; Giannini, G.; Santin, G.; Hayato, Y.; Ichikawa, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Novella, P.; Sorel, M.; Tornero, A.

    2007-03-01

    The particle identification (PID) methods used for the calculation of secondary pion yields with the HARP forward spectrometer are presented. Information from time of flight and Cherenkov detectors is combined using likelihood techniques. The efficiencies and purities associated with the different PID selection criteria are obtained from the data. For the proton-aluminium interactions at 12.9 GeV/ c incident momentum, the PID efficiencies for positive pions are 86% in the momentum range below 2 GeV/ c, 92% between 2 and 3 GeV/ c and 98% in the momentum range above 3 GeV/ c. The purity of the selection is better than 92% for all momenta. Special emphasis has been put on understanding the main error sources. The final PID uncertainty on the pion yield is 3.3%.

  16. On the dissolution kinetics of humic acid particles. Effect of monocarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Brigante, Maximiliano; Zanini, Graciela; Avena, Marcelo

    2008-05-01

    The dissolution kinetics of humic acid particles has been studied in batch experiments, and the effects of monocarboxylic (formic, acetic, and propionic) acids are reported. The dissolution rate of the particles is significantly affected by the presence of monocarboxylic acids in the pH range 4-10. At pH 7, for example, propionic acid increases 30 times this dissolution rate. The capacity of increasing the dissolution rate is in the order formic acidacidacid, and this dissolving capacity of carboxylics seems to be directly related to their affinity for HA molecules located at the surface of the solid particles. The results indicate that carboxylics and related compounds may affect markedly the mobility and transport of humic substances in the environment. PMID:18328533

  17. Reflective particle technology for identification of critical components

    SciTech Connect

    Tolk, K M

    1992-01-01

    Reflective Particle Tags were developed for uniquely identifying individual strategic weapons that would be counted in order to verify arms control treaties. These tags were designed to be secure from copying and transfer even after being lift under the control of a very determined adversary for a number of years. This paper discusses how this technology can be applied in other applications requiring confidence that a piece of equipment, such as a seal or a component of a secure, has not been replaced with a similar item. The hardware and software needed to implement this technology is discussed, and guidelines for the sign of systems that rely on these or similar randomly formed features for security applications are presented. Substitution of identical components is one of the easiest ways to defeat security seals, secure containers, verification instrumentation, and similar equipment. This technology, when properly applied, provides a method to counter this defeat scenario. This paper presents a method for uniquely identifying critical security related equipment. Guidelines for implementing identification systems based on reflective particles or similar random features without compromising their intrinsic security are discussed.

  18. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  19. Oleic acid coated magnetic nano-particles: Synthesis and characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Biswajit Goyal, P. S.

    2015-06-24

    Magnetic nano particles of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} coated with oleic acid were synthesized using wet chemical route, which involved co-precipitation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The nano particles were characterized using XRD, TEM, FTIR, TGA and VSM. X-ray diffraction studies showed that nano particles consist of single phase Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} having inverse spinel structure. The particle size obtained from width of Bragg peak is about 12.6 nm. TEM analysis showed that sizes of nano particles are in range of 6 to 17 nm with a dominant population at 12 - 14 nm. FTIR and TGA analysis showed that -COOH group of oleic acid is bound to the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles and one has to heat the sample to 278° C to remove the attached molecule from the surface. Further it was seen that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles exhibit super paramagnetism with a magnetization of about 53 emu/ gm.

  20. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4particles/kgFUEL (for 75 and 675 ppmm fuel-S). The sulfur (gas) to H2SO4 (particle) conversion efficiency is between 10% and 25%.

  1. 1- and 2-particle Microrheology of Hyaluronic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Austin; Kearns, Sarah; Ross, David; Das, Moumita; Thurston, George; Franklin, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (also called HA or Hyaluronan) is a high molecular weight polysaccaride ubiquitous in the extracellular matrix of soft tissue such as cartilage, skin, the eye's vitreous gel and synovial fluid. It has been shown to play an important role in mechanotransduction, cell migration and proliferation, and in tissue morphodynamics. We present a confocal microrheology study of hyaluronic acid of varying concentrations. The mean squared displacement (MSD) of sub-micron colloidal tracer particles is tracked in two dimensions and shows a transition from diffusive motion at low concentrations to small-time trapping by the protein network as the concentration increases. Correlations between particle motion can be used to determine an effective mean-squared displacement which deviates from the single-particle MSD as the fluid becomes less homogeneous. The real and effective mean-squared displacements are used to probe the local and space-averaged frequency dependent rheological properties of the fluid as the concentration changes.

  2. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  3. Identification and application of keto acids transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Peiran; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Production of organic acids by microorganisms is of great importance for obtaining building-block chemicals from sustainable biomass. Extracellular accumulation of organic acids involved a series of transporters, which play important roles in the accumulation of specific organic acid while lack of systematic demonstration in eukaryotic microorganisms. To circumvent accumulation of by-product, efforts have being orchestrated to carboxylate transport mechanism for potential clue in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06. Six endogenous putative transporter genes, YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D24607g, YALI0D20108g and YALI0E32901g, were identified. Transport characteristics and substrate specificities were further investigated using a carboxylate-transport-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. These transporters were expressed in Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 to assess their roles in regulating extracellular keto acids accumulation. In a Y. lipolytica T1 line over expressing YALI0B19470g, α-ketoglutarate accumulated to 46.7 g·L(-1), whereas the concentration of pyruvate decreased to 12.3 g·L(-1). Systematic identification of these keto acids transporters would provide clues to further improve the accumulation of specific organic acids with higher efficiency in eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:25633653

  4. Identification and application of keto acids transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Peiran; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Production of organic acids by microorganisms is of great importance for obtaining building-block chemicals from sustainable biomass. Extracellular accumulation of organic acids involved a series of transporters, which play important roles in the accumulation of specific organic acid while lack of systematic demonstration in eukaryotic microorganisms. To circumvent accumulation of by-product, efforts have being orchestrated to carboxylate transport mechanism for potential clue in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06. Six endogenous putative transporter genes, YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D24607g, YALI0D20108g and YALI0E32901g, were identified. Transport characteristics and substrate specificities were further investigated using a carboxylate-transport-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. These transporters were expressed in Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 to assess their roles in regulating extracellular keto acids accumulation. In a Y. lipolytica T1 line over expressing YALI0B19470g, α-ketoglutarate accumulated to 46.7 g·L−1, whereas the concentration of pyruvate decreased to 12.3 g·L−1. Systematic identification of these keto acids transporters would provide clues to further improve the accumulation of specific organic acids with higher efficiency in eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:25633653

  5. Amine bearing polymeric particles as acid neutralizers for engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, A.N.; Chattha, M.S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a lubricating oil composition consisting of a major proportion of a lubricating base oil and about 0.1 to 15 weight percent of an acid neutralizing additive which consists of polymer particles (a) bearing pendant amine groups, and (b) having a diameter of about 500 A and 10,000 A. The amine functional particles are formed by reacting polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups with a secondary amine in an amount so as to react essentially all of the epoxide groups on the epoxide bearing polymer particles with the secondary amine. The polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups are formed by the free radical addition polymerization of: (a) between about 50 and about 100 weight percent of an ethylenically unsaturated monomers bearing an epoxide group, and (b) 0 up to about 50 weight percent of other monoethylenically unsaturated monomers; in the presence of: (I) a non-polar organic liquid which is a solvent for the polymerizable monomers, but a non-solvent for the resultant polymer, and (II) polymeric dispersion stabilizer containing at least two segments, with one segment being solvated by the non-polar organic liquid and the second segment being of different polarity than the first segment and relatively insoluble in the non-polar organic liquid. The second segment of the stabilizer is chemically attached to the polymerized particle.

  6. The DIRC counter: A new type of particle identification device for B factories

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, P.; Kawahara, H.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Ratcliff, B.; Simopoulos, C.; Lu, A.; Lynch, G.

    1992-07-01

    A very thin, solid radiator, totally internally reflecting, imaging Cherenkov counter (DIRC) is described. this device is well matched to the hadronic charged particle identification requirements at an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}B Factory.

  7. The DIRC counter: A new type of particle identification device for B factories

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, B.

    1993-01-01

    A very thin, solid radiator, totally internally reflecting, imaging Cherenkov counter (DIRC) is described. This device is well matched to the hadronic charged particle identification requirements at an asymmetric e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  8. Particle identification using time-of-flight technology for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.R.

    1995-07-15

    The large multiplicities expected for LHC Pb+Pb collisions require new development in particle identification techniques. Presently, Pestov Spark Counters, low pressure Parallel Plate Chambers and scintillators with photo multiplier readout are under consideration.

  9. A rocket-borne energy spectrometer using multiple solid-state detectors for particle identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, K. L.; Smith, L. G.; Voss, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    A rocket-borne experiment using energy spectrometers that allows particle identification by the use of multiple solid-state detectors is described. The instrumentation provides information regarding the energy spectrum, pitch-angle distribution, and the type of energetic particles present in the ionosphere. Particle identification was accomplished by considering detector loss mechanisms and their effects on various types of particles. Solid state detectors with gold and aluminum surfaces of several thicknesses were used. The ratios of measured energies for the various detectors were compared against known relationships during ground-based analysis. Pitch-angle information was obtained by using detectors with small geometrical factors mounted with several look angles. Particle flux was recorded as a function of rocket azimuth angle. By considering the rocket azimuth, the rocket precession, and the location of the detectors on the rocket, the pitched angle of the incident particles was derived.

  10. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  11. Detection and study of new heavy particles through jet identification

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    A solution to the problem of the identification of an arbitrary number of jets in high energy collisions is reviewed. Some of the applications of this solution to the study of the electroweak interactions are illustrated through two examples: the detection and analysis of top quarks, and the detection of charged Higgs or pseudo Goldstone bosons, in e/sup +/e/sup -/ reactions. Although these two examples involve e/sup +/e/sup -/ initial states, the jet identification method described in this paper could be used in the analysis of any reaction involving jets.

  12. Modified MALDI MS fatty acid profiling for bacterial identification.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Kent J; Jensen, Kirk R; McAlpin, Casey R; Rees, Jon C; Cody, Robert; Ubukata, Masaaki; Cox, Christopher R

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial fatty acid profiling is a well-established technique for bacterial identification. Ten bacteria were analyzed using both positive- and negative-ion modes with a modified matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) approach using CaO as a matrix replacement (metal oxide laser ionization MS (MOLI MS)). The results show that reproducible lipid cleavage similar to thermal in situ tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide saponification/derivatization had occurred. Principal component analysis showed that replicates from each organism grouped in a unique space. Cross validation (CV) of spectra from both ionization modes resulted in greater than 94% validation of the data. When CV results were compared for the two ionization modes, negative-ion data produced a superior outcome. MOLI MS provides clinicians a rapid, reproducible and cost-effective bacterial diagnostic tool. PMID:23832941

  13. Charged particle identification with modules of the plastic ball

    SciTech Connect

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Maier, M.R.; Ritter, H.G.; Warwick, A.I.; Weik, F.; Wieman, H.; Wolf, K.L.

    1980-10-01

    The low energy pion channel (LEP) at LAMPF was used to calibrate the response of modules of the Plastic Ball detector for positive pions and protons. The detection efficiency was measured at various energies. The resolution and efficiency were found to be independent of the point at which the particle entered the detector. Scattered out particles could be well detected by including neighbouring detectors in the analysis.

  14. Composition and hygroscopicity of aerosol particles at Mt. Lu in South China: Implications for acid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Chi, Jianwei; Shi, Zongbo; Wang, Xinfeng; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan; Li, Tao; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Daizhou; Wang, Zifa; Shi, Chune; Liu, Liangke; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of aerosol particles were studied at Mt. Lu, an elevated site (115°59‧E, 29°35‧N, 1165 m) within the acid precipitation area. Northeast winds transport copious amounts of air pollutants and water vapor from the Yangtze River Delta into this acid precipitation area. NH4+ and SO42- are the dominant ions in PM2.5 and determine aerosol acidity. Individual particle analysis shows abundant S-rich and metals (i.e. Fe-, Zn-, Mn-, and Pb-rich) particles. Unlike aerosol particles in North China and urban areas, there are little soot and mineral particles at Mt. Lu. Lack of mineral particles contributed to the higher acidity in precipitation in the research area. Nano-sized spherical metal particles were observed to be embedded in 37% of S-rich particles. These metal particles were likely originated from heavy industries and fired-power plants. Hygroscopic experiments show that most particles start to deliquesce at 73-76% but organic coating lowers the particle deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) to 63-73%. The DRHs of these aerosol particles are clearly smaller than that of pure ammonium sulfate particles which is 80%. Since RH in ambient air was relatively high, ranging from 65% to 85% during our study period, most particles at our sampling site were in liquid phase. Our results suggest that liquid phase reactions in aerosol particles may contribute to SO2 to sulfuric acid conversion in the acid precipitation area.

  15. COMPARATIVE IN VITRO CARDIAC TOXICITY OF PRIMARY COMBUSTION PARTICLES: IDENTIFICATION OF CAUSAL CONSTITUENTS AND MECHANISMS OF INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of causal particle characteristics and mechanisms of injury would allow linkage of particulate air pollution adverse health effects to sources. Research has examined the direct cardiovascular effects of air pollution particle constituents since previous studies dem...

  16. Energy straggling eliminated as a limitation to charge resolution of transmission detectors. [used for particle identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, G.; Ahlen, S. P.; Price, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that detectors of the energy loss of penetrating charged particles are widely used for particle identification. These measurements are hampered, however, by fluctuations in the amount of energy deposited within the detector. It is shown that this limitation can be overcome with a new nuclear track detector, CR-39(DOP), and that the charge resolution of this detector exceeds that of any other, including semiconductor diodes.

  17. Infrared spectrum of nitric acid dihydrate: Influence of particle shape.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Stetzer, Olaf; Schurath, Ulrich

    2005-03-24

    In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra of airborne alpha-NAD microparticles generated by two different methods were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals obtained by shock freezing of a HNO3/H2O gas mixture could be accurately reproduced using Mie theory with published refractive indices of alpha-NAD as input. In contrast, Mie theory proved to be inadequate to properly reproduce the infrared extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals which were formed via homogeneous nucleation of supercooled HNO3/H2O solution droplets, evaporating slowly on a time scale of several hours at about 195 K. Much better agreement between measured and calculated extinction spectra was obtained by T-matrix calculations assuming oblate particles with aspect ratios greater than five. This indicates that strongly aspherical alpha-NAD crystals are obtained when supercooled nitric acid solution droplets freeze and grow slowly, a process which has been discussed as a potential pathway to the formation of crystalline polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. PMID:16833561

  18. Identification of an organic coating on marine aerosol particles by TOF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, Heikki; Juhanoja, Jyrki; Kupiainen, Kaarle

    2002-08-01

    Marine aerosol particles play an important role in atmospheric processes. It has been suggested that as marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants. This theory has been supported only by indirect evidence. Recently, we gave new morphological indication of such organic coating without however providing molecular speciation. Here we have studied the surface of marine aerosol particles by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), which is very suitable for surface research due to its unique combination of surface sensitivity and the detailed molecular information obtained. Spectra from the outermost surface gave high intensity for palmitic acid and lower peaks for other fatty acids. According to TOF-SIMS images, palmitic acid was distributed on small particles, similar with the marine particles. Sputtering stripped palmitic acid and revealed the inner core of the sea-salt particles. Our results show that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the studied aerosol particles.

  19. Foamy Virus Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Martin V; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  20. Studies of the acidic components of the Colorado Green River formation oil shale-Mass spectrometric identification of the methyl esters of extractable acids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, P.; Schnoes, H. K.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    Study of solvent extractable acidic constituents of oil shale from the Colorado Green River Formation. Identification of individual components is based on gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric data obtained for their respective methyl esters. Normal acids, isoprenoidal acids, alpha, omega-dicarboxylic acids, mono-alpha-methyl dicarboxylic acids and methyl ketoacids were identified. In addition, the presence of monocyclic, benzoic, phenylalkanoic and naphthyl-carboxylic acids, as well as cycloaromatic acids, is demonstrated by partial identification.

  1. The DIRC Particle Identification System for the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, I

    2004-06-30

    A new type of ring-imaging Cherenkov detector is being used for hadronic particle identification in the BABAR experiment at the SLAC B Factory (PEP-II). This detector is called DIRC, an acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (Light). This paper will discuss the construction, operation and performance of the BABAR DIRC in detail.

  2. Performance of the High Momentum Particle Identification Detector in ALICE at Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cataldo, Giacinto

    2008-06-01

    The ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) is a proximity focusing ring imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH), 10 m2 of active area for the hadron identification at high transverse momenta: 1 < pt < 3 GeV/c for charged π and K, 1 < pt < 5 GeV/c for p. It has been installed in ALICE since September 2006 in view of the first collisions expected mid-2008. After a short description of the detector and the online data quality monitoring this paper focuses on the HMPID particle identification (PID) capabilities even in the higher expected track multiplicity dNch/dη = 6000, simulated in central Pb-Pb ALICE events.

  3. Use of cluster counting technique for particle identification in a drift chamber with the cathode strip readout

    SciTech Connect

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir P.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility of using the clusters counting technique for particle identification in a drift chamber with the cathode strip readout is experimentally investigated. Results of counting of primary ionization clusters on a relativistic particle track, as well as results of computer simulation of pion, kaon, and proton identification in the momentum range of 1–8 GeV/c, are presented.

  4. Raman identification of drug of abuse particles collected with colored and transparent tapes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Victor Molina; López-López, María; Atoche, Juan-Carlos; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Raman microscopy is a useful tool for the analysis of drug particles collected with adhesive tapes. In this work, first, the spectra of thirty drugs of abuse, degradation products, metabolites, and common cutting agent standards were recorded and the Raman bands observed were summarized providing the forensic analyst useful information for the identification of drug evidence. Then, the collection of different drug particles by a fingerprint lifting tape commonly used to remove and store fingerprints and fibers, and a white and green packaging tape, followed by the subsequent identification of the drugs by confocal Raman spectroscopy was performed. The particles were analyzed on top of the tapes, trapped between glass slides and the tapes, trapped in the tape folded over itself in the case of the transparent tape, and after folding and unfolding the tape in the case of the colored tape. The results obtained by the different approaches show that both tapes did not compromise the drugs spectra. However, the use of transparent tape is preferred because this tape allows the previous visual detection of the particles. Finally, several drug and sugar particles were spread over a clean table and inside a pocket, and the particles were collected with transparent tape and then properly identified. Although good results were obtained in both cases, the amount of fibers and other substances present in the collection area made the previous detection of the particles difficult and increases the analysis time. PMID:24630328

  5. Finite element model updating approach to damage identification in beams using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saada, Mohamed M.; Arafa, Mustafa H.; Nassef, Ashraf O.

    2013-06-01

    The use of vibration-based techniques in damage identification has recently received considerable attention in many engineering disciplines. While various damage indicators have been proposed in the literature, those relying only on changes in the natural frequencies are quite appealing since these quantities can conveniently be acquired. Nevertheless, the use of natural frequencies in damage identification is faced with many obstacles, including insensitivity and non-uniqueness issues. The aim of this article is to develop a viable damage identification scheme based only on changes in the natural frequencies and to attempt to overcome the challenges typically encountered. The proposed methodology relies on building a finite element model (FEM) of the structure under investigation. An improved particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed to facilitate updating the FEM in accordance with experimentally determined natural frequencies in order to predict the damage location and extent. The method is tested on beam structures and was shown to be an effective tool for damage identification.

  6. Single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey N; Farquar, George R; Frank, Matthias; Gard, Eric E; Fergenson, David P

    2007-08-15

    Single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was used for the real-time detection of liquid nerve agent simulants. A total of 1000 dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for micrometer-sized single particles each of dimethyl methyl phosphonate, diethyl ethyl phosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and diethyl phthalate using laser fluences between 0.58 and 7.83 nJ/microm2, and mass spectral variation with laser fluence was studied. The mass spectra obtained allowed identification of single particles of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants at each laser fluence used although lower laser fluences allowed more facile identification. SPAMS is presented as a promising real-time detection system for the presence of CWAs. PMID:17630721

  7. Identification of Neutral Particle Sources in MST Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norval, Ryan; Munaretto, Stefano; Goetz, John; Schmitz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The plasma wall interaction (PWI) in the MST RFP has yet to be studied systematically to determine the effects of the edge plasma on overall plasma performance. Two imaging views of the MST plasma currently exist. The first views the outboard toroidal and poloidal belt limiters at the main poloidal gap limiter. The second views the inboard poloidal limiter, as well as a section of the outboard toroidal limiter away from the man gap limiter. Data from viewing outboard limiters reveals PWI structures correlate with the plasma conditions. In standard RFP plasmas at lower plasma currents the PWI is dominated by non-axisymmetric radiation belts. As the RFP plasma current rises, increasing axisymmetry is seen from the edge. When in the 3D equilibria of the quasi-single helicity (QSH) state the PWI correlates with the main magnetic mode of the plasma. The dominant source of light observed from the MST edge is from hydrogen recycling. This will be used to inform neutral particle sourcing in the EIRENE neutral transport code. EIRENE will be used to compare how variations in fueling could affect the neutral profile in MST. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in Aerosol Particles by Hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This research explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1011 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI). Detailed kinetic measurements show that the reactive uptake coefficient is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. Reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 plays a role in secondary chemistry. In the absence of O2 the reactive uptake coefficient increases to ~ 8, 5 and 3 for LNA, LA, and OA, respectively. The reactive uptake coefficient approaches values of 6, 4 and 2 for LNA, LA, and OA respectively when 18% of the total nitrogen flow is replaced with O2. Mechanistic pathways and products will also be presented herein.

  9. Detection of Anthropogenic Particles in Fish Stomachs: An Isolation Method Adapted to Identification by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Collard, France; Gilbert, Bernard; Eppe, Gauthier; Parmentier, Eric; Das, Krishna

    2015-10-01

    Microplastic particles (MP) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Ingestion combined with food intake is generally reported. However, data interpretation often is circumvented by the difficulty to separate MP from bulk samples. Visual examination often is used as one or the only step to sort these particles. However, color, size, and shape are insufficient and often unreliable criteria. We present an extraction method based on hypochlorite digestion and isolation of MP from the membrane by sonication. The protocol is especially well adapted to a subsequent analysis by Raman spectroscopy. The method avoids fluorescence problems, allowing better identification of anthropogenic particles (AP) from stomach contents of fish by Raman spectroscopy. It was developed with commercial samples of microplastics and cotton along with stomach contents from three different Clupeiformes fishes: Clupea harengus, Sardina pilchardus, and Engraulis encrasicolus. The optimized digestion and isolation protocol showed no visible impact on microplastics and cotton particles while the Raman spectroscopic spectrum allowed the precise identification of microplastics and textile fibers. Thirty-five particles were isolated from nine fish stomach contents. Raman analysis has confirmed 11 microplastics and 13 fibers mainly made of cellulose or lignin. Some particles were not completely identified but contained artificial dyes. The novel approach developed in this manuscript should help to assess the presence, quantity, and composition of AP in planktivorous fish stomachs. PMID:26289815

  10. Application of particle swarm optimization for improving the identification of image objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Nan-Hsing; Pu, Chang-En; Lin, Pei-Da; Wang, Shu-Shian

    2012-04-01

    Flight safety is very important issue for aviation industries. Analyzing the flight accidents on the basis of 2-dimensional image is hardly to illustrate the complex injuries of passengers in the flight cabin. However, how to illustrate the flight accident is a challenge from 2-dimensional space to 3-dimensional space. This study proposes a particle swarm optimization approach for improving the identification of objects from 2-dimensional image. The recognition results provide the information for building 3-dimensional systems for flight accident investigators. The experiments also show that it is a feasible approach for improving the identification of image objects.

  11. A new method of charged particle identification based on frequency spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Tao, Zhu; Guo-Fu, Liu; Jun, Yang; Xiao-Liang, Luo; Lei, Zhang; Li-Feng, Ji

    2016-03-01

    A new frequency domain method for charged particle identification, called Frequency Ratio Analysis (FRA), is proposed by analyzing the frequency spectra of proton pulses and alpha pulses acquired from a totally depleted Si detector. Identification performance of the FRA method is evaluated and compared with two time domain methods, the current pulse amplitude method and the second moment method. The results show that the FRA method is not only feasible and effective but also superior to the two time domain methods, as it achieves an obvious increase in value of the figure-of-merit (FOM). Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175254, 11375264)

  12. Arsenic speciation and identification of monomethylarsonous acid and monomethylthioarsonic acid in a complex matrix.

    PubMed

    Yathavakilla, Santha Ketavarapu V; Fricke, Michael; Creed, Patricia A; Heitkemper, Douglas T; Shockey, Nohora V; Schwegel, Carol; Caruso, Joseph A; Creed, John T

    2008-02-01

    Anion-exchange chromatography was utilized for speciation of arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), and the new As species monomethylthioarsonic acid (MMTA), using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) detection. MMA(III) and MMTA were identified for the first time in freeze-dried carrot samples that were collected over 25 years ago as part of a joint U.S. EPA, U.S. FDA, and USDA study on trace elements in agricultural crops. The discovery of MMA(III) and MMTA in terrestrial foods necessitated the analytical characterization of synthetic standards of both species, which were used for standard addition in carrot extracts. The negative ion mode, high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) data produced molecular ions of m/z 122.9418 and 154.9152 for MMA(III) and MMTA, respectively. However, ESI-MS was not sensitive enough to directly identify MMA(III) and MMTA in the carrot extracts. Therefore, to further substantiate the identification of MMA(III) and MMTA, two additional separations using an Ion-120 column were developed using the more sensitive ICPMS detection. The first separation used 20 mM tetramethylammonium hydroxide at pH 12.2 with MMA(III) eluting in less than 7 min. In the second separation, MMTA eluted at 11.2 min by utilizing 40 mM ammonium carbonate at pH 9.0. Oxidation of MMA(III) and MMTA to MMA(V) with hydrogen peroxide was observed for standards and carrot extracts alike. Several samples of carrots collected from local markets in 2006 were also analyzed and found to contain low levels of inorganic arsenic species. PMID:18181583

  13. COMPARISON OF SULFUR MEASUREMENTS FROM A REGIONAL FINE PARTICLE NETWORK WITH CONCURRENT ACID MODES NETWORK RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 um) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Environmental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during a two year period in 1988-90. he 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the...

  14. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H.; Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W.; Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K.

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  15. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  16. Parameter Identification of Chaotic Systems by a Novel Dual Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunxiang; Lau, Francis C. M.; Wang, Shiyuan; Tse, Chi K.

    In this paper, we propose a dual particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm for parameter identification of chaotic systems. We also consider altering the search range of individual particles adaptively according to their objective function value. We consider both noiseless and noisy channels between the original system and the estimation system. Finally, we verify the effectiveness of the proposed dual PSO method by estimating the parameters of the Lorenz system using two different data acquisition schemes. Simulation results show that the proposed method always outperforms the traditional PSO algorithm.

  17. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe U. /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /SLAC /Toho U.

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  18. Temperature and magnetic field responsive hyaluronic acid particles with tunable physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekici, Sema; Ilgin, Pinar; Yilmaz, Selahattin; Aktas, Nahit; Sahiner, Nurettin

    2011-01-01

    We report the preparation and characterization of thiolated-temperature-responsive hyaluronic acid-cysteamine-N-isopropyl acrylamide (HA-CYs-NIPAm) particles and thiolated-magnetic-responsive hyaluronic acid (HA-Fe-CYs) particles. Linear hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinked with divinyl sulfone as HA particles was prepared using a water-in-oil micro emulsion system which were then oxidized HA-O with NaIO4 to develop aldehyde groups on the particle surface. HA-O hydrogel particles were then reacted with cysteamine (CYs) which interacted with aldehydes on the HA surface to form HA particles with cysteamine (HA-CYs) functionality on the surface. HA-CYs particles were further exposed to radical polymerization with NIPAm to obtain temperature responsive HA-CYs-NIPAm hydrogel particles. To acquire magnetic field responsive HA composites, magnetic iron particles were included in HA to form HA-Fe during HA particle preparation. HA-Fe hydrogel particles were also chemically modified. The prepared HA-CYs-NIPAm demonstrated temperature dependent size variations and phase transition temperature. HA-CYs-NIPAm and HA-Fe-CYs particles can be used as drug delivery vehicles. Sulfamethoxazole (SMZ), an antibacterial drug, was used as a model drug for temperature-induced release studies from these particles.

  19. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  20. Inside versus Outside: Ion Redistribution in Nitric Acid Reacted Sea Spray Aerosol Particles as Determined by Single Particle Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Guasco, T.; Ryder, O. S.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Collins, D. B.; Ruppel, M. J.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles were generated under real-world conditions using natural seawater and a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves or a marine aerosol reference tank (MART) that replicates those conditions. The SSA particles were exposed to nitric acid in situ in a flow tube and the well-known chloride displacement and nitrate formation reaction was observed. However, as discussed here, little is known about how this anion displacement reaction affects the distribution of cations and other chemical constituents within and phase state of individual SSA particles. Single particle analysis of individual SSA particles shows that cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) within individual particles undergo a spatial redistribution after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, along with a more concentrated layer of organic matter at the surface of the particle. These data suggest that specific ion and aerosol pH effects play an important role in aerosol particle structure in ways that have not been previously recognized. The ordering of organic coatings can impact trace gas uptake, and subsequently impact trace gas budgets of O3 and NOx.

  1. Improving photoelectron counting and particle identification in scintillation detectors with Bayesian techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi-Ronquest, M.; Amaudruz, P.-A.; Batygov, M.; Beltran, B.; Bodmer, M.; Boulay, M. G.; Broerman, B.; Buck, B.; Butcher, A.; Cai, B.; Caldwell, T.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cleveland, B.; Coakley, K.; Dering, K.; Duncan, F. A.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, R.; Gastler, D.; Giuliani, F.; Gold, M.; Golovko, V. V.; Gorel, P.; Graham, K.; Grace, E.; Guerrero, N.; Guiseppe, V.; Hallin, A. L.; Harvey, P.; Hearns, C.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Hofgartner, J.; Jaditz, S.; Jillings, C. J.; Kachulis, C.; Kearns, E.; Kelsey, J.; Klein, J. R.; Kuźniak, M.; LaTorre, A.; Lawson, I.; Li, O.; Lidgard, J. J.; Liimatainen, P.; Linden, S.; McFarlane, K.; McKinsey, D. N.; MacMullin, S.; Mastbaum, A.; Mathew, R.; McDonald, A. B.; Mei, D.-M.; Monroe, J.; Muir, A.; Nantais, C.; Nicolics, K.; Nikkel, J. A.; Noble, T.; O'Dwyer, E.; Olsen, K.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Ouellet, C.; Palladino, K.; Pasuthip, P.; Perumpilly, G.; Pollmann, T.; Rau, P.; Retière, F.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R.; Seibert, S.; Skensved, P.; Sonley, T.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Veloce, L.; Walding, J.; Wang, B.; Wang, J.; Ward, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-05-01

    Many current and future dark matter and neutrino detectors are designed to measure scintillation light with a large array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The energy resolution and particle identification capabilities of these detectors depend in part on the ability to accurately identify individual photoelectrons in PMT waveforms despite large variability in pulse amplitudes and pulse pileup. We describe a Bayesian technique that can identify the times of individual photoelectrons in a sampled PMT waveform without deconvolution, even when pileup is present. To demonstrate the technique, we apply it to the general problem of particle identification in single-phase liquid argon dark matter detectors. Using the output of the Bayesian photoelectron counting algorithm described in this paper, we construct several test statistics for rejection of backgrounds for dark matter searches in argon. Compared to simpler methods based on either observed charge or peak finding, the photoelectron counting technique improves both energy resolution and particle identification of low energy events in calibration data from the DEAP-1 detector and simulation of the larger MiniCLEAN dark matter detector.

  2. Encapsulation of ployunsaturated fatty acid esters with solid lipid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as a-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are known to improve cardiovascular and nervous system health. These compounds are increasingly used in food and animal feed formulations. However, the high degree of unsaturation in these structures can...

  3. Identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash particles by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Huckele, Susanne; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph; Baumann, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We present for the first time the Raman microspectroscopic identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash (VA) particles. The particles were collected in April/May 2010 during research aircraft flights, which were performed by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt in the airspace near the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption and over Europe (between Iceland and Southern Germany). In addition, aerosol particles were sampled by an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor in Munich, Germany. As references for the Raman analysis, we used the spectra of VA collected at the ground near the place of eruption, of mineral basaltic rock, and of different minerals from a database. We found significant differences in the spectra of VA and other aerosol particles (e.g., soot, nitrates, sulfates, and clay minerals), which allowed us to identify VA among other atmospheric particulate matter. Furthermore, while the airborne VA shows a characteristic Raman pattern (with broad band from ca. 200 to ca. 700 cm(-1) typical for SiO₂ glasses and additional bands of ferric minerals), the differences between the spectra of aged and fresh particles were observed, suggesting differences in their chemical composition and/or structure. We also analyzed similarities between Eyjafjallajökull VA particles collected at different sampling sites and compared the particles with a large variety of glassy and crystalline minerals. This was done by applying cluster analysis, in order to get information on the composition and structure of volcanic ash. PMID:24121468

  4. Troika of single particle tracking programing: SNR enhancement, particle identification, and mapping

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Bo; Chen, Jixin; Kisley, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    single particle tracking (SPT) techniques provide a microscopic approach to probe in vivo and in vitro structure and reactions. Automatic analysis of SPT data with high efficiency and accuracy spurs the development of SPT algorithms. In this perspective, we review a range of available techniques used in SPT analysis programs. In addition, we present an example SPT program step-by-step to provide a guide so that researchers can use, modify, and/or write a SPT program for their own purposes. PMID:24263676

  5. Troika of single particle tracking programing: SNR enhancement, particle identification, and mapping.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Bo; Chen, Jixin; Kisley, Lydia; Landes, Christy F

    2014-01-14

    Single particle tracking (SPT) techniques provide a microscopic approach to probe in vivo and in vitro structure and reactions. Automatic analysis of SPT data with high efficiency and accuracy spurs the development of SPT algorithms. In this perspective, we review a range of available techniques used in SPT analysis programs. In addition, we present an example SPT program step-by-step to provide a guide so that researchers can use, modify, and/or write a SPT program for their own purposes. PMID:24263676

  6. Hierarchical scheme for LC-MSn identification of chlorogenic acids.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Michael N; Johnston, Kelly L; Knight, Susan; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2003-05-01

    The fragmentation behavior of 18 chlorogenic acids that are not substituted at position 1 has been investigated using LC-MS(4) applied to a methanolic coffee bean extract and commercial cider (hard cider). Using LC-MS(3), it is possible to discriminate between each of the three isomers of p-coumaroylquinic acid, caffeoylquinic acid, feruloylquinic acid, and dicaffeoylquinic acid, and a hierarchical key has been prepared to facilitate this process when standards are not available. MS(4) fragmentations further support these assignments, but were not essential in reaching them. The distinctive behavior of 4-acyl and 3-acyl chlorogenic acids compared with the 5-acyl chlorogenic acids is a key factor permitting these assignments. The fragmentation patterns are dependent upon the particular stereochemical relationships between the individual substituents on the quinic acid moiety. Fragmentation is facilitated by 1,2-acyl participation and proceeds through quinic acid conformers in which the relevant substituents transiently adopt a 1,3-syn-diaxial relationship. Selected ion monitoring at m/z 529 clearly indicated the presence in coffee of six caffeoylferuloylquinic acid isomers, whereas previously only two or three had been demonstrated. The hierarchical key permitted specific structures to be assigned to each of the six isomers. These assignments are internally consistent and consistent with the limited data previously available. PMID:12720369

  7. Identification of Characteristic Fatty Acids to Quantify Triacylglycerols in Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pei-Li; Wang, Hai-Tao; Pan, Yan-Fei; Meng, Ying-Ying; Wu, Pei-Chun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid profiles of lipids from microalgae are unique. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are generally enriched in polar lipids, whereas saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids constitute the majority of fatty acids in triacylglycerols (TAG). Each species has characteristic fatty acids, and their content is positively or negatively correlated with TAGs. The marine oleaginous diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was used as the paradigm to determine the quantitative relationship between TAG and characteristic fatty acid content. Fatty acid profiles and TAG content of Phaeodactylum tricornutum were determined in a time course. C16:0/C16:1 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n3) were identified as characteristic fatty acids in TAGs and polar lipids, respectively. The percentage of those characteristic fatty acids in total fatty acids had a significant linear relationship with TAG content, and thus, the correlation coefficient presenting r2 were 0.96, 0.94, and 0.97, respectively. The fatty acid-based method for TAG quantification could also be applied to other microalgae such as Nannochloropsis oceanica in which the r2 of C16:0 and EPA were 0.94 and 0.97, respectively, and in Chlorella pyrenoidosa r2-values for C18:1 and C18:3 with TAG content were 0.91 and 0.99, repectively. This characteristic fatty acid-based method provided a distinct way to quantify TAGs in microalgae, by which TAGs could be measured precisely by immediate transesterification from wet biomass rather than using conventional methods. This procedure simplified the operation and required smaller samples than conventional methods. PMID:26941747

  8. Identification of Characteristic Fatty Acids to Quantify Triacylglycerols in Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei-Li; Wang, Hai-Tao; Pan, Yan-Fei; Meng, Ying-Ying; Wu, Pei-Chun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid profiles of lipids from microalgae are unique. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are generally enriched in polar lipids, whereas saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids constitute the majority of fatty acids in triacylglycerols (TAG). Each species has characteristic fatty acids, and their content is positively or negatively correlated with TAGs. The marine oleaginous diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was used as the paradigm to determine the quantitative relationship between TAG and characteristic fatty acid content. Fatty acid profiles and TAG content of Phaeodactylum tricornutum were determined in a time course. C16:0/C16:1 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n3) were identified as characteristic fatty acids in TAGs and polar lipids, respectively. The percentage of those characteristic fatty acids in total fatty acids had a significant linear relationship with TAG content, and thus, the correlation coefficient presenting r (2) were 0.96, 0.94, and 0.97, respectively. The fatty acid-based method for TAG quantification could also be applied to other microalgae such as Nannochloropsis oceanica in which the r (2) of C16:0 and EPA were 0.94 and 0.97, respectively, and in Chlorella pyrenoidosa r (2)-values for C18:1 and C18:3 with TAG content were 0.91 and 0.99, repectively. This characteristic fatty acid-based method provided a distinct way to quantify TAGs in microalgae, by which TAGs could be measured precisely by immediate transesterification from wet biomass rather than using conventional methods. This procedure simplified the operation and required smaller samples than conventional methods. PMID:26941747

  9. System Identification of a DC Motor Using Different Variants of Particle Swarm Optimization Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Subhajit; Sharma, Kaushik Das

    2010-10-01

    System identification is a ubiquitous necessity for successful applications in various fields. The area of system identification can be characterized by a small number of leading principles, e.g. to look for sustainable descriptions by proper decisions in the triangle of model complexity, information contents in the data, and effective validation. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is a stochastic, population-based optimization algorithm and many variants of PSO have been developed since, including constrained, multi objective, and discrete or combinatorial versions and applications have been developed using PSO in many fields. The basic PSO algorithm implicitly utilizes a fully connected neighborhood topology. However, local neighborhood models have also been proposed for PSO long ago, where each particle has access to the information corresponding to its immediate neighbors, according to a certain swarm topology. In this local neighborhood model of PSO, particles have information only of their own and their nearest neighbors' bests, rather than that of the entire population of the swarm. In the present work basic PSO method and two of its local neighborhood variants are utilized for determining the optimal parameters of a dc motor. The result obtain from the simulation study demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methodology.

  10. Investigation of surfactant mediated acid-base charging of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Matthew M; Berg, John C

    2012-12-21

    The current work examines the role of acid-base properties on particle charging in apolar media. Manipulating the polarity and magnitude of charge in such systems is of growing interest to a number of applications. A major hurdle to the implementation of this technology is that the mechanism(s) of particle charging remain a subject of debate. The authors previously conducted a study of the charging of a series of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems that contained the surfactant AOT. It was observed that there was a correlation between the particle electrophoretic mobility and the acid-base nature of the particle, as characterized by aqueous point of zero charge (PZC) or the isoelectric point (IEP). The current study investigates whether or not a similar correlation is observed with other surfactants, namely, the acidic Span 80 and the basic OLOA 11000. This is accomplished by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of a series of mineral oxides that are dispersed in Isopar-L containing various concentrations of either Span 80 or OLOA 11000. The mineral oxides used have PZC values that cover a wide range of pH, providing a systematic study of how particle and surfactant acid-base properties impact particle charge. It was found that the magnitude and polarity of particle surface charge varied linearly with the particle PZC for both surfactants used. In addition, the point at which the polarity of charge reversed for the basic surfactant OLOA 11000 was shifted to a pH of approximately 8.5, compared to the previous result of about 5 for AOT. This proves that both surfactant and particle acid-base properties are important, and provides support for the theory of acid-base charging in apolar media. PMID:23157688

  11. Particle Backtracking Improves Breeding Subpopulation Discrimination and Natal-Source Identification in Mixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Fraker, Michael E.; Anderson, Eric J.; Brodnik, Reed M.; Carreon-Martinez, Lucia; DeVanna, Kristen M.; Fryer, Brian J.; Heath, Daniel D.; Reichert, Julie M.; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a novel method to improve the use of natural tagging approaches for subpopulation discrimination and source-origin identification in aquatic and terrestrial animals with a passive dispersive phase. Our method integrates observed site-referenced biological information on individuals in mixed populations with a particle-tracking model to retrace likely dispersal histories prior to capture (i.e., particle backtracking). To illustrate and test our approach, we focus on western Lake Erie’s yellow perch (Perca flavescens) population during 2006–2007, using microsatellite DNA and otolith microchemistry from larvae and juveniles as natural tags. Particle backtracking showed that not all larvae collected near a presumed hatching location may have originated there, owing to passive drift during the larval stage that was influenced by strong river- and wind-driven water circulation. Re-assigning larvae to their most probable hatching site (based on probabilistic dispersal trajectories from the particle backtracking model) improved the use of genetics and otolith microchemistry to discriminate among local breeding subpopulations. This enhancement, in turn, altered (and likely improved) the estimated contributions of each breeding subpopulation to the mixed population of juvenile recruits. Our findings indicate that particle backtracking can complement existing tools used to identify the origin of individuals in mixed populations, especially in flow-dominated systems. PMID:25799555

  12. Phase Identification of Individual Crystalline Particles by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    SciTech Connect

    SMALL,J.A.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-06-12

    Recently, an EBSD system was developed that uses a 1024 x 1024 CCD camera coupled to a thin phosphor. This camera has been shown to produce excellent EBSD patterns. In this system, crystallographic information is determined from the EBSD pattern and coupled with the elemental information from energy or wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Identification of the crystalline phase of a sample is then made through a link to a commercial diffraction database. To date, this system has been applied almost exclusively to conventional, bulk samples that have been polished to a flat surface. In this investigation, the authors report on the application of the EBSD system to the phase identification analysis (PIA) of individual micrometer and submicrometer particles rather than flat surfaces.

  13. A Framework for Sediment Particle Tracking via Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakiris, Achilleas; Papanicolaou, Thanos; Abban, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The study of sedimentary and morphodynamic processes in riverine environments has recently been shifting from the traditional Eulerian, static perspective to a Lagrangian perspective, which considers the movement characteristics of the individual transported particles, such as their travel and resting distance and time. The Lagrangian framework, in turn allows to better study processes such as bedload particle diffusion, erosion and deposition within a river reach, to more accurately predict bedload fluxes especially through the use of stochastic Discrete Particle models. A technology that goes hand-in-hand with this Lagrangian perspective is Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID), which has been recently applied for tracking the movement of tagged sediment particles within the river continuum. RFID allows the wireless, bidirectional exchange of information between a base station, known as the reader, with a typically large number of transponders (or tags) via an (excitation) antenna. RFID allows essentially the unique, wireless detection and identification of a transponder over a distance. The goal of this study is to further enhance the utility of RFID in riverine applications by developing a framework that allows extracting the 3D location of RFID tagged sediment particles in nearly real-time. To address the goal of this coupled theoretical and experimental study, a semi-theoretical approach based on antenna inductive coupling was combined with experimental measurements for developing a relationship that provides an estimate of the distance between a tagged particle and the antenna using the Return Signal Strength Indication (RSSI). The RSSI quantifies the magnetic energy transmitted from the transponder to the antenna. The RFID system used in this study was a passive, Low-Frequency (LF) system, which ensured that the LF radio waves could penetrate through the river bed material. The RSSI of the signal transmitted from each transponder was measured with an

  14. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during CRYSTAL-FACE were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward- and downward-facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197 K - 224 K and pressures of 122 hPa - 224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4- 10(exp 14) molecules/sq cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 pm and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  15. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Marcy, T. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Hudson, P. K.; Thompson, T. L.; Kaercher, B.; Ridley, B. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Baumgardner, D.; Garrett, T. J.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D. S.; Pittman, J. V.; Dhaniyala, S.; Bui, T. P.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward and downward facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197-224 K and pressures of 122-224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4 # 10(exp 14) molecules/ square cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 ?m and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  16. Particle identification using dE/dx in the Mark II detector at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarski, A.; Coupal, D.P.; Feldman, G.J.; Hanson, G.; Nash, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Rankin, P.; Van Kooten, R.

    1989-04-01

    The central drift chamber in the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider has been instrumented with 100-MHz Flash-ADCs. Pulse digitization provides particle identification through the measurement of average ionization loss in the chamber. We present the results of a study of system performance and outline the systematic corrections that optimize resolution. The data used are from a short test run at PEP with one-third of the FADCs installed and an extensive cosmic ray sample with the fully instrumented chamber. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Improved x-ray detection and particle identification with avalanche photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Diepold, Marc Franke, Beatrice; Götzfried, Johannes; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Krauth, Julian J.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Amaro, Fernando D.; Gouvea, Andrea L.; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Santos, Joaquim M. F. dos; Machado, Jorge; Amaro, Pedro; Santos, José Paulo; and others

    2015-05-15

    Avalanche photodiodes are commonly used as detectors for low energy x-rays. In this work, we report on a fitting technique used to account for different detector responses resulting from photoabsorption in the various avalanche photodiode layers. The use of this technique results in an improvement of the energy resolution at 8.2 keV by up to a factor of 2 and corrects the timing information by up to 25 ns to account for space dependent electron drift time. In addition, this waveform analysis is used for particle identification, e.g., to distinguish between x-rays and MeV electrons in our experiment.

  18. Particle Identification in the Dynamical String-Parton Model of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malov, D. E.; Umar, A. S.; Ernst, D. J.; Dean, D. J.

    The dynamical string-parton model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions is generalized to include particle identification of the final-state hadrons by phenomenologically quantizing the masses of the classical strings which result from string breaking. General features of the Nambu-Gotō strings are used to motivate a model that identifies a mass window near the physical mass of a meson, and does not allow the string to decay further if its mass falls within the window. Data from e+e- collisions in the region √ {s} =10 to 30 GeV are well reproduced by this model.

  19. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF PARTICLE BEAM LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ACID HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle beam liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was evaluated for the measurement of acid herbicides. n acetic acid/ammonium acetate/methano1 solvent system with a C-8 reversed Phase column gave baseline resolution of all target analytes. etection limits in the full...

  20. Particle identification with the ALICE Time-Of-Flight detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2014-12-01

    High performance Particle Identification system (PID) is a distinguishing characteristic of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector. The TOF exploits the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology, capable of an intrinsic time resolution at the level of few tens of ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operation plateau. The full system is made of 1593 MRPC chambers with a total area of 141 m2, covering the pseudorapidity interval [-0.9,+0.9] and the full azimuthal angle. The ALICE TOF system has shown very stable operation during the first 3 years of collisions at the LHC. In this paper a summary of the system performance as well as main results with data from collisions will be reported.

  1. Field evaluation of nanofilm detectors for measuring acidic particles in indoor and outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Hazi, Yair; Gao, Hai; Peters, Paul; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-09-01

    This field evaluation study was conducted to assess new technology designed to measure number concentrations of strongly acidic ultrafine particles. Interest in these particles derives from their potential to cause adverse health effects. Current methods for counting and sizing airborne ultrafine particles cannot isolate those particles that are acidic. We hypothesized that the size-resolved number concentration of such particles to which people are exposed could be measured by newly developed iron nanofilm detectors on which sulfuric acid (H2SO4*) droplets produce distinctive ringed reaction sites visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We carried out field measurements using an array of samplers, with and without the iron nanofilm detectors, that allowed indirect comparison of particle number concentrations and size-resolved measures of acidity. The iron nanofilm detectors are silicon chips (5 mm x 5 mm x 0.6 mm) that are coated with iron by vapor deposition. The iron layer was 21.5 or 26 nm thick for the two batches used in these experiments. After exposure the detector surface was scanned topographically by AFM to view and enumerate the ringed acid reaction sites and deposited nonacidic particles. The number of reaction sites and particles per scan can be counted directly on the image displayed by AFM. Sizes can also be measured, but for this research we did not size particles collected in the field. The integrity of the surface of iron nanofilm detectors was monitored by laboratory analysis and by deploying blank detectors and detectors that had previously been exposed to H2SO4 calibration aerosols. The work established that the detectors could be used with confidence in temperate climates. Under extreme high humidity and high temperature, the surface film was liable to detach from the support, but remaining portions of the film still produced reliable data. Exposure to ambient gases in a filtered air canister during the field tests did not affect the film

  2. Identification of Diacylglycerols and Triacylglycerols Containing Trihydroxy Fatty Acids in Castor Oil and the Regiospecific Identification of Triacylglycerols by Mass SpecTrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricinoleate, a monohydroxy fatty acid in castor oil, has many industrial uses. Dihydroxy and trihydroxy fatty acids can also be used in industry. We report here the identification of diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols containing trihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil. The C18 HPLC fractions of casto...

  3. Use of the gas-filled-magnet technique for particle identification at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.K.; Jiang, C.L.; Paul, M.

    1995-08-01

    Reaction studies of interest to astrophysics with radioactive ion beams will be done mainly in inverse reaction kinematics, i.e., heavy particles bombarding a hydrogen target. The low energy of the outgoing heavy reaction products makes particle identification with respect to mass and nuclear charge a major challenge. For the planned {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}) experiment one expects five different types of particles in the outgoing channels: {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O (from elastic scattering of {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O on {sup 12}C), {sup 15}O and {sup 15}N (from the {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O induced (p,{alpha}) reactions) and {sup 12}C recoils from the polypropylene target. While mass determination can be achieved easily by time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, a determination of the nuclear charge presents a challenge, especially if the energy of the particles is below 500 keV/u. We studied the gas-filled magnet technique for Z-identification of light ions between Z = 6-9. In a gas-filled magnet the particles move with an average charge state {bar q} which in one parameterization is given by {bar q} = Z ln(avZ{sup {alpha}})/ln(bZ{sup {beta}}) where Z is the nuclear charge of the ions and v their velocity. Introducing into the expression for the magnetic rigidity B{rho} = mv/{bar q} results in a Z dependence of B{rho} which is valid to very low velocities. As a magnet we used the Enge split-pole spectrograph which was filled with nitrogen gas at a pressure of 0.5 Torr. The particles were detected in the focal plane with a 50 x 10 cm{sup 2} parallel-grid-avalanche counter which measured TOF and magnetic rigidity. The mass and Z separation was tested with {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O beams at energies of about 600 keV/u and recoil particles ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 19}F. The Z-separation obtained at these energies was {triangle}Z/Z = 0.28 which is sufficient to separate individual elements for Z < 10.

  4. Identification of essential amino acids in the Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Tsumori, H; Minami, T; Kuramitsu, H K

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of the amino acid sequences of the glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of mutans streptococci with those from the alpha-amylase family of enzymes revealed a number of conserved amino acid positions which have been implicated as essential in catalysis. Utilizing a site-directed mutagenesis approach with the GTF-I enzyme of Streptococcus mutans GS-5, we identified three of these conserved amino acid positions, Asp413, Trp491, and His561, as being important in enzymatic activity. Mutagenesis of Asp413 to Thr resulted in a GTF which expressed only about 12% of the wild-type activity. In contrast, mutagenesis of Asp411 did not inhibit enzyme activity. In addition, the D413T mutant was less stable than was the parental enzyme when expressed in Escherichia coli. Moreover, conversion of Trp491 or His561 to either Gly or Ala resulted in enzymes devoid of GTF activity, indicating the essential nature of these two amino acids for activity. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the four Tyr residues present at positions 169 to 172 which are part of a subdomain with homology to the direct repeating sequences present in the glucan-binding domain of the GTFs had little overall effect on enzymatic activity, although the glucan products appeared to be less adhesive. These results are discussed relative to the mechanisms of catalysis proposed for the GTFs and related enzymes. PMID:9171379

  5. Preparation of poly(acrylic acid) particles by dispersion polymerization in an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hideto; Kimura, Akira; Kinoshita, Keigo; Okubo, Masayoshi

    2010-05-01

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) particles were successfully prepared by dispersion polymerization of acrylic acid in ionic liquid, N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoro-methanesulfonyl)amide ([DEME][TFSA]) at 70 degrees C with low hydrolysis grade (35.4%) poly(vinyl alcohol) as stabilizer. Interestingly, the PAA particles were easily extracted as particle state with water. Thus, the PAA particles had a cross-linked structure during the polymerization without cross-linker. Moreover, it was also noted that the cross-linking density of the PAA particles could be controlled by thermal treatment at various temperatures in [DEME][TFSA] utilizing the advantages of nonvolatility and high thermal stability of the ionic liquid. PMID:20043688

  6. Parameter identification of robot manipulators: a heuristic particle swarm search approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Levy, David

    2015-01-01

    Parameter identification of robot manipulators is an indispensable pivotal process of achieving accurate dynamic robot models. Since these kinetic models are highly nonlinear, it is not easy to tackle the matter of identifying their parameters. To solve the difficulty effectively, we herewith present an intelligent approach, namely, a heuristic particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, which we call the elitist learning strategy (ELS) and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller hybridized PSO approach (ELPIDSO). A specified PID controller is designed to improve particles' local and global positions information together with ELS. Parameter identification of robot manipulators is conducted for performance evaluation of our proposed approach. Experimental results clearly indicate the following findings: Compared with standard PSO (SPSO) algorithm, ELPIDSO has improved a lot. It not only enhances the diversity of the swarm, but also features better search effectiveness and efficiency in solving practical optimization problems. Accordingly, ELPIDSO is superior to least squares (LS) method, genetic algorithm (GA), and SPSO algorithm in estimating the parameters of the kinetic models of robot manipulators. PMID:26039090

  7. Uptake of nitric acid by sub-micron-sized ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, O. P.; Cziczo, D. J.; Morgan, A. M.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Niedziela, R. F.

    The uptake of gas phase nitric acid by half-micron-diameter ice crystals has been studied at 230 K by measuring the nitrate content of ice particles which have been exposed to 5 × 10-6 torr of nitric acid in a low temperature flow tube. A cold NaOH-coated denuder is used to distinguish gas-phase nitric acid from adsorbed nitric acid. Ice particle diameters were determined by fitting measured aerosol infrared extinction spectra to spectra calculated via Mie theory, and their number density is measured directly with a CN counter. Under conditions in which the surface is saturated and not all the gas-phase nitric acid adsorbs, the measured uptakes are 1.2 × 1014 molecules/cm² where the surface area is the geometric area of the particles. Within experimental uncertainties, this surface coverage is the same as that measured on thin films of ice formed by freezing liquid water. These results are the first quantitative study of the nitric acid uptake capacity of ice particles, and they provide additional support to the suggestion that ice and snow provide a route for the efficient scavenging of nitric acid from the atmosphere.

  8. Diamonds in the rough: identification of individual napthenic acids in oil sands process water

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Steven J.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Jones, David; West, Charles E. ); Frank, Richard A.

    2011-03-10

    Expansion of the oil sands industry of Canada has seen a concomitant increase in the amount of process water produced and stored in large lagoons known as tailings ponds. Concerns have been raised, particularly about the toxic complex mixtures of water-soluble naphthenic acids (NA) in the process water. To date, no individual NA have been identified, despite numerous attempts, and while the toxicity of broad classes of acids is of interest, toxicity is often structure-specific, so identification of individual acids may also be very important. The chromatographic resolution and mass spectral identification of some individual NA from oil sands process water is described. The authors concluded that the presence of tricyclic diamondoid acids, never before even considered as NA, suggests an unprecedented degree of biodegradation of some of the oil in the oil sands. The identifications reported should now be followed by quantitative studies, and these used to direct toxicity assays of relevant NA and the method used to identify further NA to establish which, or whether all NA, are toxic. The two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method described may also be important for helping to better focus reclamation/remediation strategies for NA as well as in facilitating the identification of the sources of NA in contaminated surface waters (auth)

  9. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  10. Analysis and Identification of Acid-Base Indicator Dyes by Thin-Layer Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Daniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a very simple and effective technique that is used by chemists by different purposes, including the monitoring of the progress of a reaction. TLC can also be easily used for the analysis and identification of various acid-base indicator dyes.

  11. The identification and optimization of 2,4-diketobutyric acids as flap endonuclease 1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tumey, L Nathan; Huck, Bayard; Gleason, Elizabeth; Wang, Jianmin; Silver, Daniel; Brunden, Kurt; Boozer, Sherry; Rundlett, Stephen; Sherf, Bruce; Murphy, Steven; Bailey, Andrew; Dent, Tom; Leventhal, Christina; Harrington, John; Bennani, Youssef L

    2004-10-01

    There have been several recent reports of chemopotentiation via inhibition of DNA repair processes. Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a key enzyme involved in base excision repair (BER), a primary pathway utilized by mammalian cells to repair DNA damage. In this report, we describe the identification and SAR of a series of 2,4-diketobutyric acid FEN1 inhibitors. PMID:15341951

  12. Identification of Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid Components of Schistosomal Hemozoin

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melissa D.; Harry, S. Reese; Wright, David W.

    2009-01-01

    During the late stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection, adult schistosomes catabolize host erythrocytic hemoglobin. In order to evade the toxic effects of free heme, the blood fluke biomineralizes dimeric heme into an inert crystalline pigment called hemozoin. In the present study, the chemical reactivity of schistosomal hemozoin (SmHz) toward lipid oxidation was examined and the biological consequences of reactivity were investigated. Mass spectrometric analysis of polar lipid content associated with SmHz identified a variety of primary and secondary polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation products, including hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. Furthermore, RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells challenged with lipopolysaccharide prior to phagocytosis of SmHz experienced a decrease in nitric oxide production as compared to control experiments. The presence of these biologically active oxidation products suggests native SmHz is capable of modulating the innate immune response and may play a potential role in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. PMID:17904531

  13. Size distributions and formation of dicarboxylic acids in atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaohong; Fang, Ming; Chan, Chak K.

    The PM2.5 concentrations and the size distributions of dicarboxylic acids in Hong Kong were studied. Eleven sets of daily PM2.5 samples were obtained at a downtown sampling site during the period of 5-16 December 2000 using an R&P speciation PM2.5 sampler. About 6-12% of the total oxalic acid was found in the gas phase in some samples. A good correlation between succinate and sulfate ( R2=0.88) and a moderate correlation between oxalate and sulfate ( R2=0.74) were found. Sampling artifacts of oxalate, malonate and succinate were found to be negligible. A total of 18 sets of 48-96 h size distribution data on dicarboxylic acids, sulfate, nitrate and sodium at an urban site and a rural site from June 2000 to May 2001 were obtained using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor. Data from both sites show similar size distribution characteristics of the dicarboxylic acids. The condensation mode of oxalate was usually observed at 0.177-0.32 μm. The location of the peak of the droplet mode of oxalate was associated with that of sulfate. When the peak of sulfate in the droplet mode appeared at 0.32-0.54 μm, the peak of oxalate sometimes appeared at 0.32-0.54 μm and sometimes shifted to 0.54-1.0 μm. When the peak of sulfate in the droplet mode appeared at 0.54-1.0 μm, the peak of oxalate sometimes appeared at 0.54-1.0 μm and sometimes shifted to 1.0-1.8 μm. Oxalate, succinate and sulfate found in the droplet mode were attributed to in-cloud formation. The slight shift of the oxalate peak from 0.32-0.54 to 0.54-1.0 μm or from 0.54-1.0 to 1.0-1.8 μm was ascribed to minor oxalate evaporation after in-cloud formation. The maximum peak of malonate sometimes appeared in the droplet mode and sometimes appeared at 3.1-6.2 μm. The formation of malonate is associated to the reactions between sea salt and malonic acid.

  14. Water uptake of internally mixed ammonium sulfate and dicarboxylic acid particles probed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds in variable proportions, and the relative amount of organic fraction can influence the hygroscopic properties of the particles. Infrared spectra of submicrometer internally mixed dry particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) with various dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, maleic, glutaric and pimelic) have been measured in an aerosol flow tube at several solute mass ratios. The spectra show a notable broadening in the bandwidth of sulfate ion ν3 vibrational band near 1115 cm-1 with respect to pure AS. We attribute these perturbations, that are biggest at AS/organic acid mass ratio near unity, to intermolecular interactions between inorganic ions and organic acid molecules in the internally mixed solids. The water uptake behavior of internally mixed particles has been measured by recording the infrared integrated absorbance of liquid water as a function of relative humidity (RH). The amount of water present in the particles prior to deliquescence correlates partially with the water solubilities of the dicarboxylic acids, and also with the relative magnitudes of intermolecular interactions in the internally mixed dry solids. Phase change of ammonium sulfate in the internally mixed particles with RH has been spectrally monitored, and it is shown that water uptaken before full deliquescence produces structural changes in the particles that are revealed by their vibrational spectra.

  15. Identification and enzymatic characterization of acid phosphatase from Burkholderia gladioli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Burkholderia is widespread in diverse ecological niches, the majority of known species are soil bacteria that exhibit different types of non-pathogenic interactions with plants. Burkholderia species are versatile organisms that solubilize insoluble minerals through the production of organic acids, which increase the availability of nutrients for the plant. Therefore these bacteria are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. Results Burkholderia sp. (R 3.25 isolate) was isolated from agricultural soil in Ponta Grossa-PR-Brazil and identified through analysis of the 16S rDNA as a strain classified as Burkholderia gladioli. The expression of membrane-bound acid phosphatase (MBAcP) was strictly regulated with optimal expression at a concentration of phosphorus 5 mM. The apparent optimum pH for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate (PNPP) was 6.0. The hydrolysis of PNPP by the enzyme exhibited a hyperbolic relationship with increasing concentration of substrate and no inhibition by excess of substrate was observed. Kinetic data revealed that the hydrolysis of PNPP exhibited cooperative kinetics with n = 1.3, Vm = 113.5 U/mg and K0.5 = 65 μM. The PNPPase activity was inhibited by vanadate, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, arsenate and phosphate, however the activity was not inhibited by calcium, levamisole, sodium tartrate, EDTA, zinc, magnesium, cobalt, ouabain, oligomycin or pantoprazol. Conclusion The synthesis of membrane-bound non-specific acid phosphatase, strictly regulated by phosphate, and its properties suggest that this bacterium has a potential biotechnological application to solubilize phosphate in soils with low levels of this element, for specific crops. PMID:24713147

  16. Critical supersaturations for aerosol particles of succinic acid and its salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenningsson, B.; Bilde, M.; Rosenørn, T.; Mønster, J.

    2003-04-01

    Dicarboxylic acids, like succinic acid, have been identified as important water soluble organic compounds in the atmosphere. Salts of carboxylic acids can be formed in the atmosphere in reactions between the acid and an inorganic salt. In this work we have studied the cloud droplet nucleating ability for succinic acid and some of its salts: disodium succinate, diammonium succinate and calcium succinate. A monodisperse aerosol was generated by atomizing a water solution of the compound of interest, drying the particles in diffusion driers and selecting a narrow size range using a differential mobility analyzer. The aerosol was then analyzed using a static thermal gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNC-100B from the University of Wyoming). A CPC was used to count the number of particles as a reference. For a fixed particle diameter, the supersaturation was scanned to find a steep increase in the fraction of particles that were activated to cloud droplets. This critical supersaturation is compared with theoretical calculations using Köhler theory. Experimental critical supersaturations for succinic acid agree with Köhler theory with a van't Hoff factor of 1, i.e. it activates as if it does not dissociate. For the sodium salt, a van't Hoff factor of 2 fits laboratory data and theoretical calculations.

  17. Isolation and identification of fatty acid amides from Shengli coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ming-Jie Ding; Zhi-Min Zong; Ying Zong; Xiao-Dong Ou-Yang; Yao-Guo Huang; Lei Zhou; Feng Wang; Jiang-Pei Cao; Xian-Yong Wei

    2008-07-15

    Shengli coal, a Chinese brown coal, was extracted with carbon disulfide and the extract was gradiently eluted with n-hexane and ethyl acetate (EA)/n-hexane mixed solvents with different concentrations of EA in a silica gel-filled column. A series of fatty acid amides, including fourteen alkanamides (C{sub 15}-C{sub 28}) and three alkenamides (C{sub 18} and C{sub 22}), were isolated from the coal by this method and analyzed with a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 26 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Fourier transform infared spectroscopic imaging for the identification of concealed drug residue particles and fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Camilla; Chan, K. L. Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    Conventional FTIR spectroscopy and microscopy has been widely used in forensic science. New opportunities exist to obtain rapid chemical images and to enhance the sensitivity of detection of trace materials using attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled with a focal-plane array (FPA) detector. In this work, the sensitivity of ATR-FTIR spectroscopic imaging using three different kinds of ATR crystals (Ge coupled with an infrared microscope, ZnSe and diamond) and resulting in three different optical arrangements for the detection of model drug particles is discussed. Model systems of ibuprofen and paracetamol particles having a size below 32 micrometers have been prepared by sieving. The sensitivity level in the three different approaches has been compared and it has been found that both micro and macro-ATR imaging methods have proven to be a promising techniques for the identification of concealed drug particles. To demonstrate the power and applicability of FTIR chemical imaging to forensic research, various examples are discussed. This includes investigation of the changes of chemical nature of latent fingerprint residue under controlled conditions of humidity and temperature studied by ATR-FTIR imaging. This study demonstrates the potential of spectroscopic imaging for visualizing the chemical changes of fingerprints.

  19. Identification of novel functional inhibitors of acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Muehlbacher, Markus; Trapp, Stefan; Pechmann, Stefanie; Friedl, Astrid; Reichel, Martin; Mühle, Christiane; Terfloth, Lothar; Groemer, Teja W; Spitzer, Gudrun M; Liedl, Klaus R; Gulbins, Erich; Tripal, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    We describe a hitherto unknown feature for 27 small drug-like molecules, namely functional inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). These entities named FIASMAs (Functional Inhibitors of Acid SphingoMyelinAse), therefore, can be potentially used to treat diseases associated with enhanced activity of ASM, such as Alzheimer's disease, major depression, radiation- and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and endotoxic shock syndrome. Residual activity of ASM measured in the presence of 10 µM drug concentration shows a bimodal distribution; thus the tested drugs can be classified into two groups with lower and higher inhibitory activity. All FIASMAs share distinct physicochemical properties in showing lipophilic and weakly basic properties. Hierarchical clustering of Tanimoto coefficients revealed that FIASMAs occur among drugs of various chemical scaffolds. Moreover, FIASMAs more frequently violate Lipinski's Rule-of-Five than compounds without effect on ASM. Inhibition of ASM appears to be associated with good permeability across the blood-brain barrier. In the present investigation, we developed a novel structure-property-activity relationship by using a random forest-based binary classification learner. Virtual screening revealed that only six out of 768 (0.78%) compounds of natural products functionally inhibit ASM, whereas this inhibitory activity occurs in 135 out of 2028 (6.66%) drugs licensed for medical use in humans. PMID:21909365

  20. Identification of genes regulated by UV/salicylic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Watson, C.; Milton, J.; Oryhon, J.; Salbego, D.; Milosavljevic, A.; Woloschak, G. E.; CuraGen Corp.

    2000-02-01

    Purpose : Previous work from the authors' group and others has demonstrated that some of the effects of UV irradiation on gene expression are modulated in response to the addition of salicylic acid to irradiated cells. The presumed effector molecule responsible for this modulation is NF-kappaB. In the experiments described here, differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify those cDNAs that are differentially modulated by UV radiation with and without the addition of salicylic acid. Materials and methods : Differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Results : Eight such cDNAs are presented: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-beta), nuclear encoded mitochondrial NADH ubiquinone reductase 24kDa (NDUFV2), elongation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B), nuclear dots protein SP100, nuclear encoded mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor (IF1), a cDNA similar to a subunit of yeast CCAAT transcription factor HAP5, and two expressed sequence tags (AA187906 and AA513156). Conclusions : Sequences of four of these genes contained NF-kappaB DNA binding sites of the type that may attract transrepressor p55/p55 NF-kappaB homodimers. Down-regulation of these genes upon UV irradiation may contribute to increased cell survival via suppression of p53 independent apoptosis.

  1. Identification of Novel Functional Inhibitors of Acid Sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Stefan; Pechmann, Stefanie; Friedl, Astrid; Reichel, Martin; Mühle, Christiane; Terfloth, Lothar; Groemer, Teja W.; Spitzer, Gudrun M.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Gulbins, Erich; Tripal, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    We describe a hitherto unknown feature for 27 small drug-like molecules, namely functional inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). These entities named FIASMAs (Functional Inhibitors of Acid SphingoMyelinAse), therefore, can be potentially used to treat diseases associated with enhanced activity of ASM, such as Alzheimer's disease, major depression, radiation- and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and endotoxic shock syndrome. Residual activity of ASM measured in the presence of 10 µM drug concentration shows a bimodal distribution; thus the tested drugs can be classified into two groups with lower and higher inhibitory activity. All FIASMAs share distinct physicochemical properties in showing lipophilic and weakly basic properties. Hierarchical clustering of Tanimoto coefficients revealed that FIASMAs occur among drugs of various chemical scaffolds. Moreover, FIASMAs more frequently violate Lipinski's Rule-of-Five than compounds without effect on ASM. Inhibition of ASM appears to be associated with good permeability across the blood-brain barrier. In the present investigation, we developed a novel structure-property-activity relationship by using a random forest-based binary classification learner. Virtual screening revealed that only six out of 768 (0.78%) compounds of natural products functionally inhibit ASM, whereas this inhibitory activity occurs in 135 out of 2028 (6.66%) drugs licensed for medical use in humans. PMID:21909365

  2. Identification of trihydroxy fatty acids and the regiospecific quantification of the triacylglycerols containing trihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricinoleate, a monohydroxy fatty acid in castor oil, has many industrial uses. Dihydroxy and trihydroxy fatty acids can also be used in industry. We report here the identification of diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols containing trihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil. The Ci8 HPLC fractions of casto...

  3. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  4. Acidic reaction products of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-08-01

    Biogenic acids were measured in aerosols at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The analysed organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene, respectively. Due to a lack of authentic standards, the caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesised for this study. The mean, median, maximum and minimum concentrations (ng m-3) were as follows: limonic acid (1.26, 0.80, 16.5, below detection limit (< LOD)), pinic acid (5.53, 3.25, 31.4, 0.15), pinonic acid (9.87, 5.07, 80.1, < LOD), caric acid (5.52, 3.58, 49.8, < LOD), and caryophyllinic acid (7.87, 6.07, 86.1, < LOD). The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during the summer. Of the acids, β-caryophyllinic acid showed the highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected, based on the emission calculations of the precursor compounds and yields from oxidation experiments in smog chambers, implying that the β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields were underestimated. The concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursors were clearly lower in summer than in winter, indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during the cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were weakly correlated with the accumulation-mode particle number concentrations.

  5. Acidic reaction products of mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic acids were measured from PM2.5 aerosols at SMEAR II station (Station For Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The measured organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene. Due to lack of authentic standards caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesized at the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, University of Helsinki. The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during summer concomitant with the precursor mono- and sesquiterpenes. Of the acids β-caryophyllinic acid had highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected on the basis of emission calculations of precursor compounds and yields in oxidation experiments in smog chambers implicating that β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields are underestimated. Concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursor were clearly lower in summer than in winter indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were correlated with the accumulation mode particle number concentrations.

  6. Uncoupling effect of fatty acids on heart muscle mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

    PubMed

    Dedukhova, V I; Mokhova, E N; Skulachev, V P; Starkov, A A; Arrigoni-Martelli, E; Bobyleva, V A

    1991-12-16

    The effect of ATP/ADP-antiporter inhibitors on palmitate-induced uncoupling was studied in heart muscle mitochondria and inside-out submitochondrial particles. In both systems palmitate is found to decrease the respiration-generated membrane potential. In mitochondria, this effect is specifically abolished by carboxyatractylate (CAtr) a non-penetrating inhibitor of antiporter. In submitochondrial particles, CAtr does not abolish the palmitate-induced potential decrease. At the same time, bongkrekic acid, a penetrating inhibitor of the antiporter, suppresses the palmitate effect on the potential both in mitochondria and particles. Palmitoyl-CoA which is known to inhibit the antiporter in mitochondria as well as in particles decreases the palmitate uncoupling efficiency in both these systems. These data are in agreement with the hypothesis that the ATP/ADP-antiporter is involved in the action of free fatty acids as natural uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:1765167

  7. Identification of acid-sensing ion channels in bone.

    PubMed

    Jahr, Holger; van Driel, Marjolein; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Weinans, Harrie; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2005-11-11

    Bone balances serum pH variations and both osteoclasts and osteoblasts are regulated by subtle changes in pH. The aim of the current study was to identify molecules in bone that can sense pH. Interesting candidates are the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). In bone, ASIC2 and ASIC3 were most abundant, while in chondrocytes it was ASIC1. Isolated human monocytes expressed ASIC1, -2, and -3, which persisted after induction to osteoclast differentiation, albeit to a lower level. In human osteoblasts ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3 mRNAs were shown. Western blot and immunostaining confirmed this at protein level. ASIC4 expression was always very low abundant. For the first time, we demonstrated ASICs in human skeleton, providing a means to sense and respond to differences in extracellular pH. PMID:16185661

  8. Time-of-flight technique for particle identification at energies from 2 to 400 keV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The time of flight technique for particle identification was extended to 2 keV/nucleon and the size of the start-time detector was reduced considerably by the use of carbon foils of few micrograms/cm square in thickness combined with microchannel plates for detecting secondary electrons. Time of flight telescopes incorporating this start-time device were used to measure the stopping power of a number of low energy heavy ions in thin carbon foils and the charge states of these ions emerging from such foils. Applications for the detection and identification of low energy interplanetary and magnetospheric particles are suggested.

  9. Acid dissolution experiments - Carbonates and the 6.8-micrometer bands in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    1986-03-01

    A chemical dissolution experiment on an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) showed that carbonates, not acid-insoluble organic compounds, were responsible for virtually all the absorption at 6.8 micrometers seen in the infrared spectra of this particle. The IDP examined had an infrared spectrum characteristic of layer-lattice silicates and belongs to a class of IDP's whose spectra resemble those of protostellar objects like W33 A, which also exhibit a band at 6.8 micrometers.

  10. Size Distribution Studies on Sulfuric Acid-Water Particles in a Photolytic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, H. U.; Kunz, J. C.; Hanson, D. R.; Thao, S.; Vences, J.

    2015-12-01

    The size distribution of particles composed of sulfuric acid and water were measured in a Photolytic cylindrical Flow Reactor (PhoFR, inner diameter 5 cm, length ~ 100 cm). In the reactor, nitrous acid, water and sulfur dioxide gases along with ultraviolet light produced sulfuric acid. The particles formed from these vapors were detected with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer equipped with a diethylene glycol condensation particle counter (Jiang et al. 2011). For a set of standard conditions, particles attained a log-normal distribution with a peak diameter of 6 nm, and a total number of about 3x105 cm-3. The distributions show that ~70 % of the particles are between 4 and 8 nm diameter (lnσ ~ 0.37). These standard conditions are: 296 K, 25% relative humidity, total flow = 3 sLpm, ~10 ppbv HONO, SO2 in excess. With variations of relative humidity, the total particle number varied strongly, with a power relationship of ~3.5, and the size distributions showed a slight increase in peak diameter with relative humidity, increasing about 1 nm from 8 to 33 % relative humidity. Variations of HONO at a constant light intensity (wavelength of ~ 360 nm) were performed and particle size and total number changed dramatically. Size distributions also changed drastically with variations of light intensity, accomplished by turning on/off some of the black light flourescent bulbs that illuminated the flow reactor. Comparisons of these size distributions to recently published nucleation experiments (e.g. Zollner et al., Glasoe et al.) as well as to simulations of PhoFR reveal important details about the levels of sulfuric acid present in PhoFR as well as possible base contaminants.

  11. Optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam A; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Beaver, Melinda R; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2009-12-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy at a wavelength of 532 nm. The real refractive indices of these nonabsorbing species were retrieved from the extinction and concentration of the particles using Mie scattering theory. We obtain refractive indices for pure ammonium sulfate and pure dicarboxylic acids that are consistent with literature values, where they exist, to within experimental error. For mixed particles, however, our data deviates significantly from a volume-weighted average of the pure components. Surprisingly, the real refractive indices of internal mixtures of succinic acid and ammonium sulfate are higher than either of the pure components at the highest organic weight fractions. For binary internal mixtures of oxalic or adipic acid with ammonium sulfate, the real refractive indices of the mixtures are approximately the same as ammonium sulfate for all organic weight fractions. Various optical mixing rules for homogeneous and slightly heterogeneous systems fail to explain the experimental real refractive indices. It is likely that complex particle morphologies are responsible for the observed behavior of the mixed particles. Implications of our results for atmospheric modeling and aerosol structure are discussed. PMID:19877658

  12. RICH counter for heavy-ion particle identification using multi-anode photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Shintaro; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Morita, Yusuke; Kanbe, Ryosuke; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu; Ohno, Junichi; Kamisho, Yasuto; Tanaka, Masaomi; Nishimura, Daiki; Yoshinaga, Kenta; Ohtsubo, Takashi; Takechi, Maya; Nagashima, Masayuki; Izumikawa, Takuji; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Sato, Shinji; Suzuki, Shinji; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In order to develop a new RICH counter (Ring Imaging CHerenkov counter) for heavy-ion particle identification, we have constructed a test system for measurement of a ring image of Cherenkov light using multi-anode photomultipliers that detect a photon incident position. For a test, a 58Ni(480 MeV/u) beam provided by the HIMAC heavy-ion synchrotron was used. As radiators, we have tested synthetic silica, polycarbonate, and BK7. We have selected a wavelength of Cherenkov light by using a band pass filter. As a result, the ring image of Cherenkov light was observed and the obtained resolution of velocity will be reported at the meeting.

  13. Strategies for testing the irritation-signaling model for chronic lung effects of fine acid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hattis, D.; Abdollahzadeh, S.; Franklin, C.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The irritation signaling model proposed that a long term contribution to chronic bronchitis might result from the repeated delivery of signals resulting from temporary localized acidification of the bronchial epithelium by the action of individual particles. This led to a prediction that the effectiveness of particles in inducing changes in mucus secreting cell numbers/types should depend on the number of particles deposited that contained a particular amount of acid--implying that particles below a certain size cutoff (and therefore lacking a minimum amount of acid) should be ineffective; and that particle potency per unit weight should be greatest at the cutoff and decline strongly above the cutoff. Since the development of this hypothesis both epidemiological observations and some experimental studies have tended to reinforce the notion that acid particles can make a contribution to relatively long lasting bronchitic-like changes, and enhance the desirability of more direct testing of the model. In this paper we develop a general theoretical framework for the contributions of environmental agents to chronic obstructive lung disease, and a series of alternative hypotheses against which the predictions of the irritant signaling model can be compared. Based on this, we suggest a research program that could be used to further develop and test the model and reasonable alternatives. 82 references.

  14. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  15. Identification of Bidentate Salicylic Acid Inhibitors of PTP1B.

    PubMed

    Haftchenary, Sina; Jouk, Andriana O; Aubry, Isabelle; Lewis, Andrew M; Landry, Melissa; Ball, Daniel P; Shouksmith, Andrew E; Collins, Catherine V; Tremblay, Michel L; Gunning, Patrick T

    2015-09-10

    PTP1B is a master regulator in the insulin and leptin metabolic pathways. Hyper-activated PTP1B results in insulin resistance and is viewed as a key factor in the onset of type II diabetes and obesity. Moreover, inhibition of PTP1B expression in cancer cells dramatically inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we report the computationally guided optimization of a salicylic acid-based PTP1B inhibitor 6, identifying new and more potent bidentate PTP1B inhibitors, such as 20h, which exhibited a > 4-fold improvement in activity. In CHO-IR cells, 20f, 20h, and 20j suppressed PTP1B activity and restored insulin receptor phosphorylation levels. Notably, 20f, which displayed a 5-fold selectivity for PTP1B over the closely related PTPσ protein, showed no inhibition of PTP-LAR, PRL2 A/S, MKPX, or papain. Finally, 20i and 20j displayed nanomolar inhibition of PTPσ, representing interesting lead compounds for further investigation. PMID:26396684

  16. Particle identification performance of the prototype aerogel RICH counter for the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, S.; Adachi, I.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Šantelj, L.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Tahirovic, E.; Yusa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a new type of particle identification device, called an aerogel ring imaging Cherenkov (ARICH) counter, for the Belle II experiment. It uses silica aerogel tiles as Cherenkov radiators. For detection of Cherenkov photons, hybrid avalanche photo-detectors (HAPDs) are used. The designed HAPD has a high sensitivity to single photons under a strong magnetic field. We have confirmed that the HAPD provides high efficiency for single-photon detection even after exposure to neutron and γ -ray radiation that exceeds the levels expected in the 10-year Belle II operation. In order to confirm the basic performance of the ARICH counter system, we carried out a beam test at the using a prototype of the ARICH counter with six HAPD modules. The results are in agreement with our expectations and confirm the suitability of the ARICH counter for the Belle II experiment. Based on the in-beam performance of the device, we expect that the identification efficiency at 3.5 GeV/c is 97.4% and 4.9% for pions and kaons, respectively. This paper summarizes the development of the HAPD for the ARICH and the evaluation of the performance of the prototype ARICH counter built with the final design components.

  17. Parameter Identification of Robot Manipulators: A Heuristic Particle Swarm Search Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Levy, David

    2015-01-01

    Parameter identification of robot manipulators is an indispensable pivotal process of achieving accurate dynamic robot models. Since these kinetic models are highly nonlinear, it is not easy to tackle the matter of identifying their parameters. To solve the difficulty effectively, we herewith present an intelligent approach, namely, a heuristic particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, which we call the elitist learning strategy (ELS) and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller hybridized PSO approach (ELPIDSO). A specified PID controller is designed to improve particles’ local and global positions information together with ELS. Parameter identification of robot manipulators is conducted for performance evaluation of our proposed approach. Experimental results clearly indicate the following findings: Compared with standard PSO (SPSO) algorithm, ELPIDSO has improved a lot. It not only enhances the diversity of the swarm, but also features better search effectiveness and efficiency in solving practical optimization problems. Accordingly, ELPIDSO is superior to least squares (LS) method, genetic algorithm (GA), and SPSO algorithm in estimating the parameters of the kinetic models of robot manipulators. PMID:26039090

  18. Results from particle identification in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, F.

    2014-06-01

    The particle identification capability of the ALICE apparatus is unique among the LHC experiments as it exploits almost all known techniques. In this paper, the working principles of the relevant PID detectors in the central barrel will be discussed. A particular emphasis will be given to recent results on identified particle spectra and production yield ratios at mid-rapidity in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions.

  19. Registered particles onboard identification in the various apertures of GAMMA-400 space gamma-telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene

    2016-07-01

    GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the gamma-telescope onboard international satellite gamma-observatory designed for particle registration in the wide energy band. Its parameters are optimized for detection of gamma-quanta with the energy ˜ 100 GeV in the main aperture. The main scientific goals of GAMMA-400 are to investigate fluxes of γ-rays and the electron-positron cosmic ray component possibly generated by dark matter particles decay or annihilation and to search for and study in detail discrete γ-ray sources, to investigate the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse γ-rays, and to study γ-ray bursts and γ-emission from the active Sun. This article presents analysis of detected events identification procedures and energy resolution in three apertures provide particles registration both from upper and lateral directions based on GAMMA-400 modeling due special designed software. Time and segmentation methods are used to reject backsplash (backscattering particles created when high energy γ-rays interact with the calorimeter's matter and move in the opposite direction) in the main aperture while only energy deposition analysis allows to reject this effect in the additional and lateral ones. The main aperture provides the best angular (all strip layers information analysis) and energy (energy deposition in the all detectors studying) resolution in the energy range 0.1 - 3 × 10^{3} GeV. The energy resolution in this band is 1%. Triggers in the main aperture will be formed using information about particle direction provided by time of flight system and presence of charged particle or backsplash signal formed according to analysis of energy deposition in combination of all two-layers anticoincidence systems individual detectors. In the additional aperture gamma-telescope allows to register events in the energy band 10 × 10^{-3} - 3 × 10^{3} GeV. The additional aperture energy resolution provides due to

  20. Increased universality of Lepidopteran elicitor compounds across insects: Identification of fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) are known elicitors of induced release of volatile compounds in plants that, in turn, attract foraging parasitoids. Since the discovery of volicitin [N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-L-glutamine] in the regurgitant of larval Spodoptera exigua1, a series of related FAC...

  1. Identification of an itaconic acid degrading pathway in itaconic acid producing Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Huang, Xuenian; Zhong, Chengwei; Li, Jianjun; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Itaconic acid, one of the most promising and flexible bio-based chemicals, is mainly produced by Aspergillus terreus. Previous studies to improve itaconic acid production in A. terreus through metabolic engineering were mainly focused on its biosynthesis pathway, while the itaconic acid-degrading pathway has largely been ignored. In this study, we used transcriptomic, proteomic, bioinformatic, and in vitro enzymatic analyses to identify three key enzymes, itaconyl-CoA transferase (IctA), itaconyl-CoA hydratase (IchA), and citramalyl-CoA lyase (CclA), that are involved in the catabolic pathway of itaconic acid in A. terreus. In the itaconic acid catabolic pathway in A. terreus, itaconic acid is first converted by IctA into itaconyl-CoA with succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor, and then itaconyl-CoA is hydrated into citramalyl-CoA by IchA. Finally, citramalyl-CoA is cleaved into acetyl-CoA and pyruvate by CclA. Moreover, IctA can also catalyze the reaction between citramalyl-CoA and succinate to generate succinyl-CoA and citramalate. These results, for the first time, identify the three key enzymes, IctA, IchA, and CclA, involved in the itaconic acid degrading pathway in itaconic acid producing A. terreus. The results will facilitate the improvement of itaconic acid production by metabolically engineering the catabolic pathway of itaconic acid in A. terreus. PMID:27102125

  2. Ice formation on nitric acid-coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome; Berg, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles caused by a coating of nitric acid are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coatings on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated the ice nucleation ability of Arizona Test Dust, illite, K-feldspar, and quartz as a function of temperature (-25°C to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75% to 110%). The particles (bare or nitric acid coated) were size selected at 250 nm, and the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and saturation conditions was determined. All of the dust species nucleated ice at subsaturated conditions, although the coated particles (except quartz) showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability relative to bare particles. However, at supersaturated conditions, bare and coated particles had nearly equivalent ice nucleation characteristics. The results of a single-column model showed that simulated ice crystal number concentrations are mostly dependent upon the coated particle fraction, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and competition among ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, coatings were observed to modify ice-cloud properties, and the complexity of ice-cloud and mixed-phase-cloud evolution when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms compete for fixed water vapor budgets was supported.

  3. Identification of trihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil and the regiospecific quantification of the triacylglycerols by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricinoleate, a monohydroxy fatty acid, has many industrial uses. Trihydroxy fatty acids can also be used in industry. We report here the identification of diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols containing trihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil. The C18 HPLC fractions of castor oil were used for mass spe...

  4. Identification of amino acid thiohydantoins directly by thin-layer chromatography and indirectly by gas-liquid chromatography after hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, M; Darbre, A

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the identification of amino acid thiohydantoins by two-dimensional t.l.c. An indirect method for the determination of amino acid thiohydantoins is described which, after hydrolysis, the corresponding amino acids are determined by g.l.c. PMID:1167153

  5. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  6. Preclinical Evaluation of Bioabsorbable Polyglycolic Acid Spacer for Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Mukumoto, Naritoshi; Sulaiman, Nor Shazrina Binti; Nagata, Masaaki; Yamada, Shigeru; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Takumi

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) spacer through physical and animal experiments. Methods and Materials: The spacer was produced with surgical suture material made of PGA, forming a 3-dimensional nonwoven fabric. For evaluation or physical experiments, 150-MeV proton or 320-MeV carbon-ion beams were used to generate 60-mm width of spread-out Bragg peak. For animal experiments, the abdomens of C57BL/6 mice, with or without the inserted PGA spacers, were irradiated with 20 Gy of carbon-ion beam (290 MeV) using the spread-out Bragg peak. Body weight changes over time were scored, and radiation damage to the intestine was investigated using hematoxylin and eosin stain. Blood samples were also evaluated 24 days after the irradiation. Long-term thickness retention and safety were evaluated using crab-eating macaques. Results: No chemical or structural changes after 100 Gy of proton or carbon-ion irradiation were observed in the PGA spacer. Water equivalency of the PGA spacer was equal to the water thickness under wet condition. During 24 days' observation after 20 Gy of carbon-ion irradiation, the body weights of mice with the PGA spacer were relatively unchanged, whereas significant weight loss was observed in those mice without the PGA spacer (P<.05). In mice with the PGA spacer, villus and crypt structure were preserved after irradiation. No inflammatory reactions or liver or renal dysfunctions due to placement of the PGA spacer were observed. In the abdomen of crab-eating macaques, thickness of the PGA spacer was maintained 8 weeks after placement. Conclusions: The absorbable PGA spacer had water-equivalent, bio-compatible, and thickness-retaining properties. Although further evaluation is warranted in a clinical setting, the PGA spacer may be effective to stop proton or carbon-ion beams and to separate normal tissues from the radiation field.

  7. pH-Sensitive ionomeric particles obtained via chemical conjugation of silk with poly(amino acid)s.

    PubMed

    Serban, Monica A; Kaplan, David L

    2010-12-13

    Silk-fibroin-based biomaterials have been widely utilized for a range of biomaterial-related systems. For all these previously reported systems, the β-sheet forming feature of the silk was the key stabilizing element of the final material structure. Herein, we describe a different strategy, based on the engineering of silk-based ionomers that can yield stable colloidal composites or particle suspensions through electrostatic interactions. These silk-based ionomers were obtained by carbodiimide-mediated coupling of silk fibroin with polylysine hydrobromide and polyglutamic acid sodium salts, respectively. Colloidal composites could be obtained by mixing the ionomeric pair at high concentration (i.e., 25% w/v), while combining them at lower concentrations (i.e., 5% w/v) yielded particle suspensions. The assembly of the ionomers was driven by electrostatic interactions, pH-dependent, and reversible. The network assembly appeared to be polarized, with the interacting poly(amino acid) chains clustered to the core of the particles and the silk backbone oriented outward. In agreement with this assembly mode, doxorubicin, a hydrophilic antitumor drug, could be released at a slow rate, in a pH-dependent manner, indicating that the inside of the ionomeric particles was mainly hydrophilic in nature. PMID:21028849

  8. A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mayani, Daniel

    2011-04-26

    The main purpose of the ALICE experiment at CERN is to identify and study the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Among others, hadrochemistry allows for a detailed insight into the characteristics of the high temperature and density system created in these events. It is therefore important to be able to identify charged particles on a track by track basis. Moreover, results from high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained by other experiments (e.g. at RHIC) indicate that it is imperative to extend the detection capability of ALICE to higher momenta. To meet these challenges, we propose the construction of the Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID), which aims to identify charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons in the momentum range of 10 GeV/c

  9. Rapid identification of acetic acid bacteria using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Barrao, Cristina; Benagli, Cinzia; Chappuis, Malou; Ortega Pérez, Ruben; Tonolla, Mauro; Barja, François

    2013-03-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are widespread microorganisms characterized by their ability to transform alcohols and sugar-alcohols into their corresponding organic acids. The suitability of matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of cultured AAB involved in the industrial production of vinegar was evaluated on 64 reference strains from the genera Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter. Analysis of MS spectra obtained from single colonies of these strains confirmed their basic classification based on comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. MALDI-TOF analyses of isolates from vinegar cross-checked by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments allowed AAB to be identified, and it was possible to differentiate them from mixed cultures and non-AAB. The results showed that MALDI-TOF MS analysis was a rapid and reliable method for the clustering and identification of AAB species. PMID:23182036

  10. FIELD EVALUATION OF NANOFILM DETECTORS FOR MEASURING ACIDIC PARTICLES IN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. Beverly Cohen and her colleagues at New York University School of Medicine will test the performance of iron nanofilms to collect and measure sulfuric acid particles of different sizes under a variety of temperature and humidity conditions. The iron nanofilm detector is...

  11. Identification of light charged particles and heavy ions in silicon detectors by means of pulse-shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Pausch, G.; Ortlepp, H.G.; Bohne, W.

    1996-06-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination with totally depleted Si-detectors in reverse mount has been investigated and shown to be an excellent method of charged-particle identification in the energy range of {approx}2 to 20 AMeV. In test experiments with heavy-ion beams the authors obtained element identification up to Ti and isotope resolution even for elements heavier than carbon. The promising results and the simplicity of the electronics recommend this technique for applications in multidetector arrays. In particular, small and compact 4{pi} Si balls with relatively low thresholds for charged-particle identification to be combined with 4{pi} neutron detectors or {gamma} arrays can be constructed.

  12. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  13. Recovery of zinc, cadmium, and lanthanum by biopolymer gel particles of alginic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Konishi, Yasuhiro; Asai, Satoru; Midoh, Yuji; Oku, Muneharu )

    1993-07-01

    Biopolymer gel particles of alginic acid were found to be a useful material for recovering zinc, cadmium, and lanthanum from aqueous solutions. The metals sorbed by the gel particles could be completely eluted by using dilute HCl solution of 0.1 kmol/m[sup 3]. The distribution ratios of the individual metals between the gel and liquid phases were measured by using a batch method. The equilibrium data were consistent with predictions made assuming that sorption takes place with the ion-exchange reaction between metal ions and alginic acid. The maximum sorption capacity of the gel particles and the distribution equilibrium constants for the metals were determined by comparing the experimental data with the theoretical predictions. The observed effect of temperature on the distribution equilibrium was insignificant in the range from 15 to 35[degrees]C. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. How biogenic terpenes govern the correlation between sulfuric acid concentrations and new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Kulmala, M.; Riipinen, I.; Sihto, S.-L.; Ruuskanen, T. M.

    2008-06-01

    New particle formation has been observed to take place all around the world. However, because of the inability to determine the chemical composition of the smallest clusters or particles, indirect tools such as the correlation between nucleation rate and measured sulfuric acid concentrations have been used to infer the nucleation mechanism. In this study we describe the observed correlation with gaseous sulfuric acid concentrations by interactions of sesquiterpene oxidation products with sulfuric acid. Two formation pathways of nucleation initiating molecules are considered. The interaction of sulfuric acid with organic sulfates, which are formed from stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs, formed from sesquiterpenes), can be used to explain the observed squared relationship between particle formation rate and ambient sulfuric acid concentrations. The corresponding linear dependence is explained with the participation of secondary ozonides, which are formed from sCIs and aldehydes. Both pathways are negatively affected by increasing water vapor concentration as observed in recent studies. In order to check the assumptions made we apply the derived nucleation coefficients to measurements of the BACCI/QUEST IV campaign made during spring 2005 in Hyytiälä, Finland. A reasonable agreement between the measurement data and the predicted nucleation rates is found, giving support for the presented nucleation description.

  15. Reactions of Methanesulfonic Acid with Amines and Ammonia as a Source of New Particles in Air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihan; Varner, Mychel E; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2016-03-01

    New particle formation (NPF) from gaseous precursors as a significant source of aerosol needs to be better understood to accurately predict the impacts on visibility, climate change, and human health. While ternary nucleation of sulfuric acid, amines/NH3, and water is recognized as a significant driver for NPF, increasing evidence suggests a contribution from methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and amines under certain conditions. Here we report the formation of particles 2.5-10 nm in diameter from the reactions of MSA with methylamine (MA), dimethylamine (DMA), and NH3 at reaction times of 2.3-7.8 s in a flow reactor and compare these particles with those previously reported to be formed from reaction with trimethylamine (TMA). The effects of water vapor and concentrations of gaseous precursors on the particle number concentration and particle size were studied. The presence of water significantly enhances particle formation and growth. Under similar experimental conditions, particle number concentrations decrease in the order MA ≫ TMA ≈ DMA ≫ NH3, where NH3 is 2-3 orders of magnitude less efficient than DMA. Quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters were carried out to provide insights into the role of water and the different capacities of amines/NH3 in particle formation. Both gas-phase basicity and hydrogen-bonding capacity of amines/NH3 contribute to the potential for particles to form and grow. Our results indicate that, although amines typically have concentrations 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of NH3 in the atmosphere, they still play an important role in driving NPF. PMID:26379061

  16. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-10-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying nitrogen, respectively argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings lead to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume, that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  17. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-05-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying either nitrogen or argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed at a supersaturation of 1%, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings led to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  18. Solubility of methanol in low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid and implications for atmospheric particle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Knudsen cell techniques, we find well-behaved Henry's law uptake of methanol in aqueous 45 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions at temperatures between 197 and 231 K. Solubility of methanol increases with decreasing temperature and increasing acidity, with an effective Henry's law coefficient ranging from 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 8) M/atm. Equilibrium uptake of methanol into sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will not appreciably alter gas-phase concentrations of methanol. The observed room temperature reaction between methanol and sulfuric acid is too slow to provide a sink for gaseous methanol at the temperatures of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is also too slow to produce sufficient quantities of soluble reaction products to explain the large amount of unidentified organic material seen in particles of the upper troposphere.

  19. Identification of Organic Sulfate Esters in d-Limonene Ozonolysis SOA Under Acidic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Y.; Mueller, C.; Boege, O.; Herrmann, H.

    2006-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) components from gas phase ozonolysis of d-limonene were investigated in a series of indoor chamber experiments. The compounds smaller than 300 Da were quantified using capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry (CE/ESI-ITMS). HPLC coupled to an ESI-TOFMS and an ESI-ITMS was used for structural study of dimmers and oligomers. Only 10% of the produced SOA could be attributed to low molecular weight carboxylic acids (Mw<300). The oxidation products which have molecular weights over 300 were detected regardless of the seed particle acidity but the concentrations of these compounds were much higher for acidic seed particle experiments. Strong signals of the compounds with mass to charge ratios (m/z) 281, 465 and 481 were detected when sulphuric acid was used in the seed particles. These compounds showed a strong fragment of m/z 97 in MS2 or MS3 spectra indicating the presence of sulfate in the structures. HPLC/ESI-TOFMS analysis suggests the elemental compositions of C10H17O7S-, C20H33O10S- and C20H33O11S- for m/z 281, 465 and 481, respectively. Based on MS^{n} and TOFMS results, they are most likely organic sulfate esters, possibly formed by a heterogeneous acid catalyzed reaction of a limonene oxidation product and sulfuric acid in the particle phase. The concentrations of the organic sulfate ester were as high as 3.7 μgm-3 for m/z 281.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID BY ICP-MS AND IC-ESI-MS/MS IN RICE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, sulfur analogs of well known arsenicals have been identified in biological and dietary matrices. In this presentation, the detection and identification of dimethylthioarsinic acid (DMTA) will be reported in rice samples after an enzymatic extraction. The enzymatic ext...

  1. The search for and identification of amino acids, nucleobases and nucleosides in samples returned from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, Charles W.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril; Kuo, Kenneth C.; Stalling, David L.; Zumwalt, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the returned Mars samples for biologically important organic compounds, with emphasis on amino acid, the puring and pyrimidine bases, and nucleosides is proposed. These studies would be conducted on subsurface samples obtained by drilling past the surface oxidizing layer with emphasis on samples containing the larges quantities of organic carbon as determined by the rover gas chromatographic mass spectrometer (GCMS). Extraction of these molecules from the returned samples will be performed using the hydrothermal extraction technique described by Cheng and Ponnamperuma. More rigorous extraction methods will be developed and evaluated. For analysis of the extract for free amino acids or amino acids present in a bound or peptidic form, aliquots will be analyzed by capillary GCMS both before and after hydrolysis with 6N hydrochloric acid. Establishment of the presence of amino acids would then lead to the next logical step which would be the use of chiral stationary gas chromatography phases to determine the enatiomeic composition of the amino acids present, and thus potentially establish their biotic or abiotic origin. Confirmational analyses for amino acids would include ion-exchange and reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis. For analyses of the returned Mars samples for nucleobases and nucleosides, affinity and reversed-phase liquid chromatography would be utilized. This technology coupled with scanning UV detection for identification, presents a powerful tool for nucleobase and nucleoside analysis. Mass spectrometric analysis of these compounds would confirm their presence in samples returned form Mars.

  2. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of gas-to-particle conversion between ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Bok-Haeng

    Since 1990, the population of hogs in eastern North Carolina has increased sharply resulting in increased emissions of ammonia. An Annular Denuder System (ADS) was used, which consisted of a cyclone separator, two diffusion denuders coated with sodium carbonate and citric acid, respectively, and a filter pack consisting of Teflon and nylon filters in series. The ADS measured ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles in ambient atmosphere at a commercial hog farm in Eastern North Carolina from April 1998 to March 1999. The sodium carbonate coated denuders yielded average acid gas concentrations of 0.23 mug/m 3 HCl (+/-0.20 mug/m3); 1.10 mug/m 3 HONO (+/-1.17 mug/m3); 1.14 mug/m 3 HNO3 (+/-0.81 mug/m3), and 1.61 mug/m 3 SO2 (+/-1.58 mug/m3). The citric acid coated denuders yielded an average concentration of 17.89 mug/m 3 NH3 (+/-15.03 mug/m3). The filters yielded average fine aerosol (i.e., fine particular matter, Dp ≤ 2.5 mum) concentrations of 1.64 mug/m3 NH4+ (+/-1.26 mug/m3); 0.26 mug/m3 Cl - (+/-0.69 mug/m3); 1.92 mug/m 3 NO3- (+/-1.09 mug/m 3), and 3.18 mug/m3 SO42- (+/-3.12 mug/m3). Using the data collected from the study sites, we evaluated the seasonal variations and the effects of relative humidity on fine particle species. Based on the measurements of ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles, the mean pseudo-first-order rate constant, kS, between NH3 and H2SO4 aerosol is estimated to be 3.70 (+/-2.99) x 10-3 sec-1. The rate constant was found to increase as temperature increases, and decrease with increasing relative humidity. The equilibrium time constant was determined based on the estimated kinetic rate constants and the observed inorganic components of atmospheric aerosols. The average value of equilibrium time constant was determined to be 17.01 (+/-12.19) minutes for ambient equilibrium time between ammonia, nitric acid gas and ammonium nitrate aerosol; and 10.83 (+/-8.97) minutes for ammonia, hydrochloric acid, and ammonium chloride. The aerosol

  3. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  4. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  6. Effect of fatty acid coatings on ozone uptake to deliquesced KI/NaCl aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, M.; Rouvière, A.

    2009-12-01

    Phase transfer kinetics of gas phase oxidants may limit oxidative aging of aerosol particles. The aim of this work is to study the role of amphiphilic organic aerosol constituents on the kinetics of phase transfer of gaseous species to the bulk aqueous phase. The effect of (C9-C20) fatty acid surfactants on the phase transfer of ozone to deliquesced potassium iodide and sodium chloride have been investigated. Some other experiments of ozone uptake have been performed with different mixtures and proportions of fatty acids. The kinetic experiments were performed in an aerosol flow tube at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. To obtain deliquesced inorganic particles, the relative humidity was adjusted in the range of 75% to 80%. It is shown that the fatty acids in monolayer quantities may substantially inhibit the phase transfer of ozone to deliquesced particles. The results showed that especially the C15-C20 limit the mass transfer of ozone to the aqueous phase, whereby the magnitude of this effect was following the monolayer properties of the fatty acids. It was also possible to determine a resistance of such films to the transfer of ozone to the bulk phase.

  7. Optimal Viscosity and Particle Shape of Hyaluronic Acid Filler as a Scaffold for Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Won, Chang-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The authors previously reported that cultured human fibroblasts suspended in a hyaluronic acid filler can produce human dermal matrices with extended in vivo stability in animal and clinical studies. The present study was undertaken to determine the optimal viscosity and particle shape of hyaluronic acid filler as a scaffold for cultured human dermal fibroblasts to enhance the maximal viability of injected cells. The fibroblasts were suspended in either 1 of 3 hyaluronic acid viscosities at 2 different particle shapes. The viscosities used in this study were low (600,000-800,000 centipoises), moderate (2,000,000-4,000,000 centipoises), and high (8,000,000-12,000,000 centipoises). The particle shape was evaluated by testing round and irregular shapes. The fibroblast mixed bioimplants were injected into the back of individual athymic nude mice. The levels of type I collagen were measured using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining at 16 weeks after the injections. Results of FACS demonstrated that the mean cell ratio with human collagens in the moderate viscosity group was greater than those of control, low, and high viscosity groups. An immunohistochemical study showed similar results. The moderate viscosity group demonstrated the highest positive staining of human collagens. However, there were no significant differences between groups of irregular and round shape particles. A hyaluronic acid bioimplant with moderate viscosity is superior to that with low or high viscosity in the viability for human fibroblasts. However, the particle shape does not influence the viability of the fibroblasts. PMID:26163839

  8. External quality assessment of urine particle identification: a Northern European experience.

    PubMed

    Kouri, Timo T; Makkonen, Pirjo

    2015-11-01

    External quality assessment (EQA) schemes for urinalysis have been provided by Labquality Ltd, the publicly owned EQA service provider in Finland, since the 1980s. In 2014, the scheme on urine particle identification had 329 participating laboratories, out of which 60% from 19 countries were outside Finland. Each of the four annual web-based rounds were distributed with four Sternheimer-stained images from a single patient sample, as viewed both by bright-field and phase-contrast optics. Participants reported classified categories either at the basic or at the advanced level. Participating laboratories received assessment of their analytical performance as compared to their peers, including reflections from clinical data and preanalytical detail of the specimen. In general, reporting of basic urine particles succeeded in the eight schemes during the years 2013-2014 as follows: red blood cells 82%-92%, white blood cells 82%-97%, squamous epithelial cells 92%-98%, casts 84%-94%, and small epithelial cells 73%-83% (minimum and maximum of expected or accepted reports). This basic level of differentiation is used in routine laboratory reports, or as verification of results produced by automated instruments. Considerable effort is needed to standardise national procedures and reporting formats, in order to improve the shown figures internationally. Future technologies may help to alleviate limitations created by single digital images. Despite improvements, degenerating cells and casts always exhibit intermediate forms creating disputable classifications. That is why assessment of performance should encompass justified acceptable categories into the assessed outcomes. Preanalytical and clinical detail provide essential added value to morphological findings. PMID:26351804

  9. Acidic species and chloride depletion in coarse aerosol particles in the US east coast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Gao, Yuan

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the interactions of water-soluble acidic species associated with coarse mode aerosol particles (1.8-10 microm) and chlorine depletion, ten sets of size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Newark, New Jersey on the U.S. east coast. The samples were grouped into two categories according to the air-mass back trajectories and mass ratios of sodium to magnesium and calcium: Group I was primarily impacted by marine air mass and Group II was dominated by the continental air mass. In Group I, the concentrations of coarse mode nitrate and chloride depletion showed a strong correlation (R2=0.88). Without considering other cations, nitrate was found to account for all of the chloride depletion in coarse particles for most samples. The association of coarse mode nitrate with sea-salt particles is favored when the mass ratio of sodium to calcium is approximately equal to or greater than unity. Excess sulfate accounts for a maximum of 33% of chloride depletion in the coarse particles. Regarding chloride depletion in the different particle sizes, excess nitrate and sulfate account for 89% of the chloride depletion in the particle size range of 1.8-3.2 microm in the sample from July 13-14; all of the determined dicarboxylic acids and mono-carboxylic acids cannot compensate for the rest of the chloride depletion. In Group II, high percentages of chloride depletion were not observed. With nitrate being dominant in chlorine depletion observed at this location, N-containing species from pollution emissions may have profound impact on atmospheric composition through altering chlorine chemistry in this region. PMID:18973925

  10. Ameloglyphics: A possible forensic tool for person identification following high temperature and acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Manjushree; Juneja, Saurabh; Rakesh, Nagaraju; Bhoomareddy Kantharaj, Yashoda Devi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Forensic odontology is a branch that is evolving over time and has opened newer avenues that may help in the identification of individuals. Tooth prints are the enamel rod end patterns on tooth surface and they are considered as a hard tissue analog to fingerprints. Teeth have the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, and decomposition, and may be used as a forensic evidence. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate if the tooth prints could be used for an individual's identification and reproducibility and permanency of these tooth prints after exposing the teeth to acid and various degrees of temperature. Materials and Methods: 90 tooth prints from 20 freshly extracted maxillary premolar teeth were obtained. Cellophane tape technique was used to record enamel rod end patterns on tooth surface. Ten teeth (one from each patient) were immersed in 36.46% hydrochloric acid and the tooth prints were obtained at various intervals (5 min, 10 min, and 20 min). The other 10 teeth (one from each patient) were incinerated and impression was made at various intervals (80° C, 400° C, 600° C, and 750° C). Tooth prints obtained from different teeth (total of 90 tooth prints) were analyzed using Verifinger® standard SDK version 5.0 software. Results: All the 20 original tooth prints were distinct from each other and no inter-individual or intra-individual similarity was found. The tooth prints from the same tooth after it was exposed to acid or heat were reproducible and showed high to very high similarity with the original tooth print of that particular tooth stored in the database. Conclusion: Tooth prints may be used as an effective aid in person identification even in adverse conditions such as burn and acid attack injuries. PMID:27051220

  11. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 1. Theory for kinetic- and nucleation-type particle formation and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikanto, Joonas; Duplissy, Jonathan; Määttänen, Anni; Henschel, Henning; Donahue, Neil M.; Brus, David; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    We derive a version of Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by quantum chemical results on sulfuric acid-water hydration to describe neutral and ion-induced particle formation in the binary sulfuric acid-water system. The theory is extended to treat the kinetic regime where the nucleation free energy barrier vanishes at high sulfuric acid concentrations or low temperatures. In the kinetic regime particle formation rates become proportional to sulfuric acid concentration to second power in the neutral system or first power in the ion-induced system. We derive simple general expressions for the prefactors in kinetic-type and activation-type particle formation calculations applicable also to more complex systems stabilized by other species. The theory predicts that the binary water-sulfuric acid system can produce strong new particle formation in the free troposphere both through barrier crossing and through kinetic pathways. At cold stratospheric and upper free tropospheric temperatures neutral formation dominates the binary particle formation rates. At midtropospheric temperatures the ion-induced pathway becomes the dominant mechanism. However, even the ion-induced binary mechanism does not produce significant particle formation in warm boundary layer conditions, as it requires temperatures below 0°C to take place at atmospheric concentrations. The theory successfully reproduces the characteristics of measured charged and neutral binary particle formation in CERN CLOUD3 and CLOUD5 experiments, as discussed in a companion paper.

  12. Direct identification of the calcium-binding amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamate, in mineralized tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Hauschka, P V; Lian, J B; Gallop, P M

    1975-01-01

    A direct approach has been developed for quantitative identification of the calcium-binding amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamate, in proteins. This should be advantageous for the study of numerous systems where specific roles for the binding of calcium or other divalent cations are suspected. Investigation of mineralized tissue, where calcium-binding proteins are implicated in the mineralization process, revealed that gamma-carboxyglutamate was present in proteins solubilized from chicken bone with neutral aqueous ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. This was established by direct isolation of the amino acid from alkaline hydrolysates and its quantitative conversion to glutamic acid by decarboxylation in 0.05 M HCl at 100 degrees. The kinetics of decarboxylation and chromatographic behavior are identical to those of gamma-carboxyglutamate from human prothrombin. After resolution of the soluble bone proteins by phosphate gradient elution from hydroxyapatite, gamma-carboxyglutamate was found to be concentrated primarily in one BaSO4-adsorbable anionic protein species; bone collagen was devoid of the amino acid. In view of the recently discovered requirement of vitamin K for generation of calcium binding sites (gamma-carboxyglutamate) by gamma-carboxylation of specific glutamic acid residues in prothrombin, our findings may implicate vitamin K metabolism in normal bone development and suggest a role for the gamma-carboxyglutamate-rich protein in regulation of calcium salt deposition in mineralized tissues. PMID:1060074

  13. GPU-accelerated inverse identification of radiative properties of particle suspensions in liquid by the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. Y.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.; Zhang, L.; Li, X. C.; Jiang, B. C.

    2016-03-01

    Inverse identification of radiative properties of participating media is usually time consuming. In this paper, a GPU accelerated inverse identification model is presented to obtain the radiative properties of particle suspensions. The sample medium is placed in a cuvette and a narrow light beam is irradiated normally from the side. The forward three-dimensional radiative transfer problem is solved using a massive parallel Monte Carlo method implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU), and particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied to inversely identify the radiative properties of particle suspensions based on the measured bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo simulation significantly reduces the solution time of the radiative transfer simulation and hence greatly accelerates the inverse identification process. Hundreds of speedup is achieved as compared to the CPU implementation. It is demonstrated using both simulated BSDF and experimentally measured BSDF of microalgae suspensions that the radiative properties of particle suspensions can be effectively identified based on the GPU-accelerated algorithm with three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling.

  14. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic acids in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-10-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual organic acids were determined in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou. The δ 13C values of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 20-C 28) varied from -34.1‰ to -32.4‰ and tended to be heavier in summer and lighter in winter. These δ 13C values indicate that high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids were derived mainly from emission by C 3 plants. Reduced biological synthesis of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids in winter may be the reason for the light carbon isotopic composition. The δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 10-C 18) changed from -31.7‰ to -30.3‰ and exhibited a reverse seasonal trend, i.e., heavier in winter and lighter in summer. Slightly heavier δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids than those of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids suggested that they may be emitted from blended sources, e.g., anthropogenic sources and vegetation waxes. Lighter δ 13C values in summer may be attributed to relatively low anthropogenic sources and high botanic sources in summer. Dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids have been proposed as secondary products from photochemical degradation. The average δ 13C values of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were heavier, and ranged from -25.2‰ to -22.9‰ and from -30.0‰ to -27.6‰, respectively. Both dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids displayed the same temporal variations in the δ 13C values, i.e., negative δ 13C in the summer samples and positive in the winter samples, which may be controlled by photochemical reactions; they are generally severe in winter in Guangzhou under the monsoon weather system. The heaviest δ 13C values were observed in dicarboxylic acids, indicating that dicarboxylic acids were formed by fast and more complete oxidation reactions. These results indicate that the stable carbon isotopic composition of organic acids may provide important information about sources and

  15. Evolution and identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated during the ripening of Sardinian sausages.

    PubMed

    Greco, M; Mazzette, R; De Santis, E P L; Corona, A; Cosseddu, A M

    2005-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated during the production and the ripening of Sardinian sausage, a typical Italian dry fermented sausage. Samples were taken at different stages, and 112 strains were isolated. The isolates were characterized using the micromethod proposed by Font de Valdez et al. [Font de Valdez, G., Savoy de Giori, G., Oliver, G., & De Ruiz Holgado, A. P. (1993). Development and optimization of an expensive microsystem for the biochemical characterization of lactobacilli. Microbiologie Aliments Nutrition, 11, 215-219]. Schillinger and Lücke's [Schillinger, U., & Lücke, F. K. (1987). Identification of lactobacilli from meat and meat products. Food Microbiology. (4), 199-208] scheme and the biochemical patterns given by Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology [Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology (1986). Baltimore: William and Wilkins] were used for preliminary identification. A PCR-based method was then used to confirm the results. LAB were the dominant flora during ripening. They consisted mainly of homofermentative mesophilic rods. Lactobacillus sakei (43,3%), Lactobacillus plantarum (16,6%) and Lactobacillus curvatus (13,3%) were the main isolates. The results of the biochemical identification methods agreed well with those of PCR-based identification (91% agreement). PMID:22063151

  16. Long-term particle measurements in Finnish Arctic: Part II - Trend analysis and source location identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, James R.; Hopke, Philip K.; Hopke, Eleanor F.; Husain, Liaquat; Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Paatero, Jussi; Viisanen, Yrjö.

    2014-05-01

    Forty-seven years (1964-2010) of weekly trace metal and major ion concentrations in total suspended particle samples from Kevo, Finland were analyzed for long-term trends and by source identification methods. Significant long-term decreasing trends were detected for most species. The largest decreases over the 47 years were Sb (-3.90% yr-1), Pb (-3.87% yr-1), Mn (-3.45% yr-1), Cd (-3.42% yr-1), and Ca (-3.13% yr-1). As, Pb, and Cd concentrations at Kevo were consistent with the reported time-trends of European emissions inventories. Pb concentrations at Kevo have dramatically decreased (92%) in the past 47 years due to the reduced use of leaded gasoline in automobiles. Back-trajectory analysis suggests that the main source areas of anthropogenic species (V, Cd, Mn, Mo, Sb, Tl, W) were predominantly in Eastern Europe, European Russia, and the Baltics. Markers of stationary fuel combustion (V, Mn, Mo, Sb, Se, and Tl) pointed towards source regions in the Pechora Basin and Ural industrial areas in Russia, and near gas and oil fields in western Kazakhstan.

  17. Particle identification with the TOP and ARICH detectors at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torassa, E.

    2016-07-01

    The SuperKEKB e+e- collider will provide 40 times higher instantaneous luminosity than the KEKB collider. The Belle II detector, located at the collision point, is the upgrade of the Belle detector. The particle identification will be improved by replacing the aerogel threshold counter with two new high performance Cherenkov detectors: the time-of-propagation (TOP) in the barrel region and the focusing aerogel (ARICH) in the forward region. The time-of-propagation sub-detector consists of quartz radiator bars and micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes. The Cherenkov photons are produced and propagated through the quartz radiator, and after multiple internal reflections they are detected by the photomultiplier tubes. Photons with different Cherenkov angles reach different photomultiplier channels and arrive at different times. The time and the position convolution is used for the reconstruction of the Cherenkov angle. The focusing aerogel consists of a double layer aerogel radiator, an expansion volume and a photon detector. The aerogel thickness and the refractive indices of the two layers are optimized to focus the two light cones at the detection surface. The key features of these two detectors, the performance studies, and the construction progress are presented.

  18. Qualitative identification of carboxylic acids, boronic acids, and amines using cruciform fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Schwaebel, Thimon; Lirag, Rio Carlo; Davey, Evan A; Lim, Jaebum; Bunz, Uwe H F; Miljanić, Ognjen Š

    2013-01-01

    Molecular cruciforms are X-shaped systems in which two conjugation axes intersect at a central core. If one axis of these molecules is substituted with electron-donors, and the other with electron-acceptors, cruciforms' HOMO will localize along the electron-rich and LUMO along the electron-poor axis. This spatial isolation of cruciforms' frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) is essential to their use as sensors, since analyte binding to the cruciform invariably changes its HOMO-LUMO gap and the associated optical properties. Using this principle, Bunz and Miljanić groups developed 1,4-distyryl-2,5-bis(arylethynyl)benzene and benzobisoxazole cruciforms, respectively, which act as fluorescent sensors for metal ions, carboxylic acids, boronic acids, phenols, amines, and anions. The emission colors observed when these cruciform are mixed with analytes are highly sensitive to the details of analyte's structure and - because of cruciforms' charge-separated excited states - to the solvent in which emission is observed. Structurally closely related species can be qualitatively distinguished within several analyte classes: (a) carboxylic acids; (b) boronic acids, and (c) metals. Using a hybrid sensing system composed from benzobisoxazole cruciforms and boronic acid additives, we were also able to discern among structurally similar: (d) small organic and inorganic anions, (e) amines, and (f) phenols. The method used for this qualitative distinction is exceedingly simple. Dilute solutions (typically 10(-6) M) of cruciforms in several off-the-shelf solvents are placed in UV/Vis vials. Then, analytes of interest are added, either directly as solids or in concentrated solution. Fluorescence changes occur virtually instantaneously and can be recorded through standard digital photography using a semi-professional digital camera in a dark room. With minimal graphic manipulation, representative cut-outs of emission color photographs can be arranged into panels which permit quick naked

  19. Regional source identification using Lagrangian stochastic particle dispersion and HYSPLIT backward-trajectory models.

    PubMed

    Koracin, Darko; Vellore, Ramesh; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Watson, John G; Koracin, Julide; McCord, Travis; DuBois, David W; Chen, L W Antony; Kumar, Naresh; Knipping, Eladio M; Wheeler, Neil J M; Craig, Kenneth; Reid, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the capabilities of the receptor-oriented inverse mode Lagrangian Stochastic Particle Dispersion Model (LSPDM) with the 12-km resolution Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) wind field input for the assessment of source identification from seven regions impacting two receptors located in the eastern United States. The LSPDM analysis was compared with a standard version of the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) single-particle backward-trajectory analysis using inputs from MM5 and the Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) with horizontal grid resolutions of 12 and 80 km, respectively. The analysis included four 7-day summertime events in 2002; residence times in the modeling domain were computed from the inverse LSPDM runs and HYPSLIT-simulated backward trajectories started from receptor-source heights of 100, 500, 1000, 1500, and 3000 m. Statistics were derived using normalized values of LSPDM- and HYSPLIT-predicted residence times versus Community Multiscale Air Quality model-predicted sulfate concentrations used as baseline information. From 40 cases considered, the LSPDM identified first- and second-ranked emission region influences in 37 cases, whereas HYSPLIT-MM5 (HYSPLIT-EDAS) identified the sources in 21 (16) cases. The LSPDM produced a higher overall correlation coefficient (0.89) compared with HYSPLIT (0.55-0.62). The improvement of using the LSPDM is also seen in the overall normalized root mean square error values of 0.17 for LSPDM compared with 0.30-0.32 for HYSPLIT. The HYSPLIT backward trajectories generally tend to underestimate near-receptor sources because of a lack of stochastic dispersion of the backward trajectories and to overestimate distant sources because of a lack of treatment of dispersion. Additionally, the HYSPLIT backward trajectories showed a lack of consistency in the results obtained from different single vertical levels for starting the backward trajectories. To

  20. Identification of Silver and Palladium in Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    van Rooyen, Y. J.; Lillo, T. M.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2014-03-01

    Evidence of the release of certain metallic fission product through intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles has been seen for decades around the world, as well as in the recent AGR-1 experiment at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). However, understanding the basic mechanism of transport is still lacking. This understanding is important because the TRISO coating is part of the high temperature gas reactor functional containment and critical for the safety strategy for licensing purposes. Our approach to identify fission products in irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM), has led to first-of-a-kind data at the nano-scale indicating the presence of silver at triple points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in the triple junctions. In this initial study, the silver was only identified in SiC grain boundaries and triple points on the edge of the SiC-IPyC interface up to a depth of approximately 0.5 um. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries. Additionally spherical nano-sized palladium rich precipitates were found inside the SiC grains. These nano-sized Pd precipitates were distributed up to a depth of 5 um away from the SiC-IPyC interlayer. No silver was found in the center of the micron-sized fission product precipitates using these techniques, although silver was found on the outer edge of one of the Pd-U-Si containing precipitates which was facing the IPyC layer. Only Pd-U containing precipitates were identified in the IPyC layer and no silver was identified in the IPyC layer. The identification of silver alongside the grain boundaries and the findings of Pd alongside grain boundaries as well as inside the grains, provide significant knowledge for understanding silver and palladium transport in TIRSO fuel, which has been

  1. Identification of characteristic mass spectrometric markers for primary biological aerosol particles and comparison with field data from submicron pristine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freutel, F.; Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Martin, S. T.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to the total aerosol particle concentration is estimated to range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that PBA is a major source of particles in the supermicron range, and is also an important fraction of the submicron aerosol. PBA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. For this reason we have performed mass spectrometric laboratory measurements (Aerodyne C-ToF and W-ToF AMS, single particle laser ablation instrument SPLAT) on pure submicron aerosol particles containing typical PBA compounds in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds and to explain the observed fragmentation patterns on the basis of molecular structures. These laboratory data were compared to submicron particle mass spectra obtained during AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment, Brazil, February/March 2008). The results indicate that characteristic m/z ratios for carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, saccharose, levoglucosan, mannitol) can be identified, for example m/z = 60(C2H4O2+) or m/z = 61(C2H5O2+). Certain characteristic peaks for amino acids were also identified in the laboratory experiments. In the field data from AMAZE-08, these characteristic peaks for carbohydrates and amino acids were found, and their contribution to the total organic mass was estimated to about 5%. Fragment ions from peptides and small proteins were also identified in laboratory experiments. Larger proteins, however, seem to become oxidized to CO2+ to a large extend in the vaporizing process of the AMS. Thus, detection of proteins in atmospheric aerosol particles with the AMS appears to be difficult.

  2. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2006-03-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humidity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidities with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single-component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  3. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2005-10-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humdity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidites with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  4. Safety profile of the intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Mariana; Mendonça, Liliana; Nóbrega, Clévio; Gomes, Célia; Costa, Pedro; Hirai, Hirokazu; Moreira, João Nuno; Lima, Maria C; Manjunath, N; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2016-03-01

    In a clinical setting, where multiple administrations of the therapeutic agent are usually required to improve the therapeutic outcome, it is crucial to assess the immunogenicity of the administered nanoparticles. In this data work, we investigated the safety profile of the repeated intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles (RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs). To evaluate local activation of the immune system, we performed analysis of mouse tissue homogenates and sections from cerebellum. To investigate peripheral activation of the immune system, we used serum of mice that were intravenously injected with RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs. These data are related and were discussed in the accompanying research article entitled "Intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles alleviates Machado-Joseph disease neurological phenotype" (Conceição et al., in press) [1]. PMID:26958628

  5. Spectroscopic Evidence of Keto-enol Tautomerism in Deliquesced Malonic Acid Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Suman; Laskin, Alexander; Tivanski, Alexei V.

    2011-04-11

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy combined with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and optical microscopy coupled with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (micro-FTIR) have been applied to observe hygroscopic growth and chemical changes in malonic acid particles deposited on substrates. Extent of the hygroscopic growth of particles has been quantified in terms of the corresponding water-to-solute ratios (WSR) based on STXM/NEXAFS and micro-FTIR data sets. WSR values derived separately from two applied methods displayed a remarkable agreement with previous data reported in the literature. Comparison of NEXAFS and FTIR spectra acquired at different relative humidity (RH) shows efficient keto-enol tautomerization of malonic acid, with the enol form dominated at higher RH. The keto-enol equilibrium constants were calculated using relevant peak intensities in the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS spectra as a function of RH.

  6. Safety profile of the intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles

    PubMed Central

    Conceição, Mariana; Mendonça, Liliana; Nóbrega, Clévio; Gomes, Célia; Costa, Pedro; Hirai, Hirokazu; Moreira, João Nuno; Lima, Maria C.; Manjunath, N.; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2016-01-01

    In a clinical setting, where multiple administrations of the therapeutic agent are usually required to improve the therapeutic outcome, it is crucial to assess the immunogenicity of the administered nanoparticles. In this data work, we investigated the safety profile of the repeated intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles (RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs). To evaluate local activation of the immune system, we performed analysis of mouse tissue homogenates and sections from cerebellum. To investigate peripheral activation of the immune system, we used serum of mice that were intravenously injected with RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs. These data are related and were discussed in the accompanying research article entitled “Intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles alleviates Machado–Joseph disease neurological phenotype” (Conceição et al., in press) [1]. PMID:26958628

  7. Comparison of the composition and gas/particle partitioning of organic acids in monoterpene and isoprene dominated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Gas and particle-phase organic acids measurements from two different regions with different biogenic volatile organic compound emissions are used to understand gas/particle partitioning principles. A Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), with acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion was used to selectively detect acids. Hundreds of gas and particle-phase organic acids were measured in both locations, a monoterpene and MBO-dominated environment (ponderosa pine forest in Colorado, BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011) and isoprene and terpene-dominated environment (mixed deciduous and pine forest in Alabama, SOAS 2013). Time series of gas/particle partitioning for ions consistent with tracers for isoprene oxidation such as methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and tracers for α-pinene oxidation such as pinic and pinonic acid will be presented. Gas/particle partitioning, represented as the fraction of each species in the particle-phase, Fp, was calculated for C1-C18 alkanoic acids and biogenic VOC oxidation tracers and compared to an absorptive partitioning model. These results are compared with those of two other instruments that can also quantify gas/particle partitioning with high time resolution: a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG) and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS). Data from both environments were consistent with the values and trends predicted by the absorptive partitioning model for the tracer acids. However, for low carbon number alkanoic acids we report a higher fraction in the particle phase than predicted by the model. The Fp for the bulk-averaged acids and its relationship to the degree of oxidation and carbon number will also be presented. Temporal patterns and correlations with atmospheric conditions and composition will be explored for individual and bulk acids. We will discuss atmospheric implications of the gas/particle partitioning

  8. Particle acceleration for delivery deoxyribonucleic acid vaccine into skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinglong, Yu; Xiwen, Zhang; Yuan, Wang; Junshi, Xie; Pengfei, Hao

    2001-08-01

    Skin represents an important immunogenic inductive site, 3%-4% epidermis cells are special antigen-presenting cells. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine can elicit vigorous immune responses in epidermis cells. The means of delivering DNA vaccine into epidermis cells becomes an important step in DNA vaccine applications. This article presents a new type of gene gun based on the principle of two-stage injector acceleration. DNA coated particles are attached on an screen-type carrier located at the negative pressure inlet, the particles will be sucked into the accelerating channel by negative pressure and be accelerated at a great speed. FLUENT, a computation fluid dynamic application software is used to simulate the flow condition of the injector. Distribution of Mach number, total pressure on exit cross section, and negative pressure on negative pressure inlet are analyzed, by which the process of acceleration of particles is determined. We also measured these parameters in this study. The data show that the particle velocity can be up to 500 m/s and the particles distribute evenly over a circle of Φ 20 mm. The numerical simulation results coincide with experimental data well. Therefore, the results of numerical simulation can be served as guidance for an optimal design of the gene gun and for practical operations. When gene coated particles are distributed evenly, they can penetrate into or even through epidermis cells where the gene can be expressed and subsequently elicits host immune responses. This device may be evaluated in human objects in future.

  9. Rapid identification of airborne biological particles by flow cytometry, gas chromatography, and genetic probes. Final report, January 1995-January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, C.H.; Carlon, H.R.; Edmonds, R.L.; Robert, L.; Blew, J.

    1997-09-01

    Detection of airborne biological particulates is a primary mission of the U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center biological defense program. If biological particles could be characterized according to their unique physical and biochemical profiles, detection and perhaps even identification of the particles might be possible. This study focused upon microbial particles, more specifically upon fungal spores, yeast cells, and bacterial cells. Physical characteristics of the particles, it was proposed, could be detected by flow cytometry, while their biochemical profiles could be determined by gas chromatography, and their genetic identity could be obtained by either a suitable genetic probe or by matching its genetic fingerprint. Genetic techniques were not attempted in the work reported here, but the approach was investigated further. Trial results were encouraging.

  10. The non-destructive identification of solid over-the-counter medications using single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey N; Farquar, George R; Jones, A Daniel; Frank, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Single over-the-counter medication tablets were analyzed in real time using Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS). Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for micrometer-sized single particles dislodged from a single tablet without destroying the shape or markings of each tablet. The solid tablet was placed in a modified-top glass vial and shaken to dislodge and introduce micrometer-sized particles into the SPAMS system. Unique spectra from these particles were obtained in less than 1 s for single tablets of aspirin, ibuprofen, pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, loratadine, or diphenhydramine. The signals obtained allowed the non-destructive identification of an individual tablet in seconds. SPAMS presents an ideal system for high-throughput analysis of solid drugs. PMID:17935106

  11. Functionalised carboxylic acids in atmospheric particles: An annual cycle revealing seasonal trends and possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Monique; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Carboxylic acids represent a major fraction of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric particles. Among the particle phase carboxylic acids, straight-chain monocarboxylic acids (MCA) and dicarboxylic acids (DCA) with 2-10 carbon atoms have extensively been studied in the past. However, only a few studies exist dealing with functionalised carboxylic acids, i.e. having additional hydroxyl-, oxo- or nitro-groups. Regarding atmospheric chemistry, these functionalised carboxylic acids are of particular interest as they are supposed to be formed during atmospheric oxidation processes, e.g. through radical reactions. Therefore they can provide insights into the tropospheric multiphase chemistry. During this work 28 carboxylic acids (4 functionalised aliphatic MCAs, 5 aromatic MCAs, 3 nitroaromatic MCAs, 6 aliphatic DCAs, 6 functionalised aliphatic DCAs, 4 aromatic DCAs) were quantitatively determined in 256 filter samples taken at the rural research station Melpitz (Saxony, Germany) with a PM10 Digitel DHA-80 filter sampler. All samples were taken in 2010 covering a whole annual cycle. The resulting dataset was examined for a possible seasonal dependency of the acid concentrations. Furthermore the influence of the air mass origin on the acid concentrations was studied based on a simple two-sector classification (western or eastern sector) using a back trajectory analysis. Regarding the annual average, adipic acid was found to be the most abundant compound with a mean concentration of 7.8 ng m-3 followed by 4-oxopimelic acid with 6.1 ng m-3. The sum of all acid concentrations showed two maxima during the seasonal cycle; one in summer and one in winter, whereas the highest overall acid concentrations were found in summer. In general the target acids could be divided into two different groups, where one group has its maximum concentration in summer and the other group during winter. The first group contains all investigated aliphatic mono- and dicarboxylic

  12. Identification of uric acid as the redox molecule secreted by the yeast Arxula adeninivorans.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan; Trautwein-Schult, Anke; Jankowska, Dagmara; Kunze, Gotthard; Squire, Marie A; Baronian, Keith

    2014-03-01

    The yeast Arxula adeninivorans has been previously shown to secrete a large amount of an electro-active molecule. The molecule was produced by cells that had been cultivated in a rich medium, harvested, washed and then suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The molecule was easily detectable after 60 min of incubation in PBS, and the cells continued to produce the molecule in these conditions for up to 3 days. The peak anodic potential of the oxidation peak was 0.42 V, and it was shown to be a solution species rather than a cell-attached species. We have optimised the production of the molecule, identified it by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation and high-resolution mass spectrometric analysis and determined the pathway involved in its synthesis. It has a mass/charge ratio that corresponds to uric acid, and this identification was supported by comparing UV spectra and cyclic voltammograms of the samples to those of uric acid. An A. adeninivorans xanthine oxidase gene disruption mutant failed to produce uric acid, which added further validity to this identification. It also demonstrated that the purine catabolism pathway is involved in its production. A transgenic A. adeninivorans strain with a switchable urate oxidase gene (AUOX) accumulated uric acid when the gene was switched off but did not when the gene was switched on. Cultivation of cells on amino acid and purine-free minimal media with an inorganic nitrogen source suggests that the cells synthesise purines from inorganic nitrogen and proceed to degrade them via the normal purine degradation pathway. PMID:24407453

  13. Identification of diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol containing 11,12,13-trihydroxy-9-14-octadecadienoic acids in castor oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Castor oil has many industrial uses. Molecular species of acylglycerols containing monohydroxy, dihydroxy and trihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil have been reported. We report here the identification of acylglycerols containing triOH18:2 fatty acid in castor oil. The structure of this novel fa...

  14. Acid-Degradable Cationic Dextran Particles for the Delivery of siRNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jessica L.; Schubert, Stephanie; Wich, Peter R.; Cui, Lina; Cohen, Joel A.; Mynar, Justin L.; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2011-01-01

    We report a new acid-sensitive, biocompatible and biodegradable microparticulate delivery system, spermine modified acetalated-dextran (Spermine-Ac-DEX), which can be used to efficiently encapsulate siRNA. These particles demonstrated efficient gene knockdown in HeLa-luc cells with minimal toxicity. This knockdown was comparable to that obtained using Lipofectamine, a commercially available transfection reagent generally limited to in vitro use due to its high toxicity. PMID:21539393

  15. Molecular understanding of sulphuric acid-amine particle nucleation in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Praplan, Arnaud P; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Henschel, Henning; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kurtén, Theo; Kvashin, Alexander N; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Leppä, Johannes; Loukonen, Ville; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; McGrath, Matthew J; Nieminen, Tuomo; Olenius, Tinja; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Sarnela, Nina; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Seinfeld, John H; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjo; Virtanen, Annele; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kirkby, Jasper

    2013-10-17

    Nucleation of aerosol particles from trace atmospheric vapours is thought to provide up to half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Aerosols can cause a net cooling of climate by scattering sunlight and by leading to smaller but more numerous cloud droplets, which makes clouds brighter and extends their lifetimes. Atmospheric aerosols derived from human activities are thought to have compensated for a large fraction of the warming caused by greenhouse gases. However, despite its importance for climate, atmospheric nucleation is poorly understood. Recently, it has been shown that sulphuric acid and ammonia cannot explain particle formation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. It is thought that amines may enhance nucleation, but until now there has been no direct evidence for amine ternary nucleation under atmospheric conditions. Here we use the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN and find that dimethylamine above three parts per trillion by volume can enhance particle formation rates more than 1,000-fold compared with ammonia, sufficient to account for the particle formation rates observed in the atmosphere. Molecular analysis of the clusters reveals that the faster nucleation is explained by a base-stabilization mechanism involving acid-amine pairs, which strongly decrease evaporation. The ion-induced contribution is generally small, reflecting the high stability of sulphuric acid-dimethylamine clusters and indicating that galactic cosmic rays exert only a small influence on their formation, except at low overall formation rates. Our experimental measurements are well reproduced by a dynamical model based on quantum chemical calculations of binding energies of molecular clusters, without any fitted parameters. These results show that, in regions of the atmosphere near amine sources, both amines and sulphur dioxide should be considered when assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on particle formation. PMID:24097350

  16. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  17. Influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.S.; Lin, Z.J.; Wu, M.Y.; Liu, J.I.; Yuan, C.

    1998-12-31

    This study investigated the influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition both temporally and spatially in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan. During the period of January--December, 1996, both wet and dry deposition samples were collected by automatic acid precipitation samplers at six sampling sites which covered the entire metropolitan area. Major cations (NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup +2}, and Mg{sup +2}) and anions (F{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}) of acid deposition samples were analyzed in a central laboratory, while the pH value and conductivity of rainwater samples were measured in situ. Results from chemical analysis indicated that Ca{sup +2} was the most abundant cation in acid deposition samples. Major cations were Ca{sup +2} and NH{sub 4}{sup +}, while major anions were SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. This study also revealed that the pH value, suspended solids, Ca{sup +2}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} of rainwater decreased with rainy time in a sequential rainwater sampling process. It was estimated that approximately 80% of suspended particles could be washed out by rain droplets in the first hour of raining process. Therefore, alkaline suspended particles in the atmosphere played an very important role on the chemical composition of acid precipitation in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan.

  18. Sialic Acid-Imprinted Fluorescent Core-Shell Particles for Selective Labeling of Cell Surface Glycans.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Sudhirkumar; El-Schich, Zahra; Malakpour, Atena; Wan, Wei; Dizeyi, Nishtman; Mohammadi, Reza; Rurack, Knut; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette; Sellergren, Börje

    2015-11-01

    The expression of cell surface glycans terminating with sialic acid (SA) residues has been found to correlate with various disease states there among cancer. We here report a novel strategy for specific fluorescence labeling of such motifs. This is based on sialic acid-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles equipped with nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) fluorescent reporter groups allowing environmentally sensitive fluorescence detection at convenient excitation and emission wavelengths. Imprinting was achieved exploiting a hybrid approach combining reversible boronate ester formation between p-vinylphenylboronic acid and SA, the introduction of cationic amine functionalities, and the use of an NBD-appended urea-monomer as a binary hydrogen-bond donor targeting the SA carboxylic acid and OH functionalities. The monomers were grafted from 200 nm RAFT-modified silica core particles using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linker resulting in a shell thickness of ca. 10 nm. The particles displayed strong affinity for SA in methanol/water mixtures (K = 6.6 × 10(5) M(-1) in 2% water, 5.9 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water, B(max) ≈ 10 μmol g(-1)), whereas binding of the competitor glucuronic acid (GA) and other monosaccharides was considerably weaker (K (GA) = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water). In cell imaging experiments, the particles selectively stained different cell lines in correlation with the SA expression level. This was further verified by enzymatic cleavage of SA and by staining using a FITC labeled SA selective lectin. PMID:26414878

  19. Hygroscopic properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the boreal forest: diurnal variation, solubility and the influence of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Aufmhoff, H.; Aalto, P.; Hämeri, K.; Arnold, F.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Freshly formed atmospheric aerosol particles are neither large enough to efficiently scatter incoming solar radiation nor able to act as cloud condensation nuclei. As the particles grow larger, their hygroscopicity determines the limiting size after which they are important in both of the aforementioned processes. The condensing species resulting in growth alter the hygroscopicity of the particles. We have measured hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles present in a boreal forest, along with the very hygroscopic atmospheric trace gas sulfuric acid. The focus was on days with new particle formation by nucleation. The measured hygroscopic growth factors (GF) correlated positively with gaseous phase sulfuric acid concentrations. This correlation had a strong size dependency; the smaller the particle, the more condensing sulfuric acid is bound to alter the GF due to initially smaller mass. In addition, water uptake of nucleation mode particles was monitored during new particle formation events and followed during their growth to Aitken mode sizes. As the modal diameter increased, the solubility of the particles decreased. This indicated that initially more hygroscopic particles transformed into less hygroscopic or even hydrophobic particles. A similar behavior was seen also during days with no particle formation, with GF decreasing during the evenings and increasing during early morning. This can be tentatively explained by day- and nighttime differences in the hygroscopicity of condensable vapors.

  20. Fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in the production of hepatitis B virus particles.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hitomi; Nio, Yasunori; Akahori, Yuichi; Kim, Sulyi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Hijikata, Makoto

    2016-06-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) proliferates in hepatocytes after infection, but the host factors that contribute to the HBV lifecycle are poorly understood at the molecular level. We investigated whether fatty acid biosynthesis (FABS), which was recently reported to contribute to the genomic replication of hepatitis C virus, plays a role in HBV proliferation. We examined the effects of inhibitors of the enzymes in the FABS pathway on the HBV lifecycle by using recombinant HBV-producing cultured cells and found that the extracellular HBV DNA level, reflecting HBV particle production, was decreased by treatment with inhibitors suppressed the synthesis of long-chain saturated fatty acids with little cytotoxicity. The reduced HBV DNA level was reversed when palmitic acid, which is the product of fatty acid synthase (FAS) during FABS, was used simultaneously with the inhibitor. We also observed that the amount of intracellular HBV DNA in the cells was increased by FAS inhibitor treatment, suggesting that FABS is associated with HBV particle production but not its genome replication. This suggests that FABS might be a potent target for anti-HBV drug with a mode of action different from current HBV therapy. PMID:27178211

  1. Unravelling the properties of supported copper oxide: can the particle size induce acidic behaviour?

    PubMed

    Zaccheria, Federica; Scotti, Nicola; Marelli, Marcello; Psaro, Rinaldo; Ravasio, Nicoletta

    2013-02-01

    There is a renewed interest in designing solid acid catalysts particularly due to the significance of Lewis acid catalyzed processes such as Friedel-Crafts acylation and alkylation and cellulose hydrolysis for the development of sustainable chemistry. This paper reports a new focus point on the properties of supported CuO on silica, a material that up to now has been considered only as the precursor of an effective hydrogenation catalyst. Thus, it deals with a re-interpretation of some of our results with supported copper oxide aimed to unveil the root of acidic activity exhibited by this material, e.g. in alcoholysis reactions. Several techniques were used to highlight the very high dispersion of the oxide phase on the support allowing us to ascribe the acidic behavior to coordinative unsaturation of the very small CuO particles. In turn this unsaturation makes the CuO particles prone to coordinate surrounding molecules present in the reaction mixture and to exchange them according to their nucleophilicity. PMID:23207422

  2. Diamine-sulfuric acid reactions are a potent source of new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Bachman, Ryan; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nucleation from sulfuric acid depends on the concentrations and the stabilizing effect of other trace gases, such as ammonia and amines. Diamines are an understudied class of atmospherically relevant compounds, and we examine how they affect sulfuric acid nucleation in both flow reactor experiments and the atmosphere. The number of particles produced from sulfuric acid and diamines in the flow reactor was equal to or greater than the number formed from monoamines, implying that diamines are more effective nucleating agents. Upper limits of diamine abundance were also monitored during three field campaigns: Lamont, OK (2013); Lewes, DE (2012); and Atlanta, GA (2009). Mixing ratios were measured as high as tens of parts per trillion by volume (GA and OK). Laboratory results suggest that diamines at these levels are important for atmospheric nucleation. Diamines likely participate in atmospheric nucleation and should be considered in nucleation measurements and models.

  3. Identification and Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Based Inhibitors of Replication Protein A.

    PubMed

    Patrone, James D; Pelz, Nicholas F; Bates, Brittney S; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Camper, Demarco V; Kuznetsov, Alexey G; Browning, Carrie F; Feldkamp, Michael D; Frank, Andreas O; Gilston, Benjamin A; Olejniczak, Edward T; Rossanese, Olivia W; Waterson, Alex G; Chazin, Walter J; Fesik, Stephen W

    2016-04-19

    Replication protein A (RPA) is an essential single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein that initiates the DNA damage response pathway through protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediated by its 70N domain. The identification and use of chemical probes that can specifically disrupt these interactions is important for validating RPA as a cancer target. A high-throughput screen (HTS) to identify new chemical entities was conducted, and 90 hit compounds were identified. From these initial hits, an anthranilic acid based series was optimized by using a structure-guided iterative medicinal chemistry approach to yield a cell-penetrant compound that binds to RPA70N with an affinity of 812 nm. This compound, 2-(3- (N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)sulfamoyl)-4-methylbenzamido)benzoic acid (20 c), is capable of inhibiting PPIs mediated by this domain. PMID:26748787

  4. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes. PMID:26195111

  5. One-Pot Procedure for Recovery of Gallic Acid from Wastewater and Encapsulation within Protein Particles.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2016-02-24

    A whey protein isolate solution was heat-denatured and treated with the enzyme transglutaminase, which cross-linked ≈26% of the amino groups and increased the magnitude of the ζ-potential value. The protein solution was microemulsified, and then the resulting water-in-oil microemulsion was dispersed within a gallic acid-rich model wastewater. Gallic acid extraction by the outlined microemulsion liquid membrane (MLM) from the exterior aqueous phase (wastewater) and accumulation within the internal aqueous nanodroplets induced protein cold-set gelation and resulted in the formation of gallic acid-enveloping nanoparticles. Measurements with a strain-controlled rheometer indicated a progressive increase in the MLM viscosity during gallic acid recovery corresponding to particle formation. The mean hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles made from the heat-denatured and preheated enzymatically cross-linked proteins was 137 and 122 nm, respectively. The enzymatic cross-linking of whey proteins led to a higher gallic acid recovery yield and increased the glass transition enthalpy and temperature. A similar impact on glass transition indices was observed by the gallic acid-induced nanoparticulation of proteins. Scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of numerous jammed/fused nanoparticles. It was suggested on the basis of the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the in situ nanoparticulation of proteins shifted the C-N stretching and C-H bending peaks to higher wavenumbers. X-ray diffraction results proposed a decreased β-sheet content for proteins because of the acid-induced particulation. The nanoparticles made from the enzymatically cross-linked protein were more stable against the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and retained almost 19% of the entrapped gallic acid after 300 min sequential gastric and intestinal digestions. PMID:26862880

  6. Teicoplanin bonded sub-2 μm superficially porous particles for enantioseparation of native amino acids.

    PubMed

    Min, Yi; Sui, Zhigang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-10-10

    Superficially porous particles (SPPs) demonstrate superior efficiency than totally porous particles in chiral separations. In order to obtain high efficiency and fast separation, sub-2 μm SPPs with high surface area are synthesized, and with teicoplanin bonded, such materials are successfully applied into the rapid enantioseparation of native amino acids. In brief, 1.27 ± 0.06 μm nonporous silica particles are prepared by a modified seeded growth method, followed by mesoporous shell fabrication via one-pot templated dissolution and redeposition strategy, and pore size expansion via acid-refluxing. The diameter of the formed SPPs is 1.49 ± 0.04 μm, with the shell thickness as 206 nm. Nitrogen physisorption experiments show that the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area is 213.6 m(2)/g and pore size is 9 nm. After teicoplanin derivatization with bonding capacity as 83.3 μmol/g, the prepared chiral stationary phase is packed into a stainless steel tube with the geometry of 50 mm × 2.1 mm i.d.. In less than 6.4 min, six native amino acids (norleucine, alanine, valine, methionine, leucine, norvaline) are enantioseparated with resolution factors ranging from 1.9 to 5.0. Besides, the resolution for chiral separation is improved with ethanol-water instead of methanol-water as the mobile phase. Moreover, the low temperature gives higher resolution, but longer retention time and higher backpressure. Finally, the effect of flow rate on enantiomeric separation is studied and fast chiral separation within 1 min is obtained with flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. All these results show that the synthesized teicoplanin bonded sub-2 μm SPPs have great potential to achieve the enantioseparation of native amino acids with high resolution and rapid speed. PMID:26073115

  7. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-10-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  8. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  9. The role of acid-base effects on particle charging in apolar media.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Matthew Michael; Berg, John C

    2015-06-01

    The creation and stabilization of electric charge in apolar environments (dielectric constant≈2) have been an area of interest dating back to when an explanation was sought for the occurrence of what are now known as electrokinetic explosions during the pumping of fuels. More recently attention has focused on the charging of suspended particles in such media, underlying such applications as electrophoretic displays (e.g., the Amazon Kindle® reader) and new printing devices (e.g., the HP Indigo® Digital Press). The endeavor has been challenging owing to the complexity of the systems involved and the large number of factors that appear to be important. A number of different, and sometimes conflicting, theories for particle surface charging have been advanced, but most observations obtained in the authors' laboratory, as well as others, appear to be explainable in terms of an acid-base mechanism. Adducts formed between chemical functional groups on the particle surface and monomers of reverse micelle-forming surfactants dissociate, leaving charged groups on the surface, while the counter-charges formed are sequestered in the reverse micelles. For a series of mineral oxides in a given medium with a given surfactant, surface charging (as quantified by the maximum electrophoretic mobility or zeta potential obtained as surfactant concentration is varied) was found to scale linearly with the aqueous PZC (or IEP) values of the oxides. Different surfactants, with the same oxide series, yielded similar behavior, but with different PZC crossover points between negative and positive particle charging, and different slopes of charge vs. PZC. Thus the oxide series could be used as a yardstick to characterize the acid-base properties of the surfactants. This has led directly to the study of other materials, including surface-modified oxides, carbon blacks, pigments (charge transfer complexes), and polymer latices. This review focuses on the acid-base mechanism of particle

  10. Contribution of ants in modifying of soil acidity and particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgun, Alexandra; Golichenkov, Maxim

    2015-04-01

    Being a natural body, formed by the influence of biota on the upper layers of the Earth's crust, the soil is the most striking example of biogenic-abiogenic interactions in the biosphere. Invertebrates (especially ants that build soil nests) are important agents that change soil properties in well developed terrestrial ecosystems. Impact of soil microorganisms on soil properties is particularly described in numerous literature and concerns mainly chemical properties and general indicators of soil biological activity. Influence of ants (as representatives of the soil mesofauna) mostly appears as mechanical movement of soil particles and aggregates, and chemical effects caused by concentration of organic matter within the ant's nest. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of ants on physical and chemical soil attributes such as particle size distribution and soil acidity. The samples were taken from aerial parts of Lasius niger nests, selected on different elements of the relief (summit position, slope, terrace and floodplain) in the Arkhangelsk region (north of the European part of Russia) and compared with the specimens of the upper horizons of the reference soils. Particle size distribution was determined by laser diffraction method using laser diffraction particle size analyzer «Analysette 22 comfort» (FRITSCH, Germany). The acidity (pH) was determined by potentiometry in water suspension. Particle size distribution of the samples from the nests is more variable as compared to the control samples. For example, the content of 5-10 μm fraction ranges from 9% to 12% in reference soils, while in the anthill samples the variation is from 8% to 15%. Similarly, for 50-250 μm fraction - it ranges from 15% to 18% in reference soils, whereas in anthills - from 6% to 29%. The results of particle size analysis showed that the reference sample on the terrace has silty loam texture and nests soil L. niger are medium loam. The reference soil on the slope is

  11. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  12. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  13. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. PMID:26924312

  14. Sedimentation field-flow fractionation for characterization of citric acid-modified Hβ zeolite particles: Effect of particle dispersion and carrier composition.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Bai, Guoyi; Ding, Liang; Li, Yueqiu; Lee, Seungho

    2015-11-27

    In this study, sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was, for the first time, applied for determination of size distribution of Hβ zeolite particles modified by citric acid (CA-Hβ). Effects of the particle dispersion and the carrier liquid composition (type of dispersing reagent (surfactant) and salt added in the carrier liquid, ionic strength, and pH) on SdFFF elution behavior of CA-Hβ zeolite particles were systematically investigated. Also the SdFFF separation efficiency of the particles was discussed in terms of the forces such as van der Waals, hydrophobic, and induced-dipole interactions. Results reveal that the type of salt and pH of the carrier liquid significantly affect the SdFFF separation efficiency of the zeolite particles. It was found that addition of a salt (NaN3) into the carrier liquid affects the characteristic of the SdFFF channel surface. It was found that the use of an acidic medium (pH 3.2) leads to a particle-channel interaction, while the use of a basic medium (pH 10.6) promotes an inter-particle hydrophobic interaction. Result from SdFFF was compared with those from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). It seems that, once the experimental conditions are optimized, SdFFF becomes a valuable tool for size characterization of the zeolite particles. PMID:26493474

  15. Acid particles and the tracheobronchial region of the respiratory system. An irritation-signaling model for possible health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hattis, D.; Wasson, J.M.; Page, G.S.; Stern, B.; Franklin, C.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper explores some detailed mechanistic hypotheses for the possible action of acid particles on the tracheobronchial region of the human respiratory system. Because of the buffering capacity and volume of mucus produced per day it appears doubtful that ordinary ambient exposures to acid particles could markedly change the overall pH of tracheobronchial mucus considered as a whole. However, it is possible that individual acidic particles could contain enough acid to deliver localized irritant signals that could be the triggers for enhanced mucus secretion and cell division in sensitive portions of the bronchial tree, and thereby contribute to the processes involved in chronic bronchitis. Depending on the exact pH depression required for a signal to be perceived by the tracheobronchial epithelium, the acid content of the incoming particles per unit weight, and the effect of neutralization by ammonia in the upper respiratory tract, the minimum size of an acidic particle required to deliver a perceptible signal might range from about 0.4 to 0.7 microns for portions of the epithelium that are frequently swept by 4-micron mucus droplets. Since particle number per unit weight declines dramatically with increasing particle size, the most potent fraction of particles in terms of signals delivered per /sup +/g/m/sup 3/ is likely to be just above the minimum size that is needed to produce an effective signal. The model developed here makes predictions of the relative potency of particles of different size and acid delivery capacity that could be tested in both experimental animal systems and human epidemiological studies.

  16. Ice Nucleation of Bare and Sulfuric Acid-coated Mineral Dust Particles and Implication for Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Sanders, Cassandra N.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-27

    Ice nucleation properties of different dust species coated with soluble material are not well understood. We determined the ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35 deg C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw). Five different mineral dust species: Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, montmorillonite, quartz and kaolinite were dry dispersed and size-selected at 150 nm and exposed to sulfuric acid vapors in the coating apparatus. The condensed sulfuric acid soluble mass fraction per particle was estimated from the cloud condensation nuclei activated fraction measurements. The fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw was determined using a compact ice chamber. In water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that only coated ATD particles showed suppression of ice nucleation ability while other four dust species did not showed the effect of coating on the fraction of particles nucleating ice. The results suggest that interactions between the dust surface and sulfuric acid vapor are important, such that interactions may or may not modify the surface via chemical reactions with sulfuric acid. At water-supersaturated conditions we did not observed the effect of coating, i.e. the bare and coated dust particles had similar ice nucleation behavior.

  17. Why sulfuric acid forms particles so extremely well, and how organics might still compete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurten, T.; Ehn, M.; Kupiainen, O.; Olenius, T.; Rissanen, M.; Thornton, J. A.; Nielsen, L.; Jørgensen, S.; Ortega Colomer, I. K.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is a well-known result in aerosol science that the single most important molecule for the first steps of new-particle formation in our atmosphere is sulfuric acid, H2SO4. From a chemical perspective, this seems somewhat counterintuitive: the atmosphere contains thousands of different organic compounds, many of which can potentially form oxidation products with even lower volatility than H2SO4. The unique role of sulfuric acid is due to its formation kinetics. The conversion of sulfur dioxide, SO2 to H2SO4 requires only a single oxidant molecule (e.g. OH), as subsequent steps are extremely rapid. Still, the saturation vapor pressure of H2SO4 is over 108 times lower than that of SO2. In contrast, the oxidation reactions of organic molecules typically lower their saturation vapor pressure by only a factor of 10-1000 per oxidation step. Therefore, organic compounds are usually lost to pre-existing aerosol surfaces before they have undergone sufficiently many oxidation reactions to nucleate on their own. The presence of strong nitrogen-containing base molecules such as amines enhances the particle-forming advantages of sulfuric acid even further. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the evaporation rate of sulfuric acid from key clusters containing two acid molecules may decrease by a factor of 108 in the presence of ppt-level concentrations of amines, implying a total decrease of up to 1016 in the effective vapor pressure going from SO2 to H2SO4. In some circumstances, this decrease causes the energy barrier for new-particle formation to disappear: the process is no longer nucleation, and some common applications of e.g. the nucleation theorem cease to apply. Cluster kinetic models combined with first-principles evaporation rates appear to describe this sulfuric acid - base clustering reasonably well, and result in cluster formation rates close to those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN. There may nevertheless exist exceptions to the general rule that

  18. Retrospective analysis for the identification of 4-aminocarminic acid photo-degradation products in beverages.

    PubMed

    Gosetti, Fabio; Chiuminatto, Ugo; Mastroianni, Rita; Mazzucco, Eleonora; Manfredi, Marcello; Marengo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the identification of the photo-degradation products of 4-aminocarminic acid potentially present in commercial beverages. Sixteen beverages of different composition but all containing the E120 dye were previously analysed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry to identify the common degradation products of the E120 dye. Since it is plausible to find unauthorised 4-aminocarminic acid in beverages which report generic E120 dye on the label, retrospective analysis was employed here not only to search for the possible presence of 4-aminocarminic acid but also to investigate the potential formation of photo-degradation products derived from this compound. For this purpose, a statistical approach based on Student's t-test was used to compare the degraded beverages containing 4-aminocarminic acid with all the others. Five degradation products were identified and their structures were elucidated on the basis of the high-accuracy and high-resolution of mass and mass/mass spectra. The toxicity of the degradation products was evaluated through the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. No evidence of mutagenicity was obtained for the beverages subjected or not to irradiation, whereas a toxic effect of the 4-aminocarminic acid standard solution already at 100.0 µg l(-1) was found. This leads, once again, to the conclusion that the toxicity study must be carried out on the beverages in order to take into account of all the possible masking/protection interactions among the ingredients. PMID:25562586

  19. Simplified mechanism for new particle formation from methanesulfonic acid, amines, and water via experiments and ab initio calculations

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Matthew L.; Varner, Mychel E.; Perraud, Véronique; Ezell, Michael J.; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Airborne particles affect human health and significantly influence visibility and climate. A major fraction of these particles result from the reactions of gaseous precursors to generate low-volatility products such as sulfuric acid and high-molecular weight organics that nucleate to form new particles. Ammonia and, more recently, amines, both of which are ubiquitous in the environment, have also been recognized as important contributors. However, accurately predicting new particle formation in both laboratory systems and in air has been problematic. During the oxidation of organosulfur compounds, gas-phase methanesulfonic acid is formed simultaneously with sulfuric acid, and both are found in particles in coastal regions as well as inland. We show here that: (i) Amines form particles on reaction with methanesulfonic acid, (ii) water vapor is required, and (iii) particle formation can be quantitatively reproduced by a semiempirical kinetics model supported by insights from quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters. Such an approach may be more broadly applicable in models of outdoor, indoor, and industrial settings where particles are formed, and where accurate modeling is essential for predicting their impact on health, visibility, and climate. PMID:23090988

  20. Simplified mechanism for new particle formation from methanesulfonic acid, amines, and water via experiments and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Matthew L; Varner, Mychel E; Perraud, Véronique; Ezell, Michael J; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2012-11-13

    Airborne particles affect human health and significantly influence visibility and climate. A major fraction of these particles result from the reactions of gaseous precursors to generate low-volatility products such as sulfuric acid and high-molecular weight organics that nucleate to form new particles. Ammonia and, more recently, amines, both of which are ubiquitous in the environment, have also been recognized as important contributors. However, accurately predicting new particle formation in both laboratory systems and in air has been problematic. During the oxidation of organosulfur compounds, gas-phase methanesulfonic acid is formed simultaneously with sulfuric acid, and both are found in particles in coastal regions as well as inland. We show here that: (i) Amines form particles on reaction with methanesulfonic acid, (ii) water vapor is required, and (iii) particle formation can be quantitatively reproduced by a semiempirical kinetics model supported by insights from quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters. Such an approach may be more broadly applicable in models of outdoor, indoor, and industrial settings where particles are formed, and where accurate modeling is essential for predicting their impact on health, visibility, and climate. PMID:23090988

  1. Identification of the typical metal particles among haze, fog, and clear episodes in the Beijing atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunjie; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Suanqin; Kong, Lingdong; Fu, Hongbo; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-04-01

    For a better understanding of metal particle morphology and behaviors in China, atmospheric aerosols were sampled in the summer of 2012 in Beijing. The single-particle analysis shows various metal-bearing speciations, dominated by oxides, sulfates and nitrates. A large fraction of particles is soluble. Sources of Fe-bearing particles are mainly steel industries and oil fuel combustion, whereas Zn- and Pb-bearing particles are primarily contributed by waste incineration, besides industrial combustion. Other trace metal particles play a minor rule, and may come from diverse origins. Mineral dust and anthropogenic source like vehicles and construction activities are of less importance to metal-rich particles. Statistics of 1173 analyzed particles show that Fe-rich particles (48.5%) dominate the metal particles, followed by Zn-rich particles (34.9%) and Pb-rich particles (15.6%). Compared with the abundances among clear, haze and fog conditions, a severe metal pollution is identified in haze and fog episodes. Particle composition and elemental correlation suggest that the haze episodes are affected by the biomass burning in the southern regions, and the fog episodes by the local emission with manifold particle speciation. Our results show the heterogeneous reaction accelerated in the fog and haze episodes indicated by more zinc nitrate or zinc sulfate instead of zinc oxide or carbonate. Such information is useful in improving our knowledge of fine airborne metal particles on their morphology, speciation, and solubility, all of which will help the government introduce certain control to alleviate metal pollution. PMID:25555257

  2. Dominant Aerosol Particle Type/Mixture Identification at Worldwide Locations Using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol absorption results in atmospheric heating for various forms of particulate matter - we address means of partitioning mineral dust, pollution (e.g., black and brown carbon), and mixtures of the two using remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer measurements can be used to calculate the absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) at 440, 675, and 870 nm. The spectral change in AAOD with wavelength on logarithmic scales provides the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE). Recently, a few studies have shown that the relationship between aerosol absorption (i.e., AAE or SSA) and aerosol size [i.e., Angstrom exponent (AE) or fine mode fraction (FMF) of the AOD] can estimate the dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures (i.e., dust, pollution, and dust and pollution mixtures) [Bergstrom et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010; Lee et al. 2010; Giles et al., 2011]. To evaluate these methods, approximately 20 AERONET sites were grouped into various aerosol categories (i.e., dust, mixed, urban/industrial, and biomass burning) based on aerosol types/mixtures identified in previous studies. For data collected between 1999 and 2010, the long-term data set was analyzed to determine the magnitude of spectral AAOD, perform a sensitivity study on AAE by varying the spectral AOD and SSA, and identify dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures. An assessment of the spectral AAOD showed, on average, that the mixed (dust and pollution) category had the highest absorption (AAE ~1.5) followed by biomass burning (AAE~1.3), dust (AAE~1.7), and urban/industrial (AAE~1.2) categories with AAOD (440 nm) varying between 0.03 and 0.09 among these categories. Perturbing input parameters based on the expected uncertainties for AOD (±0.01) and SSA [±0.03; for cases where AOD(440 nm)>0.4], the sensitivity study showed the perturbed AAE mean varied from the unperturbed

  3. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and nucleotide bases for target bacterial vibrational mode identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Argue, Leanne; Hyre, Aaron; Jacobson, Michele; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of bacteria have reported a wide range of vibrational mode assignments associated with biological material. We present Raman and SER spectra of the amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamine, cysteine, alanine, proline, methionine, asparagine, threonine, valine, glycine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid and the nucleic acid bases adenosine, guanosine, thymidine, and uridine to better characterize biological vibrational mode assignments for bacterial target identification. We also report spectra of the bacteria Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, and Yersinia rhodei along with band assignments determined from the reference spectra obtained.

  4. Seasonal and spatial changes of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Bi, Xinhui; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations and compositions of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles from typical urban, suburban and forest park sites of Guangzhou were determined in this study. The free form of organic acids (solvent extractable) in aerosols in Guangzhou varied with site and season. The suburban samples contained the highest contents of alkanoic, alkenoic and dicarboxylic acids. These findings were consistent with a higher supply of hydrocarbons and NOx in the suburban area. However, concentrations of aromatic acids were similar in the urban, suburban and forest park sites. Generally, winter season samples of the acids from anthropogenic sources contained more organic acids than summer season samples due to stronger removal by wet deposition in the summer. For the acids from botanic sources, the summer season samples were higher. In addition to the free acids, bound acids (solvent non-extractable) mainly formed by esterification of free acids were also found in the samples. In general, bound acids were higher than free acids. Esterification is mainly controlled by the pKa of organic acids and the atmospheric pH value. This explains why aromatic and dicarboxylic acids occur mainly as bound forms and why the samples from urban sites contained high levels of bound acids as the pH of rain water can reach 4.53. Concentrations of alkanoic and alkenoic acids in the aerosols of Guangzhou were much higher than those in the other areas studied.

  5. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Steve J.; Stout, Jake M.; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2–C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity. PMID:22802619

  6. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed. PMID:27043733

  7. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during the Summer in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Yu, H.; Weech, D.; Haller, G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; McGraw, R. L.; Kanawade, V. P.; Lee, S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and because of the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During the 2011 (July - August) Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period in Long Island, New York, we have measured aerosol number concentrations down to 1 nm with a particle size magnifier (a new technique developed by Airmodus to detect sub-3nm particles), aerosol size distributions larger than 3 nm with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), and concentrations of sulfuric acid (a key aerosol precursor) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), along with a number of atmospheric trace gases and micron and sub-micron size particles. There were several different types of airmasses in our observation site during the summer, including long-range transported polluted or less polluted continental airmasses and relatively clean marine airmasses, mixed with local biogenic emissions. Our observation results show a very similar diurnal trend of sulfuric acid and total aerosol concentrations down to 1 nm during the daytime, consistent with our recent laboratory studies of sulfuric acid-ammonia-amine-water multicomponent nucleation that the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm particles is largely due to sulfuric acid. However, the rise of sub-3 nm particle concentrations didn't always lead to NPF events characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. Additionally, there were also unexpected rises of sub-3 nm particles during the nighttime, with no sulfuric acid and when there were no NPF events. These results provide unique observation data needed to understand the atmospheric NPF processes in this observation site.

  8. Phase identification of quasi-periodic flow measured by particle image velocimetry with a low sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chong; Wang, Hongping; Wang, Jinjun

    2013-05-01

    This work mainly deals with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) time coefficient method used for extracting phase information from quasi-periodic flow. The mathematical equivalence between this method and the traditional cross-correlation method is firstly proved. A two-dimensional circular cylinder wake flow measured by time-resolved particle image velocimetry within a range of Reynolds numbers is then used to evaluate the reliability of this method. The effect of both the sampling rate and Reynolds number on the identification accuracy is finally discussed. It is found that the POD time coefficient method provides a convenient alternative for phase identification, whose feasibility in low-sampling-rate measurement has additional advantages for experimentalists.

  9. Identification of inelastic parameters based on deep drawing forming operations using a global-local hybrid Particle Swarm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Miguel; Luersen, Marco A.; Muñoz-Rojas, Pablo A.; Trentin, Robson G.

    2016-04-01

    Application of optimization techniques to the identification of inelastic material parameters has substantially increased in recent years. The complex stress-strain paths and high nonlinearity, typical of this class of problems, require the development of robust and efficient techniques for inverse problems able to account for an irregular topography of the fitness surface. Within this framework, this work investigates the application of the gradient-based Sequential Quadratic Programming method, of the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex algorithm, of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), and of a global-local PSO-Nelder-Mead hybrid scheme to the identification of inelastic parameters based on a deep drawing operation. The hybrid technique has shown to be the best strategy by combining the good PSO performance to approach the global minimum basin of attraction with the efficiency demonstrated by the Nelder-Mead algorithm to obtain the minimum itself.

  10. Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopic identification of dispersant/particle bonding mechanisms in functional inks.

    PubMed

    Deiner, L Jay; Farjami, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    In additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, material is deposited drop by drop, to create micron to macroscale layers. A typical inkjet ink is a colloidal dispersion containing approximately ten components including solvent, the nano to micron scale particles which will comprise the printed layer, polymeric dispersants to stabilize the particles, and polymers to tune layer strength, surface tension and viscosity. To rationally and efficiently formulate such an ink, it is crucial to know how the components interact. Specifically, which polymers bond to the particle surfaces and how are they attached? Answering this question requires an experimental procedure that discriminates between polymer adsorbed on the particles and free polymer. Further, the method must provide details about how the functional groups of the polymer interact with the particle. In this protocol, we show how to employ centrifugation to separate particles with adsorbed polymer from the rest of the ink, prepare the separated samples for spectroscopic measurement, and use Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for accurate determination of dispersant/particle bonding mechanisms. A significant advantage of this methodology is that it provides high level mechanistic detail using only simple, commonly available laboratory equipment. This makes crucial data available to almost any formulation laboratory. The method is most useful for inks composed of metal, ceramic, and metal oxide particles in the range of 100 nm or greater. Because of the density and particle size of these inks, they are readily separable with centrifugation. Further, the spectroscopic signatures of such particles are easy to distinguish from absorbed polymer. The primary limitation of this technique is that the spectroscopy is performed ex-situ on the separated and dried particles as opposed to the particles in dispersion. However, results from attenuated total reflectance spectra of the wet separated

  11. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  12. Dynamics of sinking particles in northern Japan trench in the western North Pacific: biogenic chemical components and fatty acids biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, K. H.; Noriki, S.; Itou, M.; Tsunogai, S.

    Biogenic opal was predominant component, and had strongly positive correlation with organic carbon in both traps. The average atomic ratios of biogenic opal and calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) were also large (7.1 and 11 in the shallow and deep trap, respectively) and the highest ratio was found in May 1995, when the biogenic opal proportion (%) to the total particle flux and C org/C inorg ratio increased concomitantly. However, transient switching of the biogenic opal and CaCO 3 ratios (0.6 and 0.8) was observed in winter 1995, which seems to be related to a warm-core ring developed in the northwestern Pacific. Downward fluxes of fatty acids as molecular markers were determined and compared with major biogenic chemical components in sinking particles. As a diatom index of fatty acids, the 16:1(n-7)/16:0 ratio is positively related to biogenic opal contribution (%) to the sinking particles in the shallow and deep traps. 20:5(n-3) proportion (%) was also correlated with opal content (%) in sinking particles in the 1-km trap. In addition, a major source of sinking fatty acids in the western North Pacific might be characterized by algal fatty acids as a diatom marker (16:1(n-7)), comparing to a zooplankton fatty acid (18:1(n-9)) in the central North Pacific and fecal pellets and coccolithophores in the eastern North Pacific, respectively. Also, PUFA index (a measure of polyunsaturated fatty acids contribution to the total fatty acids) correlated well with Chl a inventory in surface 0-50 m water. These results suggest that undegraded diatomaceous fatty acids are present in sinking particles, and the composition of fatty acids is useful to understand the origin of sinking organic particles.

  13. Identification of a new sulfonic acid metabolite of metolachlor in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Yockel, M.E.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Williams, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    An ethanesulfonic acid metabolite of metolachlor (metolachlor ESA) was identified in soil-sample extracts by negative-ion, fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) and FAB tandem mass spectrometry (FAB-MS/MS). Production fragments from MS/MS analysis of the deprotonated molecular ion of metolachlor ESA in the soil extract can be reconciled with the structure of the synthesized standard. The elemental compositions of the (M - H)- ions of the metolachlor ESA standard and the soil-sample extracts were confirmed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. A dissipation study revealed that metolachlor ESA is formed in soil under field conditions corresponding to a decrease in the concentration of the parent herbicide, metolachlor. The identification of the sulfonated metabolite of metolachlor suggests that the glutathione conjugation pathway is a common detoxification pathway shared by chloroacetanilide herbicides.

  14. Modeling and parameters identification of 2-keto-L-gulonic acid fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jibin; Yuan, Jingqi

    2015-04-01

    This article presents a modeling approach for industrial 2-keto-L-gulonic acid (2-KGA) fed-batch fermentation by the mixed culture of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare (K. vulgare) and Bacillus megaterium (B. megaterium). A macrokinetic model of K. vulgare is constructed based on the simplified metabolic pathways. The reaction rates obtained from the macrokinetic model are then coupled into a bioreactor model such that the relationship between substrate feeding rates and the main state variables, e.g., the concentrations of the biomass, substrate and product, is constructed. A differential evolution algorithm using the Lozi map as the random number generator is utilized to perform the model parameters identification, with the industrial data of 2-KGA fed-batch fermentation. Validation results demonstrate that the model simulations of substrate and product concentrations are well in coincidence with the measurements. Furthermore, the model simulations of biomass concentrations reflect principally the growth kinetics of the two microbes in the mixed culture. PMID:25348654

  15. Application of molecular methods for routine identification of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    González, Angel; Guillamón, José Manuel; Mas, Albert; Poblet, Montse

    2006-04-15

    Recently many new species of Acetic acid Bacteria have been described. The description and identification as new species was based on molecular techniques (sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, DNA base ratio (% GC) determinations and DNA-DNA hybridisation) and phenotypic characterization. In the present paper, we propose a fast and reliable method for the identification most of the species currently described based on the RFLP-PCR of the 16S rRNA. According to the proposed protocol, 1 species can be identified with the use of a single enzyme, 13 with a combination of 2 enzymes, 2 species with a combination of 3 enzymes, 2 with a combination of 4 enzymes. To differentiate 5 more species RFLP-PCR of the ITS was also needed, after using 3 enzymes. Finally, a pair of species (Acetobacter pasteurianus and Acetobacter pomorum) could not be distinguished with the proposed method. However, doubts can be raised about their differentiation as separate species. Keeping these limitations in mind, the method is fast and reliable, allowing the processing of large number of samples in relatively short periods of time (less than 24 h after the isolation). PMID:16386324

  16. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  17. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  18. Hygroscopic Properties of Internally Mixed Particles Composed of NaCl and Water-Soluble Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Suman; Wang, Bingbing; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric aging of naturally emitted marine aerosol often leads to formation of internally mixed particles composed of sea salts and water soluble organic compounds of anthropogenic origin. Mixing of sea salt and organic components has profound effects on the evolving chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of the resulted particles, which are poorly understood. Here, we have studied chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated NaCl particles mixed with malonic acid (MA) and glutaric acid (GA) at different molar ratios using micro-FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray elemental microanalysis.Hygroscopic properties of inte rnally mixed NaCl and organic acid particles were distinctly different from pure components and varied significantly with the type and amount of organic compound present. Experimental results were in a good agreement with the AIM modeling calculations of gas/liquid/solid partitioning in studied systems. X-ray elemental microanalysis of particles showed that Cl/Na ratio decreased with increasing organic acid component in the particles with MA yielding lower ratios relative to GA. We attribute the depletion of chloride to the formation of Na-malonate and Na-glutarate salts resulted by HCl evaporation from dehydrating particles.

  19. Hygroscopic properties of internally mixed particles composed of NaCl and water-soluble organic acids.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Suman; Wang, Bingbing; Tivanski, Alexei; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric aging of naturally emitted marine aerosol often leads to formation of internally mixed particles composed of sea salts and water-soluble organic compounds of anthropogenic origin. Mixing of sea salt and organic components has profound effects on the evolving chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of the resulted particles, which are poorly understood. Here, we have studied chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated NaCl particles mixed with malonic acid (MA) and glutaric acid (GA) at different molar ratios using micro-FTIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray elemental microanalysis. Hygroscopic properties of internally mixed NaCl and organic acid particles were distinctly different from pure components and varied significantly with the type and amount of organic compound present. Experimental results were in a good agreement with the AIM modeling calculations of gas/liquid/solid partitioning in studied systems. X-ray elemental microanalysis of particles showed that Cl/Na ratio decreased with increasing organic acid component in the particles with MA yielding lower ratios relative to GA. We attribute the depletion of chloride to the formation of sodium malonate and sodium glutarate salts resulted by HCl evaporation from dehydrating particles. PMID:24437520

  20. Direct Measurement of pH in Individual Particles via Raman Microspectroscopy and Variation in Acidity with Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Rindelaub, Joel D; Craig, Rebecca L; Nandy, Lucy; Bondy, Amy L; Dutcher, Cari S; Shepson, Paul B; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-02-18

    Atmospheric aerosol acidity is an important characteristic of aqueous particles, which has been linked to the formation of secondary organic aerosol by catalyzing reactions of oxidized organic compounds that have partitioned to the particle phase. However, aerosol acidity is difficult to measure and traditionally estimated using indirect methods or assumptions based on composition. Ongoing disagreements between experiments and thermodynamic models of particle acidity necessitate improved fundamental understanding of pH and ion behavior in high ionic strength atmospheric particles. Herein, Raman microspectroscopy was used to determine the pH of individual particles (H2SO4+MgSO4) based on sulfate and bisulfate concentrations determined from νs(SO4(2-)) and νs(HSO4(-)), the acid dissociation constant, and activity coefficients from extended Debye-Hückel calculations. Shifts in pH and peak positions of νs(SO4(2-)) and νs(HSO4(-)) were observed as a function of relative humidity. These results indicate the potential for direct spectroscopic determination of pH in individual particles and the need to improve fundamental understanding of ion behavior in atmospheric particles. PMID:26745214

  1. Unambiguous identification of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles through quantitative susceptibility mapping of the nonlinear response to magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Wong, Richard; Prince, Martin; Wang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles generate signal void regions on gradient echo images due to their strong magnetization. In practice, the signal void region might be indistinguishable from that generated by air. However, the response of SPIO to an externally applied magnetic field is non-linear. Magnetization of SPIO saturates at around 1 Tesla while magnetization of water and air increase linearly with field strength. Phantom experiment and mice experiments demonstrated the feasibility of a non-ambiguous identification of superparamagnetic contrast agents. PMID:20688448

  2. Results of the two-dimensional particle identification analysis applied for the RICH in the DELPHI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polok, G.

    1999-08-01

    The Cherenkov radiation is fully described by two variables Θ and φ, polar and azimuthal angles, respectively. In all published methods the azimuthal angle φ is completely neglected. We want to suggest that one can profit using the φ angle as additional aid in the particle identification procedure. For the first time, two-dimensional analysis results, taking into account not only both angles but also their errors, are presented. The two-dimensional method based on the Lagrange technique couples together the constraint equation and the minimization function and leads to the correct probability estimation. The principles and advantages of the proposed method are presented.

  3. The effect of fatty acid surfactants on the uptake of ozone to aqueous halogenide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvière, A.; Ammann, M.

    2010-12-01

    The reactive uptake of ozone to deliquesced potassium iodide aerosol particles coated with linear saturated fatty acids (C9, C12, C15, C18 and C20) was studied. The experiments were performed in an aerosol flow tube at 293 K and atmospheric pressure. The uptake coefficient on pure deliquesced KI aerosol was γ = (1.10±0.20)×10-2 at 72-75% relative humidity. In presence of organic coatings, the uptake coefficient decreased significantly for long straight chain surfactants (≥C15), while it was only slightly reduced for the short ones (C9, C12). We linked the kinetic results to the monolayer properties of the surfactants, and specifically to the expected phase state of the monolayer formed (liquid expanded or liquid condensed state). The results showed a decrease of the uptake coefficient by 30% for C12, 85% for C15 and 50% for C18 in presence of a monolayer of a fatty acid at the equilibrium spreading pressure at the air/water interface. The variation among C12, C15 and C18 follows the density of the monolayer at equilibrium spreading pressure, which is highest for the C15 fatty acid. We also investigated the effect of organic films to mixed deliquesced aerosol composed of a variable mixture of KI and NaCl, which allowed determining the resistance exerted to O3 at the aqueous surface by the two longer chained surfactants pentadecanoic acid (C15) and stearic acid (C18). For these, the probability that a molecule hitting the surface is actually transferred to the aqueous phase underneath was βC15=6.8×10-4 and βC18 = 3.3×10-4, respectively. Finally, the effect of two-component coatings, consisting of a mixture of long and short chained surfactants, was studied qualitatively.

  4. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol. PMID:26226053

  5. Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Acetaminophen, Acetylsalicylic Acid, and Caffeine in Commercial Analgesic Tablets by LC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenk, Christopher J.; Hickman, Nicole M.; Fincke, Melissa A.; Motry, Douglas H.; Lavine, Barry

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate LC-MS experiment is described for the identification and quantitative determination of acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, and caffeine in commercial analgesic tablets. This inquiry-based experimental procedure requires minimal sample preparation and provides good analytical results. Students are provided sufficient background…

  6. Biogenic iodine emissions and identification of end-products in coastal ultrafine particles during nucleation bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MäKelä, J. M.; Hoffmann, T.; Holzke, C.; VäKevä, M.; Suni, T.; Mattila, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Tapper, U.; Kauppinen, E. I.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2002-10-01

    Ultrafine particles sampled during new particle formation bursts observed in the coastal zone were studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and elemental analysis using energy-dispersive X ray (EDX). It was observed that both iodine and sulphur were present in the new particles with diameter below 10 mn. Gaseous emissions of halogen compounds from seaweeds were also measured at the same location during low-tide particle nucleation episodes. Based on the presence of iodine in the particle phase during low-tide nucleation bursts, and the significant emission of iodine compounds from the seaweeds during these periods, it is apparent that part of the biogenic iodine species emitted from the seaweeds end up in the ultrafine particulate phase. It was not possible to quantitatively determine the iodine content in the particles; however, in most cases the relative contribution from iodine and sulphate was similar, while some cases indicated no sulphate. On larger sized particles the contribution of sulphate was significantly higher than iodine. It appears that the condensable species leading to the appearance of new particles in the coastal atmosphere is an iodine species. Whether or not this iodine species also participates in the nucleation of new stable clusters could not be completely verified.

  7. Identification of platinum and palladium particles emitted from vehicles and dispersed into the surface environment.

    PubMed

    Prichard, Hazel M; Fisher, Peter C

    2012-03-20

    Platinum, palladium, and rhodium are emitted from vehicle catalytic converters. Until now, the form of precious metal particles in road dust and urban waste has not been identified. This study has located, imaged, and analyzed these particles in road dust and gully waste. Two fragments of catalytic converter have been observed in road dust. They are 40-80 μm in size and covered in many minute particles (<0.3 μm) of either platinum with minor rhodium or palladium. One fragment identified in gully sediment is smaller, 25 μm in diameter, hosting only one attached particle of palladium with minor rhodium. As fragments are washed off roads they begin to disintegrate and the precious metals become detached. Also precious metal-bearing particles have been located in incinerated sewage ash including a 20 μm diameter cluster of <3 μm sized platinum particles that may be the remains of a catalytic converter fragment that has survived incineration. The form of these precious metal-bearing particles described here reveals that as they are dispersed from roads they are likely to be present predominantly as two particle sizes. Either they are attached to larger fragments of catalytic converter or they are released as individual detached tiny <0.3 μm to nanoparticle sizes. PMID:22313190

  8. Particle size, charge and colloidal stability of humic acids coprecipitated with Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Angelico, Ruggero; Ceglie, Andrea; He, Ji-Zheng; Liu, Yu-Rong; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Colombo, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a colloidal character whose size and negative charge are strictly dependent on surface functional groups. They are able to complex large amount of poorly ordered iron (hydr)oxides in soil as a function of pH and other environmental conditions. Accordingly, with the present study we intend to assess the colloidal properties of Fe(II) coprecipitated with humic acids (HA) and their effect on Fe hydroxide crystallinity under abiotic oxidation and order of addition of both Fe(II) and HA. TEM, XRD and DRS experiments showed that Fe-HA consisted of Ferrihydrite with important structural variations. DLS data of Fe-HA at acidic pH showed a bimodal size distribution, while at very low pH a slow aggregation process was observed. Electrophoretic zeta-potential measurements revealed a negative surface charge for Fe-HA macromolecules, providing a strong electrostatic barrier against aggregation. Under alkaline conditions HA chains swelled, which resulted in an enhanced stabilization of the colloid particles. The increasing of zeta potential and size of the Fe-HA macromolecules, reflects a linear dependence of both with pH. The increase in the size and negative charge of the Fe-HA precipitate seems to be more affected by the ionization of the phenolic acid groups, than by the carboxylic acid groups. The main cause of negative charge generation of Fe/HA is due to increased dissociation of phenolic groups in more expanded structure. The increased net negative surface potential induced by coprecipitation with Ferrihydrite and the correspondent changes in configuration of the HA could trigger the inter-particle aggregation with the formation of new negative surface. The Fe-HA coprecipitation can reduce electrosteric repulsive forces, which in turn may inhibit the aggregation process at different pH. Therefore, coprecipitation of Ferrihydrite would be expected to play an important role in the carbon stabilization and persistence not only in organic soils, but

  9. Detection and Identification: Instrumentation and Calibration for Air/Liquid/Surface-borne Nanoscale Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tsz Yan; Zuo, Zhili; Pui, David Y. H.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoscale particles can be found in the air-borne, liquid-borne and surface-borne dispersed phases. Measurement techniques for nanoscale particles in all three dispersed phases are needed for the environmental, health and safety studies of nanomaterials. We present our studies on connecting the nanoparticle measurements in different phases to enhance the characterization capability. Microscopy analysis for particle morphology can be performed by depositing air-borne or liquid-borne nanoparticles on surfaces. Detection limit and measurement resolution of the liquid-borne nanoparticles can be enhanced by aerosolizing them and taking advantage of the well-developed air-borne particle analyzers. Sampling electrically classified air-borne virus particles with a gelatin filter provides higher collection efficiency than a liquid impinger.

  10. The effect of fatty acid surfactants on the uptake of ozone to aqueous halogenide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvière, A.; Ammann, M.

    2010-06-01

    The reactive uptake of ozone to deliquesced potassium iodide aerosol particles coated with linear saturated fatty acids (C9, C12, C15, C18 and C20) as surfactants was studied. The experiments were performed in an aerosol flow tube at 293 K and atmospheric pressure. The uptake coefficient on pure deliquesced KI aerosol was γ=(1.10±0.20)×10-2 at 72-75% relative humidity. In presence of organic coatings, the uptake coefficient decreased significantly for long straight chain surfactants (>C15), while it was only slightly reduced for the short ones (C9, C12). We linked the kinetic results to the monolayer properties of the surfactants, and specifically to the phase state of the monolayer formed (liquid expanded or liquid condensed state). We also investigated the effect of organic films to mixed deliquesced aerosol composed of a variable mixture of KI and NaCl, which allowed determining the resistance exerted to O3 at the aqueous surface by the two longer chained surfactants pentadecanoic acid (C15) and stearic acid (C18). Finally, the effect of two-component coatings, consisting of a mixture of long and short chained surfactants, was also studied.

  11. LC/MS/MS identification of some folic acid degradation products after E-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, M. M.; Marchioni, E.; Zhao, M.; Kuntz, F.; Di Pascoli, T.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Bergaentzle, M.

    2012-08-01

    Folates belong to the B vitamin group based on the parental compound folic acid (FA). They are involved in important biochemical processes like DNA synthesis and repair. FA is composed of a pteridine ring, p-aminobenzoic acid and glutamate moieties. The human metabolism is not able to synthesize folates and therefore obtain them from diet. FA, a synthetic vitamin, is used as a food fortificant because of its low price, relative stability and increased bioavailability compared to natural folate forms. FA is known to be a sensitive compound easily degradable in aqueous solution by ultraviolet and visible light towards various by-products. Irradiation is a process for preservation of foods that uses accelerated electrons, gamma rays or X-rays. Irradiation is proposed for the treatment of various food products, eliminating or reducing pathogens and insects, increasing the storage time and replacing chemical fumigants. This study concerns the identification of degradation products of FA after E-beam irradiation. FA aqueous solutions were irradiated with a Van de Graaff electrons beam accelerator (2 MeV, 100 μA current, 20 cm scan width, dose rate about 2 kGy/s). Applied doses were between 0 (control) and 10.0 kGy. Absorbed doses were monitored with FWT 60.00 radiochromic dosimeters.

  12. Identification of immunoglobulins using Chou's pseudo amino acid composition with feature selection technique.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hua; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-04-01

    Immunoglobulins, also called antibodies, are a group of cell surface proteins which are produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance (called antigen). They play key roles in many medical, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. Correct identification of immunoglobulins is crucial to the comprehension of humoral immune function. With the avalanche of protein sequences identified in postgenomic age, it is highly desirable to develop computational methods to timely identify immunoglobulins. In view of this, we designed a predictor called "IGPred" by formulating protein sequences with the pseudo amino acid composition into which nine physiochemical properties of amino acids were incorporated. Jackknife cross-validated results showed that 96.3% of immunoglobulins and 97.5% of non-immunoglobulins can be correctly predicted, indicating that IGPred holds very high potential to become a useful tool for antibody analysis. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a web-server for IGPred was established at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/IGPred. We believe that the web-server will become a powerful tool to study immunoglobulins and to guide related experimental validations. PMID:26883492

  13. Rapid glutamic acid decarboxylase test for identification of Bacteroides and Clostridium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Jilly, B J; Schreckenberger, P C; LeBeau, L J

    1984-01-01

    A rapid 4-h test for glutamic acid decarboxylase is described for the identification of certain anaerobic bacteria. The test substrate consisted of 1.0 g of L-glutamic acid, 0.3 ml of Triton X-155, and 0.05 g of bromcresol green sodium salt in 1 liter of water. The substrate was dispensed in 0.5-ml amounts into test tubes, and a turbid suspension was made with the test organism. The test was then incubated aerobically at 35 degrees C for 4 h. The development of a blue color was considered positive. A total of 345 strains of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria were tested. All isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis. Clostridium perfringens, and Clostridium sordellii gave a positive reaction. Some isolates of Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides vulgatus were also positive. The use of this rapid test in conjunction with other rapid methods, such as the spot indol test, will enable laboratory workers to report these pathogens on the same day on which an inoculum of pure culture growth on agar is available. PMID:6376535

  14. Comparative gene identification 58/α/β hydrolase domain 5 lacks lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Derek; Dinh, Anna; Kurz, Daniel; Shah, Dharika; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.; Brasaemle, Dawn L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58)/α/β hydrolase domain 5 (ABHD5) cause Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, characterized by excessive triacylglycerol storage in cells and tissues. CGI-58 has been identified as a coactivator of adipose TG lipase (ATGL) and a lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT). We developed a molecular model of CGI-58 structure and then mutated predicted active site residues and performed LPAAT activity assays of recombinant WT and mutated CGI-58. When mutations of predicted catalytic residues failed to reduce LPAAT activity, we determined that LPAAT activity was due to a bacterial contaminant of affinity purification procedures, plsC, the sole LPAAT in Escherichia coli. Purification protocols were optimized to reduce plsC contamination, in turn reducing LPAAT activity. When CGI-58 was expressed in SM2-1(DE3) cells that lack plsC, lysates lacked LPAAT activity. Additionally, mouse CGI-58 expressed in bacteria as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein and human CGI-58 expressed in yeast lacked LPAAT activity. Previously reported lipid binding activity of CGI-58 was revisited using protein-lipid overlays. Recombinant CGI-58 failed to bind lysophosphatidic acid, but interestingly, bound phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] and phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate [PI(5)P]. Prebinding CGI-58 with PI(3)P or PI(5)P did not alter its coactivation of ATGL in vitro. In summary, purified recombinant CGI-58 that is functional as an ATGL coactivator lacks LPAAT activity. PMID:24879803

  15. Advantages of core-shell particle columns in Sequential Injection Chromatography for determination of phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Chocholouš, Petr; Vacková, Jana; Srámková, Ivana; Satínský, Dalibor; Solich, Petr

    2013-01-15

    Currently, for Sequential Injection Chromatography (SIC), only reversed phase C18 columns have been used for chromatographic separations. This article presents the first use of three different stationary phases: three core-shell particle-packed reversed phase columns in flow systems. The aim of this work was to extend the chromatographic capabilities of the SIC system. Despite the particle-packed columns reaching system pressures of ≤ 610 PSI, their conditions matched those of a commercially produced and optimised SIC system (SIChrom™ (FIAlab(®), USA)) with a 8-port high-pressure selection valve and medium-pressure Sapphire™ syringe pump with a 4 mL reservoir and maximum system pressure of ≤ 1000 PSI. The selectivity of each of the tested columns, Ascentis(®) Express RP-Amide, Ascentis(®) Express Phenyl-Hexyl and Ascentis(®) Express C18 (30 mm × 4.6mm, core-shell particle size 2.7 μm), was compared by their ability to separate seven phenolic acids that are secondary metabolite substances widely distributed in plants. The separations of all of the components were performed by isocratic elution using binary mobile phases composed of acetonitrile and 0.065% phosphoric acid at pH 2.4 (a specific ratio was used for each column) at a flow-rate of 0.60 mL/min. The volume of the mobile phase was 3.8 mL for each separation. The injection volume of the sample was 10 μL for each separation. The UV detection wavelengths were set to 250, 280 and 325 nm. The RP-Amide column provided the highest chromatographic resolution and allowed for complete baseline separation of protocatechuic, syringic, vanillic, ferulic, sinapinic, p-coumaric and o-coumaric acids. The Phenyl-Hexyl and C18 columns were unable to completely separate the tested mixture, syringic and vanillic acid and ferulic and sinapinic acids could not be separated from one another. The analytical parameters were a LOD of 0.3 mg L(-1), a LOQ of 1.0 mg L(-1), a calibration range of 1.0-50.0 (100.0) mg L(-1

  16. Competition between Displacement and Dissociation of a Strong Acid Compared to a Weak Acid Adsorbed on Silica Particle Surfaces: The Role of Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Tang, Mingjin; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-16

    The adsorption of nitric (HNO3) and formic (HCOOH) acids on silica particle surfaces and the effect of adsorbed water have been investigated at 296 K using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Under dry conditions, both nitric and formic acids adsorb reversibly on silica. Additionally, the FTIR spectra show that both of these molecules remain in the protonated form. At elevated relative humidities (RH), adsorbed water competes both for surface adsorption sites with these acids as well as promotes their dissociation to hydronium ions and the corresponding anions. Compared to HNO3, the extent of dissociation is much smaller for HCOOH, very likely because it is a weaker acid. This study provides valuable insights into the interaction of HNO3 and HCOOH with silica surface on the molecular level and further reveals the complex roles of surface-adsorbed water in atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust particles-many of these containing silica. PMID:27220375

  17. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

  18. Multivariable wavelet finite element-based vibration model for quantitative crack identification by using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingwu; Gao, Robert X.; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Sun, Chuang; Yang, Zhibo

    2016-08-01

    Crack is one of the crucial causes of structural failure. A methodology for quantitative crack identification is proposed in this paper based on multivariable wavelet finite element method and particle swarm optimization. First, the structure with crack is modeled by multivariable wavelet finite element method (MWFEM) so that the vibration parameters of the first three natural frequencies in arbitrary crack conditions can be obtained, which is named as the forward problem. Second, the structure with crack is tested to obtain the vibration parameters of first three natural frequencies by modal testing and advanced vibration signal processing method. Then, the analyzed and measured first three natural frequencies are combined together to obtain the location and size of the crack by using particle swarm optimization. Compared with traditional wavelet finite element method, MWFEM method can achieve more accurate vibration analysis results because it interpolates all the solving variables at one time, which makes the MWFEM-based method to improve the accuracy in quantitative crack identification. In the end, the validity and superiority of the proposed method are verified by experiments of both cantilever beam and simply supported beam.

  19. Effect of particle size reduction, hydrothermal and fermentation treatments on phytic acid content and some physicochemical properties of wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Majzoobi, Mahsa; Pashangeh, Safoora; Farahnaky, Asgar; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi; Jamalian, Jalal

    2014-10-01

    With the aim of reducing phytic acid content of wheat bran, particle size reduction (from 1,200 to 90 μm), hydrothermal (wet steeping in acetate buffer at pH 4.8 at 55 °C for 60 min) and fermentation (using bakery yeast for 8 h at 30 °C) and combination of these treatments with particle size reduction were applied and their effects on some properties of the bran were studied. Phytic acid content decreased from 50.1 to 21.6, 32.8 and 43.9 mg/g after particle size reduction, hydrothermal and fermentation, respectively. Particle size reduction along with these treatments further reduced phytic acid content up to 76.4 % and 57.3 %, respectively. Hydrothermal and fermentation decreased, while particle size reduction alone or in combination increased bran lightness. With reducing particle size, total, soluble and insoluble fiber content decreased from 69.7 to 32.1 %, 12.2 to 7.9 % and 57.4 to 24.3 %, respectively. The highest total (74.4 %) and soluble (21.4 %) and the lowest insoluble fiber (52.1 %) content were determined for the hydrothermaled bran. Particle size reduction decreased swelling power, water solubility and water holding capacity. Swelling power and water holding capacity of the hydrothermaled and fermented brans were lower, while water solubility was higher than the control. The amount of Fe(+2), Zn(+2) and Ca(+2) decreased with reducing particle size. Fermentation had no effect on Fe(+2)and Zn(+2) but slightly reduced Ca(+2). The hydrothermal treatment slightly decreased these elements. Amongst all, hydrothermal treatment along with particle size reduction resulted in the lowest phytic acid and highest fiber content. PMID:25328222

  20. Identification and functional characterization of genes encoding omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic activities from unicellular microalgae.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, Royah; Napier, Johnathan A; Sayanova, Olga

    2013-12-01

    In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative "front-end" desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4) from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs) in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15). These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in marine microalgae. PMID:24351909

  1. Identification and Functional Characterization of Genes Encoding Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Activities from Unicellular Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Vaezi, Royah; Napier, Johnathan A.; Sayanova, Olga

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative “front-end” desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4) from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs) in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15). These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in marine microalgae. PMID:24351909

  2. A direct comparison of nanosilver particles and nanosilver plates for the oxidation of ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Babak; Meskinfam, Masoumeh

    2012-11-01

    We study of spherical silver nanoparticles of different size and Ag nanoplates were grown at zinc tin oxide (ZTO) surface and characterized using SEM. The application of different electrodes in voltammetry for determination ascorbic acid indicated that oxidation of this biomolecule occurs at these electrodes in diffusion controlled process. Ag nanoplates modified zinc tin oxide electrodes exhibit at least two to three times higher current than spherical nanosilver particles. The observed behavior suggests that Ag nanoplates exhibit higher electrocatalytic activity than spherical silver nanoparticles. The reason for such behavior may be due to lattice plane as well as due to more available surface edges. As dimensions of nanoplates are increased surface area in the case of nanoplates also appears to play a significant role.

  3. Electrophoretic Mobility of Poly(acrylic acid)-Coated Alumina Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhosale, Prasad S.; Chun, Jaehun; Berg, John C.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) adsorption on the electrokinetic behavior of alumina dispersions under high pH conditions was investigated as a function of polymer concentration and molecular weight as well as the presence, concentration and ion type of background electrolyte. Systems of this type are relevant to nuclear waste treatment, in which PAA is known to be an effective rheology modifier. The presence of all but the lowest molecular weight PAA studied (1800) led to decreases in dynamic electrophoretic mobility at low polymer concentrations, attributable to bridging flocculation, as verified by measurements of particle size distribution. Bridging effects increased with polymer molecular weight, and decreased with polymer concentration. Increases in background electrolyte concentration enhanced dynamic electrophoretic mobility as the polymer layers were compressed and bridging was reduced. Such enhancements were reduced as the cation was changed from Na+ to K+ to Cs+.

  4. Uptake of 13N-labeled N2O5 to citric acid aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, Goran; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Birrer, Mario; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Furthermore it's suspected of being a non negligible source of tropospheric Cl, even over continental areas [1,2]. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N delivered by PSI's PROTRAC facility [3] in conjunction with an aerosol flow tube reactor in order to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles. 13NO is mixed with non labeled NO and O3 in a gas reactor where N2O5 is synthesized under dry conditions to prevent hydrolysis on the reactor walls. The resulting N2O5 flow is fed into an aerosol flow tube reactor together with a humidified aerosol flow. By using movable inlets we can vary the length of the aerosol flow tube and thus the reaction time. The gas feed from the reactor is then directed into a narrow parallel plate diffusion denuder system that allows for selective separation of the gaseous species present in the gas phase. Aerosol particles are trapped on a particle filter placed at the end of the denuder system. The activity of 13N labeled species trapped on the denuder plates and in the particle filter can be monitored via scintillation counters. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 27-61.5% RH. The results obtained from our measurements have shown that the uptake coefficient increases with humidity from 1.65±0.3x10-3 (~27% RH) to 1.25±0.3x10-2 (45% RH) and 2.00±0.3x10-2 (61.5% RH). Comparison to literature data shows that this is similar to values reported for some polycarboxylic acids (like malonic acid), while being higher than some others [4]. The increase is likely related to the increasing amount of water associated

  5. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  6. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from <2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3, and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]<0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on

  7. Identification of Phenolic Acids and Flavonoids in Monofloral Honey from Bangladesh by High Performance Liquid Chromatography: Determination of Antioxidant Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Yung An, Chua; Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Hawlader, Mohammad Nurul Islam; Azlan, Siti Amirah Binti Mohd; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the phenolic acids, flavonoids, and antioxidant properties of monofloral honey collected from five different districts in Bangladesh. A new high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a UV detector method was developed for the identification of the phenolic acids and flavonoids. A total of five different phenolic acids were identified, with the most abundant being caffeic acid, benzoic acid, gallic acid, followed by chlorogenic acid and trans-cinnamic acid. The flavonoids, kaempferol, and catechin were most abundant, followed by myricetin and naringenin. The mean moisture content, total sugar content, and color characteristics of the honey samples were 18.36 ± 0.95%, 67.40 ± 5.63 g/100 g, and 129.27 ± 34.66 mm Pfund, respectively. The mean total phenolic acids, total flavonoid content, and proline content were 199.20 ± 135.23, 46.73 ± 34.16, and 556.40 ± 376.86 mg/kg, respectively, while the mean FRAP values and DPPH radical scavenging activity were 327.30 ± 231.87 μM Fe (II)/100 g and 36.95 ± 20.53%, respectively. Among the different types of honey, kalijira exhibited the highest phenolics and antioxidant properties. Overall, our study confirms that all the investigated honey samples are good sources of phenolic acids and flavonoids with good antioxidant properties. PMID:25045696

  8. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  9. Reactivity of Water Soluble Organic Acids with Chloride and Nitrate Particles Investigated by Micro-spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Kelly, S. T.; Shilling, J. E.; Tivanski, A.; Moffet, R.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric particles often consist of a complex organic and inorganic mixture. Interactions between organic and inorganic species may affect particles' chemical and physical properties thus atmospheric chemistry and climate. Water soluble organic acids (WSOA) can contribute a significant fraction of organic materials in condense phase. Inorganic particles, such as sea salt and mineral dust, are main components in the atmosphere and can undergo complex heterogeneous reactions. For example, depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with WSOA resulting in the release gaseous HCl and formation of organic salts. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where acid displacement reactions are mainly driven by the high volatility and evaporation of HNO3 as particles go through dehydration process. Furthermore, secondary organic material (SOM), which contains a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits a similar reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present field and laboratory studies on the reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA/SOM and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis such as computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show various potentials of chloride and nitrate depletion by WSOA and SOM. Formation of corresponding organic salts is confirmed and quantified.

  10. Simultaneous HPTLC analysis of ursolic acid, betulinic acid, stigmasterol and lupeol for the identification of four medicinal plants commonly available in the Indian market as Shankhpushpi.

    PubMed

    Sethiya, Neeraj Kumar; Mishra, Shrihari

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a new, simple, sensitive, selective and precise high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprint and quantitative estimation method for the analysis of ursolic acid, betulinic acid, stigmasterol and lupeol in Shankhpushpi botanicals. Linear ascending development was carried out in a twin trough glass chamber saturated with petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-toluene (7:2:1, v/v/v). The plate was dried, sprayed with anisaldehyde reagent and analyzed by CAMAG TLC scanner III at 580 nm. The system was found to give compact spots for ursolic acid (0.21), betulinic acid (0.29), stigmasterol (0.33) and lupeol (0.50). The relationship between the concentration of standard solutions and the peak response is linear within the concentration range of 100-600 ng/spot for ursolic acid, betulinic acid, stigmasterol and lupeol. The concentration of 134.2 and 146.1 mg of ursolic acid per gram of Clitorea ternatea (CT) and Canscora decussata (CD); 110.6 mg of betulinic acid per gram of EA; 92.75, 154.95, 31.947 and 39.21 mg of stigmasterol per gram of Evolvulus alsinoides (EA), Convolvulus pluricaulis (CP), CT and CD; 30.12 mg of lupeol per gram of CT were found. The proposed HPTLC method may use for routine quality testing and identification of Shankhpushpi botanicals. PMID:25217706

  11. Identification of the fragmentation of brittle particles during compaction process by the acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Hégron, Lise; Sornay, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Some nuclear fuels are currently manufactured by a powder metallurgy process that consists of three main steps, namely preparation of the powders, powder compaction, and sintering of the compact. An optimum between size, shape and cohesion of the particles of the nuclear fuels must be sought in order to obtain a compact with a sufficient mechanical strength, and to facilitate the release of helium and fission gases during irradiation through pores connected to the outside of the pellet after sintering. Being simple to adapt to nuclear-oriented purposes, the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is used to control the microstructure of the compact by monitoring the compaction of brittle Uranium Dioxide (UO2) particles of a few hundred micrometers. The objective is to identify in situ the mechanisms that occur during the UO2 compaction, and more specifically the particle fragmentation that is linked to the open porosity of the nuclear matter. Three zones of acoustic activity, strongly related to the applied stress, can be clearly defined from analysis of the continuous signals recorded during the compaction process. They correspond to particle rearrangement and/or fragmentation. The end of the noteworthy fragmentation process is clearly defined as the end of the significant process that increases the compactness of the material. Despite the fact that the wave propagation strongly evolves during the compaction process, the acoustic signature of the fragmentation of a single UO2 particle and a bed of UO2 particles under compaction is well identified. The waveform, with a short rise time and an exponential-like decay of the signal envelope, is the most reliable descriptor. The impact of the particle size and cohesion on the AE activity, and then on the fragmentation domain, is analyzed through the discrete AE signals. The maximum amplitude of the burst signals, as well as the mean stress corresponding to the end of the recorded AE, increase with increasing mean diameter of

  12. Influence of the active mass particle suspension in electrolyte upon corrosion of negative electrode of a lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Yu.; Shtompel, G.; Ostapenko, E.; Leonov, V.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the suspension of positive active mass particles in the electrolyte on the performance of the negative electrode in a lead-acid battery is studied. A significant increase in the rate of corrosion of the lead electrode is shown when slime particles get in contact with its surface, which may result in the rise of macro-defects on the lugs of the negative electrodes.

  13. Characterization and source identification of sub-micron particles at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheung, K; Ling, Z H; Wang, D W; Wang, Y; Guo, H; Lee, B; Li, Y J; Chan, C K

    2015-09-15

    Particle size distribution measurements were conducted continuously at a 30-second interval using the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) in August, September, November and December of 2011 at a coastal background site in Hong Kong. Concurrent measurements of CO, NOx, O3, SO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were used to determine the causes of high particle number concentration (PNC) events. In all sampling months, PNC were usually higher in the evening, likely resulting from the arrival of upwind air pollutants as wind direction changed in the late afternoon. On the more polluted days, the PNC were usually higher around noon, particularly in August, similar to the diurnal trend of O3. The mode diameter at noon was smaller than in other time periods in all sampling months, further highlighting the role of secondary formation at this urban background site. A prolonged period of pollution episode occurred in late August. High PNC resulted from the arrival of pollution laden air from the PRD region or super regions. In December, new particle formation followed by subsequent growth accounted for most of the polluted days. Overall, meteorology was the most important parameter affecting particle concentrations and formation at this Hong Kong background site. PMID:25965042

  14. GPCR-styrene maleic acid lipid particles (GPCR-SMALPs): their nature and potential.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Mark; Charlton, Jack; Jamshad, Mohammed; Routledge, Sarah J; Bailey, Sian; La-Borde, Penelope J; Azam, Maria T; Logan, Richard T; Bill, Roslyn M; Dafforn, Tim R; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest class of membrane proteins and are an important target for therapeutic drugs. These receptors are highly dynamic proteins sampling a range of conformational states in order to fulfil their complex signalling roles. In order to fully understand GPCR signalling mechanisms it is necessary to extract the receptor protein out of the plasma membrane. Historically this has universally required detergents which inadvertently strip away the annulus of lipid in close association with the receptor and disrupt lateral pressure exerted by the bilayer. Detergent-solubilized GPCRs are very unstable which presents a serious hurdle to characterization by biophysical methods. A range of strategies have been developed to ameliorate the detrimental effect of removing the receptor from the membrane including amphipols and reconstitution into nanodics stabilized by membrane scaffolding proteins (MSPs) but they all require exposure to detergent. Poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) (SMA) incorporates into membranes and spontaneously forms nanoscale poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) lipid particles (SMALPs), effectively acting like a 'molecular pastry cutter' to 'solubilize' GPCRs in the complete absence of detergent at any stage and with preservation of the native annular lipid throughout the process. GPCR-SMALPs have similar pharmacological properties to membrane-bound receptor, exhibit enhanced stability compared with detergent-solubilized receptors and being non-proteinaceous in nature, are fully compatible with downstream biophysical analysis of the encapsulated GPCR. PMID:27068979

  15. Raman scattering investigations of the interaction of a COV with pure and acid doped ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, S.; Oancea, A.; Focsa, C.; Chazallon, B.

    2009-04-01

    Ice present in polar stratosphere is as well a common component of the troposphere, particularly in cirrus clouds widespread in tropopause and upper troposphere region. With water droplets, ice constitutes the condensed matter that can interact with atmospheric trace gases via many different trapping processes (co-deposition i.e; incorporation during growing ice conditions, adsorption, freezing etc). The incorporation of trace gases in ice surface/volume can both affect the atmospheric chemistry and the ice structure and reactivity. This can therefore modify the nature and composition of the incorporated species in ice, or in the gas phase. Recently, field measurements have demonstrated the presence of nitric acid in ice particles from cirrus clouds(1,2) (concentration between 0.63 wt% and 2.5 wt %). Moreover, laboratory experiments have shown that the uptake of atmospheric trace gases can be enhanced up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude in these doped ice particles. Among trace gases capable to interact with atmospheric condensed matter figure volatile organic compounds such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols (ex: ethanol and methanol). They play an important role in the upper troposphere (3,4) and snowpack chemistry (5) as they can be easily photolysed, producing free radicals and so influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone-budget of the atmosphere (3,4). The temperature range at which these physico-chemical processes occur extents between ~ 190 K and 273K. Interaction between ice and trace gases are therefore largely dependent on the ice surface properties as well as on the phase formation dynamic (crystalline or not). This study aims to examine and characterize the incorporation of a COV (ex: ethanol), at the surface or in the volume of ice formed by different growth mechanisms (vapour deposition or droplets freezing). Vibrational spectra of water OH and ethanol CH-spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy at different temperatures

  16. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity. PMID:25330256

  17. Identification of solar nebula condensates in interplanetary dust particles and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloeck, W.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    Orthopyroxene and olivine grains, low in FeO, but containing MnO contents up to 5 wt percent were found in interplanetary dust particles (IDP) collected in the stratosphere. The majority of olivines and pyroxenes in meteorites contain less than 0.5 wt percent MnO. Orthopyroxenes and olivines high in Mn and low in FeO have only been reported from a single coarse grained chondrule rim in the Allende meteorite and from a Tieschitz matrix augite grain. The bulk MnO contents of the extraterrestrial dust particles with high MnO olivines and pyroxenes are close to CI chondrite abundances. High MnO, low FeO olivines and orthopyroxenes were also found in the matrix of Semarkona, an unequilibrated ordinary chondrite. This may indicate a related origin for minerals in extraterrestrial dust particles and in the matrix of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  18. Identification of quantitative trait loci(QTL) controlling important fatty acids in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids play important role in controlling oil quality of peanut. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80%, there are several minor fatty acids accounting for about 20% in peanut oil, such as palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), stearic (S...

  19. Cellular fatty acid composition as an adjunct to the identification of asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods.

    PubMed

    Bernard, K A; Bellefeuille, M; Ewan, E P

    1991-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (CFA) compositions of 561 asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography as an adjunct to their identification when grown on blood agar at 35 degrees C. The organisms could be divided into two groups. In the first group (branched-chain type), which included coryneform CDC groups A-3, A-4, and A-5; some strains of B-1 and B-3; "Corynebacterium aquaticum"; Brevibacterium liquefaciens; Rothia dentocariosa; and Listeria spp., the rods had sizable quantities of antiesopentadecanoic (Ca15:0) and anteisoheptadecanoic (Ca17:0) acids. Other species with these types of CFA included B. acetylicum, which contained large amounts of isotridecanoic (Ci13:0) and anteisotridecanoic (Ca13:0) acids. CFAs useful for distinguishing among Jonesia denitrificans, Oerskovia spp., some strains of CDC groups B-1 and B-3, Kurthia spp., and Propionibacterium avidum were hexadecanoic (C 16:0) acid, isopentadecanoic (Ci15:0) acid, and Ca15:0). The second group (straight-chained type), which included Actinomyces pyogenes; Arcanobacterium haemolyticum; C. bovis; C. cystitidis; C. diphtheriae; C. flavescens, "C. gentalium"; C. jeikeium; C. kutscheri; C. matruchotii; C .minutissimum; C. mycetoides; C. pilosum; C. pseudodiphtheriticum; "C. pseudogenitalium"; C. pseudotuberculosis; C. renale; CDC groups 1, 2, ANF-1, D-2, E, F-1, F-2, G-1, G-2, and I-2; C. striatum; "C. tuberculostearicum"; C. ulcerans; C. vitarumen; C. xerosis; and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, was typified by significant quantities of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and oleic acids (C18:cis9), with differences in the amounts of linoleic acid (C18:2), stearic acid (C18:0), an unnamed peak (equivalent chain length, 14.966), and small quantities of other known saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. CFA composition of these organisms was sufficiently discriminatory to assist in classification but could not be used as the sole means of identification. PMID:1899679

  20. Identification and yield of carbonic acid and formaldehyde in irradiated ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellorusso, Neil; Khanna, R. K.; Moore, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Carbonic acid, (OH)2CO, was tentatively identified in the IR spectrum of a proton irradiated CO2 + H2O ice mixture. In this report, we present additional evidence for a more definitive identification of (OH)2CO with (1) the infrared spectrum of a residue obtained by proton irradiation of CO2 + D2O ice mixture, and (2) the IR spectra of solid phases of formaldehyde (H2CO), acetone (CH3)2CO, and dimethyl carbonate (OCH3)2CO, which are structurally similar to (OH)2CO. IR characteristics (peak frequencies and complex refractive indices of the compounds in point 2) are also reported. In particular, the integrated absorption coefficients for the C-O band for the compounds in point 2 do not vary by more than 20 percent. Based on these values, we estimate the yields of H2CO and (OH)2CO by proton irradiation or ice mixtures. Both H2CO and (OH)2CO are possible irradiation products of cometary and planetary ices.

  1. Identification and yield of carbonic acid and formaldehyde in irradiated ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellorusso, N.; Khanna, R. K.; Moore, M. H.

    1993-03-01

    Carbonic acid, (OH)2CO, was tentatively identified in the IR spectrum of a proton irradiated CO2 + H2O ice mixture. In this report, we present additional evidence for a more definitive identification of (OH)2CO with (1) the infrared spectrum of a residue obtained by proton irradiation of CO2 + D2O ice mixture, and (2) the IR spectra of solid phases of formaldehyde (H2CO), acetone (CH3)2CO, and dimethyl carbonate (OCH3)2CO, which are structurally similar to (OH)2CO. IR characteristics (peak frequencies and complex refractive indices of the compounds in point 2) are also reported. In particular, the integrated absorption coefficients for the C-O band for the compounds in point 2 do not vary by more than 20 percent. Based on these values, we estimate the yields of H2CO and (OH)2CO by proton irradiation or ice mixtures. Both H2CO and (OH)2CO are possible irradiation products of cometary and planetary ices.

  2. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  3. Identification of staphylococci with a self-educating system using fatty acid analysis and biochemical tests.

    PubMed Central

    Behme, R J; Shuttleworth, R; McNabb, A; Colby, W D

    1996-01-01

    We characterized all of the 35 aerobic taxa of the genus Staphylococcus by using an objective, self-learning system combining both whole-cell fatty acid (FA) analysis and the results of 35 biochemical tests. Isolates were compared with the type strain for each taxon to generate an FA profile library and a biochemical table of test responses. Isolates were accepted into the system if they had a similarity index of > or = 0.6 for a taxon within the FA profile library and if they were identified as the same taxon by a computer program using a probability matrix constructed from the biochemical data. These stringent criteria led to acceptance of 1,117 strains assigned to legitimate taxa. Additional FA groups were assembled from selected strains that did not meet the inclusion criteria based on the type strains and were added to the system as separate entries. Currently, 1,512 isolates have bee accepted into the system. This approach has resulted in a comprehensive table of biochemical test results and a FA profile library, which together provide a practical system for valid identifications. PMID:8940451

  4. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  5. Integrated Particle Handling Methods for Multiplexed Microbial Identification and Characterization in Sediments and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Darrell P. Chandler; Ann E. Jarrell; Craig S. Criddle

    2004-03-17

    Molecular methods are still relatively ineffectual for monitoring community dynamics during bioremediation, due primarily to the cost, technical difficulty and retrospective nature of the analyses. For nucleic acid analyses to meaningfully contribute to bioremediation efforts they must not only contribute to the fundamental understanding of microbial ecology, but also be formatted in such a manner that infield analysis can be achieved. The objective of this project is therefore to develop an integrated microbial and nucleic acid detection method and prototype system for the characterization and analysis of subsurface sediments, focusing on the molecular detection of metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria and activity in sediments obtained from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center. We are meeting this objective by combining environmental molecular microbiology with renewable surface techniques, microfluidic systems and microparticle analytical chemistry. The fluidic systems are used to evaluate hypotheses on the integrated biochemistry that is necessary to directly detect 16S rRNA from metal-reducing microbial communities on a suspension microarray, without using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These investigations include the use of peptide nucleic acid capture and detection probes and 'tunable surface' concepts to increase nucleic acid capture and detection efficiency and/or mitigate interferences due to co-extracted humic acids. The unified microparticle sample preparation method and suspension array is then used to characterize the 16S rRNA metal- and sulfate-reducing microbial community in FRC sediments before and after biostimulation.

  6. The AMS experiment--particle identification with the transition radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückel*, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS) is a multi-purpose particle detector designed for operation in space [The AMS collaboration, Alcaraz, J., et al., (2002) "The alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS)", Nucl. Instr. Meth., A 478, 119-122; The AMS collaboration, Alpat, B. (2001) "The alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS) experiment on the international space station", Nucl. Instr. Meth., A 461, 272-274; Battiston, R. (1998) "The alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS)", Nucl. Instr. Meth., A 409, 458-463; Buenerd M (2001) AMS, a particle spectrometer in space. Talk given at the XXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics in Taxco, Mexico].† It will be mounted on the International Space Station† by the end of 2005 as shown in Fig. 1. There it will investigate the primary cosmic particle spectrum undistorted by the earth's atmosphere. About 1011 particles in the energy range up to a few TeV will be analysed for mass, electrical charge and energy. The unpreceded precision and statistics of the data will allow new insights in the physics of cosmic rays, especially in the asymmetry between matter and antimatter and in the nature of dark matter.

  7. Identification of proteolytic cleavage sites within the gag-analogue protein of Ty1 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Martin-Rendon, E; Hurd, D W; Marfany, G; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-12-01

    Like retroviruses, the yeast retrotransposon Ty1 produces its proteins as precursors that are subsequently cleaved by a protease encoded by the element. These cleavage events are essential for transposition as they release the active reverse transcriptase and integrase and they modify the structure of the virus-like particles in a way that is analogous to the morphological changes that occur during retrovirus core maturation. Using a combination of epitope tagging, amino acid analysis and mutagenesis, we have identified the major cleavage sites for the Ty1 protease within the particle-forming protein, p1, at 407S/408N. In addition, we present evidence indicating that the Ty1 protease may be a 17 kDa protein. PMID:8971723

  8. Multifunctional PLGA particles containing poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles and ascorbic acid with simultaneous antioxidative and prolonged antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, Magdalena; Bračko, Ines; Milenković, Marina; Filipović, Nenad; Nunić, Jana; Filipič, Metka; Uskoković, Dragan P

    2014-01-01

    A water-soluble antioxidant (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) was encapsulated together with poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNpPGA) within a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymeric matrix and their synergistic effects were studied. The PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles synthesized by a physicochemical method with solvent/non-solvent systems are spherical, have a mean diameter of 775 nm and a narrow size distribution with a polydispersity index of 0.158. The encapsulation efficiency of AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid within PLGA was determined to be >90%. The entire amount of encapsulated ascorbic acid was released in 68 days, and the entire amount of AgNpPGAs was released in 87 days of degradation. The influence of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid on cell viability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, as well as antimicrobial activity against seven different pathogens was investigated. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay indicated good biocompatibility of these PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles. We measured the kinetics of ROS formation in HepG2 cells by a DCFH-DA assay, and found that PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid caused a significant decrease in DCF fluorescence intensity, which was 2-fold lower than that in control cells after a 5h exposure. This indicates that the PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid microspheres either act as scavengers of intracellular ROS and/or reduce their formation. Also, the results of antimicrobial activity of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid obtained by the broth microdilution method showed superior and extended activity of these particles. The samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential and particle size analysis. This paper presents a new approach to the treatment of infection that at the same time offers a very pronounced antioxidant effect. PMID:23988864

  9. Cloning and identification of the human LPAAT-zeta gene, a novel member of the lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase family.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Yu, Long; Wu, Hai; Shan, Yuxi; Guo, Jinhu; Dang, Yongjun; Wei, Youheng; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2003-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a naturally occurring component of phospholipid and plays a critical role in the regulation of many physiological and pathophysiological processes including cell growth, survival, and pro-angiogenesis. LPA is converted to phosphatidic acid by the action of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT). Five members of the LPAAT gene family have been detected in humans to date. Here, we report the identification of a novel LPAAT member, which is designated as LPAAT-zeta. LPAAT-zeta was predicted to encode a protein consisting of 456 amino acid residues with a signal peptide sequence and the acyltransferase domain. Northern blot analysis showed that LPAAT-zeta was ubiquitously expressed in all 16 human tissues examined, with levels in the skeletal muscle, heart, and testis being relatively high and in the lung being relatively low. The human LPAAT-zeta gene consisted of 13 exons and is positioned at chromosome 8p11.21. PMID:12938015

  10. Identification and Characterization of Linoleic Acid as an Endogenous Modulator of in Vitro N-1-Naphthylphthalamic Acid Binding.

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    An endogenous inhibitor of the in vitro binding of the phytotropin N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid to microsomal membranes was detected in extracts prepared from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyls. Following extensive purification, the inhibitor was identified as linoleic acid. Authentic linoleic acid inhibited N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid binding noncompetitively in a dose-dependent manner, exhibiting a 50% inhibitory concentration of approximately 24 ([mu]M. Using a variety of fatty acids and their derivatives, this inhibition was found to exhibit strict structural requirements, with both linoleic and linolenic acids being the most inhibitory. A variety of membrane-solubilizing detergents elicited no such inhibitory activity when tested at equivalent concentrations. The possible physiological significance of this interaction is discussed and it is proposed that linoleic acid serves as an intracellular modulator of phytotropin binding and therefore polar auxin transport. PMID:12223622

  11. Identification of 53 compounds that block Ebola virus-like particle entry via a repurposing screen of approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Sun, Wei; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Tawa, Gregory; Shinn, Paul; Chen, Catherine Z; Schimmer, Aaron; Sanderson, Philip; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    In light of the current outbreak of Ebola virus disease, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutics to treat Ebola infection, and drug repurposing screening is a potentially rapid approach for identifying such therapeutics. We developed a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) 1536-well plate assay to screen for entry inhibitors of Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP) and the matrix VP40 protein fused to a beta-lactamase reporter protein and applied this assay for a rapid drug repurposing screen of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. We report here the identification of 53 drugs with activity of blocking Ebola VLP entry into cells. These 53 active compounds can be divided into categories including microtubule inhibitors, estrogen receptor modulators, antihistamines, antipsychotics, pump/channel antagonists, and anticancer/antibiotics. Several of these compounds, including microtubule inhibitors and estrogen receptor modulators, had previously been reported to be active in BSL-4 infectious Ebola virus replication assays and in animal model studies. Our assay represents a robust, effective and rapid high-throughput screen for the identification of lead compounds in drug development for the treatment of Ebola virus infection. PMID:26038505

  12. Identification of the energetic-particle driven GAM in the LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Osakabe, M.; Shimizu, A.; Watari, T.; Nishiura, M.; Toi, K.; Ogawa, K.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kato, S.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2015-08-01

    n = 0 modes with frequency chirping have been observed by a heavy ion beam probe and Mirnov coils in the large helical device plasmas, where n is the toroidal mode number. The spatial structures of the electrostatic potential fluctuation and the density fluctuation correspond to those of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The modes are observed only during the tangential neutral beam injection with the energy of 175 keV. The energy spectra of fast ions measured by a neutral particle analyzer implies that the modes are excited by the fast ions through the inverse Landau damping. The absolute values and the temperature dependence of the frequency of the mode can be interpreted by the dispersion relation taking into account the measured energy spectra of the fast ions. Therefore, the observed n = 0 modes are identified as the energetic-particle driven GAM.

  13. Identification of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Through a Combined Measurement of Axial and Scalar Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, G.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Collar, J. I.; Odom, B.

    2007-10-12

    We study the prospects for detecting weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in a number of phenomenological scenarios, with a detector composed of a target simultaneously sensitive to both spin-dependent and spin-independent couplings, as is the case of COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics). First, we show that sensitivity to both couplings optimizes chances of initial WIMP detection. Second, we demonstrate that, in case of detection, a comparison of the signal on two complementary targets, such as in COUPP CF{sub 3}I and C{sub 4}F{sub 10} bubble chambers, allows a significantly more precise determination of the dark matter axial and scalar couplings. This strategy would provide crucial information on the nature of the WIMPs and possibly allow discrimination between neutralino and Kaluza-Klein dark matter.

  14. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27113385

  15. DETERMINATION OF THE STRONG ACIDITY OF ATMOSPHERIC FINE PARTICLES (<2.5 UM) USING ANNULAR DENUDER TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a standardized methodology description for the determination of strong acidity of fine particles (less than 2.5 microns) in ambient air using annular denuder technology. his methodology description includes two parts: art A - Standard Method and Part B - Enhanced M...

  16. Effect of processing methods on the mechanical properties of natural rubber filled with stearic acid modified soy protein particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber was reinforced with stearic acid modified soy protein particles prepared with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber composites. Elastic modulus of the composites increased with the increasing filler concen...

  17. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  18. AMINO ACID COMPOSITION OF SUSPENDED PARTICLES, SEDIMENT-TRAP MATERIAL, AND BENTHIC SEDIMENT IN THE POTOMAC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment trap deployments in estuaries provide a method for estimating the amount of organic material transported to the sediments from the euphotic zone. he amino acid composition of suspended particles, benthic sediment, and sediment-trap material collected at 2.4 m, 5.8 m, and...

  19. Identification and quantification of ozonation products of anthracene and phenanthrene adsorbed on silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraudin, Emilie; Budzinski, Hélène; Villenave, Eric

    Primary products of the reactions of gas-phase ozone with anthracene and phenanthrene adsorbed on silica model particles have been investigated. Silica was selected as proxy for mineral atmospheric particles. The particles, coated with anthracene or phenanthrene and placed on a filter, were exposed in a reaction cell to a gaseous ozone flow. Ozone concentration was constant ((6.0±0.6)×10 13 molecule cm -3) during the experiments. Anthracene, phenanthrene and their ozonation products were then extracted by focused microwave-assisted extraction or fluid pressurized extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Anthraquinone and anthrone on the one hand, and 1,1'-biphenyl-2,2'-dicarboxaldehyde on the other hand were identified as the products of anthracene and phenanthrene, respectively and quantified versus time of ozone exposure. This kinetical approach allowed to show that anthraquinone, anthrone and 1,1'-biphenyl-2,2'-dicarboxaldehyde are the primary products of the studied reactions, and to determine their formation yields (respectively, 0.42±0.04, 0.056±0.005 and 1.0±0.4).

  20. Identification of a Herbal Powder by Deoxyribonucleic Acid Barcoding and Structural Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Bhavisha P.; Thaker, Vrinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Authentic identification of plants is essential for exploiting their medicinal properties as well as to stop the adulteration and malpractices with the trade of the same. Objective: To identify a herbal powder obtained from a herbalist in the local vicinity of Rajkot, Gujarat, using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcoding and molecular tools. Materials and Methods: The DNA was extracted from a herbal powder and selected Cassia species, followed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the rbcL barcode locus. Thereafter the sequences were subjected to National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis, followed by the protein three-dimension structure determination of the rbcL protein from the herbal powder and Cassia species namely Cassia fistula, Cassia tora and Cassia javanica (sequences obtained in the present study), Cassia Roxburghii, and Cassia abbreviata (sequences retrieved from Genbank). Further, the multiple and pairwise structural alignment were carried out in order to identify the herbal powder. Results: The nucleotide sequences obtained from the selected species of Cassia were submitted to Genbank (Accession No. JX141397, JX141405, JX141420). The NCBI BLAST analysis of the rbcL protein from the herbal powder showed an equal sequence similarity (with reference to different parameters like E value, maximum identity, total score, query coverage) to C. javanica and C. roxburghii. In order to solve the ambiguities of the BLAST result, a protein structural approach was implemented. The protein homology models obtained in the present study were submitted to the protein model database (PM0079748-PM0079753). The pairwise structural alignment of the herbal powder (as template) and C. javanica and C. roxburghii (as targets individually) revealed a close similarity of the herbal powder with C. javanica. Conclusion: A strategy as used here, incorporating the integrated use of DNA

  1. Identification and physiological characterization of phosphatidic acid phosphatase enzymes involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP, EC 3.1.3.4) catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidate yielding diacylglycerol (DAG), the lipid precursor for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. Despite the importance of PAP activity in TAG producing bacteria, studies to establish its role in lipid metabolism have been so far restricted only to eukaryotes. Considering the increasing interest of bacterial TAG as a potential source of raw material for biofuel production, we have focused our studies on the identification and physiological characterization of the putative PAP present in the TAG producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. Results We have identified two S. coelicolor genes, named lppα (SCO1102) and lppβ (SCO1753), encoding for functional PAP proteins. Both enzymes mediate, at least in part, the formation of DAG for neutral lipid biosynthesis. Heterologous expression of lppα and lppβ genes in E. coli resulted in enhanced PAP activity in the membrane fractions of the recombinant strains and concomitantly in higher levels of DAG. In addition, the expression of these genes in yeast complemented the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of the PAP deficient strain GHY58 (dpp1lpp1pah1). In S. coelicolor, disruption of either lppα or lppβ had no effect on TAG accumulation; however, the simultaneous mutation of both genes provoked a drastic reduction in de novo TAG biosynthesis as well as in total TAG content. Consistently, overexpression of Lppα and Lppβ in the wild type strain of S. coelicolor led to a significant increase in TAG production. Conclusions The present study describes the identification of PAP enzymes in bacteria and provides further insights on the genetic basis for prokaryotic oiliness. Furthermore, this finding completes the whole set of enzymes required for de novo TAG biosynthesis pathway in S. coelicolor. Remarkably, the overexpression of these PAPs in Streptomyces bacteria contributes to a higher productivity of this single

  2. Identification of Tazarotenic Acid as the First Xenobiotic Substrate of Human Retinoic Acid Hydroxylase CYP26A1 and CYP26B1.

    PubMed

    Foti, Robert S; Isoherranen, Nina; Zelter, Alex; Dickmann, Leslie J; Buttrick, Brian R; Diaz, Philippe; Douguet, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26A1 and 26B1 are heme-containing enzymes responsible for metabolizing all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA). No crystal structures have been solved, and therefore homology models that provide structural information are extremely valuable for the development of inhibitors of cytochrome P450 family 26 (CYP26). The objectives of this study were to use homology models of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 to characterize substrate binding characteristics, to compare structural aspects of their active sites, and to support the role of CYP26 in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Each model was verified by dockingat-RA in the active site and comparing the results to known metabolic profiles ofat-RA. The models were then used to predict the metabolic sites of tazarotenic acid with results verified by in vitro metabolite identification experiments. The CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 homology models predicted that the benzothiopyranyl moiety of tazarotenic acid would be oriented toward the heme of each enzyme and suggested that tazarotenic acid would be a substrate of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1. Metabolite identification experiments indicated that CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 oxidatively metabolized tazarotenic acid on the predicted moiety, with in vitro rates of metabolite formation by CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 being the highest across a panel of enzymes. Molecular analysis of the active sites estimated the active-site volumes of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 to be 918 Å(3)and 977 Å(3), respectively. Overall, the homology models presented herein describe the enzyme characteristics leading to the metabolism of tazarotenic acid by CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 and support a potential role for the CYP26 enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics. PMID:26937021

  3. Microplastic particles in sediments of Lagoon of Venice, Italy: First observations on occurrence, spatial patterns and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, A.; Boldrin, A.; Guerriero, P.; Moschino, V.; Rella, R.; Sturaro, A.; Da Ros, L.

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve knowledge of the identification, distribution and abundances of microplastic particles of 1 mm or less (S-MPPs) in the coastal area of the Mediterranean region, a preliminary monitoring survey was carried out in a transitional environment along the north-eastern Italian coasts, the Lagoon of Venice. S-MPPs were evaluated in sediments collected from 10 sites chosen in shallow areas variously affected by natural conditions and anthropogenic influences (i.e., landward stations influenced by freshwater inputs, seaward areas near sea inlets, and sites influenced by the presence of aquaculture farms, industry and city centers). S-MPPs, extracted from bulk sediments by density separation, were counted and identified by Fourier-Transform Infrared Micro-spectroscopy (μFT-IR). The μFT-IR process included automatic surface chemical mapping and references to an infrared library database to identify the compositional spectra of particles. S-MPPs were recovered from all samples - a fact which emphasizes their extensive distribution throughout the Lagoon. Total abundances varied from 2175 to 672 S-MPPs kg-1 d.w., higher concentrations generally being observed in landward sites. Of the ten polymer types identified, the most abundant, accounting for more than 82% of total S-MPPs, were polyethylene and polypropylene. The most frequent size (93% of observed microplastics) was in the range 30-500 μm. Total S-MPP values were significantly correlated with the finer sediment fraction and with the metal pollution index.

  4. Development of a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) particle vaccine to protect against house dust mite induced allergy.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijaya B; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Jing, Xuefang; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Thorne, Peter S; Salem, Aliasger K

    2014-09-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles carrying antigen and adjuvant is a promising vaccine system which has been shown to stimulate systemic antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we investigated the relationship of (i) the sizes of PLGA particle and (ii) the presence of cytosine-phosphate-guanine motifs (CpG), with the extent and type of immune response stimulated against Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus-2 (Der p2) antigen. Different sizes of PLGA particles encapsulating CpG were prepared using a double emulsion solvent evaporation method. Mice were vaccinated with Der p2 and different sizes of empty or CpG-loaded PLGA particles. Vaccinated mice were exposed to daily intranasal instillation of Der p2 for 10 days followed by euthanization to estimate leukocyte accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids, antibody profiles, and airway hyperresponsiveness. PLGA particles showed a size-dependent decrease in the proportion of eosinophils found in BAL fluids. Mice vaccinated with the Der p2 coated on 9-μm-sized empty PLGA particles showed increased levels of IgE and IgG1 antibodies as well as increased airway hyperresponsiveness. All sizes of PLGA particles encapsulating CpG prevented airway hyperresponsiveness after Der p2 exposures. Inflammatory responses to Der p2 exposure were significantly reduced when smaller PLGA particles were used for vaccination. In addition, encapsulating CpG in PLGA particles increased IgG2a secretion. This study shows that the size of PLGA particles used for vaccination plays a major role in the prevention of house dust mite-induced allergy and that incorporation of CpG into the PLGA particles preferentially develops a Th1-type immune response. PMID:24981892

  5. Design and evaluation of inhalable chitosan-modified poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanocomposite particles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingshi; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Kurashima, Homare; Takeuchi, Hirofumi; Yokoyama, Toyokazu; Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Yoshiaki

    2012-08-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate two types of chitosan-modified poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanocomposite particles containing salmon calcitonin for pulmonary delivery, which were obtained using spray drying fluidized bed granulation (Agglomaster™) and dry powder coating techniques (Mechanofusion™), respectively. The physicochemical properties, pulmonary distribution, pulmonary clearance rate as well as in vivo hypocalcemia actions of the two types of nanocomposite particles were investigated. As indicated by scanning electron micrographs, soft matrix nanocomposite particles and soft ordered nanocomposite particles were produced by Agglomaster™ and Mechanofusion™, respectively. Both forms of chitosan-modified PLGA nanocomposite particles exhibited a high inhalation efficiency, i.e. more than 50% of the two types of nanocomposite particles could be deposited in the deep lung of male Wistar rats. However, the chitosan-modified PLGA nanocomposite particles designed by Agglomaster™ exhibited superior properties to those obtained by Mechanofusion™ with respect to the redispersibility of fine particles in aqueous liquid, the pulmonary retention time and pharmacological effects. In addition, compared with non-modified PLGA nanocomposite particles, the chitosan-modified PLGA nanocomposite particles obtained by Agglomaster™ exhibited enhanced pulmonary absorption of salmon calcitonin via the lung. The findings in this study suggest that the spray drying fluidized bed granulation technique is superior to the dry powder coating technique for producing chitosan-modified dry powder formulations containing salmon calcitonin for inhalation. This can be attributed to the avoidance of aggregation of chitosan-modified PLGA nanocomposite particles when using Agglomaster™ rather than Mechanofusion™. PMID:22683651

  6. High-performance liquid chromatography of corynomycolic acids as a tool in identification of Corynebacterium species and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    De Briel, D; Couderc, F; Riegel, P; Jehl, F; Minck, R

    1992-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) study of 307 strains of Corynebacterium species and related taxa revealed that strains classified as "Corynebacterium aquaticum"; "Corynebacterium asperum"; and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) groups 1, 2, A-3, A-4, A-5, B-1, B-3, E, F-2, and I-2 as well as some unidentified coryneforms do not contain any corynomycolic acids; therefore, they should not be included in the genus Corynebacterium. Such an HPLC method of identification permitted the correct assignment to the genus Rhodococcus of two unpigmented strains of coryneform bacteria whose mycolic acid profiles were comparable to those of Rhodococcus equi. Bacteria belonging to CDC groups ANF-1, ANF-3, F-1, G-1, G-2, and I-1, as well as some other Corynebacterium sp. strains, yielded corynomycolic acid HPLC patterns related to those of Corynebacterium species. Either similarities or differences were observed in the corynomycolic acid profiles of Corynebacterium species tested after culture on sheep blood agar and/or sheep blood agar supplemented with Tween 80, which demonstrated that identification at the species or group level is possible. However, Corynebacterium striatum and CDC group I-1 bacteria as well as CDC group G-1 and group G-2 bacteria had indistinguishable HPLC patterns. Conversely, some variations were observed within some species as Corynebacterium xerosis, C. striatum, and Corynebacterium minutissimum. The evaluation procedure of this HPLC method by mass spectrometry analysis of isolated eluted peaks revealed that analytical reverse-phase HPLC alone does not provide any structural information, since isomers with identical polarities coeluted as a single peak. Nevertheless, HPLC is a rapid and reliable method for identification of corynomycolic acid-containing bacteria in the clinical microbiological laboratory. PMID:1624556

  7. High-performance liquid chromatography of corynomycolic acids as a tool in identification of Corynebacterium species and related organisms.

    PubMed

    De Briel, D; Couderc, F; Riegel, P; Jehl, F; Minck, R

    1992-06-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) study of 307 strains of Corynebacterium species and related taxa revealed that strains classified as "Corynebacterium aquaticum"; "Corynebacterium asperum"; and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) groups 1, 2, A-3, A-4, A-5, B-1, B-3, E, F-2, and I-2 as well as some unidentified coryneforms do not contain any corynomycolic acids; therefore, they should not be included in the genus Corynebacterium. Such an HPLC method of identification permitted the correct assignment to the genus Rhodococcus of two unpigmented strains of coryneform bacteria whose mycolic acid profiles were comparable to those of Rhodococcus equi. Bacteria belonging to CDC groups ANF-1, ANF-3, F-1, G-1, G-2, and I-1, as well as some other Corynebacterium sp. strains, yielded corynomycolic acid HPLC patterns related to those of Corynebacterium species. Either similarities or differences were observed in the corynomycolic acid profiles of Corynebacterium species tested after culture on sheep blood agar and/or sheep blood agar supplemented with Tween 80, which demonstrated that identification at the species or group level is possible. However, Corynebacterium striatum and CDC group I-1 bacteria as well as CDC group G-1 and group G-2 bacteria had indistinguishable HPLC patterns. Conversely, some variations were observed within some species as Corynebacterium xerosis, C. striatum, and Corynebacterium minutissimum. The evaluation procedure of this HPLC method by mass spectrometry analysis of isolated eluted peaks revealed that analytical reverse-phase HPLC alone does not provide any structural information, since isomers with identical polarities coeluted as a single peak. Nevertheless, HPLC is a rapid and reliable method for identification of corynomycolic acid-containing bacteria in the clinical microbiological laboratory. PMID:1624556

  8. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  9. Identification of Proteins in Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Particles: the HCMV Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Patricia; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Wang, Dai; Camp, David G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Wiley, H S.; Britt, William; Shenk, Thomas; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Jay

    2004-10-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the herpes virus family, is a large complex enveloped virus composed of both viral and cellular gene products. While the sequence of the HCMV genome has been known for over a decade, the full set of viral and cellular proteins that compose the HCMV virion are unknown. To approach this problem we have utilized gel-free two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS to identify and determine the relative abundances of viral and cellular proteins in purified HCMV AD169 virions and dense bodies. Analysis of the proteins from purified HCMV virion preparations has indicated that the particle contains significantly more viral proteins than previously known. In this study, we identified 71 HCMV-encoded proteins that included 12 proteins encoded by known viral open reading frames (ORFs) previously not associated with virions and 12 proteins from novel viral ORFs. Analysis of the relative abundance of HCMV proteins indicated that the predominant virion protein was the pp65 tegument protein and that gM rather than gB was the most abundant glycoprotein. We have also identified over 70 host cellular proteins in HCMV virions, which include cellular structural proteins, enzymes, and chaperones. In addition, analysis of HCMV dense bodies indicated that these viral particles are composed of 29 viral proteins with a reduced quantity of cellular proteins in comparison to HCMV virions. This study provides the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the viral and cellular proteins that compose infectious particles of a large complex virus.

  10. Catalytic Activity of Supported Metal Particles for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Helen H. Farrell

    2007-08-01

    Production of hydrogen by splitting water in thermochemical water-splitting cycles, such as the sulfur-based group that employs the catalytic decomposition of sulfuric acid into SO2 and O2 is of considerable interest. Most of these processes occur at high temperatures (T = 1,000 K) and exposes catalysts to the extreme conditions such as steam, oxygen, and acid vapor that severely damage these catalysts within a short time. To develop an understanding of the factors that cause catalyst deactivation, we performed density-functional-theory (DFT)-based first-principles calculations and computer simulations for transition metal (TM) particles positioned on the two types of substrate (?-alumina and TiO2-rutile). The catalytic activity of the considered systems is defined by several factors, namely: (i) The efficiency of detaching oxygen atoms from the sulfur-containing species SOn (n = 1,2,3). The breaking of the S-O bonds may occur at both the substrate and the transition metal cluster. However, the bond-breaking at the substrate is endothermic (and takes about 1.5 eV per bond) while at low-coordinated metal atom of a cluster it is exothermic (with energy gain of about 0.5 eV per bond). This explains why the presence of transition metal clusters is necessary for catalytic activity; (ii) The ability of the cluster to “clean” itself, i.e., to eliminate oxygen from its surface, in order to regain the catalytically active sites and to continue the process. We found that the clusters of Pd and Pt with the size = 2-3 nm are more efficient in this process (at T = 1,000 K) than the clusters of other TM’s considered (Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os); (iii) The ability of the cluster to keep its size to avoid sintering (that reduces the number of low-coordinated catalytically active sites at the surface of the cluster). We found that the sintering of Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os clusters is significantly suppressed in comparison with the sintering of Pd and Pt clusters of the same size (the

  11. Development of a high-rate ion counter for particle identification with GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Pain, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber to measure particle-gamma coincidences. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been designed, built and tested to be incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The design of the gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber utilizes 22 anode grids to measure energy loss of the heavy ion recoils and a plastic scintillator for timing measurements. The anode grids are tilted at 30 degrees to handle high incident-particle rate. The detector was developed, built and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and will be used in GODDESS measurements with stable and rare isotope beams. Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber to measure particle-gamma coincidences. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been designed, built and tested to be incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The design of the gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber utilizes 22 anode grids to measure energy loss of the heavy ion recoils and a plastic scintillator for timing measurements. The anode grids are tilted at 30 degrees to handle high incident-particle

  12. A detection system with broad angular acceptance for particle identification and angular distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Arazi, A.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Capurro, O. A.; Cardona, M. A.; de Barbará, E.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martí, G. V.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    A new detection system for time-optimized heavy-ion angular distribution measurements has been designed and constructed. This device is composed by an ionization chamber with a segmented-grid anode and three position-sensitive silicon detectors. This particular arrangement allows identifying reaction products emitted within a 30° wide angular range with better than 1° angular resolution. As a demonstration of its capabilities, angular distributions of the elastic scattering cross-section and the production of alpha particles in the 7Li+27Al system, at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, are presented.

  13. Stress-Survival Gene Identification From an Acid Mine Drainage Algal Mat Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Fujishima, K.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Rothschild-Mancinelli, B.; Rothschild, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities from acid mine drainage environments are exposed to multiple stressors to include low pH, high dissolved metal loads, seasonal freezing, and desiccation. The microbial and algal communities that inhabit these niche environments have evolved strategies that allow for their ecological success. Metagenomic analyses are useful in identifying species diversity, however they do not elucidate the mechanisms that allow for the resilience of a community under these extreme conditions. Many known or predicted genes encode for protein products that are unknown, or similarly, many proteins cannot be traced to their gene of origin. This investigation seeks to identify genes that are active in an algal consortium during stress from living in an acid mine drainage environment. Our approach involves using the entire community transcriptome for a functional screen in an Escherichia coli host. This approach directly targets the genes involved in survival, without need for characterizing the members of the consortium.The consortium was harvested and stressed with conditions similar to the native environment it was collected from. Exposure to low pH (< 3.2), high metal load, desiccation, and deep freeze resulted in the expression of stress-induced genes that were transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA). These mRNA transcripts were harvested to build complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries in E. coli. The transformed E. coli were exposed to the same stressors as the original algal consortium to select for surviving cells. Successful cells incorporated the transcripts that encode survival mechanisms, thus allowing for selection and identification of the gene(s) involved. Initial selection screens for freeze and desiccation tolerance have yielded E. coli that are 1 order of magnitude more resistant to freezing (0.01% survival of control with no transcript, 0.2% survival of E. coli with transcript) and 3 orders of magnitude more resistant to desiccation (0.005% survival of

  14. Annular denuders for use in global climate and stratospheric measurements of acidic gases and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Robert K.

    1991-02-01

    Measurements of acidic and basic gases that coexist with fine particle (less than 2.5 micron) may be useful for determining the impact of these species on global climate changes and determining species that influence stratospheric ozone levels. Annular denuders are well suited for this purpose. A new concentric annular denuder system, consisting of a three channel denuder, a Teflon coated cyclone preseparator, and a multistage filter pack was developed, evaluated, and shown to provide reliable atmospheric measurements of SO2, HNO2, HNO3, NH3, SO4(=), NH4(+), NO3(-), and H(+). For example, the precision of the annular denuder for the ambient measurements of HNO3 and nitrates at concentrations between 0.1 to 3 microgram/cu m was + or - 12 and 16 pct., respectively. The 120 x 25 mm three channel denuder is encased in a stainless steel sheath and has annular spaces that are 1 mm wide. This design was shown to have nearly identical capacity for removal of SO2 as conventional 210 x 25 mm single channel denuder configurations. The cyclone preseparator was designed and tested to have a D sub 50 cutoff diameter of 2.5 micron and minimal retention of HNO3.

  15. Identification of multiple salicylic acid-binding proteins using two high throughput screens

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Tian, Miaoying; Moreau, Magali; Park, Sang-Wook; Choi, Hyong Woo; Fei, Zhangjun; Friso, Giulia; Asif, Muhammed; Manosalva, Patricia; von Dahl, Caroline C.; Shi, Kai; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P.; O'Doherty, Inish; Schroeder, Frank C.; van Wijk, Klass J.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important hormone involved in many diverse plant processes, including floral induction, stomatal closure, seed germination, adventitious root initiation, and thermogenesis. It also plays critical functions during responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. The role(s) of SA in signaling disease resistance is by far the best studied process, although it is still only partially understood. To obtain insights into how SA carries out its varied functions, particularly in activating disease resistance, two new high throughput screens were developed to identify novel SA-binding proteins (SABPs). The first utilized crosslinking of the photo-reactive SA analog 4-AzidoSA (4AzSA) to proteins in an Arabidopsis leaf extract, followed by immuno-selection with anti-SA antibodies and then mass spectroscopy-based identification. The second utilized photo-affinity crosslinking of 4AzSA to proteins on a protein microarray (PMA) followed by detection with anti-SA antibodies. To determine whether the candidate SABPs (cSABPs) obtained from these screens were true SABPs, recombinantly-produced proteins were generated and tested for SA-inhibitable crosslinking to 4AzSA, which was monitored by immuno-blot analysis, SA-inhibitable binding of the SA derivative 3-aminoethylSA (3AESA), which was detected by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay, or SA-inhibitable binding of [3H]SA, which was detected by size exclusion chromatography. Based on our criteria that true SABPs must exhibit SA-binding activity in at least two of these assays, nine new SABPs are identified here; nine others were previously reported. Approximately 80 cSABPs await further assessment. In addition, the conflicting reports on whether NPR1 is an SABP were addressed by showing that it bound SA in all three of the above assays. PMID:25628632

  16. Design and evaluation of peptide nucleic acid probes for specific identification of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Joong; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F

    2015-02-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  17. Design and Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Specific Identification of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  18. Online Identification of Gas/Particle Products from M-xylene Photo-Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J.; Hastie, D.; Auld, J.

    2009-04-01

    Particulate matter in the atmosphere is a major pollutant that contributes to climate change, reduced visibility and negative human health impacts. Secondary particulate matter formed from the photo-oxidation of hydrocarbons significantly contributes to the particulate matter concentration in the atmosphere, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere. However, at this time there is a lack of understanding of the chemical reactions that produce the secondary particulate matter. To further the knowledge in this area, we have been using a newly developed system to investigate the composition of secondary particulate matter formed from the photo-oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The system consists of a flow reactor for hydrocarbon oxidation, an online Counter Flow Membrane Denuder (CFMD) for gas/particle separation and an APCI MS-MS (TAGA 6000E) for composition analysis. This system has been used to study the HO initiated oxidation of m-xylene. The products formed during the experiment were a complex mixture of organic species in both the gas and particle phase. Results showing the detection of a wide variety of species including ring retaining products, furanones, quinones, and nitrophenols will be presented.

  19. Identification of robust adaptation gene regulatory network parameters using an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, X N; Ren, H P

    2016-01-01

    Robust adaptation is a critical ability of gene regulatory network (GRN) to survive in a fluctuating environment, which represents the system responding to an input stimulus rapidly and then returning to its pre-stimulus steady state timely. In this paper, the GRN is modeled using the Michaelis-Menten rate equations, which are highly nonlinear differential equations containing 12 undetermined parameters. The robust adaption is quantitatively described by two conflicting indices. To identify the parameter sets in order to confer the GRNs with robust adaptation is a multi-variable, multi-objective, and multi-peak optimization problem, which is difficult to acquire satisfactory solutions especially high-quality solutions. A new best-neighbor particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed to implement this task. The proposed algorithm employs a Latin hypercube sampling method to generate the initial population. The particle crossover operation and elitist preservation strategy are also used in the proposed algorithm. The simulation results revealed that the proposed algorithm could identify multiple solutions in one time running. Moreover, it demonstrated a superior performance as compared to the previous methods in the sense of detecting more high-quality solutions within an acceptable time. The proposed methodology, owing to its universality and simplicity, is useful for providing the guidance to design GRN with superior robust adaptation. PMID:27323043

  20. Biochemical systems identification by a random drift particle swarm optimization approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Finding an efficient method to solve the parameter estimation problem (inverse problem) for nonlinear biochemical dynamical systems could help promote the functional understanding at the system level for signalling pathways. The problem is stated as a data-driven nonlinear regression problem, which is converted into a nonlinear programming problem with many nonlinear differential and algebraic constraints. Due to the typical ill conditioning and multimodality nature of the problem, it is in general difficult for gradient-based local optimization methods to obtain satisfactory solutions. To surmount this limitation, many stochastic optimization methods have been employed to find the global solution of the problem. Results This paper presents an effective search strategy for a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm that enhances the ability of the algorithm for estimating the parameters of complex dynamic biochemical pathways. The proposed algorithm is a new variant of random drift particle swarm optimization (RDPSO), which is used to solve the above mentioned inverse problem and compared with other well known stochastic optimization methods. Two case studies on estimating the parameters of two nonlinear biochemical dynamic models have been taken as benchmarks, under both the noise-free and noisy simulation data scenarios. Conclusions The experimental results show that the novel variant of RDPSO algorithm is able to successfully solve the problem and obtain solutions of better quality than other global optimization methods used for finding the solution to the inverse problems in this study. PMID:25078435

  1. Shape evolution of SrCO{sub 3} particles in the presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jiaguo . E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com; Guo Hua; Cheng Bei

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, strontium carbonate particles with different morphologies were prepared by a simple precipitation reaction of sodium carbonate with strontium nitrate in the absence and presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA). The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the concentration of PSMA on the morphologies and phase structures of strontium carbonate particles were investigated and discussed. The results showed that SrCO{sub 3} particles with various shapes, such as bundles, dumbbells, irregular aggregates and spheres could be obtained by varying the concentration of PSMA. A schematic illustration was proposed to account for the shape evolution of the as-prepared SrCO{sub 3} particles.

  2. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester abrogates bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, M S F; Perilli, E; Stansborough, R L; Marino, V; Cantley, M D; Xu, J; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Haynes, D R; Gibson, R J; Crotti, T N

    2015-06-01

    Particle-induced bone loss by osteoclasts is a common cause of aseptic loosening around implants. This study investigates whether caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a potent and specific inhibitor of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 and nuclear factor kappa B, at a low dose reduces bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis. The effects of particles and CAPE treatment on gastrointestinal tract (GIT) histopathology were also evaluated. Mice were scanned using in vivo animal micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a baseline measurement. PE particles (2.82 × 10(9) particles/mL) were implanted over the calvariae on day 0. CAPE was administered subcutaneously (1 mg/kg/day) at days 0, 4, 7 and 10. Mice were killed at day 14 and serum was analysed for Type-1 carboxyterminal collagen crosslinks (CTX)-1 and osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) levels. Ex vivo μCT scans were conducted to assess bone volume (BV) change and percentage area of calvarial surface resorbed. Calvarial and GIT tissue was processed for histopathology. By day 14, PE particles significantly induced calvarial bone loss compared with control animals as evidenced by resorption areas adjacent to the implanted PE in three-dimensional μCT images, an increase in percentage of resorbed area (p = 0.0022), reduction in BV (p = 0.0012) and increased Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells. Serum CTX-1 (p = 0.0495) and OSCAR levels (p = 0.0006) significantly increased in the PE implant group. CAPE significantly inhibited PE particle-induced calvarial osteolysis, as evidenced by a significant reduction in surface bone resorption (p = 0.0012) and volumetric change (p = 0.0154) compared with PE only, but had no effect on systemic CTX-1. Neither particles nor CAPE had an effect on GIT histopathology. PMID:25804981

  3. Composition of fine and ultrafine particles and source identification by stable isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gone, Jec-Kong

    Fine (da < 2.1 μm) and ultra-fine (da < 0.1μm) atmosphere particulate samples collected from two sites in the United States were analyzed for elemental compositions by Instrumental, Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The eastern site samples were collected at the Great Smoky Mountain National Park from July 15 to August 25, 1995. The western site samples were collected from a rooftop in Pasadena, California over one winter month in January/February, 1996. Elemental concentrations determined by INAA for the eastern site samples were compared with results from samples (da < 2.4 μm) collected concurrently but analyzed by other techniques. The results showed consistency between different analytical techniques. Factor Analysis (FA) and Absolute Factor Score-Multiple Linear Regression (AFS-MLR) methods were used to identify sources and their contributions to fine particulate samples at the eastern site. The results showed that the crustal contribution to fine aerosol mass was significant around July 24-26, 1995, and the coal combustion contribution peaked around August 14-18, 1995. The average contribution from crustal sources to the fine particulate mass was 7 +/- 3% for the 2.1 μm samples and 11 +/- 4% for the 2.4 μm samples. The mass difference may be due to the different maximum size of the particles. The average contribution from combustion sources was 77 +/- 4% for the 2.1 μm samples and 90 +/- 6% for the 2.4 μm samples. Elemental patterns were used to identify sources of ultra-fine particles. Motor vehicle emissions might be the cause of the increase in the ultra-fine particle concentration of Al and Fe at the western site. Variations in stable isotope ratios of 130Ba/138 Ba, 121Sb/123Sb, 84Sr/ 86Sr and 79Br/81Br were investigated using INAA. This technique was applied to fine particulate samples with sources identified by FA. The results showed that the 130Ba/ 138Ba ratio of the dust sample was 0.00151 +/- 0

  4. Elemental characterization and source identification of size resolved atmospheric particles in French classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Dinh Trinh; Alleman, Laurent Y.; Coddeville, Patrice; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-01

    Indoor airborne particles were chemically characterized to identify their major sources in 3 elementary schools presenting different site typologies (rural, urban, and industrial) in the North of France. The sampling campaigns were conducted simultaneously indoors and outdoors during 2 weekly periods successively in each school, in presence and absence of pupils. The indoor weekly mean PM10 mass concentrations in presence of pupils varied from 72.7 to 85.3 μg m-3, generally exceeding the WHO guidelines. The presence/absence PM10 ratios confirm the PM10 concentrations raise during children's activities. Their presence leads to an increase of elemental concentration (ng m-3) but does not influence the elemental distribution in the different particulate fractions. Crustal elements represent an important portion (7-10%) of the indoor PM10 mass, mostly driven by the Ca content (4.4-7.2%) due to the use of chalk. The trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, …) are enriched in the fine fractions (70-100%) compared to the coarse ones. Crustal elements (Al, Ca, Ti, Sr, …) present higher concentrations in the coarse fractions (40-60%). Elemental ratios and Cluster Analysis confirmed different particulate metal sources from the school surroundings. Among these sources, re-suspension dust, traffic, and marine aerosols were observed in all schools. Mixed anthropogenic sources were identified in urban and industrial sites, and petro-chemistry was only evidenced in the school near the industrial zone. Indoors, these outdoor anthropogenic particles represent the only sources of trace elements evidenced during this study.

  5. Automated particle identification through regression analysis of size, shape and colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Luna, J. C.; Cooper, J. M.; Neale, S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Rapid point of care diagnostic tests and tests to provide therapeutic information are now available for a range of specific conditions from the measurement of blood glucose levels for diabetes to card agglutination tests for parasitic infections. Due to a lack of specificity these test are often then backed up by more conventional lab based diagnostic methods for example a card agglutination test may be carried out for a suspected parasitic infection in the field and if positive a blood sample can then be sent to a lab for confirmation. The eventual diagnosis is often achieved by microscopic examination of the sample. In this paper we propose a computerized vision system for aiding in the diagnostic process; this system used a novel particle recognition algorithm to improve specificity and speed during the diagnostic process. We will show the detection and classification of different types of cells in a diluted blood sample using regression analysis of their size, shape and colour. The first step is to define the objects to be tracked by a Gaussian Mixture Model for background subtraction and binary opening and closing for noise suppression. After subtracting the objects of interest from the background the next challenge is to predict if a given object belongs to a certain category or not. This is a classification problem, and the output of the algorithm is a Boolean value (true/false). As such the computer program should be able to "predict" with reasonable level of confidence if a given particle belongs to the kind we are looking for or not. We show the use of a binary logistic regression analysis with three continuous predictors: size, shape and color histogram. The results suggest this variables could be very useful in a logistic regression equation as they proved to have a relatively high predictive value on their own.

  6. Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Prudence O.; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Sheehy, Joshua J.; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Warren, Frederick J.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired. PMID:25799321

  7. Rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids including two new constituents from Tydemania expeditionis by LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Long; Kubanek, Julia; Hay, Mark E.; Aalbersberg, William; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tydemania expeditionis Weber-van Bosse (Udoteaceae) is a weakly calcified green alga. In the present paper, liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray mass spectrometry was developed to identify the fingerprint components. A total of four triterpenoid sulfates and three hydroxy fatty acids in the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract were structurally characterized on the basis of retention time, online UV spectrum and mass fragmentation pattern. Furthermore, detailed LC-MS analysis revealed two new hydroxy fatty acids, which were then prepared and characterized by extensive NMR analyses. The proposed method provides a scientific and technical platform for the rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids in similar marine algae and terrestrial plants. PMID:21915955

  8. Particle Size (Sieving) and Enthalpy (Acid Calorimetry) Analysis of Single-Pull K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    PR Bredt; CH Delegard; AJ Schmidt; KL Silvers; BM Thornton; S Gano

    2000-12-22

    This report presents the results of particle size analyses and calorimetry testing performed on selected single-pull sludge samples collected from the Hanford K East Basin between December 1998 and June 1999. The samples were collected as isolated cores predominantly from areas that had not been previously sampled (e.g., North Loadout Pit, Dummy Elevator Pit, Tech View Pit), or from areas in which the sludge composition had been altered since the last sampling (e.g., Weasel Pit). Particle size analyses were performed by washing wet sludge samples through a series of four sieves with openings of 250, 500, 1410, and 4000 {micro}m. The loaded sieves were weighed before and after drying to obtain wet and dry particle size distributions. Knowledge of the particle size distribution is needed to design and predict the performance of the systems that will be used to retrieve, transport, and recover sludge. Also, sieving provides an opportunity to observe the components in the sludge. For example, during sieving of the sludge sample from the North Loadout Pit, significant quantities of organic ion exchange beads were observed. The uranium metal content and the particle size of the uranium metal in the K Basin sludge will largely determine the chemical reactivity of the sludge. In turn, the designs for the sludge handling and storage systems must be compatible with the reactivity of the sludge. Therefore, acid calorimetry was performed to estimate the uranium metal content of the sludge. For this testing, sludge samples were dissolved in nitric acid within a calibrated adiabatic calorimeter. The resulting dissolution enthalpy data were then used to discriminate between metallic uranium ({minus}3750 J/g in nitric acid) and uranium oxide ({minus}394 J/g in nitric acid). Results from this testing showed that the single-pull sludge samples contained little or no uranium metal.

  9. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosols containing dicarboxylic acids. Effect of particle phase, composition, and nitrate content.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul T; Badger, Claire L; Cox, R Anthony; Folkers, Mareike; Henk, Hartmut H; Mentel, Thomas F

    2009-04-30

    Reactive uptake coefficients for loss of N(2)O(5) to micron-size aerosols containing oxalic malonic, succinic, and glutaric acids, and mixtures with ammonium hydrogen sulfate and ammonium sulfate, are presented. The uptake measurements were made using two different systems: atmospheric pressure laminar flow tube reactor (Cambridge) and the Large Indoor Aerosol Chamber at Forschungszentrum Juelich. Generally good agreement is observed for the data recorded using the two techniques. Measured uptake coefficients lie in the range 5 x 10(-4)-3 x 10(-2), dependent on relative humidity, on particle phase, and on particle composition. Uptake to solid particles is generally slow, with observed uptake coefficients less than 1 x 10(-3), while uptake to liquid particles is around an order of magnitude more efficient. These results are rationalized using a numerical model employing explicit treatment of both transport and chemistry. Our results indicate a modest effect of the dicarboxylic acids on uptake and confirm the strong effect of particle phase, liquid water content, and particulate nitrate concentrations. PMID:19385680

  10. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF

  11. (210)Pb as a tracer of soil erosion, sediment source area identification and particle transport in the terrestrial environment.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, Gerald

    2014-12-01

    Although (137)Cs has been used extensively to study soil erosion and particle transport in the terrestrial environment, there has been much less work using excess or unsupported (210)Pb ((210)Pbxs) to study the same processes. Furthermore, since (137)Cs activities in soils are decreasing because of radioactive decay, some locations have an added complication due to the addition of Chernobyl-derived (137)Cs, and the activities of (137)Cs in the southern hemisphere are low, there is a need to develop techniques that use (210)Pbxs to provide estimates of rates of soil erosion and particle transport. This paper reviews the current status of (210)Pbxs methods to quantify soil erosion rates, to identify and partition suspended sediment source areas, and to determine the transport rates of particles in the terrestrial landscape. Soil erosion rates determined using (210)Pbxs are based on the unsupported (210)Pb ((210)Pbxs) inventory in the soil, the depth distribution of (210)Pbxs, and a mass balance calibration ('conversion model') that relates the soil inventory to the erosion rate using a 'reference site' at which neither soil erosion nor soil deposition has occurred. In this paper several different models are presented to illustrate the effects of different model assumptions such as the timing, depth and rates of the surface soil mixing on the calculated erosion rates. The suitability of model assumptions, including estimates of the depositional flux of (210)Pbxs to the soil surface and the post-depositional mobility of (210)Pb are also discussed. (210)Pb can be used as one tracer to permit sediment source area identification. This sediment 'fingerprinting' has been extended far beyond using (210)Pb as a single radioisotope to include numerous radioactive and stable tracers and has been applied to identifying the source areas of suspended sediment based on underlying rock type, land use (roads, stream banks, channel beds, cultivated or uncultivated lands, pasture lands

  12. Establishment of reliable mass spectra and retention indices library: identification of fatty acids in human plasma without authentic standards.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Tan, Binbin; Zeng, Maomao; Lu, Hongmei; Liang, Yizeng

    2012-01-15

    Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is routinely employed to analyze small molecules in various samples. The more challenge of GC-MS data processing is to identify the unknown compounds in samples. Mass spectra and retention indices library searching are commonly used method. However, the current libraries are often built through collecting data from different groups. To unknown compounds with similar mass spectra and retention indices (e.g. geometric (cis/trans) isomers), the inaccurate results sometime are supplied. In this case, the costly standard compounds have to be used in every analysis. In this report, taking identification of fatty acids as an example, we proposed a strategy of establishment of special database constructed by equivalent chain length (ECL) values in uniform conditions and mass spectra of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The mass spectral characteristics were firstly used to identify all expected straight saturated fatty acids, and subsequently calculate the ECL for fatty acids in the sample. Finally, the ECL values of fatty acids in the sample were compared with those of fatty acids in the customized database to identify their structures. The results showed that the method developed in this report could effectively identify similar unknown compounds (FAMEs in the human plasma) after validated by the authentic standards. PMID:22265504

  13. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These

  14. Automatic identification approach for high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring fatty acid global profiling.

    PubMed

    Tie, Cai; Hu, Ting; Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2015-08-18

    Fatty acids (FAs) are a group of lipid molecules that are essential to organisms. As potential biomarkers for different diseases, FAs have attracted increasing attention from both biological researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. A sensitive and accurate method for globally profiling and identifying FAs is required for biomarker discovery. The high selectivity and sensitivity of high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (HPLC-MRM) gives it great potential to fulfill the need to identify FAs from complicated matrices. This paper developed a new approach for global FA profiling and identification for HPLC-MRM FA data mining. Mathematical models for identifying FAs were simulated using the isotope-induced retention time (RT) shift (IRS) and peak area ratios between parallel isotope peaks for a series of FA standards. The FA structures were predicated using another model based on the RT and molecular weight. Fully automated FA identification software was coded using the Qt platform based on these mathematical models. Different samples were used to verify the software. A high identification efficiency (greater than 75%) was observed when 96 FA species were identified in plasma. This FAs identification strategy promises to accelerate FA research and applications. PMID:26189701

  15. Gas/particle partitioning of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids at a suburban site in Saitama, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Linfa; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kubota, Tsutomu; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Wang, Qingyue; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids (diacids) exhibit semivolatile behavior in the atmosphere, but their partitioning between the gaseous and particulate phases is still unclear. An annular denuder-filter pack system with a cyclone PM 2.5 was employed to investigate the gaseous and particulate phase concentrations of diacids, with high collection efficiency of most target compounds. Saturated diacids, unsaturated diacids, ketocarboxylic acids, and dicarbonyls were determined in gaseous and particulate samples collected from a suburban site in Japan, during 2007 summer, 2008 late-winter and early-winter. The concentrations of gaseous and particulate diacids in early-winter were lower than those in summer, but higher than those in late-winter. Individual diacid in gaseous phase showed a relatively good correlation with ambient oxidants, but a low correlation with NO gas (a primary pollutant). Particulate fraction to the total amount ( FP) of individual acid was larger in winter than in summer, and also was larger at night than in the daytime. In the same sample, individual diacid and ketocarboxylic acid had higher particulate phase occurrence ( FP > 56% in summer), whereas unsaturated diacid had higher gaseous phase occurrence ( FP < 18% in summer). In summer, gas/particle partitioning of diacids varied diurnally; FP values of oxalic and glyoxylic acids increased from their lowest values in the morning to their highest values at night, exhibiting the similar diurnal variation of relative humidity in the atmosphere. The higher humidity at night may lead to the formation of droplets in which water-soluble gaseous phases can dissolve, thus promoting gas-to-particle conversion. These results suggest that gas/particle partitioning of diacids depends not only on the concentrations in the gaseous phase by photochemical oxidation, but also on the characteristics of the atmosphere (e.g., temperature, sunlight, and relative humidity) and the aerosols (e.g., acidity

  16. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosol particles containing mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Badger, Claire L; Griffiths, Paul T; George, Ingrid; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Cox, R Anthony

    2006-06-01

    The kinetics of reactive uptake of N2O5 on submicron aerosol particles containing humic acid and ammonium sulfate has been investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) and aerosol composition using a laminar flow reactor coupled with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to characterize the aerosol. For single-component humic acid aerosol the uptake coefficient, gamma, was found to increase from 2 to 9 x 10(-4) over the range 25-75% RH. These values are 1-2 orders of magnitude below those typically observed for single-component sulfate aerosols (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2003, 5, 3453-3463;(1) Atmos. Environ. 2000, 34, 2131-2159(2)). For the mixed aerosols, gamma was found to decrease with increasing humic acid mass fraction and increase with increasing RH. For aerosols containing only 6% humic acid by dry mass, a decrease in reactivity of more than a factor of 2 was observed compared with the case for single-component ammonium sulfate. The concentration of liquid water in the aerosol droplets was calculated using the aerosol inorganic model (for the ammonium sulfate component) and a new combined FTIR-DMA system (for the humic acid component). Analysis of the uptake coefficients using the water concentration data shows that the change in reactivity cannot be explained by the change in water content alone. We suggest that, due to its surfactant properties, the main effect of the humic acid is to reduce the mass accommodation coefficient for N2O5 at the aerosol particle surface. This has implications for the use of particle hygroscopicity data for predictions of the rate of N2O5 hydrolysis. PMID:16722713

  17. Identification of Pauses during Formation of HIV-1 Virus Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Pei-I; Miller, Anna K.; Ballew, Jeff; Sandrin, Virginie; Adler, Frederick R.; Saffarian, Saveez

    2013-01-01

    HIV Gag polymerizes on the plasma membrane to form virus like particles (VLPs) that have similar diameters to wild-type viruses. We use multicolor, dual-penetration depth, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, which corrects for azimuthal movement, to image the assembly of individual VLPs from the time of nucleation to the recruitment of VPS4 (a component of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport, and which marks the final stage of VLP assembly). Using a mathematical model for assembly and maximum-likelihood comparison of fits both with and without pauses, we detect pauses during Gag polymerization in 60% of VLPs. Pauses range from 2 to 20 min, with an exponentially distributed duration that is independent of cytosolic Gag concentration. VLPs assembled with late domain mutants of Gag (which do not recruit the key endosomal sorting complexes required for transport proteins Alix or TSG101) exhibit similar pause distributions. These pauses indicate that a single rate-limiting event is required for continuation of assembly. We suggest that pauses are either related to incorporation of defects in the hexagonal Gag lattice during VLP assembly or are caused by shortcomings in interactions of Gag with essential and still undefined cellular components during formation of curvature on the plasma membrane. PMID:24268138

  18. Ames assay chromatograms and the identification of mutagens in diesel particle extract

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeen, I.T.; Pero, A.M.; Zator, R.; Schuetzie, D.; Riley, T.L.

    1984-05-01

    Dichloromethane extracts of passenger car diesel exhaust particles were separated into 65 fractions by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and Ames assays (TA98 without activation) were carried out on each fraction. The only prominently mutagenic fractions were ones with elution times approximately coincident with those for 1,3-, 1,6-, and 1,8-dinitropyrenes, 1-nitropyrene, and 3- and 8-nitrofluoranthene. These compounds were quantified in one extract sample by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography coupled with a nitrogen-phosphorus detector. Among five extract samples studied, 30-40% of the total mutagenicity recovered from the columns could be attributed to these six nitroarenes, 15-20% was recovered in the as yet uncharacterized polar fraction, and the remainder was distributed roughly equally over 63 fractions. About 70% of the mutagenicity applied to the HPLC columns was recovered from the columns. The Ames assay mutagenicities of the unfractionated extracts were shown to be additive in the mutagenicities of the components. 23 references.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Early Solar system Organic Matter Preserved in Chondritic Porous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George; Wirick, Sue; Keller, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    The chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, have experienced minimal aqueous or thermal alteration since their formation. These CP IDPs are the best preserved samples of the minerals and organic matter that was present in the primitive Solar Nebula that are currently available for laboratory analysis [1]. The ~10 μm CP IDPs are aggregates of tens-of-thousands of mostly sub-micron grains of diverse compositions and mineralogies. Many of the individual mineral grains are coated by a 50 to 200 nm thick rims of carbonaceous material, and other carbonaceous material occurs as larger, discrete subunits within the particles [2]. We characterize this carbonaceous material using two high-resolution, synchrotron-based instruments: a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) to locate and map the carbon and to identify its major functional groups by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and a micro-Fourier Transform Infrared (μ-FTIR) spectrometer to further characterize the functional groups by mid-infrared spectroscopy. Carbon-XANES spectroscopy identifies the rims coating the individual grains in CP IDPs as organic matter, dominated by the C=C, likely C-rings, and the C=O functional groups [3]. This structure, with the organic rims being the contact surfaces between the grains, implies a 3-step formation sequence: grain condensation, organic rim emplacement, and, finally, aggregation of the grains to form the dust particles. This suggests these organic rims formed very early in the evolution of the Solar Nebula, after grain condensation but before grain aggregation [3]. These organic rims coat grains of diverse compositions, including silicates, sulfides, and carbonates, which is inconsistent with formation by Fischer-Tropsch-like, mineral-specific catalysis, one of the mechanisms suggested for the formation of primitive organic matter. Our observations are consistent with an

  20. Gene selection for cancer identification: a decision tree model empowered by particle swarm optimization algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the application of microarray data, how to select a small number of informative genes from thousands of genes that may contribute to the occurrence of cancers is an important issue. Many researchers use various computational intelligence methods to analyzed gene expression data. Results To achieve efficient gene selection from thousands of candidate genes that can contribute in identifying cancers, this study aims at developing a novel method utilizing particle swarm optimization combined with a decision tree as the classifier. This study also compares the performance of our proposed method with other well-known benchmark classification methods (support vector machine, self-organizing map, back propagation neural network, C4.5 decision tree, Naive Bayes, CART decision tree, and artificial immune recognition system) and conducts experiments on 11 gene expression cancer datasets. Conclusion Based on statistical analysis, our proposed method outperforms other popular classifiers for all test datasets, and is compatible to SVM for certain specific datasets. Further, the housekeeping genes with various expression patterns and tissue-specific genes are identified. These genes provide a high discrimination power on cancer classification. PMID:24555567

  1. PIXE identification of fine and coarse particles of aerosol samples and their distribution across Beirut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumié, M.; Saliba, N.; Nsouli, B.; Younes, M.; Noun, M.; Massoud, R.

    2011-12-01

    This study is the first national attempt to assess the levels of PMs in Beirut city and consequently understand air pollution distribution. Aerosol sampling was carried out using three PM 10 and three PM 2.5 samplers which were installed at three locations lying along the SE-NW direction over Beirut. The sampling of PM 10 and PM 2.5 was done during a period extending from May till December 2009. The random collection of the particles (1 in 6 days) was carried out on Teflon filters, for a period of 24-h. The elemental analysis of particulate matter was performed using proton induced X-ray emission technique PIXE at the Lebanese 1.7 MV Tandem-Pelletron accelerator of Beirut. Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S and Cl were quantified using 1 MeV proton beam, while K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were determined using 3 MeV-energy of proton beam.

  2. Development of a high-rate ion counter for particle identification with GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Jones, K. L.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics can provide a wealth of data on the structure of exotic nuclei. Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber. GODDESS enables particle-gamma coincidence measurements to be performed for inelastic, stripping and pickup reactions with high resolution and high efficiency. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber was developed, built and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and with first in-beam tests during the GODDESS commissioning experiment at Argonne National Laboratory. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  3. Electrochemical model parameter identification of a lithium-ion battery using particle swarm optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Ashiqur; Anwar, Sohel; Izadian, Afshin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a gradient-free optimization technique, namely particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, is utilized to identify specific parameters of the electrochemical model of a Lithium-Ion battery with LiCoO2 cathode chemistry. Battery electrochemical model parameters are subject to change under severe or abusive operating conditions resulting in, for example, over-discharged battery, over-charged battery, etc. It is important for a battery management system to have these parameter changes fully captured in a bank of battery models that can be used to monitor battery conditions in real time. Here the PSO methodology has been successfully applied to identify four electrochemical model parameters that exhibit significant variations under severe operating conditions: solid phase diffusion coefficient at the positive electrode (cathode), solid phase diffusion coefficient at the negative electrode (anode), intercalation/de-intercalation reaction rate at the cathode, and intercalation/de-intercalation reaction rate at the anode. The identified model parameters were used to generate the respective battery models for both healthy and degraded batteries. These models were then validated by comparing the model output voltage with the experimental output voltage for the stated operating conditions. The identified Li-Ion battery electrochemical model parameters are within reasonable accuracy as evidenced by the experimental validation results.

  4. Identification of a Compound Spinel and Silicate Presolar Grain in a Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) have undergone minimal parent body alteration and contain an assemblage of highly primitive materials, including molecular cloud material, presolar grains, and material that formed in the early solar nebula [1-3]. The exact parent bodies of individual IDPs are not known, but IDPs that have extremely high abundances of presolar silicates (up to 1.5%) most likely have cometary origins [1, 4]. The presolar grain abundance among these minimally altered CP IDPs varies widely. "Isotopically primitive" IDPs distinguished by anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions, numerous 15N-rich hotspots, and some C isotopic anomalies have higher average abundances of presolar grains (375 ppm) than IDPs with isotopically normal bulk N (<10 ppm) [5]. Some D and N isotopic anomalies have been linked to carbonaceous matter, though this material is only rarely isotopically anomalous in C [1, 5, 6]. Previous studies of the bulk chemistry and, in some samples, the mineralogy of select anhydrous CP IDPs indicate a link between high C abundance and pyroxene-dominated mineralogy [7]. In this study, we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of samples that were analyzed by [7] to characterize isotopically anomalous materials and to establish possible correlations with C abundance.

  5. Use of submitochondrial particle (SMP) assays for assessing wetlands constructed for sequestering acid mine runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Bettermann, A.D.; Haahr, J.E.; Lazorchak, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Use of constructed wetlands to sequester metals from acid mine drainage is part of a USEPA SITE demonstration at Burleigh Tunnel near Silverplume, Colorado. Samples are collected on a seasonal basis for toxicity evaluation of two different pilot treatment systems. Water samples were obtained from the outflow of two experimental wetland cells utilizing either upflow and downflow treatment, as well as upstream and downstream of the discharge of Burleigh Tunnel to Clear Creek. Submitochondrial Particle (SMP), Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas acute bioassays were used to evaluate the water quality. The SMP bioassay is based on the electron transfer complex derived from mitochondria. Toxic responses result from subcellular perturbations of various subsets of enzyme systems contained in the complex. In prior work, a 0.79 r{sup 2} was reported between the SMP bioassay and P. promelas for 11 inorganics on the EPA Priority Pollutant list. The SMP bioassay provided data consistent with the whole organism results. The two most toxic samples: the Burleigh outflow, and the Clear Creek Upstream sample, gave C. dubia LC50s of 1.01% and 8.41%, respectively. The Burleigh outflow P. promelas LC50 was 1.55%. SMP EC50s for the Burleigh outflow and the Clear Creek Upstream sample were 0.63% and 1.63%, respectively. As the SMP bioassay requires 1 hour to run and costs approximately 1/10th of whole organism assays, it was feasible to determine EC50 values for 7 samples vs. the two sample LC50s determined using whole organism assays. The SMP bioassays can provide sufficient sampling density, at low cost, allowing effective delineation of wetland performance over time.

  6. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhi; Daly, Michael; Clémence, Lopez; Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L.; Devine, Declan M.

    2016-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO3 thermoplastic composite's interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the "complex" process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the "complex" surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the "complex" treatment process, the CaCO3 particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the "dry" treated CaCO3 composites. Furthermore, "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites have a significantly higher tensile strength than the composites containing untreated and "dry" treated CaCO3. This is mainly because the "wet" and "complex" treatment processes have increased adsorption density of stearate, which enhances the interfacial interaction between matrix and filler. These results confirm that the chemical adsorption of the surfactant ions at the solid-liquid interface is higher than at other interface. From this study, it was concluded that the utilization of the "complex" method minimised the negative effects of void

  7. Long-term carbon stabilization through sorption of dissolved aromatic acids to reactive particles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. G.; Sanderman, J.; Chadwick, O.; Chorover, J.; Vitousek, P.

    2010-12-01

    Short-range order minerals are highly reactive soil constituents that are found in all soils and in particularly high quantities in volcanic soils. They retain large quantities of soil carbon, thereby acting as a long-term sink for carbon dioxide, but the main source for this carbon accumulation in soil is not yet known. We evaluated the biochemistry of solid and dissolved organic carbon in horizons containing differing short-range ordered mineral concentrations using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, stable isotope measurements and soil column leaching experiments across a well-constrained chronosequence of volcanic soils in Hawai’i. Molecular mixing model results, isotopic and elemental measurements, indicate that the oldest and most persistent C stores across the chronosequence are comprised not of highly microbially processed organic matter (e.g. proteins or lipids), but rather of partially oxidized aromatic plant compounds (up to 62% of the total soil C) preserved through chemical bonding to reactive soil minerals via carboxyl-rich functionalities. NMR spectra obtained from deep soil horizons containing an abundance of SRO minerals, showed strong chemical resemblance to that of DOM derived from plant litter. Solublization and high production rates of recalcitrant DOM controlled substantially by microbial activity were observed in the soil column leaching experiments. When the DOM-rich solution derived from organic horizons was leached through mineral soil horizons, the quantity of DOM sorbed was dependent on the abundance of SRO minerals present in the soil. These results suggest that microbial-driven DOM formation derived from plant litter and the subsequent binding of the aromatic acids in the DOM to reactive mineral surfaces is a dominant source for long-term soil carbon stabilization in these soils. This potentially globally significant carbon sink may be unresponsive to climate change over decadal to centennial timescales due to

  8. Heparin-decorated, hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel particles for the controlled release of bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian; Jha, Amit K; Duncan, Randall L; Jia, Xinqiao

    2011-08-01

    We are interested in developing hydrophilic particulate systems that are capable of sequestering growth factors, regulating their release and potentiating their biological functions. To this end heparin (HP)-decorated, hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) were synthesized using an inverse emulsion polymerization technique employing divinyl sulfone as the crosslinker. By varying the feed composition of the aqueous phase the amount of HP integrated in the particles can be systematically tuned. The resulting microscopic particles are spherical in shape and contain nanosized pores suitable for growth factor encapsulation. The covalently immobilized HP retained its ability to bind bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) specifically, and its release kinetics can be adjusted by tuning the particle composition. Compared with pure HA particles the hybrid HA/HP HGPs show a higher BMP-2 loading capacity. While BMP-2 was released from HA HGPs with a significant initial burst, a near zero order release kinetics was observed from HA/HP hybrid particles with an optimized heparin content of 0.55 μg per mg HGPs. The ability of HA/HP hybrid particles to present BMP-2 in a controlled manner, combined with the innate bioactivity of HA, induced robust and consistent chondrogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells, as shown by up-regulation of the mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers and the production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. The simplicity of the particle synthesis, combined with the defined biological activities of the constituent building blocks, renders the HP-decorated, HA-based hydrogel particle system an attractive candidate for the sustained release of BMP-2, possibly for cartilage repair and regeneration. PMID:21550426

  9. Heparin-decorated, hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel particles for the controlled release of bone morphogenetic protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xian; Jha, Amit K.; Duncan, Randall L.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2011-01-01

    We are interested in developing hydrophilic particulate systems that are capable of sequestering growth factors, regulating their release and potentiating their biological functions. Towards this end, heparin (HP)-decorated, hyaluronic acid (HA)-based, hydrogel particles (HGPs) were synthesized using an inverse emulsion polymerization technique employing divinyl sulfone as the crosslinker. By varying the feed composition of the aqueous phase, the amount of heparin integrated in the particles can be systematically tuned. The resulting microscopic particles are spherical in shape and contain nanosized pores suitable for growth factor encapsulation. The covalently immobilized heparin retained its ability to bind bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) specifically, and its release kinetics can be adjusted by tuning the particle composition. Compared to the pure HA particles, the hybrid HA/HP HGPs show a higher BMP-2 loading capacity. While BMP-2 was released from HA HGPs with a significant initial burst, a near zero-order release kinetics was observed from HA/HP hybrid particles with an optimized heparin content of 0.55 μg per milligram HGPs. The ability of HA/HP hybrid particles to present BMP-2 in a controlled manner, combined with the innate bioactivity of HA, induced robust and consistent chondrogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells, as evidenced by the up-regulation of mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers and the production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. The simplicity of the particle synthesis, combined with the defined biological activities of the constituent building blocks, renders the HP-decorated, HA-based hydrogel particle system an attractive candidate for the sustained release of BMP-2, possibly for cartilage repair and regeneration. PMID:21550426

  10. Computational Study on the Effect of Hydration on New Particle Formation in the Sulfuric Acid/Ammonia and Sulfuric Acid/Dimethylamine Systems.

    PubMed

    Henschel, Henning; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-03-24

    The formation of new particles through condensation from the gas phase is an important source of atmospheric aerosols. The properties of the electrically neutral clusters formed in the very first steps of the condensation process are, however, not directly observable by experimental means. We present here electronic structure calculations on the hydrates of clusters of three molecules of sulfuric acid and three molecules of ammonia or dimethylamine. On the basis of the results of these new calculations together with previously published material we simulate the influence of hydration on the dynamic processes involved in particle formation. Most strongly affected by hydration and most important as a mediator for the effect on particle formation rates are the evaporation rates of clusters. The results give an estimate of the sensitivity of the atmospheric particle formation rate for humidity. The particle formation rate can change approximately two orders of magnitude in either direction due to hydration; the net effect, however, is highly dependent on the exact conditions. PMID:26918813

  11. Exosomes and Microvesicles: Identification and Targeting By Particle Size and Lipid Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Kastelowitz, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are two classes of submicroscopic vesicle released by cells into the extracellular space. Collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles, these membrane containers facilitate important cell-cell communication by carrying a diverse array of signaling molecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. Recently, the role of extracellular vesicle signaling in cancer progression has become a topic of significant interest. Methods to detect and target exosomes and microvesicles are needed to realize applications of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and, perhaps, therapeutic targets. Detection of exosomes and microvesicles is a complex problem as they are both submicroscopic and of heterogeneous cellular origins. In this Minireview, we highlight the basic biology of extracellular vesicles, and address available biochemical and biophysical detection methods. Detectible characteristics described here include lipid and protein composition, and physical properties such as the vesicle membrane shape and diffusion coefficient. In particular, we propose that detection of exosome and microvesicle membrane curvature with lipid chemical probes that sense membrane shape is a distinctly promising method for identifying and targeting these vesicles. PMID:24740901

  12. Duplex DNA-Invading γ-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids Enable Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Infections in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Amburg, Joel I.; Crawford, Elizabeth M.; Prakash, Ranjit A.; Rabson, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early and targeted antimicrobial intervention is lifesaving, yet current diagnostic approaches fail to provide actionable information within a clinically viable time frame due to their reliance on blood culturing. Here, we present a novel pathogen identification (PID) platform that features the use of duplex DNA-invading γ-modified peptide nucleic acids (γPNAs) for the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens directly from blood, without culturing. The PID platform provides species-level information in under 2.5 hours while reaching single-CFU-per-milliliter sensitivity across the entire 21-pathogen panel. The clinical utility of the PID platform was demonstrated through assessment of 61 clinical specimens, which showed >95% sensitivity and >90% overall correlation to blood culture findings. This rapid γPNA-based platform promises to improve patient care by enabling the administration of a targeted first-line antimicrobial intervention. PMID:27094328

  13. Identification of Positively Charged Residues in Enterovirus 71 Capsid Protein VP1 Essential for Production of Infectious Particles

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shilin; Li, Guiming; Wang, Ying; Gao, Qianqian; Wang, Yizhuo; Cui, Rui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a positive-stranded RNA virus, is the major cause of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in children, which can cause severe central nervous system disease and death. The capsids of EV71 consist of 60 copies of each of four viral structural proteins (VP1 to VP4), with VP1, VP2, and VP3 exposed on the surface and VP4 arranged internally. VP1 plays a central role in particle assembly and cell entry. To gain insight into the role of positively charged residues in VP1 function in these processes, a charged-to-alanine scanning analysis was performed using an infectious cDNA clone of EV71. Twenty-seven mutants containing single charged-to-alanine changes were tested. Sixteen of them were not viable, seven mutants were replication defective, and the remaining four mutants were replication competent. By selecting revertants, second-site mutations which could at least partially restore viral infectivity were identified within VP1 for four defective mutations and two lethal mutations. The resulting residue pairs represent a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions of the VP1 protein which could serve as a potential novel drug target. Interestingly, mutation K215A in the VP1 GH loop led to a significant increase in thermal stability, demonstrating that conditional thermostable mutants can be generated by altering the charge characteristics of VP1. Moreover, all mutants were sensitive to the EV71 entry inhibitor suramin, which binds to the virus particle via the negatively charged naphthalenetrisulfonic acid group, suggesting that single charged-to-alanine mutation is not sufficient for suramin resistance. Taken together, these data highlight the importance of positively charged residues in VP1 for production of infectious particles. IMPORTANCE Infection with EV71 is more often associated with neurological complications in children and is responsible for the majority of fatalities. No licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies are

  14. The photochemical production of organic nitrates from α-pinene and loss via acid-dependent particle phase hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindelaub, Joel D.; McAvey, Kevin M.; Shepson, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical oxidation of α-pinene under high NOx conditions was studied in a photochemical reaction chamber to investigate organic nitrate (RONO2) production and fate between the gas and particle phases. We report an organic nitrate yield of 26 ± 7% from the oxidation of this monoterpene in the presence of nitric oxide (NO). However, the apparent organic nitrate yield was found to be highly dependent on both chamber relative humidity (RH) and seed aerosol acidity, likely as a result of particle phase hydrolysis. The particle phase loss of organic nitrates is believed to increase the gas to particle partitioning within the system, leading to decreased RONO2 yields in both the gas and particle phases at elevated RH and an apparent non-equilibrium partitioning mechanism. The hydrolysis of particle phase organic nitrates in this study, starting at low chamber relative humidity, implies that aerosol partitioning of organic nitrates may be an important sink for atmospheric NOx and may have a significant impact on regional air quality.

  15. Identification of diacylglycerol and triacylglycerols containing 11,12,13-trihydroxy-9,14-octadecadienoic acid in castor oil by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Castor oil has many industrial uses. Molecular species of acylglycerols containing monohydroxy, dihydroxy and trihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil have been reported. The identification of acylglycerols containing a triOH18:2 fatty acid in castor oil is reported here. The structure of this novel fat...

  16. Identification of novel rice low phytic acid mutations via TILLING by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate or InsP6) accounts for 75-85% of the total phosphorus in seeds. Low phytic acid (lpa) mutants exhibit decreases in seed InsP6 with corresponding increases in inorganic P which, unlike phytic acid P, is readily utilized by humans and monogastric ...

  17. Identification of acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricinoleate, a monohydroxy fatty acid, in castor oil has many industrial uses. Dihydroxy fatty acids can also be used in industry. The C18 HPLC fractions of castor oil were used for mass spectrometry of lithium addicts to identify the acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids. Four diacylglycer...

  18. Identification of acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricinoleate, a monohydroxy fatty acid, in castor oil has many industrial uses. Dihydroxy fatty acids can also be used in industry. The C18 HPLC fractions of castor oil were used for mass spectrometry to identify the acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids. Four diacylglycerols identified were...

  19. Handling missing data for the identification of charged particles in a multilayer detector: A comparison between different imputation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, S.; Riggi, D.; Riggi, F.

    2015-04-01

    Identification of charged particles in a multilayer detector by the energy loss technique may also be achieved by the use of a neural network. The performance of the network becomes worse when a large fraction of information is missing, for instance due to detector inefficiencies. Algorithms which provide a way to impute missing information have been developed over the past years. Among the various approaches, we focused on normal mixtures' models in comparison with standard mean imputation and multiple imputation methods. Further, to account for the intrinsic asymmetry of the energy loss data, we considered skew-normal mixture models and provided a closed form implementation in the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm framework to handle missing patterns. The method has been applied to a test case where the energy losses of pions, kaons and protons in a six-layers' Silicon detector are considered as input neurons to a neural network. Results are given in terms of reconstruction efficiency and purity of the various species in different momentum bins.

  20. Measurement and analysis of the relationship between ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles in eastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Baek, Bok Haeng; Aneja, Viney P

    2004-05-01

    An annular denuder system, which consisted of a cyclone separator; two diffusion denuders coated with sodium carbonate and citric acid, respectively; and a filter pack consisting of Teflon and nylon filters in series, was used to measure acid gases, ammonia (NH3), and fine particles in the atmosphere from April 1998 to March 1999 in eastern North Carolina (i.e., an NH3-rich environment). The sodium carbonate denuders yielded average acid gas concentrations of 0.23 microg/m3 hydrochloric acid (standard deviation [SD] +/- 0.2 microg/m3); 1.14 microg/m3 nitric acid (SD +/- 0.81 microg/m3), and 1.61 microg/m3 sulfuric acid (SD +/- 1.58 microg/m3). The citric acid denuders yielded an average concentration of 17.89 microg/m3 NH3 (SD +/- 15.03 microg/m3). The filters yielded average fine aerosol concentrations of 1.64 microg/m3 ammonium (NH4+; SD +/- 1.26 microg/m3); 0.26 microg/m3 chloride (SD +/- 0.69 microg/m3), 1.92 microg/m3 nitrate (SD +/- 1.09 microg/m3), and 3.18 microg/m3 sulfate (SO4(2-); SD +/- 3.12 microg/m3). From seasonal variation, the measured particulates (NH4+, SO4(2-), and nitrate) showed larger peak concentrations during summer, suggesting that the gas-to-particle conversion was efficient during summer. The aerosol fraction in this study area indicated the domination of ammonium sulfate particles because of the local abundance of NH3, and the long-range transport of SO4(2-) based on back trajectory analysis. Relative humidity effects on gas-to-particle conversion processes were analyzed by particulate NH4+ concentration originally formed from the neutralization processes with the secondary pollutants in the atmosphere. PMID:15149049

  1. Hierarchical scheme for liquid chromatography/multi-stage spectrometric identification of 3,4,5-triacyl chlorogenic acids in green Robusta coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2010-08-15

    Liquid chromatography/multi-stage spectrometry (LC/MS(n)) (n = 2-4) has been used to detect and characterize in green Robusta coffee beans eight quantitatively minor triacyl chlorogenic acids with seven of them not previously reported in nature. These comprise 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid (Mr 678); 3,5-dicaffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-feruloyl-4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 3,4-dicaffeoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid (Mr 692); 3-caffeoyl-4,5-diferuloylquinic acid and 3,4-diferuloyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid (Mr 706); and 3,4-dicaffeoyl-5-sinapoylquinic acid and 3-sinapoyl-4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (Mr 722). Structures have been assigned on the basis of LC/MS(n) patterns of fragmentation. A new hierarchical key for the identification of triacyl quinic acids is presented, based on previously established rules of fragmentation. Fifty-two chlorogenic acids have now been characterized in green Robusta coffee beans. In this study five samples of green Robusta coffee beans and fifteen samples of Arabica coffee beans were analyzed with triacyl chlorogenic acids only found in Robusta coffee bean extracts. These triacyl chlorogenic acids could be considered as useful phytochemical markers for the identification of Robusta coffee beans. PMID:20607843

  2. Biphenyl-4-yl-acrylohydroxamic acids: Identification of a novel indolyl-substituted HDAC inhibitor with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Cincinelli, Raffaella; Zwick, Vincent; Musso, Loana; Zuco, Valentina; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Zunino, Franco; Simoes-Pires, Claudia; Nurisso, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Cuendet, Muriel; Dallavalle, Sabrina

    2016-04-13

    Modification of the cap group of biphenylacrylohydroxamic acid-based HDAC inhibitors led to the identification of a new derivative (3) characterized by an indolyl-substituted 4-phenylcinnamic skeleton. Molecular docking was used to predict the optimal conformation in the class I HDACs active site. Compound 3 showed HDAC inhibitory activity and antiproliferative activity against a panel of tumor cell lines, in the low μM range. The compound was further tested in vitro for acetylation of histone H4 and other non-histone proteins, and in vivo in a colon carcinoma model, showing significant proapoptotic and antitumor activities. PMID:26890116

  3. Identification of glucuronides as in vivo liver conjugates of seven cannabinoids and some of their hydroxy and acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Harvey, D J; Martin, B R; Paton, W D

    1977-02-01

    Glucuronide conjugates of cannabidiol (CBD), 7-hydroxy-CBD, propyl-CBD, cannabinol (CBN), 7-hydroxy-CBN, CBN-7-oic acid, propyl CBN and cannabichromene have been identified as major metabolites of CBD, CBN and their propyl homologues and of cannabichromene in mouse liver. Trace amounts of the glucuronide conjugates of delta1- and delta1(6)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were also detected. Identification was made by combined gas-liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric studies of the trimethylsilyl (TMS), d9-TMS and methyl ester-TMS derivatives of the glucuronides and the TMS derivatives of the product of the reduction of the metabolites with lithium aluminium deuteride. PMID:847285

  4. Identification of self-growth-inhibiting compounds lauric acid and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinpei; Igarashi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Chigusa; Shitara, Tetsuo; Nomoto, Akio; Mizote, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori growth medium is usually supplemented with horse serum (HS) or FCS. However, cyclodextrin derivatives or activated charcoal can replace serum. In this study, we purified self-growth-inhibiting (SGI) compounds from H. pylori growth medium. The compounds were recovered from porous resin, Diaion HP-20, which was added to the H. pylori growth medium instead of known supplements. These SGI compounds were also identified from 2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which was supplemented in a pleuropneumonia-like organisms broth. The growth-inhibiting compounds were identified as lauric acid (LA) and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid [7-(Z)-TDA]. Although several fatty acids had been identified in H. pylori, these specific compounds were not previously found in this species. However, we confirmed that these fatty acids were universally present in the cultivation medium of the H. pylori strains examined in this study. A live/dead assay carried out without HS indicated that these compounds were bacteriostatic; however, no significant growth-inhibiting effect was observed against other tested bacterial species that constituted the indigenous bacterial flora. These findings suggested that LA and 7-(Z)-TDA might play important roles in the survival of H. pylori in human stomach epithelial cells. PMID:25767109

  5. Particle phase distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater--Using humic acid and iron nano-sized colloids as test particles.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Katrine; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Baun, Anders; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different particulate fractions in stormwater: Total, Particulate, Filtrated, Colloidal and Dissolved fractions, were examined and compared to synthetic suspensions of humic acid colloids and iron nano-sized particles. The distribution of low-molecular weight PAHs (LMW PAHs), middle-molecular weight PAHs (MMW PAHs) and high-molecular weight PAHs (HMW PAHs) among the fractions was also evaluated. The results from the synthetic suspensions showed that the highest concentrations of the PAHs were found in the Filtrated fractions and, surprisingly, high loads were found in the Dissolved fractions. The PAHs identified in stormwater in the Particulate fractions and Dissolved fractions follow their hydrophobic properties. In most samples >50% of the HMW PAHs were found in the Particulate fractions, while the LMW and MMW PAHs were found to a higher extent in the Filtrated fractions. The highest concentrations of PAHs were present in the stormwater with the highest total suspended solids (TSS); the relative amount of the HMW PAHs was highest in the Particulate fractions (particles>0.7 μm). The highest concentration of PAHs in the Colloidal fraction was found in the sample with occurrence of small nano-sized particles (<10nm). The results show the importance of developing technologies that both can manage particulate matter and effectively remove PAHs present in the Colloidal and Dissolved fractions in stormwater. PMID:26057998

  6. Variation of Atmospheric Deposition of Acid Species and Yellow Sand Particles From 1987 to 1999 Through Modeling Studies and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Uno, I.; Zhang, M.; Akimoto, H.

    2002-05-01

    Acid deposition is of serious environmental concern in East Asia. Wet and dry deposition monitoring datasets have been collected for long enough to understand the deposition distribution and its variation in time and space in this region Field observations indicate that acid precipitation often occurs in the southern part of China, even though emissions of the precursors are stronger in the north, where such high levels of strong acids in precipitation have not been widely. The acidity of rainwater is heavily influenced and modified by natural soil dust from desert and semi-arid areas. This soil aerosol, or _gKOSA", is lifted from Asian deserts and the Loess plateau, and then carried by the prevailing wind over East Asia. A comprehensive Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (AQPMS) is used to perform year-long, quantitative simulation of rainwater pH in East Asia for 1987 and 1999, respectively with emissions of Akimoto et al.(1987) and Street et al.(2000), to discuss the variation of deposition of acid species and yellow sand particles due to the emission change in the past dozen years. Monitoring data at 17 sites of EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) in addition to the field observation data of SEPA(State Environmental Protection Agency) of China are used to evaluate the model, and a reasonable agreement is obtained. Emission in Sichuan province has decreased and emission in central China including Hubei province and Hunan province has increased. Model simulation shows the change of emission pattern caused the serious acid-rain-hit area moving southeastward as observed. In the west part of Sichuan province, the pH value increased, this is partly due to the success of countermeasures against acid rain in China since 1996, which reduce the emission in Sichuan area much more than expected. The variations of annual distribution of rain pH, sulfate, nitrite and yellow sand particles deposition are also discussed in detail, so do the

  7. Anacardic Acids from Cashew Nuts Ameliorate Lung Damage Induced by Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Owen, Robert W.; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50 μg of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100 μL of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  8. Investigation of a dual-particle liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor for extractive fermentation of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manoj; Bassi, Amarjeet S; Zhu, Jesse J-X; Gomaa, Hassan

    2008-01-01

    A dual-particle liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed (DP-LSCFB) bioreactor has been constructed and investigated for the simultaneous production and extraction of lactic acid using immobilized Lactobacillus bulgaricus and ion-exchange resins. The apparatus consisted of a downer fluidized bed, 13 cm I.D. and 4.75 m tall, and a riser fluidized bed, 3.8 cm I.D. and 5.15 m in height. The lactic acid production and removal was carried out in the downer, while the riser was used for the recovery of lactic acid. A continuously recirculating bed of ion-exchange resin was used for adsorption of the produced acid as well as for maintaining optimum pH for bioconversion, thus eliminating the need for costly and complex chemical control approach used in conventional techniques. Studies using lactic acid aqueous solution as feed and sodium hydroxide solution as regeneration stream showed 93% lactic acid removal from the downer and 46% recovery in the riser under the conditions investigated. Such results prove the functionality of using the newly developed bioreactor design for the continuous production and recovery of products of biotechnological significance. PMID:19194893

  9. Anacardic acids from cashew nuts ameliorate lung damage induced by exposure to diesel exhaust particles in mice.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50  μ g of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100  μ L of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  10. Aerosol-chamber study of the α-pinene/O 3 reaction: influence of particle acidity on aerosol yields and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Gnauk, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    α-Pinene ozonolysis was carried out in the presence of ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid seed particles in a 9 m 3 Teflon chamber at the mixing ratios of 100 ppbv for α-pinene and about 70 ppbv for ozone. The evolution of size distribution was measured by means of a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS). The resulting secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was sampled by a denuder/quartz fiber filter combination for the determination of the total organic carbon concentration (TOC) in the particle phase, using a thermographic method and by a denuder/PTFE filter combination for the analysis of individual chemical species in the particle phase using capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS). cis-Pinic acid ( m/ z 185) and another species tentatively identified at m/ z 171 and 199 were the major particle phase species for both seed particles although the product yields were different, indicating the influence of seed particle acidity. A thermographic method for the determination of TOC showed an increase of particle phase organics by 40% for the experiments with higher acidity. CE-ESI-MS analysis showed a large increase in the concentration of compounds with Mw>300 from the experiments with sulfuric acid seed particles. These results suggest that the seed particle acidity enhances the yield of SOA and plays an important role in the formation of larger molecules in the particle phase. Our results from direct particle phase chemical analysis suggest for the first time that condensation of smaller organics takes place by polymerization or aldol condensation following the formation of aldehydes, such as pinonaldehyde from the terpene ozonolysis.

  11. Use of liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry for identification of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid in Anoectochilus roxburghii (wall.) Lindl.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liying; Chen, Tianwen; Ye, Zhao; Chen, Guonan

    2007-07-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA) are the two important bioactive compounds in Anoectochilus roxburghii (wall) Lindl (A. roxburghii), which has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine. So far, there has been no report to indicate that A. roxburghii contains these two bioactive compounds. It is necessary to develop an effective method to extract and analyze OA and UA in A. roxburghii. In this paper, a quantitative method, consisting of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) followed by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-IT-MS) analysis, was developed for identification of OA and UA in A. roxburghii. The extraction was carried out by using CO(2) as the supercritical fluid and ethanol as the modifier before LC separation. The mobile phase used for LC separation consisted of acetic acid (1%, v/v), water (15%, v/v) and methanol (84%, v/v), and the elution was performed at a flow rate of 0.8 ml/min. The mass spectrometer was operated in APCI(+) mode with selected ion monitoring (SIM) to quantify OA and UA at m/z 439.4. Under optimum conditions, the linear responses of OA and UA were obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-80 (r = 0.9992) and 0.5-50 microg/ml (r = 0.9989) with the detection limits of 0.125 and 0.085 microg/ml, respectively. The proposed method has been used for the identification and quantitation of OA and UA in a real A. roxburghii sample. PMID:17535010

  12. Determination of the strong acidity of atmospheric fine-particles (<2. 5 mum) using annular denuder technology. Standard method, enhanced method

    SciTech Connect

    Purdue, L.J.

    1992-11-01

    The report is a standardized methodology description for the determination of strong acidity of fine particles (less than 2.5 micrometers) in ambient air using annular denuder technology. The methodology description includes two parts: Part A - Standard Method and Part B - Enhanced Method. The Standard Method utilizes a denuder for removing ammonia and a filter assembly for determination of atmospheric strong acidity fine particle aerosols in ambient air, but does not account for potential interferences from nitric acid, ammonium nitrate aerosol or other ammonium salts which might bias the acidity measurement. The Enhanced Method adds an additional denuder upstream of the filter assembly to selectively remove acid gases (nitric acid vapors, nitrous acid and sulfur dioxide) from the gas stream prior to filtration. In addition, backup nylon and citric acid impregnated filters are used to correct for biases due to the dissociation of ammonium nitrate aerosol.

  13. Identification and quantitation of new glutamic acid derivatives in soy sauce by UPLC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Chen, Ting

    2013-10-01

    Glutamic acid is an abundant amino acid that lends a characteristic umami taste to foods. In fermented foods, glutamic acid can be found as a free amino acid formed by proteolysis or as a non-proteolytic derivative formed by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to identify different structures of glutamic acid derivatives in a typical fermented protein-based food product, soy sauce. An acidic fraction was prepared with anion-exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by UPLC/MS/MS and UPLC/TOF-MS. α-Glutamyl, γ-glutamyl, and pyroglutamyl dipeptides, as well as lactoyl amino acids, were identified in the acidic fraction of soy sauce. They were chemically synthesized for confirmation of their occurrence and quantified in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Pyroglutamyl dipeptides accounted for 770 mg/kg of soy sauce, followed by lactoyl amino acids (135 mg/kg) and γ-glutamyl dipeptides (70 mg/kg). In addition, N-succinoylglutamic acid was identified for the first time in food as a minor compound in soy sauce (5 mg/kg). PMID:24130027

  14. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Jill A.; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese; Risa, Kristin; Roepstorff, Peter; Fladmark, Kari E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM), the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM) could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment. PMID:23708184

  15. Identification of enzyme activity that conjugates indole-3-acetic acid to aspartate in immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the first identification of plant enzyme activity catalyzing the conjugation of indole-3-acetic acid to amino acids. Enzymatic synthesis of indole-3-acetylaspartate (IAA-Asp) by a crude enzyme preparation from immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) was observed. The reaction yielded a product with the same Rf as IAA-Asp standard after thin layer chromatography. The identity of IAA-Asp was verified by HPLC analysis. IAA-Asp formation was dependent on ATP and Mg2+, and was linear during a 60 min period. The enzyme preparation obtained after poly(ethylene glycol) 6000 fractionation showed optimum activity at pH 8.0, and the temperature optimum for IAA-Asp synthesis was 30 degrees C. PMID:17920159

  16. [Identification of phenylacetic acid produced by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis, the causal agent of bayoud, using GC-MS].

    PubMed

    Ait Kettout, T; Rahmania, F

    2010-01-01

    These studies are concerned with the isolation and identification of secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis (F. o. a.), the causal agent of bayoud, the wilt disease of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Fungal secondary metabolites are chemical compounds identified in a limited number of species. They consist of toxins, antibiotics and antifungal agents. Among the metabolites we could isolate from the pathogen grown in a liquid medium, and then identify by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), phenylacetic acid has been distinguished. This compound is widely described in the literature as having antimicrobial, antifungal, phytotoxic properties and also endowed with hormonal activity similar to that of indole acetic acid (IAA). To date, this metabolite has never been reported in F. o. a. PMID:21146137

  17. Improving amino-acid identification, fit and C(alpha) prediction using the Simplex method in automated model building.

    PubMed

    Romo, Tod D; Sacchettini, James C; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2006-11-01

    Automated methods for protein model building in X-ray crystallography typically use a two-phased approach that involves first modeling the protein backbone followed by building in the side chains. The latter phase requires the identification of the amino-acid side-chain type as well as fitting of the side-chain model into the observed electron density. While mistakes in identification of individual side chains are common for a number of reasons, sequence alignment can sometimes be used to correct errors by mapping fragments into the true (expected) amino-acid sequence and exploiting contiguity constraints among neighbors. However, side chains cannot always be confidently aligned; this depends on having sufficient accuracy in the initial calls. The recognition of amino-acid side-chains based on the surrounding pattern of electron density, whether by features, density correlation or free atoms, can be sensitive to inaccuracies in the coordinates of the predicted backbone C(alpha) atoms to which they are anchored. By incorporating a Nelder-Mead Simplex search into the side-chain identification and model-building routines of TEXTAL, it is demonstrated that this form of residue-by-residue rigid-body real-space refinement (in which the C(alpha) itself is allowed to shift) can improve the initial accuracy of side-chain selection by over 25% on average (from 25% average identity to 32% on a test set of five representative proteins, without corrections by sequence alignment). This improvement in amino-acid selection accuracy in TEXTAL is often sufficient to bring the pairwise amino-acid identity of chains in the model out of the so-called ;twilight zone' for sequence-alignment methods. When coupled with sequence alignment, use of the Simplex search yielded improvements in side-chain accuracy on average by over 13 percentage points (from 64 to 77%) and up to 38 percentage points (from 40 to 78%) in one case compared with using sequence alignment alone. PMID:17057345

  18. Identification of mebeverine acid as the main circulating metabolite of mebeverine in man.

    PubMed

    Stockis, Arnel; Guelen, P J M; de Vos, D

    2002-06-20

    The intestinal spasmolytic drug mebeverine is known to undergo fast in vivo enzymatic hydrolysis into mebeverine alcohol and veratric acid. A reversed-phase HPLC method with coulometric detection was developed in order to assay the hitherto unidentified secondary metabolite mebeverine acid. After intake of a single oral dose of 405 mg mebeverine hydrochloride in four healthy human volunteers, peak plasma concentrations of mebeverine acid were found to be 1000-fold higher than those of mebeverine alcohol, i.e. approximately 3 microg/ml versus 3 ng/ml. The appearance of mebeverine acid in plasma (median T(max)=1.25 h) as well as its disappearance (median apparent t(1/2)=1.1 h) were rapid. The urinary excretion of mebeverine acid within the first 4 h after dosing amounted to 67% of the mebeverine dose (median range: 23-107%). Mebeverine acid appears to be a valuable marker of oral exposure to mebeverine. PMID:12062694

  19. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kate E.; Burton, Edward D.; Cook, Perran; Raven, Mark D.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.

  20. Identification of novel secreted fatty acids that regulate nitrogen catabolite repression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoying; Hirai, Go; Ueki, Masashi; Hirota, Hiroshi; Wang, Qianqian; Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Hitora, Yuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Yashiroda, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of poor nitrogen sources such as branched-chain amino acids is repressed in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources such as NH4+ and glutamate (Glu), which is called nitrogen catabolite repression. Amino acid auxotrophic mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were unable to grow on minimal medium containing NH4Cl or Glu even when adequate amounts of required amino acids were supplied. However, growth of these mutant cells was recovered in the vicinity of colonies of the prototrophic strain, suggesting that the prototrophic cells secrete some substances that can restore uptake of amino acids by an unknown mechanism. We identified the novel fatty acids, 10(R)-acetoxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid and 10(R)-hydroxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid, as secreted active substances, referred to as Nitrogen Signaling Factors (NSFs). Synthetic NSFs were also able to shift nitrogen source utilization from high-quality to poor nitrogen sources to allow adaptive growth of the fission yeast amino acid auxotrophic mutants in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources. Finally, we demonstrated that the Agp3 amino acid transporter was involved in the adaptive growth. The data highlight a novel intra-species communication system for adaptation to environmental nutritional conditions in fission yeast. PMID:26892493

  1. Identification of novel secreted fatty acids that regulate nitrogen catabolite repression in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoying; Hirai, Go; Ueki, Masashi; Hirota, Hiroshi; Wang, Qianqian; Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Hitora, Yuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Yashiroda, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of poor nitrogen sources such as branched-chain amino acids is repressed in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources such as NH4(+) and glutamate (Glu), which is called nitrogen catabolite repression. Amino acid auxotrophic mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were unable to grow on minimal medium containing NH4Cl or Glu even when adequate amounts of required amino acids were supplied. However, growth of these mutant cells was recovered in the vicinity of colonies of the prototrophic strain, suggesting that the prototrophic cells secrete some substances that can restore uptake of amino acids by an unknown mechanism. We identified the novel fatty acids, 10(R)-acetoxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid and 10(R)-hydroxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid, as secreted active substances, referred to as Nitrogen Signaling Factors (NSFs). Synthetic NSFs were also able to shift nitrogen source utilization from high-quality to poor nitrogen sources to allow adaptive growth of the fission yeast amino acid auxotrophic mutants in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources. Finally, we demonstrated that the Agp3 amino acid transporter was involved in the adaptive growth. The data highlight a novel intra-species communication system for adaptation to environmental nutritional conditions in fission yeast. PMID:26892493

  2. A novel method based on physicochemical properties of amino acids and one class classification algorithm for disease gene identification.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Abdulaziz; Charkari, Nasrollah Moghadam

    2015-08-01

    Identifying the genes that cause disease is one of the most challenging issues to establish the diagnosis and treatment quickly. Several interesting methods have been introduced for disease gene identification for a decade. In general, the main differences between these methods are the type of data used as a prior-knowledge, as well as machine learning (ML) methods used for identification. The disease gene identification task has been commonly viewed by ML methods as a binary classification problem (whether any gene is disease or not). However, the nature of the data (since there is no negative data available for training or leaners) creates a major problem which affect the results. In this paper, sequence-based, one class classification method is introduced to assign genes to disease class (yes, no). First, to generate feature vector, the sequences of proteins (genes) are initially transformed to numerical vector using physicochemical properties of amino acid. Second, as there is no definite approach to define non-disease genes (negative data); we have attempted to model solely disease genes (positive data) to make a prediction by employing Support Vector Data Description algorithm. The experimental results confirm the efficiency of the method with precision, recall and F-measure of 79.3%, 82.6% and 80.9%, respectively. PMID:26146156

  3. Detection and identification of alkylphosphonic acids by positive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry using a tricationic reagent.

    PubMed

    Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Purohit, Ajay; Dubey, D K

    2011-11-30

    The retrospective detection and identification of degradation products of chemical warfare agents are of immense importance in order to prove their spillage and use. A highly sensitive liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method--using an imidazolium-based tricationic reagent--was developed for the detection and identification of the anionic degradation products of nerve agents. A commercially available solution of 1,3-imidazolium-bis-(1-hexylbenzylimidazolium) trifluoride (IBHBI) formed adducts with alkylphosphonic acids (APAs), allowing detection of the APAs by positive mode ESI-MS. Tandem mass spectrometry was used for the unambiguous identification of the APAs. Parameters influencing the formation and stability of these adduct during mass spectrometric analysis, such as solvent composition, concentration of IBHBI, effect of pH and interferences by salts, were optimized. The absolute limits of detection (0.1 ng) for achieved for the APAs were better than those previously reported, and linear dynamic ranges of 10-2000 ng mL(-1) were achieved. The method was repeatable with a relative standard deviation ≤7.3%. APAs present in aqueous samples provided by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons during the 22(nd) and 24(th) Official Proficiency tests were detected and identified as IBHBI adducts. The added advantage of this method is that low-mass analytes are detected at higher mass, thus obviating the problem with background noise at low mass. PMID:22002694

  4. Gas-particle partitioning of organic acids during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS): measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. A. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-Particle partitioning measurements of organic acids were carried out during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS, June-July 2013) at the Centerville, AL Supersite in the Southeast US, a region with significant isoprene and terpene emissions. Organic acid measurements were made with a Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) and acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion. We investigate both individual species and bulk organic acids and partitioning to organic and water phases in the aerosol. Measured partitioning is compared to data from three other instruments that can also quantify gas-particle partitioning with high time resolution: another HRToF-CIMS using iodide (I-) as the reagent ion to ionize acids and other highly oxidized compounds, a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG), and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS The partitioning measurements for three of the instruments are generally consistent, with results in the same range for most species and following similar temporal trends and diurnal cycles. The TD-PTRMS measures on average ½ the partitioning to the particle phase of the acetate CIMS. Both the measurements and the model of partitioning to the organic phase respond quickly to temperature, and the model agrees with the measured partitioning within the error of the measurement for multiple compounds, although many compounds do not match the modeled partitioning, especially at lower m/z. This discrepancy may be due to thermal decomposition of larger molecules into smaller ones when heated.

  5. Transcriptome-based identification of new anti-anti-inflammatory and vasodilating properties of the n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid in vascular endothelial cell under proinflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, Valentina; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata; Calabriso, Nadia; Buonomo, Tonia; Stuppia, Liborio; Storelli, Carlo; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Scope High intakes of n-3 fatty acids exert anti-inflammatory effects and cardiovascular protection, but the underlying molecular basis is incompletely defined. By genome-wide analysis we searched for novel effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on gene expression and pathways in human vascular endothelium under pro-inflammatory conditions. Methods and Results Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with DHA and then stimulated with interleukin(IL)-1β. Total RNA was extracted, and gene expression examined by DNA microarray. DHA alone altered the expression of 188 genes, decreasing 92 and increasing 96. IL-1β changed the expression of 2031 genes, decreasing 997 and increasing 1034. Treatment with DHA before stimulation significantly affected the expression of 116 IL-1β-deregulated genes, counter-regulating the expression of 55 genes among those decreased and of 61 among those increased. Functional and network analyses identified immunological, inflammatory and metabolic pathways as the most affected. Newly identified DHA-regulated genes are involved in stemness, cellular growth, cardiovascular system function and cancer, and included cytochrome p450 4F2(CYP4F2), transforming growth factor(TGF)-β2, Cluster of Differentiation (CD)47, caspase recruitment domain(CARD)11 and phosphodiesterase(PDE)5α. Conclusions Endothelial exposure to DHA regulates novel genes and related pathways. Such unbiased identification should increase our understanding of mechanisms by which n-3 fatty acids affect human diseases. PMID:26114549

  6. Reaction of oleic acid particles with NO3 radicals: Products, mechanism, and implications for radical-initiated organic aerosol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2006-03-16

    The heterogeneous reaction of liquid oleic acid aerosol particles with NO3 radicals in the presence of NO2, N2O5, and O2 was investigated in an environmental chamber using a combination of on-line and off-line mass spectrometric techniques. The results indicate that the major reaction products, which are all carboxylic acids, consist of hydroxy nitrates, carbonyl nitrates, dinitrates, hydroxydinitrates, and possibly more highly nitrated products. The key intermediate in the reaction is the nitrooxyalkylperoxy radical, which is formed by the addition of NO3 to the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent addition of O2. The nitrooxyalkylperoxy radicals undergo self-reactions to form hydroxy nitrates and carbonyl nitrates, and may also react with NO2 to form nitrooxy peroxynitrates. The latter compounds are unstable and decompose to carbonyl nitrates and dinitrates. It is noteworthy that in this reaction nitrooxyalkoxy radicals appear not to be formed, as indicated by the absence of the expected products of decomposition or isomerization of these species. This is different from gas-phase alkene-NO3 reactions, in which a large fraction of the products are formed through these pathways. The results may indicate that, for liquid organic aerosol particles in low NOx environments, the major products of the radical-initiated oxidation (including by OH radicals) of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds will be substituted forms of the parent compound rather than smaller decomposition products. These compounds will remain in the particle and can potentially enhance particle hygroscopicity and the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. PMID:16526637

  7. Reversible transformation between α-oxo acids and α-amino acids on ZnS particles: a photochemical model for tuning the prebiotic redox homoeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Yanqiang; Su, Wenhui

    2013-01-01

    How prebiotic metabolic pathways could have formed is an essential question for the origins of life on early Earth. From the abiogenetic point of view, the emergence of primordial metabolism may be postulated as a continuum from Earth's geochemical processes to chemoautotrophic biochemical procedures on mineral surfaces. In the present study, we examined in detail the reversible amination of α-ketoglutarate on UV-irradiated ZnS particles under variable reaction conditions such as pH, temperature, hole scavenger species and concentrations, and different amino acids. It was observed that the reductive amination of α-ketoglutarate and the oxidative amination of glutamate were both effectively performed on ZnS surfaces in the presence and absence of a hole scavenger, respectively. Accordingly, a photocatalytic mechanism was proposed. The reversible photochemical reaction was more efficient under basic conditions but independent of temperature in the range of 30-60 °C. SO3 2- was more effective than S2- as the hole scavenger. Finally, we extended the glutamate dehydrogenase-like chemistry to a set of other α-amino acids and their corresponding α-oxo acids and found that hydrophobic amino acid side chains were more conducive to the reversible redox reactions. Since the experimental conditions are believed to have been prevalent in shallow water hydrothermal vent systems of early Earth, the results of this work not only suggest that the ZnS-assisted photochemical reaction can regulate the redox equilibrium between α-amino acids and α-oxo acids, but also provide a model of how prebiotic metabolic homoeostasis could have been developed and regulated. These findings can advance our understanding of the establishment of archaic non-enzymatic metabolic systems and the origins of autotrophy.

  8. Mercapturic acids derived from toluene in rat urine samples: identification and measurement by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cosnier, Frédéric; Brochard, Céline; Burgart, Manuella; Cossec, Benoît

    2012-10-01

    Toluene is one of the most widely used CMR chemicals in industry. Worker exposure to this compound is regulated in France, but new, more sensitive methods are required to effectively monitor this exposure. A gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was developed and fully validated for the simultaneous determination of urinary toluene mercapturic acids derived from side chain and ring oxidation, i.e., benzylmercapturic acid and the three isomers o-, m- and p-toluylmercapturic acids, respectively. The method involves a simple and efficient two-step preparation procedure consisting of liquid-liquid extraction of the urinary acids followed by a microwave-assisted esterification of the isolated compounds using 2-propanol. The method meets all the required validation criteria: high selectivity, intra-day and inter-day precision ranges between 1.0 % and 12.4 %, with close to 100 % recovery. Linearity has been shown over the reduced concentration range 0.03-0.5 mg/L whereas a multiplicative model (ln-ln transformation) had to be used to describe the full range of concentrations 0.03-20 mg/L. The limits of detection for the four analytes, ranging from 2.8 to 5.5 μg/L, made the method suitable for their identification and quantification in urine from rats inhaling toluene in the 2 to 200 ppm concentration range. All urine samples from exposed rats contained measurable amounts of all metabolites. This is the first time that o- and m-toluylmercapturic acids have been shown to occur. Our results confirm the hypothesis that toluene mercapturic acids derived from ring oxidation exist in three forms. PMID:22829455

  9. Magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) in urban soils: Their source identification and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shenggao; Yu, Xiuling; Chen, Yuyin

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic measurement is an effective method to determine spatial distribution and the degree of heavy metal pollution and to identify various anthropogenic sources of heavy metals. The objectives of this investigation are to characterize the magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) in urban soils and to discuss their potential environmental implications. The TMPs are separated from the urban topsoils of Luoyang city, China. The magnetic properties, morphology, and mineral phase of TMPs are studied using mineral magnetic measurement, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), X-ray diffraction, and synchrotron-radiation-based microprobe. The content of TMPs in urban topsoils ranges from 0.05 to 1.95% (on average 0.32%). The magnetic susceptibility of TMPs ranges from 4559×10(-8) to 23,661×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1) (on average 13,637×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1)). Thermomagnetic and bulk X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that main magnetic minerals of TMPs are magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (α-Fe2O3). The morphology of TMPs observed by SEM includes three shape types: spherule, irregular-shaped, and aggregate particles. The size of spherical TMPs ranges from 30 to about 200 μm, with the largest percentage of 30-50 μm. Synchrotron-radiation-based microprobe (μ-XRF and μ-XRD) indicates that TMPs are enriched with heavy metals Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and Cr, which are incorporated into lattice or adsorbed on the surface of magnetite/hematite. The content of TMPs significantly relates with the Tomlinson Pollution Load Index (PLI) (R(2)=0.467), suggesting that it can be used as proxy indicator of degree of heavy metal contamination in urban soils. The magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of TMPs can serve as the identification of pollution sources in urban soils. PMID:26588801

  10. Using chiral identification of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid as a groundwater dating tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have studied the hydrologic fate of metolachlor and its two predominant metabolites, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid, in groundwater and base flows of streams for several years. These two metabolites are excellent markers for groundwater processes related to...

  11. STRUCTURAL IDENTIFICATION OF DEHYDROTRIFERULIC AND DEHYDROTETRAFERULIC ACIDS ISOLATED FROM INSOLUBLE MAIZE FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two new dehydrotriferulic acids and two dehydrotetraferulic acids were isolated from saponified maize bran insoluble fiber using size exclusion chromatography on BioBeads S-X3 followed by Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and semi-preparative Phenyl-Hexyl-RP-HPLC. Based on UV-spectroscopy, mass spectros...

  12. Identification of ellagic acid derivatives in methanolic extracts from Qualea species.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Ana L M; Carli, Camila B A; Rodrigues, Clenilson M; Maia, Danielle C G; Carlos, Iracilda Z; Eberlin, Marcos N; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia A; Vilegas, Wagner

    2008-01-01

    The methanolic extract from the barks of the medicinal plant Qualea parviflora (Vochysiaceae) was fractionated by column chromatography over silica gel followed by gel permeation over Sephadex LH-20 to give 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid-4-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), 3-O-methylellagic acid-4'-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (2), 3,3',4-tri-O-methylellagic acid-4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), and 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid (4), together with triterpenes and saponins. We also performed comparative analyses among this species and Q. grandiflora and Q. multiflora using high-pressure liquid chromatography. The biological assays showed that, when compared to the standard ellagic acid, compounds 1-4 are less cytotoxic but have a lower capacity of stimulating murine peritoneal macrophages to release nitric oxide and tumoural-alpha necrose factor. PMID:19227825

  13. Identification of Delta5-fatty acid desaturase from the cellular slime mold dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-01

    cDNA fragments putatively encoding amino acid sequences characteristic of the fatty acid desaturase were obtained using expressed sequence tag (EST) information of the Dictyostelium cDNA project. Using this sequence, we have determined the cDNA sequence and genomic sequence of a desaturase. The cloned cDNA is 1489 nucleotides long and the deduced amino acid sequence comprised 464 amino acid residues containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain. The whole sequence was 38.6% identical to the initially identified Delta5-desaturase of Mortierella alpina. We have confirmed its function as Delta5-desaturase by over expression mutation in D. discoideum and also the gain of function mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the lipids from transformed D. discoideum and yeast demonstrated the accumulation of Delta5-desaturated products. This is the first report concering fatty acid desaturase in cellular slime molds. PMID:10504413

  14. Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, J.; Takahashi, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Yabushita, A.; Shimizu, A.; Matsui, I.; Sugimoto, N.

    2006-04-13

    Uptakes of sulfate and nitrate onto Asian dust particles during transport from the Asian continent to the Pacific Ocean were analyzed by using a single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Observation was conducted at Tsukuba in Japan in the springtime of 2004. Sulfate-rich dust particles made their largest contribution during the 'dust event' in the middle of April 2004. As a result of detailed analysis including backward trajectory calculations, it was confirmed that sulfate components originating from coal combustion in the continent were internally mixed with dust particles. Even in the downstream of the outflow far from the continental coastline, significant contribution of Asian dust to sulfate was observed. Asian dust plays critical roles as the carrier of sulfate over the Pacific Ocean.

  15. Gallic Acid Production with Mouldy Polyurethane Particles Obtained from Solid State Culture of Aspergillus niger GH1.

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Marco; Mussatto, Solange I; Rodríguez, Raul; Teixeira, Jose A; Martinez, Jose L; Hernandez, Ayerim; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2015-06-01

    Gallic acid production in a batch bioreactor was evaluated using as catalytic material the mouldy polyurethane solids (MPS) obtained from a solid-state fermentation (SSF) bioprocess carried out for tannase production by Aspergillus niger GH1 on polyurethane foam powder (PUF) with 5 % (v/w) of tannic acid as inducer. Fungal biomass, tannic acid consumption and tannase production were kinetically monitored. SSF was stopped when tannase activity reached its maximum level. Effects of washing with distilled water and drying on the tannase activity of MPS were determined. Better results were obtained with dried and washed MPS retaining 84 % of the tannase activity. Maximum tannase activity produced through SSF after 24 h of incubation was equivalent to 130 U/gS with a specific activity of 36 U/mg. The methylgallate was hydrolysed (45 %) in an easy, cheap and fast bioprocess (30 min). Kinetic parameters of tannase self-immobilized on polyurethane particles were calculated to be 5 mM and 04.1 × 10(-2) mM/min for K M and V max, respectively. Results demonstrated that the MPS, with tannase activity, can be successfully used for the production of the antioxidant gallic acid from methyl-gallate substrate. Direct use of PMS to produce gallic acid can be advantageous as no previous extraction of enzyme is required, thus reducing production costs. PMID:25920332

  16. Development of an Interaction Assay between Single-Stranded Nucleic Acids Trapped with Silica Particles and Fluorescent Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Isoda, T.; Maeda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Biopolymers are easily denatured by heating, a change in pH or chemical substances when they are immobilized on a substrate. To prevent denaturation of biopolymers, we developed a method to trap a polynucleotide on a substrate by hydrogen bonding using silica particles with surfaces modified by aminoalkyl chains ([A-AM silane]/SiO2). [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was synthesized by silane coupling reaction of N-2-(aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (A-AM silane) with SiO2 particles with a diameter of 5 μm at 100 °C for 20 min. The surface chemical structure of [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations. The surface of the silica particles was modified with A-AM silane and primary amine groups were formed. [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was trapped with single-stranded nucleic acids [(Poly-X; X = A (adenine), G (guanine) and C (cytosine)] in PBS solution at 37 °C for 1 h. The single-stranded nucleic acids were trapped on the surface of the [A-AM silane]/SiO2 by hydrogen bonding to form conjugated materials. The resulting complexes were further conjugated by derivatives of acridine orange (AO) as fluorescent labels under the same conditions to form [AO:Poly-X:A-AM silane]/SiO2 complexes. Changes in the fluorescence intensity of these complexes originating from interactions between the single-stranded nucleic acid and aromatic compounds were also evaluated. The change in intensity displayed the order [AO: Poly-G: A-AM silane]/SiO2 > [AO:Poly-A:A-AM silane]/SiO2 >> [AO:Poly-C:A-AM silane]/SiO2. This suggests that the single-stranded nucleic acids conjugated with aminoalkyl chains on the surfaces of SiO2 particles and the change in fluorescence intensity reflected the molecular interaction between AO and the nucleic-acid base in a polynucleotide. PMID:24955635

  17. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles with Nitric Acid. A Combined CCSEM/EDX, ESEM AND ICP-MS Study

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2005-05-26

    The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four authentic dust samples with gas-phase nitric acid was investigated in this study. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to investigate the hygroscopic behavior of mineral dust particles reacted with nitric acid. Differences in the reactivity of mineral dust particles from these four different dust source regions with nitric acid were observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, namely China loess dust and Saudi coastal dust, were found to react to the greatest extent.

  18. Microbial Quality and Direct PCR Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Nonpathogenic Staphylococci from Artisanal Low-Acid Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Aymerich, T.; Martín, B.; Garriga, M.; Hugas, M.

    2003-01-01

    Detection of six species of lactic acid bacteria and six species of gram-positive catalase-positive cocci from low-acid fermented sausages (fuets and chorizos) was assessed by species-specific PCR. Without enrichment, Lactobacillus sakei and Lactobacillus curvatus were detected in 11.8% of the samples, and Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus xylosus were detected in 17.6%. Enriched samples allowed the detection of L. sakei and S. xylosus in all of the samples (100%) and of Enterococcus faecium in 11.8% of the sausages. The percentages of L. curvatus, L. plantarum, Staphylococcus carnosus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis varied depending on the sausage type. L. curvatus was detected in 80% of fuets and in 57% of chorizos. L. plantarum was found in 50% of fuets and 100% of chorizos. S. epidermidis was detected in only 11.8% of fuets, and S. carnosus was detected in only 5.9% of chorizos. Lactococcus lactis, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus simulans were not detected in any sausage type. From a microbiological point of view, 70.6% of the samples could be considered of high quality, as they had low counts of Enterobacteriaceae and did not contain any of the food-borne pathogens assayed. PMID:12902246

  19. Identification of a small, very acidic constitutive nucleolar protein (NO29) as a member of the nucleoplasmin family

    PubMed Central

    Zirwes, Rudolf F.; Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion S.; Franke, Werner W.

    1997-01-01

    We report the discovery and molecular characterization of a small and very acidic nucleolar protein of an SDS/PAGE mobility corresponding to Mr 29,000 (NO29). The cDNA-deduced sequence of the Xenopus laevis protein defines a polypeptide of a calculated molecular mass of 20,121 and a pI of 3.75, with an extended acidic region near its C terminus, and is related to the major nucleolar protein, NO38, and the histone-binding protein, nucleoplasmin. This member of the nucleoplasmin family of proteins was immunolocalized to nucleoli in Xenopus oocytes and diverse somatic cells. Protein NO29 is associated with nuclear particles from Xenopus oocytes, partly complexed with protein NO38, and occurs in preribosomes but not in mature ribosomes. The location and the enormously high content of negatively charged amino acids lead to the hypothesis that NO29 might be involved in the nuclear and nucleolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins and the coordinated assembly of pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:9326619

  20. Fluorescent Boronic Acid Polymer Grafted on Silica Particles for Affinity Separation of Saccharides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Boronic acid affinity gels are important for effective separation of biological active cis-diols, and are finding applications both in biotech industry and in biomedical research areas. To increase the efficacy of boronate affinity separation, it is interesting to introduce repeating boronic acid units in flexible polymer chains attached on solid materials. In this work, we synthesize polymer brushes containing boronic acid repeating units on silica gels using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A fluorescent boronic acid monomer is first prepared from an azide-tagged fluorogenic boronic acid and an alkyne-containing acrylate by Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction (the CuAAC click chemistry). The boronic acid monomer is then grafted to the surface of silica gel modified with an ATRP initiator. The obtained composite material contains boronic acid polymer brushes on surface and shows favorable saccharide binding capability under physiological pH conditions, and displays interesting fluorescence intensity change upon binding fructose and glucose. In addition to saccharide binding, the flexible polymer brushes on silica also enable fast separation of a model glycoprotein based on selective boronate affinity interaction. The synthetic approach and the composite functional material developed in this work should open new opportunities for high efficiency detection, separation, and analysis of not only simple saccharides, but also glycopeptides and large glycoproteins. PMID:24444898

  1. Fluorescent boronic acid polymer grafted on silica particles for affinity separation of saccharides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhifeng; Uddin, Khan Mohammad Ahsan; Kamra, Tripta; Schnadt, Joachim; Ye, Lei

    2014-02-12

    Boronic acid affinity gels are important for effective separation of biological active cis-diols, and are finding applications both in biotech industry and in biomedical research areas. To increase the efficacy of boronate affinity separation, it is interesting to introduce repeating boronic acid units in flexible polymer chains attached on solid materials. In this work, we synthesize polymer brushes containing boronic acid repeating units on silica gels using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A fluorescent boronic acid monomer is first prepared from an azide-tagged fluorogenic boronic acid and an alkyne-containing acrylate by Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction (the CuAAC click chemistry). The boronic acid monomer is then grafted to the surface of silica gel modified with an ATRP initiator. The obtained composite material contains boronic acid polymer brushes on surface and shows favorable saccharide binding capability under physiological pH conditions, and displays interesting fluorescence intensity change upon binding fructose and glucose. In addition to saccharide binding, the flexible polymer brushes on silica also enable fast separation of a model glycoprotein based on selective boronate affinity interaction. The synthetic approach and the composite functional material developed in this work should open new opportunities for high efficiency detection, separation, and analysis of not only simple saccharides, but also glycopeptides and large glycoproteins. PMID:24444898

  2. Identification of novel secreted proteases during extracellular proteolysis by dermatophytes at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Sriranganadane, Dev; Waridel, Patrice; Salamin, Karine; Feuermann, Marc; Mignon, Bernard; Staib, Peter; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Quadroni, Manfredo; Monod, Michel

    2011-11-01

    The dermatophytes are a group of closely related fungi which are responsible for the great majority of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Among various potential virulence factors, their secreted proteolytic activity attracts a lot of attention. Most dermatophyte-secreted proteases which have so far been isolated in vitro are neutral or alkaline enzymes. However, inspection of the recently decoded dermatophyte genomes revealed many other hypothetical secreted proteases, in particular acidic proteases similar to those characterized in Aspergillus spp. The validation of such genome predictions instigated the present study on two dermatophyte species, Microsporum canis and Arthroderma benhamiae. Both fungi were found to grow well in a protein medium at acidic pH, accompanied by extracellular proteolysis. Shotgun MS analysis of secreted protein revealed fundamentally different protease profiles during fungal growth in acidic versus neutral pH conditions. Most notably, novel dermatophyte-secreted proteases were identified at acidic pH such as pepsins, sedolisins and acidic carboxypeptidases. Therefore, our results not only support genome predictions, but demonstrate for the first time the secretion of acidic proteases by dermatophytes. Our findings also suggest the existence of different pathways of protein degradation into amino acids and short peptides in these highly specialized pathogenic fungi. PMID:21919205

  3. Identification and heterologous expression of a Δ4-fatty acid desaturase gene from Isochrysis sphaerica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bing; Jiang, Mulan; Wan, Xia; Gong, Yangmin; Liang, Zhuo; Hu, Chuanjiong

    2013-10-28

    The marine microalga Isochrysis sphaerica is rich in the very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5ω-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6ω-3) that are important to human health. Here, we report a functional characterization of a Δ4-fatty acid desaturase gene (FAD4) from I. sphaerica. IsFAD4 contains a 1,284 bp open reading frame encoding a 427 amino acid polypeptide. The deduced amino sequence comprises three conserved histidine motifs and a cytochrome b5 domain at its N-terminus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that IsFad4 formed a unique Isochrysis clade distinct from the counterparts of other eukaryotes. Heterologous expression of IsFAD4 in Pichia pastoris showed that IsFad4 was able to desaturate docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) to form DHA, and the rate of converting DPA to DHA was 79.8%. These results throw light on the potential industrial production of specific polyunsaturated fatty acids through IsFAD4 transgenic yeast or oil crops. PMID:23851273

  4. Fine-particle emissions from solid biofuel combustion studied with single-particle mass spectrometry: Identification of markers for organics, soot, and ash components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagels, Joakim; Dutcher, Dabrina D.; Stolzenburg, Mark R.; McMurry, Peter H.; GäLli, Markus E.; Gross, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of combustion phase and fuel on smoke particle emissions from a wood stove operated with three different wood fuels and from a corn stove were investigated. A single-particle mass spectrometer (aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS)) was used for time- and size-resolved chemical signatures and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used for online mobility size distributions. Markers of particle phase organics and elemental carbon, PM1.5, and CO emissions were strongly reduced for the corn stove compared to the wood stove. This is because the more controlled fuel and air supply in the corn stove result in more complete combustion. NOx emissions and particle phase phosphates showed the opposite trend. Marker ions and particle types associated with soot and alkali salts such as potassium chloride and potassium sulfates dominated during flaming combustion and were correlated with increased exhaust temperatures and reduced CO emissions. Marker ions of hydrocarbons and oxidized organics as well as a particle cluster type with a strong organic signature were associated with reduced combustion temperature and increased CO levels, observed during start up from cold stove, addition of fuel, and combustion with reduced air supply. Two different particle types were identified in corn experiments when particles were classified according to mobility before they were measured with the ATOFMS. "Less massive" particles contained mostly ash and soot and had vacuum aerodynamic diameters that were nearly independent of mobility diameter. "More massive" particles had aerodynamic diameters that increased linearly with mobility diameter, indicating approximately spherical shapes, and were hypothesized to consist of organics.

  5. Incorporation of D-alanine into lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid in Bacillus subtilis. Identification of genes and regulation.

    PubMed

    Perego, M; Glaser, P; Minutello, A; Strauch, M A; Leopold, K; Fischer, W

    1995-06-30

    The Bacillus subtilis dlt operon (D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid) is responsible for D-alanine esterification of both lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and wall teichoic acid (WTA). The dlt operon contains five genes, dltA-dltE. Insertional inactivation of dltA-dltD results in complete absence of D-alanine from both LTA and WTA. Based on protein sequence similarity with the Lactobacillus casei dlt gene products (Heaton, M. P., and Neuhaus, F. C. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 4707-4717), we propose that dltA encodes the D-alanine-D-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl) and dltC the D-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp). We further hypothesize that the products of dltB and dltD are concerned with the transport of activated D-alanine through the membrane and the final incorporation of D-alanine into LTA. The hydropathy profiles of the dltB and dltD gene products suggest a transmembrane location for the former and an amino-terminal signal peptide for the latter. The incorporation of D-alanine into LTA and WTA did not separate in any of the mutants studied which indicates that either one and the same enzyme is responsible for D-alanine incorporation into both polymers or a separate enzyme, encoded outside the dlt operon, transfers the D-alanyl residues from LTA to WTA (Haas, R., Koch, H.-U., and Fischer, W. (1984) FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 21, 27-31). Inactivation of dltE has no effect on D-alanine ester content of both LTA and WTA, and at present we cannot propose any function for its gene product. Transcription analysis shows that the dlt operon is transcribed from a sigma D-dependent promoter and follows the pattern of transcription of genes belonging to the sigma D regulon. However, the turn off of transcription observed before sporulation starts seems to be dependent on the Spo0A and AbrB sporulation proteins and results in a D-alanine-free purely anionic LTA in the spore membrane. The dlt operon is dispensable for cell growth; its inactivation does not affect cell growth or morphology as

  6. Products of the radical initiated oxidation of model solid and liquid organic acid particles in simulated "clean" and "polluted" environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum, L. H.; Smith, G. D.

    2009-05-01

    Using a flow tube reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, the Cl-initiated oxidation of solid and supercooled liquid organic acid particles were investigated at 293 K. In creating aerosols of species which are able to be supercooled or solid at room temperature, it is possible to distinguish the effect of phase on particle reactivity and product formation. In a clean atmosphere, where there are negligible concentrations of NOx, the primary fate of peroxy radicals (formed from H-abstraction by Cl and OH radicals in the presence of O2) are their reactions to form ketone and alcohol products. These products are then able to undergo further oxidation to form multiply oxidized products. The formation of low-molecular weight volatile species may also be important in the oxidative aging of organic aerosols, however neither the mechanism of their formation nor their formation yields are well understood. We have shown that, for equivalent Cl exposures, more multiply-oxidized species as well as more low-molecular-weight species were created from the oxidation of solid particles than from liquid particles. The findings from these studies suggest that slower diffusion of the oxidation products in solid particles confines them to the surface where they continue to react with Cl radicals producing more-highly- functionalized products which may decompose more readily. By introducing nitric oxide to the flow tube reaction system, we show that in a polluted atmosphere, where NOx is present in significant concentrations, organic nitrate formation may become important on the surface of solid particles but not liquid particles as the RO2 are confined to the surface of solid particles (causing a enhanced localized concentration of RO2) where they may then react with ambient nitric oxide through the reaction RO2 + NO → RO2NO* → RONO2. These experiments of these model systems indicate that particle phase could be important in determining how organic aerosols

  7. Identification of possible sources of atmospheric PM10 using particle size, SEM-EDS and XRD analysis, Jharia Coalfield Dhanbad, India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debananda; Singh, Gurdeep; Gosai, Nitin

    2015-11-01

    Identification of responsible sources of pollution using physical parameter particulate matter (PM)10 in a critically polluted area is discussed in this paper. Database was generated by Ambient Air Quality Monitoring (AAQM) with respect to PM10 and PM2.5 in 18 monitoring stations at Jharia coalfield as per the siting criteria (IS: 5182, Part XIV) during 2011 to 2012. Identification of the probable sources of PM10 was carried out through particle size, shape, morphology analysis (scanning electron microscopy (SEM)), suitable compounds (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) and elements (energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)). Monitoring stations nearby opencast mine were affected by the big-sized and irregular-shaped particles; on the other hand, monitoring stations nearby city were affected by the small-sized and regular-shaped particles. In a city area, additional sources like diesel generator (DG) set, construction activities, coal burning, etc., were identified. Blistering effects were also observed in the particles from mine fire-affected areas. Using the X-ray diffraction technique, presence of FeS2, CuO, FeSO4 and CuSO4 compounds was observed, which indicates the effects of mine fire on particulate emission due to presence of SO4(2-) and S2- ions. PMID:26450690

  8. Direct photoaffinity labeling of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (CRABP-I) with all-trans-retinoic acid: identification of amino acids in the ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Radominska-Pandya, A

    2000-10-17

    Cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins I and II (CRABP-I and -II, respectively) are transport proteins for all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A (retinol), and have been reported to be directly involved in the metabolism of RA. In this study, direct photoaffinity labeling with [11,12-(3)H]RA was used to identify amino acids comprising the ligand binding site of CRABP-I. Photoaffinity labeling of CRABP-I with [(3)H]RA was light- and concentration-dependent and was protected by unlabeled RA and various retinoids, indicating that the labeling was directed to the RA-binding site. Photolabeled CRABP-I was hydrolyzed with endoproteinase Lys-C to yield radioactive peptides, which were separated by reversed-phase HPLC for analysis by Edman degradation peptide sequencing. This method identified five modified amino acids from five separate HPLC fractions: Trp7, Lys20, Arg29, Lys38, and Trp109. All five amino acids are located within one side of the "barrel" structure in the area indicated by the reported crystal structure as the ligand binding site. This is the first direct identification of specific amino acids in the RA-binding site of CRABPs by photoaffinity labeling. These results provide significant information about the ligand binding site of the CRABP-I molecule in solution. PMID:11027136

  9. Thermolysis characteristics of salts of o-phthalic acid with the formation of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudanova, L. I.; Logvinenko, V. A.; Yudanov, N. F.; Rudina, N. A.; Ishchenko, A. V.; Korol'kov, I. V.; Semyannikov, P. P.; Sheludyakova, L. A.; Alferova, N. I.

    2016-06-01

    Studies of the thermolysis of ortho-[Ni(H2O)2(C8H4O4)](H2O)2, [Cu(H2O)(C8H4O4)], and acid [M(H2O)6](C8H5O4)2 (M(II) = Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II)), [Cu(H2O)2(C8H5O4)2] phthalates reveal that the solid products of their decomposition are composites with nanoparticles embedded in carbon-polymer matrices. Metallic nanoparticles with oxide nanoparticle impurities are detected in iron/cobalt polymer composites, while nickel/copper composites are composed of only metallic particles. It is found that nickel nanoparticles with the diameters of 6-8 nm are covered with disordered graphene layers, while the copperbased composite matrix contains spherical conglomerates (50-200 nm) with numerous spherical Cu particles (5-10 nm).

  10. Effect of 70-nm silica particles on the toxicity of acetaminophen, tetracycline, trazodone, and 5-aminosalicylic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Kondoh, M; Watari, A; Hasezaki, T; Isoda, K; Tsutsumi, Y; Yagi, K

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to nano-sized particles is increasing because they are used in a wide variety of industrial products, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Some animal studies indicate that such nanomaterials may have some toxicity, but their synergistic actions on the adverse effects of drugs are not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether 70-nm silica particles (nSP70), which are widely used in cosmetics and drug delivery, affect the toxicity of a drug for inflammatory bowel disease (5-aminosalicylic acid), an antibiotic drug (tetracycline), an antidepressant drug (trazodone), and an antipyretic drug (acetaminophen) in mice. Co-administration of nSP70 with trazodone did not increase a biochemical marker of liver injury. In contrast, co-administration increased the hepatotoxicity of the other drugs. Co-administration of nSP70 and tetracycline was lethal. These findings indicate that evaluation of synergistic adverse effects is important for the application of nano-sized materials. PMID:21612156

  11. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P; Gurinov, Andrey; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity. PMID:25579955

  12. Hydrothermal in situ preparation of TiO2 particles onto poly(lactic acid) electrospun nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Kamal K.; Mishra, Pradeep K.; Srivastava, Pradeep; Gangwar, Mayank; Nath, Gopal; Maiti, Pralay

    2013-01-01

    The novel poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/TiO2 hybrid nanofibres are produced via electrospinning technique. Hydrolysed titanium precursor has been electrosprayed simultaneously on the continuous electrospun PLA nanofibres surface. The adhered amorphous titania has been transformed into TiO2 particle through hydrothermal treatment for different times. The phase structure has been worked out using XRD, FTIR, XPS and Raman spectroscopy. The predominant phase is anatase with a small extent of brookite phase after the hydrothermal treatment. The size and location of TiO2 particle have been determined using SEM micrographs. The orderness of the PLA crystallites has been checked using XRD patterns before and after hydrothermal treatment. UV absorption capability of the titania coated nanofibres has been enhanced to a significant level. The antimicrobial activity of the hybrids has been verified using two different microorganisms (gram negative Escherichia coli and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) and 70% reduction of antimicrobial activity has been reported.

  13. The uptake of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} onto small sulfuric acid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.R.; Lovejoy, E.R. |

    1994-11-01

    The probabilities for N{sub 2}O{sub 5} loss onto sulfuric acid aerosol (60-80 wt% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 0.1-0.2 {mu}m radius, 230-300 K) were measured using a laminar flow reactor coupled to a sulfuric acid aerosol source and a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The aerosol morphology was extracted from measurements of the aerosol extinction of ultraviolet light (200-370nm) by using Mie theory. The reaction probabilities, {gamma}, are large (0.06-0.12) and are comparable to probabilities measured previously under similar conditions on bulk sulfuric acid surfaces and small aerosol. These measurements confirm that the overall reaction of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} with H{sub 2}O in/on 60-80% sulfuric acid is fast and the uptake is due to loss very close to the liquid surface. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Gas chromatography analysis of cellular fatty acids and neutral monosaccharides in the identification of lactobacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, A F; Korkeala, H; Mononen, I

    1987-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids and monosaccharides in a group of 14 lactobacilli were analyzed by gas chromatography and the identity of the components was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the same bacterial sample, both monosaccharides and fatty acids were liberated by methanolysis, and in certain experiments, fatty acids alone were released by basic hydrolysis. The results indicate that basic hydrolysis gave more comprehensive information about the fatty acids, but the analysis of monosaccharides was found to be much more useful in distinguishing between different species of lactobacilli. The method described allowed differentiation of 11 of 14 Lactobacillus species, and even single colonies isolated from agar plates could be used for analysis without subculturing. PMID:3435147

  15. Understanding Particle Formation: Solubility of Free Fatty Acids as Polysorbate 20 Degradation Byproducts in Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody Formulations.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Nidhi; Demeule, Barthélemy; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the aqueous solubilities at 2-8 °C of the major free fatty acids (FFAs) formed by polysorbate 20 (PS20) degradation and identify possible ways to predict, delay, or mitigate subsequent particle formation in monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. The FFA solubility limits at 2-8 °C were determined by titrating known amounts of FFA in monoclonal antibody formulations and identifying the FFA concentration leading to visible and subvisible particle formation. The solubility limits of lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids at 2-8 °C were 17 ± 1 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 1.5 ± 0.5 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.04% (w/v) PS20 at pH 5.4 and >22 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 0.75 ± 0.25 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.02% (w/v) PS20 at pH 6.0. For the first time, a 3D correlation between FFA solubility, PS20 concentration, and pH has been reported providing a rational approach for the formulator to balance these with regard to potential particle formation. The results suggest that the lower solubilities of the longer chain FFAs, generated from degradation of the stearate, palmitate, and myristate fraction of PS20, is the primary cause of seeding and subsequent FFA precipitation rather than the most abundant lauric acid. PMID:26419285

  16. Identification and synthesis of some fatty acid derivatives from larvae of Chilecomadia valdiviana (Lepidoptera: Cossidae).

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jan; Lopez, Katya; Buono-Core, Gonzalo

    2007-05-01

    Larvae of Chilecomadia valdiviana (Lepidoptera: Cossidae) were extracted and the extract was fractionated by chromatography on silica. As shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, the major fraction contained saturated and unsaturated straight-chain acetates, with (Z )-5,13-tetradecadienyl acetate and dodecyl acetate as the main components, while in a minor fraction the corresponding alcohols were detected. The identification of the compounds and the synthesis of some reference material are presented. PMID:17487622

  17. Raman spectroscopic identification of phthalic and mellitic acids in mineral matrices.

    PubMed

    Osterrothová, Kateřina; Jehlička, Jan

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy has many advantages for planetary exploration, and the Raman technique is currently being developed for future space missions. The Raman microspectroscopic study of organic acids (phthalic and mellitic acids) in experimentally prepared mixtures with halite and gypsum was performed using near infrared 785 nm and visible 514 nm excitation wavelengths. Gypsum and halite matrices were chosen as analogues of Martian minerals. Carboxylic acids mixed with mineral powders were also investigated through a UV-transparent crystal of gypsum and halite (approximately 2 mm, resp. 5 mm thick), thereby creating a type of artificial inclusion that could potentially be present in Martian minerals. The detection limit of phthalic acid mixed in mineral matrices and analyzed through crystals was 1 wt% using both excitation wavelengths. A Raman mellitic acid signal was obtained at a concentration as low as 1 wt% in halite matrix, and at a concentration of 5 wt% when analyzed through halite crystal. In the case of mellitic acid mixed with gypsum and for analyses through a gypsum crystal, the detection limit is 5 wt% using both excitation wavelengths. PMID:20870453

  18. Identification and Pharmacological Characterization of Multiple Allosteric Binding Sites on the Free Fatty Acid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel C.-H.; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J.; Brown, Sean P.; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  19. Identification and pharmacological characterization of multiple allosteric binding sites on the free fatty acid 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daniel C-H; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J; Brown, Sean P; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Swaminath, Gayathri

    2012-11-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  20. Identification and Characterization of Mutations Conferring Resistance to d-Amino Acids in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Leiman, Sara A.; Richardson, Charles; Foulston, Lucy; Elsholz, Alexander K. W.; First, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria produce d-amino acids for incorporation into the peptidoglycan and certain nonribosomally produced peptides. However, d-amino acids are toxic if mischarged on tRNAs or misincorporated into protein. Common strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis are particularly sensitive to the growth-inhibitory effects of d-tyrosine due to the absence of d-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase, an enzyme that prevents misincorporation of d-tyrosine and other d-amino acids into nascent proteins. We isolated spontaneous mutants of B. subtilis that survive in the presence of a mixture of d-leucine, d-methionine, d-tryptophan, and d-tyrosine. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that these strains harbored mutations affecting tRNATyr charging. Three of the most potent mutations enhanced the expression of the gene (tyrS) for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. In particular, resistance was conferred by mutations that destabilized the terminator hairpin of the tyrS riboswitch, as well as by a mutation that transformed a tRNAPhe into a tyrS riboswitch ligand. The most potent mutation, a substitution near the tyrosine recognition site of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, improved enzyme stereoselectivity. We conclude that these mutations promote the proper charging of tRNATyr, thus facilitating the exclusion of d-tyrosine from protein biosynthesis in cells that lack d-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase. IMPORTANCE Proteins are composed of l-amino acids. Mischarging of tRNAs with d-amino acids or the misincorporation of d-amino acids into proteins causes toxicity. This work reports on mutations that confer resistance to d-amino acids and their mechanisms of action. PMID:25733611

  1. Identification and characterization of an amino acid transporter expressed differentially in liver

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sumin; Roderick, Hywel Llewelyn; Camacho, Patricia; Jiang, Jean X.

    2000-01-01

    Cellular metabolic needs are fulfilled by transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane by means of specialized transporter proteins. Although many of the classical amino acid transporters have been characterized functionally, less than half of these proteins have been cloned. In this report, we identify and characterize a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane amino acid transporter. The deduced amino acid sequence is 505 residues and is highly hydrophobic with the likely predicted structure of 9 transmembrane domains, which putatively place the amino terminus in the cytoplasm and the carboxy terminus on the cell surface. Expression of the cRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed strong transport activities specific for histidine and glutamine. This protein is a Na+- and pH-dependent transporter and tolerates substitution of Na+ by Li+. Furthermore, this transporter is not an obligatory exchanger because efflux occurs in the absence of influx. This transporter is expressed predominantly in the liver, although it is also present in the kidney, brain, and heart. In the liver, it is located in the plasma membrane of hepatocytes, and the strongest expression was detected in those adjacent to the central vein, gradually decreasing towards the portal tract. Because this protein displays functional similarities to the N-system amino acid transport, we have termed it mNAT, for murine N-system amino acid transporter. This is the first transporter gene identified within the N-system, one of the major amino acid transport systems in the body. The expression pattern displayed by mNAT suggests a potential role in hepatocyte physiology. PMID:10716701

  2. Identification of a Transcription Factor Controlling pH-Dependent Organic Acid Response in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Lars; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Thykaer, Jette

    2012-01-01

    Acid formation in Aspergillus niger is known to be subjected to tight regulation, and the acid production profiles are fine-tuned to respond to the ambient pH. Based on transcriptome data, putative trans-acting pH responding transcription factors were listed and through knock out studies, mutants exhibiting an oxalate overproducing phenotype were identified. The yield of oxalate was increased up to 158% compared to the wild type and the corresponding transcription factor was therefore entitled Oxalic Acid repression Factor, OafA. Detailed physiological characterization of one of the ΔoafA mutants, compared to the wild type, showed that both strains produced substantial amounts of gluconic acid, but the mutant strain was more efficient in re-uptake of gluconic acid and converting it to oxalic acid, particularly at high pH (pH 5.0). Transcriptional profiles showed that 241 genes were differentially expressed due to the deletion of oafA and this supported the argument of OafA being a trans-acting transcription factor. Furthermore, expression of two phosphoketolases was down-regulated in the ΔoafA mutant, one of which has not previously been described in fungi. It was argued that the observed oxalate overproducing phenotype was a consequence of the efficient re-uptake of gluconic acid and thereby a higher flux through glycolysis. This results in a lower flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, demonstrated by the down-regulation of the phosphoketolases. Finally, the physiological data, in terms of the specific oxygen consumption, indicated a connection between the oxidative phosphorylation and oxalate production and this was further substantiated through transcription analysis. PMID:23251373

  3. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  4. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  5. [Screening and identification of indoleacetic acid producing endophytic bacterium in Panax ginseng].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Tian, Lei; Chen, Chang-qing; Zhang, Guan-jun; Li, Tong; Chen, Jing-xiu; Wang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria which was producing indoleacetic acid was screened from Panax ginseng by using the Salkowski method. The active strain was also tested for its ability of nitrogen fixation by using the Ashby agar plates, the PKV plates and quantitative analysis of Mo-Sb-Ascrobiology acid colorimetry was used to measure its ability of phosphate solubilization, for its ability of potassium solubilization the silicate medium and flame spectrophotometry was used, for its ability of producing siderophores the method detecting CAS was used, for its ability of producing ACC deaminase the Alpha ketone butyric acid method was applied. And the effect on promoting growth of seed by active strain was tested. The results showed that the indoleacetic acid producing strain of JJ5-2 was obtained from 118 endophytes, which the content of indoleacetic acid was 10.2 mg x L(-1). The JJ5-2 strain also had characteristics of phosphate and potassium solubilization, nitrogen fixation, producing siderophores traits, and the promoting germination of ginseng seeds. The JJ5-2 strain was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis by analyzing morphology, physiological and biochemical properties and 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:26080547

  6. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  7. A history of the isolation and identification of folic acid (folate).

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Irwin H

    2012-01-01

    In the 1930s, Lucy Wills identified a 'new hemopoietic factor' in yeast and liver which cured tropical macrocytic anemia in humans and experimental anemia in monkeys. Janet Watson and William B. Castle named the unknown substance, which would ultimately become a form of folate, 'Wills' factor'. Further studies with this unknown substance showed that it was active against nutritional pancytopenia in monkeys and experimental anemia in chicks, leading to various designations such as vitamin M (monkey) and vitamin B(c) (chick). Other factors with growth-promoting activity for microorganisms such as Lactobacillus casei were given the interim names including folic acid - in recognition of extracts from leafy greens. Competing pharmaceutical research groups headed by Robert Stokstad at Lederle Laboratories and Joseph John Pfiffner at Parke-Davis Research Laboratory independently isolated factors bearing the biological properties of Wills' factor and other unknown related factors including folic acid, Lederle Laboratories from a bacterial culture and Parke-Davis Laboratory from yeast and liver as a conjugate of folate. The new vitamin then was crystallized, chemically identified, and synthesized as pteroylglutamic acid and named folic acid between 1943 and 1945. Further studies of the monoglutamic folic acid and the yeast isolate polyglutamyl folate followed through the 1950s and to the present. PMID:23183294

  8. High pressure liquid chromatographic identification of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulphate disaccharides.

    PubMed

    Zebrower, M; Kieras, F J; Heaney-Kieras, J

    1991-06-01

    In this report we describe a system capable of resolving all of the known unsaturated disaccharides derived from the chondroitin sulphates, dermatan sulphate and hyaluronic acid by chondroitinase digestion. This system is superior to others in that the non-sulphated and mono-, di- and tri-sulphated disaccharides can be separated with good resolution in approximately 40 min in an isocratic solvent. The system employs an amino-cyano silica gel column (Whatman Partisil 5 PAC, 25 cm) and is eluted with an isocratic solvent consisting of 48% (v/v) acetonitrile, 14% (v/v) methanol and 38% (v/v) aqueous buffer. This aqueous buffer contains 0.5 M Tris-HCl, 0.1 M boric acid, 23.4 mM sulphuric acid, pH 8.0. UV absorption is monitored at 229 nm and for most disaccharides as little as 150 ng can be reliably determined. The addition of boric acid to the eluent is essential for good resolution of all components and the addition of low concentrations of sulphuric acid is used to control the elution times of various components. The system was applied to the analysis of glycosaminoglycan standards and excellent agreement with previous compositional analyses was obtained. PMID:1794040

  9. Identification of edible Bird’s nest with amino acid and monosaccharide analysis.

    PubMed

    Chua, Yong Guan; Chan, Sheot Harn; Bloodworth, Bosco Chen; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Leong, Lai Peng

    2015-01-14

    This study describes the approach of amino acid and monosaccharide combined with Hotelling T2 range plot to identify edible bird nests (EBN) and non-EBN. Prior to the approach, an analytical method was developed and validated to quantify monosaccharides in EBN. Hotelling T2 range plots of both compounds were successful in predicting the different types of EBN and differentiating EBN and non-EBN. This outcome suggests EBN contains a group of glycoproteins which is not affected by the EBN’s coloration, country of origin, and/or the processing method of the food item. In addition, the glycoproteins were shown to be unique to EBN. EBN were revealed to be rich in protein and essential amino acids as well as contain a wider variety of monosaccharides than most food items. The overall findings suggest that amino acid and monosaccharide provide information not only on the detected compounds and also insights into the glycoproteins of EBN. PMID:25392186

  10. Isolation, identification and quantification of unsaturated fatty acids, amides, phenolic compounds and glycoalkaloids from potato peel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Ma, Qiong; Cao, Ye; Ma, Jian-Nan; Ma, Chao-Mei

    2012-12-15

    Eleven compounds were isolated from potato peels and identified. Their structures were determined by interpretation of UV, MS, 1D, and 2D NMR spectral data and by comparison with reported data. The main components of the potato peels were found to be chlorogenic acid and other phenolic compounds, accompanied by 2 glycoalkaloids, 3 low-molecular-weight amide compounds, and 2 unsaturated fatty acids, including an omega-3 fatty acid. The potato peels showed more potent radical scavenging activity than the flesh. The quantification of the 11 components indicated that the potato peels contained a higher amount of phenolic compounds than the flesh. These results suggest that peel waste from the industry of potato chips and fries may be a source of useful compounds for human health. PMID:22980823

  11. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, J Saúl; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P; Arévalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (CoS), four treatments (T) were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min), followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min). Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c), α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) and stearic acid (C18:0) differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica. PMID:27626416

  12. SuperSAGE analysis of the Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome after fatty acid-amino acid elicitation (FAC): identification of early mediators of insect responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants trigger and tailor defense responses after perception of the oral secretions (OS) of attacking specialist lepidopteran larvae. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in the OS of the Manduca sexta larvae are necessary and sufficient to elicit the herbivory-specific responses in Nicotiana attenuata, an annual wild tobacco species. How FACs are perceived and activate signal transduction mechanisms is unknown. Results We used SuperSAGE combined with 454 sequencing to quantify the early transcriptional changes elicited by the FAC N-linolenoyl-glutamic acid (18:3-Glu) and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) to examine the function of candidate genes in the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. The analysis targeted mRNAs encoding regulatory components: rare transcripts with very rapid FAC-elicited kinetics (increases within 60 and declines within 120 min). From 12,744 unique Tag sequences identified (UniTags), 430 and 117 were significantly up- and down-regulated ≥ 2.5-fold, respectively, after 18:3-Glu elicitation compared to wounding. Based on gene ontology classification, more than 25% of the annotated UniTags corresponded to putative regulatory components, including 30 transcriptional regulators and 22 protein kinases. Quantitative PCR analysis was used to analyze the FAC-dependent regulation of a subset of 27 of these UniTags and for most of them a rapid and transient induction was confirmed. Six FAC-regulated genes were functionally characterized by VIGS and two, a putative lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP) and a protein of unknown function, were identified as important mediators of the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. Conclusions The analysis of the early changes in the transcriptome of N. attenuata after FAC elicitation using SuperSAGE/454 has identified regulatory genes involved in insect-specific mediated responses in plants. Moreover, it has provided a foundation for the identification of additional novel regulators associated with this

  13. Chip-based device for parallel sorting, amplification, detection, and identification of nucleic acid subsequences

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Colston, Jr, Billy W.

    2016-08-09

    An apparatus for chip-based sorting, amplification, detection, and identification of a sample having a planar substrate. The planar substrate is divided into cells. The cells are arranged on the planar substrate in rows and columns. Electrodes are located in the cells. A micro-reactor maker produces micro-reactors containing the sample. The micro-reactor maker is positioned to deliver the micro-reactors to the planar substrate. A microprocessor is connected to the electrodes for manipulating the micro-reactors on the planar substrate. A detector is positioned to interrogate the sample contained in the micro-reactors.

  14. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Fruit Pulp Processing Byproducts and Potential Probiotic Properties of Selected Lactobacillus Strains.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Estefânia F; Luciano, Winnie A; Xavier, Danilo E; da Costa, Whyara C A; de Sousa Oliveira, Kleber; Franco, Octávio L; de Morais Júnior, Marcos A; Lucena, Brígida T L; Picão, Renata C; Magnani, Marciane; Saarela, Maria; de Souza, Evandro L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in byproducts of fruit (Malpighia glabra L., Mangifera indica L., Annona muricata L., and Fragaria vesca L.) pulp processing. Fifty strains of LAB were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and 16S rRNA gene sequence (16S rRNA) analysis. Species belonging to Lactobacillus genus were the predominant LAB in all fruit pulp processing byproducts. The average congruency between the MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA in LAB species identification reached 86%. Isolates of L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. pentosus, L. lactis and L. mesenteroides were identified with 100% congruency. MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis presented 86 and 100% efficiency of LAB species identification, respectively. Further, five selected Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis 59, L. pentosus 129, L. paracasei 108, L. plantarum 49, and L. fermentum 111) were evaluated for desirable probiotic-related properties and growth behavior on two different cultivation media. The exposure to pH 2.0 sharply decreased the counts of the different Lactobacillus strains after a 1 or 2 h incubation, while varied decreases were noted after 3 h of exposure to pH 3.0. Overall, the exposure to pH 5.0 and to bile salts (0.15, 0.30, and 1.00%) did not decrease the counts of the Lactobacillus strains. All tested Lactobacillus strains presented inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli, and presented variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. The selected Lactobacillus strains presented satisfactory and reproducible growth behavior. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis revealed high efficiency and congruency for LAB species identification, and the selected Lactobacillus strains may be candidates for further investigation of novel probiotic strains. PMID:27625647

  15. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Fruit Pulp Processing Byproducts and Potential Probiotic Properties of Selected Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Estefânia F.; Luciano, Winnie A.; Xavier, Danilo E.; da Costa, Whyara C. A.; de Sousa Oliveira, Kleber; Franco, Octávio L.; de Morais Júnior, Marcos A.; Lucena, Brígida T. L.; Picão, Renata C.; Magnani, Marciane; Saarela, Maria; de Souza, Evandro L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in byproducts of fruit (Malpighia glabra L., Mangifera indica L., Annona muricata L., and Fragaria vesca L.) pulp processing. Fifty strains of LAB were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and 16S rRNA gene sequence (16S rRNA) analysis. Species belonging to Lactobacillus genus were the predominant LAB in all fruit pulp processing byproducts. The average congruency between the MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA in LAB species identification reached 86%. Isolates of L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. pentosus, L. lactis and L. mesenteroides were identified with 100% congruency. MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis presented 86 and 100% efficiency of LAB species identification, respectively. Further, five selected Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis 59, L. pentosus 129, L. paracasei 108, L. plantarum 49, and L. fermentum 111) were evaluated for desirable probiotic-related properties and growth behavior on two different cultivation media. The exposure to pH 2.0 sharply decreased the counts of the different Lactobacillus strains after a 1 or 2 h incubation, while varied decreases were noted after 3 h of exposure to pH 3.0. Overall, the exposure to pH 5.0 and to bile salts (0.15, 0.30, and 1.00%) did not decrease the counts of the Lactobacillus strains. All tested Lactobacillus strains presented inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli, and presented variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. The selected Lactobacillus strains presented satisfactory and reproducible growth behavior. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA analysis revealed high efficiency and congruency for LAB species identification, and the selected Lactobacillus strains may be candidates for further investigation of novel probiotic strains. PMID:27625647

  16. Application of combined mass spectrometry and partial amino acid sequence to the identification of gel-separated proteins.

    PubMed

    Patterson, S D; Thomas, D; Bradshaw, R A

    1996-05-01

    The combined use of peptide mass information with amino acid sequence information derived by chemical sequencing or mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches provides a powerful means of protein identification. We have used a two-part strategy to identify proteins from nerve growth factor (NGF)-stimulated rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 cell lysates that associate with the adaptor protein Shc (Shc homologous and collagen protein). Initial experiments with metabolically radiolabeled cell extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed a number of proteins that coimmunoprecipitated with anti-Shc antibody compared with control (unstimulated) cell extracts. The experiment was scaled up and cell lysate from NGF-stimulated PC-12 cells was applied to a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-Shc affinity column, eluted, separated by SDS-PAGE and blotted to Immobilon-CD. The blotted proteins were proteolytically digested in situ, and the masses obtained from the extracted peptides were used in a peptide-mass search program in an attempt to identify the protein. Even if a strong candidate was found using this search, an additional step was performed to confirm the identification. The mixtures were fractionated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and subjected to chemical sequencing to obtain (partial) sequence information, or post-source decay (PSD-) matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization (MALDI)-MS to obtain sequence-specific fragment ions. This data was used in a peptide-sequence tag search to confirm the identity of the proteins. This combined approach allowed identification of four proteins of M(r) 43,000 to 200,000. In one case the identified protein clearly did not correspond to the radiolabeled band, but to a protein contaminant from the column. The advantages and pitfalls of the approach are discussed. PMID:8783013

  17. Identification and quantitation of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin-9-carboxylic acid, a major metabolite of delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, M A; Feng, S; Murphy, T P; Warrington, A W; Ross, S; Nimrod, A; Mehmedic, Z; Fortner, N

    2001-09-01

    After incubation of delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin with human hepatocytes, a major metabolic product was detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that showed identical retention time and mass spectrum to the synthetic 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin-9-carboxylic acid (11-nor-delta9-THCV-9-COOH). Analysis of human urine specimens from marijuana users and plasma samples from Marinol users showed that 11-nor-delta9-THCV-9-COOH was only present in urine specimens of marijuana users. These results supported the conclusion that identification of 11-nor-delta9-THCV-9-COOH in a donor's urine specimen indicates the use or ingestion of cannabis-related product(s) and would not explain the sole use of Marinol. PMID:11550824

  18. Separation and Identification of Phenolic Acid and Flavonoids from Nerium indicum Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, A.; Sudha, P. N.

    2015-01-01

    Four major compounds were separated and identified from the methanol extracts of Nerium indicum flowers (Arali) using HPLC and mass spectral data. Through mass data, the chemical structures were elucidated as: trans5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (1), quercetin-3-O- rutinoside (2), luteolin-5-O-rutinoside (3) and luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (4). In addition, the cis isomers of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid in Nerium indicum flowers were confirmed by Mass, HPLC and UV. The structures of these compounds confirmed with the help of liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. PMID:25767323

  19. Preparation and properties of films cast from mixtures of poly(vinyl alcohol) and submicron particles prepared from amylose-palmitic acid inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Fanta, George F; Selling, Gordon W; Felker, Frederick C; Kenar, James A

    2015-05-01

    The use of starch in polymer composites for film production has been studied for increasing biodegradability, improving film properties and reducing cost. In this study, submicron particles were prepared from amylose-sodium palmitate complexes both by rapidly cooling jet-cooked starch-palmitic acid mixtures and by acidifying solutions of starch-sodium palmitate complexes. Films were cast containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) with up to 50% starch particles. Tensile strength decreased and Young's modulus increased with starch concentration, but percent elongations remained similar to controls regardless of preparation method or starch content. Microscopy showed particulate starch distribution in films made with rapidly cooled starch-palmitic acid particles but smooth, diffuse starch staining with acidified sodium palmitate complexes. The mild effects on tensile properties suggest that submicron starch particles prepared from amylose-palmitic acid complexes provide a useful, commercially viable approach for PVOH film modification. PMID:25659717

  20. Higher Intakes of Antioxidants and Unsaturated Fatty Acid Reduce the Cardiac Autonomic Effects of Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Higher intakes of antioxidants (vitamins C and E, carotene) found in foods such as cruciferous vegetables, and unsaturated fatty acids, including omega-3 from fish and monounsaturated fats from nuts and seeds, may prevent cardiovascular disease. We examined whether higher intake of such antioxidants...

  1. Identification of amino acid residues in Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases influencing the structure of the glucan product.

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, A; Nakano, Y J; Mukasa, H; Kuramitsu, H K

    1994-01-01

    The glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of mutans streptococci are important virulence factors in the sucrose-dependent colonization of tooth surfaces by these organisms. To investigate the structure-function relationship of the GTFs, an approach was initiated to identify amino acid residues of the GTFs which affect the incorporation of glucose residues into the glucan polymer. Conserved amino acid residues were identified in the GTF-S and GTF-I enzymes of the mutans streptococci and were selected for site-directed mutagenesis in the corresponding enzymes from Streptococcus mutans GS5. Conversion of six amino acid residues of the GTF-I enzyme to those present at the corresponding positions in GTF-S, either singly or in multiple combinations, resulted in enzymes synthesizing increased levels of soluble glucans. The enzyme containing six alterations synthesized 73% water-soluble glucan in the absence of acceptor dextran T10, while parental enzyme GTF-I synthesized no such glucan product. Conversely, when residue 589 of the GTF-S enzyme was converted from Thr to either Asp or Glu, the resulting enzyme synthesized primarily water-insoluble glucan in the absence of the acceptor. Therefore, this approach has identified several amino acid positions which influence the nature of the glucan product synthesized by GTFs. PMID:8050997

  2. Identification of a Binding Site for Unsaturated Fatty Acids in the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nurr1.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Giri, Pankaj K; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Brust, Richard; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Shang, Jinsai; Campbell, Sean; Wilson, Henry D; Granados, Juan; Gardner, William J; Creamer, Trevor P; Solt, Laura A; Kojetin, Douglas J

    2016-07-15

    Nurr1/NR4A2 is an orphan nuclear receptor, and currently there are no known natural ligands that bind Nurr1. A recent metabolomics study identified unsaturated fatty acids, including arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that interact with the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of a related orphan receptor, Nur77/NR4A1. However, the binding location and whether these ligands bind other NR4A receptors were not defined. Here, we show that unsaturated fatty acids also interact with the Nurr1 LBD, and solution NMR spectroscopy reveals the binding epitope of DHA at its putative ligand-binding pocket. Biochemical assays reveal that DHA-bound Nurr1 interacts with high affinity with a peptide derived from PIASγ, a protein that interacts with Nurr1 in cellular extracts, and DHA also affects cellular Nurr1 transactivation. This work is the first structural report of a natural ligand binding to a canonical NR4A ligand-binding pocket and indicates a natural ligand can bind and affect Nurr1 function. PMID:27128111

  3. Identification of soybean purple acid phosphatase genes and their expression responses to phosphorus availability and symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are members of the metallo-phosphoesterase family and have been known to play important roles in phosphorus (P) acquisition and recycling in plants. Low P availability is a major constraint to growth and production of soybean, Glycine max. Comparat...

  4. A practical guide to the isolation, analysis and identification of conjugated linoleic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural and synthetic conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are reputed to have therapeutic properties that are specific to particular geometrical and positional isomers. Analysis of these has presented unique problems that have brought forward distinctive solutions, especially the use of gas chromatogra...

  5. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  6. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  7. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized. PMID:25345524

  8. CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE REACTION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is of biological significance and may be implicated in the overall toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic. The course of the reaction in aqueous phase was monitored and an initial product, dimethylthioarsin...

  9. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J.; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  10. Identification, purification, and characterization of a novel amino acid racemase, isoleucine 2-epimerase, from Lactobacillus species.

    PubMed

    Mutaguchi, Yuta; Ohmori, Taketo; Wakamatsu, Taisuke; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of d-leucine, d-allo-isoleucine, and d-valine was observed in the growth medium of a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus otakiensis JCM 15040, and the racemase responsible was purified from the cells and identified. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme was GKLDKASKLI, which is consistent with that of a putative γ-aminobutyrate aminotransferase from Lactobacillus buchneri. The putative γ-aminobutyrate aminotransferase gene from L. buchneri JCM 1115 was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli and then purified to homogeneity. The enzyme catalyzed the racemization of a broad spectrum of nonpolar amino acids. In particular, it catalyzed at high rates the epimerization of l-isoleucine to d-allo-isoleucine and d-allo-isoleucine to l-isoleucine. In contrast, the enzyme showed no γ-aminobutyrate aminotransferase activity. The relative molecular masses of the subunit and native enzyme were estimated to be about 49 kDa and 200 kDa, respectively, indicating that the enzyme was composed of four subunits of equal molecular masses. The Km and Vmax values of the enzyme for l-isoleucine were 5.00 mM and 153 μmol·min(-1)·mg(-1), respectively, and those for d-allo-isoleucine were 13.2 mM and 286 μmol·min(-1)·mg(-1), respectively. Hydroxylamine and other inhibitors of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes completely blocked the enzyme activity, indicating the enzyme requires pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a coenzyme. This is the first evidence of an amino acid racemase that specifically catalyzes racemization of nonpolar amino acids at the C-2 position. PMID:24039265

  11. Identification, Purification, and Characterization of a Novel Amino Acid Racemase, Isoleucine 2-Epimerase, from Lactobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Mutaguchi, Yuta; Ohmori, Taketo; Wakamatsu, Taisuke; Doi, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of d-leucine, d-allo-isoleucine, and d-valine was observed in the growth medium of a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus otakiensis JCM 15040, and the racemase responsible was purified from the cells and identified. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme was GKLDKASKLI, which is consistent with that of a putative γ-aminobutyrate aminotransferase from Lactobacillus buchneri. The putative γ-aminobutyrate aminotransferase gene from L. buchneri JCM 1115 was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli and then purified to homogeneity. The enzyme catalyzed the racemization of a broad spectrum of nonpolar amino acids. In particular, it catalyzed at high rates the epimerization of l-isoleucine to d-allo-isoleucine and d-allo-isoleucine to l-isoleucine. In contrast, the enzyme showed no γ-aminobutyrate aminotransferase activity. The relative molecular masses of the subunit and native enzyme were estimated to be about 49 kDa and 200 kDa, respectively, indicating that the enzyme was composed of four subunits of equal molecular masses. The Km and Vmax values of the enzyme for l-isoleucine were 5.00 mM and 153 μmol·min−1·mg−1, respectively, and those for d-allo-isoleucine were 13.2 mM and 286 μmol·min−1·mg−1, respectively. Hydroxylamine and other inhibitors of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent enzymes completely blocked the enzyme activity, indicating the enzyme requires pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme. This is the first evidence of an amino acid racemase that specifically catalyzes racemization of nonpolar amino acids at the C-2 position. PMID:24039265

  12. Toxicity of 50-nm polystyrene particles co-administered to mice with acetaminophen, 5-aminosalicylic acid or tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Isoda, K; Nozawa, T; Tezuka, M; Ishida, I

    2014-09-01

    We investigated whether nano-sized polystyrene particles affect drug-induced toxicity. The particles, which are widely used industrially, had diameters of 50 (NPP50), 200 (NPP200) or 1000 (NPP1000) nm. The toxic chemicals tested were acetaminophen (APAP), 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), tetracycline (TC), and sodium valproate (VPA). All treatments in the absence of the nanoparticles were non-lethal and did not result in severe toxicity. However, when mice were injected with APAP, 5-ASA or TC together with polystyrene particles, synergistic, enhanced toxicity was observed in mice injected with NPP50. These synergic effects were not observed in mice co-injected with NPP200 or NPP1000. On the other hand, co-administration of VPA and NPP50, NPP200 or NPP1000 did not elevate toxicity. The results show that NPP50 differs in hepatotoxicity depending on the drug co-administered. These findings suggest that further evaluation of the interactions between polystyrene nanoparticles and drugs is a critical prerequisite to the pharmaceutical application of nanotechnology. PMID:25272938

  13. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEONLA-BSA, which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEONLA-BSA particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEONLA-BSA changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  14. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEON(LA-BSA), which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEON(LA-BSA) particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEON(LA-BSA) changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  15. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period 2011 in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Kanawade, V. P.; You, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; Lee, Y.; McGraw, R. L.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period (July-August 2011) in Long Island, New York, we deployed a particle size magnifier (Airmodus A09) running at different working fluid saturation ratios and a TSI CPC3776 to extract the information of sub-3 nm particles formation. A scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), and a number of atmospheric trace gas analyzers were used to simultaneously measure aerosol size distributions, sulfuric acid, and other possible aerosol precursors, respectively. Our observation results show that sub-3 nm particles existed during both NPF and non-NPF events, indicating the formation of sub-3nm particle didn't always lead to NPF characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. However, sub-3 nm particles were much higher during NPF events. Sub-3 nm particles were well-correlated with sulfuric acid showing the same diurnal variations and noontime peaks, especially for NPF days. These results are consistent with laboratory studies showing that formation of sub-3 nm particles is very sensitive to sulfuric acid (than amines and ammonia) [Yu et al. GRL 2012]. HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis indicates that air masses from Great Lakes, containing more SO2, VOCs and secondary organics, may contribute to growth of sub-3 nm particles and NPF.

  16. Reactivity of NaCl with Secondary Organic Acids: An Important Mechanism of the Chloride Depletion in Sea Salt Particles Mixed with Organic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Kelly, S.; Gilles, M. K.; Shilling, J. E.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sea salt particles, one of the major sources of atmospheric aerosols, undergo complex multi-phase reactions and have profound consequences on their physical and chemical properties, thus on climate. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of sea salt chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Some studies have also showed that the chloride deficit cannot be fully compensated for this mechanism. We present an important pathway contributing to this chloride depletion: reactions of weak organic acids with sea salt particles. NaCl particles internally mixed with secondary organic materials generated from the reactions of limonene and alpha-pinene with ozone served as surrogates for sea salt particles mixed with organic materials. Chemical imaging analysis of these particles was conducted using complementary techniques including computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). Substantial chloride depletion and formation of organic salts were observed along with distinctive changes in particle morphology after hydration/dehydration processes. The results indicate that secondary organic acids can effectively react with NaCl particles resulting in displacement of chloride and release of gaseous HCl. This is consistent with a recent field study showing chloride depletion in sea salt particles mixed with organic materials which cannot be fully compensated by inorganic acid displacement. Although the formation of the organic salts is not thermodynamically favored in bulk aqueous solution, these reactions are driven by the high volatility and evaporation of gaseous HCl in particles, especially during hydration/dehydration processes. The

  17. Spontaneous remodeling of HDL particles at acidic pH enhances their capacity to induce cholesterol efflux from human macrophage foam cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Su Duy; Öörni, Katariina; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Pihlajamaa, Tero; Metso, Jari; Jauhiainen, Matti; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2012-01-01

    HDL particles may enter atherosclerotic lesions having an acidic intimal fluid. Therefore, we investigated whether acidic pH would affect their structural and functional properties. For this purpose, HDL2 and HDL3 subfractions were incubated for various periods of time at different pH values ranging from 5.5 to 7.5, after which their protein and lipid compositions, size, structure, and cholesterol efflux capacity were analyzed. Incubation of either subfraction at acidic pH induced unfolding of apolipoproteins, which was followed by release of lipid-poor apoA-I and ensuing fusion of the HDL particles. The acidic pH-modified HDL particles exhibited an enhanced ability to promote cholesterol efflux from cholesterol-laden primary human macrophages. Importantly, treatment of the acidic pH-modified HDL with the mast cell-derived protease chymase completely depleted the newly generated lipid-poor apoA-I, and prevented the acidic pH-dependent increase in cholesterol efflux. The above-found pH-dependent structural and functional changes were stronger in HDL3 than in HDL2. Spontaneous acidic pH-induced remodeling of mature spherical HDL particles increases HDL-induced cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, and therefore may have atheroprotective effects. PMID:22855736

  18. Source identification of particulate matter collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea using quantitative single-particle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Ryu, JiYeon; Maskey, Shila; Kim, Jo-Chun; Sohn, Jongryeul; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-06-01

    Subway particle samples collected at four underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea were characterized by a single-particle analytical technique, low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis. To clearly identify indoor sources of subway particles, four sets of samples collected in tunnels, at platforms, near ticket offices, and outdoors were investigated. For the samples collected in tunnels, Fe-containing particles predominate, with relative abundances of 75-91% for the four stations. The amounts of Fe-containing particles decrease as the distance of sampling locations from the tunnel increases. In addition, samples collected at the platform in subway stations with platform screen doors (PSDs) that limit air-mixing between the platform and the tunnel showed marked decreases in relative abundances of Fe-containing particles, clearly indicating that Fe-containing subway particles are generated in the tunnel. PM 10 mass concentration levels are the highest in the tunnels, becoming lower as the distance of sampling locations from the tunnel increases. The extent of the decrease in PM 10 in stations with PSDs is also larger than that in stations without PSDs. The results clearly indicate that Fe-containing particles originating in tunnels predominate in the indoor microenvironment of subway stations, resulting in high indoor PM 10 levels, and that PSDs play a significant role in reducing Fe-containing particles at platforms and near ticket offices.

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional pickles of the Çubuk region in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bağder Elmacı, Simel; Tokatlı, Mehmet; Dursun, Derya; Özçelik, Filiz; Şanlıbaba, Pınar

    2015-05-01

    A total of 152 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from pickles produced in the Ankara-Çubuk region. These isolates were clustered into eight groups on the basis of their phenotypic characteristics including cell morphology, CO2 production from glucose, growth at 10 and 45 °C, growth in 6.5 % NaCl, and growth at pH 9.6. API 50 CH carbohydrate fermentation test, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) whole-cell protein profile analysis were also performed for precise identification of the isolates at the species level. Molecular identification revealed that the most prevalent LAB species involved in pickle fermentation were Pediococcus ethanolidurans (46 isolates, 30.3 %), Lactobacillus brevis (37 isolates, 24.3 %), Lactobacillus plantarum (37 isolates, 24.3 %), and Lactobacillus buchneri (15 isolates, 9.9 %). Other LAB were found in minor frequencies such as Pediococcus parvulus (8 isolates, 5.3 %), Lactobacillus namurensis (6 isolates, 3.9 %), Lactobacillus diolivorans (1 isolate, 0.7 %), Lactobacillus parabrevis (1 isolate, 0.7 %), and Enterococcus casseliflavus (1 isolate, 0.7 %). When results of phenotypic and genotypic identification methods were compared, differences in the species distribution of LAB associated with pickles were defined between the API and the 16S rRNA sequencing. The API 50 CHL test coincided with the 16S rRNA results in 71 out of the 152 tested isolates, indicating that API gave unreliable identification results. A clear correlation could not be found between the results of whole-cell SDS profiles and 16S rRNA sequencing. Therefore, molecular characterization by 16S rRNA sequencing was considered to be the most reliable method for identifying isolates. The results presented in this work provide insight in to the LAB population associated with traditional Çubuk pickles and constitute a LAB strain resource for further studies involving the development of

  20. Anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: 1. Identification of 1-amino-1-cycloalkyl carboxylic acid headgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Steven M.; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, David M.; Carter, H. Luke; Clancy, Daphne C.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Dwornik, Kate A.; Garrido, Dulce M.; Golden, Pamela L.; Nolte, Robert T.; Peat, Andrew J.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Tavares, Francis X.; Thomson, Stephen A.; Wang, Liping; Weiel, James E.

    2009-05-15

    Optimization of the amino acid residue within a series of anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors is described. These studies culminated in the identification of anthranilimides 16 and 22 which displayed potent in vitro inhibition of GPa in addition to reduced inhibition of CYP2C9 and excellent pharmacokinetic properties.

  1. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of BMS-582664: degradation product identification and mechanism elucidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Derbin, George; Miller, Scott; Badawy, Sherif; Hussain, Munir

    2012-09-01

    BMS-582664 is an investigational drug intended for cancer treatment through oral administration. The preformulation studies revealed two unexpected degradation products under acidic conditions by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Additional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results suggested that these were cleavage (hydrolysis) products of a diaryl ether. To further understand the degradation mechanism, the reaction was carried out in (18) O-labeled water. The (18) O was found to be incorporated in only one of the two hydrolysis products. The results suggest that the corresponding α carbon in the heterocycle was unusually eletrophilic in acidic conditions probably because of the protonation of the neighboring nitrogen. This led to the selective attack by water and the consequent hydrolysis products. The study provides a new example of hydrolytic degradation of pharmaceutical compounds, and the reaction center is an aromatic heterocyclic carbon with an aryloxy substitution. PMID:22189636

  2. Identification of dehydroabietc acid from Boswellia thurifera resin as a positive GABAA receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Diana C; Raith, Melanie; De Mieri, Maria; Schöffmann, Angela; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    In a two-microelectrode voltage clamp assay with Xenopus laevis oocytes, a petroleum ether extract (100 μg/mL) of the resin of Boswellia thurifera (Burseraceae) potentiated GABA-induced chloride currents (IGABA) through receptors of the subtype α₁β₂γ₂s by 319.8% ± 79.8%. With the aid of HPLC-based activity profiling, three known terpenoids, dehydroabietic acid (1), incensole (2), and AKBA (3), were identified in the active fractions of the extract. Structure elucidation was achieved by means of HR-MS and microprobe 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. Compound 1 induced significant receptor modulation in the oocyte assay, with a maximal potentiation of IGABA of 397.5% ± 34.0%, and EC₅₀ of 8.7 μM ± 1.3 μM. This is the first report of dehydroabietic acid as a positive GABAA receptor modulator. PMID:25200370

  3. Identification of methylglyoxal as a major mutagen in wood and bamboo pyroligneous acids.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Aya; Asanoma, Masaharu; Nukaya, Haruo

    2016-05-01

    To identify the major mutagen in pyroligneous acid (PA), 10 wood and 10 bamboo pyroligneous acids were examined using the Ames test in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100 and TA98. Subsequently, the mutagenic dicarbonyl compounds (DCs), glyoxal, methylglyoxal (MG), and diacetyl in PA were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography, and the mutagenic contribution ratios for each DC were calculated relative to the mutagenicity of PA. Eighteen samples were positive for mutagens and showed the strongest mutagenicity in TA100 in the absence of S9 mix. MG had the highest mutagenic contribution ratio, and its presence was strongly correlated with the specific mutagenicity of PA. These data indicate that MG is the major mutagen in PA. PMID:26872409

  4. Mineral matter identification in Nallihan lignite by leaching with mineral acids

    SciTech Connect

    Gulen, J.

    2007-02-15

    Coals are heterogeneous, complex noncrystalline macromolecules having both organic and inorganic materials that contain some inorganic constituents. Some techniques have been applied to this fossil fuel in order to remove these undesired inorganic parts from the organic part. Chemical demineralization is one of the suitable methods for removal of inorganic elements although it is an expensive way. But by this method, many elements are leached effectively from the lignite body from the point of economic view because these inorganic parts may cause some undesired deleterious effects. In this study, the demineralization effect of some aqueous acids of 5% such as HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF was studied. The effect of these mineral acids was shown by X-ray spectroscopy.

  5. An active ingredient of Cat's Claw water extracts identification and efficacy of quinic acid.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yezhou; Akesson, Christina; Holmgren, Kristin; Bryngelsson, Carl; Giamapa, Vincent; Pero, Ronald W

    2005-01-15

    Historic medicinal practice has defined Cat's Claw, also known as Una de Gato or Uncaria tomentosa, as an effective treatment for several health disorders including chronic inflammation, gastrointestinal dysfunction such as ulcers, tumors and infections. The efficacy of Cat's Claw was originally believed, as early as the 1960s, to be due to the presence of oxindole alkaloids. However, more recently water-soluble Cat's Claw extracts were shown not to contain significant amounts of alkaloids (<0.05%), and yet still were shown to be very efficacious. Here we characterize the active ingredients of a water-soluble Cat's Claw extract called C-Med-100 as inhibiting cell growth without cell death thus providing enhanced opportunities for DNA repair, and the consequences thereof, such as immune stimulation, anti-inflammation and cancer prevention. The active ingredients were chemically defined as quinic acid esters and could also be shown to be bioactive in vivo as quinic acid. PMID:15619581

  6. Development of fatty acid biomarkers for the identification of wild and aquacultured sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhnyj, P. A.; Pivnenko, T. N.; Kovalev, N. N.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the fatty acids (FAs) of the organs and tissues of sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) were profiled in order to compare the FA composition of sea cucumber collected from natural habitat (wild) and cages (cultured). The differences in FA contents in dermomuscular tube, peripharyngeal annulus, gonad and intestine (with or without content) between the wild and the cultured were determined. The main fatty acids in all organs and tissues were 20:5n-3, 16:1n-7, 20:4n-6, 22:6n-3, 18:0, and 18:1n-7. The basically different FAs of body wall and digestive tube were 16:1n-7, 18:1n-9 and 20:1n-11. The ratio of saturated to mono- and polyunsaturated FAs in digestive tube was independent on inside content while there was a redistribution of the total amount of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. The comparison of FA composition of the wild and the cultured sea cucumber showed that 20:5n-3, 16:1n-7 and 18:1n-7 predominated the wild while 20:4n-6 predominated the cultured. The content of branched-chain fatty acids in the wild was 3%-4% and about 9% in the cultured. The possible FAs for identifying the wild and the cultured sea cucumbers were selected. It was suggested that the indexes such as the ratio of either (n-3:n-6) to (n-7:n-6) or (n-3) + (n-7) to (n-6) may serve as the biomarkers distinguishing the wild and the cultured sea cucumber.

  7. Identification of Thiotetronic Acid Antibiotic Biosynthetic Pathways by Target-directed Genome Mining.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Li, Jie; Millán-Aguiñaga, Natalie; Zhang, Jia Jia; O'Neill, Ellis C; Ugalde, Juan A; Jensen, Paul R; Mantovani, Simone M; Moore, Bradley S

    2015-12-18

    Recent genome sequencing efforts have led to the rapid accumulation of uncharacterized or "orphaned" secondary metabolic biosynthesis gene clusters (BGCs) in public databases. This increase in DNA-sequenced big data has given rise to significant challenges in the applied field of natural product genome mining, including (i) how to prioritize the characterization of orphan BGCs and (ii) how to rapidly connect genes to biosynthesized small molecules. Here, we show that by correlating putative antibiotic resistance genes that encode target-modified proteins with orphan BGCs, we predict the biological function of pathway specific small molecules before they have been revealed in a process we call target-directed genome mining. By querying the pan-genome of 86 Salinispora bacterial genomes for duplicated house-keeping genes colocalized with natural product BGCs, we prioritized an orphan polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid BGC (tlm) with a putative fatty acid synthase resistance gene. We employed a new synthetic double-stranded DNA-mediated cloning strategy based on transformation-associated recombination to efficiently capture tlm and the related ttm BGCs directly from genomic DNA and to heterologously express them in Streptomyces hosts. We show the production of a group of unusual thiotetronic acid natural products, including the well-known fatty acid synthase inhibitor thiolactomycin that was first described over 30 years ago, yet never at the genetic level in regards to biosynthesis and autoresistance. This finding not only validates the target-directed genome mining strategy for the discovery of antibiotic producing gene clusters without a priori knowledge of the molecule synthesized but also paves the way for the investigation of novel enzymology involved in thiotetronic acid natural product biosynthesis. PMID:26458099

  8. Identification of Indole-3-Acetic Acid in the Basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune 1

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Ephraim; Miles, Philip G.

    1967-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was detected in the ether extracts of culture filtrates of indigotin-producing strains of the basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune. Several solvents, known to give distinctly different RF values for IAA, and 3 location reagents gave identical results with synthetic IAA and IAA found in the extract. Confirmation was obtained by the Avena straight growth test, split pea test, and ultraviolet absorption spectrum. PMID:16656596

  9. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy on nucleic acids and related compounds adsorbed on colloidal silver particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, K.; Pohle, W.; Fabian, H.

    1991-04-01

    Various nucleic acids and related compounds have been investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on silver sol. The time delay between the addition of the various nucleic acids to the silver sol and the appearance of their SER spectra, i.e. the time needed by the various molecules to adsorb on an active site of the silver surface with an adsorption geometry which allows a SERS enhancement, shows strong differences. For instance, an immediate appearance of SER spectra has been found for DNA, whereas ribonucleic acids (RNAs) demonstrated a strong time delay (up to days) of the appearance of their SER spectra. This delay can be tentatively explained by the higher rigidity of RNA molecules compared with DNA. The more flexible DNA molecules are better adaptable to adsorption on silver than RNAs. The SER spectra of RNAs and DNAs showed strong changes within their relative line intensities as a function of time before they achieved stationary conditions, which indicates a protracted re-arrangement of the large molecules on the silver surface.

  10. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-07-24

    The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory, and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multiprotein network designated as the "lipolysome." Adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydrolysis and requires comparative gene identification-58 (Cgi-58) as a potent activator of enzyme activity. Here, we identify adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-Fabp) and other members of the fatty acid-binding protein (Fabp) family as interaction partners of Cgi-58. Co-immunoprecipitation, microscale thermophoresis, and solid phase assays proved direct protein/protein interaction between A-Fabp and Cgi-58. Using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments and site-directed mutagenesis, we located a potential contact region on A-Fabp. In functional terms, A-Fabp stimulates Atgl-catalyzed TG hydrolysis in a Cgi-58-dependent manner. Additionally, transcriptional transactivation assays with a luciferase reporter system revealed that Fabps enhance the ability of Atgl/Cgi-58-mediated lipolysis to induce the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Our studies identify Fabps as crucial structural and functional components of the lipolysome. PMID:25953897

  11. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling*

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory, and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multiprotein network designated as the “lipolysome.” Adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydrolysis and requires comparative gene identification-58 (Cgi-58) as a potent activator of enzyme activity. Here, we identify adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-Fabp) and other members of the fatty acid-binding protein (Fabp) family as interaction partners of Cgi-58. Co-immunoprecipitation, microscale thermophoresis, and solid phase assays proved direct protein/protein interaction between A-Fabp and Cgi-58. Using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments and site-directed mutagenesis, we located a potential contact region on A-Fabp. In functional terms, A-Fabp stimulates Atgl-catalyzed TG hydrolysis in a Cgi-58-dependent manner. Additionally, transcriptional transactivation assays with a luciferase reporter system revealed that Fabps enhance the ability of Atgl/Cgi-58-mediated lipolysis to induce the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Our studies identify Fabps as crucial structural and functional components of the lipolysome. PMID:25953897

  12. Identification of GH15 Family Thermophilic Archaeal Trehalases That Function within a Narrow Acidic-pH Range.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Shimodaira, Satoru; Ishida, Shin-Nosuke; Amemiya, Miko; Honda, Shotaro; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2015-08-01

    Two glucoamylase-like genes, TVN1315 and Ta0286, from the archaea Thermoplasma volcanium and T. acidophilum, respectively, were expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene products, TVN1315 and Ta0286, were identified as archaeal trehalases. These trehalases belong to the CAZy database family GH15, although they have putative (α/α)6 barrel catalytic domain structures similar to those of GH37 and GH65 family trehalases from other organisms. These newly identified trehalases function within a narrow range of acidic pH values (pH 3.2 to 4.0) and at high temperatures (50 to 60°C), and these enzymes display Km values for trehalose higher than those observed for typical trehalases. These enzymes were inhibited by validamycin A; however, the inhibition constants (Ki) were higher than those of other trehalases. Three TVN1315 mutants, corresponding to E408Q, E571Q, and E408Q/E571Q mutations, showed reduced activity, suggesting that these two glutamic acid residues are involved in trehalase catalysis in a manner similar to that of glucoamylase. To date, TVN1315 and Ta0286 are the first archaeal trehalases to be identified, and this is the first report of the heterologous expression of GH15 family trehalases. The identification of these trehalases could extend our understanding of the relationships between the structure and function of GH15 family enzymes as well as glycoside hydrolase family enzymes; additionally, these enzymes provide insight into archaeal trehalose metabolism. PMID:25979886

  13. Identification of GH15 Family Thermophilic Archaeal Trehalases That Function within a Narrow Acidic-pH Range

    PubMed Central

    Shimodaira, Satoru; Ishida, Shin-nosuke; Amemiya, Miko; Honda, Shotaro; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Two glucoamylase-like genes, TVN1315 and Ta0286, from the archaea Thermoplasma volcanium and T. acidophilum, respectively, were expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene products, TVN1315 and Ta0286, were identified as archaeal trehalases. These trehalases belong to the CAZy database family GH15, although they have putative (α/α)6 barrel catalytic domain structures similar to those of GH37 and GH65 family trehalases from other organisms. These newly identified trehalases function within a narrow range of acidic pH values (pH 3.2 to 4.0) and at high temperatures (50 to 60°C), and these enzymes display Km values for trehalose higher than those observed for typical trehalases. These enzymes were inhibited by validamycin A; however, the inhibition constants (Ki) were higher than those of other trehalases. Three TVN1315 mutants, corresponding to E408Q, E571Q, and E408Q/E571Q mutations, showed reduced activity, suggesting that these two glutamic acid residues are involved in trehalase catalysis in a manner similar to that of glucoamylase. To date, TVN1315 and Ta0286 are the first archaeal trehalases to be identified, and this is the first report of the heterologous expression of GH15 family trehalases. The identification of these trehalases could extend our understanding of the relationships between the structure and function of GH15 family enzymes as well as glycoside hydrolase family enzymes; additionally, these enzymes provide insight into archaeal trehalose metabolism. PMID:25979886

  14. Identification of acetic acid bacteria in traditionally produced vinegar and mother of vinegar by using different molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Yetiman, Ahmet E; Kesmen, Zülal

    2015-07-01

    Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were combined for the investigation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) populations in traditionally produced vinegars and mother of vinegar samples obtained from apple and grape. The culture-independent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, which targeted the V7-V8 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, showed that Komagataeibacter hansenii and Komagataeibacter europaeus/Komagataeibacter xylinus were the most dominant species in almost all of the samples analyzed directly. The culture-independent GTG5-rep PCR fingerprinting was used in the preliminary characterization of AAB isolates and species-level identification was carried out by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S rDNA internally transcribed to the spacer (ITS) region and tuf gene. Acetobacter okinawensis was frequently isolated from samples obtained from apple while K. europaeus was identified as the dominant species, followed by Acetobacter indonesiensis in the samples originating from grape. In addition to common molecular techniques, real-time PCR intercalating dye assays, including DNA melting temperature (Tm) and high resolution melting analysis (HRM), were applied to acetic acid bacterial isolates for the first time. The target sequence of ITS region generated species-specific HRM profiles and Tm values allowed discrimination at species level. PMID:25828705

  15. Identification of Darmstoff analogs as selective agonists and antagonists of lysophosphatidic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Gududuru, Veeresa; Zeng, Kui; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Makarova, Natalia; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pigg, Kathryn R; Baker, Daniel L; Tigyi, Gabor; Miller, Duane D

    2006-01-15

    Darmstoff describes a family of gut smooth muscle-stimulating acetal phosphatidic acids initially isolated and characterized from the bath fluid of stimulated gut over 50 years ago. Despite similar structural and biological profiles, Darmstoff analogs have not previously been examined as potential LPA mimetics. Here, we report a facile method for the synthesis of potassium salts of Darmstoff analogs. To understand the effect of stereochemistry on lysophosphatidic acid mimetic activity, synthesis of optically pure stereoisomers of selected Darmstoff analogs was achieved starting with chiral methyl glycerates. Each Darmstoff analog was evaluated for subtype-specific LPA receptor agonist/antagonist activity, PPARgamma activation, and autotaxin inhibition. From this study we identified compound 12 as a pan-antagonist and several pan-agonists for the LPA(1-3) receptors. Introduction of an aromatic ring in the lipid chain such as analog 22 produced a subtype-specific LPA(3) agonist with an EC(50) of 692 nM. Interestingly, regardless of their LPA(1/2/3) ligand properties all of the Darmstoff analogs tested activated PPARgamma. However, these compounds are weak inhibitors of autotaxin. The results indicate that Darmstoff analogs constitute a novel class of lysophosphatidic acid mimetics. PMID:16290140

  16. Identification and localization of an arachidonic acid-sensitive potassium channel in the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Bernd H A; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Harvey, Margaret C; Duzhyy, Dmytro E

    2004-07-14

    Receptor cells of the auditory and vestibular end organs of vertebrates acquire various types of potassium channels during development. Their expression and kinetics can differ along the tonotopic axis as well as in different cell types of the sensory epithelium. These variations can play a crucial role in modulating sensory transduction and cochlear tuning. Whole-cell tight-seal recordings of isolated hair cells revealed the presence of an arachidonic acid-sensitive A-type channel in the short (outer) hair cells of the chicken cochlea. This polyunsaturated fatty acid blocked the A-current, thereby increasing the amplitude and duration of the voltage response in these cells. We identified the gene encoding this channel as belonging to a member of the Shal subfamily, Kv4.2. Expression of the recombinant channel shows half-activation and inactivation potentials shifted to more positive values relative to native channels, suggesting that the native channel is coexpressed with an accessory subunit. RT-PCR revealed that transcription begins early in development, whereas in situ hybridization showed mRNA expression limited to the intermediate and short hair cells located in specific regions of the adult cochlea. Additional localization, using immunofluorescent staining, revealed clustering in apical-lateral regions of the receptor cell as well as in the cochlear ganglion. These experiments provide evidence that in addition to membrane proteins modulating excitation in these receptor cells, fatty acids contribute to the coding of auditory stimuli via these channels. PMID:15254081

  17. Isolation and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from a Traditional Jeotgal Product in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gyu Sung; Do, Hyung Ki

    2006-06-01

    Seventeen lactic acid bacterial strains (LAB) were isolated using MRS agar medium from Jeotgal, a Korean fermented food, purchased at the Jukdo market of Pohang. To identify the strains isolated, they were tested by examining their cell morphologies, gram-staining, catalase activity, arginine hydrolase activity, D-L lactate form and carbohydrate fermentation. According to the phenotypic characteristics, three strains were tent atively identified as Lactobacillus spp., ten were Enterococcus spp. (or Streptococcus spp., or Pediococcus spp.) and the rest were Leuconostoc spp. (or Weissella spp.). Five strains among 17 were chosen by preliminary bacteriocin activity test. Four bacterial strains which inhibited both indicator microorganisms were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. The results are as follows; Leuconostoc mesenteroides (HK 4), Leuconostoc mesenteroides (HK 5), Leuconostoc mesenteroides(HK 11), Streptococcus salivarius(HK 8). In order to check LAB which are showing a high survival rate in gut, we investigated three strains inhibiting both indicator microorganisms in artificial gastric acid and bile juice -all except HK8. The three strains mentioned above grew in extreme low acid conditions.

  18. Identification of salicylic acid using surface modified polyurethane film using an imprinted layer of polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, K

    2007-02-01

    The surface of polyurethane (PU) was modified by coating a thin layer of polyaniline (PAN) by oxi