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Sample records for acid peptic diseases

  1. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  2. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia. PMID:24908957

  3. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  4. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  5. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  6. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C

    2007-10-01

    Peptic ulcer disease usually occurs in the stomach and proximal duodenum. The predominant causes in the United States are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease include epigastric discomfort (specifically, pain relieved by food intake or antacids and pain that causes awakening at night or that occurs between meals), loss of appetite, and weight loss. Older patients and patients with alarm symptoms indicating a complication or malignancy should have prompt endoscopy. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should discontinue their use. For younger patients with no alarm symptoms, a test-and-treat strategy based on the results of H. pylori testing is recommended. If H. pylori infection is diagnosed, the infection should be eradicated and antisecretory therapy (preferably with a proton pump inhibitor) given for four weeks. Patients with persistent symptoms should be referred for endoscopy. Surgery is indicated if complications develop or if the ulcer is unresponsive to medications. Bleeding is the most common indication for surgery. Administration of proton pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy control most bleeds. Perforation and gastric outlet obstruction are rare but serious complications. Peritonitis is a surgical emergency requiring patient resuscitation; laparotomy and peritoneal toilet; omental patch placement; and, in selected patients, surgery for ulcer control.

  7. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  8. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  9. Psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, Susan

    2002-06-01

    Over the past decade, while gastroenterologists' interest in mind-body interactions in organic disorders dwindled, stronger evidence has linked psychosocial factors with the incidence and recurrence of peptic ulcer and with the course of inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological-behavioral approaches to treatment continue to be disappointing. Psychosocial factors may affect ulcer by increasing duodenal acid load, altering local circulation or motility, intensifying Helicobacter pylori infection, stimulating corticosteroid secretion, and affecting health risk behaviors; possible mechanisms for inflammatory bowel disease include immune deregulation, gut permeability changes, and poor medication adherence. Both belong to the growing category of diseases thought to have an infectious component: for peptic ulcer the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, for inflammatory bowel disease an exaggerated immune response to gut bacteria. Peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease, which present unique interactions among psychological, immunologic, endocrine, infectious, and behavioral factors, are splendid paradigms of the biopsychosocial model.

  10. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  11. Definition and Facts for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next: Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  12. Optimal management of peptic ulcer disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa; Maggi, Stefania; Addante, Filomena; Sancarlo, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    Recent data report that the incidence of peptic ulcer is decreasing in the general population; conversely, the rates of gastric and duodenal ulcer hospitalization and mortality remain very high in older patients. Two major factors that might explain this epidemiological feature in the elderly population are the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the increasing prescriptions of gastroduodenal damaging drugs, including NSAIDs and/or aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). The main goals for treating peptic ulcer disease in old age are to reduce recurrence of the disease and to prevent complications, especially bleeding and perforation. The available treatments for peptic ulcer are essentially based on gastric acid suppression with antisecretory drugs and the eradication of H. pylori infection. The aim of this article is to report the available data on clinical efficacy and tolerability of peptic ulcer treatments in elderly patients and provide recommendations for their optimal use in this special population. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapies for 7 days are highly effective for the cure of H. pylori-positive peptic ulcers as well as for reducing ulcer recurrence. Antisecretory drugs are also the treatment of choice for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcers and are useful as preventive therapy in chronic users of NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin as antiplatelet therapy. Antisecretory PPI therapy has a favourable tolerability profile in geriatric patients; however, monitoring is suggested in older patients with frequent pulmonary infections, gastrointestinal malabsorption, unexplained chronic diarrhoea, osteoporosis or those taking concomitant cytochrome P450 2C19-metabolized medications. The overall approach to the geriatric patient should include a comprehensive geriatric assessment that ensures multidimensional evaluation of the patient in order to better define the clinical risk of adverse outcomes in the older patient with peptic ulcer and

  13. Historical impact to drive research in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Banić, M; Malfertheiner, P; Babić, Z; Ostojić, R; Kujundzic, M; Fatović-Ferenčić, S; Plesko, S; Petričušić, L

    2011-01-01

    The story of gastric acid secretion began with early ideas on gastric secretion (Spallanzani and de Réaumur, 17th century) and with first descriptions of food digestion (Dupuytren and Bichat, Beaumont, early 18th century), followed by proof that gastric juice contained acid (Prout, early 18th century). The research continued with first descriptions of gastric glands as the source of gastric acid and its changes upon digestive stimulus (Purkinje and Golgi, mid and late 19th century). The theory of 'nervism' - the neuro-reflex stimulation of gastric secretion by vagal nerve (Pavlov, early 20th century) was contrasted by a histamine-mediated concept of gastric secretion (Popielski and Code, mid 20th century). Thus, gastric acid and pepsin (Schwann, early 19th century) were found to be essential for food digestion and studies also pointed to histamine, being the most potent final common chemostimulator of oxyntic cells. The discoveries in etiopathogenesis of mucosal injury were marked by the famous dictum: 'No acid, no ulcer' ('Ohne saueren Magensaft kein peptisches Geschwür', Schwarz, 1910) that later induced the term of 'mucosal defense' and the notion that the breaking of 'gastric mucosal barrier' represents the initial step in the process of mucosal injury (Davenport, Code and Scholer, mid 20th century). The prostaglandins were shown to influence all major components of gastric mucosal barrier, described with the term 'cytoprotection' (Vane, Robert and Jacobson, 1970s). Beginning in the latter half of 19th century, the studies on gastric bacteriology that followed enabled the discovery of association between Campylobacter (Helicobacter) pylori and peptic ulcers (Warren and Marshall, 1980s) that led to worldwide major interventions in treating peptic ulcer disease. The surgical approach to peptic ulcer had been outlined by resection procedures (Billroth, Pean, Moynihan, late 19 century) and vagotomy, with or without drainage procedures (Jaboulay, Latarjet

  14. Treatment for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medicines, such as antibiotics, bismuth subsalicylates, or antacids. PPIs reduce stomach acid and protect the lining ... it with antibiotics, not in place of antibiotics. Antacids An antacid may make the pain from a ...

  15. Prostaglandins, H2-receptor antagonists and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Bright-Asare, P; Habte, T; Yirgou, B; Benjamin, J

    1988-01-01

    Peptic ulcer develops when offensive factors overwhelm defensive processes in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Offensive factors include NSAIDs, hydrochloric acid-peptic activity, bile reflux, and some products of the lipoxygenase pathway such as leukotriene B4; whereas defensive processes are largely mediated by prostaglandins through poorly understood mechanisms uniformly termed cytoprotection. Cytoprotection, a physiological process working through the products of arachidonic acid metabolism, may result from the net effect of the protective actions of prostaglandins versus the damaging actions of leukotrienes. Some prostaglandins also have antisecretory effects. Therefore the peptic ulcer healing effects of prostaglandin analogues, all of which have significant antisecretory activity, may be more due to their antisecretory effects than primarily to their effects on mucosal defences. Certain drug-induced gastroduodenal lesions, e.g. NSAID-induced ulcers, which are often unresponsive to H2-receptor antagonists, have been healed and their recurrence prevented by the use of PGE1 and PGE2 analogues. All the prostaglandin analogues investigated to date in humans have the potential for inducing abortion, an important side effect which may limit their worldwide use. The optimal prostaglandin analogue for ulcer healing should not induce abortion and should be potently cytoprotective. The predominant damaging agent in the development of peptic ulcer disease is gastric hydrochloric acid. Thus, the worldwide established efficacy and safety of H2-receptor antagonists such as cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine and most recently of roxatidine acetate suggest that these agents have become the standard by which other forms of anti-ulcer therapy should be judged. PMID:2905237

  16. Surgical perspectives in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lipof, Tamar; Shapiro, David; Kozol, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    For much of the twentieth century, surgery was frequently the solution for peptic ulcer disease. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of ulcers paralleled the development of potent pharmaceutical therapy. As the surgical world developed parietal cell vagotomy which would minimize the complications of surgery, patients failing medical therapy became rare. Emergent surgery for complicated peptic ulcers has not declined however. The development of proton pump inhibitors and the full understanding of the impact of H pylori has led to a trend towards minimalism in surgical therapy for complicated peptic ulcer disease. In addition to the changes in patient care, these developments have had an impact on the training of surgeons. This article outlines these trends and developments. PMID:16718847

  17. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  18. [Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease: Present and Future Perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Wook

    2016-06-25

    Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most commonly encountered diseases in gastroenterology clinics. After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall, it has been identified as the most important cause of peptic ulcer. Eradication of H. pylori markedly reduces the post-treatment recurrence rate of peptic ulcer. However, as human populations age, the incidence of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal diseases increases and consequent use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-in-flammatory drugs increases. Thus causes and presenting patterns of peptic ulcer have changed. In this review, I describe new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease and explore future perspectives.

  19. Sarcomas arising after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, M.R.; Winans, C.S.; Griem, M.L.; Moossa, R.; Elner, V.M.; Franklin, W.A.

    1985-06-01

    Therapeutic gastric irradiation has been used to reduce peptic juice secretion in patients with peptic ulcer disease. Between 1937 and 1968 a total of 2049 patients received such therapy at the University of Chicago. Three of these patients are known to have developed sarcomas in the field of radiation. Two gastric leiomyosarcomas of the stomach were diagnosed 26 and 14 years after treatment and a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the anterior chest wall was removed six years after gastric irradiation. Of 743 peptic ulcer patients treated without irradiation and constituted as a control group for the study of therapeutic gastric radiation, none is known to have developed sarcoma. As the incidence of sarcoma in these patient groups is known only from the tumor registry of the University of Chicago, other cases of sarcoma may exist in the groups. While an increased incidence of sarcoma has not been proven to occur in patients who received therapeutic gastric irradiation for peptic ulcer disease, the possibility of such a risk should be borne in mind by physicians caring for such patients.

  20. Is there any role of acid reducing gastric surgery in peptic ulcer perforation?

    PubMed

    Nivatvongs, Supanit

    2005-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is known to be the prime factor of peptic ulcer disease as well as NSAID usage. Although medical treatment of the bacteria can eliminate the problem for more than 90% of the infected people but the cost of treatment is high then acid reducing gastric surgery still has a definite role. The prevalence of H. pylori in peptic ulcer perferation is still unknown also whether vagotomy and gastrectomy could eradicate H. pylori. Now laparoscopic surgery especially the simple repair of the perforation has became routinely used in many part of the world. So acid reducing gastric surgery is a good choice in chronic user of NSAID and also an option for people who have H. pylori infection.

  1. [Peptic Ulcer Disease Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection].

    PubMed

    Yeo, Se-Hwan; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2016-06-25

    Although the global prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is decreasing, PUD is still one of the most common upper gastrointestinal diseases in the world due to Helicobacter pylori infection and increased use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Korea, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is also declining, but it is still the major cause of PUD. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are caused by imbalances between bacterial virulence factors, host factors, and environmental influences. In this review, we describe the prevalence trends of H. pylori infection in Korea, the mechanism of H. pylori infection-related PUD, and treatment strategies.

  2. Peptic ulcer disease in endogenous hypercortisolism: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Caglar, Erkan; Ugurlu, Serdal; Tuncer, Murat; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-11-01

    Many clinicians believe hypercortisolism is ulcerogenic. However, data from clinical studies show that prophylaxis for peptic ulcer disease is no longer recommended in patients receiving corticosteroid treatment. This has not yet been verified in endogenous hypercortisolism by controlled clinical studies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) and peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The study group contained 20 cases with CS resulting from ACTH-dependent endogenous hypercortisolism. The control groups consisted of 14 age- and gender-matched cases receiving exogenous corticosteroid therapy and 100 cases of dyspepsia with non-cushingoid features. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on all cases. Biopsies were taken from five different points: two samples from the antrum, two samples from the corpus, and one sample from the fundus. A histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was also obtained from evaluation of biopsy specimens. The frequency of stomach and duodenal ulcers did not vary between the groups (p = 0.5 and p = 0.7). Antral gastritis was less frequent and pangastritis was more common in cases with CS compared to the healthy controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). The incidence of Candida esophagitis was more frequent in cases with CS compared to cases with corticosteroid treatment and healthy controls (p = 0.03). Histopathological findings and frequency of Helicobacter pylori based on pathology results did not vary between the three groups. It is possible that neither exogenous nor endogenous corticosteroid excess directly causes peptic ulcer or Helicobacter pylori infection. Prophylactic use of proton pump inhibitors is not compulsory for hypercortisolism of any type.

  3. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Laws, H L; McKernan, J B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the authors' experience with endoscopic management of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Patients with complications of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure still require surgical management. Virtually all operations for duodenal ulcer include some form of vagotomy. American surgeons in academic centers prefer highly selective vagotomy in suitable candidates. Video-directed laparoscopic and thoracoscopic operations have been done for all complications of duodenal ulcer except for acute hemorrhage. METHODS: The authors have performed laparoscopic operation on eight patients with intractable chronic duodenal ulcer, seven patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with duodenal ulcer, one patient with chronic duodenal ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction, and one patient with acute perforation. Operations performed included omentopexy, anterior seromyotomy plus post truncal vagotomy, and highly selective vagotomy. Seven patients had a simultaneous Nissen fundoplication; and the patient with obstruction underwent concomitant pyloroplasty and vagotomy. Six patients with intestinal ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure were treated with thoracoscopic vagotomy. Techniques used are shown. RESULTS: There has been one recurrent ulcer in the laparoscopic group after anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy. The patient treated by omentopexy for duodenal perforation recovered gastrointestinal function promptly with no further difficulty, but eventually died of primary medical disease. Patients undergoing thoracoscopic vagotomy have all become asymptomatic. Postoperative hospital stay after highly selective vagotomy, anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy, or thoracoscopic vagotomy was 1-5 days. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic management of duodenal ulcers is feasible. Larger numbers of patients with

  4. [Peptic ulcer disease and helicobacter pylori: How we know what we know].

    PubMed

    Scholl, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is one of the main causes of peptic ulcers. But how was this causal relationship demonstrated? A historical and philosophical analysis of a series of studies conducted during the 1980s can elucidate the question. In the beginning, a mere correlation between the newly discovered bacterium and peptic ulcers was found in gastric biopsies. It remained an open question whether the bacterium caused the disease, or whether it constituted merely an opportunistic infection. Yet determining the direction of causality was difficult in the absence of an animal model: Even though gastritis was observed in a courageous self-experiment involving a swallowed bacterial culture, tf!e significance of the individual case was small. The failings of the self-experiment could only be rectified by a randomised, placebo-controlled trial which met the requirements of Koch's third postulate. Moreover, it was necessary to gain an initial understanding of the mechanism by which the causal relationship between H. pylori and peptic ulcers is mediated: How, forexample, does the bacterium survive in the acid environment of the stomach? The study of the case from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science illustrates how medical knowledge is established incrementally.

  5. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

  6. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS. We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05. The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease. PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  7. Epstein-Barr virus association with peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Carreón-Talavera, Ricardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) use are considered the main risk to develop peptic ulcer disease (PUD). However, PUD also occurs in the absence of HP infection and/or NSAID use. Recently, we have found evidence that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation increases the risk to develop premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. Objective. To study a possible association between EBV and PUD. Methods. Antibodies against an EBV reactivation antigen, HP, and the HP virulence factor CagA were measured in sera from 207 Mexican subjects, controls (healthy individuals, n = 129), and PUD patients (n = 78, 58 duodenal and 20 gastric ulcers). Statistical associations were estimated. Results. Duodenal PUD was significantly associated with high anti-EBV IgG titers (p = 0.022, OR = 2.5), while anti-EBV IgA was positively associated with gastric PUD (p = 0.002, OR = 10.1). Conclusions. Our study suggests that EBV reactivation in gastric and duodenal epithelium increases the risk to develop PUD.

  8. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  9. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  10. Young onset peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia are separate entities.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, A; Varis, K; Salmi, H A; Sipponen, P; Härkönen, M; Sarna, S

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in young men were studied in 202 consecutive conscripts who attended Central Military Hospital in Helsinki because of long-standing upper abdominal complaints. Active peptic ulceration (APU) was found in 48 patients, inactive peptic ulcer disease (IPU) was diagnosed in 77 patients, non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was diagnosed in 52 patients. In 25 cases the reason for symptoms was another disease, and these patients were excluded from the study. A control series (CON) consisted of 30 symptomless healthy young male volunteers. The likelihood of discriminating between peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a young male patient with dyspepsia are indicated by odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence limits (CL 95). Active peptic ulcer disease differs from NUD, e.g., by 1) presence of antrum gastritis, OR 41.5 (CL 95: 10.1-171), 2) Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa, OR 31.0 (7.4-130), 3) Lewisa+ phenotype, OR 8.9 (1.7-45.4), 4) serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) greater than 100 micrograms/l, OR 4.6 (1.7-12.4), 5) non-secretor status, OR 4.3 (1.6-11.6), and 6) O-blood group, OR 3.0 (1.2-7.7). In conclusion, the status of gastroduodenal mucosa, gastric secretion pattern and distribution of some genetic markers in patient series indicate that young onset peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia are two separate entities. Helicobacter-positive antrum gastritis is the best determinant of ulcer risk, but also high S-PGI, Lewisa+ phenotype, non-secretor status and O-blood group are signs of increased risk of peptic ulcer.

  11. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I. bleed - peptic ulcer; H. pylori - peptic ulcer; Helicobacter pylori - peptic ulcer ... is infection of the stomach by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ). Most people with peptic ulcers have ...

  12. Risk factors influencing morbidity and mortality in perforated peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Taş, İlhan; Ülger, Burak Veli; Önder, Akın; Kapan, Murat; Bozdağ, Zübeyir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Peptic ulcer perforation continues to be a major surgical problem. In this study, risk factors that influence morbidity and mortality in perforated peptic ulcer disease were examined. Material and Methods: Files of 148 patients who were included in the study due to peptic ulcer perforation between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Data regarding age, gender, complaints, time elapsed between onset of symptoms and hospital admission, physical examination findings, co-morbid diseases, laboratory and imaging findings, length of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: The study group included 129 (87.2%) male and 19 (12.8%) female patients. The mean age was 51.7±20 (15-88) years. Forty five patients (30.4%) had at least one co-morbid disease. In the postoperative period, 30 patients (20.3%) had complications. The most common complication was wound infection. Mortality was observed in 27 patients (18.2%). The most common cause of mortality was sepsis. Multivariate analysis revealed age over 60 years, presence of co-morbidities and Mannheim peritonitis index as independent risk factors for morbidity. Age over 60 years, time to admission and Mannheim peritonitis index were detected as independent risk factors for mortality. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and proper treatment are important in patients presenting with peptic ulcer perforation. PMID:25931940

  13. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  14. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose. PMID:27448107

  15. [Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug and Aspirin-induced Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-06-25

    Despite decreasing Helicobacter pylori prevalence, the prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is increasing in the aged population, mainly due to increasing use of NSAIDs to manage pain and inflammation. In addition, low dose aspirin is employed as an anti-coagulant for those who have suffered or are at high risk of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease. However, NSAIDs and aspirin are injurious to mucosa of stomach and duodenum. NSAID-induced inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis is thought to be a major mechanism of gastrointestinal mucosal injury. The proportion of elderly has increased rapidly in Korea, with the proportion over 65 years old expected to be 24.3% in 2030. In this higher-risk population, the strategy to reduce the incidence of NSAID-related peptic ulcers and complications such as bleeding, obstruction and perforation is very important. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can be used for reducing the risk of NSAID-related ulcers and upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications. However, continuous use of PPI has several problems. In addition, NSAID-related problems in the lower GI tract have increased, in contrast to the decrease of NSAID-related upper GI disease. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based knowledge regarding the mechanism, complications of treatment, and prevention strategies for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease in Korea.

  16. Primary Histoplasma capsulatum Enterocolitis Mimicking Peptic and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakshabendi, Rahman; Torres-Miranda, Daisy; LaBarbera, Francis Daniel; Nakshabandi, Ahmad; Nakshabendi, Imad

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, histoplasmosis may present as disseminated disease. We present a 52-year-old Caucasian male with symptoms of dyspepsia, postprandial epigastric pain, nausea, and nonbloody diarrhea. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were suspicious for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, biopsies were consistent with histoplasmosis, specifically in the duodenum. PMID:27812393

  17. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen.

  18. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen. PMID:27312831

  19. A pilot study of Helicobacter pylori genotypes and cytokine gene polymorphisms in reflux oesophagitis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, R A; Ozgur, O; Gucuyeter, S; Kaklikkaya, N; Cobanoglu, U; Aydin, F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes various diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. While majority of the people infected with H. pylori is asymptomatic, 15-20 % of them develop such diseases. The main factors, which determine the development of H. pylori related diseases might be bacterial virulence, host genetic and environmental factors.The aim of this study was to reveal the factors that play a role in the disease development in patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer, infected with Helicobacter pylori. Environmental factors such as medical agents, smoking and body mass index were evaluated. The factors specific to bacteria such as vacA, CagA, babA and iceA virulence genotypes and the host factors such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon-γ, TNF-α, ve TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms were compared between the two groups.H. pylori infected twenty five patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer were enrolled in the study. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding environmental factors. IL-2 -330T +166T (p=0.037) and IL10 -1082A; -819C (p=0.049) gene polymorphisms were significantly more common in the group of patients with peptic ulcer compared to the group with reflux esophagitis. In both groups of patients, either with reflux esophagitis or peptic ulcer, multiple H. pylori virulence genotypes (cagA, vacA, babA) (mean values 74 %, 78 %, 54 % respectively) were observed.In this study, we revealed that cytokine gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development peptic ulcer while H. pylori virulence genotypes seem to be crucial for the development of associated diseases (Tab. 4, Ref. 51).

  20. The Association of Helicobacter pylori Eradication with the Occurrences of Chronic Kidney Diseases in Patients with Peptic Ulcer Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Ku, Ming-Kun; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    The association of Helicobacter pylori eradication with the occurrence of renal dysfunction in patients with peptic ulcer diseases is still unclear. This study aimed to clarify the relevance of H. pylori eradication to the occurrence of chronic kidney diseases in patients with peptic ulcer diseases. Data that were available from 2000–2011 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan, and all patients with peptic ulcer diseases (n = 208 196) were screened for eligibility. We divided randomly selected patients into an H. pylori eradication cohort (cohort A, n = 3593) and matched them by age and sex to a without H. pylori eradication cohort (cohort B, n = 3593). Subgroup analysis was further performed for H. pylori eradication within ≤ 90 days of the diagnosis date (early eradication, n = 2837) and within 91–365 days (non-early eradication, n = 756). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the association of H. pylori eradication with the risk of developing chronic kidney diseases and mortality. We observed that there were more patients suffering from chronic kidney disease in cohort B than in the early eradication subgroup of cohort A (8.49% vs. 6.70%, respectively, p = 0.0075); the mortality rate was also higher in cohort B (4.76% vs. 3.70%, respectively, p = 0.0376). Old age, pulmonary disease, connective tissue disorders, and diabetes were risk factors for chronic kidney diseases but early H. pylori eradication was a protective factor against chronic kidney diseases (hazard ratio: 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.52–0.88, p = 0.0030), and death (hazard ratio: 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.49–0.96, p = 0.0297). In conclusion, our findings have important implications suggesting that early H. pylori eradication is mandatory since it is associated with a protective role against the occurrence of chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27764171

  1. Association between early Helicobacter pylori eradication and a lower risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori plays a central role in the development of peptic ulcers. The effect of early H pylori eradication on the recurrence of complicated peptic ulcer disease in ESRD patients remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether early H pylori eradication therapy in ESRD patients can reduce the risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers.We conducted a population-based cohort study and recruited patients with ESRD who had developed peptic ulcers. We categorized patients into early (time lag ≦120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis) and late H pylori eradication therapy groups. The Cox proportional hazards model was used. The endpoint was based on hospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcers.The early and late H pylori eradication therapy groups consisted of 2406 and 1356 ESRD patients, respectively, in a time lag of 120 days. After adjusting for possible confounders, the early eradication group exhibited a lower rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.64-0.91, P = 0.003) in a time lag of ≦120 days, but a similar rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease in time lags of ≦1 year (HR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.79-1.19, P = 0.758) and 2 years (HR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.86-1.44, P = 0.433) compared with the late eradication group.We recommend administering H pylori eradication within 120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis to H pylori infected ESRD patients who have developed peptic ulcers.

  2. The role of psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer disease: beyond Helicobacter pylori and NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    A variety of organic etiologies are associated with peptic ulcer disease, and the most relevant of these are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Between 5% and 20% of patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer, however, lack an identifiable organic etiology. In these patients particularly and in all ulcer patients in general, psychosocial factors may play a significant role. At present, there is no definitive study proving a causal relationship between psychological stress and the development of ulcer disease. Studies to date suffer from significant methodological limitations and have not effectively addressed the poor correlation between ulcer craters and ulcer symptoms. A conservative application of available data would suggest that psychosocial factors play a significant role in symptom perception and reporting in patients with dyspeptic symptoms and may play a role in ulcer formation. PMID:16581366

  3. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD.

  4. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD. PMID:26470920

  5. Validity of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses in administrative databases: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Montedori, Alessandro; Abraha, Iosief; Chiatti, Carlos; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful to investigate the epidemiology, health outcomes, quality indicators and healthcare utilisation concerning peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding, but the databases need to be validated in order to be a reliable source for research. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision and 10th version (ICD-9 and ICD-10) codes for peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched, using appropriate search strategies. We will include validation studies that used administrative data to identify peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses or studies that evaluated the validity of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding codes in administrative data. The following inclusion criteria will be used: (a) the presence of a reference standard case definition for the diseases of interest; (b) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, etc) and (c) the use of an administrative database as a source of data. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will evaluate quality using the checklist of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. We will submit results of this study to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results will serve as a guide for researchers validating administrative healthcare databases to determine appropriate case definitions for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal

  6. Efficacy of Zinc Sulfate in Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Parhizkar, Baran; Sheikhesmaeili, Farshad; Roshani, Mohammad; Nayebi, Morteza; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a common disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Considering its global prevalence finding new approach for treating is important. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of zinc sulfate on gastric and duodenal ulcer treatment. Materials and Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was done on 90 patients who were admitted to the gastrointestinal endoscopy clinic of Tohid hospital in Sanandaj, Iran. All patients were diagnosed with gastric and duodenal ulcers. They were randomly divided into two-intervention and control groups, using block randomization with block sizes of 4. Patients and researcher were unaware of the grouping. To assess the level of zinc, blood samples were taken. In case of positive Rapid Urease Test (RUT), triple therapy regimen including amoxicillin, clarithromycin and omeprazole was administered for two weeks. For intervention group in addition to "triple therapy", an oral dose of Zinc Sulfate 220mg capsules were administered daily, while the control group received placebo capsules. Results A total of 54.5% and 57% of the patients in the intervention and control groups had gastric ulcer respectively. The Rapid Urease Test (RUT) result of 72.7% of intervention group and 83.3% of control group was positive (p = 0.24). Serum zinc level of 20.9% of intervention group and 35.7% of control group was lower than the normal level (p = 0.13). The mean of serum zinc level of intervention group and control group were 81.9 and 78.9 mg dL respectively (p = 0.4). After intervention, peptic ulcer in 81.8% of the intervention group and 83.3% of the control groups were improved (p= 0.85). Response to treatment were higher in patients with normal zinc levels compared to patients with abnormal levels (77.5% vs. 22.5%, p=0.019). Conclusion A daily dose of 220mg zinc sulfate was not significantly effective on peptic ulcer. However, patients with normal zinc levels had better ulcer treatment. PMID

  7. Technetium-99m colloidal bismuth subcitrate: A novel method for the evaluation of peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, T.E.; Lyons, K.P.; Raiszadeh, M.; Fardi, M.; Snider, P.

    1984-01-01

    The therapeutic agent colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) selectively binds to peptic ulcers. The authors have developed a method for labeling this agent with Tc-99m. Chromatographic quality control studies of the agent on silica gel coated strips (ITLC-SG) showed that more than 97% of Tc-99m was bound to CBS. During in-vitro stability testing, the radio-label was stable for a minimum of 6 hours. The chromatographic findings are in agreement with the in-vivo distribution of the agent which showed no significant radioactivity in thyroid, kidneys, liver, or bladder. The resulting Tc-99m-CBS solution is administered orally in drinking water. Preliminary animal studies have been conducted on 5 adult 3 kg New Zealand rabbits sedated with 50 mg Ketamine I.M. The rabbits were intubated with I.V. tubing advanced to the stomach. They were given a gastric erosive suspension of 600-1000 mg/kg of pulverized ASA in 10 cc tap water. Four hours later they were given 3-4 mCi of the radiotracer in a 5 cc volume of water. Serial in-vivo images were obtained for 2 hours which included thyroid, abdomen, and urinary bladder. Next the stomachs were excised, opened along the greater curvature, imaged, vigorously washed and reimaged. All 5 rabbits showed avid localized binding of radiotracer which remained fixed even with vigorous washing. Areas of normal appearing mucosa were relatively devoid of radiotracer. This new compound may have significant clinical usefulness in the detection of peptic ulcer disease. In addition, such a non-invasive technique, carrying none of the risks or discomfort of endoscopy could also find application in the evaluation of the response to therapy.

  8. [Role of Allelic Genes of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Tissue Inhibitors in the Peptic Ulcer Disease Development].

    PubMed

    Shaymardanova, E Kh; Nurgalieva, A Kh; Khidiyatova, I M; Gabbasova, L V; Kuramshina, O A; Kryukova, A Ya; Sagitov, R B; Munasipov, F R; Khusnutdinova, E Kh

    2016-03-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract, mainly manifesting itself in the formation of the fairly persistent ulcer defect of the mucous membrane of the stomach and/or duodenum. Association analysis of common polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinases genes MMP-1 (rs1799750, rs494379), MMP-2 (rs2285052), MMP-3 (rs3025058), MMP-9 (rs3918242, rs17576), and MMP-12 (rs2276109) and their tissue inhibitors TIMP-2 (rs8179090) and TIMP-3 (rs9619311) was carried out in 353 patients with a gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer and in 325 unrelated healthy individuals from the Republic of Bashkortostan. Associations of polymorphic variants rs1799750 and rs494379 of gene MMP-1, rs3025058 of gene MMP-3, rs3918242 and rs17576 of gene MMP-9, and rs9619311 of gene TIMP-3 with the risk of peptic ulcer disease in Russians and Tatars were revealed.

  9. Increased Subsequent Risk of Peptic Ulcer Diseases in Patients With Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that patients with bipolar disorders (BDs) exhibit increased physical comorbidity and psychological distress. Studies have shown that schizophrenia and anxiety increase the risk of peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs). Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the association between these 2 diseases and examine the possible risk factors. We used patients diagnosed with BDs from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprising patients without BDs was frequency matched by age, sex, and comorbidities, and the occurrence of PUDs was evaluated in both the cohorts. The BD and non-BD cohort consisted of 21,060 patients with BDs and 84,240 frequency-matched patients without BDs, respectively. The incidence of PUDs (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.43–1.59; P < 0.001) was higher among the patients with BDs than the control patients. Cox models showed that irrespective of comorbidities, BDs were an independent risk factor for PUDs. Patients with BDs exhibit a substantially higher risk for developing PUDs. According to our data, we suggest that, following a diagnosis of BD, practitioners could notice the occurrence of PUD and associated prevention. Further prospective clinical studies investigating the relationship between BDs and PUDs are warranted. PMID:26200637

  10. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-05-01

    Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS.We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05.The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20-1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease.PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  11. The use of carprofen, a non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent, in peptic ulcer diseases.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Obtulowicz, W; Zmuda, A; Polański, M; Kopp, B; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1983-12-01

    The effects of carprofen (Roche), a nonsteroid antiinflammatory agent, on gastric secretion, serum gastrin level, electropotential difference (PD), gastric microbleeding, DNA loss, and the generation of mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) were examined in 20 duodenal ulcer patients with active ulcer (15 patients) or in remission (5 patients). Carprofen administered for one-week period at a therapeutic dose (300 mg/day) was well tolerated by all ulcer patients and no adverse effects were observed during or after treatment. Endoscopy performed after carprofen treatment showed complete ulcer healing in 9 out of 15 patients and no exacerbations were observed in the rest of patients. No significant changes were observed in basal or pentagastrin-induced secretion, PD, gastric microbleeding and DNA loss. The generation of PGE2, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2 was not affected by the treatment with carprofen. This study indicates that carprofen shows excellent gastrointestinal tolerance in ulcer patients, and it might be useful in the treatment of arthritic patients with peptic ulcer disease.

  12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease and H. pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Fashner, Julia; Gitu, Alfred C

    2015-02-15

    The most common causes of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) are Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The test-and-treat strategy for detecting H. pylori is appropriate in situations where the risk of gastric cancer is low based on age younger than 55 years and the absence of alarm symptoms. Most other patients should undergo upper endoscopy to rule out malignancy and other serious causes of dyspepsia. Urea breath tests and stool antigen tests are most accurate for identifying H. pylori infection and can be used to confirm cure; serologic tests are a convenient but less accurate alternative and cannot be used to confirm cure. Treatment choices include standard triple therapy, sequential therapy, quadruple therapy, and levofloxacin-based triple therapy. Standard triple therapy is only recommended when resistance to clarithromycin is low. Chronic use of NSAIDs in patients with H. pylori infection increases the risk of PUD. Recommended therapies for preventing PUD in these patients include misoprostol and proton pump inhibitors. Complications of PUD include bleeding, perforation, gastric outlet obstruction, and gastric cancer. Older persons are at higher risk of PUD because of high-risk medication use, including antiplatelet drugs, warfarin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and bisphosphonates.

  13. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48-1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤ 5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control.

  14. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48–1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control. PMID:26426633

  15. Peptic ulcer disease with related drug treatment in pregnant women and congenital abnormalities in their offspring.

    PubMed

    Bánhidy, Ferenc; Dakhlaoui, Abdallah; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2011-03-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is a common disease which can also occur in pregnant women. However, the possible association of PUD and related drug treatments in pregnant women with the risk of structural birth defects (i.e. congenital abnormalities [CA]) in their offspring has not been estimated in controlled population-based epidemiological studies. Thus, the prevalence of PUD in pregnant women who later delivered babies (cases) with different CA and in pregnant women who delivered newborns without CA (controls) was compared in the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities. Controls were matched to cases. Of 22,843 cases with congenital abnormalities, 182 (0.80%) had mothers with reported/recorded PUD, while of 38,151 controls, 261 (0.68%) were born to mothers with reported/recorded PUD. However, PUD(?) based on maternal information and/or unspecified diagnostic criteria, and PUD(!) based on endoscopic diagnosis showed different variables of mothers and newborn infants. Thus, finally, 20 case mothers and 58 control mothers with PUD(!) and related drugs were evaluated in detail. There was no higher risk for total CA group in the offspring of mothers with PUD during pregnancy (adjusted OR with 95% CI: 0.6, 0.3-0.9). Specific CA groups in cases were also assessed versus controls, but specified CA had no higher risk in the offspring of pregnant women with PUD and related drug treatments. In conclusion, a higher rate of CA was not found in the offspring of mothers with PUD.

  16. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-04-01

    To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531-534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19-142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03-1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events.

  17. Assessment of Risk Factors of Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mhaskar, Rahul S; Ricardo, Izurieta; Azliyati, Azizan; Laxminarayan, Rajaram; Amol, Bapaye; Santosh, Walujkar; Boo, Kwa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer. There have been no studies addressing environmental and dietary risk factors in western India. We conducted a case control study enrolling peptic ulcer patients in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: Risk factors for peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection were assessed in a participant interview. H. pylori status was assessed from stool by monoclonal antigen detection. Results: We enrolled 190 peptic ulcer, 35 stomach cancer patients, and 125 controls. Fifty-one percent (180/350) of the participants were infected with H. pylori. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) [odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.39], meat consumption (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.30–4.23), smoking (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24–4.02), eating restaurant food (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.39–10.23), and drinking nonfiltered or nonboiled water (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.23) were risk factors for H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03–2.89), meat (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.75), fish (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02–1.89) consumption, and a family history of ulcer (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08–1.60) were risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers (OR: 0.20, 95% CI: 0.10–0.37) and parasite infestation (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24–0.80) were protective against H. pylori infection. Conclusion: H. pylori infection is associated with peptic ulcer. Lower SES, consumption of restaurant food, meat, nonfiltered water, and smoking are risk factors for H. pylori. Consumption of meat, fish, and a family history of peptic ulcer are risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers and concurrent parasite infestation appear to be protective against H. pylori. PMID:23853433

  18. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  19. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  20. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori-Negative, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Related Peptic Ulcer Disease in Patients Referred to Afzalipour Hospital.

    PubMed

    Seyed Mirzaei, Seyed Mahdi; Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Shafiei Pour, Sara

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Although Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the main causes of peptic ulcers disease (PUD), recently the prevalence of idiopathic peptic ulcer (IPU) is increasing in most parts of the world. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of IPU in Kerman, the center of largest province in south-east Iran. METHODS We included 215 patients with peptic ulcer in our study. Combined methods rapid urease test (RUT), histology, and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on endoscopic samples of peptic ulcers. NSAID use was determined by medical history. SPSS software version 16 was used for data analysis. p value<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS Of 215 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer, four (1.8%) had H.pylorinegative and NSAID-negative PUD. There were not significant differences between patients with IPU and patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori or NSAIDs regarding the sex, age, cigarette smoking, and opioid abuse. CONCLUSION Our study showed that in contrast to other reports from western and some Asian countries, the prevalence of IPU is low in Kerman and H.pylori infection is still the major cause of PUD. We recommend a large and multi-central study to determine the prevalence of IPU in Iran.

  1. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Healthcare Workers: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Yue; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) in Taiwan have heavy, stressful workloads, are on-call, and have rotating nightshifts, all of which might contribute to peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We wanted to evaluate the PUD risk in HCWs, which is not clear. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 50,226 physicians, 122,357 nurses, 20,677 pharmacists, and 25,059 other HCWs (dieticians, technicians, rehabilitation therapists, and social workers) as the study cohort, and randomly selected an identical number of non-HCW patients (i.e., general population) as the comparison cohort. Conditional logistical regression analysis was used to compare the PUD risk between them. Subgroup analysis for physician specialties was also done. Nurses and other HCWs had a significantly higher PUD risk than did the general population (odds ratio [OR]: 1.477; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.433-1.521 and OR: 1.328; 95% CI: 1.245-1.418, respectively); pharmacists had a lower risk (OR: 0.884; 95% CI: 0.828-0.945); physicians had a nonsignificantly different risk (OR: 1.029; 95% CI: 0.987-1.072). In the physician specialty subgroup analysis, internal medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, and family medicine specialists had a higher PUD risk than other physicians (OR: 1.579; 95% CI: 1.441-1.731, OR: 1.734; 95% CI: 1.565-1.922, OR: 1.336; 95% CI: 1.151-1.550, and OR: 1.615; 95% CI: 1.425-1.831, respectively). In contrast, emergency physicians had a lower risk (OR: 0.544; 95% CI: 0.359-0.822). Heavy workloads, long working hours, workplace stress, rotating nightshifts, and coping skills may explain our epidemiological findings of higher risks for PUD in some HCWs, which might help us improve our health policies for HCWs. PMID:26301861

  2. Alteration of the Tongue Manifestation Reflects Clinical Outcomes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hwang-Huei; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Wu, Ping-Ping; Luo, Shu-Fang; Lin, Hung-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study investigated whether the tongue inspection technique in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) can be used as a noninvasive auxiliary diagnostic tool to differentiate the subtypes of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and as an indicator of therapeutic efficacy. Subjects and methods A total of 198 outpatients from the China Medical University Hospital were recruited. The control group comprised 50 healthy adults. The remaining 148 patients were diagnosed with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, or Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection using upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, biopsy, and Campylobacter-like organism test. Tongue appearance was evaluated by a physician experienced in clinical Chinese medicine. Images of the tongue were immediately recorded using a high-resolution digital camera system. Results The affected group of 148 patients received an 8-week course of ulcer therapy. Of these, 108 patients infected with Hp were subjected to triple therapy in the first week. Forty-nine of these 108 cases infected with Hp completed secondary examination of upper GI endoscopy and tongue inspection. Forty-one of 49 cases (83.7%) were fully cured of Hp infection. These results showed that the color of the tongue body did not change in the cured patients; however, tongue fur was markedly thinner with a color change to white (p<0.05), while sublingual veins with engorgement (p<0.05) and blood stasis (p<0.01) improved after the ulcer healed and Hp was eradicated. Conclusions TCM tongue inspection can be potentially used as a noninvasive auxiliary diagnostic method and as an indicator for clinical outcomes for patients with PUD. PMID:23153037

  3. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

  4. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  5. Helicobacter pylori heterogeneity in patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Armitano, Rita Inés; Matteo, Mario José; Goldman, Cinthia; Wonaga, Andrés; Viola, Luis Alberto; De Palma, Gerardo Zerbetto; Catalano, Mariana

    2013-06-01

    Genetic diversification allows Helicobacter pylori to persist during chronic colonization/infection. We investigated the intra-host variation of several markers that suggested microevolution in patients with chonic gastritis (CG) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). One-hundred twenty-six isolates recovered from 14 patients with CG and 13 patients with PUD were analysed. cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), oipA, vacA, bab gene status and the presence of jhp0926, jhp0945, jhp0947, jhp0949 and jhp0940 genes from the genomic Plasticity Zone (PZ) were taken into accout to investigate intra-host variation. lspA-glmM-RFLP was performed to identify mixed infections. Only one patient was colonised/infected by two ancestrally unrelated strains. Among the 126 isolates, a significant association among cagPAI genotypes, oipA status and vacA alleles was indicated. Complete cagPAI, oipA "on", and vacA s1-m1 variants were significantly found in patients with PUD, without intra-host variations. Isolates from 7/14 patients with CG lacked babA in all chromosomal loci. In contrast, isolates from all or several biopsies of PUD patients carried babA, but in one patient only, the isolates showed positive Lewis b (Leb) binding assay. Considering cagPAI, vacA, oipA, bab genotypes, intra-host variation was also significantly higher in patients with CG. Conversely, a similarly high intra-host variation in almost PZ genes was observed in isolates from patients with CG and PUD. In conclusion, the lowest intra-host variation in cagPAI, oipA, vacA, and bab genes found in patients with PUD suggests the selection of a particular variant along the bacteria-host environment interplay during ulceration development. However, the predominance of this variant may be a refletion of the multifactorial etiology of the disease rather than the cause, as it was also found in patients with CG. The intra-host variation in PZ genes may predict that this genomic region and the other markers of microevolution studied

  6. Helicobacter pylori heterogeneity in patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Armitano, Rita Inés; Matteo, Mario José; Goldman, Cinthia; Wonaga, Andrés; Viola, Luis Alberto; De Palma, Gerardo Zerbetto; Catalano, Mariana

    2013-06-01

    Genetic diversification allows Helicobacter pylori to persist during chronic colonization/infection. We investigated the intra-host variation of several markers that suggested microevolution in patients with chonic gastritis (CG) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). One-hundred twenty-six isolates recovered from 14 patients with CG and 13 patients with PUD were analysed. cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), oipA, vacA, bab gene status and the presence of jhp0926, jhp0945, jhp0947, jhp0949 and jhp0940 genes from the genomic Plasticity Zone (PZ) were taken into accout to investigate intra-host variation. lspA-glmM-RFLP was performed to identify mixed infections. Only one patient was colonised/infected by two ancestrally unrelated strains. Among the 126 isolates, a significant association among cagPAI genotypes, oipA status and vacA alleles was indicated. Complete cagPAI, oipA "on", and vacA s1-m1 variants were significantly found in patients with PUD, without intra-host variations. Isolates from 7/14 patients with CG lacked babA in all chromosomal loci. In contrast, isolates from all or several biopsies of PUD patients carried babA, but in one patient only, the isolates showed positive Lewis b (Leb) binding assay. Considering cagPAI, vacA, oipA, bab genotypes, intra-host variation was also significantly higher in patients with CG. Conversely, a similarly high intra-host variation in almost PZ genes was observed in isolates from patients with CG and PUD. In conclusion, the lowest intra-host variation in cagPAI, oipA, vacA, and bab genes found in patients with PUD suggests the selection of a particular variant along the bacteria-host environment interplay during ulceration development. However, the predominance of this variant may be a refletion of the multifactorial etiology of the disease rather than the cause, as it was also found in patients with CG. The intra-host variation in PZ genes may predict that this genomic region and the other markers of microevolution studied

  7. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Healthcare Workers: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong-Yue; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) in Taiwan have heavy, stressful workloads, are on-call, and have rotating nightshifts, all of which might contribute to peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We wanted to evaluate the PUD risk in HCWs, which is not clear. Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 50,226 physicians, 122,357 nurses, 20,677 pharmacists, and 25,059 other HCWs (dieticians, technicians, rehabilitation therapists, and social workers) as the study cohort, and randomly selected an identical number of non-HCW patients (i.e., general population) as the comparison cohort. Conditional logistical regression analysis was used to compare the PUD risk between them. Subgroup analysis for physician specialties was also done. Nurses and other HCWs had a significantly higher PUD risk than did the general population (odds ratio [OR]: 1.477; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.433–1.521 and OR: 1.328; 95% CI: 1.245–1.418, respectively); pharmacists had a lower risk (OR: 0.884; 95% CI: 0.828–0.945); physicians had a nonsignificantly different risk (OR: 1.029; 95% CI: 0.987–1.072). In the physician specialty subgroup analysis, internal medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, and family medicine specialists had a higher PUD risk than other physicians (OR: 1.579; 95% CI: 1.441–1.731, OR: 1.734; 95% CI: 1.565–1.922, OR: 1.336; 95% CI: 1.151–1.550, and OR: 1.615; 95% CI: 1.425–1.831, respectively). In contrast, emergency physicians had a lower risk (OR: 0.544; 95% CI: 0.359–0.822). Heavy workloads, long working hours, workplace stress, rotating nightshifts, and coping skills may explain our epidemiological findings of higher risks for PUD in some HCWs, which might help us improve our health policies for HCWs. PMID:26301861

  8. Is peptic ulcer disease a risk factor of postherpetic neuralgia in patients with herpes zoster?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Chang, Chia-Yu; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Lu, Chin-Li; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster which is caused by a reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus. The pathogenesis of postherpetic neuralgia may involve peripheral and central mechanisms. Reported risk factors for postherpetic neuralgia include female gender, old age, diminished cell-mediated immunity and nutritional deficiencies. Based on our clinical observation which revealed that peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is one of the common comorbidities in patients with postherpetic neuralgia, we hypothesize that herpes zoster patients with PUD may be at a greater risk for the development of postherpetic neuralgia due to their impaired cellular immunity and depressed nutritional status. Major causes of PUD include Helicobacter pylori infection and usage of ulcerogenic medications. Patients with H. pylori infection may develop T cell dysfunctions and nutritional deficiencies including vitamin C, iron, cobalamin, carotenes and alpha-tocopherol. Ulcerogenic medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids have been found not only to be ulcerogenic but also immunosuppressive to T cells. In addition, usage of steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may cause deficiencies of alpha-tocopherol, carotenes, cobalamin, iron, zinc and vitamin C. Vitamin C, carotenes and alpha-tocopherol are anti-inflammatory and the major oxidant scavengers in the aqua phase and biomembranes. Deficiencies of these nutrients may induce dysregulated inflammation and oxidative damage leading to neuropathic pain in patients with herpes zoster. Furthermore, nutrient deficiencies including zinc, iron, cobalamin and vitamin C are associated with dysregulation of Ca(v)3.2 T-channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, upregulation of nitric oxide synthase, the increase of nitric oxide formation and dysfunction of central norepinephrine inhibitory pain pathway. Prospective cohort studies are suggested to test the hypothesis. We further

  9. How host regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis protects against peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Poshmaal; Ng, Garrett Z; Sutton, Philip

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent of a range of gastrointestinal pathologies including peptic ulcer disease and the major killer, gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection with this bacterium induces a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa (gastritis). It is this gastritis that, over decades, eventually drives the development of H. pylori-associated disease in some individuals. The majority of studies investigating H. pylori pathogenesis have focused on factors that promote disease development in infected individuals. However, an estimated 85% of those infected with H. pylori remain completely asymptomatic, despite the presence of pathogenic bacteria that drive a chronic gastritis that lasts many decades. This indicates the presence of highly effective regulatory processes in the host that, in most cases, keeps a check on inflammation and protect against disease. In this minireview we discuss such known host factors and how they prevent the development of H. pylori-associated pathologies.

  10. In-practice evaluation of whole-blood Helicobacter pylori test: its usefulness in detecting peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Quartero, A O; Numans, M E; de Melker, R A; de Wit, N J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 10% of patients presenting with dyspepsia to the general practitioner have peptic ulcers; the large majority of which are related to infection with Helicobactor pylori. Office-based tests for H. pylori detection are generally validated and evaluated in selected patient groups. AIM: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a whole-blood serology test for infection with Helicobacter pylori in detecting peptic ulcer disease (PUD) in daily general practice. METHOD: A descriptive study of 171 primary care dyspepsia patients selected for open-access endoscopy in primary care and aged between 18 and 75 years, in 92 general practices in central, southern, and eastern parts of the Netherlands. H. pylori status was assessed using the BM-test Helicobacter pylori, which is identical to the Helisal test. Dyspepsia severity score was measured using a validated symptom score. Symptom characteristics and probability of relevant disease were assessed by the general practitioner. Endoscopy was carried out in local hospitals. Diagnostic outcome of both endoscopy and H. pylori reference test was supplied by local specialists. The BM-test was evaluated against endoscopic results. RESULTS: A high number (61.8%) of false-negative BM-tests resulted in a low sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 48-75%) for detection of H. pylori infection. Only 12 out of 32 patients with PUD had a positive BM-test, resulting in a positive likelihood ratio (LR) for PUD of 1.41 and a negative LR of 0.85. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the relatively poor performance of the BM-test in daily general practice, and shows the limited diagnostic value of H. pylori office-tests for detecting PUD in primary care. The discriminative value of the test result is too small to support either a 'test-and-endoscope' of a 'test-and-treat' strategy in general practice. PMID:10695060

  11. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  12. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  13. A systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic peptic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Chia

    2015-09-01

    An idiopathic peptic ulcer is defined as an ulcer with unknown cause or an ulcer that appears to arise spontaneously. The first step in treatment is to exclude common possible causes, including Helicobacter pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, ulcerogenic drugs, and uncommon diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. When all known causes are excluded, a diagnosis of idiopathic peptic ulcer can be made. A patient whose peptic ulcer is idiopathic may have a higher risk for complicated ulcer disease, a poorer response to gastric acid suppressants, and a higher recurrence rate after treatment. Risk factors associated with this disease may include genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, smoking, concomitant diseases, a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and higher stress. Therefore, the diagnosis and management of emerging disease should systematically explore all known causes and treat underlying disease, while including regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing and the use of proton-pump inhibitors on a case-by-case basis.

  14. [Bleeding peptic ulcers--how can recurrent bleeding be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Labenz, J; Tillenburg, B; Peitz, U; Stolte, M; Börsch, G

    1995-01-01

    Bleeding is the most frequent complication of peptic ulcer disease. Patients with a previous ulcer hemorrhage have a high risk for future bleeding episodes. Therefore, treatment aiming at ulcer prophylaxis is mandatory. Helicobacter pylori infection, acid/pepsin and intake of Aspirin or NSAIDs are the main causal factors involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. Ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be cured by gastric acid suppression (e.g. omeprazole) and prevented by withdrawal of the ulcerogenic substances or co-medication with omeprazole or misoprostol. Acid and Helicobacter pylori are necessary, albeit by themselves not sufficient factors in the causal web of the formerly idiopathic, gastritis-associated peptic ulcer disease of the stomach and the duodenum. Maintenance therapy with antisecretory drugs results in a marked decrease of ulcer recurrences and probably further ulcer complications after an index bleeding, but a definite cure of the ulcer disease is not feasible in the majority of patients. The proportion of patients remaining in remission is dependent on the degree of gastric acid suppression. Therefore, potent antisecretory drugs such as the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole should be used if a physician decides to initiate a long-term maintenance therapy. Several studies have demonstrated beyond doubt that cure of Helicobacter pylori eradication resulted in a stable remission of gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. In addition, a true reinfection after apparent eradication of the bacteria has been rarely observed in adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  16. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  17. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  18. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  19. Subtotal Gastrectomy With Billroth II Anastomosis Is Associated With a Low Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Peptic Ulcer Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Duodenal diversion can ameliorate lipid and glucose metabolism. We assessed the risk of stroke after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis (SGBIIA) in peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We identified 6425 patients who received SGBIIA for PUD between 1998 and 2010 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database as the study cohort; we frequency-matched them with 25,602 randomly selected controls from the PUD population who did not receive SGBIIA according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and obesity. All patients were followed until the end of 2011 to determine the incidence of stroke. The incidence of stroke was lower in patients in the SGBIIA cohort than in those in the non-SGBIIA cohort (18.9 vs 22.9 per 1000 person-years, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72–0.89, P < 0.001). The risk of ischemic stroke (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.86, P < 0.001), rather than hemorrhagic stroke (aHR 1.00, 95% CI 0.78–1.28), was lower for the SGBIIA cohort than for the non-SGBIIA cohort according to the multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was lower in men (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.86) than in women (aHR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65–0.99) and in patients aged ≥65 years (aHR 0.72, 95% CI 0.63–0.81) than in those of other age groups (≤49 years, aHR 0.82, 95% CI 0.48–1.39; 50–64 years, aHR 1.01, 95% CI 0.79–1.28). The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was also reduced in patients with comorbidities (aHR 0.84, 5% CI 0.75–0.95) rather than in those without comorbidities (aHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.59–1.12). SGBIIA is associated with a low risk of ischemic stroke for PUD patients, and its protective effect is prominent in men, patients aged ≥65

  20. Effect of the oral intake of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 on Helicobacter pylori causing peptic ulcer in C57BL/6 mice models.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Garg, Neena; Sachdev, Atul; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are being proposed to cure peptic ulcers by reducing colonization of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach mucosa and by eradicating already established infection. In lieu of that, in vitro inhibitory activity of pediocin-producing probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 was evaluated against H. pylori by growth inhibition assays. Further, chronic gastritis was first induced in two groups of C57BL/6 mice by orogastric inoculation with H. pylori with polyethylene catheter, and probiotic P. acidilactici BA28 was orally administered to study the eradication and cure of peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori and P. acidilactici BA28 were detected in gastric biopsy and fecal samples of mice, respectively. A probiotic treatment with P. acidilactici BA28, which is able to eliminate H. pylori infection and could reverse peptic ulcer disease, is being suggested as a co-adjustment with conventional antibiotic treatment. The study provided an evidence of controlling peptic ulcer disease, by diet mod

  1. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45–0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after

  2. [Pancreatic tissue heterotopy in the stomach of a patient with complications due to peptic ulcerative disease].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, V K; Makovkin, V V; Gerasimov, V N

    2008-01-01

    In the literature there are reports on rare pancreatic tissue heterotopy that promotes the complicated course of duodenal or gastric ulcerative disease. In this connection, the authors have decided to share their observation of a 41-year-old female patient admitted to a hospital for perforated ulcer and ulcerous hemorrhage. Another ulcerative stenosis and ulcer penetration into the pancreas were found at surgery. Partial gastrectomy was carried out due to failure to suture the perforative opening. A gross biopsy specimen from the pyloric portion of the stomach displayed heterotopic parts in the pancreas with and without excretory ducts.

  3. Perforated peptic ulcer over 56 years. Time trends in patients and disease characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Svanes, C; Salvesen, H; Stangeland, L; Svanes, K; Søreide, O

    1993-01-01

    Perforated gastroduodenal ulcer was studied in 1483 patients in the Bergen area during the years 1935-90 to discover time trends in age and sex, disease characteristics, treatment, and outcome. The male:female ratio fell from 10:1 to 1.5:1, median age increased from 41 to 62 years. Most perforations were found in the duodenum in 1935-64, and in the pyloric and praepyloric area in 1965-90. There was a 10% occurrence of gastric ulcers throughout the study period. Ulcer site was related to age (more gastric and less duodenal perforations with increasing age) and sex (more pyloric and less duodenal ulcers among women). There were twice as many perforations in the evening compared with the early morning. The diurnal variation was more pronounced for duodenal and pyloric than for gastric and praepyloric perforations. Circadian and seasonal variation of ulcer perforation did not change during the 56 years studied. Treatment delay increased from median five hours to median nine hours. Infective complications and mortality fell with the introduction of antibiotics around 1950. General complications has increased in recent years because of the increase of elderly patients. Among patients who died, the proportion with associated disease rose from 27 to 85% during the study period. PMID:8282252

  4. Molecular mechanisms in therapy of acid-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shin, J. M.; Vagin, O.; Munson, K.; Kidd, M.; Modlin, I. M.; Sachs, G.

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of gastric acid secretion is the mainstay of the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulceration; therapies to inhibit acid are among the best-selling drugs worldwide. Highly effective agents targeting the histamine H2 receptor were first identified in the 1970s. These were followed by the development of irreversible inhibitors of the parietal cell hydrogen-potassium ATPase (the proton pump inhibitors) that inhibit acid secretion much more effectively. Reviewed here are the chemistry, biological targets and pharmacology of these drugs, with reference to their current and evolving clinical utilities. Future directions in the development of acid inhibitory drugs include modifications of current agents and the emergence of a novel class of agents, the acid pump antagonists. PMID:17928953

  5. Peptic ulcer disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... will take two types of antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). These medicines may cause nausea, ... NSAIDs, you will likely need to take a proton pump inhibitor for 8 weeks. Taking antacids as ...

  6. Domoic acid epileptic disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, John S; Gulland, Frances M

    2014-03-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  7. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Gulland, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  8. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  9. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  10. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  11. Vagotomy and double pyloroplasty for peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Hines, J R; Geurkink, R E; Kornmesser, T A; Wikholm, L; Davis, R P

    1975-01-01

    Seventy patients with peptic ulcers (55 duodenal and 15 gastric) were treated by truncal vagotomy and doulbe pyloroplasty during the past four years. Clinical and experimental data as presented lead us to believe that transecting the pylorus twice produces an incontinent pyloric sphincter and a larger gastric outlet than is found in other methods of pyloroplasty. This decreases gastric stasis and has led to a lower ulcer recurrence rate (1.5%). In addition the untoward postoperative sequelae are minimal. The 70 patients treated (for the most pare consecutive cases) exhibited the usual complications of peptic ulcer disease. Thirty-three had intractable pain, 23 bleeding (15 massive), 13 obstruction, and one acute perforation. There were no operative or postoperative deaths and the only serious postoperative complication was unrelated to the double pyloroplasty. During the followup period four patients have died of unrelated diseases. Of the remaining 66 patients one developed a probable recurrent peptic ulcer which has responded to medical management. Four patients have intermittent dumping, three have mild diarrhea and one has failed to gain weight, Constipation and weight gain are more common complaints. It would appear that vagotomy with double pyloroplasty is a safe and effective operation for peptic ulcers and that further clinical trials are warranted. PMID:1119866

  12. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45-0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after endoscopic therapy

  13. The relationship between the Five-Factor Model personality traits and peptic ulcer disease in a large population-based adult sample.

    PubMed

    Realo, Anu; Teras, Andero; Kööts-Ausmees, Liisi; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Allik, Jüri

    2015-12-01

    The current study examined the relationship between the Five-Factor Model personality traits and physician-confirmed peptic ulcer disease (PUD) diagnosis in a large population-based adult sample, controlling for the relevant behavioral and sociodemographic factors. Personality traits were assessed by participants themselves and by knowledgeable informants using the NEO Personality Inventory-3 (NEO PI-3). When controlling for age, sex, education, and cigarette smoking, only one of the five NEO PI-3 domain scales - higher Neuroticism - and two facet scales - lower A1: Trust and higher C1: Competence - made a small, yet significant contribution (p < 0.01) to predicting PUD in logistic regression analyses. In the light of these relatively modest associations, our findings imply that it is certain behavior (such as smoking) and sociodemographic variables (such as age, gender, and education) rather than personality traits that are associated with the diagnosis of PUD at a particular point in time. Further prospective studies with a longitudinal design and multiple assessments would be needed to fully understand if the FFM personality traits serve as risk factors for the development of PUD.

  14. [Gastroprotective action of the nettle extract in experimental peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Burkova, V N; Boev, S G; Vengerovskiĭ, A I; Iudina, N V; Arbuzov, A G

    2011-01-01

    Nettle extract produced from leaves crushed to 40-70 nm fragments protects the stomach mucous membrane, and does it better than the extract derived from same leaves crushed to 1 mm fragments, on the models of peptic ulcers caused by acetylsalicylic acid, histamine, prednisolone, and immobilized stress. The antiulcer activity of the nettle extract from 40-70 nm fragments is comparable with the effect of buckthorn oil. Nettle extracts also hinder the excess acid secretion and diminish the acidity of stomach juice in experimental peptic ulcer caused by pylorus ligation. PMID:21476271

  15. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research.

  16. Subtotal Gastrectomy With Billroth II Anastomosis Is Associated With a Low Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Peptic Ulcer Disease Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Duodenal diversion can ameliorate lipid and glucose metabolism. We assessed the risk of stroke after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis (SGBIIA) in peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We identified 6425 patients who received SGBIIA for PUD between 1998 and 2010 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database as the study cohort; we frequency-matched them with 25,602 randomly selected controls from the PUD population who did not receive SGBIIA according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and obesity. All patients were followed until the end of 2011 to determine the incidence of stroke. The incidence of stroke was lower in patients in the SGBIIA cohort than in those in the non-SGBIIA cohort (18.9 vs 22.9 per 1000 person-years, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72-0.89, P < 0.001). The risk of ischemic stroke (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69-0.86, P < 0.001), rather than hemorrhagic stroke (aHR 1.00, 95% CI 0.78-1.28), was lower for the SGBIIA cohort than for the non-SGBIIA cohort according to the multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was lower in men (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69-0.86) than in women (aHR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65-0.99) and in patients aged ≥65 years (aHR 0.72, 95% CI 0.63-0.81) than in those of other age groups (≤49 years, aHR 0.82, 95% CI 0.48-1.39; 50-64 years, aHR 1.01, 95% CI 0.79-1.28). The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was also reduced in patients with comorbidities (aHR 0.84, 5% CI 0.75-0.95) rather than in those without comorbidities (aHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.59-1.12). SGBIIA is associated with a low risk of ischemic stroke for PUD patients, and its protective effect is prominent in men, patients aged ≥65 years, and those with comorbidities.

  17. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ERADICATION IN PATIENTS WITH PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI, DEPENDING ON THE GENOTYPE OF THE DRUGMETABOLISM OF PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS].

    PubMed

    Elokhina, E V; Kostenko, M B; Livzan, M A; Scalskiy, S V

    2015-01-01

    One of the most likely causes of the lack of effectiveness of eradication therapy of peptic ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, is a feature of omeprazole metabolism by cytochrome CYP2C19. The paper work presents evidence that the rate of reduction of the clinical picture and the likelihood of scarring ulcers and eradication rates higher in patients slow metabolizers of omeprazole.

  18. The effect of calcium salts, ascorbic acid and peptic pH on calcium, zinc and iron bioavailabilities from fortified human milk using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry, Paz; Wallingford, John Charles; Miller, Dennis Dean; Glahn, Raymond Philip

    2005-05-01

    The calcium, zinc, and iron bioavailabilities of human milk with commercial and noncommercial human milk fortifiers (HMFs) were evaluated under a variety of conditions: peptic digestion at pH 2 and pH 4, supplementation of ascorbic acid, and addition of three calcium salts. The noncommercial HMFs consisted of casein phosphopeptides (CPPs), alpha-lactalbumin, colostrum, and hydrolyzed whey protein concentrate (WPC). They were mixed with human milk (HM) and calcium, zinc, and iron were added. Ascorbic acid (AA) was added in certain studies. The commercial HMFs were Nestlé FM-85, Similac HMF (SHMF), and Enfamil HMF (EHMF). All HMFs were compared to S-26/SMA HMF. Results showed that the peptic pH (2 vs. 4) had no effect on mineral bioavailability. Addition of different calcium salts had no effect on calcium cell uptake and cell ferritin levels (an indicator of iron uptake), however, the addition of calcium glycerophosphate/gluconate increased zinc uptake by Caco-2 cells. Addition of AA significantly increased ferritin levels, with no effect on calcium or zinc uptake. Among the commercial HMFs, FM-85 was significantly lower in zinc uptake than S-26/SMA, and HM+EHMF was significantly higher than HM+S-26/SMA. Cell ferritin levels were significantly higher for HM+S-26/SMA than for all other commercial fortifiers. None of the commercial HMFs were different from HM+S-26/SMA in calcium uptake.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: sialic acid storage disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions sialic acid storage disease sialic acid storage disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Sialic acid storage disease is an inherited disorder that primarily ...

  20. The molecular mechanism of the neutral-to-base transition of human serum albumin. Acid/base titration and proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on a large peptic and a large tryptic fragment of albumin.

    PubMed

    Bos, O J; Labro, J F; Fischer, M J; Wilting, J; Janssen, L H

    1989-01-15

    In order to obtain a better understanding of the neutral-to-base (N-B) transition of human serum albumin, we performed acid/base titration experiments and 500-MHz 1H NMR experiments on albumin and on a large peptic (residues 1-387) and large tryptic (residues 198-585) fragment of albumin. The acid/base titration experiments revealed that Ca2+ ions induce a downward pK shift of several histidine residues of the peptic (P46) fragment and of albumin. By contrast, Ca2+ has very little influence on the pK of histidine residues of the tryptic (T45) fragment. In albumin, the pH-dependent His C-2 proton resonances, observed with 1H NMR experiments, have been allotted the numbers 1-17. It proved possible to locate these resonances in the P46 and the T45 fragments. A correspondence was found between the number of histidines detected by the acid/base titration and by the 1H NMR experiments. The results of the experiments lead us to conclude that in domain 1 at least the histidines corresponding to the His C-2 proton resonances 1-5 play a dominant role in the N-B transition. The Cu2+-binding histidine residue 3 (resonance 8) of the albumin molecule is not involved in the N-B transition. In addition, we were able to assign His C-2 proton resonance 9 to histidine 464 of the albumin molecule. The role of the N-B transition in the transport and cellular uptake mechanisms of endogenous and exogenous compounds is discussed.

  1. Perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  2. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  3. Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bacteria will change this waste product into carbon dioxide—a harmless gas. Carbon dioxide normally appears in your breath when you exhale. ... If your breath sample has higher levels of carbon dioxide than normal, you have H. pylori in your ...

  4. Nervonic acid and demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Sargent, J R; Coupland, K; Wilson, R

    1994-04-01

    Demyelination in adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is associated with an accumulation of very long chain saturated fatty acids such as 26:0 stemming from a genetic defect in the peroxisomal beta oxidation system responsible for the chain shortening of these fatty acids. Long chain monoenoic acids such as erucic acid, 22:1(n-9), can normalise elevated serum levels of 26:0 in ALD by depressing their biosynthesis from shorter chain saturated fatty acids. Sphingolipids from post mortem ALD brain have decreased levels of nervonic acid, 24:1(n-9), and increased levels of stearic acid, 18:0. Increased levels of 26:0 are accompanied by decreased nervonic acid biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts from ALD patients. Sphingolipids from post mortem MS brain have the same decreased 24:1(n-9) and increased 18:0 seen in post mortem ALD brain. The 24:1(n-9) content of sphingomyelin is depressed in erythrocytes from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Defects in the microsomal biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids including 24:1(n-9) in 'jumpy' and 'quaking' mice are accompanied by impaired myelination. An impairment in the provision of nervonic acid in demyelinating diseases is indicated, suggesting that dietary therapy with oils rich in very long chain monenoic acid fatty acids may be beneficial in such conditions.

  5. Perforated peptic ulcer in Tikur Anbessa Hospital: a review of 74 cases.

    PubMed

    Ersumo, Tessema; W/Meskel, Yidnekachew; Kotisso, Berhanu

    2005-01-01

    Little is known on the pattern of perforated peptic ulcer in Ethiopia. To evaluate the early, outcome of management, a five-year retrospective analysis of 74 operated cases of perforated peptic ulcer was undertaken. Perforated peptic ulcer accounted for 3.4% of the adult emergency surgical procedures. The mean age was 32.6 years, with a male to female ratio of 7.2 to 1.0. Fifty-six percent of the cases were unmarried. In nearly 22.0% of the patients, no previous history of peptic ulcer disease was documented. Delay in diagnosis was noted in 95% of the cases. Most patients had duodenal ulcer perforation, and about 78% had purulent peritonitis at laparotomy. Fourteen died in hospital. Early presentation of patients to surgical care facilities may reduce morbidity and mortality in cases of peptic ulcer perforation.

  6. Glucagonoma, chronic recurrent peptic ulcer disease, and enhanced amylase-creatinine clearance ratio. Report of a case with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pitchumoni, C S; Thelmo, W; Ahmed, K S; Kumar, A; Davidian, M; Einhorn, R; Adler, J; McCarthy, J

    1979-09-01

    A 53-year-old white woman developed diabetes mellitus, migratory erythema, and anemia, clinical features suggesting the presence of a "glucagonoma." Ten years earlier, after laparotomy and pancreatic biopsy, she had been told that she had an inoperable pancreatic carcinoma. Review of that biopsy together with current hormonal assay now confirms the diagnosis of glucagonoma. The recurrent peptic ulcer in this patient despite high levels of glucagon, a gastric inhibitory agent, is noted but not explained. An enhanced amylase-creatinine clearance ratio supports the notion that glucagon increases the clearances of amylase.

  7. Risk factors for postoperative respiratory complications and their predictive value. A study in 40-75 year-old men undergoing elective surgery for peptic ulcer or gallbladder disease.

    PubMed

    Wirén, J E; Janzon, L

    1982-01-01

    Age, body weight, smoking, chronic bronchitis and duration of anaesthesia were assessed as risk factors for respiratory complications following surgery for peptic ulcer or gallbladder disease. The studies were made on 53 men aged 40-75 years. All variables were associated with increased postoperative risk of chest X-ray abnormality or arterial hypoxaemia or clinically overt respiratory complications. In the statistical analysis, however, none of the factors proved to be useful as a predictor of postoperative respiratory complications. The observed high frequencies of X-ray abnormalities (54%) and arterial hypoxaemia (43%) after operation indicate potential dangers. They may be reduced by cessation of smoking before the operation and reduction of weight.

  8. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer. PMID:26074689

  9. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-06-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

  10. Uric acid transport and disease

    PubMed Central

    So, Alexander; Thorens, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism in humans. It has antioxidant properties that may be protective but can also be pro-oxidant, depending on its chemical microenvironment. Hyperuricemia predisposes to disease through the formation of urate crystals that cause gout, but hyperuricemia, independent of crystal formation, has also been linked with hypertension, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, and diabetes. We discuss here the biology of urate metabolism and its role in disease. We also cover the genetics of urate transport, including URAT1, and recent studies identifying SLC2A9, which encodes the glucose transporter family isoform Glut9, as a major determinant of plasma uric acid levels and of gout development. PMID:20516647

  11. Xanthogranulomatous pseudotumor of stomach induced by perforated peptic ulcer mimicking a stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Chen, Yung-Fang; Ho, Yung-Jen; Yang, Mei-Due; Shen, Wu-Chung

    2006-10-01

    Perforation is a serious complication of peptic ulcer disease occurring in 5% of such patients. Occasionally, the perforation may be sealed off by the omentum or the adjacent organs. Sealed perforated ulcer with pseudotumor formation is very rarely encountered. Here we present a case of gastric pseudotumor induced by perforation of a peptic ulcer. The imaging features in a barium sulfate study and computed tomography mimic an intramural tumor of the stomach.

  12. One-week triple therapy with lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and metronidazole to cure Helicobacter pylori infection in peptic ulcer disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Perng, C L; Kim, J G; El-Zimaity, H M; Osato, M S; Graham, D Y

    1998-03-01

    The efficacy and acceptability of classical bismuth triple therapy may be limited by poor patient compliance and adverse effects. It is widely agreed that improved, simpler, and reliable therapies are needed to cure Helicobacter pylori infection and foster patient compliance. We evaluated the efficacy and side effects of a Bazzoli triple therapy substituting lansoprazole for omeprazole for H. pylori infection in active peptic ulcer in Korea (30 mg of lansoprazole, 250 mg of clarithromycin, and 400 mg of metronidazole, all twice daily). H. pylori status was evaluated by rapid urease test, histology, and culture at entry and four or more weeks after ending antimicrobial therapy. Fifty-eight patients (mean age: 43 years) with gastric (N = 30) or duodenal ulcer (N = 28) and H. pylori infection were studied. H. pylori was cured in 47 (81%, 95% CI = 69-90%). Mild side effects, including vomiting, diarrhea, and itching, were observed in four patients (7%). Compliance averaged 95%. Fifty-five ulcers (95%) were healed. Pretreatment pylorobulbar deformity was observed in 49 patients (85%), and in 43 (88%) the deformity disappeared after treatment. Pretreatment metronidazole and clarithromycin resistance was observed in 87% and 2% of patients, respectively. The cure rate of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in patients >50 years of age than those <50. Treatment with low-dose one-week lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and metronidazole resulted in a relatively low cure rate, but was well tolerated. Studies to define the optimal duration, dose, and dosing interval of this combination therapy in Korea are needed.

  13. Fasting and food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations in relation to the antral G-cell population. A study in patients with peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Stave, R; Gedde-Dahl, D; Gjone, E

    1978-01-01

    The fasting serum concentration and the first-hour serum gastric response to a protein-rich meal were related to the antral G-cell population in 14 patients with peptic ulcer. They were divided into a uremic (n=5) and non-uremic group (n=9). Fasting serum gastrin correlated significantly with the total antral G-cell mass only in the non-uremic patients who showed a relatively narrow transitional body-antrum zone. Conversely, the integrated serum gastric response was inversely related to the size of this zone in both groups of patients. A presumptive endocrine G-cell mass was estimated by subtracting the G cells in the transitional zone from the total antral G-cell population. Total gastrin output correlated positively with this estimated mass in the non-uremic group and in the material as a whole. Also, the integrated gastrin response was positively correlated with the presumptive endocrine G-cell mass in the whole material. It was concluded that G cells in the transitional body-antrum zone, where also parietal cells are present, do not release gastrin into the circulation during meal stimulation like G cells in the remaining part of the pyloric antrum. On the basis of these results and our previous morphological observations (19), we propose that the G cells in the transitional zone are involved in a paracrine interrelationship with the surrounding parietal cells rather than contributing to the circulating pool of gastrin.

  14. [Peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori. Comments on the authors' cases].

    PubMed

    Dallera, F; Gendarini, A; Scanzi, G

    1993-01-01

    The presence of Helicobacter was tested on a group with antral or duodenal ulcer with or without gastritis, versus a group without gastric or duodenal pathology. Furthermore an open trial was performed between omeprazole and colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) on patients similarly affected by peptic disease. Although CBS did eliminate Helicobacter in more than a half of patients, what was not obtained by omeprazole, this result did not mean a better control of peptic disease: in fact the omeprazole was remarkably more active in our series on clinical and endoscopic ground, whether the Helicobacter was present or not, and further studies are required to assess the real significance of Helicobacter pylori in the above conditions.

  15. Peptic ulcer at the end of the 20th century: biological and psychological risk factors.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, S

    1999-11-01

    The prevailing concept of peptic ulcer etiology has swung over entirely in just a few years from the psychological to the infectious, yet the rich literature documenting an association between psychosocial factors and ulcer is not invalidated by the discovery of Helicobacter pylori. Physical and psychological stressors interact to induce ulcers in animal models, concrete life difficulties and subjective distress predict the development of ulcers in prospective cohorts, shared catastrophes such as war and earthquakes lead to surges in hospitalizations for complicated ulcers, and stress or anxiety can worsen ulcer course. Many known ulcer risk factors, including smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, heavy drinking, loss of sleep and skipping breakfast, can increase under stress; the association of low socioeconomic status with ulcer is also accounted for in part by psychosocial factors. Among possible physiological mechanisms, stress may induce gastric hypersecretion, reduce acid buffering in the stomach and the duodenum, impair gastroduodenal blood flow, and affect healing or inflammation through psychoneuroimmunological mechanisms. Psychosocial factors seem to be particularly prominent among idiopathic or complicated ulcers, but they are probably operative in run of the mill H pylori disease as well, either through additive effects or by facilitating the spread of the organism across the pylorus, while gastrointestinal damage by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can also be potentiated by stress. Although the clinical importance of peptic ulcer is fading along with the millennium, due to secular trends and new therapies, it remains worthy of study as a splendid example of the biopsychosocial model.

  16. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  17. [Drug therapy of peptic ulcer. What is coming up?].

    PubMed

    Müller, P; Dammann, H G; Simon, B; Kommerell, B

    1987-02-01

    Prostaglandin-E analogues inhibit gastric acid secretion after oral administration. Therefore, these drugs are tested in clinical trials and one of them--Misoprostol--has recently been registered. With regard to healing rate of peptic ulcers and improvement of clinical signs and symptoms the prostaglandin analogues are superior to placebo but only equally effective or even slightly inferior to H2-receptor blockers. Side effects such as diarrhea or uterotropic actions will probably limit their broad application. The exact therapeutic effectiveness of prostaglandin analogues in treatment of peptic ulcer remains to be evaluated in greater detail. The substituted benzimidazole omeprazole is the first drug which exerts a long lasting and almost complete suppressive effect on gastric acid secretion in humans. This unique inhibition leads to a significant and more rapid healing rate of duodenal ulcers compared to treatment with H2-blockers. Additionally, peptic ulcers resistant to H2-blocker therapy can be treated effectively with omeprazole. In spite of these promising results the exact therapeutic effectiveness of this drug requires further evaluation.

  18. Lessons for atherosclerosis research from tuberculosis and peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, M C

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the causes of a disease is essential to the effective alteration of factors affecting the disease's incidence. The history of the medical understanding of tuberculosis and peptic ulcer shows that we may neglect to consider the contribution of microorganisms to long-term or recurring diseases. The author presents evidence that we may similarly be overlooking the role of microorganisms in atherosclerosis. A collaborative, comprehensive investigation of the role of microorganisms in atherosclerosis is needed to understand the cause of this disease. PMID:7882229

  19. [Anatlysis of HSPA1B A1267G gene polymorphism in peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, M J; Salehi, Z; Sabet, E E; Ejtehadi, F

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a common illness, affecting a considerable number of people worldwide, and its occurrence can be influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function mostly as molecular chaperones, and are induced by various stresses. The A to G transition at position 1267 of the HSPA1B gene was shown to correlate with changes in the level of HSPA mRNA expression. Here, the relation between A1267G polymorphism of the HSPAIB gene and risk of peptic ulcer in the Iranian population was evaluated. One hundred subjects, who underwent gastroscopy, took part in the study. DNA samples extracted from the biopsy tissues were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). After gastroscopy, peptic ulcer was diagnosed for 50 patients; among them the distribution of AA/AB/BB genotypes was 10, 88 and 2%, respectively. As for the other 50 subjects (without peptic ulcer) included in the control group, the AA/AB/BB genotypes were identified as 40, 52 and 8%, respectively. A significant association was found between the HSPA1B genotype and peptic ulcer (6.76 OR; 95% CI, 2.26-20.2; p = 0.0006). Thus, the HSPA1B A1267G polymorphism may be a marker of susceptibility to peptic ulcer.

  20. Serum bile acids in hepatobiliary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchier, I A; Pennington, C R

    1978-01-01

    We review the estimation of total and individual serum bile acids to detect the presence and nature of hepatobiliary disease. The different methods for measuring serum bile acids are discussed. PMID:355064

  1. [Peptic ulcer: late complications of the surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Pinatel Lopasso, F

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of surgical treatment of peptic ulcer decreased in the last two decades. The majority of procedures for surgical management of peptic disease impairs the ability of the stomach to receive and to store food. The intake of high protein-caloric content diets can improve some nutritional deficits expressed by loss of body weight and anemia. The mechanism responsible for diarrhea is unknown, but truncal vagotomy has the highest incidence. It is usually episodic, lessens over the first year after operation and rarely remains a severe problem. The decreasing levels of colecistokinin response after meal in gastrectomy and the division of hepatic branch of anterior vagus can cause gallbladder sludge and stone formation. Alkaline reflux explains gastritis and esophagitis after partial gastric resection. Surgical duodenal diversion, like a Roux-en-Y limb, have been successful in its control. The mechanism that leads to the dumping syndrome are loss of gastric reservoir function and rapid emptying of hyperosmolar meals into small intestine. Somatostatin analogues improve the symptoms caused by abnormal release of neurohormonal agents responsible of the behaviour of the gastrointestinal tract after meals. Cancer of gastric remanent may be due to increased bacterial overgrowth and nitrosation formation. The endoscopic follow-up is essential for early diagnosis of the stump cancer. In spite of all complications, the surgeon cannot have hesitations by carrying out radical approach meanly during catastrophic emergencies of peptic disease i.e. in elderly aged patients. Nowadays, the control of chronic sequelas is easy with conservative therapeutic.

  2. Predictors for frequent esophageal dilations of benign peptic strictures.

    PubMed

    Agnew, S R; Pandya, S P; Reynolds, R P; Preiksaitis, H G

    1996-05-01

    Recurrence of esophageal peptic stricture necessitating repeated dilation treatments remains a problem for many patients despite optimal acid suppressive therapy. The factors associated with frequent relapses are poorly understood. We studied retrospectively a population of 58 patients with benign peptic strictures and dysphagia treated by esophageal dilation and followed for 66.5 +/- 6.7 months. Data was collected for age, sex, heartburn, weight loss, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, number of dilation treatments during the first year of follow-up, frequency and number of subsequent dilation treatments, type of dilator used, and history of other concurrent treatments. Patients who lacked heartburn (P = 0.007) or who reported a history of weight loss (P = 0.006) at the time of their initial presentation required more frequent dilations during the first year of follow-up. The mean number of dilations in year 1 was 6.2 +/- 0.9 for patients lacking heartburn versus 3.2 +/- 0.5 for patients with heartburn (P = 0.004), and 9.0 +/- 1.8 for patients who reported weight loss versus 4.1 +/- 0.5 (P = 0.006) for those who did not. The patients requiring frequent treatment during their first year also required frequent subsequent dilations because of stricture recurrence (P < 0.0001). We did not demonstrate any relationship between the other factors studied and treatment frequency. These observations suggest that patients who require frequent retreatment for recurrent peptic stricture are more likely to provide a history of weight loss and less likely to complain of heartburn at initial presentation. The pattern of frequent repeat dilation for recurrent peptic strictures is established during the first year of follow-up.

  3. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression.

  4. [Prevalence of erosive esophagitis and peptic esophageal strictures].

    PubMed

    Vasilevskiĭ, D I; Skurikhin, S S; Luft, A V; Mednikov, S N; Silant'ev, D S; Kulagin, V I; Dvoretskiĭ, S Iu; Bagnenko, S F

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a widespread among population in economically developed countries including Russia. It was analyzed the results of 34 903 endoscopic examinations of upper gastrointestinal tract in ethnically and socially homogeneous population of Leningrad region with symptoms of gastric dispepsia. Procedures were performed for the period 2007-2013. Prevalence of erosive esophagitis was 4.9%. Peptic esophageal strictures due to chronic reflux-associated inflammation were revealed in 0.2% of examined patients (3.7% of patients with erosive esophagitis). Obtained data allow to considergastroesophageal reflux disease as a socially significant problem in Russia requiring close attention and further study.

  5. Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers and Helicobacter pylori infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting-Chun; Lee, Chia-Long

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT), with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed (13)C-urea breath test (UBT) or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity.

  6. [The characteristics of treating gastric and duodenal peptic ulcer in workers in an oil-refining enterprise].

    PubMed

    Murzanov, M M; Iskakov, M N

    1995-01-01

    The article covers a topical problem--study of transitory disablement in oil-processing workers suffering from peptic ulcer. The authors demonstrate data on increased occurrence of peptic ulcer among those workers engaged mostly into the main industrial process and stress the great economic detriment caused by the disease. Application of endoscopy treatment and therapy within the local prophylactic department appeared to dramatically decrease the transitory disablement. The article could be interesting for gastroenterologists, industrial medicine officers.

  7. Historic changes of occupational work load and mortality from peptic ulcer in Germany.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, A; Sonnenberg, G S; Wirths, W

    1987-09-01

    The occurrence of peptic ulcer disease appears to be associated with the amount of occupational work load. Worldwide the number of hospital admissions, surgical operations, and death rates from gastric and duodenal ulcer have declined during recent decades. This communication examines the probability of a correlation between the time trends of gastric and duodenal ulcer mortality in Germany and changes in the occupational work load between 1870 and 1984. Lifetime cumulative hours of work declined for all consecutive cohorts of the population born between 1840 and 1955. The fall occurred similarly in all age groups. However, lifetime cumulative energy expenditure originating from industrial blue collar work showed a peak for the cohorts born during the last quarter of the 19th century. A marked decline occurred in all cohorts born after 1905. A similar birth-cohort pattern was found for mortality from peptic ulcer disease, with those born at the turn of the century showing a higher risk of dying from peptic ulcer disease than any previous or subsequent generation. The coincidence of the birth-cohort patterns of both mortality from peptic ulcer and occupational energy expenditure suggests that birth-cohort pattern of peptic ulcer may be related to the trends of occupational work load that occurred during the industrial revolution. The amount of work hours appears to be a less sensitive measure for the occupational work load. The superimposition of two counteracting historic changes, namely the increased industrial work force and the decreased occupational work load due to legislative regulations, industrial automation, and mechanization may have shaped the rise and fall in the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease.

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, A P; Aggarwal, K K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardioceuticals are nutritional supplements that contain all the essential nutrients including vitamins, minerals, omega-3-fatty acids and other antioxidants like a-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 in the right proportion that provide all round protection to the heart by reducing the most common risks associated with the cardiovascular disease including high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels and factors that contribute to coagulation of blood. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to significantly reduce the risk for sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause mortality in patients with known coronary heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are also used to treat hyperlipidemia and hypertension. There are no significant drug interactions with omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends consumption of two servings of fish per week for persons with no history of coronary heart disease and at least one serving of fish daily for those with known coronary heart disease. Approximately 1 g/day of eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid is recommended for cardio protection. Higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids are required to reduce elevated triglyceride levels (2-4 g/day). Modest decreases in blood pressure occur with significantly higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids.

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, A P; Aggarwal, K K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardioceuticals are nutritional supplements that contain all the essential nutrients including vitamins, minerals, omega-3-fatty acids and other antioxidants like a-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 in the right proportion that provide all round protection to the heart by reducing the most common risks associated with the cardiovascular disease including high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels and factors that contribute to coagulation of blood. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to significantly reduce the risk for sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause mortality in patients with known coronary heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are also used to treat hyperlipidemia and hypertension. There are no significant drug interactions with omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends consumption of two servings of fish per week for persons with no history of coronary heart disease and at least one serving of fish daily for those with known coronary heart disease. Approximately 1 g/day of eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid is recommended for cardio protection. Higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids are required to reduce elevated triglyceride levels (2-4 g/day). Modest decreases in blood pressure occur with significantly higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:25720716

  10. Prognostic factors in peptic ulcer perforations: a retrospective 14-year study.

    PubMed

    Unver, Mutlu; Fırat, Özgür; Ünalp, Ömer Vedat; Uğuz, Alper; Gümüş, Tufan; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Öztürk, Şafak; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Ersin, Sinan; Güler, Adem

    2015-05-01

    Regarding the complications of peptic ulcer, a perforation remains the most important fatal complication. The aim of our retrospective study was to determine relations between postoperative morbidity and comorbid disease or perioperative risk factors in perforated peptic ulcer. In total, 239 patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer in Ege University General Surgery Department, between June 1999 and May 2013 were included in this study. The clinical data concerning the patient characteristics, operative methods, and complications were collected retrospectively. One hundred seventy-five of the 239 patients were male (73.2%) and 64 were female (26.8%). Mean American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 1 in the patients without morbidity, but mean ASA score was 3 in the morbidity and mortality groups. Primary suture and omentoplasty was the selected procedure in 228 of the patients. Eleven patients underwent resection. In total, 105 patients (43.9%) had comorbidities. Thirty-seven patients (67.3%) in the morbidity group had comorbid diseases. Thirteen (92.9%) patients in the mortality group had comorbid diseases. Perforation as a complication of peptic ulcer disease still remains among the frequent indications of urgent abdominal surgery. Among the analyzed parameters, age, ASA score, and having comorbid disease were found to have an effect on both mortality and morbidity. The controversial subject in the present study is regarding the duration of symptoms. The duration of symptoms had no effect on mortality nor morbidity in our study.

  11. Prognostic Factors in Peptic Ulcer Perforations: A Retrospective 14-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Unver, Mutlu; Fırat, Özgür; Ünalp, Ömer Vedat; Uğuz, Alper; Gümüş, Tufan; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Öztürk, Şafak; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Ersin, Sinan; Güler, Adem

    2015-01-01

    Regarding the complications of peptic ulcer, a perforation remains the most important fatal complication. The aim of our retrospective study was to determine relations between postoperative morbidity and comorbid disease or perioperative risk factors in perforated peptic ulcer. In total, 239 patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer in Ege University General Surgery Department, between June 1999 and May 2013 were included in this study. The clinical data concerning the patient characteristics, operative methods, and complications were collected retrospectively. One hundred seventy-five of the 239 patients were male (73.2%) and 64 were female (26.8%). Mean American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 1 in the patients without morbidity, but mean ASA score was 3 in the morbidity and mortality groups. Primary suture and omentoplasty was the selected procedure in 228 of the patients. Eleven patients underwent resection. In total, 105 patients (43.9%) had comorbidities. Thirty-seven patients (67.3%) in the morbidity group had comorbid diseases. Thirteen (92.9%) patients in the mortality group had comorbid diseases. Perforation as a complication of peptic ulcer disease still remains among the frequent indications of urgent abdominal surgery. Among the analyzed parameters, age, ASA score, and having comorbid disease were found to have an effect on both mortality and morbidity. The controversial subject in the present study is regarding the duration of symptoms. The duration of symptoms had no effect on mortality nor morbidity in our study. PMID:26011220

  12. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional. PMID:27648623

  13. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional.

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic esophagitis; Reflux esophagitis; GERD; Heartburn - chronic; Dyspepsia - GERD ... into the esophagus. This is called reflux or gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux may cause symptoms. Harsh stomach acids can ...

  15. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  16. Association of presence/absence and on/off patterns of Helicobacter pylori oipA gene with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer risks: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are increasing studies examining the relationship between the status of H. pylori oipA gene and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastric cancer (GC) but the results turn out to be controversial. We attempted to clarify whether oipA gene status is linked with PUD and/or GC risks. Methods A systematically literature search was performed through four electronic databases. According to the specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven articles were ultimately available for the meta-analysis of oipA presence/absence with PUD and GC, and eleven articles were included for the meta-analysis of oipA on/off status with PUD and GC. Results For the on/off functional status analysis of oipA gene, the “on” status showed significant associations with increased risks of PUD (OR = 3.97, 95% CI: 2.89, 5.45; P < 0.001) and GC (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.45, 4.07; P = 0.001) compared with gastritis and functional dyspepsia controls. Results of the homogeneity test indicated different effects of oipA “on” status on PUD risk between children and adult subgroups and on GC risk between PCR-sequencing and immunoblot subgroups. For the presence/absence analysis of oipA gene, we found null association of the presence of oipA gene with the risks of PUD (OR = 1.93, 95% CI: 0.60, 6.25; P = 0.278) and GC (OR = 2.09, 95% CI: 0.51, 8.66; P = 0.308) compared with gastritis and functional dyspepsia controls. Conclusions To be concluded, when oipA exists, the functional “on” status of this gene showed association with increased risks for PUD and GC compared with gastritis and FD controls. However, merely investigating the presence/absence of oipA would overlook the importance of its functional on/off status and would not be reliable to predict risks of PUD and GC. Further large-scale and well-designed studies concerning on/off status of oipA are required to confirm our meta-analysis results. PMID:24256489

  17. Vitamin C, Gastritis, and Gastric Disease: a historical review and update

    PubMed Central

    Aditi, Anupam; Graham, David Y.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori as the cause of gastritis and peptic ulcers ushered in the modern era of research into gastritis and into acid-peptic diseases and rekindled interest in the role of ascorbic acid in the pathophysiology and treatment of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Here, we review historic and modern studies on ascorbic acid and gastric diseases with an emphasis on H. pylori gastritis and its sequelae. The relationship of ascorbic acid and gastritis and peptic ulcer and its complications was extensively studied during the 1930’s through the 1950’s. Much of this extensive literature has been effectively “lost”. Ascorbic acid deficiency was associated with all forms of gastritis (e.g., autoimmune, chemical, and infectious) due in varying degrees to insufficient intake, increased metabolic requirements, and destruction within the GI tract. Importantly, gastritis-associated abnormalities in gastric ascorbic acid metabolism are reversed by H. pylori eradication and potentially worsened by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Diets rich in naturally occuring ascorbic acid are associated with protection of the gastric corpus from atrophy and a reduction in the incidence of gastric cancer possibly through the ability of ascorbic acid to reduce oxidative damage to the gastric mucosa by scavenging carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and free radicals and attenuating the H. pylori-induced inflammatory cascade. Ascorbic acid supplementation was possibly associated with a decreased incidence of bleeding from peptic ulcer disease. Pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid also may improve the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication therapy. Occasionally, looking back can help plot the way forward. PMID:22543844

  18. [Uric acid, kidney disease and nephrolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Hopfer, Helmut; Mayr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Different types of kidney disease are known to be associated with hyperuricemia. The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms strongly vary, and different ways of therapeutic approach are therefore required. In tumor lysis syndrome, a rapid, excessive increase of serum uric acid level can cause an acute renal failure. For chronic urate nephropathy, on the other hand, constantly elevated serum uric acid level for a longer period seems to be important. Being still controversial as a disease entity however, the aetiology for putative chronic urate nephropathy might be in fact chronic lead intoxication, as suggested by quite an amount of association data. In terms of uric acid nephrolithiasis, the major risk factor is a urinary acidification defect with persistently acidic urine pH, and not necessarily hyperuricemia or hyperuricosuria. Evidence suggests that metabolic diseases with increased insulin resistance are strongly associated with urinary acidification defect. Patients with uric acid kidney stones should therefore be thoroughly evaluated for such metabolic diseases and in a positive case adequately treated.

  19. [Uric acid, kidney disease and nephrolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Hopfer, Helmut; Mayr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Different types of kidney disease are known to be associated with hyperuricemia. The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms strongly vary, and different ways of therapeutic approach are therefore required. In tumor lysis syndrome, a rapid, excessive increase of serum uric acid level can cause an acute renal failure. For chronic urate nephropathy, on the other hand, constantly elevated serum uric acid level for a longer period seems to be important. Being still controversial as a disease entity however, the aetiology for putative chronic urate nephropathy might be in fact chronic lead intoxication, as suggested by quite an amount of association data. In terms of uric acid nephrolithiasis, the major risk factor is a urinary acidification defect with persistently acidic urine pH, and not necessarily hyperuricemia or hyperuricosuria. Evidence suggests that metabolic diseases with increased insulin resistance are strongly associated with urinary acidification defect. Patients with uric acid kidney stones should therefore be thoroughly evaluated for such metabolic diseases and in a positive case adequately treated. PMID:27008449

  20. Perforated peptic ulcer: how to improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Adamsen, Sven; Wøjdemann, Morten; Møller, Ann Merete

    2009-01-01

    Despite the introduction of histamine H2-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors and the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, both the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer and the mortality rate for patients undergoing surgery for peptic ulcer perforation have increased. This increase has occurred despite improvements in perioperative treatment and monitoring. To improve the outcome of these patients, it is necessary to investigate the reasons behind this high mortality rate. In this review we evaluate the existing evidence in order to identify significant risk factors with an emphasis on risks that are preventable. A systematic review including randomized studies was carried out. There are a limited number of studies of patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Most of these studies are of low evident status. Only a few randomized, controlled trials have been published. The mortality rate and the extent of postoperative complications are fairly high but the reasons for this have not been thoroughly explained, even though a number of risk factors have been identified. Some of these risk factors can be explained by the septic state of the patient on admission. In order to improve the outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation, sepsis needs to be factored into the existing knowledge and treatment.

  1. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  2. Phytanic acid metabolism in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Wanders, Ronald J A; Komen, Jasper; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2011-09-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a branched-chain fatty acid which cannot be beta-oxidized due to the presence of the first methyl group at the 3-position. Instead, phytanic acid undergoes alpha-oxidation to produce pristanic acid (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecanoic acid) plus CO(2). Pristanic acid is a 2-methyl branched-chain fatty acid which can undergo beta-oxidation via sequential cycles of beta-oxidation in peroxisomes and mitochondria. The mechanism of alpha-oxidation has been resolved in recent years as reviewed in this paper, although some of the individual enzymatic steps remain to be identified. Furthermore, much has been learned in recent years about the permeability properties of the peroxisomal membrane with important consequences for the alpha-oxidation process. Finally, we present new data on the omega-oxidation of phytanic acid making use of a recently generated mouse model for Refsum disease in which the gene encoding phytanoyl-CoA 2-hydroxylase has been disrupted.

  3. [Cardiovascular disease and omega-3 fatty acids].

    PubMed

    Ponte, E; Cafagna, D; Balbi, M

    1997-09-01

    Fish oil is rich in the long chain omega-3 (omega-3) polyinsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), Pioneering studies of Dyerberg and Bang primarily originate interests in this way. The low incidence of acute myocardial infarction they verified within the Greenland Eskimos suggested that a high dietary omega-3 PUFA intake due to marine food might protect against coronary heart disease. They showed that the Eskimos had a beneficial lipid pattern and that their balance between pro-aggregatory thromboxanes and anti-aggregatory prostacyclins was shifted towards an anti-thrombotic state. The two major omega-3 fatty acids are decosapentaenoic acid (EPA C 20:5, omega 3), with five double bonds, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA C 22:6, omega 3), with six double bonds. These fatty acids' significant effects include reduction of plasma triglycerides and lipoprotein levels as well as of platelets thrombogenicity in the microcirculation, which is due to effects on the mediators production derived from arachidonic acid (prostaglandins and leucotrienes), meddling in inflammatory and immune cell function, retarded atherosclerosis development. Experimental studies of atherogenesis and arterial thrombogenesis support the hypothesis that dietary omega-3 PUFA intake may play a leading role in primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

  4. Evaluation of Anti-Secretory and Anti-Ulcerogenic Activities of Avipattikar Churna on The Peptic Ulcers in Experimental Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Sudesh; Khan, Gulam Muhammad; Lamichane, Shreekrishna; Gautam, Jaya; Ghimire, Saurav; Adhikari, Rashmi; Lamsal, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Avipattikar churna, a poly-herbal formulation, is one of the popular ayurvedic formulations which is used for peptic ulcer diseases but the scientific documentation with regards to its effect for the indication is lacking. Aims: This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-secretory and the anti-ulcerogenic activities of the churna and to compare its activity with that of ranitidine in a pyloric ligated model of rats. Material and methods: Four groups of rats with 6 animals in each served as the ulcer controls, churna low dose (500 mg/kg), churna high dose (750mg/kg) and ranitidine (25mg/kg). The control group rats received only vehicle (2% (v/v) gum acacia), while the rats of the other groups received the respective dose of the churna or ranitidine which was suspended in the vehicle. The treatments were given twice a day, orally, for two days. After 1 hour of the last dose, pyloric ligations were performed and the rats were sacrificed for evaluation after four hours of the ligations. The gastric contents were collected and its volume, pH and acidity were measured. The numbers of ulcers and their lengths were measured which were used to calculate the gastric irritancy index and the curative ratio. The histological examinations of the gastric tissues were also performed. Results: The churna, in both doses, significantly decreased the volumes of the gastric contents, the ulcer score, the length of the ulcer, the gastric irritancy index and pH increased as compared to those in the control group. The effects of the churna were comparable to that of ranitidine. The histopathological evaluation of the gastric tissue also supported the results. Conclusion: Avipattikar churna has anti-secretory and anti-ulcerogenic effects which are comparable to those of ranitidine in peptic ulcer diseases. PMID:23905120

  5. Changing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer among dyspeptic Sardinian patients.

    PubMed

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara; Loria, Maria Francesca; Bassotti, Gabrio; Graham, David Y; Malaty, Hoda M; Pes, Giovanni M

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 50 years, the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection has fallen as standards of living improved. The changes in the prevalence of infection and its manifestations (peptic ulcer disease and gastric mucosal lesions) were investigated in a large cohort of Sardinians undergoing upper endoscopy for dyspepsia. A retrospective observational study was conducted involving patients undergoing endoscopy for dyspepsia from 1995 to 2013. H. pylori status was assessed by histology plus the rapid urease test or 13C-UBT. Gastric mucosal lesions were evaluated histologically. Data including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use and the presence of peptic ulcers were collected. The prevalence of H. pylori was calculated for each quartile and for each birth cohort from 1910 to 2000. 11,202 records were retrieved for the analysis (62.9% women). The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 43.8% (M: 46.6% vs. F: 42.0%; P = 0.0001). A dramatic decrease in the prevalence of infection occurred over the 19-year observation period. The birth cohort effect was evident in each category (quartile) reflecting the continuous decline in H. pylori acquisition. Over time, the prevalence of peptic ulcers also declined, resulting in an increase in the proportion of H. pylori negative/NSAID positive and H. pylori negative/NSAID negative peptic ulcers. The prevalence of gastric mucosal changes also declined despite aging. The decline in H. pylori prevalence over time likely reflects the improvement in socioeconomic conditions in Sardinia such that H. pylori infection and its clinical outcomes including peptic ulcer are becoming less frequent even among dyspeptic patients.

  6. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week. PMID:21814382

  7. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Wild Type Homozygozity of Polymorphisms +896 and +1196 Is Associated with High Gastrin Serum Levels and Peptic Ulcer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pohjanen, Vesa-Matti; Koivurova, Olli-Pekka; Huhta, Heikki; Helminen, Olli; Mäkinen, Johanna M.; Karhukorpi, Jari M.; Joensuu, Tapio; Koistinen, Pentti O.; Valtonen, Jarno M.; Niemelä, Seppo E.; Karttunen, Riitta A.; Karttunen, Tuomo J.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 is a part of the innate immune system and recognizes Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms +896 (rs4986790) and +1196 (rs4986791) in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori related gastroduodenal diseases in relation to gastric secretion and inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms, serum gastrin-17 and pepsinogen I and II concentrations were determined, and gastroscopies with histopathological analyses were performed to 216 dyspeptic patients. As genotype controls, 179 controls and 61 gastric cancer patients were studied. In our study, the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 polymorphisms were in total linkage disequilibrium. The homozygous wild types displayed higher gastrin-17 serum concentrations than the mutants (p = 0.001) and this effect was independent of Helicobacter pylori. The homozygous wild types also displayed an increased risk for peptic ulcers (OR: 4.390). Toll-like receptor 4 genotypes did not show any association with Helicobacter pylori positivity or the features of gastric inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was seen in gastrin and somatostatin expressing cells of antral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Our results suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 4 in gastric acid regulation and that the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 wild type homozygozity increases peptic ulcer risk via gastrin secretion. PMID:26161647

  8. [Surgical treatment of peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Andrade, Humberto

    2003-01-01

    Despite a decreasing number of operations for ulcer, there are many patients who require definitive treatment. If an operation is required for duodenal ulcer, vagotomy of some type is part of the treatment, and in gastric ulcer resection with or without vagotomy is required. Extended proximal gastric vagotomy can be performed in the majority of patients, excluding those who are unstable or have severe concomitant diseases. In cases of urgent surgery for hemorrhage or perforation, the surgical procedure must be selected individually. Although the role of traditional operations is well established, there is increasing interest in laparoscopic approaches. However, because there is a diminishing of elective surgery for ulcer, it is unlikely that these new procedures may be evaluated as operations were evaluated in the past.

  9. [Peptic activity of gastric juice in chronic gastritis. Morpho-functional aspects].

    PubMed

    Perasso, A; Testino, G; Cornaggia, M; Melloni, E

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study has been to evaluate peptic activity in gastric juice and gastric peptic cell mass in chronic gastritis. As regard peptic activity, there is a close correlation between it and the peptic gastric cell mass considered globally and expressed as Peptic Gastric Index (PGI), resulting from the individual average between fundic peptic index (chief cells + fundic muco-peptic cells) and antral peptic index (antral muco-peptic cells), both obtained by multiplying the number of peptic cells per mm2 by the thickness of respectively fundic and antral gland layer). In particular fundic and antral superficiale gastritis does not involve changes in peptic activity in gastric juice. On the contrary, in case of fundic pre-atrophic or atrophic there is a significant drop of peptic activity in gastric juice, regardless of the histological condition of the antrum. The lowest value of peptic activity may be noticed in case of atrophic pan-gastritis. Pre-atrophic and atrophic gastritis limited to the antrum--with superficial fundic gastritis--does not involve significant decreases of peptic activity in gastric juice. In this experiences Helicobacter pylori seem to influence peptic secretion: in fact, there is an increases of peptic activity in gastric juice in case of chronic pre-atrophic gastritis HP+.

  10. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  11. Peptic ulcer in childhood. Psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, G N; Gargoulas, A; Papaloukas, A; Marinopoulou, A; Rabavilas, A D

    1979-01-01

    Thirty children (20 girls and 10 boys, aged 6-16 years) with primary peptic ulcers, matched in paris for age, sex and socio-economic standard to a group of 30 ulcer-free controls, were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview, a structured 'present psychiatric state' examination and to personality and intelligence tests. With one exception all patients suffered from duodenal ulcer; 3 male patients had personalities with psychopathic elements, 7 patients had nicknames, 5 suffered from psychiatric disorders, 3 had attempted suicide in the past, and 3 had had homosexual experiences. These parameters were negative in all controls. The patients had lower mean IQ, worse scholastic adaptation, more anxious and overprotective parents, higher frequency of faddiness in food and lower frequency of nail-biting than the controls. Psychotraumatic events had preceded the onset of ulcer symptomatology in 11 cases. The findings are discussed and the contribution of psychological factors in the pathogenesis of childhood peptic ulcer is stressed. PMID:550183

  12. Time trends in peptic ulcer surgery, 1956 to 1986. A nation-wide survey in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, S; Nyrén, O

    1989-01-01

    To establish time trends in surgical rates for peptic ulcer disease, all surgical departments in Sweden were requested to complete a questionnaire regarding elective operations for gastric and duodenal ulcers and emergency operations for ulcer perforations performed in 1956, 1966, 1976, and 1986. A total of 8558 operations were reported for these years. The incidence of elective surgery declined steadily, the rates being 72.1, 45.0, 31.9, and 10.7 per 100,000 inhabitants. The male:female ratio fell from 4.2 to 1.5:1, while the duodenal/gastric ulcer ratio remained virtually unchanged. The operation rate for perforation decreased by 50%, from 12.8 to 6.4 per 100,000 inhabitants. We conclude that there has been a dramatic decline in elective peptic ulcer surgery in Sweden that began long before the advent of fiberoptic endoscopy, highly selective vagotomy, or H2-receptor antagonists. The comparable decline in emergency procedures suggests that true changes in the incidence or severity of the disease have occurred. In the future the few patients still needing elective surgery for peptic ulcer may have to be served by a small number of specialized centers. PMID:2589883

  13. Endoscopic Obliteration for Bleeding Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, J.J. J.; Gajda, A.G. G.; Kamiński, P. Ł.; Lembas, L.; Bielecki, K.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 133 patients treated for bleeding peptic ulcer in our Department, is reviewed. Within several hours of admission, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal tract gastroscopy and obliteration of the bleeding ulcer. Bleeding gastric ulcers were found in 41 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 92 patients. Patients were classified according to the Forrest scale: IA – 11 patients, IB – 49 patients, IIA – 35 patients, lIB – 40 patients. In 126 (94.7%) patients the bleeding was stopped, and 7 required urgent surgery: 3 patients with gastric ulcer underwent gastrectomy, and 4 with duodenal ulcer – truncal vagotomy with pyloroplasty and had the bleeding site underpinned. Fifty-five patients underwent elective surgery: gastrectomy and vagotomy (18 patients with gastric ulcer), highly selective vagotomy (25 patients with duodenal ulcer) and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty (12 patients with duodenal ulcer). None of the patients was observed to have recurrent bleeding. PMID:18493453

  14. Risk Factors Associated with Uncomplicated Peptic Ulcer and Changes in Medication Use after Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Sáez, María E.; Johansson, Saga; Nagy, Péter; García Rodríguez, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Few epidemiologic studies have investigated predictors of uncomplicated peptic ulcer disease (PUD) separately from predictors of complicated PUD. Objective To analyze risk factors associated with uncomplicated PUD and medication use after diagnosis. Methods Patients diagnosed with uncomplicated PUD (n = 3,914) were identified from The Health Improvement Network database among individuals aged 40–84 years during 1997–2005, with no previous history of PUD. Prescription records for the year after the date of diagnosis were reviewed and a nested case–control analysis was performed to calculate the odds ratios for the association of potential risk factors with PUD. Results Medications associated with developing uncomplicated PUD included current use of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), paracetamol, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antidepressants, antihypertensives or acid suppressants. Uncomplicated PUD was significantly associated with being a current or former smoker and having had a score of at least 3 on the Townsend deprivation index. Approximately 50% of patients who were users of ASA (19% of patients) or chronic users of NSAIDs (7% of patients) at diagnosis did not receive another prescription of the medication in the 60 days after diagnosis, and 30% were not represcribed therapy within a year. Among patients who were current users of ASA or chronic NSAIDs at the time of the PUD diagnosis and received a subsequent prescription for their ASA or NSAID during the following year, the vast majority (80–90%) also received a proton pump inhibitor coprescription. Conclusions Our results indicate that several risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also predictors of uncomplicated PUD, and that some patients do not restart therapy with ASA or NSAIDs after a diagnosis of uncomplicated PUD. Further investigation is needed regarding the consequences for these patients in terms of increased

  15. Clinical profile and outcome of surgical treatment of perforated peptic ulcers in Northwestern Tanzania: A tertiary hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Perforated peptic ulcer is a serious complication of peptic ulcers with potential risk of grave complications. There is paucity of published reports on perforated peptic ulcer disease in our local environment. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical presentation, management and outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation in our setting and to identify predictors of outcome of these patients. Methods This was a combined retrospective and prospective study of patients who were operated for perforated peptic ulcers at Bugando Medical Centre between April 2006 and March 2011. Data were collected using a pre-tested and coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS computer software version 15.0. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authority before the commencement of the study. Results A total of 84 patients were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 1.3: 1. Their median age was 28 years and the modal age group was 21-30 years. The median duration of illness was 5.8 days. The majority of patients (69.0%) had no previous history of treatment for peptic ulcer disease. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking was reported in 10.7%, 85.7% and 64.3% respectively. Eight (9.5%) patients were HIV positive with a median CD4 count of 220 cells/μl. Most perforations were located on the duodenum {90.4%) with the duodenal to gastric ulcers ratio of 12.7: 1. Graham's omental patch (Graham's omentopexy) of the perforations was performed in 83.3% of cases. Complication and mortality rates were 29.8% and 10.7% respectively. The factors significantly related to complications were premorbid illness, HIV status, CD 4 count < 200 cells/μl, treatment delay and acute perforation (P < 0.001). Mortality rate was high in patients who had age ≥ 40 years, delayed presentation (>24 hrs), shock at admission (systolic BP < 90 mmHg), HIV positivity, low CD4 count (<200 cells/μl), gastric ulcers

  16. Refsum disease, peroxisomes and phytanic acid oxidation: a review.

    PubMed

    Wanders, R J; Jansen, G A; Skjeldal, O H

    2001-11-01

    Refsum disease was first recognized as a distinct disease entity by Sigvald Refsum in the 1940s. The discovery of markedly elevated levels of the branched-chain fatty acid phytanic acid in certain patients marked Refsum disease as a disorder of lipid metabolism. Although it was immediately recognized that the accumulation of phytanic acid is due to its deficient breakdown in Refsum disease patients, the true enzymatic defect remained mysterious until recently. A major breakthrough in this respect was the resolution of the mechanism of phytanic acid alpha-oxidation in humans. In this review we describe the many aspects of Refsum disease from the clinical signs and symptoms to the enzyme and molecular defect plus the recent identification of genetic heterogeneity in Refsum disease.

  17. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    bleeding recurrence most possibly attributed to small bowel ulcers, nevertheless 30-d mortality was zero. Presence of chronic obstructive lung disease and diabetes was related with unexplained recurrence of hemorrhage in logistic regression analysis, while absence of small bowel ulcers was protective (relative risk 0.13, P = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Among NSAID consumers, more bleeders than non-bleeders with peptic ulcers present small bowel ulcers; lesions related to more severe bleeding and unexplained episodes of bleeding recurrence. PMID:25512771

  18. SUBTOTAL GASTRIC RESECTION FOR PEPTIC ULCER—Preliminary Report of a Variation in Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Gunther W.

    1953-01-01

    Internists as well as surgeons agree that subtotal gastric resection is a satisfactory method of treatment for a selected group of patients with intractable or complicated peptic ulcer. A short historical review of the development of the operation is given. The importance of removing a large portion of the acid pepsin-secreting area of the stomach is stressed. A variation from the usual method of resection accomplishes this and at the same time leaves a satisfactory gastric pouch and lessens the incidence of the dumping syndrome. PMID:13032792

  19. Modulatory Effects of Dietary Amino Acids on Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Sangam, Supraj Raja; Singh, Shubham; Joginapally, Venkateswara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are playing a vital role in maintaining the cellular integrity and function, as well as for brain cells. Protein intake and supplementation of individual amino acids can affect the brain functioning and mental health, and many of the neurotransmitters in the brain are made from amino acids. The amino acid supplementation has been found to reduce symptoms, as they are converted into neurotransmitters which in turn extenuate the mental disorders. The biosynthesis of amino acids in the brain is regulated by the concentration of amino acids in plasma. The brain diseases such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD), and Huntington's diseases (HD) are the most common mental disorders that are currently widespread in numerous countries. The intricate biochemical and molecular machinery contributing to the neurological disorders is still unknown, and in this chapter, we revealed the involvement of dietary amino acids on neurological diseases.

  20. Modulatory Effects of Dietary Amino Acids on Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Sangam, Supraj Raja; Singh, Shubham; Joginapally, Venkateswara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are playing a vital role in maintaining the cellular integrity and function, as well as for brain cells. Protein intake and supplementation of individual amino acids can affect the brain functioning and mental health, and many of the neurotransmitters in the brain are made from amino acids. The amino acid supplementation has been found to reduce symptoms, as they are converted into neurotransmitters which in turn extenuate the mental disorders. The biosynthesis of amino acids in the brain is regulated by the concentration of amino acids in plasma. The brain diseases such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD), and Huntington's diseases (HD) are the most common mental disorders that are currently widespread in numerous countries. The intricate biochemical and molecular machinery contributing to the neurological disorders is still unknown, and in this chapter, we revealed the involvement of dietary amino acids on neurological diseases. PMID:27651266

  1. Microbial Nucleic Acid Sensing in Oral and Systemic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Crump, K E; Sahingur, S E

    2016-01-01

    One challenge in studying chronic infectious and inflammatory disorders is understanding how host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), specifically toll-like receptors (TLRs), sense and respond to pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, their communication with each other and different components of the immune system, and their role in propagating inflammatory stages of disease. The discovery of innate immune activation through nucleic acid recognition by intracellular PRRs such as endosomal TLRs (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) and cytoplasmic proteins (absent in melanoma 2 and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factor) opened a new paradigm: Nucleic acid sensing is now implicated in multiple immune and inflammatory conditions (e.g., atherosclerosis, cancer), viral (e.g., human papillomavirus, herpes virus) and bacterial (e.g., Helicobacter pylori, pneumonia) diseases, and autoimmune disorders (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis). Clinical investigations reveal the overexpression of specific nucleic acid sensors in diseased tissues. In vivo animal models show enhanced disease progression associated with receptor activation. The involvement of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic conditions is further supported by studies reporting receptor knockout mice being either protected from or prone to disease. TLR9-mediated inflammation is also implicated in periodontal diseases. Considering that persistent inflammation in the oral cavity is associated with systemic diseases and that oral microbial DNA is isolated at distal sites, nucleic acid sensing may potentially be a link between oral and systemic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent advances in how intracellular PRRs respond to microbial nucleic acids and emerging views on the role of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic diseases. We also highlight new information on the role of intracellular PRRs in the pathogenesis of oral diseases including periodontitis

  2. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  3. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  4. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  5. Fatty acid metabolism: Implications for diet, genetic variation, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Gu, Zhennan; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q.

    2014-01-01

    Cultures across the globe, especially Western societies, are burdened by chronic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Several factors, including diet, genetics, and sedentary lifestyle, are suspected culprits to the development and progression of these health maladies. Fatty acids are primary constituents of cellular physiology. Humans can acquire fatty acids by de novo synthesis from carbohydrate or protein sources or by dietary consumption. Importantly, regulation of their metabolism is critical to sustain balanced homeostasis, and perturbations of such can lead to the development of disease. Here, we review de novo and dietary fatty acid metabolism and highlight recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between dietary influences and genetic variation in fatty acid metabolism and their role in chronic diseases. PMID:24511462

  6. Altered cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Robert C; Dorsey, E Ray; Beck, Christopher A; Brenna, J Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease.

  7. Postmarketing surveillance of rabeprazole in upper gastrointestinal peptic lesions in Japanese patients with coexisting hepatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Isao; Nakamura, Kimihide; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Yuzuru; Sezai, Shuichi; Ikeda, Yusei; Shinmura, Wahei; Watahiki, Hajime; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Hioki, Yayuki; Suzuki, Masao; Kumada, Takashi; Honda, Takashi; Rikitoku, Tomoo; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Fukui, Hiroshi; Yamao, Junichi; Kawasaki, Hironaka; Hosoda, Akihide; Onji, Morikazu; Matsui, Hidetaka; Sata, Michio; Torimura, Takuji; Oho, Kazuhiko; Maekawa, Ryuichiro; Takagi, Yoshiyuki; Shakado, Satoshi; Nakayama, Masafumi; Gondo, Kazuhisa; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Kusaba, Taku; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hori, Takeshi; Iida, Yozo; Yutoku, Kouki; Maetani, Noboru; Kubo, Yoshitsugu; Miyata, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    Background: Many Japanese patients with hepatic disorders confirmed on diagnostic imaging and coexisting upper gastrointestinal (GI) peptic lesions receive treatment with proton pump inhibitors. Some pharmacotherapies used to treat peptic ulcers have been associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including elevated liver enzyme levels. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the tolerability and effectiveness of rabeprazole sodium in treating peptic lesions in patients with coexisting hepatic disorders. Methods: This open-label, practice-based, postmarketing surveillance investigation was conducted at 15 centers across Japan. Male and female patients aged ≥18 years with peptic lesions confirmed on upper GI endoscopy and with underlying hepatic disease were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive rabeprazole 10 or 20 mg PO (tablet) QD after a meal for up to 8 weeks. Tolerability was assessed using monitoring of the incidence of ADRs determined by direct patient questioning, spontaneous reporting, and laboratory assessment. All patients who received at least 1 dose of study drug were included in the tolerability assessment. Effectiveness was assessed at baseline and study end using the rates of achievement of improvement on endoscopy, relief of subjective/objective symptoms (rates of improvement in epigastric pain and heartburn), and global improvement. The effectiveness analysis included all patients with complete data before and after treatment. Subanalyses were conducted to determine the effectiveness of drug by identification of the proportion of patients with coexisting hepatic disorders (cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, and other hepatic diseases [eg, alcoholic hepatitis, fatty liver]) and by peptic lesion (gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, stomal ulcer, and reflux esophagitis) who achieved improvement. Results: A total of 114 patients were enrolled; 108 patients were included in the tolerability analysis (81 men, 27 women; mean age, 59

  8. Marshall and Warren Lecture 2009: peptic ulcer bleeding: an expedition of 20 years from 1989-2009.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joseph J Y

    2010-02-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common medical emergencies leading to substantial mortality and morbidity. The last two decades has witnessed some important advances in the management of this condition, and some of these are results from clinical trials conducted in the Asia Pacific region. The optimal use of combined endoscopic hemostasis and the use of pharmacologic control of acid secretion in the stomach have significantly improved clinical outcome. The role of surgery has been redefined. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection and prophylactic treatment in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and anti-platelet users have made progress in preventing recurrence of peptic ulcer and bleeding. Instead of merely focusing on safety in the gastrointestinal tract, striking a balance between risk and benefit of continuing anti-platelet agents should be a top agenda.

  9. Tobacco and vascular disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tobacco use and exposure may cause an acceleration of coronary artery disease and peptic ulcer disease. It is also linked to reproductive disturbances, esophageal reflux, hypertension, fetal illness and death, and ...

  10. Degrees of acid suppression and ulcer healing: dosage considerations.

    PubMed

    Pounder, R E

    1991-01-01

    The human stomach has a normal circadian rhythm of intragastric acidity characterized by increasing acidity during the day and peaks in the early hours of the morning. Eating causes a transient decrease of intragastric acidity. Acid appears to be the permissive factor in peptic ulcer disease and to be responsible for symptoms; the patient with duodenal ulcer may secrete too much acid. Pharmacological control of gastric acid secretion will speed ulcer healing. Modern regimens, which typically use a bedtime dose of an H2-receptor antagonist, produce a pulse of decreased acidity. Intragastric acidity is decreased during the night and early morning, leaving a normal profile of acidity during the day and early evening. Higher or more frequent doses of an antisecretory agent can produce a more profound decrease of 24-h intragastric acidity. Theoretical problems associated with a sustained or profound decrease of 24-h intragastric acidity include the threat of enteric infection and infestation, potential bacterial overgrowth with possible N-nitrosamine formation, and drug-induced hypergastrinaemia. In light of these potential problems, for the management of simple peptic ulceration, it appears sensible to use the minimum intervention required. Bedtime H2-receptor blockade is one such regimen. The more potent antisecretory regimens can be used for difficult clinical problems such as the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, intractable duodenal ulceration, and severe oesophagitis.

  11. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  12. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  13. The prevalence of self-reported peptic ulcer in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, A; Everhart, J E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to draw a current picture of the sociodemographic characteristics of peptic ulcer in the United States. METHODS. During the National Health Interview Survey of 1989, a special questionnaire on digestive diseases was administered to 41,457 randomly selected individuals. Data were retrieved from public use tapes provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. Odds ratios were calculated by logistic regression after adjustment for sample weights in the survey. RESULTS. Of adult US residents, 10% reported having physician-diagnosed ulcer disease, and one third of these individuals reported having an ulcer in the past year. Old age, short education, low family income, being a veteran, and smoking acted as significant and independent risk factors. Gastric and duodenal ulcer occurred in both sexes equally often. Duodenal ulcer was more common in Whites than non-Whites, while gastric ulcer was more common in non-Whites. CONCLUSIONS. The age-related rise and socioeconomic gradients of peptic ulcer represent the historic scars of previous infection rates with Helicobacter pylori. The racial variations reflect different ages at the time of first infection; younger and older age at the acquisition of H. pylori appear to be associated with gastric and duodenal ulcer, respectively. PMID:8633736

  14. Amylase clearance in differentiating acute pancreatitis from peptic ulcer with hyperamylasemia.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B

    1975-03-01

    Thirty-four patients with abdominal pain, tenderness, and hyperamylasemia suggesting acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to elucidate the relationship between peptic ulcer disease and pancreatitis. Confirming evidence of pancreatitis and/or ulcer was obtained either at laparotomy of by upper gastrointestinal roentgenograms. The presence or absence of pancreatitis was substantiated by measurement of the amylase/creatinine clearance ratio, which is significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in patients with acute pancreatitis (9.3 plus or minus 0.9), than in patients without pancreatitis (3.1 plus or minus 0.2). Nine of the 34 patients were found to have gastric or duodenal ulcers. However, seven of the nine, despite an elevated serum amylase, had no sign of pancreatitis at surgery, on radiological examination, or by elevation of the amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (3.1 plus or minus 0.4). It is suggested that hyperamylasemia associated with peptic ulcer disease is most often not indicative of acute pancreatitis and that treatment is most appropriately directed at the ulcer.

  15. [Supplementation with omega fatty acids in various diseases].

    PubMed

    Sicińska, Paulina; Pytel, Edyta; Kurowska, Joanna; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2015-07-24

    For some decades, an increase in propagation of coronary heart disease, obesity, diabetes, tumors and mental disorders has been observed. Consequently, new and effective methods of treatment of these diseases using drugs and diet supplements have been developed. A promising solution is the use of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of some diseases. These compounds have broad application in prevention of many diseases and are used to support standard therapies. Their activity is connected with participation in metabolic processes regulating biochemical transformations in cells and tissues. Omega-3 fatty acids regulate production of cytokines, increased levels of which may contribute to occurrence of chronic inflammatory diseases, autoaggression of the immunological system, arteriosclerosis or tumor development. These substances exert a beneficial effect on the blood system by improvement of blood circulation and nerve signal transmission. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of irregular heartbeat, stabilize arterial pressure, and restore balance in cholesterol metabolism disorders. They also play a key role in maintaining physical and mental efficiency; thus administration of these compounds for young children is of great importance. Nevertheless, administration of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet seems to be essential. The purpose of this study is to present the structure and sources of omega-3 and - 6 fatty acids and discuss the problems concerning therapeutic use of these compounds in various disorders.

  16. Multiple forms of acid phosphatase activity in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J P; Peters, S P; Glew, R H; Lee, R E; McCafferty, L R; Mercer, D W; Wenger, D A

    1978-07-01

    Although the primary genetic defect in all individuals with Gaucher's disease is a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase activity, the finding of marked elevations in splenic and serum acid phosphatase activity is almost as consistent a finding. Gaucher spleen and serum contain at least two forms of acid phosphatase that can be readily separated by chromatography on columns containing the cation exchange resin Sulphopropyl Sephadex. The major species of acid phosphatase (designated SP-I) contained in Triton X-100 (1% v/v) extracts of Gaucher spleen accounts for 65%--95% of the total activity and has the following properties: (1) it does not bind to the cation exchange column; (2) it exhibitis a pH optimum of 4.5--5.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride (15 mM), L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM), and beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The minor acid phosphatase activity (designated SP-II) present in extracts of Gaucher spleen has properties similar to those of the major species of acid phosphatase activity contained in serum from patients with Gaucher's disease: (1) it binds firmly to cation exchange columns (eluted by 0.5 M sodium chloride); (2) it exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0--6.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride and sodium dithionite; and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M) and L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM). In addition, a second form of acid phosphatase that is tartrate resistant was found to be elevated in Gaucher serum. This form of serum acid phosphatase did not bind to Sulphopropyl Sephadex, was found to be significantly resistant to beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and was only partially inhibited by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The findings reported here indicate that at least three distinct forms of acid phosphatase activity are elevated in Gaucher's disease. Furthermore, the minor acid phosphatase activity contained in spleen homogenates has properties very similar to

  17. Transport of phytanic acid on lipoproteins in Refsum disease.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, A S; Sankaralingam, A; Lumb, P J; Hardman, T C; Sidey, M C; Gibberd, F B

    1999-02-01

    Patients with Refsum disease accumulate significant quantities of phytanic acid in adipose and neural tissue. The accumulation can be reversed by following a diet low in phytanic acid, yet the mechanism of transport of this fatty acid is obscure. We investigated the distribution of phytanic acid in different lipoprotein subfractions in 11 patients with Refsum disease and 9 unaffected siblings. Plasma phytanic acid was distributed on VLDL (16.2% +/- 12.2%), IDL (1.77% +/- 1.64%), LDL (34.8% +/- 12.6%) and HDL (14.3% +/- 7.87%). No correlations with any parameter were seen with total phytanic acid content. Weak nonsignificant correlations were found with the fractional distribution of phytanic acid and VLDL triglyceride (r = 0.35; p = 0.12) and plasma HDL-cholesterol (r = 0.32; p = 0.16) and with LDL:HDL cholesterol ratio (r = 0.33; p = 0.14). Significant correlation of the fractional distribution of phytanic acid on lipoprotein particles was noted with the ratio of apolipoprotein B: apolipoprotein A1-containing particles (r = 0.46; p = 0.03) and apolipoprotein B: apolipoprotein A1 in HDL2 (r = 0.53; p = 0.01). This suggests that the import-export balance for phytanic acid in plasma is related to forward and reverse cholesterol transport on lipoprotein particles, and only weakly to plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. These ratios of apolipoprotein particles may play a significant role in determining the rate of phytanic acid elimination in patients with Refsum disease.

  18. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in the amount of atherosclerosis plaque formation and decreased portal vascular resistance and portal hypotension in animal models. Furthermore, rodent models have demonstrated antifibrotic activity using bile acid receptor agonists. Early human data using a FXR agonist, obeticholic acid, have shown promising results with improvement of histological activity and even a reduction of fibrosis. Human studies are ongoing and will provide further information on bile acid receptor agonist therapies. Thus, bile acids and their derivatives have the potential for management of liver diseases and potentially other disease states including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26320013

  19. Linoleic acid content in adipose tissue and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Riemersma, R A; Wood, D A; Butler, S; Elton, R A; Oliver, M; Salo, M; Nikkari, T; Vartiainen, E; Puska, P; Gey, F

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of an inverse relation between essential fatty acids in adipose tissue, in particular linoleic acid, and mortality from coronary heart disease was studied by a cross sectional survey of random population samples of apparently healthy men aged 40-49 from four European regions with differing mortality from coronary heart disease. The proportion of linoleic acid in adipose tissue was lowest in men from north Karelia, Finland, where mortality from coronary heart disease is highest, and highest in men from Italy, where mortality is lowest, with intermediate proportions in men from Scotland and south west Finland. Similar gradients were observed for the desaturation and elongation products dihomo-gamma-linolenic and arachidonic acid. The proportion of saturated fatty acids in adipose tissue was highest in Finland, intermediate in Scotland, and lowest in Italy. Italian men also had the highest proportion of oleate in their adipose tissue and the lowest proportion of myristoleate and palmitoleate. Finnish men were more obese and had a higher blood pressure. Serum cholesterol concentration was higher in north Karelia and south west Finland than in Scotland or Italy. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations reflected the regional differences in serum cholesterol, being higher in Finland and lower in Italy. The ratios of HDL cholesterol to total cholesterol, however, did not differ. The regional differences in linoleic acid in adipose tissue remained highly significant when the observed differences in other known risk factors for coronary heart disease among the four areas were taken into account by multivariate analysis. The gradients in proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids probably reflect differences in dietary intake of linoleic acid. PMID:3087455

  20. Experimental production of peptic ulcer, gastric damage and cancer models and their use in pathophysiological studies and pharmacological treatment--Polish achievements.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T

    2003-12-01

    The common acid related diseases of the upper GI tract could be considered as primarily due to the defect in barrier function either of the gastric mucosal or duodenal epithelium leading to the formation of gastric or duodenal ulcers. An attempt was made in this chapter to discuss the history of peptic ulcer disease in humans and methods for the production of acute gastric lesions and ulcers in experimental animals with the special attention focused to the contribution of Polish scientists and investigators into this field. Early surgical advances in the management of peptic ulcers were emphasized that were then subsequently replaced by pharmacological treatment (histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors) and considered as the major strategy against the acid disorders. This included the immense body of work performed by numerous group of investigators, including Polish researchers, to identify the effects of acid, bile salts, aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), stress, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, prostaglandins (PG) and nitric oxide (NO) on the integrity of the gastrointestinal mucosa, which all were discussed in this chapter. The concept of major defensive mechanism in the stomach called "cytoprotection", originally proposed by Andre Robert is recalled in the relevance to the great contribution of Polish scientist working at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow. These experimental studies gave a new insight into the mechanism of action of arachidonate cascade products such as PGs, tromboxanes and leukotrienes and had opened the new therapeutic avenues for the gastroprotective treatment of the acute gastric mucosal damage. Detailed studies revealed, however, that PG-induced cytoprotection offers a short-term protection against gastric lesions induced by corrosive agents but unfortunately this phenomenon gives a little, if any, impact to the process of ulcer healing. The experimental studies on healing

  1. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  2. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Holl, Eda K; Shumansky, Kara L; Borst, Luke B; Burnette, Angela D; Sample, Christopher J; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2016-08-30

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal's ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:27528673

  3. Immune sensing of nucleic acids in inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Olivier; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Gilliet, Michel

    2014-09-01

    Endosomal and cytosolic nucleic acid receptors are important immune sensors required for the detection of infecting or replicating viruses. The intracellular location of these receptors allows viral recognition and, at the same time, avoids unnecessary immune activation to self-nucleic acids that are continuously released by dying host cells. Recent evidence, however, indicates that endogenous factors such as anti-microbial peptides have the ability to break this protective mechanism. Here, we discuss these factors and illustrate how they drive inflammatory responses by promoting immune recognition of self-nucleic acids in skin wounds and inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis and lupus.

  4. Dental erosion and acid reflux disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lazarchik, David A; Frazier, Kevin B

    2009-01-01

    Dental erosion can be difficult to detect, especially in the early stages when lesions are subtle and can be easily overlooked. Patients often are not aware of erosion until the dentition has sustained severe damage that requires extensive and expensive dental rehabilitation. The pH of stomach acid is much lower than the critical pH of enamel dissolution; therefore, reflux of stomach contents into the oral cavity over an extended period of time can cause severe loss of tooth structure. Dental treatment for reflux-induced erosion should focus not only on appropriate restoration but also on all available preventive measures, such as neutralization of acid and remineralization or strengthening of enamel against acid attack. Dentists must maintain a high degree of suspicion for reflux-induced erosion whenever a patient displays symptoms of acid reflux disease or a pattern of erosion that suggests an intrinsic source of acid exposure.

  5. Uric acid and chronic kidney disease: which is chasing which?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jalal, Diana; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Kang, Duk-Hee; Ritz, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    Serum uric acid is commonly elevated in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but was historically viewed as an issue of limited interest. Recently, uric acid has been resurrected as a potential contributory risk factor in the development and progression of CKD. Most studies documented that an elevated serum uric acid level independently predicts the development of CKD. Raising the uric acid level in rats can induce glomerular hypertension and renal disease as noted by the development of arteriolosclerosis, glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Pilot studies suggest that lowering plasma uric acid concentrations may slow the progression of renal disease in subjects with CKD. While further clinical trials are necessary, uric acid is emerging as a potentially modifiable risk factor for CKD. Gout was considered a cause of CKD in the mid-nineteenth century [1], and, prior to the availability of therapies to lower the uric acid level, the development of end-stage renal disease was common in gouty patients. In their large series of gouty subjects Talbott and Terplan found that nearly 100% had variable degrees of CKD at autopsy (arteriolosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis) [2]. Additional studies showed that during life impaired renal function occurred in half of these subjects [3]. As many of these subjects had urate crystals in their tubules and interstitium, especially in the outer renal medulla, the disease became known as gouty nephropathy. The identity of this condition fell in question as the presence of these crystals may occur in subjects without renal disease; furthermore, the focal location of the crystals could not explain the diffuse renal scarring present. In addition, many subjects with gout also had coexistent conditions such as hypertension and vascular disease, leading some experts to suggest that the renal injury in gout was secondary to these latter conditions rather than to uric acid per se [4]. Indeed, gout was

  6. Fatty acids in cardiovascular health and disease: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Baum, Seth J; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Willett, Walter C; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Rudel, Lawrence L; Maki, Kevin C; Whelan, Jay; Ramsden, Christopher E; Block, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Research dating back to the 1950s reported an association between the consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and risk of coronary heart disease. Recent epidemiological evidence, however, challenges these findings. It is well accepted that the consumption of SFAs increases low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), whereas carbohydrates, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) do not. High-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C increases with SFA intake. Among individuals who are insulin resistant, a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet typically has an adverse effect on lipid profiles (in addition to decreasing HDL-C, it also increases triglyceride and LDL particle concentrations). Consequently, a moderate fat diet in which unsaturated fatty acids replace SFAs and carbohydrates are not augmented is advised to lower LDL-C; compared with a low-fat diet, a moderate-fat diet will lower triglycerides and increase HDL-C. Now, there is some new evidence that is questioning the health benefits of even MUFAs and PUFAs. In addition, in a few recent studies investigators have also failed to demonstrate expected cardiovascular benefits of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids. To clarify the clinical pros and cons of dietary fats, the National Lipid Association held a fatty acid symposium at the 2011 National Lipid Association Scientific Sessions. During these sessions, the science regarding the effects of different fatty acid classes on coronary heart disease risk was reviewed. PMID:22658146

  7. Association of Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer in Saudi Patients.

    PubMed

    Saber, Taisir; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Yousef, Amany R; Khalifa, Amany; Al Qurashi, Hesham; Shaqhan, Mohammad; Samaha, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between occurrence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer, and the presence of H. pylori cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG, and to estimate the value of these antibodies in detecting infection by cagA gene-positive H. pylori strains in Saudi patients. The study included 180 patients who were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Taif province and Western region of Saudi Arabia (60 gastric cancer, 60 peptic ulcer, and 60 with non-ulcer dyspepsia). Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained and tested for H. pylori infection by rapid urease test and culture. PCR was performed on the isolated strains and biopsy specimens for detection of the cagA gene. Blood samples were collected and tested for CagA IgG by ELISA. H. pylori infection was detected among 72.8% of patients. The cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG were found in 63.4% and 61.8% of H. pylori-infected patients, respectively. They were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in patients with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer compared with those with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Detection of the CagA IgG was 91.6% sensitive, 89.6% specific, and 90.8% accurate compared with detection of the cagA gene. Its positive and negative predictive values were 93.8% and 86%, respectively. The study showed a significant association between the presence of the cagA gene and gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease, and between anti-CagA IgG and the cagA gene in Saudi patients. However, a further larger study is required to confirm this finding.

  8. Nucleic acid oxidation: an early feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Whitman, Melissa A; Timmons, Michael D; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, Michael P; Lynn, Bert C; Lovell, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Studies of oxidative damage during the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest its central role in disease pathogenesis. To investigate levels of nucleic acid oxidation in both early and late stages of AD, levels of multiple base adducts were quantified in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from the superior and middle temporal gyri (SMTG), inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and cerebellum (CER) of age-matched normal control subjects, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, preclinical AD, late-stage AD, and non-AD neurological disorders (diseased control; DC) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Median levels of multiple DNA adducts in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) elevated in the SMTG, IPL, and CER in multiple stages of AD and in DC subjects. Elevated levels of fapyguanine and fapyadenine in mitochondrial DNA suggest a hypoxic environment early in the progression of AD and in DC subjects. Overall, these data suggest that oxidative damage is an early event not only in the pathogenesis of AD but is also present in neurodegenerative diseases in general. Levels of oxidized nucleic acids in nDNA and mtDNA were found to be significantly elevated in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), preclinical Alzheimer's disease (PCAD), late-stage AD (LAD), and a pooled diseased control group (DC) of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) subjects compared to normal control (NC) subjects. Nucleic acid oxidation peaked early in disease progression and remained elevated. The study suggests nucleic acid oxidation is a general event in neurodegeneration.

  9. Neridronic acid for the treatment of bone metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Davide; Viapiana, Ombretta; Idolazzi, Luca; Fracassi, Elena; Adami, Silvano

    2009-10-01

    Neridronic acid (6-amino-1-idroxyesilidene-1,1-bisphosphonate) is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate licensed in Italy for the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta and Paget's disease of bone. The pharmacodynamic profile is similar to that of other nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates and is characterized by its high affinity for bone tissue particularly at sites undergoing a process of remodeling. In growing children affected by osteogenesis imperfect, neridronic acid rapidly increases bone mineral density as measured by dual X-ray absortiometry and this is associated with a significant decrease in fracture cumulative number. Similar results have been obtained also in newborns (< 12 month old) and in adult patients. In Paget's disease of bone, 200 mg intravenous neridronic acid is associated with a 65% rate of full remission and a biochemical response (decrease of > 75% of bone turnover markers) in 95% of the patients. Neridronic acid treatment has been reported to be effective also in other skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis, algodystrophy, hypercalcemia of malignancy and bone metastasis. Neridronic acid has been developed only for parenteral use, and it is the only one used as intramuscular injection. This avoids all the limitations of oral bisphosphonates and may be offered for a home treatment with simple nursing assistance. PMID:19761412

  10. Fatty acids in cardiovascular health and disease: a comprehensive update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research dating back to the 1950s reported an association between the consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and risk of coronary heart disease. Recent epidemiological evidence, however, challenges these findings. It is well accepted that the consumption of SFAs increases low-density lipoprotei...

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids as adjunctive therapy in Crohns disease.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Angie

    2006-01-01

    Crohns disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that can have a significant impact on the health of those afflicted. The etiology of the disease is unknown, but genetic, environmental, dietary, and immunological factors are thought to be involved. Multiple nutrients can become depleted during active disease due to inadequate intake or malabsorption. Preventing these deficiencies is paramount in the care of those suffering from Crohns disease. Often the traditional treatments (medications) have limited effectiveness and negative side effects that inhibit their use. Enteral nutrition has promising therapeutic benefits, but its use is often limited to the pediatric population due to poor patient acceptability. Omega-3 fatty acids have been investigated for their anti-inflammatory properties as an alternative to traditional care. This article reviews the etiology of Crohns disease, nutritional deficiencies, traditional treatments, and the use of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of Crohns recurrence. The results from clinical trials have been conflicting, but a new fish oil preparation that limits the side effects of traditional fish oil therapy shows promise as an adjunctive treatment for Crohns disease. Continued research is needed to validate these findings.

  12. [Peroxisomal neurologic diseases and Refsum disease: very long chain fatty acids and phytanic acid as diagnostic markers].

    PubMed

    Molzer, B; Stöckler, S; Bernheimer, H

    1992-01-01

    Peroxisomal disorders are genetic metabolic diseases with generalized, multiple, or single functional disturbances of the peroxisome. According to the extent of the functional disturbances 3 groups of diseases can be differentiated: disorders with generalized loss of peroxisomal functions (Zellweger syndrome, ZS; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, NALD; infantile Refsum's disease), disorders with multiple enzymatic defects (e.g. rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata), and disorders with a single enzymatic defect in the peroxisome, the most important being adrenoleukodystrophy/adrenomyeloneuropathy (ALD/AMN). Adult Refsum's disease, a genetic neurological disorder with phytanic acid accumulation, is due to a mitochondrial enzyme deficiency, but is often considered together with peroxisomal diseases because of phytanic acid (PHYT) accumulation in most peroxisomal diseases. The main clinical and pathological criteria of the major disorders and the biochemical parameters of their differentiation are presented. Elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and/or PHYT are the primary diagnostic markers for all peroxisomal disorders and adult Refsum's disease, respectively. Our investigations disclosed 30 ALD/AMN hemizygotes, 16 ALD/AMN heterozygotes, 8 cases of ZS/NALD and 7 patients with adult Refsum's disease. In addition, 15 cases of peroxisomal disorders were confirmed by biochemical investigations in autopsy material. With regard to peroxisomal disorders, therapeutic concepts exist only for ALD/AMN: corticosteroid substitution for adrenal insufficiency, dietary treatment, and bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Adult Refsum's disease can be treated successfully by dietary therapy. In case of dietary treatment and BMT, assay of VLCFA and/or PHYT is important for the biochemical evaluation of these therapies.

  13. Recent Developments in the Endoscopic Treatment of Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is an internal medical emergency. Endoscopic hemostasis has been shown to improve the survival rate of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Although the established hemostatic modalities, including injection, thermal therapy, and mechanical therapy, are effective in controlling peptic ulcer bleeding, hemostasis can be difficult to achieve in some cases. As a result, recent, new endoscopic hemostatic modalities, including over-the-scope clips, topical hemostatic sprays, and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided angiotherapy, have been developed. PMID:27744666

  14. Distribution of Prostaglandin E2 in Gastric and Duodenal Mucosa: Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sill Moo; Yoo, Byung Chul; Lee, Hyo Rang; Chung, Hyuk; Lee, Young Soon

    1992-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin E which is present abundantly in the gastric mucosa is a powerful inhibitor of gastric acid secretion and a stimulus to gastric mucus production. In addition, prostaglandin E2 inhibits ulcer formation in animals, and the synthetic analogues of prostaglandin E have successfully been used in the treatment of patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. To evaluate the role of endogenous prostaglandin E2 in the pathogenesis of the peptic ulcer disease, we measured mucosal prostaglandin E2 levels in patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer disease and compared with that of non-ulcer control persons. Methods The study population was made up of 44 non-ulcer persons, 36 patients with a benign gastric ulcer, and 48 with a duodenal ulcer. Every mucosai specimen, taken from the antrum and from the duodenal bulb, were homogenized, mixed with 1 M HCI, and centrifuged. After removal of the supernatant, precipitate was eluted with ethyl acetate in the Amprep C18 minicolumn. Then the extracted prostaglandin E2 in the ethyl acetate fractions was converted into its methyl oximate derivatives, and the prostaglandin E2 level was measured by radioimmunoassay. During the procedure any homogenized specimen which was looking grossly bloody was removed from the assay in order to avoid any possible contamination or prostaglandin E2 in blood. Results In non-ulcer persons, the mean values was 258.17±127.03 pg/mg. tissue in antrum and 121.07±67.46 pg/mg. tissue in duodenal bulb. The corresponding values were 186.42±70.51 pg/mg. tissue, 79.44±39.04 pg/mg. tissue in gastric ulcer patients and 204. 94 92.03 pg/mg. tissue, 99.66±56.10 pg/mgl. tissue in duodenal ulcer patients respectively. Gastric ulcer patients have the significantly lower level of the antral and duodenal prostaglandin E2 (p<0.005). Those levels of duodenal ulcer patients were also significantly lower than those of non-ulcer persons (p<0.025 & 0.05). Antral prostaglandin E2 level increased to

  15. Perforated peptic ulcer following gastric bypass for obesity.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, A M; Pickens, N E; Thoburn, E K

    1999-03-01

    Peptic ulcer in the excluded segment of a gastric bypass performed in the management of morbid obesity has only rarely been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with the condition in a series of 4300 patients who underwent gastric-restrictive surgery between 1978 and 1997. Eleven patients presented with acute perforation of a peptic ulcer in the excluded gastric segment. Nine ulcers were duodenal, one was gastric, and one patient had both gastric and duodenal perforations. The time between primary gastric-restrictive surgery and ulcer perforation varied from 20 days to 12 years. All patients presented with upper abdominal pain. The classical radiological sign of perforated peptic ulcer, free air under the diaphragm, did not occur in any patient. Nine patients were initially treated by primary closure of the perforation with subsequent definitive ulcer therapy by vagotomy, pyloroplasty, or gastrectomy. One case, initially treated elsewhere, was managed by placement of a Malecot catheter through the duodenal perforation, gastrostomy, and peritoneal drainage. One recent case remains symptom-free on H2 blockers after simple closure. There was no mortality. Six cases were previously reported in the literature with a 33 per cent mortality rate.

  16. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  17. Laparoscopic Peptic Ulcer Perforation Closure: the Preferred Choice.

    PubMed

    Shah, Franal H; Mehta, Sudhir G; Gandhi, Mona D; Saraj

    2015-12-01

    Peptic ulcer perforation is a common life-threatening emergency needing immediate intervention. Laparoscopic closure of perforation is now widely practiced over conventional open closure. This study aimed to compare laparoscopic peptic ulcer perforation closure with conventional open closure in terms of operative time, postoperative analgesia, complications, hospital stay, and return to routine activities. This unicentric, nonblinded, prospective, randomized study was carried out in 50 patients with peptic ulcer perforation who were randomly allocated to undergo either laparoscopic closure or open closure surgery with 25 patients in each group. The mean operative time (60 vs 90 min) was less in the laparoscopic group (p < 0.05). Postoperative analgesia requirements (1 vs 6 days) were also less in laparoscopic patients (p < 0.05). Complications (nil vs 6; p < 0.05) and hospital stay (3 vs 8 days) were less in laparoscopic patients (p < 0.05). Patients return to normal activities (5 vs 10 days; p < 0.05) earlier in laparoscopic perforation closure than in open closure. Our study has shown better outcomes and lesser morbidities with laparoscopic approach in terms of shorter operative time, shorter hospital stay, less analgesic requirements, and less wound infections. Patients also return to routine activities earlier with the laparoscopic approach. It is a safe alternative to open surgery and should be a preferred choice when there are no contraindications to laparoscopy.

  18. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  19. CXC chemokine CXCL12 tissue expression and circulating levels in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Vahid; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khorramdelazad, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most prevalent human infections. CXCL12 is a well-known CXC chemokine involved in inflammation and play major roles in angiogenesis. There is currently very limited data on the role of CXCL12 in peptic ulcer disease. Hence, we aimed to explore whether CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer induced by H. pylori. In this study, we enrolled 102 H. pylori-infected patients, including 51 with active ulcer (GA) and 51 with healing ulcer (GH). We also recruited 50 healthy subjects as control, which did not show any sign or symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases, infection, or immune-related disorders. Endoscopy was performed to determine the stage of the disease. ELISA was used for detection of H. pylori infection and CXCL12 measurement. We also employed western blotting to detect CXCL12 in ulcerative lesions of H. pylori. Demographic data were also collected by questionnaire. Our results demonstrated that CXCL12 serum levels in GA group (151.8±18.31pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in GH (36.89±6.78pg/mL) and control groups (33.77±9.12pg/mL) (P<0.0001). However, we did not observe a significant difference between GH and control groups. Moreover, overexpression of CXCL12 in gastric lesions of patients in GA group was confirmed by Western blot analysis. According to the result of the present study, it could be concluded that CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis and healing of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer. CXCL12 serum levels may also be used to distinguish between GA and GH phases of the disease.

  20. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Enzo; Goni, Elisabetta; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Mario, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding and recurrence rate are strongly linked to Helicobacter pylori infection even if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a relevant role in this setting. Further studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Therefore, a test-and-treat strategy appears to be mandatory for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. Concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), evidence clearly shows that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment. Therefore, H. pylori treatment is not contraindicated in patients with GERD. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. Novel possible mechanisms by which H. pylori may elicit dyspeptic symptoms include alterations of gastric motility, as well as endocrine and acid-secretory abnormalities. Hunger sensations, acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility are regulated by ghrelin, particularly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment. The improvement of symptoms correlates with enhanced plasma ghrelin levels. Apart from the need for more trials on this topic, these findings may give insight into the underlying pathophysiology of FD symptoms. Recent reports suggest that the presence of bacterial DNA in the oral cavity may be relevant to its transmission. A potential protective role of H. pylori on inflammatory bowel diseases needs to be better elucidated.

  1. [Role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease prevention].

    PubMed

    Piñeiro-Corrales, Guadalupe; Lago Rivero, N; Culebras-Fernández, Jesús M

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids, in addition to its known energy value and its structural function, have other beneficial properties. In particular, the polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 acting on the cardiovascular apparatus through many channels exerting a protective effect against cardiovascular risk. The benefits associated with the reduction in cardiac mortality and sudden death particular, are related to the incorporation of EPA and DHA in phospholipid membrane of cardiomyocytes. An index is established that relates the percentage of EPA + DHA of total fatty acids in erythrocytes and risk of death from cardiovascular disease may layering in different degrees. Therefore, the primary source of fatty fish w-3 PUFA, behaves like a reference food in cardiosaludables diets.

  2. Dysregulation of hepatic fatty acid metabolism in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kyubok; Norris, Keith; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in hypertriglyceridemia which is largely due to impaired clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins occasioned by downregulation of lipoprotein lipase and very low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue and of hepatic lipase and LDL receptor-related protein in the liver. However, data on the effect of CKD on fatty acid metabolism in the liver is limited and was investigated here. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to undergo 5/6 nephrectomy (CRF) or sham operation (control) and observed for 12 weeks. The animals were then euthanized and their liver tissue tested for nuclear translocation (activation) of carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) and sterol-responsive element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) which independently regulate the expression of key enzyme in fatty acid synthesis, i.e. fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) as well as nuclear Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) which regulates the expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation and transport, i.e. L-FABP and CPT1A. In addition, the expression of ATP synthase α, ATP synthase β, glycogen synthase and diglyceride acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) and DGAT2 were determined. Results Compared with controls, the CKD rats exhibited hypertriglyceridemia, elevated plasma and liver tissue free fatty acids, increased nuclear ChREBP and reduced nuclear SREBP-1 and PPARα, upregulation of ACC and FAS and downregulation of L-FABP, CPT1A, ATP synthase α, glycogen synthase and DGAT in the liver tissue. Conclusion Liver in animals with advanced CKD exhibits ChREBP-mediated upregulation of enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis, downregulation of PPARα-regulated fatty acid oxidation system and reduction of DGAT resulting in reduced fatty acid incorporation in triglyceride. PMID:23045433

  3. Dietary fatty acids in metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Giuseppe; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Italia

    2012-01-01

    In the last few decades, the prevalence of overweight and essential obesity has been undergoing a fast and progressive worldwide increase. Obesity has been in turn linked to type II diabetes, with the total number of diabetic patients worryingly increasing, in the last fifteen years, suggesting a pandemic phenomenon. At the same time, an increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases has been also recorded. Increasing evidence suggests that the diet is involved in such escalation. In particular, the progressive globalization of food industry allowed massive supply, at a relatively low price, of a great variety of pre-packed food and bakery products, with very high energy content. Most of this food contains high amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and of hydrogenated or trans fatty acids (TFA), that probably represent the prominent risk factors in the diet. Herein we will report diffusion and possible impact on health of such molecules, with reference to coronary heart disease, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We will also discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of fatty acids and fatty acid-derivatives which have been involved either in promoting or in preventing human pathologies. Free fatty acids (FFA) are not indeed only essential fuels for the organism. They also act as ligands for both membrane and nuclear receptors involved in different signaling pathways. Notably, some of these pathways can induce cell stress and apoptosis. Most important, FFA can affect glucose-induced insulin secretion and activate β-cell death. These events can be at least in part counteracted by polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:22414056

  4. Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Boltin, Doron

    2016-02-01

    The ideal treatment regimen for the eradication Helicobacter pylori infection has yet to be identified. Probiotics, particularly Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces, have been suggested as adjuncts to antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori. There is in vitro evidence that probiotics dampen the Th1 response triggered by H. pylori, attenuate H. pylori associated hypochlorhydria and secrete bacteriocidal metabolites. Probiotics interact with the innate host immune system through adherence to the gastric epithelium and secretion of bacterial adhesins. In prospective human studies, probiotic monotherapy effectively decrease H. pylori density (expired (13)CO2) by 2.0%-64.0%. Probiotic monotherapy has also been shown to eradicate H. pylori in up to 32.5%, although subsequent recrudescence is likely. Eleven meta-analyses have evaluated the efficacy of probiotics as adjuvants to antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. The addition of a probiotic increased treatment efficacy, OR 1.12-2.07. This benefit is probably strain-specific and may only be significant with relatively ineffective antibiotic regimens. The pooled prevalence of adverse effects was 12.9%-31.5% among subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with 24.3%-45.9% among controls. Diarrhea in particular was significantly reduced in subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with controls (OR 0.16-0.47). A reduction in adverse events other than diarrhea is variable. Despite the apparent benefit on efficacy and side effects conferred by probiotics, the optimal probiotic species, dose and treatment duration has yet to be determined. Further studies are needed to identify the probiotic, antibiotic and patient factors which might predict benefit from probiotic supplementation.

  5. Homovanilic acid in Huntington's disease and Sydenham's chorea.

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, L; Oliveira, C R; Diniz, M; Amaral, R; Conçalves, A F; Pio-Abreu, J

    1981-01-01

    Homovanilic acid (HVA) was determined in the lumbar CSF of 12 patients with Huntington's disease and 12 with Sydenham's chorea before and after probenecid administration. The means of HVA concentration (basal and after probenecid) were lower in those with Huntington's disease than in controls, and were even lower in a sub-group characterised by increased tone and slowness of voluntary movement. There was no correlation between CSF HVA values and the severity of abnormal movements, nor with length of the illness and age of the patients with Huntington's disease. The mean basal HVA concentration did not differ from controls in those with Sydenham's chorea but the accumulation with probenecid was significantly lower. These results suggest a decrease in cerebral dopamine release in both forms of chorea. PMID:6453208

  6. Amino acid runs in eukaryotic proteomes and disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Brocchieri, Luciano; Bergman, Aviv; Mrázek, Jan; Gentles, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    We present a comparative proteome analysis of the five complete eukaryotic genomes (human, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana), focusing on individual and multiple amino acid runs, charge and hydrophobic runs. We found that human proteins with multiple long runs are often associated with diseases; these include long glutamine runs that induce neurological disorders, various cancers, categories of leukemias (mostly involving chromosomal translocations), and an abundance of Ca2 + and K+ channel proteins. Many human proteins with multiple runs function in development and/or transcription regulation and are Drosophila homeotic homologs. A large number of these proteins are expressed in the nervous system. More than 80% of Drosophila proteins with multiple runs seem to function in transcription regulation. The most frequent amino acid runs in Drosophila sequences occur for glutamine, alanine, and serine, whereas human sequences highlight glutamate, proline, and leucine. The most frequent runs in yeast are of serine, glutamine, and acidic residues. Compared with the other eukaryotic proteomes, amino acid runs are significantly more abundant in the fly. This finding might be interpreted in terms of innate differences in DNA-replication processes, repair mechanisms, DNA-modification systems, and mutational biases. There are striking differences in amino acid runs for glutamine, asparagine, and leucine among the five proteomes. PMID:11782551

  7. Helicobacter pylori and gastric acid: an intimate and reciprocal relationship

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, Helge L.; Kleveland, Per M.; Sørdal, Øystein F.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is the main cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. There are still unanswered questions related to the interaction between Hp and man, like what determines the susceptibility for the initial infection and the mechanisms for the carcinogenic effect. The initial infection seems to require a temporal gastric hypoacidity. For Hp to survive in the gastric mucous layer, some acidity is necessary. Hp itself is probably not directly carcinogenic. Only when inducing oxyntic mucosal inflammation and atrophy with hypoacidity, Hp predisposes for gastric cancer. Gastrin most likely plays a central role in the Hp pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer. PMID:27803738

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids: role in metabolism and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Philipp A; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Berneis, Kaspar

    2013-01-01

    The inverse association of cardiovascular risk with intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was suspected early in populations that are known to have a high consumption of fish and fish oil. Subsequent cohort studies confirmed such associations in other populations. Further evidence of possible beneficial effects on metabolism and cardiovascular health was provided by many studies that were able to show specific mechanisms that may underlie these observations. These include improvement of the function of tissues involved in the alterations occurring during the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, as adipose tissue, the liver and skeletal muscle. Direct action on the cardiovascular system was not only shown regarding vascular function and the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, but also by providing antiarrhythmic effects on the heart. Data on these effects come from in vitro as well as in vivo studies that were conducted in animal models of disease, in healthy humans and in humans suffering from cardiovascular disease. To define prophylactic as well as treatment options in primary and secondary prevention, large clinical trial assessed the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on end points as cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, so far these trials provided ambiguous data that do allow recommendations regarding the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in higher dosages and beyond the dietary advice of regular fish intake only in few clinical situations, such as severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Thomas, C J; Radcliffe, J; Itsiopoulos, C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Thomas, C J; Radcliffe, J; Itsiopoulos, C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia. PMID:26301243

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J.; Thomas, C. J.; Radcliffe, J.; Itsiopoulos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia. PMID:26301243

  12. Role of ω-3 Fatty Acids in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2015-07-01

    There is a large and increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The Indian subcontinent may be one of the regions with the highest burden of CVD in the world. With affluence and urbanization, fat intake, especially saturated fat, is increasing. Vitamins have beneficial effects which are useful to the heart, but do not provide the all-round cardioprotection that is required. Hence, there is a perceived need of nutritional supplement that is rich in these essential nutrients. Studies have shown multifactorial cardio-protective actions of ω-3 fatty acids. A cardioceutical contains all the essential nutrients, vitamins, and minerals including ω-3 fatty acids in the right proportion that will provide all-round protection to the heart.

  13. Investigation of "mysterious" disease in livestock: hydrocyanic acid poisoning.

    PubMed

    Krishna, L; Katoch, R C

    1989-12-01

    An investigation of "mysterious" disease due to hydrocyanic acid (HCN) poisoning in livestock in this state was carried out. Detailed clinicopathological and pathological studies were conducted. Characteristic signs of acute tympany followed with profuse frothing, convulsions and dyspnea were recorded. Cynosis of the mucosa with characteristic anoxemic tissue changes and a high concentration of HCN in rumen content, feed and skeletal muscles were recorded. These were sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Successful treatment with a specific antidote was achieved, and further morbidity and mortality was checked. PMID:2559533

  14. Investigation of "mysterious" disease in livestock: hydrocyanic acid poisoning.

    PubMed

    Krishna, L; Katoch, R C

    1989-12-01

    An investigation of "mysterious" disease due to hydrocyanic acid (HCN) poisoning in livestock in this state was carried out. Detailed clinicopathological and pathological studies were conducted. Characteristic signs of acute tympany followed with profuse frothing, convulsions and dyspnea were recorded. Cynosis of the mucosa with characteristic anoxemic tissue changes and a high concentration of HCN in rumen content, feed and skeletal muscles were recorded. These were sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Successful treatment with a specific antidote was achieved, and further morbidity and mortality was checked.

  15. Association of endothelial progenitor cells and peptic ulcer treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    NIE, ZHIHONG; XU, LIMIN; LI, CHUANYUAN; TIAN, TAO; XIE, PINGPING; CHEN, XIA; LI, BOJING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and peptic ulcers in patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in association with the efficiency of peptic ulcer treatment. The study recruited healthy subjects and peptic ulcer patients with or without T2DM. All the ulcer patients, including those with and without T2DM, were administered omeprazole for 8 weeks. Peptic ulcer patients with T2DM were additionally treated with glipizide and novolin. Blood samples were then obtained from the three groups following ulcer treatment. CD133+ cells were isolated from the blood samples using magnetic bead selection, and cultured in complete medium 199. Morphological and quantity changes in EPCs were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. In addition, flow cytometric analysis was used to quantify the number of vascular endothelial cells. The treatment was partially effective in 7 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM and 12 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. However, this treatment was ineffective in 20 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. Notably, 25 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM were defined as completely recovered following treatment. In addition, the number of circulating EPCs as well as their colony forming ability was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment, compared with the other groups. Circulating EPC counts were significantly increased in peptic ulcer patients without T2DM, as compared with the healthy controls. With regards to colony formation, peptic ulcer patients without T2DM did not exhibit improved colony formation ability. In conclusion, the number of circulating EPCs and their colony-forming ability was significantly reduced in peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment when compared with the other groups. This suggests that the poor curative effect of peptic ulcer treatment in these

  16. The stomach in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R H; Camilleri, M; Crowe, S E; El-Omar, E M; Fox, J G; Kuipers, E J; Malfertheiner, P; McColl, K E L; Pritchard, D M; Rugge, M; Sonnenberg, A; Sugano, K; Tack, J

    2016-01-01

    The stomach is traditionally regarded as a hollow muscular sac that initiates the second phase of digestion. Yet this simple view ignores the fact that it is the most sophisticated endocrine organ with unique physiology, biochemistry, immunology and microbiology. All ingested materials, including our nutrition, have to negotiate this organ first, and as such, the stomach is arguably the most important segment within the GI tract. The unique biological function of gastric acid secretion not only initiates the digestive process but also acts as a first line of defence against food-borne microbes. Normal gastric physiology and morphology may be disrupted by Helicobacter pylori infection, the most common chronic bacterial infection in the world and the aetiological agent for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In this state-of-the-art review, the most relevant new aspects of the stomach in health and disease are addressed. Topics include gastric physiology and the role of gastric dysmotility in dyspepsia and gastroparesis; the stomach in appetite control and obesity; there is an update on the immunology of the stomach and the emerging field of the gastric microbiome. H. pylori-induced gastritis and its associated diseases including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer are addressed together with advances in diagnosis. The conclusions provide a future approach to gastric diseases underpinned by the concept that a healthy stomach is the gateway to a healthy and balanced host. This philosophy should reinforce any public health efforts designed to eradicate major gastric diseases, including stomach cancer. PMID:26342014

  17. The stomach in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, R H; Camilleri, M; Crowe, S E; El-Omar, E M; Fox, J G; Kuipers, E J; Malfertheiner, P; McColl, K E L; Pritchard, D M; Rugge, M; Sonnenberg, A; Sugano, K; Tack, J

    2015-10-01

    The stomach is traditionally regarded as a hollow muscular sac that initiates the second phase of digestion. Yet this simple view ignores the fact that it is the most sophisticated endocrine organ with unique physiology, biochemistry, immunology and microbiology. All ingested materials, including our nutrition, have to negotiate this organ first, and as such, the stomach is arguably the most important segment within the GI tract. The unique biological function of gastric acid secretion not only initiates the digestive process but also acts as a first line of defence against food-borne microbes. Normal gastric physiology and morphology may be disrupted by Helicobacter pylori infection, the most common chronic bacterial infection in the world and the aetiological agent for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In this state-of-the-art review, the most relevant new aspects of the stomach in health and disease are addressed. Topics include gastric physiology and the role of gastric dysmotility in dyspepsia and gastroparesis; the stomach in appetite control and obesity; there is an update on the immunology of the stomach and the emerging field of the gastric microbiome. H. pylori-induced gastritis and its associated diseases including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer are addressed together with advances in diagnosis. The conclusions provide a future approach to gastric diseases underpinned by the concept that a healthy stomach is the gateway to a healthy and balanced host. This philosophy should reinforce any public health efforts designed to eradicate major gastric diseases, including stomach cancer.

  18. [Aggressive factors in the physiopathology of peptic ulcer. Recent findings].

    PubMed

    Testino, G

    1996-06-01

    The peptic ulcer (PU) is characterized by definite gastric cyto-secretory profiles. In case of duodenal ulcer (DU) and pre-pyloric gastric ulcer (PPGU), there is a prevalence of hyperparietalism with hyperchloridria, while in ulcer with body-fundic localization (BFGU) normo-hypoparietalism with normo-hypochloridria prevails. As well, the total peptic activity follows a superimposable course: it increases in cases of DU and PPGU, while it remains in the normal range in case of BFGU. With reference to the qualitative variations of pepsin, in course of PU the amount of pepsin 1 increases significantly. Such pepsin has a powerful proteolytic action even at high pH: which explains the possible onset of PU even in hypochloridria conditions. Helicobacter pylori (HP) has revolutionized the pathogenetic approach towards the gastric pathology: in 75% of cases there are alterations of the mucosae superficial profile, micropapillary changes, erosions, vacuolations with cellular degeneration. In 90% of cases is present chronic active inflammation in correspondence of the glandular neck of the gastric epithelium. In 70% of cases of BFGU there are qualitative alterations of the superficial epithelium. The gastric anatomic-functional behaviour, however, has an autonomous course and it is not influenced by the presence of infection. It results, therefore, that the bacterium is an important cofactor in PU pathogenesis by means of a direct cytotoxic-enzymatic action, without influencing a secretory behaviour which, in PU, is substantially conditioned by the genetic characteristics of the patient.

  19. Prophylactic aspirin and risk of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, J.; Colin-Jones, D.; Langman, M.; Lawson, D.; Logan, R.; Murphy, M.; Rawlins, M.; Vessey, M.; Wainwright, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the risks of hospitalisation for bleeding peptic ulcer with the current prophylactic aspirin regimens of 300 mg daily or less. DESIGN--A case-control study with hospital and community controls. SETTING--Hospitals in Glasgow, Newcastle, Nottingham, Oxford, and Portsmouth. SUBJECTS--1121 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer bleeding matched with hospital and community controls. RESULTS--144 (12.8%) cases had been regular users of aspirin (taken at least five days a week for at least the previous month) compared with 101 (9.0%) hospital and 77 (7.8%) community controls. Odds ratios were raised for all doses of aspirin taken, whether compared with hospital or community controls (compared with combined controls: 75 mg, 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.4); 150 mg, 3.2 (1.7 to 6.5); 300 mg, 3.9 (2.5 to 6.3)). Results were not explained by confounding influences of age, sex, prior ulcer history or dyspepsia, or concurrent non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. Risks seemed particularly high in patients who took non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs concurrently. CONCLUSION--No conventionally used prophylactic aspirin regimen seems free of the risk of peptic ulcer complications. PMID:7711618

  20. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Depner, Christopher M.; Tripathy, Sasmita

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on Greenland Inuits in the 1970s and subsequent human studies have established an inverse relationship between the ingestion of omega-3 fatty acids [C20–22 ω 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)], blood levels of C20–22 ω 3 PUFA, and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). C20–22 ω 3 PUFA have pleiotropic effects on cell function and regulate multiple pathways controlling blood lipids, inflammatory factors, and cellular events in cardiomyocytes and vascular endothelial cells. The hypolipemic, anti-inflammatory, anti-arrhythmic properties of these fatty acids confer cardioprotection. Accordingly, national heart associations and government agencies have recommended increased consumption of fatty fish or ω 3 PUFA supplements to prevent CVD. In addition to fatty fish, sources of ω 3 PUFA are available from plants, algae, and yeast. A key question examined in this review is whether nonfish sources of ω 3 PUFA are as effective as fatty fish-derived C20–22 ω 3 PUFA at managing risk factors linked to CVD. We focused on ω 3 PUFA metabolism and the capacity of ω 3 PUFA supplements to regulate key cellular events linked to CVD. The outcome of our analysis reveals that nonfish sources of ω 3 PUFA vary in their capacity to regulate blood levels of C20–22 ω 3 PUFA and CVD risk factors. PMID:22904344

  1. Phytanic acid alpha-oxidase deficiency (Refsum disease) presenting in infancy.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M A; Clayton, P T

    1994-01-01

    This report describes a patient with high serum phytanic acid concentration due to phytanic acid alpha-oxidase deficiency (classical Refsum disease). He presented unusually early, hypotonia and developmental delay being apparent by 7 months. A generalized peroxisomal disorder (so-called 'infantile Refsum disease') was excluded by analyses of pristanic acid, very long-chain fatty acids, bile acids and plasmalogen synthesis. The early presentation raises the possibility of in utero exposure to phytanate.

  2. Expression of fatty acid synthase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Christoph; Riener, Marc-Oliver; Kirovski, Georgi; Saugspier, Michael; Steib, Kathrin; Weiss, Thomas S; Gäbele, Erwin; Kristiansen, Glen; Hartmann, Arndt; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which starts with simple hepatic steatosis and may progress toward inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the last step in fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus, it is believed to be a major determinant of the maximal hepatic capacity to generate fatty acids by de novo lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between hepatic steatosis and inflammation with FASN expression. In vitro incubation of primary human hepatocytes with fatty acids dose-dependently induced cellular lipid-accumulation and FASN expression, while stimulation with TNF did not affect FASN levels. Further, hepatic FASN expression was significantly increased in vivo in a murine model of hepatic steatosis without significant inflammation but not in a murine NASH model as compared to control mice. Also, FASN expression was not increased in mice subjected to bile duct ligation, an experimental model characterized by severe hepatocellular damage and inflammation. Furthermore, FASN expression was analyzed in 102 human control or NAFLD livers applying tissue micro array technology and immunohistochemistry, and correlated significantly with the degree of hepatic steatosis, but not with inflammation or ballooning of hepatocytes. Quantification of FASN mRNA expression in human liver samples confirmed significantly higher FASN levels in hepatic steatosis but not in NASH, and expression of SREBP1, which is the main transcriptional regulator of FASN, paralleled FASN expression levels in human and experimental NAFLD. In conclusion, the transcriptional induction of FASN expression in hepatic steatosis is impaired in NASH, while hepatic inflammation in the absence of steatosis does not affect FASN expression, suggesting that FASN may serve as a new diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for the progression of NAFLD. PMID:20606731

  3. G-quadruplex nucleic acids and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuliang; Brosh, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Alternate DNA structures that deviate from B-form double-stranded DNA such as G-quadruplex (G4) DNA can be formed by sequences that are widely distributed throughout the human genome. G-quadruplex secondary structures, formed by the stacking of planar quartets composed of four guanines that interact by Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding, can affect cellular DNA replication and transcription, and influence genomic stability. The unique metabolism of G-rich chromosomal regions that potentially form quadruplexes may influence a number of biological processes including immunoglobulin gene rearrangements, promoter activation and telomere maintenance. A number of human diseases are characterized by telomere defects, and it is proposed that G-quadruplex structures which form at telomere ends play an important role in telomere stability. Evidence from cellular studies and model organisms suggests that diseases with known defects in G4 DNA helicases are likely to be perturbed in telomere maintenance and cellular DNA replication. In this minireview, we discuss the connections of G-quadruplex nucleic acids to human genetic diseases and cancer based on the recent literature. PMID:20670277

  4. [Potentialities of transabdominal ultrasound study in the diagnosis of gastric peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The results of examination in 44 patients with gastric peptic ulcer were used to consider the potentialities of a transabdominal ultrasound study in the diagnosis and monitoring of gastric ulcerations. The ultrasound semiotics of gastric ulcers is described in the paper. A role of transabdominal ultrasound study in the algorithm of radiation and instrumental studies of gastric ulcer is defined. The inclusion of this study into the algorithm of diagnosis and monitoring of gastric peptic ulcer will make it possible not only to diagnose gastric ulcerations better, but to follow up their cicatrization. It is expedient to include a transabdominal ultrasound study as one of the diagnostic techniques for gastric peptic ulcer.

  5. Plasma fatty acids in chronic kidney disease: nervonic acid predicts mortality.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Gregory C; Carrero, Juan J; Heimbürger, Olof; Barany, Peter; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Although the value of red blood cell fatty acids (FAs) in estimating risk for acute coronary syndrome in the general population is evident, the value of FAs in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. Here, we provide a pilot analysis in a spectrum of CKD patients. Plasma samples were obtained from 20 incident dialysis patients (CKD stage 5), matched with samples from 10 CKD stage 3-4 patients, and 10 control subjects. Whole plasma FAs were measured using gas chromatography. Whereas neither linoleic acid nor arachidonate acid were altered in CKD, metabolic intermediates of arachidonate synthesis (γ-linolenate and dihomo γ-linolenate) were reduced in CKD. Demming (orthogonal) correlation of FA abundance with estimated GFR identified several saturated and unsaturated FAs in addition to the intermediates; again, neither linoleate nor arachidonate were related. Follow-up data within the CKD stage 5 patients revealed that nervonic acid, a component of membrane sphingolipids and phosphatidylethanolamines, was a significant predictor of all-cause mortality; the age-adjusted relative risk for a 0.15% change is 2.1 (1.4, 3.7; 95% CI; P = .0008). These findings support the exploration of FAs in larger studies for validation of the role FAs in cardiovascular risk and mortality in CKD.

  6. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed

    Nair, Mydhily R B; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  7. Long-Term Recurrence Rates of Peptic Ulcers without Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Hyun; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Jee, Sam Ryong; Chung, Woo Chul; Shim, Ki-Nam; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study is to investigate the recurrence rate of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) over a long follow-up period with PUD patients without Helicobacter pylori. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients diagnosed with PUD on endoscopy and divided them into two groups: a H. pylori-negative group (HP-negative group), and a group of patients with untreated H. pylori (HP noneradicated group). We compared the recurrence rates of PUD in these two groups and analyzed the factors that affected ulcer recurrence. Results Total of nine hospitals in Korea participated, and a total of 1,761 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The HP-negative group included 553 patients, and the HP noneradicated group included 372 patients. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of PUD recurrence were 36.4% in the HP-negative group and 43.8% in the HP noneradicated group (p=0.113). The factors that were found to affect recurrence in the HP-negative group were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. Conclusions The 5-year cumulative probability of PUD recurrence without H. pylori infection after a long-term follow-up was 36.4% and the factors that affected recurrence were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. PMID:27114412

  8. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Mydhily R. B.; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10–20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid metabolism and elimination in cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salous, Abdelghaffar Kamal

    The bioactive lipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) are present in human and mouse plasma at a concentration of ~0.1-1 microM and regulate physiological and pathophysiological processes in the cardiovascular system including atherothrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, and immune function, edema formation, and permeability. PPAP2B, the gene encoding LPP3, a broad activity integral membrane enzyme that terminates LPA actions in the vasculature, has a single nucleotide polymorphism that been recently associated with coronary artery disease risk. The synthesis and signaling of LPA and S1P in the cardiovascular system have been extensively studied but the mechanisms responsible for their elimination are less well understood. The broad goal of this research was to examine the role of LPP3 in the termination of LPA signaling in models of cardiovascular disease involving vascular wall cells, investigate the role of LPP3 in the elimination of plasma LPA, and further characterize the elimination of plasma LPA. The central hypothesis is that LPP3 plays an important role in attenuating the pathological responses to LPA signaling and that it mediates the elimination of exogenously applied bioactive lipids from the plasma. These hypotheses were tested using molecular biological approaches, in vitro studies, synthetic lysophospholipid mimetics, modified surgical procedures, and mass spectrometry assays. My results indicated that LPP3 played a critical role in attenuating LPA signaling mediating the pathological processes of intimal hyperplasia and vascular leak in mouse models of disease. Additionally, enzymatic inactivation of lysophospholipids by LPP and PLA enzymes in the plasma was not a primary mechanism for the rapid elimination of plasma LPA and S1P. Instead, evidence strongly suggested a transcellular uptake mechanism by hepatic non-parenchymal cells as the predominant mechanism for elimination of these molecules. These results support a model in

  10. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) in Vascular Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Siew T.; Yung, Yun C.; Herr, Deron R.; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small signaling lipid that is capable of stimulating a plethora of different cellular responses through the activation of its family of cognate G protein-coupled receptors. LPA mediates a wide range of biological effects in many tissue types that have been recently reviewed, however its effects on vasculature development and function have received comparatively less examination. In this review, literature on the actions of LPA in three main aspects of vascular development (vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and vascular maturation) is discussed. In addition, evidence for the roles of LPA signaling in the formation of secondary vascular structures, such as the blood brain barrier, is considered, consistent with significant roles for LPA signaling in vascular development, function, and disease. PMID:19621353

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease: can omega-3 fatty acids really help?

    PubMed Central

    Barbalho, Sandra Maria; Goulart, Ricardo de Alvares; Quesada, Karina; Bechara, Marcelo Dib; de Carvalho, Antonely de Cássio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants to the traditional therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied to enhance the efficacy of the treatment and improve patients’ quality of life. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3FA) have been associated with attenuation of the inflammatory responses in IBD, possibly acting as substrates for anti-inflammatory eicosanoid production, similar to prostaglandins and leukotrienes. ω3FA also act as substrates for the synthesis of resolvins, maresins and protectins, indispensable in resolving inflammation processes. These acids may influence the development or course of IBD by: reducing oxidative stress, production of tumor necrosis factor-α and proinflammatory cytokines; working as chemopreventive agents; and decreasing the expression of adhesion molecules. There are numerous controversies in the literature on the effects of ω3FA in the prevention or treatment of IBD, but their effects in reducing inflammation is incontestable. Therefore, more studies are warranted to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms and establish the recommended daily intake to prevent or induce remission in IBD patients. PMID:26752948

  12. Potential mechanisms for low uric acid in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Radhika; Young, Sarah; Rosen, Ami; Bernhard, Douglas; Millington, David; Factor, Stewart; Jinnah, H A

    2016-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have described an association between low serum uric acid (UA) and Parkinson disease (PD). Uric acid is a known antioxidant, and one proposed mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD is oxidative damage of dopamine neurons. However, other complex metabolic pathways may contribute. The purpose of this study is to elucidate potential mechanisms of low serum UA in PD. Subjects who met diagnostic criteria for definite or probable PD (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) aged 55-80 years were recruited. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected from all participants, and both uric acid and allantoin were measured and corrected for body mass index (BMI). Urinary metabolites were compared using a twoway ANOVA with diagnosis and sex as the explanatory variables. There were no significant differences between PD and controls for total UA (p = 0.60), UA corrected for BMI (p = 0.37), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on UA (p = 0.24). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PD and controls for allantoin (p = 0.47), allantoin corrected for BMI (p = 0.57), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on allantoin (p = 0.78). Allantoin/UA ratios also did not significantly differ by diagnosis (p = 0.99). Our results imply that low serum UA in PD may be due to an intrinsic mechanism that alters the homeostatic set point for serum UA in PD, and may contribute to relatively lower protection against oxidative damage. These findings provide indirect support for neuroprotection trials aimed at raising serum UA.

  13. Chelation therapy in cardiovascular disease: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, deferoxamine, and dexrazoxane.

    PubMed

    Elihu, N; Anandasbapathy, S; Frishman, W H

    1998-02-01

    This review was conducted to assess whether there is sufficient evidence for the clinical use of chelation therapy in cardiovascular disease based on original articles and abstracts published in the last 30 years, with emphasis placed on the most recent placebo-controlled studies. Articles postulating the mechanisms of chelation also were included. The majority of the literature focused on three chelators in particular, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), deferoxamine, and dexrazoxane (ICRF-187). Historically, much has been written on the beneficial effects of EDTA. However, there are few controlled studies, and the mechanism of action of EDTA is poorly understood. Although studies of deferoxamine are more recent, most of the research is limited to animals and ex vivo models. Recently, dexrazoxane was approved, but only for parenteral use for reducing the incidence and severity of cardiomyopathy associated with doxorubicin administration in women with metastatic breast cancer. Given these limitations, it is concluded that more controlled studies are required to determine the efficacy of chelation therapy in cardiovascular disease before it can be used broadly in the clinical setting.

  14. Roles of lysophosphatidic acid in cardiovascular physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Susan S; Cheng, Hsin-Yuan; Miriyala, Sumitra; Panchatcharam, Manikandan; Morris, Andrew J

    2008-09-01

    The bioactive lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) exerts a range of effects on the cardiovasculature that suggest a role in a variety of critical cardiovascular functions and clinically important cardiovascular diseases. LPA is an activator of platelets from a majority of human donors identifying a possible role as a regulator of acute thrombosis and platelet function in atherogenesis and vascular injury responses. Of particular interest in this context, LPA is an effective phenotypic modulator of vascular smooth muscle cells promoting the de-differentiation, proliferation and migration of these cells that are required for the development of intimal hyperplasia. Exogenous administration of LPA results in acute and systemic changes in blood pressure in different animal species, suggesting a role for LPA in both normal blood pressure regulation and hypertension. Advances in our understanding of the molecular machinery responsible for the synthesis, actions and inactivation of LPA now promise to provide the tools required to define the role of LPA in cardiovascular physiology and disease. In this review we discuss aspects of LPA signaling in the cardiovasculature focusing on recent advances and attempting to highlight presently unresolved issues and promising avenues for further investigation.

  15. Roles of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Cardiovascular Physiology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Susan S.; Cheng, Hsin-Yuan; Miriyala, Sumitra; Panchatcharam, Manikandan; Morris, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The bioactive lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) exerts a range of effects on the cardiovasculature that suggest a role in a variety of critical cardiovascular functions and clinically important cardiovascular diseases. LPA is an activator of platelets from a majority of human donors identifying a possible role as a regulator of acute thrombosis and platelet function in atherogenesis and vascular injury responses. Of particular interest in this context, LPA is an effective phenotypic modulator of vascular smooth muscle cells promoting the de-differentiation, proliferation and migration of these cells that is required for the development of intimal hyperplasia. Exogenous administration of LPA results in acute and systemic changes in blood pressure in different animal species, suggesting a role for LPA in both normal blood pressure regulation and hypertension. Advances in our understanding of the molecular machinery responsible for the synthesis, actions and inactivation of LPA now promises to provide the tools required to define the role of LPA in cardiovascular physiology and disease. In this review we discuss aspects of LPA signaling in the cardiovasculature focusing on recent advances and attempting to highlight presently unresolved issues and promising avenues for further investigation. PMID:18586114

  16. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  17. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  18. The history and rationale of using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in the treatment of peptic ulcers. In memoriam Ioan Puşcaş (1932-2015).

    PubMed

    Buzás, György M; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) started to be used in the treatment of peptic ulcers in the 1970s, and for more than two decades, a group led by Ioan Puşcaş used them for this purpose, assuming that by inhibiting the gastric mucosa CA isoforms, hydrochloric acid secretion is decreased. Although acetazolamide and other sulfonamide CAIs are indeed effective in healing ulcers, the inhibition of CA isoforms in other organs than the stomach led to a number of serious side effects which made this treatment obsolete when the histamine H2 receptor antagonists and the proton pump inhibitors became available. Decades later, in 2002, it has been discovered that Helicobacter pylori, the bacterial pathogen responsible for gastric ulcers and cancers, encodes for two CAs, one belonging to the α-class and the other one to the β-class of these enzymes. These enzymes are crucial for the life cycle of the bacterium and its acclimation within the highly acidic environment of the stomach. Inhibition of the two bacterial CAs with sulfonamides such as acetazolamide, a low-nanomolar H. pylori CAI, is lethal for the pathogen, which explains why these compounds were clinically efficient as anti-ulcer drugs. Thus, the approach promoted by Ioan Puşcaş for treating this disease was a good one although the rationale behind it was wrong. In this review, we present a historical overview of the sulfonamide CAIs as anti-ulcer agents, in memoriam of the scientist who was in the first line of this research trend.

  19. Gedunin and photogedunin of Xylocarpus granatum show significant anti-secretory effects and protect the gastric mucosa of peptic ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V; Singh, N; Shrivastva, S; Mishra, S K; Dharmani, P; Mishra, V; Palit, G

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the gastroprotective mechanism of Xylocarpus granatum fruit and its active constituents gedunin and photogedunin was investigated. Chloroform fraction (Fr-CHCl(3)) of X. granatum fruit was evaluated against cold restraint (CRU), aspirin (AS), alcohol (AL) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models in rats and histamine (HA) induced duodenal ulcer model in guinea pigs. Potential anti-ulcer activity of Fr-CHCl(3) was observed against CRU (58.28%), AS (67.81%), AL (84.38%), PL (65.66%) and HA (61.93%) induced ulcer models. The standard drug omeprazole (10mg/kg, p.o.) showed 68.25% protection against CRU, 57.08% against AS and 69.42% against PL model and 70.79% against HA induced duodenal ulcer. Sucralfate, another standard drug (500 mg/kg, p.o.) showed 62.72% protection in AL induced ulcer model. Fr-CHCl(3) significantly reduced free acidity (51.42%), total acidity (30.76%) and upregulated mucin secretion by 58.37% respectively. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-CHCl(3) yielded gedunin (36%), photogedunin (2%). Further, Fr-CHCl(3) and its compounds gedunin and photogedunin significantly inhibited H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity in vitro with IC(50) of 89.37, 56.86 and 66.54 microg/ml respectively as compared to the IC(50) value of omeprazole (30.24 microg/ml) confirming their anti-secretory activity. Conclusively, Fr-CHCl(3) of Xylocarpus granatum was found to possess anti-ulcerogenic activity which might be due to its anti-secretory activity and subsequent strengthening of the defensive mechanism. This study is the first of its kind to show significant anti-secretory effect of gedunin and photogedunin. Therefore it could act as a potent therapeutic agent against peptic ulcer disease. PMID:19962286

  20. The history and rationale of using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in the treatment of peptic ulcers. In memoriam Ioan Puşcaş (1932-2015).

    PubMed

    Buzás, György M; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) started to be used in the treatment of peptic ulcers in the 1970s, and for more than two decades, a group led by Ioan Puşcaş used them for this purpose, assuming that by inhibiting the gastric mucosa CA isoforms, hydrochloric acid secretion is decreased. Although acetazolamide and other sulfonamide CAIs are indeed effective in healing ulcers, the inhibition of CA isoforms in other organs than the stomach led to a number of serious side effects which made this treatment obsolete when the histamine H2 receptor antagonists and the proton pump inhibitors became available. Decades later, in 2002, it has been discovered that Helicobacter pylori, the bacterial pathogen responsible for gastric ulcers and cancers, encodes for two CAs, one belonging to the α-class and the other one to the β-class of these enzymes. These enzymes are crucial for the life cycle of the bacterium and its acclimation within the highly acidic environment of the stomach. Inhibition of the two bacterial CAs with sulfonamides such as acetazolamide, a low-nanomolar H. pylori CAI, is lethal for the pathogen, which explains why these compounds were clinically efficient as anti-ulcer drugs. Thus, the approach promoted by Ioan Puşcaş for treating this disease was a good one although the rationale behind it was wrong. In this review, we present a historical overview of the sulfonamide CAIs as anti-ulcer agents, in memoriam of the scientist who was in the first line of this research trend. PMID:26108882

  1. Ascorbic acid absorption in Crohn's disease. Studies using L-(carboxyl-/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, S.H.; Shaffer, J.L.; Johns, C.W.; Bennett, R.J.; Irving, M.H.

    1989-04-01

    Total body pool and intestinal absorption of ascorbic acid were studied in 12 patients undergoing operation for Crohn's disease (six with fistulae and six without) and in six control patients undergoing operation for reasons other than Crohn's disease. L-(carboxyl-/sup 14/C)Ascorbic acid, 0.19-0.40 megabecquerels (MBq), was given orally. After a period of equilibration, the labeled ascorbic acid was flushed out of the patient's body tissues using large doses of unlabeled ascorbic acid. Intestinal absorption of ascorbic acid, assessed from the total cumulative urinary /sup 14/C recovery, was found to be similar in patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease (73.9 +/- 8.45%), those without fistulas (72.8 +/- 11.53%), and in controls (80.3 +/- 8.11%). Total body pools of ascorbic acid, calculated using the plasma /sup 14/C decay curves, were similar in patients with Crohn's disease with fistulas (17.1 +/- 5.91 mg/kg), patients without fistulas (9.6 +/- 3.58 mg/kg), and in controls (13.3 +/- 4.28 mg/kg). The results indicate that ascorbic acid absorption is normal in patients with both fistulizing and nonfistulizing Crohn's disease. The results suggest that routine supplements of vitamin C are not necessary unless oral ascorbic acid intake is low.

  2. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  3. Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. II. Uptake of glutamic acid and other amino acids by fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Comings, D E; Goetz, I E; Holden, J; Holtz, J

    1981-03-01

    Injection of kainic acid, a rigid analog of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamic acid (glu), into the neostriatum of rats produces a condition that mimics Huntington disease (HD) in at least 12 different morphological and biochemical parameters. These results suggested that one of the possible basic mechanisms in HD is a defect in the presynaptic of glial uptake of glu, resulting in chronic hyperstimulation and death of a specific set of neurons. To test this hypothesis, the uptake of glu was studied in 12 carefully matched sets of control-HD pairs and two lines of Tourette syndrome fibroblasts. Although the first six sets suggested a glutamate transport defect in HD cells, examination of 12 sets indicated that there were no significant differences between control and HD cells. The fibroblasts showed both a high and low affinity uptake of glutamic acid. Sodium dependent uptake of L-glutamate (L-glu) minus D-glutamate (D-glu) at 100, 1,000, and 10,000 Micrometers glutamate was normal in HD and Tourette syndrome cells.

  4. Management of recurrent peptic ulcer perforation: problem-focused or definitive surgery?

    PubMed

    Yazici, Pinar; Kaya, Cemal

    2014-01-01

    The combination of modern antisecretory drugs and eradication of Helicobacter pylori has changed the treatment options for peptic ulcer patients in favour of conservative therapy. Surgical approach which is used to be main treatment option has become now exceptional for uncomplicated gastroduodenal ulcers. However, it includes fixing the problem leaving the origin of the problem. We presented a peptic ulcer patient with recurrent attacks of ulcer perforation and discussed the surgical approach to these complicated cases.

  5. Acute Appendicitis Is Associated with Peptic Ulcers: A Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2015-12-08

    Despite some studies having indicated a possible association between appendicitis and duodenal ulcers, this association was mainly based on regional samples or limited clinician experiences, and as such, did not permit unequivocal conclusions. In this case-control study, we examined the association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers using a population-based database. We included 3574 patients with acute appendicitis as cases and 3574 sex- and age-matched controls. A Chi-squared test showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalences of prior peptic ulcers between cases and controls (21.7% vs. 16.8%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of prior peptic ulcers for cases was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24~1.54, p < 0.001) compared to controls. The results further revealed that younger groups demonstrated higher ORs for prior peptic ulcers among cases than controls. In particular, the adjusted OR for cases < 30 years old was as high as 1.65 (95% CI = 1.25~2.19; p < 0.001) compared to controls. However, we failed to observe an association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers in the ≥ 60-year age group (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.93~1.52). We concluded that there is an association between acute appendicitis and a previous diagnosis of peptic ulcers.

  6. The Evidence for α-Linolenic Acid and Cardiovascular Disease Benefits: Comparisons with Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid12

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Jennifer A.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the cardiovascular disease (CVD) benefits of α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n–3) has advanced markedly during the past decade. It is now evident that ALA benefits CVD risk. The expansion of the ALA evidence base has occurred in parallel with ongoing research on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n–3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n–3) and CVD. The available evidence enables comparisons to be made for ALA vs. EPA + DHA for CVD risk reduction. The epidemiologic evidence suggests comparable benefits of plant-based and marine-derived n–3 (omega-3) PUFAs. The clinical trial evidence for ALA is not as extensive; however, there have been CVD event benefits reported. Those that have been reported for EPA + DHA are stronger because only EPA + DHA differed between the treatment and control groups, whereas in the ALA studies there were diet differences beyond ALA between the treatment and control groups. Despite this, the evidence suggests many comparable CVD benefits of ALA vs. EPA + DHA. Thus, we believe that it is time to revisit what the contemporary dietary recommendation should be for ALA to decrease the risk of CVD. Our perspective is that increasing dietary ALA will decrease CVD risk; however, randomized controlled clinical trials are necessary to confirm this and to determine what the recommendation should be. With a stronger evidence base, the nutrition community will be better positioned to revise the dietary recommendation for ALA for CVD risk reduction. PMID:25398754

  7. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic Acid cycle in Huntington disease and in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Cortes, Etty P; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-06-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease, and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (-50% to 90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the human HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%) suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients.

  8. Helicobacter pylori is not the predominant etiology for peptic ulcers requiring operation.

    PubMed

    Zelickson, Marc S; Bronder, Cathy M; Johnson, Brent L; Camunas, Joseph A; Smith, Dane E; Rawlinson, Dustin; Von, Stephen; Stone, H Harlan; Taylor, Spence M

    2011-08-01

    As the number of patients requiring operation for peptic ulcer disease (PUD) declines, presumed contemporary ulcer etiology has largely been derived from medically treated patients not subjected to surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the specific causes of PUD in patients requiring surgery. Our Acute Care Surgical Service registry was reviewed for patients operated on for complications of PUD from 2004 to 2009. Emphasis was placed on individual etiologic factors for PUD. There were 128 patients (52% male, 81% white) who underwent emergency operation including: simple patch closure (n = 61, 48%); gastric resection (n = 22, 17%); gastric resection with vagotomy (n = 21, 16%); vagotomy and pyloroplasty (n = 18, 14%); or other procedures (n = 6, 5%). Complications necessitating operation were perforation (n = 79, 62%); bleeding (n = 29, 23%); obstruction (n = 12, 9%); and intractability (n = 8, 6%). Perioperative mortality was 12.5 per cent. Risk factors for PUD included tobacco use (50%), alcohol abuse (34%), and steroids (21%). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use was confirmed in 68 (53%) patients. Of the 128 patients, 82 (64%) were tested for Helicobacter pylori, 33 (40%) of which were positive and 49 (60%) negative. Helicobacter pylori, thus, was the confirmed ulcer etiology in only 26 per cent of cases. Unlike contemporary series of medically treated PUD, Helicobacter pylori may not be the predominant etiologic factor in patients who experience complications requiring surgery. A "traditional" surgical approach with liberal use of vagotomy, not antibiotic triple therapy, may well be the preferred treatment consideration in such cases. PMID:21944523

  9. Proximal gastric vagotomy: does it have a place in the future management of peptic ulcer?

    PubMed

    Johnson, A G

    2000-03-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy (PGV) is a modification of truncal vagotomy, which was introduced by Dragstedt for the treatment of duodenal ulcer (DU) in 1943. It is a technically demanding operation; but when performed by an experienced surgeon, it is safe and gives a cure rate for DU of more than 90%, with minimal side effects. The operation permanently alters the natural history of the disease and may be used for gastric ulcer (GU), with ulcer excision; but it is not as effective. Further adaptations, such as posterior truncal vagotomy with anterior seromyotomy, were introduced to simplify and shorten the operation, but they did not receive wide acceptance. Recently, with the identification of Helicobacter, it was found that DU can also be cured by eliminating the infection. PGV is therefore used electively in patients with persistent DU that is not Helicobacter-positive or in the few in whom Helicobacter cannot be eliminated. In patients with bleeding or perforated DUs, PGV may be used in conjunction with underrunning the vessel or patching the perforation. However, few surgeons doing emergency peptic ulcer surgery have experience with PGV, so simple suture followed by medical treatment is the safest option. Because elective PGV is now a rare procedure, patients should be referred to a center with special expertise. If Helicobacter becomes resistant to antibiotics in the future, surgery may be needed regularly again, but the technical nuances would have to be learned.

  10. Protective effects of ginger and marshmallow extracts on indomethacin-induced peptic ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zaghlool, Sameh S.; Shehata, Basim A.; Abo-Seif, Ali A.; Abd El-Latif, Hekma A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastric ulcer is one of the most serious diseases. Most classic treatment lines produce adverse drug reactions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the protective effects of two natural extracts, namely ginger and marshmallow extracts, on indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into five groups; a normal control group, an ulcer control group, and three treatment groups receiving famotidine (20 mg/kg), ginger (100 mg/kg), and marshmallow (100 mg/kg). Treatments were given orally on a daily basis for 14 days prior to a single intra-peritoneal administration of indomethacin (20 mg/kg). Results: Indomethacin administration resulted in significant ulcerogenic effect evidenced by significant elevations in ulcer number, ulcer index, and blood superoxide dismutase activity accompanied by significant decreases in gastric mucosal nitric oxide and glutathione levels. In addition, elevations in gastric mucosal lipid peroxides and histamine content were observed. Alternatively, pretreatment with famotidine, ginger or marshmallow significantly corrected macroscopic and biochemical findings, supported microscopically by results of histopathological study. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that administration of either ginger or marshmallow extract could protect against indomethacin-induced peptic ulcer in rats presumably via their antioxidant properties and inhibition of histamine release. PMID:26283843

  11. [Unsaturated fatty acids as a preventive measure for Alzheimer's disease: the literature review].

    PubMed

    Sukhanov, A V

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the using of omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids (docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid) as a possible preventive measure for Alzheimer's disease on the basis of modern literature data. It is possible to use the combination of the anticholinesterase drugs and the omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:22708456

  12. Linking Inflammation and Parkinson Disease: Hypochlorous Acid Generates Parkinsonian Poisons.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Kalogiannis, Mike; Krasnikov, Boris F; Gomlin, Irving; Peltier, Morgan R; Moran, Graham R

    2016-06-01

    Inflammation is a common feature of Parkinson Disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a reactive oxygen species formed by neutrophils and other myeloperoxidase-containing cells during inflammation. HOCl chlorinates the amine and catechol moieties of dopamine to produce chlorinated derivatives collectively termed chlorodopamine. Here, we report that chlorodopamine is toxic to dopaminergic neurons both in vivo and in vitro Intrastriatal administration of 90 nmol chlorodopamine to mice resulted in loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra and decreased ambulation-results that were comparable to those produced by the same dose of the parkinsonian poison, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Chlorodopamine was also more toxic to differentiated SH SY5Y cells than HOCl. The basis of this selective toxicity is likely mediated by chlorodopamine uptake through the dopamine transporter, as expression of this transporter in COS-7 cells conferred sensitivity to chlorodopamine toxicity. Pharmacological blockade of the dopamine transporter also mitigated the deleterious effects of chlorodopamine in vivo The cellular actions of chlorodopamine included inactivation of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, as well as inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. The latter effect is consistent with inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase. Illumination at 670 nm, which stimulates cytochrome c oxidase, reversed the effects of chlorodopamine. The observed changes in mitochondrial biochemistry were also accompanied by the swelling of these organelles. Overall, our findings suggest that chlorination of dopamine by HOCl generates toxins that selectively kill dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in a manner comparable to MPP+. PMID:27026709

  13. Cisapride for gastro-oesophageal reflux and peptic oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Staiano, A; Capozzi, C; Di Lorenzo, C; Boccieri, A; Auricchio, S

    1987-01-01

    Twenty children (age range 75 days-47 months) with reflux oesophagitis entered a random double blind trial in which they received either Cisapride (Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd), a new prokinetic agent, or an identical placebo syrup. Diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux was made by measurement of intraluminal oesophageal pH combined with manometry. Oesophagitis was assessed in all patients by histological examination of mucosal specimens taken during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. Manometry, pH test, and endoscopy with biopsy examination were repeated at the end of the treatment period. Seventeen patients completed the trial, eight of whom were taking the drug and nine the placebo. Mean total clinical score and post-prandial reflux time (% of reflux) significantly improved in patients in the group given Cisapride but not in the group given placebo. Furthermore, there was a significant improvement of the histological oesophagitis score only in the children in the group given Cisapride, whereas placebo was ineffective. It is concluded that Cisapride is a useful agent both for the relief of symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux and for the healing of peptic oesophagitis in infancy. PMID:3300570

  14. Stimuli of pepsinogen secretion from frog isolated peptic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, H.; Komiyama, K.; Shirakawa, T.; Heldman, A.; Anderson, W.; Hirschowitz, B.I.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously studied pepsinogen (Pg) secretion from isolated intact esophageal mucosa of the bullfrog R. catesbeiana. By stimulus-response studies using agonists and antagonists they characterized specific stimulation of cholinergic, adrenergic and peptidergic receptors and interaction of cAMP and Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent pathways. To understand cell mechanisms more definitively and to relate these to morphology it was necessary to isolate peptic cells. Esophageal mucosa was digested with 0.1% collagenase for 80-100 min and sieved through teflon mesh. One esophagus yielded approximately 10/sup 7/ cells, 70% pure and 89 +/- 5% viable. Basal secretion was 3% of Pg content/hr. The cells responded to graded concentrations of bombesin, bethanechol, IBMX, 8Br-cAMP, forskolin, TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13 acetate) and A23187. The response to (TPA + A23187) was double the additive single output values; (TPA + A23187 + forskolin) stimulated secretion of more than double the sum of the 3 component stimuli. In calcium and magnesium-free medium, the A23187 response and the synergistic response of combinations were both lost. They have identified 3 messengers for Pg cell stimulation - cAMP, Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and protein kinase C - each of which can be separately stimulated, and when combined are strongly synergistic.

  15. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  16. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25616451

  18. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  19. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. PMID:27531536

  20. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD.

  1. ERECTA, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and jasmonic acid modulate quantitative disease resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana to Verticillium longisporum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Verticillium longisporum is a soil-borne vascular pathogen infecting cruciferous hosts such as oilseed rape. Quantitative disease resistance (QDR) is the major control means, but its molecular basis is poorly understood so far. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed using a new (Bur×Ler) recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of Arabidopsis thaliana. Phytohormone measurements and analyses in defined mutants and near-isogenic lines (NILs) were used to identify genes and signalling pathways that underlie different resistance QTL. Results QTL for resistance to V. longisporum-induced stunting, systemic colonization by the fungus and for V. longisporum-induced chlorosis were identified. Stunting resistance QTL were contributed by both parents. The strongest stunting resistance QTL was shown to be identical with Erecta. A functional Erecta pathway, which was present in Bur, conferred partial resistance to V. longisporum-induced stunting. Bur showed severe stunting susceptibility in winter. Three stunting resistance QTL of Ler origin, two co-localising with wall-associated kinase-like (Wakl)-genes, were detected in winter. Furthermore, Bur showed a much stronger induction of salicylic acid (SA) by V. longisporum than Ler. Systemic colonization was controlled independently of stunting. The vec1 QTL on chromosome 2 had the strongest effect on systemic colonization. The same chromosomal region controlled the level of abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) in response to V. longisporum: The level of ABA was higher in colonization-susceptible Ler than in colonization-resistant Bur after V. longisporum infection. JA was down-regulated in Bur after infection, but not in Ler. These differences were also demonstrated in NILs, varying only in the region containing vec1. All phytohormone responses were shown to be independent of Erecta. Conclusions Signalling systems with a hitherto unknown role in the QDR of A. thaliana against V. longisporum were

  2. Acetic acid in aged vinegar affects molecular targets for thrombus disease management.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Yanyan, Zhang; Junfeng, Fan

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying the action of dietary vinegar on antithrombotic activity, acetic acid, the main acidic component of dietary vinegar, was used to determine antiplatelet and fibrinolytic activity. The results revealed that acetic acid significantly inhibits adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-, collagen-, thrombin-, and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation. Acetic acid (2.00 mM) reduced AA-induced platelet aggregation to approximately 36.82 ± 1.31%, and vinegar (0.12 mL L(-1)) reduced the platelet aggregation induced by AA to 30.25 ± 1.34%. Further studies revealed that acetic acid exerts its effects by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 and the formation of thromboxane-A2. Organic acids including acetic acid, formic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, and malic acid also showed fibrinolytic activity; specifically, the fibrinolytic activity of acetic acid amounted to 1.866 IU urokinase per mL. Acetic acid exerted its fibrinolytic activity by activating plasminogen during fibrin crossing, thus leading to crosslinked fibrin degradation by the activated plasmin. These results suggest that organic acids in dietary vinegar play important roles in the prevention and cure of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Upper gastro-intestinal disease in Scotland: a survey of practice amongst Scottish gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Kubba, A K; Whyman, M R

    1996-10-01

    Given the range of causes of upper gastrointestinal disease (UGD), the evolving role of Helicobacter pylori in its pathogenesis and the variety of treatments available, one might expect complex management strategies in the management of these diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the current management strategies used in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis in Scotland and to identify areas where large and clinically important variations in practice exist between gastro-intestinal specialists. Between June and September 1994, 130 gastro-intestinal physicians and surgeons were sent a postal questionnaire based on their response to four hypothetical clinical scenarios. Eighty-one (63%) correspondents returned completed questionnaires. The case histories related to: bleeding duodenal ulcer; peptic ulceration whilst taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids; management of dyspepsia in the young; and management of gastritis. Thirty-eight per cent of clinicians surveyed advocated the use of intravenous acid reducing agents in peptic ulcer bleeding. A total of 88% advocated endoscopic therapy in the presence of stigmata of recent haemorrhage and 5% suggested a follow up of endoscopy to confirm healing after ulcer bleeding. In treating the patient with ulcer while on NSAIDs, 45% of clinicians would use H2 receptor antagonists, 37% would use omeprazole, 14% misoprostol and 4% helicobacter eradication. Of the clinicians surveyed, 63% said they would investigate a 25-year-old patient with dyspepsia by endoscopy and 84% of these will biopsy for H. pylori. Empirical treatment was favoured by 37% and 4% considered a barium meal. There was no consensus in the treatment of gastritis. There exists considerable divergence of opinion between clinicians in investigation and treatment of upper gastrointestinal disease. The role of endoscopy, the type and duration of medical treatment of bleeding and non bleeding ulcer and gastritis require

  4. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients.

  5. [Association of fatty acid metabolism with systemic inflammatory response in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Denisenko, Y K; Novgorodtseva, T P; Zhukova, N V; Antonuk, M V; Lobanova, E G; Kalinina, E P

    2016-03-01

    We examined composition of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NFAs), erythrocyte fatty acids, levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with different type of the inflammatory response. The results of our study show that asthma and COPD in remission are associated with changes in the composition NFAs of plasma, FA of erythrocytes, level eicosanoid despite the difference in the regulation of immunological mechanisms of systemic inflammation. These changes are characterized by excessive production of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites (thromboxane B2, leukotriene B4) and deficiency of their functional antagonist, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3). The recognized association between altered fatty acid composition and disorders of the immune mechanisms of regulation of systemic inflammation in COPD and asthma demonstrated the important role of fatty acids and their metabolites in persistence of inflammatory processes in diseases of the respiratory system in the condition of remission. PMID:27420629

  6. Tranexamic acid in control of haemorrhage after dental extraction in haemophilia and Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Forbes, C D; Barr, R D; Reid, G; Thomson, C; Prentice, C R; McNicol, G P; Douglas, A S

    1972-05-01

    In a double-blind trial tranexamic acid (AMCA, Cyclokapron), 1 g three times a day for five days, significantly reduced blood loss and transfusion requirements after dental extraction in patients with haemophilia and Christmas disease. No side effects were seen in either group of patients. Screening tests showed no toxic action of tranexamic acid on the liver, kidney, or heart.

  7. Phytanic acid and pristanic acid, branched-chain fatty acids associated with Refsum disease and other inherited peroxisomal disorders, mediate intracellular Ca2+ signaling through activation of free fatty acid receptor GPR40.

    PubMed

    Kruska, Nicol; Reiser, Georg

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of the two branched-chain fatty acids phytanic acid and pristanic acid is known to play an important role in several diseases with peroxisomal impairment, like Refsum disease, Zellweger syndrome and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency. Recent studies elucidated that the toxic activity of phytanic acid and pristanic acid is mediated by multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions, generation of reactive oxygen species and Ca2+ deregulation via the InsP3-Ca2+ signaling pathway in glial cells. However, the exact signaling mechanism through which both fatty acids mediate toxicity is still under debate. Here, we studied the ability of phytanic acid and pristanic acid to activate the free fatty acid receptor GPR40, a G-protein-coupled receptor, which was described to be involved in the Ca2+ signaling of fatty acids. We treated HEK 293 cells expressing the GPR40 receptor with phytanic acid or pristanic acid. This resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular Ca2+ level, similar to the effect seen after treatment with the synthetic GPR40 agonist GW9508. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the GPR40 activation might be due to an interaction of the carboxylate moiety of fatty acids with the receptor. Our findings indicate that the phytanic acid- and pristanic acid-mediated Ca2+ deregulation can involve the activation of GPR40. Therefore, we suppose that activation of GPR40 might be part of the signaling cascade of the toxicity of phytanic and pristanic acids.

  8. Inverse Association Between Serum Uric Acid Levels and Alzheimer's Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Du, Na; Xu, Donghua; Hou, Xu; Song, Xuejia; Liu, Cancan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yangang; Li, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The association between Alzheimer's disease and uric acid levels had gained great interest in recent years, but there was still lack of definite evidence. A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies was performed to comprehensively estimate the association. Relevant studies published before October 26, 2014, were searched in PubMed, Embase, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases. Study-specific data were combined using random-effects or fixed-effects models of meta-analysis according to between-study heterogeneity. Twenty-four studies (21 case-control and 3 cohort studies) were finally included into the meta-analysis. Those 21 case-control studies included a total of 1128 cases of Alzheimer's disease and 2498 controls without Alzheimer's disease. Those 3 cohort studies included a total of 7327 participants. Meta-analysis showed that patients with Alzheimer's disease had lower levels of uric acid than healthy controls (weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.77 mg/dl, 95% CI -2.28 to -0.36, P = 0.0002). High serum uric acid levels were significantly associated with decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (risk ratio (RR) = 0.66, 95% CI 0.52-0.85, P = 0.001). There was low risk of publication bias in the meta-analysis. There is an inverse association between serum uric acid levels and Alzheimer's disease. High serum uric acid level is a protective factor of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Prognostic Factors and Complications in Patients With Operational Peptic Ulcer Perforation in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Suriya, Chutikarn; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Kayee, Toranee

    2014-01-01

    Background Peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) is a very serious condition that leads to excessive complications and mortality. This study aimed to explore the possible prognostic factors and complications in patients with perforated peptic ulcer operation. Methods A 6-year retrospective cohort study in Nakornping Hospital between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2010 was conducted. The study included 912 patients who underwent PUP surgery. Patient characteristics were analyzed by using frequency, percentage, mean (standard deviation) and median (range). A comparison between groups was made. The Pearson’s Chi-squared or Fisher’s exact test was used for categorical variables, as appropriate. The Student’s t test was used for continuous variables with normal distribution, and Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed for continuous variables with non-normal distributions. Exponential risk regression analysis was performed to estimate the relative risk (RR) for the prognostic factors with a probability value of < 0.05 as a statistically significant value. Post-operative length of stay was computed graphically based on Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results During the study period, 912 post-operative PUP patients were observed. The median age of patients was 78.5 (15 - 92) years, and 77.74% of the patients were male gender. Multivariate analysis showed that five prognostic indicators: underlying illnesses; liver disease (RR: 5.41; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36 - 21.56) and kidney disease (RR: 4.72; 95% CI: 1.05 - 21.11); duration of operation > 3 h (RR: 9.83; 95% CI: 1.61-59.66); unplanned admission to ICU (RR: 9.22; 95% CI: 1.55 - 54.68); and prolonged ventilation > 24 h (RR: 9.02; 95% CI: 0.42 - 9.98) were associated with post-operative PUP complications. Post-operative complications developed in 87 (9.54%) patients with 135 complications: 11 (1.21%) patients underwent re-operation, 32 (3.51%) patients suffered with surgical site infection, 74 (8.11%) patients encountered

  10. Evaluation of combined famotidine with quercetin for the treatment of peptic ulcer: in vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Abourehab, Mohammed A S; Khaled, Khaled A; Sarhan, Hatem A A; Ahmed, Osama A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a combined drug dosage form of famotidine (FAM) and quercetin (QRT) to augment treatment of gastric ulcer. FAM was prepared as freeze-dried floating alginate beads using ion gelation method and then coated with Eudragit RL100 to sustain FAM release. QRT was prepared as solid dispersion with polyvinyl pyrrolidone K30 to improve its solubility. Photo images and scanning electron microscope images of the prepared beads were carried out to detect floating behavior and to reveal surface and core shape of the prepared beads. Anti-ulcerogenic effect and histopathological examination of gastric tissues were carried out to investigate the effect of the combined drug formulation compared with commercial FAM tablets and FAM beads. Gastric glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, tissue myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation enzyme activities and levels in rat stomach tissues were also determined. Results revealed that spherical beads were formed with an average diameter of 1.64±0.33 mm. They floated immediately with no lag time before floating, and remained buoyant throughout the test period. Treatment with a combination of FAM beads plus QRT showed the absence of any signs of inflammation or hemorrhage, and significantly prevented the indomethacin-induced decrease in GSH levels (P<0.05) with regain of normal GSH gastric tissue levels. Also, there was a significant difference in the decrease of malondialdehyde level compared to FAM commercial tablets or beads alone (P<0.05). The combined formula significantly improved the myeloperoxidase level compared to both the disease control group and commercial FAM tablet-treated group (P<0.05). Formulation of FAM as floating beads in combination with solid dispersion of QRT improved the anti-ulcer activity compared to commercially available tablets, which reveals a promising application for treatment of peptic ulcer. PMID:25926722

  11. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  12. [Neuroepigenetics: Desoxyribonucleic acid methylation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias].

    PubMed

    Mendioroz Iriarte, Maite; Pulido Fontes, Laura; Méndez-López, Iván

    2015-05-21

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that controls gene expression. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), global DNA hypomethylation of neurons has been described in the human cerebral cortex. Moreover, several variants in the methylation pattern of candidate genes have been identified in brain tissue when comparing AD patients and controls. Specifically, DNA methylation changes have been observed in PSEN1 and APOE, both genes previously being involved in the pathophysiology of AD. In other degenerative dementias, methylation variants have also been described in key genes, such as hypomethylation of the SNCA gene in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies or hypermethylation of the GRN gene promoter in frontotemporal dementia. The finding of aberrant DNA methylation patterns shared by brain tissue and peripheral blood opens the door to use those variants as epigenetic biomarkers in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Pathways of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Utilization: Implications for Brain Function in Neuropsychiatric Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joanne J.; Green, Pnina; Mann, J. John; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Sublette, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have profound effects on brain development and function. Abnormalities of PUFA status have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms could involve not only suboptimal PUFA intake, but also metabolic and genetic abnormalities, defective hepatic metabolism, and problems with diffusion and transport. This article provides an overview of physiologic factors regulating PUFA utilization, highlighting their relevance to neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:25498862

  14. Pathways of polyunsaturated fatty acid utilization: implications for brain function in neuropsychiatric health and disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Joanne J; Green, Pnina; John Mann, J; Rapoport, Stanley I; Sublette, M Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have profound effects on brain development and function. Abnormalities of PUFA status have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms could involve not only suboptimal PUFA intake, but also metabolic and genetic abnormalities, defective hepatic metabolism, and problems with diffusion and transport. This article provides an overview of physiologic factors regulating PUFA utilization, highlighting their relevance to neuropsychiatric disease.

  15. Dietary fatty acids modulate antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease[S

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jing; Ma, Xiong; Webb, Tonya; Potter, James J.; Oelke, Mathias; Li, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids are major contributors to the development and progression of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Dietary fatty acids also alter hepatic NKT cells that are activated by antigens presented by CD1d. In the current study, we examine the mechanism of dietary fatty acid induced hepatic NKT cell deficiency and its causal relationship to insulin resistance and NAFLD. We discover that dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA) or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), but not polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), cause hepatic NKT cell depletion with increased apoptosis. Dietary SFA or MUFA also impair hepatocyte presentation of endogenous, but not exogenous, antigen to NKT cells, indicating alterations of the endogenous antigen processing or presenting pathway. In vitro treatment of normal hepatocytes with fatty acids also demonstrates impaired ability of CD1d to present endogenous antigen by dietary fatty acids. Furthermore, dietary SFA and MUFA activate the NFκB signaling pathway and lead to insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, both dietary SFA and MUFA alter endogenous antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells and contribute to NKT cell depletion, leading to further activation of inflammatory signaling, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. PMID:20185414

  16. Perforation of a gastric tube peptic ulcer into the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Katsoulis, I E; Veloudis, G; Exarchos, D; Yannopoulos, P

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of a 52-year-old male patient who died from massive hematemesis as a result of perforation of a benign peptic ulcer into the descending thoracic aorta, 1 year after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer and gastric tube interposition. We also review the literature for mechanisms of ulceration in intrathoracic gastric grafts and for complications of such ulcers.

  17. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Research Tools in Disease Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Pramod K.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug “Macugen” is FDA approved and a series of aptamer-based drugs are in clinical pipelines. The present review discusses the aspects of design, unique properties, applications, and development of different aptamers to aid in cancer diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment under defined conditions. PMID:25050359

  18. Antioxidant enzymes and fatty acid composition as related to disease resistance in postharvest loquat fruit.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Yang, Zhenfeng; Cai, Yuting; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-11-15

    Two cultivars of loquat fruit were stored at 20°C for 10days to investigate the relationship between disease resistance, and fatty acid composition and activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that decay incidence increased with storage time in both cultivars. A significantly lower disease incidence was observed in 'Qingzhong' fruit than in 'Fuyang', suggesting 'Qingzhong' had increased disease resistance. Meanwhile, 'Qingzhong' fruit also had lower levels of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, and lower lipoxygenase activity, but higher levels of linolenic and linoleic acids and higher activities of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) compared with 'Fuyang'. These results suggest that the higher levels of linolenic and linoleic acids and the higher activity of CAT and APX have a role in disease resistance of postharvest loquat fruit.

  19. Omacor and omega-3 fatty acids for treatment of coronary artery disease and the pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Kar, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are found in fish oil and they have been shown to mitigate the risk of cardiovascular disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids because they cannot be synthesized de novo and must be consumed from dietary sources such as marine fish. It reduces fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary artery disease, sudden cardiac death, and all-cause mortality. It also has beneficial effects in mortality reduction after a myocardial infarction. Omacor is a highly potent form of Omega-3 fatty acids that lowers plasma triglycerides. In patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia who are refractory to statins, it helps augment triglyceride reduction. Omacor also increases high-density lipoprotein and decreases low-density lipoprotein levels. It is well tolerated with minimal adverse effects and no known interactions causing rhabdomyolysis. In high doses, Omacor has pronounced cardiovascular benefits with improvement of triglycerides and various lipid parameters. Omega-3 fatty acids have also been shown to have beneficial effects on arrhythmias, inflammation, and heart failure. It may also decrease platelet aggregation and induce vasodilation. Omega-3 fatty acids also reduce atherosclerotic plaque formation and stabilize plaques preventing plaque rupture leading to acute coronary syndrome. Moreover, omega-3 fatty acids may have antioxidant properties that improve endothelial function and may contribute to its antiatherosclerotic benefits. In this review, we sought to provide the current literature on the use of omega-3 fatty acids and the potent formulation Omacor in the treatment of coronary artery disease.

  20. Omacor and omega-3 fatty acids for treatment of coronary artery disease and the pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Kar, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are found in fish oil and they have been shown to mitigate the risk of cardiovascular disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids because they cannot be synthesized de novo and must be consumed from dietary sources such as marine fish. It reduces fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary artery disease, sudden cardiac death, and all-cause mortality. It also has beneficial effects in mortality reduction after a myocardial infarction. Omacor is a highly potent form of Omega-3 fatty acids that lowers plasma triglycerides. In patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia who are refractory to statins, it helps augment triglyceride reduction. Omacor also increases high-density lipoprotein and decreases low-density lipoprotein levels. It is well tolerated with minimal adverse effects and no known interactions causing rhabdomyolysis. In high doses, Omacor has pronounced cardiovascular benefits with improvement of triglycerides and various lipid parameters. Omega-3 fatty acids have also been shown to have beneficial effects on arrhythmias, inflammation, and heart failure. It may also decrease platelet aggregation and induce vasodilation. Omega-3 fatty acids also reduce atherosclerotic plaque formation and stabilize plaques preventing plaque rupture leading to acute coronary syndrome. Moreover, omega-3 fatty acids may have antioxidant properties that improve endothelial function and may contribute to its antiatherosclerotic benefits. In this review, we sought to provide the current literature on the use of omega-3 fatty acids and the potent formulation Omacor in the treatment of coronary artery disease. PMID:21975796

  1. Fish oil and omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease: do they really work?

    PubMed

    Kromhout, Daan; Yasuda, Satoshi; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2012-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found abundantly in fish oil, exert pleiotropic cardiometabolic effects with a diverse range of actions. The results of previous studies raised a lot of interest in the role of fish oil and omega-3 fatty acids in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The present review will focus on the current clinical uses of omega-3 fatty acids and provide an update on their effects. Since recently published trials in patients with coronary artery diseases or post-myocardial infarction did not show an effect of omega-3 fatty acids on major cardiovascular endpoints, this review will examine the limitations of those data and suggest recommendations for the use of omega-3 fatty acids.

  2. Periodontal disease: modulation of the inflammatory cascade by dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sculley, D V

    2014-06-01

    Periodontal disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis, is caused by the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and the host immune system. The ensuing oxidative stress and inflammatory cascade result in the destruction of gingival tissue, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. This article reviews the underlying mechanisms and host-bacteria interactions responsible for periodontal disease and evidence that nutritional supplementation with fish oil may provide a protective effect. Historical investigations of diet and disease have highlighted an inverse relationship between ingestion of fish oil, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the incidence of typical inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and coronary heart disease. Ingestion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, results in their incorporation into membrane phospholipids, which can alter eicosanoid production after stimulation during the immune response. These eicosanoids promote a reduction in chronic inflammation, which has led to the proposal that fish oil is a possible modulator of inflammation and may reduce the severity of periodontal diseases. Tentative animal and human studies have provided an indication of this effect. Further human investigation is needed to establish the protective effects of fish oil in relation to periodontal disease. PMID:23889472

  3. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  4. How to achieve a near 100% cure rate for H. pylori infection in peptic ulcer patients. A personal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    de Boer, W A

    1996-06-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the main etiological factor in duodenal and gastric ulcer disease, and eradication of the organism cures peptic ulcer disease. Cure of the infection therefore has become the ultimate treatment goal in ulcer patients. Only therapies that achieve a > 90% cure rate should be used in clinical practice and, as in any other disease, the therapy with the highest cure rates should be used. Bismuth-based triple therapy is considered the gold standard; it has been used successfully in many studies, usually with good tolerability on the part of patients. Many physicians have been hesitant to prescribe this therapy. The regimen is complex, and it is thought to have many side effects. Several groups have shown that concomitant therapy with a proton pump inhibitor increases efficacy and lessens side effects. Moreover, it has become clear that the duration of treatment can be decreased to just 7 days. With this adjustment it now seems sensible to use this short 7-day quadruple therapy, which at present has superior cure rates when compared with any other anti-Helicobacter therapy. This article is a plea for the use of this regimen and gives practical advice about how to employ therapy in general practice. Suggestions are made about how to motivate a patient to comply with the therapy prescribed. If these suggestions are followed, good compliance seems possible, and a near 100% cure rate will be within reach.

  5. Hyaluronic acid as a biomarker of fibrosis in chronic liver diseases of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    ORASAN, OLGA HILDA; CIULEI, GEORGE; COZMA, ANGELA; SAVA, MADALINA; DUMITRASCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a significant public health problem worldwide. The degree of liver fibrosis secondary to these diseases is important, because it is the main predictor of their evolution and prognosis. Hyaluronic acid is studied as a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases, in an attempt to avoid the complications of liver puncture biopsy, considered the gold standard in the evaluation of fibrosis. We review the advantages and limitations of hyaluronc acid, a biomarker, used to manage patients with chronic viral hepatitis B or C infection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, HIV-HCV coinfection, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, biliary atresia, hereditary hemochromatosis and cystic fibrosis. PMID:27004022

  6. Omega-hydroxylation of phytanic acid in rat liver microsomes: implications for Refsum disease.

    PubMed

    Komen, J C; Duran, M; Wanders, R J A

    2004-07-01

    The 3-methyl-branched fatty acid phytanic acid is degraded by the peroxisomal alpha-oxidation route because the 3-methyl group blocks beta-oxidation. In adult Refsum disease (ARD), peroxisomal alpha-oxidation is defective, which is caused by mutations in the gene coding for phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase in the majority of ARD patients. As a consequence, phytanic acid accumulates in tissues and body fluids. This study focuses on an alternative route of phytanic acid degradation, omega-oxidation. The first step in omega-oxidation is hydroxylation at the omega-end of the fatty acid, catalyzed by a member of the cytochrome P450 multienzyme family. To study this first step, the formation of hydroxylated intermediates was studied in rat liver microsomes incubated with phytanic acid and NADPH. Two hydroxylated metabolites of phytanic acid were formed, omega- and (omega-1)-hydroxyphytanic acid (ratio of formation, 5:1). The formation of omega-hydroxyphytanic acid was NADPH dependent and inhibited by imidazole derivatives. These results indicate that phytanic acid undergoes omega-hydroxylation in rat liver microsomes and that an isoform of cytochrome P450 catalyzes the first step of phytanic acid omega-oxidation.

  7. Plasma and brain fatty acid profiles in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Schneider, Julie A; Tangney, Christine; Tremblay-Mercier, Jennifer; Fortier, Mélanie; Bennett, David A; Morris, Martha Clare

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is generally associated with lower omega-3 fatty acid intake from fish but despite numerous studies, it is still unclear whether there are differences in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma or brain. In matched plasma and brain samples provided by the Memory and Aging Project, fatty acid profiles were quantified in several plasma lipid classes and in three brain cortical regions. Fatty acid data were expressed as % composition and as concentrations (mg/dL for plasma or mg/g for brain). Differences in plasma fatty acid profiles between AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and those with no cognitive impairment (NCI) were most apparent in the plasma free fatty acids (lower oleic acid isomers and omega-6 fatty acids in AD) and phospholipids (lower omega-3 fatty acids in AD). In brain, % DHA was lower only in phosphatidylserine of mid-frontal cortex and superior temporal cortex in AD compared to NCI (-14% and -12%, respectively; both p < 0.05). The only significant correlation between plasma and brain fatty acids was between % DHA in plasma total lipids and % DHA in phosphatidylethanolamine of the angular gyrus, but only in the NCI group (+0.77, p < 0.05). We conclude that AD is associated with altered plasma status of both DHA and other fatty acids unrelated to DHA, and that the lipid class-dependent nature of these differences reflects a combination of differences in intake and metabolism. PMID:22466064

  8. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong; Lu, Lei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Min; Li, Xianchi; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing dramatically especially in developing countries like India. CVD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There has been a growing awareness of the role of nutrients in the prevention of CVD. One specific recommendation in the battle against CVD is the increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids, which are polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies have reported inverse associations of CVD with dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids supplementation might exert protective effects on CVD. They exert their cardioprotective effect through multiple mechanisms. Omega-3 fatty acid therapy has shown promise as a useful tool in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD. This review briefly summarizes the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in primary and secondary prevention of CVD.

  10. Formation of dopamine adducts derived from brain polyunsaturated fatty acids: mechanism for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuebo; Yamada, Naruomi; Maruyama, Wakako; Osawa, Toshihiko

    2008-12-12

    Oxidative stress appears to be directly involved in the pathogenesis of the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic systems in Parkinson disease. In this study, we formed four dopamine modification adducts derived from docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6/omega-3) and arachidonic acid (C18:4/omega-6), which are known as the major polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain. Upon incubation of dopamine with fatty acid hydroperoxides and an in vivo experiment using rat brain tissue, all four dopamine adducts were detected. Furthermore, hexanoyl dopamine (HED), an arachidonic acid-derived adduct, caused severe cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, whereas the other adducts were only slightly affected. The HED-induced cell death was found to include apoptosis, which also seems to be mediated by reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial abnormality. Additionally, the experiments using monoamine transporter inhibitor and mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells that lack the monoamine transporter indicate that the HED-induced cytotoxicity might specially occur in the neuronal cells. These data suggest that the formation of the docosahexaenoic acid- and arachidonic acid-derived dopamine adducts in vitro and in vivo, and HED, the arachidonic acid-derived dopamine modification adduct, which caused selective cytotoxicity of neuronal cells, may indicate a novel mechanism responsible for the pathogenesis in Parkinson disease.

  11. A systemic review of the roles of n-3 fatty acids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Natalie D; Othman, Rgia A; Suh, Miyoung; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2009-04-01

    Attention to the role of n-3 long-chain fatty acids in human health and disease has been continuously increased during recent decades. Many clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown positive roles for n-3 fatty acids in infant development; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; and more recently, in various mental illnesses, including depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and dementia. These fatty acids are known to have pleiotropic effects, including effects against inflammation, platelet aggregation, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. These beneficial effects may be mediated through several distinct mechanisms, including alterations in cell membrane composition and function, gene expression, or eicosanoid production. A number of authorities have recently recommended increases in intakes of n-3 fatty acids by the general population. To comply with this recommendation a variety of food products, most notably eggs, yogurt, milk, and spreads have been enriched with these fatty acids. Ongoing research will further determine the tissue distribution, biological effects, cost-effectiveness, and consumer acceptability of such enriched products. Furthermore, additional controlled clinical trials are needed to document whether long-term consumption or supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid or the plant-derived counterpart (alpha-linolenic acid) results in better quality of life.

  12. Refsum disease diagnostic marker phytanic acid alters the physical state of membrane proteins of liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, P; Struy, H

    1999-08-27

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid), a branched chain fatty acid accumulating in Refsum disease to high levels throughout the body, induces uncoupling of rat liver mitochondria similar to non-branched fatty acids (e.g. palmitic acid), but the contribution of the ADP/ATP carrier or the aspartate/glutamate carrier in phytanic acid-induced uncoupling is of minor importance. Possible deleterious effects of phytanic acid on membrane-linked energy coupling processes were studied by ESR spectroscopy using rat liver mitochondria and a membrane preparation labeled with the lipid-specific spin probe 5-doxylstearic acid (5-DSA) or the protein-specific spin probe MAL-TEMPO (4-maleimido-2,2,6, 6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl). The effects of phytanic acid on phospholipid molecular dynamics and on the physical state of membrane proteins were quantified by estimation of the order parameter or the ratio of the amplitudes of the weakly to strongly immobilized MAL-TEMPO binding sites (W/S ratio), respectively. It was found, that phytanic acid (1) increased the mobility of phospholipid molecules (indicated by a decrease in the order parameter) and (2) altered the conformational state and/or the segmental mobility of membrane proteins (indicated by a drastic decrease in the W/S ratio). Unsaturated fatty acids with multiple cis-double bonds (e.g. linolenic or arachidonic acid), but not non-branched FFA (ranging from chain length C10:0 to C18:0), also decrease the W/S ratio. It is hypothesized that the interaction of phytanic acid with transmembrane proteins might stimulate the proton permeability through the mitochondrial inner membrane according to a mechanism, different to a protein-supported fatty acid cycling.

  13. Transcriptional control of amino acid homeostasis is disrupted in Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sbodio, Juan I.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Paul, Bindu D.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in amino acid metabolism, which have been observed in Huntington’s disease (HD), may account for the profound inanition of HD patients. HD is triggered by an expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the protein huntingtin (Htt), impacting diverse cellular processes, ranging from transcriptional regulation to cognitive and motor functions. We show here that the master regulator of amino acid homeostasis, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), is dysfunctional in HD because of oxidative stress contributed by aberrant cysteine biosynthesis and transport. Consistent with these observations, antioxidant supplementation reverses the disordered ATF4 response to nutrient stress. Our findings establish a molecular link between amino acid disposition and oxidative stress leading to cytotoxicity. This signaling cascade may be relevant to other diseases involving redox imbalance and deficits in amino acid metabolism. PMID:27436896

  14. Uric Acid Level and Erectile Dysfunction In Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Yalcin; Akilli, Hakan; Kayrak, Mehmet; Aribas, Alpay; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman; Perez-Pozo, Santos E.; Covic, Adrian; McFann, Kim; Johnson, Richard J.; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a frequent complaint of elderly subjects, and is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Uric acid is also associated with endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease, raising the hypothesis that an increased serum uric acid might predict erectile dysfunction in patients who are at risk for coronary artery disease. Aim To evaluate the association of serum uric acid levels with presence and severity of ED in patients presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 312 adult male patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent exercise stress test (EST) for workup of chest pain and completed a sexual health inventory for men (SHIM) survey form to determine the presence and severity of ED. Routine serum biochemistry (and uric acid levels) were measured. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for ED. Main Outcome Measures The short version of the international index of erectile function (IIEF-5) questionnaire diagnosed ED (cutoff score ≤21). Serum Uric acid levels were determined. Patients with chest pain of suspected cardiac origin underwent an exercise stress test. Results 149 of 312 (47.7%) male subjects had ED by survey criteria. Patients with ED were older and had more frequent CAD, hypertension, diabetes, and impaired renal function, and also had significantly higher levels of uric acid, fibrinogen, glucose, CRP, triglycerides compared with patients without ED. Uric acid levels were associated with ED by univariate analysis (OR = 1.36, p = 0.002); however, this association was not observed in multivariate analysis adjusted for eGFR. Conclusion Subjects presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin are more likely to have ED if they have elevated uric acid levels. PMID:24433559

  15. The influence of the branched-chain fatty acids pristanic acid and Refsum disease-associated phytanic acid on mitochondrial functions and calcium regulation of hippocampal neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rönicke, Sabine; Kruska, Nicol; Kahlert, Stefan; Reiser, Georg

    2009-11-01

    Pristanic acid and phytanic acid are branched-chain fatty acids, which play an important role in diseases with peroxisomal impairment, like Refsum disease (MIM 266500), Zellwegers syndrome and alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency (MIM 604489). Several studies revealed that the toxic activity of phytanic acid is mediated by multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions. However, the action of pristanic acid on brain cells is still completely unknown. Here, we exposed astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons in mixed culture to pristanic acid and phytanic acid to analyse cellular consequences. Pristanic acid exerts a strong cytotoxic activity on brain cells, displayed by dramatic Ca2+ deregulation, in situ mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. Interestingly, pristanic acid strongly induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas phytanic acid exerts weaker effects on ROS production. In conclusion, pristanic acid as well as phytanic acid induced a complex array of toxic activities with mitochondrial dysfunction and Ca2+ deregulation.

  16. Use of tranexamic acid in control of haemorrhage after extraction of teeth in haemophilia and Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Tavenner, R W

    1972-05-01

    Bleeding after dental extraction was controlled with tranexamic acid in 19 patients with haemophilia and 3 with Christmas disease. The results were slightly better than those obtained with aminocaproic acid; the dose used was smaller; and side effects were few.

  17. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Oxylipins in Neuroinflammation and Management of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Devassy, Jessay Gopuran; Leng, Shan; Gabbs, Melissa; Monirujjaman, Md; Aukema, Harold M

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is becoming one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative conditions worldwide. Although the disease progression is becoming better understood, current medical interventions can only ameliorate some of the symptoms but cannot slow disease progression. Neuroinflammation plays an important role in the advancement of this disorder, and n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are involved in both the reduction in and resolution of inflammation. These effects may be mediated by the anti-inflammatory and proresolving effects of bioactive lipid mediators (oxylipins) derived from n-3 PUFAs [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] in fish oil. Although interventions have generally used fish oil containing both EPA and DHA, several studies that used either EPA or DHA alone or specific oxylipins derived from these fatty acids indicate that they have distinct effects. Both DHA and EPA can reduce neuroinflammation and cognitive decline, but EPA positively influences mood disorders, whereas DHA maintains normal brain structure. Fewer studies with a plant-derived n-3 PUFA, α-linolenic acid, suggest that other n-3 PUFAs and their oxylipins also may positively affect AD. Further research identifying the unique anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties of oxylipins from individual n-3 PUFAs will enable the discovery of novel disease-management strategies in AD. PMID:27633106

  18. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Oxylipins in Neuroinflammation and Management of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Devassy, Jessay Gopuran; Leng, Shan; Gabbs, Melissa; Monirujjaman, Md; Aukema, Harold M

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is becoming one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative conditions worldwide. Although the disease progression is becoming better understood, current medical interventions can only ameliorate some of the symptoms but cannot slow disease progression. Neuroinflammation plays an important role in the advancement of this disorder, and n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are involved in both the reduction in and resolution of inflammation. These effects may be mediated by the anti-inflammatory and proresolving effects of bioactive lipid mediators (oxylipins) derived from n-3 PUFAs [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] in fish oil. Although interventions have generally used fish oil containing both EPA and DHA, several studies that used either EPA or DHA alone or specific oxylipins derived from these fatty acids indicate that they have distinct effects. Both DHA and EPA can reduce neuroinflammation and cognitive decline, but EPA positively influences mood disorders, whereas DHA maintains normal brain structure. Fewer studies with a plant-derived n-3 PUFA, α-linolenic acid, suggest that other n-3 PUFAs and their oxylipins also may positively affect AD. Further research identifying the unique anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties of oxylipins from individual n-3 PUFAs will enable the discovery of novel disease-management strategies in AD.

  19. The skeletal muscle arachidonic acid cascade in health and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, Marina; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2014-05-01

    Muscle atrophy and weakness are often observed in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, and are the major clinical features of the autoimmune myopathies, polymyositis and dermatomyositis. A general understanding of the pathogenesis of muscle atrophy and the impaired muscle function associated with chronic inflammatory diseases has not been clarified. In this context, arachidonic acid metabolites, such as the prostaglandin and leukotriene subfamilies, are of interest because they contribute to immune and nonimmune processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that prostaglandins and leukotrienes are involved in causing muscular pain and inflammation, and also in myogenesis and the repair of muscles. In this Review, we summarize novel findings that implicate prostaglandins and leukotrienes in the muscle atrophy and weakness that occur in inflammatory diseases of the muscles, with a focus on inflammatory myopathies. We discuss the role of the arachidonic acid cascade in skeletal muscle growth and function, and individual metabolites as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of inflammatory muscle diseases.

  20. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation.

  1. Oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, Chih-Chien; Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Chun-Chi; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Chia-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and a high risk for developing malignancy. Excessive oxidative stress is thought to play a major role in elevating these risks by increasing oxidative nucleic acid damage. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) production and antioxidant defense mechanisms and can cause vascular and tissue injuries as well as nucleic acid damage in CKD patients. The increased production of RONS, impaired nonenzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant defense mechanisms, and other risk factors including gene polymorphisms, uremic toxins (indoxyl sulfate), deficiency of arylesterase/paraoxonase, hyperhomocysteinemia, dialysis-associated membrane bioincompatibility, and endotoxin in patients with CKD can inhibit normal cell function by damaging cell lipids, arachidonic acid derivatives, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Several clinical biomarkers and techniques have been used to detect the antioxidant status and oxidative stress/oxidative nucleic acid damage associated with long-term complications such as inflammation, atherosclerosis, amyloidosis, and malignancy in CKD patients. Antioxidant therapies have been studied to reduce the oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with CKD, including alpha-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, glutathione, folic acid, bardoxolone methyl, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and providing better dialysis strategies. This paper provides an overview of radical production, antioxidant defence, pathogenesis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with CKD, and possible antioxidant therapies.

  2. Effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunliang; Wang, Yutong; Li, Jinfeng; Hua, Linlin; Han, Bing; Zhang, Yuzhen; Yang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Zhilei; Bai, Hongying; Yin, Honglei; Lou, Jiyu

    2016-09-01

    Caffeic acid is a type of phenolic acid and organic acid. It is found in food (such as tomatoes, carrots, strawberries, blueberries and wheat), beverages (such as wine, tea, coffee and apple juice) as well as Chinese herbal medicines. In the present study, we examined the effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rats were randomly divided into three groups: i) control group, ii) AD model group and iii) caffeic acid group. Caffeic acid significantly rescued learning deficits and increased cognitive function in the rats with AD as demonstrated by the Morris water maze task. Furthermore, caffeic acid administration resulted in a significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity and nitrite generation in the rats with AD compared with the AD model group. Furthermore, caffeic acid suppressed oxidative stress, inflammation, nuclear factor‑κB‑p65 protein expression and caspase‑3 activity as well as regulating the protein expression of p53 and phosphorylated (p-)p38 MAPK expression in the rats with AD. These experimental results indicate that the beneficial effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a model of AD were due to the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27430591

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: epidemiology and effects on cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mori, Trevor A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies provide support that the polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid from fish and fish oils are cardioprotective, particularly in the setting of secondary prevention. Omega-3 fatty acids benefit multiple cardiometabolic risk factors including lipids, blood pressure, vascular reactivity and cardiac function, as well as having antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative actions. Omega-3 fatty acids do not associate with any adverse effects and do not adversely interact with prescriptive drugs such as lipid-lowering, antihypertensive or hypoglycaemic medications. Clinical studies suggest that doses up to 4 g daily when prescribed with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs do not associate with increased risk of major bleeding episodes. Omega-3 fatty acids have gained widespread usage by general practitioners and clinicians in clinical settings such as pregnancy and infant development, secondary prevention in coronary heart disease patients and treatment of dyslipidaemias. Health authorities currently recommend an intake of at least two oily fish meals per week for the general population which equates to approximately 500 mg per day of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. In patients with coronary heart disease the guidelines recommend 1 g daily supplements and in hypertriglyceridaemic patients up to 4 g per day. These doses are now achievable with readily available purified encapsulated preparations of omega-3 fatty acids. However, a more practical recommendation for increasing omega-3 fatty acid intake in the general population is to incorporate fish as part of a healthy diet that includes increased consumption of fruits and vegetables, and moderation of salt intake.

  4. Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Treatment of Non-cholestatic Liver Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Jillian; Hussaini, Trana; Alsahafi, Majid; Azalgara, Vladimir Marquez; Erb, Siegfried R.; Partovi, Nilufar; Yoshida, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: To systematically evaluate the literature for evidence to support the use of bile acids in non-cholestatic liver conditions. Methods: Searches were conducted on the databases of Medline (1948-March 31, 2015), Embase (1980-March 31, 2015) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and on Google and Google Scholar to identify articles describing ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its derivatives for non-cholestatic hepatic indications. Combinations of the following search terms were used: ursodeoxycholic acid, ursodiol, bile acids and/or salts, non alcoholic fatty liver, non alcoholic steatohepatitis, fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, alcohol, liver disease, autoimmune, autoimmune hepatitis, liver transplant, liver graft, transplant rejection, graft rejection, ischemic reperfusion injury, reperfusion injury, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, viral hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, transaminases, alanine transaminase, liver enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase. No search limits were applied. Additionally, references of the included studies were reviewed to identify additional articles. Results: The literature search yielded articles meeting inclusion criteria for the following indications: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (n = 5); alcoholic liver disease (n = 2); autoimmune hepatitis (n = 6), liver transplant (n = 2) and viral hepatitis (n = 9). Bile acid use was associated with improved normalization of liver biochemistry in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis B and C infections. In contrast, liver biochemistry normalization was inconsistent in alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation. The majority of studies reviewed showed that normalization of liver biochemistry did not correlate to improvement in histologic disease. In the prospective trials reviewed, adverse effects associated with the bile acids

  5. Serum uric acid levels and long-term outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Tokiko; Mochizuki, Toshio; Takei, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2014-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but data regarding the relationship between serum uric acid levels and the long-term outcomes of CKD patients have been limited. The present study evaluated the associations between baseline serum uric acid levels with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The subjects of this study were 551 stage 2-4 CKD patients. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationship between serum uric acid tertiles and all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, 50 % reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and development of ESRD, initially without adjustment, and then after adjusting for several groups of covariates. The mean age of the study subjects was 58.5 years, 59.3 % were men, and 10.0 % had diabetes. The mean eGFR was 42.02 ± 18.52 ml/min/1.73 m(2). In all subjects, the mean serum uric acid level was 6.57 ± 1.35 mg/dl, and 52.2 % of study subjects were on hypouricemic therapy (allopurinol; 48.3 %) at baseline. Thirty-one patients (6.1 %) died during a follow-up period of approximately 6 years. There was no significant association between serum uric acid level and all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, development of ESRD and 50 % reduction in eGFR in the unadjusted Cox models. In the adjusted models, hyperuricemia was found to be associated with all-cause mortality and CVD mortality after adjustment with CVD risk factors, kidney disease factors, and allopurinol, but not associated with development of ESRD and 50 % reduction in eGFR. The results of this study showed that hyperuricemia but not serum uric acid levels were associated with all-cause mortality, CVD mortality after adjustments with CVD risk factors, kidney disease factors, and allopurinol in stage 2-4 CKD patients.

  6. Simultaneous induction of jasmonic acid and disease-responsive genes signifies tolerance of American elm to Dutch elm disease

    PubMed Central

    Sherif , S. M.; Shukla, M. R.; Murch, S. J.; Bernier, L.; Saxena, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by three fungal species in the genus Ophiostoma, is the most devastating disease of both native European and North American elm trees. Although many tolerant cultivars have been identified and released, the tolerance mechanisms are not well understood and true resistance has not yet been achieved. Here we show that the expression of disease-responsive genes in reactions leading to tolerance or susceptibility is significantly differentiated within the first 144 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Analysis of the levels of endogenous plant defense molecules such as jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in tolerant and susceptible American elm saplings suggested SA and methyl-jasmonate as potential defense response elicitors, which was further confirmed by field observations. However, the tolerant phenotype can be best characterized by a concurrent induction of JA and disease-responsive genes at 96 hpi. Molecular investigations indicated that the expression of fungal genes (i.e. cerato ulmin) was also modulated by endogenous SA and JA and this response was unique among aggressive and non-aggressive fungal strains. The present study not only provides better understanding of tolerance mechanisms to DED, but also represents a first, verified template for examining simultaneous transcriptomic changes during American elm-fungus interactions. PMID:26902398

  7. Simultaneous induction of jasmonic acid and disease-responsive genes signifies tolerance of American elm to Dutch elm disease.

    PubMed

    Sherif, S M; Shukla, M R; Murch, S J; Bernier, L; Saxena, P K

    2016-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by three fungal species in the genus Ophiostoma, is the most devastating disease of both native European and North American elm trees. Although many tolerant cultivars have been identified and released, the tolerance mechanisms are not well understood and true resistance has not yet been achieved. Here we show that the expression of disease-responsive genes in reactions leading to tolerance or susceptibility is significantly differentiated within the first 144 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Analysis of the levels of endogenous plant defense molecules such as jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in tolerant and susceptible American elm saplings suggested SA and methyl-jasmonate as potential defense response elicitors, which was further confirmed by field observations. However, the tolerant phenotype can be best characterized by a concurrent induction of JA and disease-responsive genes at 96 hpi. Molecular investigations indicated that the expression of fungal genes (i.e. cerato ulmin) was also modulated by endogenous SA and JA and this response was unique among aggressive and non-aggressive fungal strains. The present study not only provides better understanding of tolerance mechanisms to DED, but also represents a first, verified template for examining simultaneous transcriptomic changes during American elm-fungus interactions. PMID:26902398

  8. Duodenoportal fistula caused by peptic ulcer after extended right hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Takifuji, Katsunari; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Tani, Masaji; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    Background A fistula between the duodenum and the main portal vein near a peptic ulcer is extremely rare, and only two cases of duodenal ulcers have been reported in the past. Case presentation We report a 68-year-old man with a diagnosis of anemia who had a history of extended right hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma 20 months previously. The first endoscopic examination revealed a giant peptic ulcer with active bleeding at the posterior wall of the duodenal bulbs, and hemostasis was performed. Endoscopic treatment and transarterial embolization were performed repeatedly because of uncontrollable bleeding from the duodenal ulcer. Nevertheless, he died of sudden massive hematemesis on the 20th hospital day. At autopsy, communication with the main portal vein and duodenal ulcer was observed. Conclusion It should be borne in mind that the main portal vein is exposed at the front of the hepatoduodenal ligament in cases with previous extrahepatic bile duct resection. PMID:17123451

  9. Pharmacology and therapeutics of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in chronic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Yates, Clara M; Calder, Philip C; Ed Rainger, G

    2014-03-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have well documented anti-inflammatory properties, and consequently therapeutic potential in chronic inflammatory diseases. Here we discuss the effects of n-3 PUFAs on various inflammatory pathways and how this leads to alterations in the function of inflammatory cells, most importantly endothelial cells and leukocytes. Strong evidence indicates n-3 PUFAs are beneficial as a dietary supplement in certain diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis; however for other conditions such as asthma, the data are less robust. A clearer understanding of the pharmacology of n-3 PUFAs will help to establish targets to modulate chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24201219

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids: potential role in the management of early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Jicha, Gregory A; Markesbery, William R

    2010-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for brain growth and development. They play an important role throughout life, as critical modulators of neuronal function and regulation of oxidative stress mechanisms, in brain health and disease. Docosahexanoic acid (DHA), the major omega-3 fatty acid found in neurons, has taken on a central role as a target for therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A plethora of in vitro, animal model, and human data, gathered over the past decade, highlight the important role DHA may play in the development of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including AD. Cross sectional and prospective cohort data have demonstrated that reduced dietary intake or low brain levels of DHA are associated with accelerated cognitive decline or the development of incipient dementia, including AD. Several clinical trials investigating the effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in AD have been completed and all failed to demonstrate its efficacy in the treatment of AD. However, these trials produced intriguing data suggesting that the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may depend on the stage of disease, other dietary mediators, and apolipoprotein E status. PMID:20396634

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids: potential role in the management of early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jicha, Gregory A; Markesbery, William R

    2010-04-07

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for brain growth and development. They play an important role throughout life, as critical modulators of neuronal function and regulation of oxidative stress mechanisms, in brain health and disease. Docosahexanoic acid (DHA), the major omega-3 fatty acid found in neurons, has taken on a central role as a target for therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A plethora of in vitro, animal model, and human data, gathered over the past decade, highlight the important role DHA may play in the development of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including AD. Cross sectional and prospective cohort data have demonstrated that reduced dietary intake or low brain levels of DHA are associated with accelerated cognitive decline or the development of incipient dementia, including AD. Several clinical trials investigating the effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in AD have been completed and all failed to demonstrate its efficacy in the treatment of AD. However, these trials produced intriguing data suggesting that the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may depend on the stage of disease, other dietary mediators, and apolipoprotein E status.

  12. Evidence that folic acid deficiency is a major determinant of hyperhomocysteinemia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Eliseu Felippe; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Miglioranza, Anelise; Zanatta, Angela; Barchak, Alethea Gatto; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Saute, Jonas; Rosa, Charles; Carrion, Maria Júlia; Camargo, Daiane; Dalbem, André; da Costa, Jaderson Costa; de Sousa Miguel, Sandro René Pinto; de Mello Rieder, Carlos Roberto; Wajner, Moacir

    2009-06-01

    In the present work we measured blood levels of total homocysteine ((t)Hcy), vitamin B(12) and folic acid in patients with Parkinson s disease (PD) and in age-matched controls and searched for possible associations between these levels with smoking, alcohol consumption, L-DOPA treatment and disease duration in PD patients. We initially observed that plasma (t)Hcy levels were increased by around 30 % in patients affected by PD compared to controls. Linear correlation, multiple regression and comparative analyses revealed that the major determinant of the increased plasma concentrations of (t)Hcy in PD patients was folic acid deficiency, whereas in controls (t)Hcy levels were mainly determined by plasma vitamin B(12) concentrations. We also observed that alcohol consumption, gender and L-DOPA treatment did not significantly alter plasma (t)Hcy, folic acid and vitamin B(12) levels in parkinsonians. Furthermore, disease duration was positively associated with (t)Hcy levels and smoking was linked with a deficit of folic acid in PD patients. Considering the potential synergistic deleterious effects of Hcy increase and folate deficiency on the central nervous system, we postulate that folic acid should be supplemented to patients affected by PD in order to normalize blood Hcy and folate levels, therefore potentially avoiding these risk factors for neurologic deterioration in this disorder.

  13. Recent Advances in Nucleic Acid-Based Delivery: From Bench to Clinical Trials in Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cláudia; Ribeiro, António J; Veiga, Francisco; Silveira, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    Delivery of nucleic acids is the most promising therapy for many diseases that remain untreatable. Therefore, many research efforts have been put on finding a safe and efficient delivery system able to provide a sustained response. Viral vectors have proved to be the most efficient for delivery of nucleic acids and, thus, stand as the foremost vector used in current clinical trials. However, safety issues arise as a main concern and mitigate their use, impelling the improvement of non-viral alternatives. This review focuses on the recent advances in pre-clinical development of non-viral polyplexes and lipoplexes for nucleic acid-based delivery, in contrast with vectors being used in present clinical trials. Nucleic acid vectors for neurodegenerative ataxias, Parkinson's disease, retinitis pigmentosa, cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, pancreatic and lung cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis are discussed to illustrate current state of pre-clinical and clinical studies. Thereby, denoting the prospects for treatment of genetic diseases and elucidating the trend in non-viral vector development and improvement which is expected to significantly increase disease rescue exceeding the modest clinical successes observed so far. PMID:27305810

  14. Recent Advances in Nucleic Acid-Based Delivery: From Bench to Clinical Trials in Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cláudia; Ribeiro, António J; Veiga, Francisco; Silveira, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    Delivery of nucleic acids is the most promising therapy for many diseases that remain untreatable. Therefore, many research efforts have been put on finding a safe and efficient delivery system able to provide a sustained response. Viral vectors have proved to be the most efficient for delivery of nucleic acids and, thus, stand as the foremost vector used in current clinical trials. However, safety issues arise as a main concern and mitigate their use, impelling the improvement of non-viral alternatives. This review focuses on the recent advances in pre-clinical development of non-viral polyplexes and lipoplexes for nucleic acid-based delivery, in contrast with vectors being used in present clinical trials. Nucleic acid vectors for neurodegenerative ataxias, Parkinson's disease, retinitis pigmentosa, cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, pancreatic and lung cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis are discussed to illustrate current state of pre-clinical and clinical studies. Thereby, denoting the prospects for treatment of genetic diseases and elucidating the trend in non-viral vector development and improvement which is expected to significantly increase disease rescue exceeding the modest clinical successes observed so far.

  15. New insights into sulfur amino acid function in gut health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAA) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable AA and is transmet...

  16. A randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial of omega-3 fatty acids and alpha lipoic acid in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Lynne; Quinn, Joseph; Montine, Thomas; Dodge, Hiroko H; Woodward, William; Baldauf-Wagner, Sara; Waichunas, Dana; Bumgarner, Lauren; Bourdette, Dennis; Silbert, Lisa; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, inflammation, and increased cholesterol levels are all mechanisms that have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Several epidemiologic studies have reported a decreased risk of AD with fish consumption. This pilot study was designed to evaluate the effects of supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids alone (ω-3) or omega-3 plus alpha lipoic acid (ω-3 + LA) compared to placebo on oxidative stress biomarkers in AD. The primary outcome measure was peripheral F2-isoprostane levels (oxidative stress measure). Secondary outcome measures included performance on: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living/Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL), and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog). Thirty-nine AD subjects were randomized to one of three groups: 1) placebo, 2) ω-3, or 3) ω-3 + LA for a treatment duration of 12 months. Eighty seven percent (34/39) of the subjects completed the 12-month intervention. There was no difference between groups at 12 months in peripheral F2-isoprostane levels (p = 0.83). The ω-3 + LA and ω-3 were not significantly different than the placebo group in ADAS-cog (p = 0.98, p = 0.86) and in ADL (p = 0.15, p = 0.82). Compared to placebo, the ω-3 + LA showed less decline in MMSE (p < 0.01) and IADL (p = 0.01) and the ω-3 group showed less decline in IADL (p < 0.01). The combination of ω-3 + LA slowed cognitive and functional decline in AD over 12 months. Because the results were generated from a small sample size, further evaluation of the combination of omega-3 fatty acids plus alpha-lipoic acid as a potential treatment in AD is warranted.

  17. A randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial of omega-3 fatty acids and alpha lipoic acid in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Lynne; Quinn, Joseph; Montine, Thomas; Dodge, Hiroko H; Woodward, William; Baldauf-Wagner, Sara; Waichunas, Dana; Bumgarner, Lauren; Bourdette, Dennis; Silbert, Lisa; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, inflammation, and increased cholesterol levels are all mechanisms that have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Several epidemiologic studies have reported a decreased risk of AD with fish consumption. This pilot study was designed to evaluate the effects of supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids alone (ω-3) or omega-3 plus alpha lipoic acid (ω-3 + LA) compared to placebo on oxidative stress biomarkers in AD. The primary outcome measure was peripheral F2-isoprostane levels (oxidative stress measure). Secondary outcome measures included performance on: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living/Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL), and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog). Thirty-nine AD subjects were randomized to one of three groups: 1) placebo, 2) ω-3, or 3) ω-3 + LA for a treatment duration of 12 months. Eighty seven percent (34/39) of the subjects completed the 12-month intervention. There was no difference between groups at 12 months in peripheral F2-isoprostane levels (p = 0.83). The ω-3 + LA and ω-3 were not significantly different than the placebo group in ADAS-cog (p = 0.98, p = 0.86) and in ADL (p = 0.15, p = 0.82). Compared to placebo, the ω-3 + LA showed less decline in MMSE (p < 0.01) and IADL (p = 0.01) and the ω-3 group showed less decline in IADL (p < 0.01). The combination of ω-3 + LA slowed cognitive and functional decline in AD over 12 months. Because the results were generated from a small sample size, further evaluation of the combination of omega-3 fatty acids plus alpha-lipoic acid as a potential treatment in AD is warranted. PMID:24077434

  18. Laparoscopic Repair of Perforated Peptic Ulcer: Outcome and Associated Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alemrajabi, Mahdi; Safari, Saeed; Tizmaghz, Adnan; Alemrajabi, Fatemeh; Shabestanipour, Ghazaal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mainstay of treatment for perforated peptic ulcer is Omental patch closure. With the advent of laparoscopic surgery, this approach is being used for the treatment of perforated peptic ulcer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of laparoscopy in Firoozgar general hospital over a period of 18 months. The outcome of the laparoscopic approach and the associated morbidity and mortality, operation time, conversion rate and hospital stay were assessed. Methods A prospective analysis of 29 consecutive patients (mean age 37.5 years; 23 men) with perforated peptic ulcers and who had undergone laparoscopic surgery was carried over a period of 18 months from March 2014 until September 2015. Pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative clinical data were collectively analyzed by SPSS 19 for Windows. Results Seventeen patients had a history of cigarette smoking, 11 patients had a history of opium consumption, 19 were chronic NSAID users, 26 had Helicobacter pylori infections, and six had a co-morbid condition. Previous surgical history included laparotomy for pancreatic cancer in two patients, for sigmoid colon cancer in one patient, and for acute appendicitis in four patients. The average operating time for all cases was 47.5 + 20 min. The mean lag time between onset of symptoms and surgery was 20.4 hours. All patients underwent laparoscopic closure of the perforation with Omental patch closure. No morbidity was observed, and none of the patients needed conversion to open surgery. One patient died after 11 months of follow-up due to the progression of underlying pancreatic cancer. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.2 days. Conclusions The results of the laparoscopic approach for perforated peptic ulcer were promising, with no conversion to open surgery, no morbidity, and mortality. PMID:27504170

  19. [A study on the pattern of pain expression of peptic ulcer patients].

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Choi, Y H

    1991-08-01

    Pain is a subjective and multidimensional concept. Therefore the patient's expression of pain have been referred to the best believable indicator of pain condition but the support data obtained from the patient considered cultural difference is a deficient condition in determined on the precise nursing diagnosis. The purpose of this research was to understand multiple pain responses in cultural difference and sensitivity, to encourage communication between medical teams, and to provide the foundation data of on data of precise nursing assessment for the patient in pain. The research problem was to grasp pain express pattern of Korean peptic ulcer patients. The subjects were 20 peptic ulcer patients in medical unit or OPD of twp university hospitals in Seoul. Data were collected from September 7th to 22nd, 1990 by intensive interviews. Interviews were done by the researcher and all were tape-recorded. The Data analysis was done by Phenomenological method from Van Kaam. Validity assured by confirmation of the internal consistency of the statements and category by nursing colleague in educational and clinicians in medical care. From the emic data, 96 descriptive statements were organized in 18 theme cluster. The results of study were summarized as follows. 1. Pain Express Pattern cluster of Peptic Ulcer Patients were "pain as clogging", "shallow pain", "pain as pressing", "nauseateing pain", "pain as smarting", "pain as pulling", "pain as pricking", "pain as bursting", "wrenching pain", "excising pain", "uncontrollable pain for mind and body", "awakening pain", "pain as hollowing" and the other cluster. As above mentioned, Pain Express Pattern of Peptic Ulcer Patient appeared diversely in verbal and they were propered to Korean culture. Therefore they will provide for the foundation data of precise nursing assessment.

  20. Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations Predict Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinny-Köster, Benedict; Bartels, Michael; Becker, Susen; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background The liver plays a key role in amino acid metabolism. In former studies, a ratio between branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (Fischer’s ratio) revealed associations with hepatic encephalopathy. Furthermore, low concentrations of branched-chain amino acids were linked to sarcopenia in literature. Encephalopathy and sarcopenia are known to dramatically worsen the prognosis. Aim of this study was to investigate a complex panel of plasma amino acids in the context of mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. Methods 166 patients evaluated for orthotopic liver transplantation were included. 19 amino acids were measured from citrated plasma samples using mass spectrometry. We performed survival analysis for plasma amino acid constellations and examined the relationship to established mortality predictors. Results 33/166 (19.9%) patients died during follow-up. Lower values of valine (p<0.001), Fischer’s ratio (p<0.001) and valine to phenylalanine ratio (p<0.001) and higher values of phenylalanine (p<0.05) and tyrosine (p<0.05) were significantly associated with mortality. When divided in three groups, the tertiles discriminated cumulative survival for valine (p = 0.016), phenylalanine (p = 0.024) and in particular for valine to phenylalanine ratio (p = 0.003) and Fischer’s ratio (p = 0.005). Parameters were also significantly correlated with MELD and MELD-Na score. Conclusions Amino acids in plasma are valuable biomarkers to determine increased risk of mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. In particular, valine concentrations and constellations composed of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were strongly associated with prognosis. Due to their pathophysiological importance, the identified amino acids could be used to examine individual dietary recommendations to serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27410482

  1. Towards the routine application of nucleic acid technology for avian disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, D; Mawditt, K; Shaw, K; Britton, P; Naylor, C

    1997-01-01

    The use of nucleic acid technology (polymerase chain reaction, probing, restriction fragment analysis and nucleotide sequencing) in the study of avian diseases has largely been confined to fundamental analysis and retrospective studies. More recently these approaches have been applied to diagnosis and what one might call real-time epidemiological studies on chickens and turkeys. At the heart of these approaches is the identification and characterisation of pathogens based on their genetic material, RNA or DNA. Among the objectives has been the detection of pathogens quickly combined with the simultaneous identification of serotype, subtype or genotype. Nucleic acid sequencing also gives a degree of characterisation unmatched by other approaches. In this paper we describe the use of nucleic acid technology for the diagnosis and epidemiology of infectious bronchitis virus, turkey rhinotracheitis virus (avian pneumovirus) and Newcastle disease virus.

  2. Divinyl ether fatty acid synthesis in late blight-diseased potato leaves.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Chételat, A; Caldelari, D; Farmer, E E

    1999-03-01

    We conducted a study of the patterns and dynamics of oxidized fatty acid derivatives (oxylipins) in potato leaves infected with the late-blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Two 18-carbon divinyl ether fatty acids, colneleic acid and colnelenic acid, accumulated during disease development. To date, there are no reports that such compounds have been detected in higher plants. The divinyl ether fatty acids accumulate more rapidly in potato cultivar Matilda (a cultivar with increased resistance to late blight) than in cultivar Bintje, a susceptible cultivar. Colnelenic acid reached levels of up to approximately 24 nmol (7 microgram) per g fresh weight of tissue in infected leaves. By contrast, levels of members of the jasmonic acid family did not change significantly during pathogenesis. The divinyl ethers also accumulated during the incompatible interaction of tobacco with tobacco mosaic virus. Colneleic and colnelenic acids were found to be inhibitory to P. infestans, suggesting a function in plant defense for divinyl ethers, which are unstable compounds rarely encountered in biological systems.

  3. Role of omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolites in asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Jun; Arita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are found naturally in fish oil and are commonly thought to be anti-inflammatory nutrients, with protective effects in inflammatory diseases including asthma and allergies. The mechanisms of these effects remain mostly unknown but are of great interest for their potential therapeutic applications. Large numbers of epidemiological and observational studies investigating the effect of fish intake or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adulthood on asthmatic and allergic outcomes have been conducted. They mostly indicate protective effects and suggest a causal relationship between decreased intake of fish oil in modernized diets and an increasing number of individuals with asthma or other allergic diseases. Specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM: protectins, resolvins, and maresins) are generated from omega-3 fatty acids such as EPA and DHA via several enzymatic reactions. These mediators counter-regulate airway eosinophilic inflammation and promote the resolution of inflammation in vivo. Several reports have indicated that the biosynthesis of SPM is impaired, especially in severe asthma, which suggests that chronic inflammation in the lung might result from a resolution defect. This article focuses on the beneficial aspects of omega-3 fatty acids and offers recent insights into their bioactive metabolites including resolvins and protectins.

  4. Immunomodulation and hormonal disruption without compromised disease resistance in perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) exposed Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Smits, Judit E G; Nain, Sukhbir

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the impact of oral perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on Japanese quail at concentrations found in American and Belgian workers at PFOA manufacturing facilities. Three arms of the immune system were tested; T cell, B cell, and innate immunity. After 6 weeks exposure, quail were challenged with E. coli infection to test the ultimate measure of immunotoxicity, disease resistance. The T cell response was lower in the high exposure groups. Antibody mediated, and innate immune responses were not different. Growth rate was higher, whereas thyroid hormone levels were lower in PFOA-exposed birds. Morbidity/mortality from disease challenge was not different among the control and PFOA-exposed groups, and no overt PFOA toxicity was observed pre-disease challenge. Although PFOA at 'worst case scenario' levels caused T cell immunosuppression, this did not translate into increased disease susceptibility, demonstrating that immunotoxicity testing must be interpreted with caution since disease resistance is the ultimate concern. PMID:23639742

  5. Three targets of branched-chain amino acid supplementation in the treatment of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Holecek, Milan

    2010-05-01

    The article explains the pathogenesis of disturbances in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) and protein metabolism in various forms of hepatic injury and it is suggested that the main cause of decrease in plasma BCAA concentration in liver cirrhosis is hyperammonemia. Three possible targets of BCAA supplementation in hepatic disease are suggested: (1) hepatic encephalopathy, (2) liver regeneration, and (3) hepatic cachexia. The BCAA may ameliorate hepatic encephalopathy by promoting ammonia detoxification, correction of the plasma amino acid imbalance, and by reduced brain influx of aromatic amino acids. The influence of BCAA supplementation on hepatic encephalopathy could be more effective in chronic hepatic injury with hyperammonemia and low concentrations of BCAA in blood than in acute hepatic illness, where hyperaminoacidemia frequently develops. The favorable effect of BCAA on liver regeneration and nutritional state of the body is related to their stimulatory effect on protein synthesis, secretion of hepatocyte growth factor, glutamine production and inhibitory effect on proteolysis. Presumably the beneficial effect of BCAA on hepatic cachexia is significant in compensated liver disease with decreased plasma BCAA concentrations, whereas it is less pronounced in hepatic diseases with inflammatory complications and enhanced protein turnover. It is concluded that specific benefits associated with BCAA supplementation depend significantly on the type of liver disease and on the presence of inflammatory reaction. An important task for clinical research is to identify groups of patients for whom BCAA treatment can significantly improve the health-related quality of life and the prognosis of hepatic disease. PMID:20071143

  6. Branched chain amino acid metabolism profiles in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald G; Reily, Michael D; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Vaillancourt, Richard R; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a globally widespread disease of increasing clinical significance. The pathological progression of the disease from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been well defined, however, the contribution of altered branched chain amino acid metabolomic profiles to the progression of NAFLD is not known. The three BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine and valine are known to mediate activation of several important hepatic metabolic signaling pathways ranging from insulin signaling to glucose regulation. The purpose of this study is to profile changes in hepatic BCAA metabolite levels with transcriptomic changes in the progression of human NAFLD to discover novel mechanisms of disease progression. Metabolomic and transcriptomic data sets representing the spectrum of human NAFLD (normal, steatosis, NASH fatty, and NASH not fatty livers) were utilized for this study. During the transition from steatosis to NASH, increases in the levels of leucine (127% of normal), isoleucine (139%), and valine (147%) were observed. Carnitine metabolites also exhibited significantly elevated profiles in NASH fatty and NASH not fatty samples and included propionyl, hexanoyl, lauryl, acetyl and butyryl carnitine. Amino acid and BCAA metabolism gene sets were significantly enriched among downregulated genes during NASH. These cumulative alterations in BCAA metabolite and amino acid metabolism gene profiles represent adaptive physiological responses to disease-induced hepatic stress in NASH patients.

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Formulations in Cardiovascular Disease: Dietary Supplements are Not Substitutes for Prescription Products.

    PubMed

    Fialkow, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid products are available as prescription formulations (icosapent ethyl, omega-3-acid ethyl esters, omega-3-acid ethyl esters A, omega-3-carboxylic acids) and dietary supplements (predominantly fish oils). Most dietary supplements and all but one prescription formulation contain mixtures of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Products containing both EPA and DHA may raise low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In clinical trials, the EPA-only prescription product, icosapent ethyl, did not raise LDL-C compared with placebo. To correct a common misconception, it is important to note that omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements are not US FDA-approved over-the-counter drugs and are not required to demonstrate safety and efficacy prior to marketing. Conversely, prescription products are supported by extensive clinical safety and efficacy investigations required for FDA approval and have active and ongoing safety monitoring programs. While omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements may have a place in the supplementation of diet, they generally contain lower levels of EPA and DHA than prescription products and are not approved or intended to treat disease. Perhaps due to the lack of regulation of dietary supplements, EPA and DHA levels may vary widely within and between brands, and products may also contain unwanted cholesterol or fats or potentially harmful components, including toxins and oxidized fatty acids. Accordingly, omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements should not be substituted for prescription products. Similarly, prescription products containing DHA and EPA should not be substituted for the EPA-only prescription product, as DHA may raise LDL-C and thereby complicate the management of patients with dyslipidemia.

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Formulations in Cardiovascular Disease: Dietary Supplements are Not Substitutes for Prescription Products.

    PubMed

    Fialkow, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid products are available as prescription formulations (icosapent ethyl, omega-3-acid ethyl esters, omega-3-acid ethyl esters A, omega-3-carboxylic acids) and dietary supplements (predominantly fish oils). Most dietary supplements and all but one prescription formulation contain mixtures of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Products containing both EPA and DHA may raise low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In clinical trials, the EPA-only prescription product, icosapent ethyl, did not raise LDL-C compared with placebo. To correct a common misconception, it is important to note that omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements are not US FDA-approved over-the-counter drugs and are not required to demonstrate safety and efficacy prior to marketing. Conversely, prescription products are supported by extensive clinical safety and efficacy investigations required for FDA approval and have active and ongoing safety monitoring programs. While omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements may have a place in the supplementation of diet, they generally contain lower levels of EPA and DHA than prescription products and are not approved or intended to treat disease. Perhaps due to the lack of regulation of dietary supplements, EPA and DHA levels may vary widely within and between brands, and products may also contain unwanted cholesterol or fats or potentially harmful components, including toxins and oxidized fatty acids. Accordingly, omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements should not be substituted for prescription products. Similarly, prescription products containing DHA and EPA should not be substituted for the EPA-only prescription product, as DHA may raise LDL-C and thereby complicate the management of patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:27138439

  9. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. PMID:27198192

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids: a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, G; Franceschi, F; Bibbò, S; Gasbarrini, A

    2014-10-01

    The integrity of gastric barrier derives from the balance between defending and damaging factors. In particular, prostaglandins play a relevant role in the maintenance of gastric homeostasis and prevention of peptic disease, at different levels. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentanoic acid, are the precursors of the third series of prostaglandins (with anti-inflammatory properties), also reducing the formation of the second series of prostaglandins (pro-inflammatory ones). Such a pathophysiological rationale brought to the experimental application, both in animal models and, more recently, in humans, of omega-3 fatty acids against gastrointestinal damage. Omega-3 fatty acids have shown interesting results in preventing different types of gastric damage in mouse models. A large retrospective case-control study on patients taking both anti-thrombotic therapy and eicosapentanoic acid showed (although only at unadjusted analysis) an inverse correlation between consumption of eicosapentanoic acid and gastrointestinal injury. Prospective, well-designed, comparative studies are warranted to clarify if omega-3 fatty acids may represent, or not, a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids: a comprehensive review of their role in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Yashodhara, B M; Umakanth, S; Pappachan, J M; Bhat, S K; Kamath, R; Choo, B H

    2009-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 FAs) are essential fatty acids with diverse biological effects in human health and disease. Reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is a well-established benefit of their intake. Dietary supplementation may also benefit patients with dyslipidaemia, atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, obesity, inflammatory diseases, neurological/ neuropsychiatric disorders and eye diseases. Consumption of omega-3 FAs during pregnancy reduces the risk of premature birth and improves intellectual development of the fetus. Fish, fish oils and some vegetable oils are rich sources of omega-3 FAs. According to the UK Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition guidelines (2004), a healthy adult should consume a minimum of two portions of fish a week to obtain the health benefit. This review outlines the health implications, dietary sources, deficiency states and recommended allowances of omega-3 FAs in relation to human nutrition.

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disease affecting up to 40% of people in the Western world. Risk factors associated with GERD include age and lifestyle habits, although the clinically relevant contribution of many of these factors is unclear. In GERD, refluxed gastric acid damages the oesophageal mucosa, generally when the pH falls below 4. GERD patients present a variety of symptoms, most commonly heartburn and regurgitation. Oesophageal complications associated with GERD include erosions, ulcers, peptic strictures, and Barrett's oesophagus which is implicated in the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Diagnosis of GERD is problematic due to the range of symptoms which may be presented to the physician and symptom severity is frequently unrelated to disease severity. While endoscopic monitoring may be used to assess the presence and severity of GERD, a lack of visible damage does not necessarily indicate an absence of GERD. Techniques used to diagnose GERD include addition of an acid solution into the oesophagus in order to replicate symptoms (Bernstein test) or 24-hour intra-oesophageal pH monitoring. Proton pump inhibitors are effective in the treatment of GERD, acting to reduce the acidity of the gastric juice and hence reduce oesophageal damage and symptoms associated with GERD. Symptoms most indicative of GERD are those associated with erosive oesophagitis, including heartburn and acid regurgitation. Less common GERD-associated symptoms include chest pain, a range of ear, nose and throat conditions, and asthma. In contrast to perceptions of the disease as 'merely' heartburn, the impact on patients' quality of life can be profound. Increasing awareness of GERD by health care professionals has led to improved diagnosis and a greater appreciation of the need for maintenance therapy.

  13. Extended use of a selective inhibitor of acid lipase for the diagnosis of Wolman disease and cholesteryl ester storage disease.

    PubMed

    Civallero, G; De Mari, J; Bittar, C; Burin, M; Giugliani, R

    2014-04-10

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency produces two well defined inborn disorders, Wolman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). WD is a severe, early-onset condition involving massive storage of triglycerides and cholesteryl esters in the liver, with death usually occurring before one year of life. CESD is a more attenuated, later-onset disease that leads to a progressive and variable liver dysfunction. Diagnosis of LAL deficiency is mainly based on the enzyme assay of LAL activity in fibroblasts. Recently, a selective acid lipase inhibitor was used for the determination of enzyme activity in dried-blood filter paper (DBFP) samples. To extend and to validate these studies, we tested LAL activity with selective inhibition on DBFP samples, leukocytes and fibroblasts. Our results showed a clear discrimination between patients with LAL deficiency and healthy controls when using DBFP, leukocytes or fibroblasts (p<0.001). Deficiency of LAL was also demonstrated in individuals referred to our laboratory with suspected clinical diagnosis of WD, CESD, and Niemann-Pick type B. We conclude that the assay of LAL using selective inhibitor is a reliable and useful method for the identification of LAL deficiency, not only in DBFP samples but also in leukocytes and fibroblasts. This is important as enzyme replacement therapy for LAL deficiency is currently being developed, making the correct diagnosis a critical issue.

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites in brain function and disease.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, Richard P; Layé, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    The brain is highly enriched with fatty acids. These include the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, which are largely esterified to the phospholipid cell membrane. Once PUFAs are released from the membrane, they can participate in signal transduction, either directly or after enzymatic conversion to a variety of bioactive derivatives ('mediators'). PUFAs and their mediators regulate several processes within the brain, such as neurotransmission, cell survival and neuroinflammation, and thereby mood and cognition. PUFA levels and the signalling pathways that they regulate are altered in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and major depression. Diet and drugs targeting PUFAs may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of brain disorders.

  15. Therapeutic and cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitor regimens for idiopathic or drug-induced peptic ulcer complication.

    PubMed

    Nam, Doo Hyun; Park, So Young; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Chull

    2011-03-01

    Peptic ulcer (PU) disease has a high rate of occurrence and recurrence in Korean and the selection of drug for treatment is diverse. In this study, the therapeutical effectiveness of regimens including proton pump inhibitors (PPI) was compared with the single PPI therapy. The clinical data were collected from 1,658 patients having idiopathic or drug-induced PU complication from a Medical Center in Daegu, Korea, and analyzed retrospectively based on the results of endoscopic examination, the drug history and the therapeutic cost depending on drugs used. The comparison of complete healing rate and recurrence rate showed no significant differences between the single PPI groups and the combination group with antacids, prokinetic agent or mucosa protectants. However, the combination therapy of PPI with mucosa protectants gave a slightly better therapeutic outcome than single PPI treatment in gastric ulcer patients. Comparatively, the combination of PPI with antacids significantly reduced the therapeutic effectiveness in duodenal ulcer patients. The analysis of cost-based therapeutic effectiveness reveals that any economic benefits in PU treatment were not gained by the combination of other class of ulcer drugs. Even though the rapidity of healing rate was not considered, it can be concluded that the PPI combination therapy might be not desirable in PU treatment. Particularly triplet or quartet combination therapy in PPI regimen was absolutely economically ineffective therapy in spite of the increase of medication costs.

  16. Fifty years with bile acids and steroids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sjövall, Jan

    2004-08-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites, e.g., steroid hormones and bile acids, constitute a class of compounds of great biological importance. Their chemistry, biochemistry, and regulation in the body have been intensely studied for more than two centuries. The author has studied aspects of the biochemistry and clinical chemistry of steroids and bile acids for more than 50 years, and this paper, which is an extended version of the Schroepfer Medal Award lecture, reviews and discusses part of this work. Development and application of analytical methods based on chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) have been a central part of many projects, aiming at detailed characterization and quantification of metabolic profiles of steroids and bile acids under different conditions. In present terminology, much of the work may be termed steroidomics and cholanoidomics. Topics discussed are bile acids in human bile and feces, bile acid production, bacterial dehydroxylation of bile acids and steroids during the enterohepatic circulation, profiles of steroid sulfates in plasma of humans and other primates, development of neutral and ion-exchanging lipophilic derivatives of Sephadex for sample preparation and group separation of steroid and bile acid conjugates, profiles of steroids and bile acids in human urine under different conditions, hydroxylation of bile acids in liver disease, effects of alcohol-induced redox changes on steroid synthesis and metabolism, alcohol-induced changes of bile acid biosynthesis, compartmentation of bile acid synthesis studied with 3H-labeled ethanol, formation and metabolism of sulfated metabolites of progesterone in human pregnancy, abnormal patterns of these in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy corrected by ursodeoxycholic acid, inherited and acquired defects of bile acid biosynthesis and their treatment, conjugation of bile acids and steroids with N-acetylglucosamine, sulfate-glucuronide double conjugates of hydroxycholesterols

  17. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  18. Refsum disease: a defect in the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid in peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Pahan, K; Singh, A K; Barbosa, E

    1993-10-01

    The oxidation of phytanic acid to pristanic acid was previously demonstrated to be deficient in monolayer cultures of skin fibroblasts (Herndon et al. 1969. J. Clin. Invest. 48: 1017-1032). However, identification of subcellular organelle with deficient enzyme activity has not been established. To define the subcellular organelle with deficient enzyme activity in the catabolism of phytanic acid, we measured the oxidation of [1-14C] phytanic acid to 14CO2 and pristanic acid in different subcellular organelles isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts from control and Refsum patients. The rates of oxidation of phytanic acid in peroxisomes, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum were 37.1 +/- 2.65, 1.9 +/- 0.3, and 0.4 +/- 0.07 pmol/h per mg protein, respectively, from control fibroblasts. The phytanic acid oxidation activity in mitochondria (2.04 +/- 0.7 pmol/h per mg protein) and endoplasmic reticulum (0.43 +/- 0.2 pmol/h per mg protein) from Refsum fibroblasts was similar to control fibroblasts. However, phytanic acid oxidation in peroxisomes from Refsum fibroblasts was not detected at all the protein concentrations tested. On the other hand, the peroxisomes from Refsum fibroblasts had normal rates of activation and oxidation of palmitic and lignoceric acids, suggesting that the peroxisomes isolated from Refsum fibroblasts were metabolically active. The phytanoyl-CoA ligase, the first enzyme in the alpha-oxidation pathway, had activity similar to that in peroxisomes from control (9.86 +/- 0.09 nmol/h per mg protein) and Refsum (10.25 +/- 0.31 nmol/h per mg protein) fibroblasts. The data described here clearly demonstrate that pathognomonic accumulation of phytanic acid in patients with Refsum disease is due to the deficient activity of peroxisomal alpha-oxidation enzyme system.

  19. The roles of bile acids and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in the hepatobiliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Yuza, Kizuki; Hirose, Yuki; Nakajima, Masato; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Hait, Nitai C; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    Based on research carried out over the last decade, it has become increasingly evident that bile acids act not only as detergents, but also as important signaling molecules that exert various biological effects via activation of specific nuclear receptors and cell signaling pathways. Bile acids also regulate the expression of numerous genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in the synthesis and metabolism of bile acids, glucose, fatty acids, and lipoproteins, as well as energy metabolism. Receptors activated by bile acids include, farnesoid X receptor α, pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled receptors, TGR5, muscarinic receptor 2, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)2. The ligand of S1PR2, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates various physiological and pathophysiological cellular processes. We have recently reported that conjugated bile acids, via S1PR2, activate and upregulate nuclear sphingosine kinase 2, increase nuclear S1P, and induce genes encoding enzymes and transporters involved in lipid and sterol metabolism in the liver. Here, we discuss the role of bile acids and S1P signaling in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatobiliary diseases. PMID:27459945

  20. Polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid for bowel preparation in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Keum, Bora; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Kim, Myung Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The safety of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid has not been fully investigated in patients with renal insufficiency. High-dose ascorbic acid could induce hyperoxaluria, thereby causing tubule-interstitial nephritis and renal failure. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid in patients with chronic kidney disease. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data on colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid (n = 61) and 4 L polyethylene glycol (n = 80). The safety of the 2 groups was compared by assessing the differences in laboratory findings before and after bowel cleansing. The laboratory findings were not significantly different before and after the administration of 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 4 L polyethylene glycol. In both groups, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was not influenced by the administration of the bowel-cleansing agent. Patients’ reports on tolerance and acceptability were better in the 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid group than in the 4 L polyethylene glycol group. The 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid solution is a safe choice for bowel preparation before colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:27603372

  1. Recent Progress on Bile Acid Receptor Modulators for Treatment of Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping

    2016-07-28

    Bile acids are steroid-derived molecules synthesized in the liver, secreted from hepatocytes into the bile canaliculi, and subsequently stored in the gall bladder. During the feeding, bile flows into the duodenum, where it contributes to the solubilization and digestion of lipid-soluble nutrients. After a meal, bile-acid levels increase in the intestine, liver, and also in the systemic circulation. Therefore, serum bile-acid levels serve as an important sensing mechanism for nutrient and energy. Recent studies have described bile acids as versatile signaling molecules endowed with systemic endocrine functions. Bile acids are ligands for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1, M-BAR, and BG37) and nuclear hormone receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR; also known as NR1H4). Acting through these diverse signaling pathways, bile acids regulate triglyceride, cholesterol, glucose homeostasis, and energy expenditure. These bile-acid-controlled signaling pathways have become the source of promising novel drug targets to treat common metabolic and hepatic diseases. PMID:26878262

  2. Polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid for bowel preparation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Min; Keum, Bora; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Kim, Myung Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung

    2016-09-01

    The safety of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid has not been fully investigated in patients with renal insufficiency. High-dose ascorbic acid could induce hyperoxaluria, thereby causing tubule-interstitial nephritis and renal failure. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid in patients with chronic kidney disease.We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data on colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid (n = 61) and 4 L polyethylene glycol (n = 80). The safety of the 2 groups was compared by assessing the differences in laboratory findings before and after bowel cleansing.The laboratory findings were not significantly different before and after the administration of 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 4 L polyethylene glycol. In both groups, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was not influenced by the administration of the bowel-cleansing agent. Patients' reports on tolerance and acceptability were better in the 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid group than in the 4 L polyethylene glycol group.The 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid solution is a safe choice for bowel preparation before colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:27603372

  3. Polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid for bowel preparation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Min; Keum, Bora; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Kim, Myung Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung

    2016-09-01

    The safety of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid has not been fully investigated in patients with renal insufficiency. High-dose ascorbic acid could induce hyperoxaluria, thereby causing tubule-interstitial nephritis and renal failure. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid in patients with chronic kidney disease.We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data on colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid (n = 61) and 4 L polyethylene glycol (n = 80). The safety of the 2 groups was compared by assessing the differences in laboratory findings before and after bowel cleansing.The laboratory findings were not significantly different before and after the administration of 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 4 L polyethylene glycol. In both groups, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was not influenced by the administration of the bowel-cleansing agent. Patients' reports on tolerance and acceptability were better in the 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid group than in the 4 L polyethylene glycol group.The 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid solution is a safe choice for bowel preparation before colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function.

  4. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors. PMID:27318096

  5. Structural consequences of amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kazuki; Saito, Seiji; Sugawara, Kanako; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    To determine the structural changes in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase due to amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease, we built structural models of mutant alpha-subunits resulting from 33 missense mutations (24 infantile and 9 late-onset), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid replacement on the structure by calculating the number of atoms affected and determining the solvent-accessible surface area of the corresponding amino acid residue in the wild-type alpha-subunit. In the infantile Tay-Sachs group, the number of atoms influenced by a mutation was generally larger than that in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group in both the main chain and the side chain, and residues associated with the mutations found in the infantile Tay-Sachs group tended to be less solvent-accessible than those in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group. Furthermore, color imaging determined the distribution and degree of the structural changes caused by representative amino acid substitutions, and that there were also differences between the infantile and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease groups. Structural study is useful for elucidating the basis of Tay-Sachs disease.

  6. Structural consequences of amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kazuki; Saito, Seiji; Sugawara, Kanako; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    To determine the structural changes in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase due to amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease, we built structural models of mutant alpha-subunits resulting from 33 missense mutations (24 infantile and 9 late-onset), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid replacement on the structure by calculating the number of atoms affected and determining the solvent-accessible surface area of the corresponding amino acid residue in the wild-type alpha-subunit. In the infantile Tay-Sachs group, the number of atoms influenced by a mutation was generally larger than that in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group in both the main chain and the side chain, and residues associated with the mutations found in the infantile Tay-Sachs group tended to be less solvent-accessible than those in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group. Furthermore, color imaging determined the distribution and degree of the structural changes caused by representative amino acid substitutions, and that there were also differences between the infantile and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease groups. Structural study is useful for elucidating the basis of Tay-Sachs disease. PMID:18490185

  7. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors.

  8. Novel Retinoic Acid Receptor Alpha Agonists for Treatment of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Li, Zhengzhe; Chen, Yibang; Evans, Todd; Chuang, Peter; Das, Bhaskar; He, John Cijiang

    2011-01-01

    Development of pharmacologic agents that protect podocytes from injury is a critical strategy for the treatment of kidney glomerular diseases. Retinoic acid reduces proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis in multiple animal models of kidney diseases. However, clinical studies are limited because of significant side effects of retinoic acid. Animal studies suggest that all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) attenuates proteinuria by protecting podocytes from injury. The physiological actions of ATRA are mediated by binding to all three isoforms of the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs): RARα, RARβ, and RARγ. We have previously shown that ATRA exerts its renal protective effects mainly through the agonism of RARα. Here, we designed and synthesized a novel boron-containing derivative of the RARα-specific agonist Am580. This new derivative, BD4, binds to RARα receptor specifically and is predicted to have less toxicity based on its structure. We confirmed experimentally that BD4 binds to RARα with a higher affinity and exhibits less cellular toxicity than Am580 and ATRA. BD4 induces the expression of podocyte differentiation markers (synaptopodin, nephrin, and WT-1) in cultured podocytes. Finally, we confirmed that BD4 reduces proteinuria and improves kidney injury in HIV-1 transgenic mice, a model for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Mice treated with BD4 did not develop any obvious toxicity or side effect. Our data suggest that BD4 is a novel RARα agonist, which could be used as a potential therapy for patients with kidney disease such as HIVAN. PMID:22125642

  9. Novel retinoic acid receptor alpha agonists for treatment of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yifei; Wu, Yingwei; Liu, Ruijie; Li, Zhengzhe; Chen, Yibang; Evans, Todd; Chuang, Peter; Das, Bhaskar; He, John Cijiang

    2011-01-01

    Development of pharmacologic agents that protect podocytes from injury is a critical strategy for the treatment of kidney glomerular diseases. Retinoic acid reduces proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis in multiple animal models of kidney diseases. However, clinical studies are limited because of significant side effects of retinoic acid. Animal studies suggest that all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) attenuates proteinuria by protecting podocytes from injury. The physiological actions of ATRA are mediated by binding to all three isoforms of the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs): RARα, RARβ, and RARγ. We have previously shown that ATRA exerts its renal protective effects mainly through the agonism of RARα. Here, we designed and synthesized a novel boron-containing derivative of the RARα-specific agonist Am580. This new derivative, BD4, binds to RARα receptor specifically and is predicted to have less toxicity based on its structure. We confirmed experimentally that BD4 binds to RARα with a higher affinity and exhibits less cellular toxicity than Am580 and ATRA. BD4 induces the expression of podocyte differentiation markers (synaptopodin, nephrin, and WT-1) in cultured podocytes. Finally, we confirmed that BD4 reduces proteinuria and improves kidney injury in HIV-1 transgenic mice, a model for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Mice treated with BD4 did not develop any obvious toxicity or side effect. Our data suggest that BD4 is a novel RARα agonist, which could be used as a potential therapy for patients with kidney disease such as HIVAN.

  10. Accumulation of aspartic acid421- and glutamic acid391-cleaved tau in neurofibrillary tangles correlates with progression in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L; Binder, Lester I; Mena, Raul; García-Sierra, Francisco

    2008-05-01

    Truncations of tau protein at aspartic acid421 (D421) and glutamic acid391 (E391) residues are associated with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Using immunohistochemistry with antibodies to D421- and E391-truncated tau (Tau-C3 and MN423, respectively), we correlated the presence of NFTs composed of these truncated tau proteins with clinical and neuropathologic parameters in 17 AD and 23 non-AD control brains. The densities of NFTs composed of D421- or E391-truncated tau correlated with clinical dementia index and Braak staging in AD. Glutamic acid391 tau truncation was prominent in the entorhinal cortex, whereas D421 truncation was prominent in the subiculum, suggesting that NFTs composed of either D421- or E391-truncated tau may be formed mutually exclusively in these areas. Both truncations were associated with the prevalence of the apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele. By double labeling, intact tau in NFTs was commonly associated with D421-cleaved tau but not with E391-truncated tau; D421-cleaved tau was never associated with E391-truncated tau. These results indicate that tau is not randomly proteolyzed at different domains, and that proteolysis occurs sequentially from the C-terminus to inner regions of tau in AD progression. Identification of NFTs composed of tau at different stages of truncation may facilitate assessment of neurofibrillary pathology in AD.

  11. An update on the role of omega-3 fatty acids on inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Costa, André G V; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Zabala, María; Laiglesia, Laura M; Martínez, J Alfredo; Moreno-Aliaga, María J

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation is involved in the pathophysiology of many chronic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and neurodegenerative diseases. Several studies have evidenced important anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs). This review illustrates current knowledge about the efficacy of n-3 LC-PUFAs (eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), particularly) in preventing and/or treating several chronic inflammatory conditions (inflammatory bowel diseases and rheumatoid arthritis) as well as their potential benefits on neurodegenerative diseases. It is well established that n-3 LC-PUFAs are substrates for synthesis of novel series of lipid mediators (e.g., resolvins, protectins, and maresins) with potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties, which have been proposed to partly mediate the protective and beneficial actions of n-3 LC-PUFAs. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge from preclinical studies analyzing the actions of EPA- and DHA-derived resolvins and protectins on pathophysiological models of rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer, and irritable bowel syndrome.

  12. An update on the role of omega-3 fatty acids on inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Costa, André G V; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Zabala, María; Laiglesia, Laura M; Martínez, J Alfredo; Moreno-Aliaga, María J

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation is involved in the pathophysiology of many chronic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and neurodegenerative diseases. Several studies have evidenced important anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs). This review illustrates current knowledge about the efficacy of n-3 LC-PUFAs (eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), particularly) in preventing and/or treating several chronic inflammatory conditions (inflammatory bowel diseases and rheumatoid arthritis) as well as their potential benefits on neurodegenerative diseases. It is well established that n-3 LC-PUFAs are substrates for synthesis of novel series of lipid mediators (e.g., resolvins, protectins, and maresins) with potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties, which have been proposed to partly mediate the protective and beneficial actions of n-3 LC-PUFAs. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge from preclinical studies analyzing the actions of EPA- and DHA-derived resolvins and protectins on pathophysiological models of rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer, and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:25752887

  13. Novel Insights into Acid-Sensing Ion Channels: Implications for Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ren-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Sen; Xie, Ya-Ya; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative diseases often strike older adults and are characterized by progressive deterioration of cells, eventually leading to tissue and organ degeneration for which limited effective treatment options are currently available. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of extracellular H+-activated ligand-gated ion channels, play critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant activation of ASICs is reported to regulate cell apoptosis, differentiation and autophagy. Accumulating evidence has highlighted a dramatic increase and activation of ASICs in degenerative disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, intervertebral disc degeneration and arthritis. In this review, we have comprehensively discussed the critical roles of ASICs and their potential utility as therapeutic targets in degenerative diseases. PMID:27493834

  14. Novel Insights into Acid-Sensing Ion Channels: Implications for Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ren-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Sen; Xie, Ya-Ya; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative diseases often strike older adults and are characterized by progressive deterioration of cells, eventually leading to tissue and organ degeneration for which limited effective treatment options are currently available. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of extracellular H(+)-activated ligand-gated ion channels, play critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant activation of ASICs is reported to regulate cell apoptosis, differentiation and autophagy. Accumulating evidence has highlighted a dramatic increase and activation of ASICs in degenerative disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, intervertebral disc degeneration and arthritis. In this review, we have comprehensively discussed the critical roles of ASICs and their potential utility as therapeutic targets in degenerative diseases. PMID:27493834

  15. Serum zinc status and Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Niu, Jing-Xiu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xin-Zhuo; Yin, Xiao-Dong; Pang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori status and serum zinc value in gastric disease patients and healthy controls were investigated. Cases used in this work were 45 gastric cancer patients, 44 with peptic ulcers, 52 suffering gastritis and 64 healthy controls, all diagnosed histologically with the controls undergoing medical checkups. Helicobacter pylori status and serum levels of Zn were determined by 13C-urea breath test and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer, respectively. Our study showed that Helicobacter pylori infection has no change in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer group, on the contrast, serum levels of Zn were significantly reduced in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer group, compared with healthy controls, and the higher the Zn levels are, the more increased risk of gastric cancer. Helicobacter pylori infection is a cause of gastritis, peptic ulcers and even gastric cancer, while serum zinc level is an indicator of protection of gastric membranes against damage. PMID:23244107

  16. Mechanism of toxicity of the branched-chain fatty acid phytanic acid, a marker of Refsum disease, in astrocytes involves mitochondrial impairment.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Georg; Schönfeld, Peter; Kahlert, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Phytanic acid is a saturated branched-chain fatty acid, which is formed by bacterial degradation of chlorophyll in the intestinal tract of ruminants. The methyl group in beta-position prevents degradation of phytanic acid by the beta-oxidation pathway. Therefore, degradation of phytanic acid is initiated by alpha-oxidation in peroxisomes. The inherited peroxisomal disorder Refsum disease is characterised by accumulation of phytanic acid. Unusually high concentrations of phytanic acid can be found in the plasma of Refsum disease patients, who suffer from neurodegeneration and muscle dystrophy. Phytanic acid has been suggested to be causally involved in the clinical symptoms. To elucidate the pathogenic mechanism, we investigated the influence of phytanic acid in rat hippocampal astrocytes by monitoring the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)), the generation of reactive oxygen species as well as the cellular ATP level. In response to phytanic acid (100 microM) cytosolic Ca(2+) was quickly increased. The phytanic acid-evoked Ca(2+) response was transient and involved activation of intracellular Ca(2+) stores. In isolated rat brain mitochondria, phytanic acid dissipated Deltapsi(m) in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, phytanic acid released cytochrome c from mitochondria. Depending on the mitochondrial activity state, phytanic acid either stimulated or inhibited the electron flux within the respiratory chain. In addition, phytanic acid induced substantial generation of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria as well as in intact cells. Phytanic acid caused cell death of astrocytes within a few hours of exposure. In conclusion, we suggest that phytanic acid initiates astrocyte cell death by activating the mitochondrial route of apoptosis.

  17. Helicobacter pylori eradication and reflux disease onset: did gastric acid get "crazy"?

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2013-02-14

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is highly prevalent in the general population. In the last decade, a potential relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication and GORD onset has been claimed. The main putative mechanism is the gastric acid hypersecretion that develops after bacterial cure in those patients with corpus-predominant gastritis. We performed a critical reappraisal of the intricate pathogenesis and clinical data available in this field. Oesophagitis onset after H. pylori eradication in duodenal ulcer patients has been ascribed to a gastric acid hypersecretion, which could develop following body gastritis healing. However, the absence of an acid hypersecretive status in these patients is documented by both pathophysiology and clinical studies. Indeed, duodenal ulcer recurrence is virtually abolished following H. pylori eradication. In addition, intra-oesophageal pH recording studies failed to demonstrated increased acid reflux following bacterial eradication. Moreover, oesophageal manometric studies suggest that H. pylori eradication would reduce--rather than favor--acid reflux into the oesophagus. Finally, data of clinical studies would suggest that H. pylori eradication is not significantly associated with either reflux symptoms or erosive oesophagitis onset, some data suggesting also an advantage in curing the infection when oesophagitis is already present. Therefore, the legend of "crazy acid" remains--as all the others--a fascinating, but imaginary tale.

  18. Evaluation of circulating levels and renal clearance of natural amino acids in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, A; Pivonello, R; Melis, D; Alfieri, R; Filippella, M; Spagnuolo, G; Salvatore, F; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2002-02-01

    Although the hypercortisolism-induced impairment of protein homeostasis is object of several studies, a detailed evaluation of the complete amino acid profile of patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) has never been performed. The aim of the current open transversal controlled study was to evaluate serum and urinary concentrations as well as renal clearance of the complete series of natural amino acids and their relationship with glucose tolerance in patients with Cushing's disease (CD). Twenty patients with CD (10 active and 10 cured) and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls entered the study. Measurement of serum and urinary levels of the complete series of natural amino acids was performed in all patients analyzed by cationic exchange high performance liquid cromatography (HPLC) after 2 weeks of a standardized protein intake regimen. The renal clearance (renal excretion rate) of each amino acid was calculated on the basis of the serum and urinary concentrations of creatinine and the specific amino acid. Fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose and insulin response to standard glucose load, insulinogenic and homeostasis model insulin resistance (Homa-R) indexes were also evaluated and correlated to the circulating levels and renal clearances of each amino acid. Significantly higher serum (p<0.01) and urinary (p<0.05) levels of alanine and cystine, lower serum and higher urinary levels of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.05) and higher renal excretion rates of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.01) were found in patients with active CD than in patients cured from the disease and in controls. No difference was found between cured patients and controls. Creatinine clearance was similar in active and cured patients and in controls. In patients with active CD, urinary cortisol levels were significantly correlated to urinary cystine levels (r=0.85; p<0.01) and renal excretion rate of leucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05), isoleucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05) and valine (r=-0

  19. Periodic Acid-Schiff Staining Parallels the Immunoreactivity Seen By Direct Immunofluorescence in Autoimmune Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abreu Velez, Ana Maria; Upegui Zapata, Yulieth Alexandra; Howard, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Background: In many countries and laboratories, techniques such as direct immunofluorescence (DIF) are not available for the diagnosis of skin diseases. Thus, these laboratories are limited in the full diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases, vasculitis, and rheumatologic diseases. In our experience with these diseases and the patient's skin biopsies, we have noted a positive correlation between periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and immunofluorescence patterns; however, these were just empiric observations. In the current study, we aim to confirm these observations, given the concept that the majority of autoantibodies are glycoproteins and should thus be recognized by PAS staining. Aims: To compare direct immunofluorescent and PAS staining, in multiple autoimmune diseases that are known to exhibit specific direct immunofluorescent patterns. Materials and Methods: We studied multiple autoimmune skin diseases: Five cases of bullous pemphigoid, five cases of pemphigus vulgaris, ten cases of cutaneous lupus, ten cases of autoimmune vasculitis, ten cases of lichen planus (LP), and five cases of cutaneous drug reactions (including one case of erythema multiforme). In addition, we utilized 45 normal skin control specimens from plastic surgery reductions. Results: We found a 98% positive correlation between DIF and PAS staining patterns over all the disease samples. Conclusion: We recommend that laboratories without access to DIF always perform PAS staining in addition to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, for a review of the reactivity pattern. PMID:27114972

  20. Personal view: to treat or not to treat? Helicobacter pylori and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease - an alternative hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Axon, A T R

    2004-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes acute on chronic gastritis and is responsible for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. However, recent papers have suggested that it may protect against gastro-oesophageal reflux, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal cancer. Furthermore, the rapid increase in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus in the developed world has been attributed by some to the falling prevalence of H. pylori. These considerations have led to the suggestion that H. pylori infection should not necessarily be treated, especially in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Conversely, data from prospective randomized studies have shown that H. pylori eradication does not cause gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in patients with duodenal ulcer or in the normal population, nor does it worsen the outcome of pre-existing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Therefore, although H. pylori is negatively associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, its eradication does not induce the disease. A hypothesis is presented suggesting that the increased prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a result of rising acid secretion in the general population, which, in turn, is a consequence of the increased linear height (a predictor of acid secretion). The greater acid secretion could also explain the decline in the prevalence of H. pylori and perhaps account for the inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. These considerations are explored in discussing whether H. pylori infection should be treated in infected patients presenting with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  1. Multiple roles of dihomo-γ-linolenic acid against proliferation diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Gu, Yan

    2012-02-14

    Considerable arguments remain regarding the diverse biological activities of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). One of the most interesting but controversial dietary approaches focused on the diverse function of dihomo-dietary γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) in anti-inflammation and anti-proliferation diseases, especially for cancers. This strategy is based on the ability of DGLA to interfere in cellular lipid metabolism and eicosanoid (cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase) biosynthesis. Subsequently, DGLA can be further converted by inflammatory cells to 15-(S)-hydroxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). This is noteworthy because these compounds possess both anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. PGE1 could also induce growth inhibition and differentiation of cancer cells. Although the mechanism of DGLA has not yet been elucidated, it is significant to anticipate the antitumor potential benefits from DGLA.

  2. Omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and allergic diseases in infancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    Miles, Elizabeth A; Calder, Philip C

    2014-01-01

    There may be a causal relationship between intake of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and childhood allergic diseases. This can be explained by plausible biological mechanisms involving eicosanoid mediators produced from the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid. Long chain n-3 PUFAs are found in fish and fish oils. These fatty acids act to oppose the actions of n-6 PUFAs. Thus, it is considered that n-3 PUFAs will lower the risk of developing allergic diseases. In support of this, protective associations have been reported between maternal fish intake during pregnancy and allergic outcomes in infants and children from those pregnancies. However, studies of fish intake during infancy and childhood and allergic outcomes in those infants or children are inconsistent, although some reported a protective association. Supplementing pregnant women with fish oil can induce immunologic changes in cord blood. This supplementation has been reported in some studies to decrease sensitisation to common food allergens and to lower the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. The protective effect of maternal n-3 PUFAs may last until adolescence of the offspring. Fish oil supplementation in infancy may decrease the risk of developing some manifestations of allergic disease, although this benefit may not persist. Whether fish oil is a useful therapy in children with asthma receiving standard therapy is not clear from studies performed to date and this requires further exploration.

  3. [The differentiated phytotherapy of patients with duodenal peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Chernomorets, N N; Seleznev, A V; Revutskiĭ, B I; Alifanova, R E; Kravchenko, Z V; Cherkasskaia, E P

    1992-02-01

    Resulted are analysed of complex treatment of 103 patients with duodenal ulcer. Infusions and concoctions of medicinal plants were used. The regimen of administration and composition of the cocktail from herbs depended on the character of gastric secretion and dyskinesia of the gastroduodenal zone as well as on the presence of concomitant diseases; cholecystitis, gastritis, hepatitis, pancreatitis, enterocolitis. Intragastric drip administration of the concoctions and infusions of medicinal plants favour scarring of duodenal ulcers and reduction of the number and duration of recurrences.

  4. Aerosol Disinfection Capacity of Slightly Acidic Hypochlorous Acid Water Towards Newcastle Disease Virus in the Air: An In Vivo Experiment.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Hakimullah; Thammakarn, Chanathip; Suguro, Atsushi; Ishida, Yuki; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2015-12-01

    Existence of bioaerosol contaminants in farms and outbreaks of some infectious organisms with the ability of transmission by air increase the need for enhancement of biosecurity, especially for the application of aerosol disinfectants. Here we selected slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW) as a candidate and evaluated its virucidal efficacy toward a virus in the air. Three-day-old conventional chicks were challenged with 25 doses of Newcastle disease live vaccine (B1 strain) by spray with nebulizer (particle size <3 μm in diameter), while at the same time reverse osmosis water as the control and SAHW containing 50 or 100 parts per million (ppm) free available chlorine in pH 6 were sprayed on the treated chicks with other nebulizers. Exposed chicks were kept in separated cages in an isolator and observed for clinical signs. Oropharyngeal swab samples were collected from 2 to 5 days postexposure from each chick, and then the samples were titrated with primary chicken kidney cells to detect the virus. Cytopathic effects were observed, and a hemagglutination test was performed to confirm the result at 5 days postinoculation. Clinical signs (sneezing) were recorded, and the virus was isolated from the control and 50 ppm treatment groups, while no clinical signs were observed in and no virus was isolated from the 100 ppm treatment group. The virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain Sato, too, was immediately inactivated by SAHW containing 50 ppm chlorine in the aqueous phase. These data suggest that SAHW containing 100 ppm chlorine can be used for aerosol disinfection of NDV in farms. PMID:26629621

  5. Aerosol Disinfection Capacity of Slightly Acidic Hypochlorous Acid Water Towards Newcastle Disease Virus in the Air: An In Vivo Experiment.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Hakimullah; Thammakarn, Chanathip; Suguro, Atsushi; Ishida, Yuki; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2015-12-01

    Existence of bioaerosol contaminants in farms and outbreaks of some infectious organisms with the ability of transmission by air increase the need for enhancement of biosecurity, especially for the application of aerosol disinfectants. Here we selected slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW) as a candidate and evaluated its virucidal efficacy toward a virus in the air. Three-day-old conventional chicks were challenged with 25 doses of Newcastle disease live vaccine (B1 strain) by spray with nebulizer (particle size <3 μm in diameter), while at the same time reverse osmosis water as the control and SAHW containing 50 or 100 parts per million (ppm) free available chlorine in pH 6 were sprayed on the treated chicks with other nebulizers. Exposed chicks were kept in separated cages in an isolator and observed for clinical signs. Oropharyngeal swab samples were collected from 2 to 5 days postexposure from each chick, and then the samples were titrated with primary chicken kidney cells to detect the virus. Cytopathic effects were observed, and a hemagglutination test was performed to confirm the result at 5 days postinoculation. Clinical signs (sneezing) were recorded, and the virus was isolated from the control and 50 ppm treatment groups, while no clinical signs were observed in and no virus was isolated from the 100 ppm treatment group. The virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain Sato, too, was immediately inactivated by SAHW containing 50 ppm chlorine in the aqueous phase. These data suggest that SAHW containing 100 ppm chlorine can be used for aerosol disinfection of NDV in farms.

  6. Metabolism of phytanic acid and 3-methyl-adipic acid excretion in patients with adult Refsum disease.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, Anthony S; Mayne, Phillip D; Lloyd, Matthew D; Burston, David; Mei, Guam; Sidey, Margaret C; Feher, Michael D; Gibberd, F Brian

    2003-08-01

    Adult Refsum disease (ARD) is associated with defective alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid (PA). omega-Oxidation of PA to 3-methyl-adipic acid (3-MAA) occurs although its clinical significance is unclear. In a 40 day study of a new ARD patient, where the plasma half-life of PA was 22.4 days, omega-oxidation accounted for 30% initially and later all PA excretion. Plasma and adipose tissue PA and 3-MAA excretion were measured in a cross-sectional study of 11 patients. The capacity of the omega-oxidation pathway was 6.9 (2.8-19.4) mg [20.4 (8.3-57.4) micromol] PA/day. 3-MAA excretion correlated with plasma PA levels (r = 0.61; P = 0.03) but not adipose tissue PA content. omega-Oxidation during a 56 h fast was studied in five patients. 3-MAA excretion increased by 208 +/- 58% in parallel with the 158 (125-603)% rise in plasma PA. Plasma PA doubled every 29 h, while 3-MAA excretion followed second-order kinetics. Acute sequelae of ARD were noted in three patients (60%) after fasting. The omega-oxidation pathway can metabolise PA ingested by patients with ARD, but this activity is dependent on plasma PA concentration. omega-Oxidation forms a functional reserve capacity that enables patients with ARD undergoing acute stress to cope with limited increases in plasma PA levels.

  7. Folic acid: nutritional biochemistry, molecular biology, and role in disease processes.

    PubMed

    Lucock, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the chemistry, metabolism, and molecular biology of folic acid, with a particular emphasis on how it is, or may be, involved in many disease processes. Folic acid prevents neural tube defects like spina bifida, while its ability to lower homocysteine suggests it might have a positive influence on cardiovascular disease. A role for this B vitamin in maintaining good health may, in fact, extend beyond these clinical conditions to encompass other birth defects, several types of cancer, dementia, affective disorders, Down's syndrome, and serious conditions affecting pregnancy outcome. The effect of folate in these conditions can be explained largely within the context of folate-dependent pathways leading to methionine and nucleotide biosynthesis, and genetic variability resulting from a number of common polymorphisms of folate-dependent enzymes involved in the homocysteine remethylation cycle. Allelic variants of folate genes that have a high frequency in the population, and that may play a role in disease formation include 677C --> T-MTHFR, 1298A --> C-MTHFR, 2756A --> G-MetSyn, and 66A --> G-MSR. Future work will probably uncover further polymorphisms of folate metabolism, and lead to a wider understanding of the interaction between this essential nutrient and the many genes which underpin its enzymatic utilization in a plethora of critical biosynthetic reactions, and which, under adverse nutritional conditions, may promote disease.

  8. Protection against dengue disease by synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Flingai, Seleeke; Plummer, Emily M.; Patel, Ami; Shresta, Sujan; Mendoza, Janess M.; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral infection in humans. In recent years, the number of cases and outbreaks has dramatically increased worldwide. While vaccines are being developed, none are currently available that provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes. Advances in human antibody isolation have uncovered DENV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that are capable of preventing infection from multiple serotypes. Yet delivering monoclonal antibodies using conventional methods is impractical due to high costs. Engineering novel methods of delivering monoclonal antibodies could tip the scale in the fight against DENV. Here we demonstrate that simple intramuscular delivery by electroporation of synthetic DNA plasmids engineered to express modified human nAbs against multiple DENV serotypes confers protection against DENV disease and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease in mice. This synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy approach may have important applications in the fight against infectious disease. PMID:26220099

  9. Combined defects in oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid β-oxidation in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah-Sefaa, Abena; McKenzie, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria provide the main source of energy to eukaryotic cells, oxidizing fats and sugars to generate ATP. Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are two metabolic pathways which are central to this process. Defects in these pathways can result in diseases of the brain, skeletal muscle, heart and liver, affecting approximately 1 in 5000 live births. There are no effective therapies for these disorders, with quality of life severely reduced for most patients. The pathology underlying many aspects of these diseases is not well understood; for example, it is not clear why some patients with primary FAO deficiencies exhibit secondary OXPHOS defects. However, recent findings suggest that physical interactions exist between FAO and OXPHOS proteins, and that these interactions are critical for both FAO and OXPHOS function. Here, we review our current understanding of the interactions between FAO and OXPHOS proteins and how defects in these two metabolic pathways contribute to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:26839416

  10. Protection against dengue disease by synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flingai, Seleeke; Plummer, Emily M; Patel, Ami; Shresta, Sujan; Mendoza, Janess M; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral infection in humans. In recent years, the number of cases and outbreaks has dramatically increased worldwide. While vaccines are being developed, none are currently available that provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes. Advances in human antibody isolation have uncovered DENV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that are capable of preventing infection from multiple serotypes. Yet delivering monoclonal antibodies using conventional methods is impractical due to high costs. Engineering novel methods of delivering monoclonal antibodies could tip the scale in the fight against DENV. Here we demonstrate that simple intramuscular delivery by electroporation of synthetic DNA plasmids engineered to express modified human nAbs against multiple DENV serotypes confers protection against DENV disease and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease in mice. This synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy approach may have important applications in the fight against infectious disease. PMID:26220099

  11. Farnesoid X Receptor Agonists and Other Bile Acid Signaling Strategies for Treatment of Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Halilbasic, Emina; Fuchs, Claudia; Traussnigg, Stefan; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) respond to bile acids (BAs) by activating transcriptional networks and/or signaling cascades. These cascades affect the expression of a great number of target genes relevant for BA, cholesterol, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, as well as genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. FXR activation in the liver tissue and beyond, such as the gut-liver axis, kidney and adipose tissue, plays a role in metabolic diseases. These BA receptors activators hold promise to become a new class of drugs to be used in the treatment of chronic liver disease, hepatocellular cancer and extrahepatic inflammatory and metabolic diseases. This review discusses the relevant BA receptors, the new drugs that target BA transport and signaling and their possible applications. PMID:27332721

  12. Neuroprotective and ameliorative actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids against neuronal diseases: beneficial effect of docosahexaenoic acid on cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Hossain, Shahdat

    2011-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3), the most abundant n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in the brain, is essential for brain growth and development. Recent evidence has indicated the potential health benefits of DHA for managing Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, dietary administration of DHA considerably protects against and ameliorates the impairment of learning ability in amyloid-beta (Aβ)(1-40)-infused AD-model rats, with concurrent increases in DHA levels and decreases in the levels of lipid peroxide and reactive oxygen species in the cortico-hippocampal tissues. In addition, dietary DHA helps in eliminating the amyloid burden from the brains of AD-model rats. In vitro studies have revealed that DHA substantially inhibits Aβ fibrillation. Furthermore, DHA reduces amyloid-induced toxicity in cell culture. These in vitro data support the hypothesis that DHA can ameliorate the cognitive deficits of AD in vivo by limiting Aβ polymerization in the brains. Therefore, it might be a useful therapeutic agent to prevent and/or delay cognitive impairment in mild cases of AD.

  13. Does Helicobacter pylori infection eradication modify peptic ulcer prevalence? A 10 years' endoscopical survey

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, Giorgio; Liatopoulou, Stefania; Cavallaro, Lucas Giovanni; Gnocchi, Alessandro; Bò, Nadia Dal; Rugge, Massimo; Iori, Veronica; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Maino, Marta; Colla, Giancarlo; Franzè, Angelo; Mario, Francesco Di

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare peptic ulcer prevalence in patients referred for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in two Italian hospitals in pre-Helicobacter era and ten years after the progressive diffusion of eradication therapy. METHODS: We checked all the endoscopic examinations consecutively performed in the Gastroenterology Unit of Padova during 1986-1987 and 1995-1996, and in the Gastroenterology Unit of Parma during 1992 and 2002. Chi Square test was used for statistic analysis. RESULTS: Data from both the endoscopic centers showed a statistically significant decrease in the prevalence of ulcers: from 12.7% to 6.3% (P < 0.001) in Padova and from 15.6% to 12% (P < 0.001) in Parma. The decrease was significant both for duodenal (from 8.8% to 4.8%, P < 0.001) and gastric ulcer (3.9% to 1.5%, P < 0.001) in Padova, and only for duodenal ulcer in Parma (9.2% to 6.1%, P < 0.001; gastric ulcer: 6.3% to 5.8%, NS). CONCLUSION: Ten years of extensive Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication in symptomatic patients led to a significant reduction in peptic ulcer prevalence. This reduction was particularly evident in Padova, where a project for the sensibilization of H pylori eradication among general practioners was carried out between 1990 and 1992. Should our hypothesis be true, H pylori eradication might in the future lead to peptic ulcer as a rare endoscopic finding. PMID:16688832

  14. Associations between Homocysteine, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's Disease: Insights from Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The associations between homocysteine (Hcy), folic acid, and vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have gained much interest, while remaining controversial. We aim to perform meta-analyses to evaluate comprehensively: i) Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients in comparison with controls; and ii) the association between Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels and risk of AD. A literature search was performed using Medline and Scopus databases. A total of 68 studies were identified and included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analyses. First, AD patients may have higher level of Hcy, and lower levels of folate and vitamin B12 in plasma than controls. Further age-subgroup analysis showed no age effect for Hcy levels in plasma between AD patients and matched controls, while the differences in folate and vitamin B12 levels further enlarged with increased age. Second, data suggests that high Hcy and low folate levels may correlate with increased risk of AD occurrence. The comprehensive meta-analyses not only confirmed higher Hcy, lower folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients than controls, but also implicated that high Hcy and low folic acid levels may be risk factors of AD. Further studies are encouraged to elucidate mechanisms linking these conditions.

  15. A Comparative Study of Serum Uric Acid levels and Lipid Ratios in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sathiya, R.; Velu, V. Kuzhandai; Niranjan, G.; Srinivasan, A. R.; Amirtha, Ganesh B.; Ramesh, R.; Babu, M. Sathish; Saha, Subiman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) appears to be common in the Indian population of different geographical origins, religions and languages. Measurement of lipid fractions and ratios are widely recommended for risk assessment. A few studies have shown that serum uric acid plays a role in the development of cardiovascular morbidity. Very few reports are cited linking serum uric acid with the lipid fraction in CAD Objectives: To find the significance of non-HDL cholesterol, LDL-c/HDL-c ratio, TC/HDL ratio and serum uric acid level in CAD patients Subjects and Methodology: In this study, we included fifty CAD patients as subjects and an equal number of controls. Both subjects and controls were assessed for anthropometric, physiological and biochemical parameters Results: The present study showed significant increased levels of total cholesterol (p=0.002), TAGs (p<0.001), HDL (p=0.005), LDL (p<0.006) and non-HDL cholesterol (p<0.001). LDL-c/HDL-c ratio (p<0.001) and TC/HDL ratio (p<0.001) in CAD patients (subjects) were also significant when compared to controls. Uric acid level in CAD patients was increased (p<0.001). Conclusion: Serum Uric Acid, TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios could be regarded as objective markers, in association with existing atherogenic dyslipidemia in patients with CAD. PMID:25018681

  16. MTHFR C677T polymorphism, folic acid and hyperhomocysteinemia in levodopa treated patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Woitalla, D; Kuhn, W; Müller, T

    2004-01-01

    Certain mutations (TT homozygous; CT heterozygous; CC wild-type) of the methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHFR) gene and long-term levodopa application in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) support onset of hyperhomocysteinemia. Total plasma homocysteine (t-hcys) depends on B6, B12, folic acid, all of which support remyelination from t-hcys to methionine. Objective of this trial were to compare B6, B12, folic acid and t-hcys levels in plasma of 83 levodopa treated PD patients and 44 controls. PD patients with the CT or TT genotype had significant higher t-hcys levels than controls or PD patients with the CC allele. Concentrations of B6 or B12 did not differ, but folic acid was significant higher in PD patients with the CT mutation. We recommend MTHFR genotyping, t-hcys monitoring and early vitamin supplementation in PD patients. The folic acid increase in PD patients with the CT allele is hypothetically due to an endogenous upregulation of folic acid absorption to decrease t-hcys. PMID:15354385

  17. Infantile Refsum Disease: Influence of Dietary Treatment on Plasma Phytanic Acid Levels.

    PubMed

    Sá, Maria João Nabais; Rocha, Júlio C; Almeida, Manuela F; Carmona, Carla; Martins, Esmeralda; Miranda, Vasco; Coutinho, Miguel; Ferreira, Rita; Pacheco, Sara; Laranjeira, Francisco; Ribeiro, Isaura; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Lacerda, Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Infantile Refsum disease (IRD) is one of the less severe of Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs), a group of peroxisomal biogenesis disorders resulting from a generalized peroxisomal function impairment. Increased plasma levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and phytanic acid are biomarkers used in IRD diagnosis. Furthermore, an increased plasma level of phytanic acid is known to be associated with neurologic damage. Treatment of IRD is symptomatic and multidisciplinary.The authors report a 3-year-old child, born from consanguineous parents, who presented with developmental delay, retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural deafness and craniofacial dysmorphisms. While the relative level of plasma C26:0 was slightly increased, other VLCFA were normal. Thus, a detailed characterization of the phenotype was essential to point to a ZSD. Repeatedly increased levels of plasma VLCFA, along with phytanic acid and pristanic acid, deficient dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase activity in fibroblasts and identification of the homozygous pathogenic mutation c.2528G>A (p.Gly843Asp) in the PEX1 gene, confirmed this diagnosis. Nutritional advice and follow-up was proposed aiming phytanic acid dietary intake reduction. During dietary treatment, plasma levels of phytanic acid decreased to normal, and the patient's development evaluation showed slow progressive acquisition of new competences.This case report highlights the relevance of considering a ZSD in any child with developmental delay who manifests hearing and visual impairment and of performing a systematic biochemical investigation, when plasma VLCFA are mildly increased. During dietary intervention, a biochemical improvement was observed, and the long-term clinical effect of this approach needs to be evaluated.

  18. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  19. [Lipid peroxidation in patients with multiple peptic ulcers in the stomach and duodenum].

    PubMed

    Ioffe, I V

    2004-08-01

    Under the observation there were 62 patients with multiple ulcers of a stomach and duodenum from 23 till 65 years old, randomized under the sex, age and character of pathological process (sizes and localization of peptical ulcers). In all patients the parameters of lipids peroxidation were studied. The increase of intensity the peroxidation of lipids were revealed, at the expense of augmentation in a peripheric blood of the patients of concentration of a final metabolite peroxidation of lipids--malon's dialdehyde and intermediate products--dien's conjugates. The rising of a parameter hemolysis peroxidation of erythrocytes is marked also.

  20. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses. PMID:27390875

  1. Clinical, morphological, and molecular aspects of sialic acid storage disease manifesting in utero

    PubMed Central

    Froissart, R; Cheillan, D; Bouvier, R; Tourret, S; Bonnet, V; Piraud, M; Maire, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: Sialic acid storage diseases (SASDs) are caused by the defective transport of free sialic acid outside the lysosome. Apart from the Salla presentation in Finland, SASD is a very rare form of lysosomal storage disease (LSD) with approximately 35 cases, all diagnosed after birth, having been reported worldwide. We report a series of 12 French patients with very early manifestations, including eight fetuses diagnosed in utero. Results: Ultrasound examination, fetal autopsy, or clinical examination showed prominent ascites, rarely progressing to complete hydrops, and highlighted the early severity of bone disease. Dramatic increase of free sialic acid in various biological samples confirmed the diagnosis in all cases. Storage staining affinities and storage distribution in placenta and fetal organs allowed differential diagnosis from other LSDs but cannot differentiate between SASD, sialidosis, and galactosialidosis. Fourteen different mutations were identified, showing the molecular heterogeneity of SASD in the French population. We found that the previously described p.Y306X mutation generated two different transcripts, and we identified seven novel mutations: three deletions (del exon 7, del exons10+11 and c.1296delT), one splice site mutation (c.1350+1G→T) one nonsense mutation (p.W339X), and two missense mutations (p.R57C and p.G127E). Conclusions: The severity of our patients' genotypes is in agreement with their phenotypes but not with the importance and early appearance of the very frequent in utero manifestations. Minimal fetal disease in some patients and a reported case of heterogeneity of fetal involvement within a family suggest that factors other than the genotype influence fetal manifestations. PMID:15805149

  2. Ascorbic acid: new role of an age-old micronutrient in the management of periodontal disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Alagl, Adel S; Bhat, Subraya Giliyar

    2015-03-01

    To review the new role of an age-old micronutrient - ascorbic acid - in the management of periodontal disease. Articles pertaining to the topic were searched in PubMed and other search engines from year 1974 to April 2014 with the following key words: "ascorbic acid," "ascorbate," "vitamin C," "periodontal disease," "gingivitis," "periodontitis," "anti-oxidants" and "elderly." Balanced nutrition is an essential factor in the elderly. Modification of nutritional requirement is important to overcome the effect of an unbalanced diet in older individuals as a result of several external and internal host-associated factors. Micronutrient requirements as aging advances could change, and require due attention. Ascorbic acid and its relationship with periodontal disease are very well known. However, recent changes in the concept of understanding the pathogenicity has led to a new path of therapeutic intervention with ascorbic acid in many chronic diseases. Oxidative stress with its associated burden might alter the disease process. In the era of "periodontal medicine," the impact of remote tissue changes on systemic disease has to be taken into serious consideration. Deficiency of nutritional impact on the host, with micronutrient vitamin C detailed in this review with sources, absorption, interaction and its relationship with systemic disease, and thereby the impact on periodontal disease. Ascorbic acid plays an important role in the aging process, and in the maintenance of periodontal health in the elderly. PMID:25407241

  3. Ascorbic acid: new role of an age-old micronutrient in the management of periodontal disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Alagl, Adel S; Bhat, Subraya Giliyar

    2015-03-01

    To review the new role of an age-old micronutrient - ascorbic acid - in the management of periodontal disease. Articles pertaining to the topic were searched in PubMed and other search engines from year 1974 to April 2014 with the following key words: "ascorbic acid," "ascorbate," "vitamin C," "periodontal disease," "gingivitis," "periodontitis," "anti-oxidants" and "elderly." Balanced nutrition is an essential factor in the elderly. Modification of nutritional requirement is important to overcome the effect of an unbalanced diet in older individuals as a result of several external and internal host-associated factors. Micronutrient requirements as aging advances could change, and require due attention. Ascorbic acid and its relationship with periodontal disease are very well known. However, recent changes in the concept of understanding the pathogenicity has led to a new path of therapeutic intervention with ascorbic acid in many chronic diseases. Oxidative stress with its associated burden might alter the disease process. In the era of "periodontal medicine," the impact of remote tissue changes on systemic disease has to be taken into serious consideration. Deficiency of nutritional impact on the host, with micronutrient vitamin C detailed in this review with sources, absorption, interaction and its relationship with systemic disease, and thereby the impact on periodontal disease. Ascorbic acid plays an important role in the aging process, and in the maintenance of periodontal health in the elderly.

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Spotlight on Fatty Acid Oxidation and Lipoperoxidation Products

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Giuseppina; Gentile, Fabrizio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Canuto, Rosa Angela; Daga, Martina; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Lepore, Alessio; Ferretti, Carlo; Dianzani, Chiara; Muzio, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    In several human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced mainly by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, is increased. In cancer cells, the increase of ROS production has been associated with mtDNA mutations that, in turn, seem to be functional in the alterations of the bioenergetics and the biosynthetic state of cancer cells. Moreover, ROS overproduction can enhance the peroxidation of fatty acids in mitochondrial membranes. In particular, the peroxidation of mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin leads to the formation of reactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and malondialdehyde (MDA), which are able to react with proteins and DNA. Covalent modifications of mitochondrial proteins by the products of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the course of oxidative cell stress are involved in the mitochondrial dysfunctions observed in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Such modifications appear to affect negatively mitochondrial integrity and function, in particular energy metabolism, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, antioxidant defenses and stress responses. In neurodegenerative diseases, indirect confirmation for the pathogenetic relevance of LPO-dependent modifications of mitochondrial proteins comes from the disease phenotypes associated with their genetic alterations. PMID:26907355

  5. Glial fibrillary acidic protein is a body fluid biomarker for glial pathology in human disease.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel

    2015-03-10

    This review on the role of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as a biomarker for astroglial pathology in neurological diseases provides background to protein synthesis, assembly, function and degeneration. Qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques for the investigation of human tissue and biological fluid samples are discussed including partial lack of parallelism and multiplexing capabilities. Pathological implications are reviewed in view of immunocytochemical, cell-culture and genetic findings. Particular emphasis is given to neurodegeneration related to autoimmune astrocytopathies and to genetic gain of function mutations. The current literature on body fluid levels of GFAP in human disease is summarised and illustrated by disease specific meta-analyses. In addition to the role of GFAP as a diagnostic biomarker for chronic disease, there are important data on the prognostic value for acute conditions. The published evidence permits to classify the dominant GFAP signatures in biological fluids. This classification may serve as a template for supporting diagnostic criteria of autoimmune astrocytopathies, monitoring disease progression in toxic gain of function mutations, clinical treatment trials (secondary outcome and toxicity biomarker) and provide prognostic information in neurocritical care if used within well defined time-frames.

  6. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Progression of Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Individuals Without Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Maahs, David M.; Johnson, Richard J.; Jalal, Diana I.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rivard, Christopher; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine uric acid (UA) as a possible predictor of the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) using data from the prospective Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS CAC was measured by electron beam tomography at the baseline and at a follow-up 6.0 ± 0.5 years later. The study population included 443 participants with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects who were free of diagnosed coronary artery disease at baseline. The presence of renal disease was defined by the presence of albuminuria and/or low glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS In subjects without renal disease, serum UA predicted CAC progression (odds ratio 1.30 [95% CI 1.07–1.58], P = 0.007) independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and the presence of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Serum UA levels predict the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and may be useful in identifying who is at risk for vascular disease in the absence of significant chronic kidney disease. PMID:20798338

  7. Lithium Decreases Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in a Mouse Model of Alexander Disease.

    PubMed

    LaPash Daniels, Christine M; Paffenroth, Elizabeth; Austin, Elizabeth V; Glebov, Konstantin; Lewis, Diana; Walter, Jochen; Messing, Albee

    2015-01-01

    Alexander disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the astrocyte intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by elevated levels of GFAP and the formation of protein aggregates, known as Rosenthal fibers, within astrocytes. Lithium has previously been shown to decrease protein aggregates by increasing the autophagy pathway for protein degradation. In addition, lithium has also been reported to decrease activation of the transcription factor STAT3, which is a regulator of GFAP transcription and astrogliogenesis. Here we tested whether lithium treatment would decrease levels of GFAP in a mouse model of Alexander disease. Mice with the Gfap-R236H point mutation were fed lithium food pellets for 4 to 8 weeks. Four weeks of treatment with LiCl at 0.5% in food pellets decreased GFAP protein and transcripts in several brain regions, although with mild side effects and some mortality. Extending the duration of treatment to 8 weeks resulted in higher mortality, and again with a decrease in GFAP in the surviving animals. Indicators of autophagy, such as LC3, were not increased, suggesting that lithium may decrease levels of GFAP through other pathways. Lithium reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT3, suggesting this as one pathway mediating the effects on GFAP. In conclusion, lithium has the potential to decrease GFAP levels in Alexander disease, but with a narrow therapeutic window separating efficacy and toxicity.

  8. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer’s disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer’s disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically-induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/−APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25616451

  9. Intraneuronal amyloid beta accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Tamaoki, Toshio; Tanaka, Koich; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Masao; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Shimohama, Shun; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2010-03-01

    In an analysis of amyloid pathology in Alzheimer disease, we used an in situ approach to identify amyloid-beta (Abeta) accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in postmortem brain tissue of the hippocampal formation from subjects with Alzheimer disease. When carboxyl-terminal-specific antibodies directed against Abeta40 and Abeta42 were used for immunocytochemical analyses, Abeta42 was especially apparent within the neuronal cytoplasm, at sites not detected by the antibody specific to Abeta-oligomer. In comparison to the Abeta42-positive neurons, neurons bearing oxidative damage to nucleic acids were more widely distributed in the hippocampus. Comparative density measurements of the immunoreactivity revealed that levels of intraneuronal Abeta42 were inversely correlated with levels of intraneuronal 8-hydroxyguanosine, an oxidized nucleoside (r=- 0.61, p<0.02). Together with recent evidence that the Abeta peptide can act as an antioxidant, these results suggest that intraneuronal accumulation of non-oligomeric Abeta may be a compensatory response in neurons to oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

  10. Fatty Acid Oxidation is Impaired in An Orthologous Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Luis F.; Lin, Cheng-Chao; Zhou, Fang; Germino, Gregory G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was first identified over 20 years ago, yet its function remains poorly understood. We have used a systems-based approach to examine the effects of acquired loss of Pkd1 in adult mouse kidney as it transitions from normal to cystic state. Methods We performed transcriptional profiling of a large set of male and female kidneys, along with metabolomics and lipidomics analyses of a subset of male kidneys. We also assessed the effects of a modest diet change on cyst progression in young cystic mice. Fatty acid oxidation and glycolytic rates were measured in five control and mutant pairs of epithelial cells. Results We find that females have a significantly less severe kidney phenotype and correlate this protection with differences in lipid metabolism. We show that sex is a major determinant of the transcriptional profile of mouse kidneys and that some of this difference is due to genes involved in lipid metabolism. Pkd1 mutant mice have transcriptional profiles consistent with changes in lipid metabolism and distinct metabolite and complex lipid profiles in kidneys. We also show that cells lacking Pkd1 have an intrinsic fatty acid oxidation defect and that manipulation of lipid content of mouse chow modifies cystic disease. Interpretation Our results suggest PKD could be a disease of altered cellular metabolism. PMID:27077126

  11. Folate and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in psychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Muskiet, Frits A J; Kemperman, Ramses F J

    2006-11-01

    Schizophrenia, autism and depression do not inherit by Mendel's law, and the search for a genetic basis seems unsuccessful. Schizophrenia and autism relate to low birth weight and pregnancy complications, which are associated with developmental adaptations by "programming". Epigenetics might constitute the basis of programming and depend on folate status and one-carbon metabolism in general. Early folate status of patients with schizophrenia might be compromised as suggested by (i) coinciding incidences of schizophrenia and neural tube defects (NTDs) in the Dutch hunger winter, (ii) coinciding seasonal fluctuations in birth of patients with schizophrenia and NTDs, (iii) higher schizophrenia incidence in immigrants and (iv) higher incidence in methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase 677C-->T homozygotes. Recent studies in schizophrenia and autism point at epigenetic silencing of critical genes or chromosomal loci. The long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), arachidonic acid (AA, from meat) and docosahexaenoic acid (fish) are components of brain phospholipids and modulators of signal transduction and gene expression. Patients with schizophrenia and, possibly, autism exhibit abnormal phospholipid metabolism that might cause local AA depletion and impaired eicosanoid-mediated signal transduction. National fish intakes relate inversely with major and postpartum depressions. Five out of six randomized controlled trials with eicosapentaenoic acid (fish) have shown positive effects in schizophrenia, and 4 of 6 were favorable in depression and bipolar disorders. We conclude that folate and LCPUFA might be important in both the etiology and severity of at least some psychiatric diseases. PMID:16650750

  12. Discovery of boronic acid-based fluorescent probes targeting amyloid-beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seung-Jin; Lee, Jun Young; Kim, Tae Ho; Lee, Dong-Eun; Jeon, Jongho; Yang, Seung Dae; Hur, Min Goo; Min, Jung-Joon; Park, Yong Dae

    2016-04-01

    A boronic acid-based fluorescent probe was developed for diagnosis of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques from Alzheimer's disease (AD). Probe 4c, which included boronic acid as a functional group, exhibited a significant increase (64.37-fold, FAβ/F0) in fluorescence intensity as a response to Aβ aggregates, with a blue shift (105nm) in the maximum emission wavelength. We found that boronic acid as a functional group improved the binding affinity (KD value=0.79±0.05μM for 4c) for Aβ aggregates and confirmed that 4c selectively stained Aβ plaques in brain sections from APP/PS1 mice. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging using mice (normal and APP/PS1) also revealed that 4c was able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to stain Aβ plaques in the brain. From these results, we believe that 4c will be useful as a fluorescent probe in preclinical research related to AD. Furthermore, we believe that our results with boronic acid also provide valuable information for the development of a probe for Aβ plaques. PMID:26927427

  13. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels as Potential Pharmacological Targets in Peripheral and Central Nervous System Diseases.

    PubMed

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Banciu, Adela; Banciu, Daniel Dumitru; Radu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are widely expressed in the body and represent good sensors for detecting protons. The pH drop in the nervous system is equivalent to ischemia and acidosis, and ASICs are very good detectors in discriminating slight changes in acidity. ASICs are important pharmacological targets being involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes affecting both the peripheral nervous system (e.g., peripheral pain, diabetic neuropathy) and the central nervous system (e.g., stroke, epilepsy, migraine, anxiety, fear, depression, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.). This review discusses the role played by ASICs in different pathologies and the pharmacological agents acting on ASICs that might represent promising drugs. As the majority of above-mentioned pathologies involve not only neuronal dysfunctions but also microvascular alterations, in the next future, ASICs may be also considered as potential pharmacological targets at the vasculature level. Perspectives and limitations in the use of ASICs antagonists and modulators as pharmaceutical agents are also discussed.

  14. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  15. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a) and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure. PMID:26579442

  16. Amino acids and mTORC1: from lysosomes to disease

    PubMed Central

    Efeyan, Alejo; Zoncu, Roberto; Sabatini, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase controls growth and metabolism, and its deregulation underlies the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and diabetes. mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates signals arising from nutrients, energy, and growth factors, but how exactly these signals are propagated await to be fully understood. Recent findings have placed the lysosome, a key mediator of cellular catabolism, at the core of mTORC1 regulation by amino acids. A multiprotein complex that includes the Rag GTPases, Ragulator, and the v-ATPase forms an amino acid-sensing machinery on the lysosomal surface that affects the decision between cell growth and catabolism at multiple levels. The involvement of a catabolic organelle in growth signaling may have important implications for our understanding of mTORC1-related pathologies. PMID:22749019

  17. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wenxing

    2015-03-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a) and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure. PMID:26579442

  18. STROBE-Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Hospitalization Due to Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chit-Ming; Tsang, Hilda; Lai, Hak-Kan; Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Thomas, G. Neil; Chan, King-Pan; Lee, Siu-Yin; Ayres, Jon G.; Lam, Tai-Hing; Leung, Wai K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the effect of air pollution on the gastrointestinal (GI) system. We investigated the association between long-term exposures to outdoor fine particles (PM2.5) and hospitalization for peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs) in a large cohort of Hong Kong Chinese elderly. A total of 66,820 subjects aged ≥65 years who were enrolled in all 18 Government Elderly Health Service centers of Hong Kong participated in the study voluntarily between 1998 and 2001. They were prospectively followed up for more than 10 years. Annual mean exposures to PM2.5 at residence of individuals were estimated by satellite data through linkage with address details including floor level. All hospital admission records of the subjects up to December 31, 2010 were retrieved from the central database of Hospital Authority. We used Cox regression to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for PUD hospitalization associated with PM2.5 exposure after adjustment for individual and ecological covariates. A total of 60,273 subjects had completed baseline information including medical, socio-demographic, lifestyle, and anthropometric data at recruitment. During the follow-up period, 1991 (3.3%) subjects had been hospitalized for PUD. The adjusted HR for PUD hospitalization per 10 μg/m3 of PM2.5 was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.02–1.36, P = 0.02). Further analysis showed that the associations with PM2.5 were significant for gastric ulcers (HR 1.29; 1.09–1.53, P = 0.003) but not for duodenal ulcers (HR 0.98; 0.78 to 1.22, P = 0.81). Long-term exposures to PM2.5 were associated with PUD hospitalization in elder population. The mechanism underlying the PM2.5 in the development of gastric ulcers warrants further research. PMID:27149464

  19. Red blood cell membrane concentration of cis-palmitoleic and cis-vaccenic acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although previous studies have suggested associations between plasma palmitoleic acid and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including blood pressure, inflammation, and insulin resistance, little is known about the relation of palmitoleic acid and CHD. This ancillary study of the Physicians'...

  20. Membrane lipid modifications and therapeutic effects mediated by hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Manuel; Price, Samantha L; Fiol-Deroque, Maria A; Marcilla-Etxenike, Amaia; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Terés, Silvia; Katsouri, Loukia; Ordinas, Margarita; López, David J; Ibarguren, Maitane; Goñi, Félix M; Busquets, Xavier; Vitorica, Javier; Sastre, Magdalena; Escribá, Pablo V

    2014-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology with relevant unmet therapeutic needs. Both natural aging and AD have been associated with a significant decline in the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and accordingly, administration of DHA has been proposed as a possible treatment for this pathology. However, recent clinical trials in mild-to-moderately affected patients have been inconclusive regarding the real efficacy of DHA in halting this disease. Here, we show that the novel hydroxyl-derivative of DHA (2-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid - OHDHA) has a strong therapeutic potential to treat AD. We demonstrate that OHDHA administration increases DHA levels in the brain of a transgenic mouse model of AD (5xFAD), as well as those of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) species that carry long polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In 5xFAD mice, administration of OHDHA induced lipid modifications that were paralleled with a reduction in amyloid-β (Αβ) accumulation and full recovery of cognitive scores. OHDHA administration also reduced Aβ levels in cellular models of AD, in association with alterations in the subcellular distribution of secretases and reduced Aβ-induced tau protein phosphorylation as well. Furthermore, OHDHA enhanced the survival of neuron-like differentiated cells exposed to different insults, such as oligomeric Aβ and NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity. These results were supported by model membrane studies in which incorporation of OHDHA into lipid-raft-like vesicles was shown to reduce the binding affinity of oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ to membranes. Finally, the OHDHA concentrations used here did not produce relevant toxicity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. In conclusion, we demonstrate the pleitropic effects of OHDHA that might prove beneficial to treat AD, which suggests that an upstream event, probably the modulation of the membrane lipid composition and structure, influences cellular homeostasis reversing the

  1. Phytanic acid oxidation: normal activation and transport yet defective alpha-hydroxylation of phytanic acid in peroxisomes from Refsum disease and rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata.

    PubMed

    Pahan, K; Khan, M; Singh, I

    1996-05-01

    In humans the oxidation of phytanic acid is a peroxisomal function. To understand the possible mechanisms for the pathognomic accumulation of phytanic acid in plasma and body fluids of Refsum disease (RD) and rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP), we investigated activities of various steps (activation, transport, and oxidation) in the metabolism of phytanic acid in peroxisomes isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts from control, RD, and RCDP subjects. Activation of phytanic acid was normal in peroxisomes from both RD and RCDP. Transport of phytanic acid or phytanoyl-CoA in the absence or presence of fatty acid activating cofactors (ATP, MgCl2, and CoASH) into peroxisomes isolated from RD and RCDP skin fibroblasts was also similar to that of peroxisomes from control fibroblasts. Defective oxidation of [(2,3)-3H]- or [1-14C]phytanic acid, or [1-14C]phytanoyl-CoA (substrate for the first step of alpha-oxidation) but normal oxidation of [1-14C] alpha-hydroxyphytanic acid (substrate for the second step of the alpha-oxidation pathway) in peroxisomes from RD clearly demonstrates that excessive accumulation of phytanic acid in plasma and body fluids of RD is due to the deficiency of phytanic acid alpha-hydroxylase in peroxisomes. However, in RCDP peroxisomes, in addition to deficient oxidation of [1-14C]phytanic acid or phytanoyl-CoA or [(2,3)-3H]phytanic acid, the oxidation of [1-14C] alpha-hydroxyphytanic acid was also deficient, indicating that in RCDP the activities both of alpha-hydroxylation of phytanic acid and decarboxylation of alpha-hydroxyphytanic acid are deficient. These observations indicate that peroxisomal membrane functions (phytanic acid activation and transport) in phytanic acid metabolism are normal in both RD and RCDP. The defect in RD is in the alpha-hydroxylation of phytanic acid; whereas in RCDP both alpha-hydroxylation of phytanic acid as well as decarboxylation of alpha-hydroxyphytanic acid are deficient.

  2. Helicobacter pylori modulation of gastric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Calam, J.

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays major causative roles in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Elevated acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcers (DUs) contributes to duodenal injury, and diminished acid secretion in patients with gastric cancer allows carcinogen-producing bacteria to colonize the stomach. Eradication of H. pylori normalizes acid secretion both in hyper-secreting DU patients and hypo-secreting relatives of gastric cancer patients. Therefore, we and others have asked how H. pylori causes these disparate changes in acid secretion. H. pylori gastritis more or less restricted to the gastric antrum in DU patients is associated with increased acid secretion. This is probably because gastritis increases release of the antral acid-stimulating hormone gastrin and diminished mucosal expression of the inhibitory peptide somatostatin. Bacterial products and inflammatory cytokines including TNFalpha may cause these changes in endocrine function. Gastritis involving the gastric corpus tends to diminish acid secretion, probably because bacterial products and cytokines including IL-1 inhibit parietal cells. Pharmacological inhibition of acid secretion increases corpus gastritis in H. pylori-infected subjects, so it is envisaged that gastric hypo-secretion of any cause might become self-perpetuating. H. pylori-associated mucosal atrophy will also contribute to acid hypo-secretion and is more likely in when the diet is high in salt or lacking in antioxidant vitamins. Data on gastric acid secretion in patients with esophagitis are limited but suggest that acid secretion is normal or slightly diminished. Nevertheless, H. pylori infection may be relevant to the management of esophagitis because: (i) H. pylori infection increases the pH-elevating effect of acid inhibiting drugs; (ii) proton pump inhibitors may increase the tendency of H. pylori to cause atrophic gastritis; and (iii) successful eradication of H. pylori is reported to increase the likelihood of

  3. Resveratrol and Omega-3 Fatty Acid: Its Implications in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kakoti, Bibhuti Bhusan; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G; Kataki, Manjir Sarma; Shah, Kajri; Pathak, Yashwant; Panguluri, Siva Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The present review aims at summarizing the major therapeutic roles of resveratrol and omega-3 fatty acids (O3FAs) along with their related pathways. This article reviews some of the key studies involving the health benefits of resveratrol and O3FAs. Oxidative stress has been considered as one of the most important pathophysiological factors associated with various cardiovascular disease conditions. Resveratrol, with the potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties, has been proven to be a significantly protective compound in restoring the normal cardiac health. A plethora of research also demonstrated the reduction of the risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, and stroke, and their complications by O3FAs derived from fish and fish oils. This review describes the potential cardioprotective role of resveratrol and O3FAs in ameliorating the endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  4. Resveratrol and Omega-3 Fatty Acid: Its Implications in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kakoti, Bibhuti Bhusan; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Kataki, Manjir Sarma; Shah, Kajri; Pathak, Yashwant; Panguluri, Siva Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The present review aims at summarizing the major therapeutic roles of resveratrol and omega-3 fatty acids (O3FAs) along with their related pathways. This article reviews some of the key studies involving the health benefits of resveratrol and O3FAs. Oxidative stress has been considered as one of the most important pathophysiological factors associated with various cardiovascular disease conditions. Resveratrol, with the potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties, has been proven to be a significantly protective compound in restoring the normal cardiac health. A plethora of research also demonstrated the reduction of the risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, and stroke, and their complications by O3FAs derived from fish and fish oils. This review describes the potential cardioprotective role of resveratrol and O3FAs in ameliorating the endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26697434

  5. Rabeprazole: a second-generation proton pump inhibitor in the treatment of acid-related disease.

    PubMed

    Pallotta, Stefano; Pace, Fabio; Marelli, Silvia

    2008-08-01

    Rabeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) presenting a very advantageous pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile over older PPIs. In particular, this drug has a very fast onset of action, due to a short activation time and a very high pKa, and may therefore be defined as a 'second generation' PPI. The aim of this article is to provide an update on the pharmacology and clinical profile of rabeprazole and its use in acid-related disorders, with a particular focus on its role in gastroesophageal reflux disease; in the treatment and prevention of duodenal and gastric ulcers and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome; in the therapy of the extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (in particular the respiratory and ear, nose and throat ones); and in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  6. Corticosteroid and hyaluronic acid treatments in equine degenerative joint disease. A review.

    PubMed

    Nizolek, D J; White, K K

    1981-10-01

    Degenerative arthrosis is perhaps the most common debilitating disease of performance horses. Treatment should be based upon a knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of normal joints and upon an understanding of the processes of degeneration and repair. These topics are briefly reviewed. Although rest is probably, the most beneficial therapy, physical and pharmaceutical treatments are often employed in an effort to speed recovery. The effects and relative benefits of intrasynovial injections of corticosteroids, hyaluronica cid, and Arteparon are considered in detail. Although local corticosteroid therapy is inexpensive and is effective in reducing lameness caused by degenerative joint disease, it is rarely indicated. Septic arthritis and "steroid arthropathy" are two serious sequelae. Whereas the incidence of the former may be avoided through careful technique, the latter effect is inherent in the action of the drug. The accelerated rate of joint destruction observed in steroid arthropathy is due to suppression of chondrocyte metabolism and thus the processes of cartilage maintenance and repair. Hyaluronic acid is present in the synovial fluid and within the matrix of cartilage. The commercial preparation is no approved for use in the United States, but it is commonly obtained from other countries. Although hyaluronate apparently does not function in the lubrication of cartilage surfaces, it may improve lubrication of soft tissues thus decreasing resistance to joint movement and lessening pain. Reports substantiate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid in treating early cases of degenerative arthrosis despite the fact that the drug does not significantly promote cartilage healing. Arteparon, a polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been used in Europe for two decades in the treatment of degeneration joint disease and is currently being tested in this country. The drug is deposited within diseased cartilage and improves the functional properties of the cartilage as

  7. Alpha-lipoic acid as a pleiotropic compound with potential therapeutic use in diabetes and other chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marilia Brito; Negrato, Carlos Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid is a naturally occurring substance, essential for the function of different enzymes that take part in mitochondria's oxidative metabolism. It is believed that alpha-lipoic acid or its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid have many biochemical functions acting as biological antioxidants, as metal chelators, reducers of the oxidized forms of other antioxidant agents such as vitamin C and E, and modulator of the signaling transduction of several pathways. These above-mentioned actions have been shown in experimental studies emphasizing the use of alpha-lipoic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for many chronic diseases with great epidemiological as well economic and social impact such as brain diseases and cognitive dysfunctions like Alzheimer disease, obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, burning mouth syndrome, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, some types of cancer, glaucoma and osteoporosis. Many conflicting data have been found concerning the clinical use of alpha-lipoic acid in the treatment of diabetes and of diabetes-related chronic complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, wound healing and diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The most frequent clinical condition in which alpha-lipoic acid has been studied was in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 1 as well type 2 diabetes. Considering that oxidative stress, a imbalance between pro and antioxidants with excessive production of reactive oxygen species, is a factor in the development of many diseases and that alpha-lipoic acid, a natural thiol antioxidant, has been shown to have beneficial effects on oxidative stress parameters in various tissues we wrote this article in order to make an up-to-date review of current thinking regarding alpha-lipoic acid and its use as an antioxidant drug therapy for a myriad of diseases that could have potential benefits from its use.

  8. Alpha-lipoic acid as a pleiotropic compound with potential therapeutic use in diabetes and other chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marilia Brito; Negrato, Carlos Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid is a naturally occurring substance, essential for the function of different enzymes that take part in mitochondria's oxidative metabolism. It is believed that alpha-lipoic acid or its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid have many biochemical functions acting as biological antioxidants, as metal chelators, reducers of the oxidized forms of other antioxidant agents such as vitamin C and E, and modulator of the signaling transduction of several pathways. These above-mentioned actions have been shown in experimental studies emphasizing the use of alpha-lipoic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for many chronic diseases with great epidemiological as well economic and social impact such as brain diseases and cognitive dysfunctions like Alzheimer disease, obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, burning mouth syndrome, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, some types of cancer, glaucoma and osteoporosis. Many conflicting data have been found concerning the clinical use of alpha-lipoic acid in the treatment of diabetes and of diabetes-related chronic complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, wound healing and diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The most frequent clinical condition in which alpha-lipoic acid has been studied was in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 1 as well type 2 diabetes. Considering that oxidative stress, a imbalance between pro and antioxidants with excessive production of reactive oxygen species, is a factor in the development of many diseases and that alpha-lipoic acid, a natural thiol antioxidant, has been shown to have beneficial effects on oxidative stress parameters in various tissues we wrote this article in order to make an up-to-date review of current thinking regarding alpha-lipoic acid and its use as an antioxidant drug therapy for a myriad of diseases that could have potential benefits from its use. PMID:25104975

  9. Multiple Genome Sequences of Helicobacter pylori Strains of Diverse Disease and Antibiotic Resistance Backgrounds from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rehvathy, Vellaya; Tan, Mun Hua; Gunaletchumy, Selva Perumal; Teh, Xinsheng; Wang, Susana; Baybayan, Primo; Singh, Siddarth; Ashby, Meredith; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Mitchell, Hazel M; Croft, Laurence J; Goh, Khean Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes human gastroduodenal diseases, including chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. It is also a major microbial risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Twenty-one strains with different ethnicity, disease, and antimicrobial susceptibility backgrounds were sequenced by use of Illumina HiSeq and PacBio RS platforms.

  10. Resolvins and omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids: Clinical implications in inflammatory diseases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Kazuki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a central process in several disorders and contributes to cancer progression. Inflammation involves a complex cascade of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signaling events with protein and lipid mediators. Recent advances in lipid detection have revealed the importance of lipid mediators in inflammation. Omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) are found naturally in fish oil and have been extensively studied in multiple inflammatory diseases with improved outcomes. Resolvins are thought to be the active metabolites of ω-3 PUFA, and are responsible for facilitating the resolving phase of acute inflammation. Clinically, resolvins have been associated with resolution of acute kidney injury and acute lung injury, micro and macro vascular response to injury, and inhibition of microglia-activated inflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to inflammatory diseases, ω-3 PUFA and resolvins appear to modulate cancer progression. ω-3 PUFA intake has been associated with reduced inflammation in colorectal cancer, and favorable phenotype in breast cancer. Resolvins offer promising therapeutic potential as they may modulate inflammation with minimal side-effects, in contrast to currently available anti-inflammatory medications. This review describes the roles of ω-3 PUFA and resolvins in the inflammatory cascade, various inflammatory diseases, and specific cancers. Additionally, it will discuss the clinical therapeutic potential of resolvins as targets in inflammatory diseases and cancers. PMID:27458590

  11. Novel bile acid therapeutics for the treatment of chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hegade, Vinod S.; Speight, R. Alexander; Etherington, Rachel E.; Jones, David E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in understanding the role of bile acids (BAs) as signalling molecules in human metabolism and inflammation have opened new avenues in the field of hepatology research. BAs are no longer considered as simple molecules helping in fat digestion but as agents with real therapeutic value in treating complex autoimmune and metabolic liver diseases. BAs and their receptors such as farnesoid X receptor, transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor have been identified as novel targets for drug development. Some of these novel pharmaceuticals are already in clinical evaluation with the most advanced drugs having reached phase III trials. Chronic liver diseases such as primary biliary cholangitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, for which there is no or limited pharmacotherapy, are most likely to gain from these developments. In this review we discuss recent and the most relevant basic and clinical research findings related to BAs and their implications for novel therapy for chronic liver diseases. PMID:27134666

  12. Novel bile acid therapeutics for the treatment of chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Hegade, Vinod S; Speight, R Alexander; Etherington, Rachel E; Jones, David E J

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in understanding the role of bile acids (BAs) as signalling molecules in human metabolism and inflammation have opened new avenues in the field of hepatology research. BAs are no longer considered as simple molecules helping in fat digestion but as agents with real therapeutic value in treating complex autoimmune and metabolic liver diseases. BAs and their receptors such as farnesoid X receptor, transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor have been identified as novel targets for drug development. Some of these novel pharmaceuticals are already in clinical evaluation with the most advanced drugs having reached phase III trials. Chronic liver diseases such as primary biliary cholangitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, for which there is no or limited pharmacotherapy, are most likely to gain from these developments. In this review we discuss recent and the most relevant basic and clinical research findings related to BAs and their implications for novel therapy for chronic liver diseases.

  13. Outcomes in patients with nonerosive reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor and alginic acid ± glycyrrhetinic acid and anthocyanosides

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Gatti, Mario; Rapacioli, Giuliana; Ivaldi, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of alginic acid alone versus alginic acid combined with low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid and bilberry anthocyanosides as an addon to conventional proton pump inhibitor therapy in relieving symptoms associated with nonerosive reflux disease. Methods This prospective, randomized, 8-week, open-label trial was conducted at two centers. Sixty-three patients with persistent symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were eligible for the study. Patients in group A (n = 31) were treated with pantoprazole and a formula (Mirgeal®) containing alginic acid and low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + standardized Vaccinium myrtillus extract for 4 weeks, then crossed over to the multi-ingredient formula for a further 4 weeks. Patients in group B (n = 32) were treated pantoprazole and alginic acid alone twice daily, then crossed over to alginic acid twice daily for a further 4 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by medical evaluation of a symptom relief score, estimated using a visual analog scale (0–10). Side effects, tolerability, and compliance were also assessed. Results Of the 63 patients enrolled in the study, 58 (29 in group A and 29 in group B) completed the 8-week trial. The baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups. During the study, significant differences were recorded in symptom scores for both groups. In group A, symptoms of chest pain, heartburn, and abdominal swelling were less serious than in group B. Treatment A was better tolerated, did not induce hypertension, and had fewer side effects than treatment B. No significant differences in compliance were found between the two groups. Conclusion Use of low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + bilberry anthocyanosides, together with alginic acid as addon therapy, substantially improves symptoms in patients with nonerosive reflux disease without increasing side effects or worsening

  14. Overproduction of bioactive retinoic acid in cells expressing disease-associated mutants of retinol dehydrogenase 12.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Belyaeva, Olga V; Popov, Ivan K; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2007-12-01

    Retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase that in vitro catalyzes the reduction of all-trans-retinaldehyde to all-trans-retinol or the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde depending on substrate and cofactor availability. Recent studies have linked the mutations in RDH12 to severe early-onset autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy. The biochemical basis of photoreceptor cell death caused by mutations in RDH12 is not clear because the physiological role of RDH12 is not yet fully understood. Here we demonstrate that, although bi-directional in vitro, in living cells, RDH12 acts exclusively as a retinaldehyde reductase, shifting the retinoid homeostasis toward the increased levels of retinol and decreased levels of bioactive retinoic acid. The retinaldehyde reductase activity of RDH12 protects the cells from retinaldehyde-induced cell death, especially at high retinaldehyde concentrations, and this protective effect correlates with the lower levels of retinoic acid in RDH12-expressing cells. Disease-associated mutants of RDH12, T49M and I51N, exhibit significant residual activity in vitro, but are unable to control retinoic acid levels in the cells because of their dramatically reduced affinity for NADPH and much lower protein expression levels. These results suggest that RDH12 acts as a regulator of retinoic acid biosynthesis and protects photoreceptors against overproduction of retinoic acid from all-trans-retinaldehyde, which diffuses into the inner segments of photoreceptors from illuminated rhodopsin. These results provide a novel insight into the mechanism of retinal degeneration associated with mutations in RDH12 and are consistent with the observation that RDH12-null mice are highly susceptible to light-induced retinal apoptosis in cone and rod photoreceptors.

  15. Association between plasma omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease risk factors.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Véronique; Rudkowska, Iwona; Paradis, Ann-Marie; Godin, Gaston; Julien, Pierre; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2013-03-01

    The consumption of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FA), namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have been linked to reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The objective of this study was to examine the relation between n-3 FA in plasma phospholipid (PL) levels and CVD risk factors. n-3 FA levels in plasma PL were determined using gas chromatography in 100 obese (body mass index (BMI), ≥30 kg·m(-2)) and 100 nonobese selected individuals from the Quebec City metropolitan area. The CVD risk factors analysed were BMI, blood pressure, plasma lipids levels, and fasting plasma glucose. Significantly higher levels of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were observed in obese subjects, whereas significantly higher levels of DHA were observed in nonobese subjects. For CVD risk factors, ALA levels were positively correlated with plasma triglyceride concentrations and negatively associated with diastolic blood pressure. None of the CVD risk factors studied was linked to EPA levels. In addition, DPA was negatively related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and positively correlated with the total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio. DHA levels were negatively correlated with BMI, waist circumference, and plasma triglyceride levels, whereas a positive association was observed with HDL-C levels. Total n-3 FA percentages were negatively correlated with BMI. In conclusion, higher DHA percentages in plasma PL are associated with a more favourable CVD risk profile, whereas higher DPA percentages in plasma PL are associated with a more deteriorated CVD risk profile.

  16. Bile Acids and Dysbiosis in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bandsma, Robert; Comelli, Elena M.; Arendt, Bianca M.; Zhang, Ling; Fung, Scott; Fischer, Sandra E.; McGilvray, Ian G.; Allard, Johane P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by dysbiosis. The bidirectional effects between intestinal microbiota (IM) and bile acids (BA) suggest that dysbiosis may be accompanied by an altered bile acid (BA) homeostasis, which in turn can contribute to the metabolic dysregulation seen in NAFLD. This study sought to examine BA homeostasis in patients with NAFLD and to relate that with IM data. Methods This was a prospective, cross-sectional study of adults with biopsy-confirmed NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver: NAFL or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: NASH) and healthy controls (HC). Clinical and laboratory data, stool samples and 7-day food records were collected. Fecal BA profiles, serum markers of BA synthesis 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and intestinal BA signalling, as well as IM composition were assessed. Results 53 subjects were included: 25 HC, 12 NAFL and 16 NASH. Levels of total fecal BA, cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and BA synthesis were higher in patients with NASH compared to HC (p<0.05 for all comparisons). The primary to secondary BA ratio was higher in NASH compared to HC (p = 0.004), but ratio of conjugated to unconjugated BAs was not different between the groups. Bacteroidetes and Clostridium leptum counts were decreased in in a subset of 16 patients with NASH compared to 25 HC, after adjusting for body mass index and weight-adjusted calorie intake (p = 0.028 and p = 0.030, respectively). C. leptum was positively correlated with fecal unconjugated lithocholic acid (LCA) (r = 0.526, p = 0.003) and inversely with unconjugated CA (r = -0.669, p<0.0001) and unconjugated CDCA (r = - 0.630, p<0.0001). FGF19 levels were not different between the groups (p = 0.114). Conclusions In adults with NAFLD, dysbiosis is associated with altered BA homeostasis, which renders them at increased risk of hepatic injury. PMID:27203081

  17. Cyclooxygenase product inhibition with acetylsalicylic acid slows disease progression in the Han:SPRD-Cy rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Naser H M; Gregoire, Melanie; Devassy, Jessay G; Wu, Yinhong; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-01-01

    Renal cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids are elevated and lipoxygenase (LOX) products are reduced in the Han:SPRD-Cy rat model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Selective COX2 inhibition reduces kidney disease progression, but COX1 levels also are elevated in this model. Since the effect of reducing the products of both COX isoforms and the role of LOX products is not known, weanling normal and diseased Han:SPRD-cy littermates were given either low dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), nordihydroguaiaretic (NDGA) or no treatment for eight weeks. Renal eicosanoids were altered in the diseased compared to normal cortex, with COX products being higher and LOX products being lower. ASA reduced COX products, cyst growth and kidney water content, while NDGA reduced LOX products without altering disease progression or kidney function. Hence, a human equivalent ASA dose equal to less than one regular strength aspirin per day slowed disease progression, while further reduction of LOX products did not worsen disease progression.

  18. Re-treatment of relapsed Paget's disease of bone with zoledronic acid: results from an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R; Brown, Jacques P; Levitt, Naomi; Román Ivorra, José A; Bachiller-Corral, Javier; Ross, Ian L; Su, Guoqin; Antunez-Flores, Oscar; Aftring, R Paul

    2013-01-01

    Six patients from the phase 3 trials of zoledronic acid in Paget's disease, who had received zoledronic acid initially and had subsequently relapsed, were entered into an open re-treatment study. Following re-treatment, each patient reached similar absolute nadirs of serum alkaline phosphatase to those recorded after their first dose. No significant adverse events were reported. It is concluded that, while re-treatment of Paget's disease with zoledronic acid is rarely needed, it is safe and effective, with no evidence of treatment resistance based on this small cohort. PMID:24422139

  19. [Neurosis and genetic theory of etiology and pathogenesis of ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kolotilova, M L; Ivanov, L N

    2014-01-01

    Based on the analysis of literature data and our own research, we have developed the original concept of etiology and pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. An analysis of the literature shows that none of the theories of pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease does not cover the full diversity of the involved functions and their shifts, which lead to the development of ulcers in the stomach and the duodenum. Our neurogenic-genetic theory of etiology and pathogenesis of gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer very best explains the cause-and-effect relationships in the patient peptic ulcer, allowing options for predominance in one or the other case factors of neurosis or genetic factors. However, it is clear that the only other: combination of neurogenic factor with genetically modified reactivity of gastroduodenal system (the presence of the target organ) cause the chronicity of the sores. The theory of peptic ulcer disease related to psychosomatic pathologies allows us to develop effective schema therapy, including drugs with psychocorrective action. On the basis of our theory of the role of Helicobacter pylori infection is treated as a pathogenetic factor in the development of peptic ulcer disease.

  20. [Neurosis and genetic theory of etiology and pathogenesis of ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kolotilova, M L; Ivanov, L N

    2014-01-01

    Based on the analysis of literature data and our own research, we have developed the original concept of etiology and pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. An analysis of the literature shows that none of the theories of pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease does not cover the full diversity of the involved functions and their shifts, which lead to the development of ulcers in the stomach and the duodenum. Our neurogenic-genetic theory of etiology and pathogenesis of gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer very best explains the cause-and-effect relationships in the patient peptic ulcer, allowing options for predominance in one or the other case factors of neurosis or genetic factors. However, it is clear that the only other: combination of neurogenic factor with genetically modified reactivity of gastroduodenal system (the presence of the target organ) cause the chronicity of the sores. The theory of peptic ulcer disease related to psychosomatic pathologies allows us to develop effective schema therapy, including drugs with psychocorrective action. On the basis of our theory of the role of Helicobacter pylori infection is treated as a pathogenetic factor in the development of peptic ulcer disease. PMID:25562999

  1. Helicobacter and disease: still more questions than answers

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Gabor

    2000-01-01

    Since the causative role of Helicobacter pylori in peptic ulcer and gastritis was established, a number of advances have been made. Helicobacter virulence factors have been identified, the changes it causes in gastric acid secretion has been elucidated, and the entire genome of H. pylori has been mapped. Multiple lines of evidence indicate a strong link between the bacterium and noncardia gastric cancer. The infection can be confidently diagnosed by noninvasive serologic tests and the urea breath test. Triple therapy is almost always curative, and the infection almost never recurs in Canadian adults, but eradicating the bacteria in the absence of peptic ulcer only rarely leads to resolution of dyspepsia. New studies suggest that treating Helicobacter may increase the risk of peptic esophagitis and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and cardia. PMID:11045091

  2. Folic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acids improve cognitive function and prevent depression, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease--but how and why?

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Low blood folate and raised homocysteine concentrations are associated with poor cognitive function. Folic acid supplementation improves cognitive function. Folic acid enhances the plasma concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). EPA, DHA, and arachidonic acid (AA) are of benefit in dementia and Alzheimer's disease by up-regulating gene expression concerned with neurogenesis, neurotransmission and connectivity, improving endothelial nitric oxide (eNO) generation, enhancing brain acetylcholine levels, and suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. EPA, DHA, and AA also form precursors to anti-inflammatory compounds such as lipoxins, resolvins, and neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) that protect neurons from the cytotoxic action of various noxious stimuli. Furthermore, various neurotrophins and statins enhance the formation of NPD1 and thus, protect neurons from oxidative stress and prevent neuronal apoptosis Folic acid improves eNO generation, enhances plasma levels of EPA/DHA and thus, could augment the formation of NPD1. These results suggest that a combination of EPA, DHA, AA and folic acid could be of significant benefit in dementia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease and improve cognitive function.

  3. The Refsum disease marker phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid, affects Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondria, and reduces cell viability in rat hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Stefan; Schönfeld, Peter; Reiser, Georg

    2005-02-01

    The saturated branched chain fatty acid, phytanic acid, a degradation product of chlorophyll, accumulates in Refsum disease, an inherited peroxisomal disorder with neurological clinical features. To elucidate the pathogenic mechanism, we investigated the influence of phytanic acid on cellular physiology of rat hippocampal astrocytes. Phytanic acid (100 microM) induced an immediate transient increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, followed by a plateau. The peak of this biphasic Ca2+ response was largely independent of extracellular Ca2+, indicating activation of cellular Ca2+ stores by phytanic acid. Phytanic acid depolarized mitochondria without causing in situ swelling of mitochondria. The slow decrease of mitochondrial potential is not consistent with fast and simultaneous opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. However, phytanic acid induced substantial generation of reactive oxygen species. Phytanic acid caused astroglia cell death after a few hours of exposure. We suggest that the cytotoxic effect of phytanic acid seems to be due to a combined action on Ca2+ regulation, mitochondrial depolarization, and increased ROS generation in brain cells.

  4. Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and salicylic acid act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Srivathsa C; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Mandal, Mihir K; Zhu, Shifeng; Chandra-Shekara, A C; Xia, Ye; Hersh, Matthew; Stromberg, Arnold J; Navarre, DuRoy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2009-07-01

    Resistance (R) protein-associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non-race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4), senescence associated gene 101 (SAG101), and EDS5, have been identified as components of resistance derived from many R proteins. Here, we show that EDS1 and SA fulfill redundant functions in defense signaling mediated by R proteins, which were thought to function independent of EDS1 and/or SA. Simultaneous mutations in EDS1 and the SA-synthesizing enzyme SID2 compromised hypersensitive response and/or resistance mediated by R proteins that contain coiled coil domains at their N-terminal ends. Furthermore, the expression of R genes and the associated defense signaling induced in response to a reduction in the level of oleic acid were also suppressed by compromising SA biosynthesis in the eds1 mutant background. The functional redundancy with SA was specific to EDS1. Results presented here redefine our understanding of the roles of EDS1 and SA in plant defense.

  5. Intraneuronal Amyloid β Accumulation and Oxidative Damage to Nucleic Acids in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Tamaoki, Toshio; Tanaka, Koich; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Masao; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Shimohama, Shun; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George

    2010-01-01

    An in situ approach was used to identify amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in postmortem brain tissue of the hippocampal formation from subjects with Alzheimer disease. When carboxyl-terminal specific antibodies directed against Aβ40 and Aβ42 were used for immunocytochemical analyses, Aβ42 was especially apparent within the neuronal cytoplasm, at sites not detected by the antibody specific to Aβ-oligomer. In comparison to the Aβ42-positive neurons, neurons bearing oxidative damage to nucleic acids were more widely distributed in the hippocampus. Comparative density measurements of the immunoreactivity revealed that levels of intraneuronal Aβ42 were inversely correlated with levels of intraneuronal 8-hydroxyguanosine, an oxidized nucleoside (r = − 0.61, p < 0.02). Together with recent evidence that the Aβ peptide can act as an antioxidant, these results suggest that intraneuronal accumulation of non-oligomeric Aβ may be a compensatory response in neurons to oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease. PMID:20034567

  6. Prevention of Alzheimer's disease: Omega-3 fatty acid and phenolic anti-oxidant interventions.

    PubMed

    Cole, Greg M; Lim, Giselle P; Yang, Fusheng; Teter, Bruce; Begum, Aynun; Ma, Qiulan; Harris-White, Marni E; Frautschy, Sally A

    2005-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are syndromes of aging that share analogous lesions and risk factors, involving lipoproteins, oxidative damage and inflammation. Unlike in CVD, in AD, sensitive biomarkers are unknown, and high-risk groups are understudied. To identify potential prevention strategies in AD, we have focused on pre-clinical models (transgenic and amyloid infusion models), testing dietary/lifestyle factors strongly implicated in reducing risk in epidemiological studies. Initially, we reported the impact of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), notably ibuprofen, which reduced amyloid accumulation, but suppressed few inflammatory markers and without reducing oxidative damage. Safety concerns with chronic NSAIDs led to a screen of alternative NSAIDs and identification of the phenolic anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant compound curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric that we found targeted multiple AD pathogenic cascades. The dietary omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), also limited amyloid, oxidative damage and synaptic and cognitive deficits in a transgenic mouse model. Both DHA and curcumin have favorable safety profiles, epidemiology and efficacy, and may exert general anti-aging benefits (anti-cancer and cardioprotective.).

  7. Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by citric acid and sodium carbonate with deicers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-11-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at -20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at -20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose.

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid liposomes for targeting chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer: an in vitro assessment

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Jordan, Nan Yeun; Verhoef, Johan JF; Metselaar, Josbert M; Storm, Gert; Kok, Robbert J

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, oxidative stress, and uncontrolled cell proliferation are common key features of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis and cancer. ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs; also known as omega3 fatty acids or fish oil) have beneficial effects against inflammation upon dietary consumption. However, these effects cannot be fully exploited unless diets are enriched with high concentrations of fish oil supplements over long periods of time. Here, a nanomedicine-based approach is presented for delivering effective levels of PUFAs to inflammatory cells. Nanoparticles are internalized by immune cells, and hence can adequately deliver bioactive lipids into these target cells. The ω3 FA docosahexaenoic acid was formulated into liposomes (ω-liposomes), and evaluated for anti-inflammatory effects in different types of immune cells. ω-Liposomes strongly inhibited the release of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species from human neutrophils and murine macrophages, and also inhibited the production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and MCP1. Moreover, ω-liposomes inhibited tumor-cell proliferation when evaluated in FaDu head and neck squamous carcinoma and 4T1 breast cancer cells in in vitro cultures. We propose that ω-liposomes are a promising nanonutraceutical formulation for intravenous delivery of fish oil FAs, which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory disorders and cancer. PMID:27785012

  9. Efficacy of acid suppression therapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease-related chronic laryngitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Wu, Haitao; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This research aims to assess the response to acid suppression therapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related chronic laryngitis (CL). Methods: Data were extracted from Web of Knowledge, Embase, and PubMed for English language article published up to March 2016. Pooled overall response rate (ORR) rates were evaluated to determine acid suppression treatment efficacy. Random effects model was used with standard approaches to sensitivity analysis, quality assessment, heterogeneity, and exploration of publication bias. Results: Pooled data from 21 reports (N = 2864, antireflux medicine: 2741; antireflux surgery: 123, study duration 4–108 week) were analyzed. With the random-effect model, the ORR was 66% (95% confidence interval [CI] 54%–78%). The ORRs were 80% for antireflux surgery (95% CI 67%–93%, 3 studies, 123 patients), whereas 64% for antireflux medicine (95% CI 50%–77%, 18 studies, 2741 patients), and the ORR was 70% (95% CI 55%–85%, 15 reports, 2731 patients) for >8 weeks’ therapy duration, whereas 57% (95% CI 48%–65%, 6 reports, 133 patients) for ≤8 weeks’ duration of therapy. Conclusions: Acid suppression seems to be an effective therapy for GERD-related CL. There was an increase in effect among patients with surgery therapeutic method and longer therapy duration. PMID:27749540

  10. Regional anomalies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; comparison with acid air pollution particulate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Winchester, J W

    1989-01-01

    Mortality rates due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for males and females in standard metropolitan statistical areas are highest in two broad regions of the U.S. One is the southeast, with age-adjusted rates high in Georgia and north Florida but decreasing toward south Florida; the other is the western plains, with rates high in Colorado and north Texas but decreasing toward south Texas. Rates are generally low in the northeast, upper midwest, and far west, as well as in the largest cities of these regions. These geographic patterns suggest that atmospheric environmental conditions may contribute to the risk of COPD. Based on measured aerosol characteristics and atmospheric chemical reasoning, it is argued that ambient air in the high COPD regions may be especially irritating to the respiratory tract because of fine particles that contain the reaction products of acid air pollutants. In the southeast, sulfuric acid aerosol concentrations are high, apparently because of a sunny warm humid climate that favors rapid oxidation of sulfur dioxide as well as the region's proximity to large primary air pollution sources further north. Particulate sulfur is also associated with soil mineral constituents. In the western plains, concentrations of alkaline dust are high because of soil erosion during windy dry conditions. Acid air pollutants can be scavenged to mineral particle surfaces and form chemical reaction products that may include solubilized mineral aluminum. These may be inhaled and deposited in the respiratory tract so as to contribute to COPD mortality risk.

  11. Inactivation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Citric Acid and Sodium Carbonate with Deicers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at −20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at −20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. PMID:26319879

  12. Pilot study of omega-3 fatty acid supplements in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Okpala, Iheanyi; Ibegbulam, Obike; Duru, Augustine; Ocheni, Sunday; Emodi, Ifeoma; Ikefuna, Anthony; Umar, Garba; Asinobi, Isaac; Madu, Anazoeze; Okoye, Augustine; Nwagha, Tessy; Oguonu, Uche; Uamai, Ify; Agwu, Obineche; Nonyelu, Charles; Anike, Uche; Agu, Kingsley; Anigbo, Chukwudi; Chukwura, Awele; Ugwu, Ogechukwu; Herrada, Sagrario

    2011-07-01

    In a previous retrospective study, it was observed that the greater the amounts of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the blood, the lesser the number of complications of sickle cell disease (SCD) and the higher the steady state haemoglobin level. SCD causes ischaemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation; which can be ameliorated by a metabolite of DHA that down-regulates expression of pro-inflammatory genes. The objectives of this prospective pilot study were to evaluate the effects of DHA and EPA supplements in SCD, and test the hypothesis that these effects are mediated partly by reducing inflammation. Oral DHA and EPA supplements were given to 16 SCD patients for 6 months. We then compared pre- and post-supplementation values of number of crisis, steady state Hb, plasma unconjugated bilirubin and three indices of inflammation: plasma interleukin-6, blood neutrophil and platelet counts. There was a significant reduction in the plasma level of unconjugated bilirubin, and the number of sickle cell crisis; but not in the markers of inflammation. The pilot data suggest that DHA and EPA supplements reduce the number of crisis and steady state haemolysis in SCD; but provide no evidence that these effects are mediated by reducing inflammation.

  13. Mutations at the lysosomal acid cholesteryl ester hydrolase gene locus in Wolman disease.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R A; Byrum, R S; Coates, P M; Sando, G N

    1994-01-01

    The genomic sequences encoding the human lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (sterol esterase; EC 3.1.1.13) have been isolated and sequenced, and the information has been used to identify mutations in both alleles of the gene from a patient with Wolman disease, an autosomal recessive lysosomal lipid storage disorder. The genomic locus consists of 10 exons spread over 36 kb. The 5' flanking region is G+C-rich and has characteristics of a "housekeeping" gene promoter. One of the identified mutations involves the insertion of a T residue after position 634, resulting in the appearance of an in-frame translation stop signal 13 codons downstream. The second mutation is a T-to-C transition at nucleotide 638. This results in a leucine-to-proline substitution at amino acid 179 and is predicted to lead to the disruption of the alpha-helical structure in a highly conserved region of the protein. These mutations are each capable of completely disrupting the catalytic function of the lysosomal acid cholesteryl ester hydrolase; their presence can account for the extreme phenotype of the lysosomal lipid storage disorder manifested in members of this patient's family. Images PMID:8146180

  14. Estimation of Salivary and Serum Total Sialic Acid Levels in Periodontal Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Surekha R; Kolte, Abhay P; Gupta, Madhur

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic gingivitis and periodontitis are inflammatory diseases. An important function of host sialic acid is to regulate innate immunity. The aim of the study was to assess the concentration of Total sialic acid (TSA) in saliva and serum and also to find out their association if any, in periodontal health and disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 subjects were clinically examined and distributed into three groups (n=30) according to the periodontal status namely healthy, chronic gingivitis and chronic periodontitis.Clinical measurements including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, oral hygeine index were recorded .TSA concentration was determined in saliva and serum of all subjects. Results: In healthy group the mean salivary TSA level was 39.05mg/dl ±6.35(p<0.0001), mean serum TSA level was 49.75 mg/dl ± 4.87 (p<0.0001). In the chronic gingivitis group the mean salivary TSA level was 68.23 mg/dl ± 2.71 (p<0.0001), mean serum TSA level was 65.65 mg/dl ±3.56 (p<0.0001). In the chronic periodontitis group the mean salivary TSA was 81.33 mg/dl ±3.94 (p<0.0001), mean serum TSA level was 75.98 mg/dl ±3.58 (p<0.0001). Conclusion:The present data indicates that salivary & serum TSA levels can differentiate between chronic periodontitis patients and normal individuals. Thus it can be used as an adjunct to diagnose, monitor response to therapy, to determine the current periodontal disease status and to assess the treatment outcomes. PMID:25386514

  15. L-2-Oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid reverses endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vita, J A; Frei, B; Holbrook, M; Gokce, N; Leaf, C; Keaney, J F

    1998-01-01

    The effective action of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO) is impaired in patients with atherosclerosis. This impairment has been attributed in part to increased vascular oxidative stress. EDNO action is improved by administration of ascorbic acid, a water-soluble antioxidant. Ascorbic acid is a potent free-radical scavenger in plasma, and also regulates intracellular redox state in part by sparing cellular glutathione. We specifically investigated the role of intracellular redox state in EDNO action by examining the effect of L-2-oxo-4-thiazolidine carboxylate (OTC) on EDNO-dependent, flow-mediated dilation in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study of patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease. OTC augments intracellular glutathione by providing substrate cysteine for glutathione synthesis. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was examined with high-resolution ultrasound before and after oral administration of 4.5 g of OTC or placebo in 48 subjects with angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Placebo treatment produced no change in flow-mediated dilation (7.0+/-3.9% vs. 7.2+/-3.7%), whereas OTC treatment was associated with a significant improvement in flow-mediated dilation (6.6+/-4.4% vs. 11.0+/-6.3%; P = 0.005). OTC had no effect on arterial dilation to nitroglycerin, systemic blood pressure, heart rate, or reactive hyperemia. These data suggest that augmenting cellular glutathione levels improves EDNO action in human atherosclerosis. Cellular redox state may be an important regulator of EDNO action, and is a potential target for therapy in patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:9502783

  16. Scoring systems for outcome prediction in patients with perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) often present with acute, severe illness that carries a high risk for morbidity and mortality. Mortality ranges from 3-40% and several prognostic scoring systems have been suggested. The aim of this study was to review the available scoring systems for PPU patients, and to assert if there is evidence to prefer one to the other. Material and methods We searched PubMed for the mesh terms “perforated peptic ulcer”, “scoring systems”, “risk factors”, ”outcome prediction”, “mortality”, ”morbidity” and the combinations of these terms. In addition to relevant scores introduced in the past (e.g. Boey score), we included recent studies published between January 2000 and December 2012) that reported on scoring systems for prediction of morbidity and mortality in PPU patients. Results A total of ten different scoring systems used to predict outcome in PPU patients were identified; the Boey score, the Hacettepe score, the Jabalpur score the peptic ulcer perforation (PULP) score, the ASA score, the Charlson comorbidity index, the sepsis score, the Mannheim Peritonitis Index (MPI), the Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), the simplified acute physiology score II (SAPS II), the Mortality probability models II (MPM II), the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity physical sub-score (POSSUM-phys score). Only four of the scores were specifically constructed for PPU patients. In five studies the accuracy of outcome prediction of different scoring systems was evaluated by receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC) analysis, and the corresponding area under the curve (AUC) among studies compared. Considerable variation in performance both between different scores and between different studies was found, with the lowest and highest AUC reported between 0.63 and 0.98, respectively. Conclusion While the Boey score and the ASA score

  17. Prostaglandins in peptic ulcer disease: effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds (NOSAC).

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Obtułowicz, W; Oleksy, J; Sito, E; Kopp, B

    1984-01-01

    This study shows that human fundic mucosa generates various PGs, particularly PGE2, and thromboxanes and this generation appears to be significantly lower in gastric ulcer than in duodenal ulcer patients or normal subjects. Non-steroidal antiinflammatory compounds (NOSAC), such as aspirin and indomethacin, greatly reduce the PG biosynthesis and cause mucosal damage including mucosal erosions and haemorrhages observed at endoscopy, increased gastric microbleeding and DNA loss. In contrast, carprofen, a novel NOSAC with good antiinflammatory properties and gastric tolerance, failed to affect mucosal generation of PGs and did not influence gastric mucosal integrity. This study indicates that the deficiency of endogenous PGs may play a role in the pathogenesis ulcer and that the degree of gastric mucosal damage by NOSAC is closely related to the alteration in the capability of the mucosa to generate PGs.

  18. Is Childhood Physical Abuse Associated with Peptic Ulcer Disease? Findings from a Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Bottoms, Jennifer; Brennenstuhl, Sarah; Hurd, Marion

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated childhood physical abuse and ulcers in a regionally representative community sample. Age, race and sex were controlled for in addition to five clusters of potentially confounding factors: adverse childhood conditions, adult socioeconomic status, current health behaviors, current stress and marital status, and history of…

  19. Viral RNA modulates the acid sensitivity of foot-and-mouth disease virus capsids.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, S; Abrams, C C; Fry, E; Crowther, J C; Belsham, G J; Stuart, D I; King, A M

    1995-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) manifests an extreme sensitivity to acid, which is thought to be important for entry of the RNA genome into the cell. We have compared the low-pH-induced disassembly in vitro of virions and natural empty capsids of three subtypes of serotype A FMDV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. For all three subtypes (A22 Iraq 24/64, A10(61), and A24 Cruzeiro), the empty capsid was more stable by 0.5 pH unit on average than the corresponding virion. Unexpectedly, in the natural empty capsids used in this study, the precursor capsid protein VP0 was found largely to be cleaved into VP2 and VP4. For picornaviruses the processing of VP0 is closely associated with encapsidation of viral RNA, which is considered likely to play a catalytic role in the cleavage. Investigation of the cleavage of VP0 in natural empty capsids failed to implicate the viral RNA. However, it remains possible that these particles arise from abortive attempts to encapsidate RNA. Empty capsids expressed from a vaccinia virus recombinant showed essentially the same acid lability as natural empty capsids, despite differing considerably in the extent of VP0 processing, with the synthetic particles containing almost exclusively uncleaved VP0. These results indicate that it is the viral RNA that modulates acid lability in FMDV. In all cases the capsids dissociate at low pH directly into pentameric subunits. Comparison of the three viruses indicates that FMDV A22 Iraq is about 0.5 pH unit more sensitive to low pH than types A10(61) and A24 Cruzeiro. Sequence analysis of the three subtypes identified several differences at the interface between pentamers and highlighted a His-alpha-helix dipole interaction which spans the pentamer interface and appears likely to influence the acid lability of the virus. PMID:7983739

  20. Folic Acid Supplementation Mitigates Alzheimer's Disease by Reducing Inflammation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Shuai; Ji, Lu; Wu, Tianfeng; Ji, Yong; Zhou, Yuying; Zhang, Meilin; Xu, Weili; Huang, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims. Low serum folate levels can alter inflammatory reactions. Both phenomena have been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the effect of folic acid on AD itself is unclear. We quantified folate supplementation's effect on inflammation and cognitive function in patients with AD over the course of 6 months. Methods. Patients newly diagnosed with AD (age > 60 years; n = 121; mild to severe; international criteria) and being treated with donepezil were randomly assigned into two groups with (intervention group) or without (control group) supplemental treatment with folic acid (1.25 mg/d) for 6 months. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was administered to all patients at baseline and follow-up, and blood samples were taken before and after treatment. We quantified serum folate, amyloid beta (Aβ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), plasma homocysteine (Hcy), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and the mRNA levels of presenilin (PS), IL-6, and TNFα in leukocytes. Data were analyzed using a repeated-measures mixed model. Results. The mean MMSE was slightly increased in the intervention group compared to that in the control group (P < 0.05). Posttreatment, plasma SAM and SAM/SAH levels were significantly higher (P < 0.05), while Aβ40, PS1-mRNA, and TNFα-mRNA levels were lower in the intervention group than in the control group (P < 0.05). The Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio was also higher in the intervention group (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Folic acid is beneficial in patients with AD. Inflammation may play an important role in the interaction between folic acid and AD. This trial is registered with clinical trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC-13003246. PMID:27340344

  1. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: diagnosis and treatment of Wolman and Cholesteryl Ester Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Porto, Anthony F

    2014-09-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is responsible for the hydrolysis of cholesterol esters and triglycerides. LAL is coded by the LIPA gene on chromosome 10q23.31. Its deficiency leads to two autosomal recessive disorders, Wolman disease (WD) and Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease (CESD). WD has an estimated incidence of 1 in 500,000 live births and is the result of a complete loss of LAL and presents in infancy with vomiting, diarrhea, poor weight gain and hepatomegaly subsequently leading to death. CESD is the result of partial loss of LAL and its presentation is more variable. Patients may be asymptomatic or present with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases and dystipidemia which may be confused with the diagnosis of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. CESD is currently underdiagnosed and has an estimated prevalence as high as I in 40,000 individuals. Radiologic findings in WD is calcification of the adrenal glands. Hepatomegaly is noted on CT scan in both WD and CESD. MRI may demonstrate accumulation of cholesterol esters and may be useful to study effects of potential medical therapies. The diagnosis of WD and CESD is based on LIPA gene sequencing and the measurement of LAL levels in peripheral blood leukocytes. Treatment of LAL deficiency is currently limited to control of cholesterol levels and to prevent premature atherosclerosis. Use of enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human LAL in short-term studies has shown to be safe and effective. PMID:25345094

  2. Does Lysosomial Acid Lipase Reduction Play a Role in Adult Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Polimeni, Licia; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, responsible for hydrolysing the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Wolman Disease represents the early onset phenotype of LAL deficiency rapidly leading to death. Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is a late onset phenotype that occurs with fatty liver, elevated aminotransferase levels, hepatomegaly and dyslipidaemia, the latter characterized by elevated LDL-C and low HDL-C. The natural history and the clinical manifestations of the LAL deficiency in adults are not well defined, and the diagnosis is often incidental. LAL deficiency has been suggested as an under-recognized cause of dyslipidaemia and fatty liver. Therefore, LAL activity may be reduced also in non-obese patients presenting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), unexplained persistently elevated liver transaminases or with elevation in LDL cholesterol. In these patients, it could be indicated to test LAL activity. So far, very few studies have been performed to assess LAL activity in representative samples of normal subjects or patients with NAFLD. Moreover, no large study has been carried out in adult subjects with NAFLD or cryptogenic cirrhosis. PMID:26602919

  3. The Relationship between Uric Acid Levels and Huntington’s Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Auinger, Peggy; Kieburtz, Karl; McDermott, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) may be associated with the progression of Parkinson’s disease and related neurodegenerative conditions; however, its association with Huntington’s disease (HD) progression has not been explored. A secondary analysis of 347 subjects from the CARE-HD clinical trial was performed to examine the relationship between baseline UA levels and the level of functional decline in HD. Outcomes included change in scores at 30 months for the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale components. There was less worsening of total functional capacity over time with increasing baseline UA levels (adjusted mean worsening in scores: 3.17, 2.99, 2.95, 2.28, 2.21, from lowest to highest UA quintile, p=0.03). These data suggest a possible association between higher UA levels and slower HD progression, particularly as measured by total functional capacity. If confirmed, UA could be an important predictor and potentially modifiable factor affecting the rate of HD progression. PMID:20063429

  4. Establishment of hydrochloric acid/lipopolysaccharide-induced pelvic inflammatory disease model

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yeonsu; Lee, Jaehun; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Hahn, Tae-Wook; Yoon, Byung-Il; Han, Jeong-Hee; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Park, Joung Jun; Koo, Deog-Bon; Rhee, Ki-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which is one of the most problematic complications experienced by women with sexually transmitted diseases, frequently causes secondary infections after reproductive abnormalities in veterinary animals. Although the uterus is self-protective, it becomes fragile during periods or pregnancy. To investigate PID, bacteria or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from gram negative bacteria has been used to induce the disease in several animal models. However, when LPS is applied to the peritoneum, it often causes systemic sepsis leading to death and the PID was not consistently demonstrated. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) has been used to induce inflammation in the lungs and stomach but not tested for reproductive organs. In this study, we developed a PID model in mice by HCl and LPS sequential intracervical (i.c.) administration. The proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, were detected in the mouse uterus by western blot analysis and cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after HCl (25 mg/kg) administration i.c. followed by four LPS (50 mg/kg) treatments. Moreover, mice exhibited increased infiltration of neutrophils in the endometrium and epithelial layer. These results suggest that ic co-administration of HCl and LPS induces PID in mice. This new model may provide a consistent and reproducible PID model for future research. PMID:26726020

  5. The Effect of Lipoic Acid Therapy on Cognitive Functioning in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Antonietta; Pirritano, Domenico; Plastino, Massimiliano; Cristiano, Dario; Puccio, Giovanna; Colica, Carmen; Ermio, Caterina; De Bartolo, Matteo; Mauro, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most diabetic patients have insulin resistance (IR) that is associated with compensatory hyperinsulinemia, one of the mechanisms suggested for increased AD risk in patients with DM. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is a disulfide molecule with antioxidant properties that has positive effects on glucose metabolism and IR. This study evaluated the effect of ALA treatment (600 mg/day) on cognitive performances in AD patients with and without DM. One hundred and twenty-six patients with AD were divided into two groups, according to DM presence (group A) or absence (group B). Cognitive functions were assessed by MMSE, Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive (ADAS-Cog), Clinician's Interview-Based Impression of Severity (CIBIC), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), and Alzheimer's Disease Functional and Change Scale (ADFACS). IR was assessed by HOMA index. At the end of the study, MMSE scores showed a significant improvement in 43% patients of group A (26 subjects) and 23% of group B (15 subjects), compared to baseline (P = .001). Also ADAS-Cog, CIBIC, and ADFACS scores showed a significant improvement in group A versus group B. IR was higher in group A. Our study suggests that ALA therapy could be effective in slowing cognitive decline in patients with AD and IR. PMID:26316990

  6. Ascorbic acid: its role in immune system and chronic inflammation diseases.

    PubMed

    Sorice, Angela; Guerriero, Eliana; Capone, Francesca; Colonna, Giovanni; Castello, Giuseppe; Costantini, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA), also known as vitamin C, was initially identified as the factor preventing the scurvy disease, and became very popular for its antioxidant properties. It is an important co-substrate of a large class of enzymes, and regulates gene expression by interacting with important transcription factors. AA is important in all stressful conditions that are linked to inflammatory processes and involve immunity. It has been known for decades that the persistence of an inflammatory stimulus is responsible for the onset of many diseases. AA is essential to stimulate the immune system by increasing the strength and protection of the organism. Therefore, its immunostimulant, antinflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial roles are well known, we have summarized its main functions in different types of diseases related to the immune system and chronic inflammation. We can conclude that AA, due to its effects and diversity of regulated pathways, is suitable for use in various fields of medicine including immunology, toxicology, radiobiology and others. AA is not preferable to be used as an isolated mode of treatment, but it can be co-applied as an adjuvant to regulate immunity, gene expression and other important physiological processes. However, we propose that future studies will take into consideration the research of new combinations of antioxidant natural substances and drugs. PMID:24766384

  7. Murine Trinitrobenzoic Acid-Induced Colitis as a Model of Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuemmerle, John F

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, result from the uncontrolled inflammation that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals and the dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The response of these immune systems to luminal gut microbiota and their products results in altered intestinal permeability, loss of barrier function, and mucosal inflammation and ulceration. Animal models of experiment intestinal inflammation have been developed that leverage the development of spontaneous inflammation in certain mouse strains, e.g. Samp1/Yit mice, or induction of inflammation using gene-targeting e.g. IL-10 null mice, administration of exogenous agents e.g. DSS, or adoptive transfer of T-cells into immunodeficient mice, e.g. CD4(+) CD45Rb(Hi) T-cell transfer. Colitis induced by rectal instillation of the haptenizing agent, 2,4,6 trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, is one of the most commonly used and well-characterized models of Crohn's disease in humans. PMID:27246038

  8. [L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) and kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-02-01

    Liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is expressed in the cytoplasm of human renal proximal tubules. Renal L-FABP expression is up-regulated and urinary excretion of renal L-FABP is increased by various stressors, such as urinary protein, hyperglycemia, tubular ischemia, toxins, and salt-sensitive hypertension, which lead to the progression of kidney disease. Urinary L-FABP levels accurately reflect the degree of tubulointerstitial damage and are strongly correlated with the prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in clinical studies. In patients with type I or type II diabetes, urinary L-FABP levels were reported to be significantly higher in patients with normal levels of urinary albumin than in those with microalbuminuria. Urinary L-FABP may be useful for the early detection of diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, in a longitudinal study, a higher level of urinary L-FABP was found to be a risk factor for the progression of diabetic nephropathy. With respect to acute kidney disease (AKI), urinary L-FABP facilitates the early detection of AKI before an increase in serum creatinine. Therefore, urinary L-FABP was approved as a new tubular biomarker by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan.

  9. Ursolic Acid Increases Skeletal Muscle and Brown Fat and Decreases Diet-Induced Obesity, Glucose Intolerance and Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Steven D.; Elmore, Christopher J.; Bongers, Kale S.; Ebert, Scott M.; Fox, Daniel K.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle Akt activity stimulates muscle growth and imparts resistance to obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease. We recently found that ursolic acid increases skeletal muscle Akt activity and stimulates muscle growth in non-obese mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ursolic acid might increase skeletal muscle Akt activity in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. We studied mice that consumed a high fat diet lacking or containing ursolic acid. In skeletal muscle, ursolic acid increased Akt activity, as well as downstream mRNAs that promote glucose utilization (hexokinase-II), blood vessel recruitment (Vegfa) and autocrine/paracrine IGF-I signaling (Igf1). As a result, ursolic acid increased skeletal muscle mass, fast and slow muscle fiber size, grip strength and exercise capacity. Interestingly, ursolic acid also increased brown fat, a tissue that shares developmental origins with skeletal muscle. Consistent with increased skeletal muscle and brown fat, ursolic acid increased energy expenditure, leading to reduced obesity, improved glucose tolerance and decreased hepatic steatosis. These data support a model in which ursolic acid reduces obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease by increasing skeletal muscle and brown fat, and suggest ursolic acid as a potential therapeutic approach for obesity and obesity-related illness. PMID:22745735

  10. Brain Lipotoxicity of Phytanic Acid and Very Long-chain Fatty Acids. Harmful Cellular/Mitochondrial Activities in Refsum Disease and X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, Peter; Reiser, Georg

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly understood that in the aging brain, especially in the case of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, some fatty acids at pathologically high concentrations exert detrimental activities. To study such activities, we here analyze genetic diseases, which are due to compromised metabolism of specific fatty acids, either the branched-chain phytanic acid or very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). Micromolar concentrations of phytanic acid or of VLCFAs disturb the integrity of neural cells by impairing Ca(2+) homeostasis, enhancing oxidative stress or de-energizing mitochondria. Finally, these combined harmful activities accelerate cell death. Mitochondria are more severely targeted by phytanic acid than by VLCFAs. The insertion of VLCFAs into the inner membrane distorts the arrangement of membrane constituents and their functional interactions. Phytanic acid exerts specific protonophoric activity, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and reduces ATP generation. A clear inhibition of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity by phytanic acid has also been reported. In addition to the instantaneous effects, a chronic exposure of brain cells to low micromolar concentrations of phytanic acid may produce neuronal damage in Refsum disease by altering epigenetic transcriptional regulation. Myelin-producing oligodendrocytes respond with particular sensitivity to VLCFAs. Deleterious activity of VLCFAs on energy-dependent mitochondrial functions declines with increasing the hydrocarbon chain length (C22:0 > C24:0 > C26:0). In contrast, the reverse sequence holds true for cell death induction by VLCFAs (C22:0 < C24:0 < C26:0). In adrenoleukodystrophy, the uptake of VLCFAs by peroxisomes is impaired by defects of the ABCD1 transporter. Studying mitochondria from ABCD1-deficient and wild-type mice proves that the energy-dependent functions are not altered in the disease model. Thus, a defective ABCD1 apparently exerts no obvious adaptive pressure on

  11. Brain Lipotoxicity of Phytanic Acid and Very Long-chain Fatty Acids. Harmful Cellular/Mitochondrial Activities in Refsum Disease and X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, Peter; Reiser, Georg

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly understood that in the aging brain, especially in the case of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, some fatty acids at pathologically high concentrations exert detrimental activities. To study such activities, we here analyze genetic diseases, which are due to compromised metabolism of specific fatty acids, either the branched-chain phytanic acid or very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). Micromolar concentrations of phytanic acid or of VLCFAs disturb the integrity of neural cells by impairing Ca2+ homeostasis, enhancing oxidative stress or de-energizing mitochondria. Finally, these combined harmful activities accelerate cell death. Mitochondria are more severely targeted by phytanic acid than by VLCFAs. The insertion of VLCFAs into the inner membrane distorts the arrangement of membrane constituents and their functional interactions. Phytanic acid exerts specific protonophoric activity, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and reduces ATP generation. A clear inhibition of the Na+, K+-ATPase activity by phytanic acid has also been reported. In addition to the instantaneous effects, a chronic exposure of brain cells to low micromolar concentrations of phytanic acid may produce neuronal damage in Refsum disease by altering epigenetic transcriptional regulation. Myelin-producing oligodendrocytes respond with particular sensitivity to VLCFAs. Deleterious activity of VLCFAs on energy-dependent mitochondrial functions declines with increasing the hydrocarbon chain length (C22:0 > C24:0 > C26:0). In contrast, the reverse sequence holds true for cell death induction by VLCFAs (C22:0 < C24:0 < C26:0). In adrenoleukodystrophy, the uptake of VLCFAs by peroxisomes is impaired by defects of the ABCD1 transporter. Studying mitochondria from ABCD1-deficient and wild-type mice proves that the energy-dependent functions are not altered in the disease model. Thus, a defective ABCD1 apparently exerts no obvious adaptive pressure on

  12. [ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID RELATIVE CONTENT CHANGES IN ERYTHROCYTES AND PLATELETS PHOSPHOLIPIDS MEMBRANES FEATURES IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Lizogub, V G; Zavalska, T V; Merkulova, I O; Bryuzgina, T S

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes and platelets phospholipid membranes fatty acid spectrum was detected in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients and in patients with coronary heart disease without atrial fibrillation. 87 patients were investigated. Significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease patients compared with healthy individuals was related. As well as a significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients compared with coronary heart disease patients without atrial fibrillation was related too. These dates may indicate that decreasing relative content arachidonic acid can be possible pathogenetic link in the development of arrhythmias.

  13. Lipoic acid as an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Maczurek, Annette; Hager, Klaus; Kenklies, Marlene; Sharman, Matt; Martins, Ralph; Engel, Jürgen; Carlson, David A; Münch, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that destroys patient memory and cognition, communication ability with the social environment and the ability to carry out daily activities. Despite extensive research into the pathogenesis of AD, a neuroprotective treatment - particularly for the early stages of disease - remains unavailable for clinical use. In this review, we advance the suggestion that lipoic acid (LA) may fulfil this therapeutic need. A naturally occurring cofactor for the mitochondrial enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, LA has been shown to have a variety of properties which can interfere with the pathogenesis or progression of AD. For example, LA increases acetylcholine (ACh) production by activation of choline acetyltransferase and increases glucose uptake, thus supplying more acetyl-CoA for the production of ACh. LA chelates redox-active transition metals, thus inhibiting the formation of hydroxyl radicals and also scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby increasing the levels of reduced glutathione. In addition, LA down-regulates the expression of redox-sensitive pro-inflammatory proteins including TNF and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, LA can scavenge lipid peroxidation products such as hydroxynonenal and acrolein. In human plasma, LA exists in an equilibrium of free and plasma protein bound form. Up to 150 muM, it is bound completely, most likely binding to high affinity fatty acid sites on human serum albumin, suggesting that one large dose rather than continuous low doses (as provided by "slow release" LA) will be beneficial for delivery of LA to the brain. Evidence for a clinical benefit for LA in dementia is yet limited. There are only two published studies, in which 600 mg LA was given daily to 43 patients with AD (receiving a standard treatment with choline-esterase inhibitors) in an open-label study over an observation period of up to 48 months. Whereas

  14. A Challenging Case of a Large Gastroduodenal Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Surgery of a Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Rancaño, Rocio; Antona, Esteban Martín; Montero, José Vicente Méndez

    2015-01-01

    We report a 48-year-old man in whom a chronic postbulbar duodenal ulcer destroyed much of the back wall of the duodenum and gastroduodenal artery causing pseudoaneurysm. The lesion was found and evaluated by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (that revealed a large pseudoaneurysm of 83 mm × 75 mm in diameter) and by angiography and then treated with transcatheter embolization leading to a complete resolution of the lesion. The case is rare and important for several reasons. First, we demonstrate that pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery caused by a duodenal ulcer can occur and present a diagnostic challenge (as far as we know, only three cases have been reported previously in the literature). Second, this case report focuses on the importance of ligation of the gastroduodenal artery when bleeding of peptic ulcers occurs. Additionally, we present an overview of the relevant literature. PMID:25648587

  15. Potential Role of Uric Acid in Metabolic Syndrome, Hypertension, Kidney Injury, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Is It Time for Reappraisal?

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Zohreh; Rasheed, Kashef; Kapusta, Daniel R.; Reisin, Efrain

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid concentration is a common laboratory finding in subjects with metabolic syndrome/obesity, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular events. Hyperuricemia has been attributed to hyperinsulinemia in metabolic syndrome and to decreased uric acid excretion in kidney dysfunction and is not acknowledged as a main mediator of metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder development. However, more recent investigations have altered this traditional view and shown by providing compelling evidence to support an independent link between hyperuricemia and increased risk of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorders. However, despite these new findings, controversy regarding the exact role of uric acid in inducing these diseases remains to be unfolded. Furthermore, recent data suggest that the high-fructose diet in the United State, as a major cause of hyperuricemia, may be contributing to the metabolic syndrome/obesity epidemic, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorder. Our focus in this review is to discuss the available evidence supporting a role for uric acid in the development of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder; and the potential pathophysiology mechanisms involved. PMID:23588856

  16. [Total peptic activity in gastric juice in patients with duodenal ulcer. Variations in relation to age and role of Helicobacter pylori].

    PubMed

    Testino, G; Bastardini, R; Sumberaz, A

    1994-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate total peptic activity in gastric juice in duodenal ulcer patients in relation to age and Helicobacter pylori infection. In duodenal ulcer patients peptic activity increases significantly in comparison to normal subjects. In relation to age there is no variation. Therefore, gastric secretion has an autonomous behaviour independently of any physiological variation in healthy subjects. Helicobacter pylori infection is present in 89.4% of duodenal ulcer patients. The bacterium infection does not imply a significant increase of peptic activity in gastric juice. Its lesive action is therefore not attributable to a modification of peptic activity, but it is due to its direct action on gastric metaplasia in the duodenum.

  17. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions. Methods HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h) with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1–50 μM) of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h), menadione (50 μM, 6 h) or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h). Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11) and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed. Results Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauro)ursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  18. AB115. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid profiles of Filipino patients with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and correlation with their neurologic features

    PubMed Central

    Chiong, Mary Anne D.; Cordero, Cynthia P.; Fodra, Esphie Grace D; Manliguis, Judy S.; Lopez, Cristine P.; Dalmacio, Leslie Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is the most common inborn error of metabolism in the country. The main cause of the neuropathology is still not well established although the accumulation of branched chain amino acids (BCAA) and alteration in large neutral amino acids (LNAA) as well as energy deprivation have been suggested. It is the aim of the study to determine the plasma amino acid and urine organic acid profiles of Filipino patients with MSUD and correlate the findings with their neurologic features. Methods Twenty six Filipino patients confirmed to have MSUD were studied in terms of their plasma amino acid and urine organic acid profiles. Their results were compared with 26 age and sex matched controls. Their neurologic features were reviewed and correlated with the results of their plasma amino acid and urine organic acid profiles. Results Majority of the patients with MSUD had developmental delay/intellectual disability (88%), speech delay (69%) and seizures (65%). The amino acid profile of MSUD patients revealed low glutamine and alanine with high levels of leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine and alloisoleucine compared to controls (P<0.05). The urine organic acids showed significantly elevated excretion of the branched chain ketoacids and succinate (P<0.05), however other Krebs cycle metabolites that would indicate possible energy perturbation were not found in significant amounts. There were also no metabolite markers in the plasma amino acids or urine organic acids that correlated significantly with the neurologic features. The most remarkable finding in this study was the discriminant analysis done on 7 clinically and statistically significant important amino acids in the plasma wherein elevations in leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, phenylalanine and threonine, and decreased levels of glutamine and alanine clearly defined the boundary between an MSUD case and control. Conclusions The findings suggest that there

  19. Analysis of chiral amino acids in cerebrospinal fluid samples linked to different stages of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Samakashvili, Shorena; Ibáñez, Clara; Simó, Carolina; Gil-Bea, Francisco J; Winblad, Bengt; Cedazo-Mínguez, Angel; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    Chiral micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection (chiral-MEKC-LIF) was used to investigate D- and L-amino acid contents in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples related to different Alzheimer disease (AD) stages. CSF samples were taken from (i) control subjects (S1 pool), (ii) subjects showing a mild cognitive impairment who remained stable (S2 pool), (iii) subjects showing an mild cognitive impairment that progressed to AD (S3 pool) and (iv) subjects diagnosed with AD (S4 pool). The optimized procedure only needed 10 μL of CSF and it included sample cleaning, derivatization with FITC and chiral-MEKC-LIF separation. Eighteen standard amino acids were baseline separated with efficiencies up to 703,000 plates/m, high sensitivity (LODs in the nM range) and good resolution (values ranging from 2.6 to 9.5). Using this method, L-Arg, L-Leu, L-Gln, γ-aminobutyric acid, L-Ser, D-Ser, L-Ala, Gly, L-Lys, L-Glu and L-Asp were detected in all the CSF samples. S3 and S4 samples (i.e. AD subjects) showed significant lower amounts of L-Arg L-Lys, L-Glu and L-Asp compared to the non-AD S1 and S2 samples, showing in the S4 group the lowest amounts of L-Arg L-Lys, L-Glu and L-Asp. Moreover, γ-aminobutyric acid was significantly higher in AD subjects with the highest amount also found for S4. No significant differences were observed for the rest of amino acids including D-Ser. Based on the obtained chiral-MEKC-LIF data, it was possible to correctly classify all the samples into the four groups. These results demonstrate that the use of enantioselective procedures as the one developed in this work can provide some new light on the investigations of AD, including the discovery of new biomarkers related to different stages of AD.

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: new developments and applications.

    PubMed

    Harris, William S; Dayspring, Thomas D; Moran, Terrance J

    2013-11-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids (FA) found in fish oils, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA and DHA, respectively), have been extensively studied therapeutically in a wide variety of disease conditions, but in none more than cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our review summarizes mechanisms of action, recent meta-analyses of CVD outcome trials, sources (fish and supplements), and recommendations for use of omega-3 FA in clinical practice. With the ability to now measure the omega-3 FA biostatus through blood tests, patients can achieve cardioprotective levels by either taking fish oil supplements or simply eating more oily fish. Two omega-3 FA formulations (both in the ethyl ester form) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with very high triglyceride levels (> 500 mg/dL); one contains both EPA and DHA, whereas the other contains only EPA. The agents have been extensively tested in 2 patient populations, those with very high triglycerides and those with triglycerides between 200 and 500 mg/dL while on background statin therapy. In general, treatment with EPA+DHA appears to lower patient triglycerides more effectively, but in those patients with very high triglyceride levels, use of EPA+DHA also raised low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, whereas EPA alone did not. Both formulations, at doses that do not lower triglycerides, have been shown to reduce CVD events in some, but not all, studies. Given the favorable risk-to-benefit ratio for these essentially nutritional agents, use is expected to continue to expand.

  1. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity.

  2. The role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in the treatment of major depression and Alzheimer's disease: Acting separately or synergistically?

    PubMed

    Song, Cai; Shieh, Chu-Hsin; Wu, Yi-Shyuan; Kalueff, Allan; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Su, Kuan-Pin

    2016-04-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-PUFAs), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may improve or prevent some psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases in both experimental and clinical studies. As important membrane components, these PUFAs benefit brain health by modulating neuroimmune and apoptotic pathways, changing membrane function and/or competing with n-6 PUFAs, the precursors of inflammatory mediators. However, the exact role of each fatty acid in neuroimmune modulation and neurogenesis, the interaction between EPA and DHA, and the best EPA:DHA ratios for improving brain disorders, remain unclear. It is also unknown whether EPA, as a DHA precursor, acts directly or via DHA. Here, we discuss recent evidence of EPA and DHA effects in the treatment of major depression and Alzheimer's disease, as well as their potential synergistic action on anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neurotrophic processes in the brain. We further analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which EPA, DHA or their combination may benefit these diseases. We also outline the limitations of current studies and suggest new genetic models and novel approaches to overcome these limitations. Finally, we summarize future strategies for translational research in this field. PMID:26763196

  3. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD. PMID:27651787

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease risk: do we understand the relationship?

    PubMed

    Vrablík, M; Prusíková, M; Snejdrlová, M; Zlatohlávek, L

    2009-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence documenting the effects of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids with the first double bond at the third position from methyl-terminal (so called omega-3 fatty acids (FAs)) on different components of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, it may seem the more answers on the topic we learn, the more questions remain to be elucidated. There are three levels of evidence documenting the impact of fish omega-3 FAs on CVD risk. Epidemiological data have shown unequivocally the increased intake of fish is associated with lower CVD morbidity and mortality. Numerous experimental studies have shown (almost always) positive effects of omega-3 FAs on lipoprotein metabolism, coagulation and platelet function, endothelial function, arterial stiffness etc. Most importantly, there are a few prospective clinical endpoint trials (DART, JELIS, GISSI Prevenzione and GISSI-HF) that have examined the impact of omega-3 FAs supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes in different patient populations. Recent meta-analyses of these and other clinical studies have yielded somewhat conflicting results. In this review we will summarize current evidence of omega-3 FAs effects on cardiovascular risk focusing on new data from recent clinical trials as well as possible practical implications for clinical practice.

  5. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bottasso Arias, Natalia M.; García, Marina; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Redondo, Agustina; Chopita, Nestor; Córsico, Betina; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs): intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs' expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa. PMID:26346822

  6. Intake of alpha-linolenic acid and risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Vedtofte, Mia Sadowa; Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Lauritzen, Lotte; O'Reilly, Eilis J.; Jarmo, Virtamo; Knekt, Paul; Colditz, Graham; Hallmans, Göran; Buring, Julie; Steffen, Lyn M.; Robien, Kimberly; Rimm, Eric B.; Heitmann., Berit L.

    2014-01-01

    Intake of the mainly plant derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) α-linolenic acid (ALA) has been associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the results have been inconsistent. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the association between ALA consumption and risk of CHD. Potential effect modification by long-chain n-3 PUFA (n-3 LCPUFA) was also investigated. Data from eight American and European prospective cohort studies including 148,675 women and 80,368 men were used. The outcome measure was incident CHD (CHD event and death). During follow-up of 4-10 years, 4,493 CHD events and 1,751 CHD deaths occurred. Among men we found an inverse association (not significant) between intake of ALA and CHD event and death. For each additional gram of ALA, there was a 15% lower risk of CHD events (HR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.01) and a 23% lower risk of CHD deaths (HR: 0.77; 95% CI 0.58, 1.01). We found no consistent associations among women. No effect modification by intake of n-3 LCPUFA was found. PMID:24964401

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid homeostasis, brain aging and Alzheimer's disease: Can we reconcile the evidence?

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Chouinard-Watkins, Raphael; Castellano, Christian A; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    A crossroads has been reached on research into docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the one hand, several prospective observational studies now clearly indicate a protective effect of higher fish and DHA intake against risk of AD. On the other hand, once AD is clinically evident, supplementation trials demonstrate essentially no benefit of DHA in AD. Despite apparently low DHA intake in AD, brain DHA levels are frequently the same as in controls, suggesting that low DHA intake results in low plasma DHA but does not necessarily reduce brain DHA in humans. Animal models involving dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency to deplete brain DHA may therefore not be appropriate in AD research. Studies in the healthy elderly suggest that DHA homeostasis changes during aging. Tracer methodology now permits estimation of DHA half-life in the human brain and whole body. Apolipoprotein E alleles have an important impact not only on AD but also on DHA homeostasis in humans. We therefore encourage further development of innovative approaches to the study of DHA metabolism and its role in human brain function. A better understanding of DHA metabolism in humans will hopefully help explain how higher habitual DHA intake protects against the risk of deteriorating cognition during aging and may eventually give rise to a breakthrough in the treatment of AD. PMID:22575581

  8. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD.

  9. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Chen, Kan; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD. PMID:27651787

  10. Sialic Acids in the Brain: Gangliosides and Polysialic Acid in Nervous System Development, Stability, Disease, and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Every cell in nature carries a rich surface coat of glycans, its glycocalyx, which constitutes the cell's interface with its environment. In eukaryotes, the glycocalyx is composed of glycolipids, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans, the compositions of which vary among different tissues and cell types. Many of the linear and branched glycans on cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids of vertebrates are terminated with sialic acids, nine-carbon sugars with a carboxylic acid, a glycerol side-chain, and an N-acyl group that, along with their display at the outmost end of cell surface glycans, provide for varied molecular interactions. Among their functions, sialic acids regulate cell-cell interactions, modulate the activities of their glycoprotein and glycolipid scaffolds as well as other cell surface molecules, and are receptors for pathogens and toxins. In the brain, two families of sialoglycans are of particular interest: gangliosides and polysialic acid. Gangliosides, sialylated glycosphingolipids, are the most abundant sialoglycans of nerve cells. Mouse genetic studies and human disorders of ganglioside metabolism implicate gangliosides in axon-myelin interactions, axon stability, axon regeneration, and the modulation of nerve cell excitability. Polysialic acid is a unique homopolymer that reaches >90 sialic acid residues attached to select glycoproteins, especially the neural cell adhesion molecule in the brain. Molecular, cellular, and genetic studies implicate polysialic acid in the control of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, intermolecular interactions at cell surfaces, and interactions with other molecules in the cellular environment. Polysialic acid is essential for appropriate brain development, and polymorphisms in the human genes responsible for polysialic acid biosynthesis are associated with psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism, and bipolar disorder. Polysialic acid also appears to play a role in adult brain plasticity

  11. [Is folic acid effective for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with advanced or terminal chronic kidney disease?].

    PubMed

    Peña, José; Claro, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased cardiovascular risk. Several non-traditional factors have been showed to be associated with this risk, including hyperhomocysteinemia. The effects of reducing homocysteine levels with folic acid supplementation have been studied in a number of randomized trials, with mixed results. In this article we critically appraise two systematic reviews providing disparate conclusions about this question and we summarize their main findings using the GRADE methodology. We conclude that there are methodological differences that may explain the mixed results in both systematic reviews. Folic acid supplementation does not reduce cardiovascular morbidity or mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease at any stage.

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester lessens disease symptoms in an experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Oh, Hana; Park, Sol-Ji; Ha, Sung-Min; Kang, Mi Seon; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jung, So Young; Song, Hyunkeun; Yang, Jae Wook; Park, SaeGwang

    2015-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) is an autoimmune disease that models human uveitis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a phenolic compound isolated from propolis, possesses anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. CAPE demonstrates therapeutic potential in several animal disease models through its ability to inhibit NF-κB activity. To evaluate these therapeutic effects in EAU, we administered CAPE in a model of EAU that develops after immunization with interphotoreceptor retinal-binding protein (IRBP) in B10.RIII and C57BL/6 mice. Importantly, we found that CAPE lessened the severity of EAU symptoms in both mouse strains. Notably, treated mice exhibited a decrease in the ocular infiltration of immune cell populations into the retina; reduced TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ serum levels: and inhibited TNF-α mRNA expression in retinal tissues. Although CAPE failed to inhibit IRBP-specific T cell proliferation, it was sufficient to suppress cytokine, chemokine, and IRBP-specific antibody production. In addition, retinal tissues isolated from CAPE-treated EAU mice revealed a decrease in NF-κB p65 and phospho-IκBα. The data identify CAPE as a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune uveitis that acts by inhibiting cellular infiltration into the retina, reducing the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokine, and IRBP-specific antibody and blocking NF-κB pathway activation. PMID:25795054

  13. Uric acid and cognition in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Annanmaki, Tua; Pohja, Marjatta; Parviainen, Tiina; Hakkinen, Paula; Murros, Kari

    2011-06-01

    Cognitive changes are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Low plasma uric acid (UA) level is associated with risk of PD and predicts faster progression of motor symptoms in established disease. Whether UA levels predict cognitive changes has not been studied. In a crossectional study, our group has previously shown an association of plasma and urine UA levels with cognition in PD. The aim of the present controlled longitudinal study was to examine the evolution of cognitive changes and the prognostic value of the UA levels on cognition in the previously reported PD-patient cohort. Of the original 40 patients, 31 were available for follow-up after three years. Both plasma and daily urine UA levels were measured, nutrition was evaluated using 4-day dietary recall diary and cognition was assessed by a thorough neuropsychological examination including computerized tasks with Cognispeed©. The plasma and urine UA levels of the patients remained stable during the follow-up. At the same time, the rate of cognitive decline was unexpectedly slow. A statistically significant deterioration was noted in verbal fluency (p=0.04) and in Cognispeed©'s vigilance task (p=0.0001). In forward linear regression analysis only the baseline daily urine UA level contributed to verbal fluency (p=0.01), picture completion (p=0.001), block design (p=0.006), vigilance (p=0.006), subtraction (p=0.01) and statement verification (p=0.04) tasks. The implications of the study results are discussed.

  14. Limited Effect of Chronic Valproic Acid Treatment in a Mouse Model of Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sofia; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Naia, Luana; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease, caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the coding region of ATXN3 gene, and which currently lacks effective treatment. In this work we tested the therapeutic efficacy of chronic treatment with valproic acid (VPA) (200mg/kg), a compound with known neuroprotection activity, and previously shown to be effective in cell, fly and nematode models of MJD. We show that chronic VPA treatment in the CMVMJD135 mouse model had limited effects in the motor deficits of these mice, seen mostly at late stages in the motor swimming, beam walk, rotarod and spontaneous locomotor activity tests, and did not modify the ATXN3 inclusion load and astrogliosis in affected brain regions. However, VPA chronic treatment was able to increase GRP78 protein levels at 30 weeks of age, one of its known neuroprotective effects, confirming target engagement. In spite of limited results, the use of another dosage of VPA or of VPA in a combined therapy with molecules targeting other pathways, cannot be excluded as potential strategies for MJD therapeutics. PMID:26505994

  15. 5-amino salicylic acid bound nanoparticles for the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Pertuit, David; Moulari, Brice; Betz, Thomas; Nadaradjane, Arulraj; Neumann, Dirk; Ismaïli, Lhassane; Refouvelet, Bernard; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2007-11-20

    Nanoparticles (NP) are known for their specific accumulation in the inflamed tissues in the colon and may therefore allow a selective delivery to the site of inflammation including a reduction of adverse effects. 5-amino salicylic acid (5ASA) loaded NP were designed in order to investigate their therapeutic potential in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. 5ASA was covalently bound to poly(caprolactone) prior to all formulation steps. Oil/water emulsification or nanoprecipitation methods were used for the NP formulation. Particle diameters were either 200 or 350 nm for emulsification or nanoprecipitation, respectively. In-vitro drug release demonstrated a significant drug retention inside the NP formulation. Toxicity of the different formulations was evaluated on Caco-2 and HEK cell culture which was slightly increased for 5ASA grafted NP in comparison to blank NP (Me5ASA-NP: 75 microg/l; blank NP: 210 microg/l). In-vivo, clinical activity score and myeloperoxidase activity decreased after administration of all 5ASA containing formulations (untreated control: 28.0+/-5.6 U/mg; 5ASA-NP (0.5 mg/kg): 15.2+/-5.6 U/mg; 5ASA solution (30 mg/kg): 16.2+/-3.6 U/mg). NP formulations allowed to lower significantly the dose of 5ASA. These oral NP formulations demonstrated their therapeutic potential and appear to be an interesting approach for the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Effects of niacin combination therapy with statin or bile acid resin on lipoproteins and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zambon, Alberto; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Brown, B Greg; Brunzell, John D

    2014-05-01

    Two large studies in populations selected for cardiovascular disease (CVD) demonstrated that raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol with niacin added to statin therapy did not decrease CVD. We examine the association of lipoprotein subfractions with niacin and changes in coronary stenosis and CVD event risk. One hundred and seven patients from 2 previous studies using niacin in combination with either statin or bile acid-binding resin were selected to evaluate changes in lipoproteins separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation to progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by quantitative coronary angiography. Improvement in coronary stenosis was significantly associated with the decrease of cholesterol in the dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and across most of the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) and very low density lipoprotein particle density range, but, not with any of the HDL fraction or of the more buoyant LDL fractions. Event-free survival was significantly associated with the decrease of cholesterol in the dense LDL and IDL; there was no association with changes in cholesterol in the HDL and buoyant LDL fractions. Niacin combination therapy raises HDL cholesterol and decreases dense LDL and IDL cholesterol levels. Changes in LDL and IDL are related to improvement in CVD. Lipoprotein subfraction analysis should be performed in larger studies utilizing niacin in combination with statins.

  17. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria and their potential in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewska, Paula; Adamczuk, Piotr; Silny, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Allergy is one of the most important and very common health problems worldwide. To reduce the proportion of people suffering from allergy, alternative methods of prevention and treatment are sought. The aim of this paper is to present the possibilities of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases. Probiotics are live microorganisms belonging mainly to the lactic acid bacteria. They modify the microflora of the human digestive system, especially the intestinal microflora. Prophylactic administration of probiotics in the early stages of life (naturally in breast milk or milk substitute synthetic compounds) is very important because intestinal microflora plays a huge role in the development of the immune system. Prevention of allergies as early as in the prenatal and postnatal periods provides huge opportunities for inhibiting the growing problem of allergy in emerging and highly developed societies. Effects of probiotic therapy depend on many factors such as the species of the microorganism used, the dose size and characteristics of the bacteria such as viability and capacity of adhesion to the intestinal walls. Authors of several studies showed beneficial effects of probiotics in the perinatal period, infancy, and also in adults in the prevention of atopic dermatitis or allergic rhinitis. Probiotics, due to their immunomodulatory properties and safety of use are a good, natural alternative for the prevention and treatment of many diseases including allergies. It is therefore important to explore the knowledge about their use and to carry out further clinical trials. PMID:26155109

  18. Induction of Systemic Resistance of Benzothiadiazole and Humic Acid in Soybean Plants Against Fusarium Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Mamdoh Ewis; Morsy, Kadry Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The ability of benzothiadiazole (BTH) and/or humic acid (HA) used as seed soaking to induce systemic resistance against a pathogenic strain of Fusarium oxysporum was examined in four soybean cultivars under greenhouse conditions. Alone and in combination the inducers were able to protect soybean plants against damping-off and wilt diseases compared with check treatment. These results were confirmed under field conditions in two different locations (Minia and New Valley governorates). The tested treatments significantly reduced damping-off and wilt diseases and increased growth parameters, except the number of branches per plant and also increased seed yield. Application of BTH (0.25 g/L) + HA (4 g/L) was the most potent in this respect. Soybean seed soaking in BTH + HA produced the highest activities of the testes of oxidative enzymes followed by BTH in the four soybean cultivars. HA treatment resulted in the lowest increases of these oxidative enzymes. Similar results were obtained with total phenol but HA increased total phenol more than did BTH in all tested cultivars. PMID:22783118

  19. Recent Advance in the Relationship between Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlong; Tan, Feng; Xu, Pingyi; Qu, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder disease in the elderly and is characterized by degeneration of dopamine neurons and formation of Lewy bodies. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). If glutamate is not removed promptly in the synaptic cleft, it will excessively stimulate the glutamate receptors and induce excitotoxic effects on the CNS. With lack of extracellular enzyme to decompose glutamate, glutamate uptake in the synaptic cleft is mainly achieved by the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs, also known as high-affinity glutamate transporters). Current studies have confirmed that decreased expression and function of EAATs appear in PD animal models. Moreover, single unilateral administration of EAATs inhibitor in the substantia nigra mimics several PD features and this is a solid evidence supporting that decreased EAATs contribute to the process of PD. Drugs or treatments promoting the expression and function of EAATs are shown to attenuate dopamine neurons death in the substantia nigra and striatum, ameliorate the behavior disorder, and improve cognitive abilities in PD animal models. EAATs are potential effective drug targets in treatment of PD and thus study of relationship between EAATs and PD has predominant medical significance currently. PMID:26981287

  20. Limited Effect of Chronic Valproic Acid Treatment in a Mouse Model of Machado-Joseph Disease.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Sofia; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Naia, Luana; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease, caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the coding region of ATXN3 gene, and which currently lacks effective treatment. In this work we tested the therapeutic efficacy of chronic treatment with valproic acid (VPA) (200mg/kg), a compound with known neuroprotection activity, and previously shown to be effective in cell, fly and nematode models of MJD. We show that chronic VPA treatment in the CMVMJD135 mouse model had limited effects in the motor deficits of these mice, seen mostly at late stages in the motor swimming, beam walk, rotarod and spontaneous locomotor activity tests, and did not modify the ATXN3 inclusion load and astrogliosis in affected brain regions. However, VPA chronic treatment was able to increase GRP78 protein levels at 30 weeks of age, one of its known neuroprotective effects, confirming target engagement. In spite of limited results, t