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Sample records for acid peptide hormone

  1. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  2. The evolution of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Niall, H D

    1982-01-01

    Despite limitations in our present knowledge it is already possible to discern the main features of peptide hormone evolution, since the same mechanisms (and indeed the same hormone molecules) function in many different ways. This underlying unity of organization has its basis in the tendency of biochemical networks, once established, to survive and diversify. The most surprising recent findings in endocrinology have been the discovery of vertebrate peptide hormones in multiple sites within the same organism, and the reports, persuasive but requiring confirmation, of vertebrate hormones in primitive unicellular organisms (20, 20a). Perhaps the major challenge for the future is to define the roles and interactions of the many peptide hormones identified in brain (18). The most primitive bacteria and the human brain, though an enormous evolutionary distance apart, may have more in common than we have recognized until now. As Axelrod & Hamilton have pointed out in a recent provocative article, "The Evolution of Cooperation" (1), bacteria, though lacking a brain, are capable of adaptive behavior that can be analysed in terms of game theory. It is clear that we can learn a great deal about the whole evolutionary process from a study of the versatile and durable peptide hormones molecules.

  3. Molecular biology of the peptide hormone families.

    PubMed

    Pearson, R K; Anderson, B; Dixon, J E

    1993-12-01

    The application of recombinant molecular biology has lead to remarkable advances in our understanding of the basic mechanisms of cell function in general and of the polarized GI endocrine cell in particular. This article focuses on some of the advances made towards determining the contribution of peptide hormone gene regulation to the regulation of physiological events in the GI tract. Application of these techniques to other subcellular processes involved in peptide hormone physiology such as subcellular trafficing in the regulated secretory pathway and post-translational processing have been equally impressive. For example, many of the key enzymes in the peptide hormone processing cascade have been cloned and are being studied at a molecular level. We have focused this article on the SS and gastrin peptides because of their known physiologic importance and interactions, and the depth of analysis accomplished to date. Studies using SS and gastrin as models have established principals that cover the spectrum of luminal regulation of gene activity to the identification of a single amino acid residue responsible for cAMP induction of SS gene expression. Many genes in the GI endocrine system have been cloned and the article by Dr. Habener (elsewhere in this issue) discusses progress made in understanding the complex regulation of the glucagon gene. We anticipate similar advances in studies of cholecystokinin, secretin, motilin, VIP, pancreatic polypeptide, and neuropeptide Y, whose genes have been cloned and initially characterized. Finally, as outlined in this article, the mechanisms of regulation of a specific gene often differ between sites of expression, even within the GI tract. Direct studies of the subcellular mechanisms regulating gene expression and other processes in GI endocrine cells await novel methods to maintain and propagate these cells. These studies will almost certainly involve new and creative uses of recombinant molecular biology.

  4. Predicting the effects of amino acid replacements in peptide hormones on their binding affinities for class B GPCRs and application to the design of secretin receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Te, Jerez A.; Dong, Maoqing; Miller, Laurence J.; Bordner, Andrew J.

    2012-07-01

    Computational prediction of the effects of residue changes on peptide-protein binding affinities, followed by experimental testing of the top predicted binders, is an efficient strategy for the rational structure-based design of peptide inhibitors. In this study we apply this approach to the discovery of competitive antagonists for the secretin receptor, the prototypical member of class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Proteins in this family are involved in peptide hormone-stimulated signaling and are implicated in several human diseases, making them potential therapeutic targets. We first validated our computational method by predicting changes in the binding affinities of several peptides to their cognate class B GPCRs due to alanine replacement and compared the results with previously published experimental values. Overall, the results showed a significant correlation between the predicted and experimental ΔΔG values. Next, we identified candidate inhibitors by applying this method to a homology model of the secretin receptor bound to an N-terminal truncated secretin peptide. Predictions were made for single residue replacements to each of the other nineteen naturally occurring amino acids at peptide residues within the segment binding the receptor N-terminal domain. Amino acid replacements predicted to most enhance receptor binding were then experimentally tested by competition-binding assays. We found two residue changes that improved binding affinities by almost one log unit. Furthermore, a peptide combining both of these favorable modifications resulted in an almost two log unit improvement in binding affinity, demonstrating the approximately additive effect of these changes on binding. In order to further investigate possible physical effects of these residue changes on receptor binding affinity, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on representatives of the successful peptide analogues (namely A17I, G25R, and A17I/G25R) in bound and

  5. Effects of amino acids on melanoma targeting and clearance properties of Tc-99m-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2013-11-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of amino acids on melanoma targeting and clearance properties of new (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-DTyr-Asp]-Lys-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RNleD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, RPheD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, and RdPheD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin-1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, (99m)Tc-RFD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH, and (99m)Tc-RfD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of Gly with Ser, Phe, and dPhe increased the MC1 receptor binding affinities of the peptides, whereas the substitution of Gly with Nle decreased the MC1 receptor binding affinity of the peptide. (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (18.01 ± 4.22% ID/g) and the lowest kidney and liver uptake among these (99m)Tc-peptides. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by SPECT/CT using (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH as an imaging probe. It is desirable to reduce the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RSD-Lys-(Arg(11))CCMSH to facilitate its potential therapeutic application.

  6. Structure-activity relationship of crustacean peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    In crustaceans, various physiological events, such as molting, vitellogenesis, and sex differentiation, are regulated by peptide hormones. To understanding the functional sites of these hormones, many structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been published. In this review, the author focuses the SAR of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-family peptides and androgenic gland hormone and describes the detailed results of our and other research groups. The future perspectives will be also discussed.

  7. The roles of peptide hormones during plant root development.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masashi; Sawa, Shinichiro

    2013-02-01

    Peptide hormones are a key mechanism that plants use for cell-cell interactions; these interactions function to coordinate development, growth, and environmental responses among different cells. Peptide signals are produced by one cell and received by receptors in neighboring cells. It has previously been reported that peptide hormones regulate various aspects of plant development. The mechanism of action of peptides in the shoot is well known. However, the function of peptides in the root has been relatively uncharacterized. Recent studies have discovered important roles for peptide hormones in the development of the root meristem, lateral roots, and nodules. In this review, we focus on current findings regarding the function of peptide hormones in root development.

  8. Hepcidins in amphibians and fishes: Antimicrobial peptides or iron-regulatory hormones?

    PubMed

    Shi, Jishu; Camus, Alvin C

    2006-01-01

    Hepcidin, originally identified as a 25 amino acid peptide antibiotic produced in the liver, is a key regulator of iron balance and recycling in humans and mice. Closely related hepcidin genes and peptides also have been identified in other mammals, amphibians, and a number of fish species. We hypothesize that hepcidin, the iron-regulatory hormone in humans, may have evolved from an antimicrobial peptide in fishes. In this review we will highlight the evidence that indicates hepcidin evolved from an antimicrobial peptide to an iron-regulatory hormone in vertebrate evolution. This evidence includes the discovery of hepcidin as an antimicrobial peptide and iron-regulatory hormone, structural comparison of mammalian hepcidins and nonmammalian hepcidins, and the cellular and molecular evidence indicating that, while some fish hepcidins may serve only as antimicrobial peptides, other fish and amphibian hepcidins may function as iron regulators.

  9. Adrenomedullin - new perspectives of a potent peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Ria; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2017-02-02

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a 52-amino acid multifunctional peptide, which belongs to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) superfamily of vasoactive peptide hormones. ADM exhibits a significant vasodilatory potential and plays a key role in various regulatory mechanisms, predominantly in the cardiovascular and lymphatic system. It exerts its effects by activation of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor associated with one of the receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 or 3. ADM was first isolated from human phaeochromocytoma in 1993. Numerous studies revealed a widespread distribution in various tissues and organs, which is reflected by its multiple physiological roles in health and disease. Because of its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and proliferative properties, ADM exhibits potent protective functions under diverse pathological conditions, but it is also critically involved in tumor progression. ADM has therefore raised great interest in therapeutic applications and several clinical trials already revealed promising results. However, because the receptor activation mode has not yet been fully elucidated, a rational design of potent and selective ligands is still challenging. Detailed information on the binding mode of ADM from a recently reported crystal structure as well as efforts to improve its plasma stability and bioavailability may help to overcome these limitations in the future. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  11. How the Prohormone Theory Solved Two Important Controversies in Hormonal and Neural Peptide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chrétien, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This Prohormone Theory was simultaneously proposed in 1967 by two independent groups using two different approaches and two experimental models. Donald Steiner, in elegant pulse-chase experiments, proposed the existence of proinsulin when he observed that a human insulinoma was producing higher MW forms of immunoreactive insulin, subsequently transformed into insulin-like material (1). Simultaneously and independently, Michel Chrétien, based on amino acid sequence homologies between three pituitary peptides, β-lipotropic hormone (β-LPH), γ-LPH, and β-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (β-MSH), concluded that active peptide hormones are derived from endoproteolytic cleavages of inactive precursors, apparently at pairs of basic amino acids (2). One year later, Donald Chance confirmed that the cleavage sites in proinsulin were also made of paired basic amino acids (3). This novel paradigm solved two major controversies on the biosynthesis of both insulin and neuropeptides. This short review describes how. PMID:24167501

  12. Peptide hormones and lipopeptides: from self-assembly to therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, J A; Burholt, S; Hamley, I W

    2017-02-01

    This review describes the properties and activities of lipopeptides and peptide hormones and how the lipidation of peptide hormones could potentially produce therapeutic agents combating some of the most prevalent diseases and conditions. The self-assembly of these types of molecules is outlined, and how this can impact on bioactivity. Peptide hormones specific to the uptake of food and produced in the gastrointestinal tract are discussed in detail. The advantages of lipidated peptide hormones over natural peptide hormones are summarised, in terms of stability and renal clearance, with potential application as therapeutic agents. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The revolution in insect neuropeptides illustrated by the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family of peptides.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G

    1996-01-01

    The last decade has seen a surge in the knowledge on primary structures of insect neuropeptides. Particularly successful were isolations and sequence determinations of more than 30 members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family of peptides. This brief overview describes the techniques used to obtain data on purification and structure such as high performance liquid chromatography, Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry. Moreover, a short account on the precursors and on the multiple functions of the peptides of the AKH/RPCH family in various crustacean and insect species is given.

  14. Receptors for parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide: from molecular cloning to definition of diseases.

    PubMed

    Jüppner, H; Schipani, E

    1996-07-01

    The parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor belongs to a distinct family of G protein-coupled receptors, the members of which usually signal through at least two second messenger systems, adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C. The parathyroid hormone/ parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor is most abundantly expressed in bone, kidney and growth-plate chondrocytes, and, at lower levels, in a variety of fetal and adult tissues. To search for human diseases that are caused by parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor defects, genomic DNA of patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib and of patients with Jansen's metaphyseal chondrodysplasia was screened for mutations in all coding exons of the receptor gene. Inactivating parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor mutations were excluded in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib. However, a receptor mutation that causes agonist-independent, constitutive cAMP accumulation was identified in a patient with Jansen's metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, a rare form of short-limbed dwarfism associated with hypercalcemia despite normal or low concentrations of parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide. These findings allow the conclusion to be drawn that parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptors mediate the endocrine actions of parathyroid hormone, which are required for the control of calcium homeostasis and the autocrine-paracrine actions of parathyroid hormone-related peptide, which are required for normal growth-plate development.

  15. Evolutionary Sequence Modeling for Discovery of Peptide Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, Kemal; Zaveri, Naunihal T.; Kerman, Ilan A.; Burke, Sharon; Neal, Charles R.; Xie, Xinmin; Watson, Stanley J.; Toll, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    There are currently a large number of “orphan” G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) whose endogenous ligands (peptide hormones) are unknown. Identification of these peptide hormones is a difficult and important problem. We describe a computational framework that models spatial structure along the genomic sequence simultaneously with the temporal evolutionary path structure across species and show how such models can be used to discover new functional molecules, in particular peptide hormones, via cross-genomic sequence comparisons. The computational framework incorporates a priori high-level knowledge of structural and evolutionary constraints into a hierarchical grammar of evolutionary probabilistic models. This computational method was used for identifying novel prohormones and the processed peptide sites by producing sequence alignments across many species at the functional-element level. Experimental results with an initial implementation of the algorithm were used to identify potential prohormones by comparing the human and non-human proteins in the Swiss-Prot database of known annotated proteins. In this proof of concept, we identified 45 out of 54 prohormones with only 44 false positives. The comparison of known and hypothetical human and mouse proteins resulted in the identification of a novel putative prohormone with at least four potential neuropeptides. Finally, in order to validate the computational methodology, we present the basic molecular biological characterization of the novel putative peptide hormone, including its identification and regional localization in the brain. This species comparison, HMM-based computational approach succeeded in identifying a previously undiscovered neuropeptide from whole genome protein sequences. This novel putative peptide hormone is found in discreet brain regions as well as other organs. The success of this approach will have a great impact on our understanding of GPCRs and associated pathways and help to

  16. Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones in Anopheles gambiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Michael A.; Garczynski, Stephen F.; Crim, Joe W.; Hill, Catherine A.; Brown, Mark R.

    2002-10-01

    The African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, is specialized for rapid completion of development and reproduction. A vertebrate blood meal is required for egg production, and multiple feedings subsequently allow transmission of malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp. Regulatory peptides from 35 genes annotated from the A. gambiae genome likely coordinate these and other physiological processes. Plasmodium parasites may affect actions of newly identified insulin-like peptides, which coordinate growth and reproduction of its vector, A. gambiae, as in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mammals. This genomic information provides a basis to expand understanding of hematophagy and pathogen transmission in this mosquito.

  17. Insulin-like peptide 5 is an orexigenic gastrointestinal hormone

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Johannes; Heffron, Helen; Burling, Keith; Akhter Hossain, Mohammed; Habib, Abdella M.; Rogers, Gareth J.; Richards, Paul; Larder, Rachel; Rimmington, Debra; Adriaenssens, Alice A.; Parton, Laura; Powell, Justin; Binda, Matteo; Colledge, William H.; Doran, Joanne; Toyoda, Yukio; Wade, John D.; Aparicio, Samuel; Carlton, Mark B. L.; Coll, Anthony P.; Reimann, Frank; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    The gut endocrine system is emerging as a central player in the control of appetite and glucose homeostasis, and as a rich source of peptides with therapeutic potential in the field of diabetes and obesity. In this study we have explored the physiology of insulin-like peptide 5 (Insl5), which we identified as a product of colonic enteroendocrine L-cells, better known for their secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptideYY. i.p. Insl5 increased food intake in wild-type mice but not mice lacking the cognate receptor Rxfp4. Plasma Insl5 levels were elevated by fasting or prolonged calorie restriction, and declined with feeding. We conclude that Insl5 is an orexigenic hormone released from colonic L-cells, which promotes appetite during conditions of energy deprivation. PMID:25028498

  18. Effects of calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids and rumen-protected methionine on plasma concentrations of ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (7 to 36) amide and pancreatic hormones in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Fukumori, R; Sugino, T; Shingu, H; Moriya, N; Hasegawa, Y; Kojima, M; Kangawa, K; Obitsu, T; Kushibiki, S; Taniguchi, K

    2012-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids (CLFAs) and rumen-protected methionine (RPM) on plasma concentrations of ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (7 to 36) amide, and pancreatic hormones in lactating cows. Four Holstein cows in midlactation were used in a 4 by 4 Latin square experiment in each 2-wk period. Cows were fed corn silage-based diets with supplements of CLFAs (1.5% added on dry matter basis), RPM (20 g/d), CLFAs plus RPM, and without supplement. Jugular blood samples were taken from 1 h before to 2 h after morning feeding at 10-min intervals on day 12 of each period. CLFAs decreased dry matter intake, but RPM did not affect dry matter intake. Both supplements of CLFAs and RPM did not affect metabolizable energy intake and milk yield and composition. Plasma concentrations of NEFAs, triglyceride (TG), and total cholesterol (T-Cho) were increased with CLFAs alone, but increases of plasma concentrations of TG and T-Cho were moderated by CLFAs plus RPM. Calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids increased plasma ghrelin concentration, and the ghrelin concentration with CLFAs plus RPM was the highest among the treatments. Plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1, glucagon, and insulin were decreased with CLFAs, whereas adding RPM moderated the decrease of plasma glucagon concentration by CLFAs. These results indicate that the addition of methionine to cows given CLFAs increases plasma concentrations of ghrelin and glucagon associated with the decrease in plasma concentrations of TG and T-Cho.

  19. [Synthesis of peptides with gastrinlike activity. Studies on the structure-activity relationship of the natural hormone human little gastrin I].

    PubMed

    Göhring, W; Moroder, L; Borin, G; Lobbia, A; Bali, J P; Wünsch, E

    1984-01-01

    To identify the role of the block of glutamic acid residues characteristic for the gastrin molecule, a series of shortened peptides related to the human little-gastrin-I sequence were synthesized. The biological activities of these gastrin peptides strongly suggest in the pentaglutamic acid sequence a specific information for a pronounced amplification of the hormonal activity.

  20. Action of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: involvement of novel arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, G D; Capdevila, J; Chacos, N; Manna, S; Falck, J R

    1983-01-01

    Anterior pituitary cells were incubated in the presence of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and one of three inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism:indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase system; nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an antioxidant that inhibits lipoxygenase; and icosatetraynoic acid, an acetylenic analogue of arachidonic acid that blocks all known pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. Indomethacin was ineffective in blocking luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was only marginally capable of inhibiting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Icosatetraynoic acid at 10 microM completely inhibited stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Addition of several epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites to cells in vitro resulted in secretion of luteinizing hormone equal to or greater than that induced by 10 nM luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. The half-maximal effective dose for these compounds was approximately 50 nM. The 5,6-epoxyicosatrienoic acid was the most potent of the compounds tested. These studies suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone release is closely coupled with the production of oxidized arachidonic acid metabolites. Moreover, one or more of the epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites might be a component of the cascade of reactions initiated by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone that ultimately results in secretion of luteinizing hormone. PMID:6344087

  1. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY

    PubMed Central

    La Sala, Michael S.; Hurtado, Maria D.; Brown, Alicia R.; Bohórquez, Diego V.; Liddle, Rodger A.; Herzog, Herbert; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Dotson, Cedrick D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the peripheral taste system may be modulated in the context of an animal's metabolic state. One purported mechanism for this phenomenon is that circulating gastrointestinal peptides modulate the functioning of the peripheral gustatory system. Recent evidence suggests endocrine signaling in the oral cavity can influence food intake (FI) and satiety. We hypothesized that these hormones may be affecting FI by influencing taste perception. We used immunohistochemistry along with genetic knockout models and the specific reconstitution of peptide YY (PYY) in saliva using gene therapy protocols to identify a role for PYY signaling in taste. We show that PYY is expressed in subsets of taste cells in murine taste buds. We also show, using brief-access testing with PYY knockouts, that PYY signaling modulates responsiveness to bitter-tasting stimuli, as well as to lipid emulsions. We show that salivary PYY augmentation, via viral vector therapy, rescues behavioral responsiveness to a lipid emulsion but not to bitter stimuli and that this response is likely mediated via activation of Y2 receptors localized apically in taste cells. Our findings suggest distinct functions for PYY produced locally in taste cells vs. that circulating systemically.—La Sala, M. S., Hurtado, M. D., Brown, A. R., Bohórquez, D. V., Liddle, R. A., Herzog, H., Zolotukhin, S., Dotson, C. D. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY. PMID:24043261

  2. Peptide hormones and lipopeptides: from self‐assembly to therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, J. A.; Burholt, S.

    2017-01-01

    This review describes the properties and activities of lipopeptides and peptide hormones and how the lipidation of peptide hormones could potentially produce therapeutic agents combating some of the most prevalent diseases and conditions. The self‐assembly of these types of molecules is outlined, and how this can impact on bioactivity. Peptide hormones specific to the uptake of food and produced in the gastrointestinal tract are discussed in detail. The advantages of lipidated peptide hormones over natural peptide hormones are summarised, in terms of stability and renal clearance, with potential application as therapeutic agents. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28127868

  3. Identification of novel peptide hormones in the human proteome by hidden Markov model screening.

    PubMed

    Mirabeau, Olivier; Perlas, Emerald; Severini, Cinzia; Audero, Enrica; Gascuel, Olivier; Possenti, Roberta; Birney, Ewan; Rosenthal, Nadia; Gross, Cornelius

    2007-03-01

    Peptide hormones are small, processed, and secreted peptides that signal via membrane receptors and play critical roles in normal and pathological physiology. The search for novel peptide hormones has been hampered by their small size, low or restricted expression, and lack of sequence similarity. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a bioinformatics search tool based on the hidden Markov model formalism that uses several peptide hormone sequence features to estimate the likelihood that a protein contains a processed and secreted peptide of this class. Application of this tool to an alignment of mammalian proteomes ranked 90% of known peptide hormones among the top 300 proteins. An analysis of the top scoring hypothetical and poorly annotated human proteins identified two novel candidate peptide hormones. Biochemical analysis of the two candidates, which we called spexin and augurin, showed that both were localized to secretory granules in a transfected pancreatic cell line and were recovered from the cell supernatant. Spexin was expressed in the submucosal layer of the mouse esophagus and stomach, and a predicted peptide from the spexin precursor induced muscle contraction in a rat stomach explant assay. Augurin was specifically expressed in mouse endocrine tissues, including pituitary and adrenal gland, choroid plexus, and the atrio-ventricular node of the heart. Our findings demonstrate the utility of a bioinformatics approach to identify novel biologically active peptides. Peptide hormones and their receptors are important diagnostic and therapeutic targets, and our results suggest that spexin and augurin are novel peptide hormones likely to be involved in physiological homeostasis.

  4. Transdermal delivery of a melanotropic peptide hormone analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, B.V.; Hadley, M.E.; Kreutzfeld, K.; Dorr, R.T.; Hruby, V.J.; Al-Obeidi, F.; Don, S.

    1988-01-01

    We previously reported that topical application of (Nl3/sup 4/,D-Phe/sup 7/)alpha-MSH, a superpotent analogue of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, to mice induces a darkening of follicular melanocytes throughout the skin. We now report that the melanotropin analogue can be delivered across mouse but not rat skin in an in vitro model system. Passage of the analogue from the topically applied vehicle (polyethylene glycol) across the skin into a subcutaneous receiving vessel was demonstrated by both bioassay as well as by radioimmunoassay. The bioassay data demonstrate that percutaneous absorption of the melanotropin did not result in loss of biological activity of the peptide. The differential penetration of the peptide across rodent skin reveals that one cannot predict percutaneous absorption of a substance across the stratum corneum from studies on a single species. The present results are the first to demonstrate, by direct quantitative measurements, that a bioactive peptide can be delivered across the vertebrate integument in vitro. These studies point out the potential of a topically applied melanotropin for tanning of the skin and possibly for treatment of certain hypopigmentary disorders.

  5. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange.

  6. Sequences of pituitary and placental lactogenic and growth hormones: evolution from a primordial peptide by gene reduplication.

    PubMed

    Niall, H D; Hogan, M L; Sauer, R; Rosenblum, I Y; Greenwood, F C

    1971-04-01

    Human placental lactogen has been found to resemble human pituitary growth hormone very closely in amino acid sequence, about 80% of the residues examined being identical in the two molecules when a revised sequence for growth hormone is used as the basis for comparison. The structural features responsible for the differing biological potency of the two hormones may therefore reside in rather limited regions of primary structure. The observation of internal sequence homologies within the pituitary growth hormone and prolactin and the placental lactogen molecules suggests that these polypeptide hormones may have evolved by genetic reduplication from a smaller common ancestral peptide. This finding directs further attention to subfragments of these molecules as possible possessors of intrinsic somatotrophic and lactogenic activity.

  7. Effects of ghrelin, growth hormone-releasing peptide-6, and growth hormone-releasing hormone on growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol release in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Larissa Bianca Paiva Cunha; Nascif, Sergio Oliva; Correa-Silva, Silvia Regina; Molica, Patricia; Vieira, José Gilberto Henriques; Dib, Sergio Atala; Lengyel, Ana-Maria Judith

    2010-10-01

    In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), growth hormone (GH) responses to provocative stimuli are normal or exaggerated, whereas the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has been less studied. Ghrelin is a GH secretagogue that also increases adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels, similarly to GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6). Ghrelin's effects in patients with T1DM have not been evaluated. We therefore studied GH, ACTH, and cortisol responses to ghrelin and GHRP-6 in 9 patients with T1DM and 9 control subjects. The GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-induced GH release was also evaluated. Mean fasting GH levels (micrograms per liter) were higher in T1DM (3.5 ± 1.2) than in controls (0.6 ± 0.3). In both groups, ghrelin-induced GH release was higher than that after GHRP-6 and GHRH. When analyzing Δ area under the curve (ΔAUC) GH values after ghrelin, GHRP-6, and GHRH, no significant differences were observed in T1DM compared with controls. There was a trend (P = .055) to higher mean basal cortisol values (micrograms per deciliter) in T1DM (11.7 ± 1.5) compared with controls (8.2 ± 0.8). No significant differences were seen in ΔAUC cortisol values in both groups after ghrelin and GHRP-6. Mean fasting ACTH values were similar in T1DM and controls. No differences were seen in ΔAUC ACTH levels in both groups after ghrelin and GHRP-6. In summary, patients with T1DM have normal GH responsiveness to ghrelin, GHRP-6, and GHRH. The ACTH and cortisol release after ghrelin and GHRP-6 is also similar to controls. Our results suggest that chronic hyperglycemia of T1DM does not interfere with GH-, ACTH-, and cortisol-releasing mechanisms stimulated by these peptides.

  8. Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides influence gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelestimur, Haluk; Kacar, Emine; Uzun, Aysegul; Ozcan, Mete; Kutlu, Selim

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamic Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and orthologous mammalian peptides of Arg-Phe-amide, may be important regulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal reproductive axis. These peptides may modulate the effects of kisspeptins because they are presently recognized as the most potent activators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, their effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons have not been investigated. In the current study, the GT1–7 cell line-expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone was used as a model to explore the effects of Arg-Pheamide-related peptides on kisspeptin activation. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using the calcium-sensitive dye, fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone released into the medium was detected via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results showed that 100 nmol/L kisspeptin-10 significantly increased gonadotropin-releasing hormone levels (at 120 minutes of exposure) and intracellular calcium concentrations. Co-treatment of kisspeptin with 1 μmol/L gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone or 1 μmol/L Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 significantly attenuated levels of kisspeptin-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone but did not affect kisspeptin-induced elevations of intracellular calcium concentration. Overall, the results suggest that gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 may have inhibitory effects on kisspeptin-activated gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons independent of the calcium signaling pathway. PMID:25206468

  9. Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides influence gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Kelestimur, Haluk; Kacar, Emine; Uzun, Aysegul; Ozcan, Mete; Kutlu, Selim

    2013-06-25

    The hypothalamic Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and orthologous mammalian peptides of Arg-Phe-amide, may be important regulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal reproductive axis. These peptides may modulate the effects of kisspeptins because they are presently recognized as the most potent activators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, their effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons have not been investigated. In the current study, the GT1-7 cell line-expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone was used as a model to explore the effects of Arg-Pheamide-related peptides on kisspeptin activation. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using the calcium-sensitive dye, fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone released into the medium was detected via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results showed that 100 nmol/L kisspeptin-10 significantly increased gonadotropin-releasing hormone levels (at 120 minutes of exposure) and intracellular calcium concentrations. Co-treatment of kisspeptin with 1 μmol/L gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone or 1 μmol/L Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 significantly attenuated levels of kisspeptin-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone but did not affect kisspeptin-induced elevations of intracellular calcium concentration. Overall, the results suggest that gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 may have inhibitory effects on kisspeptin-activated gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons independent of the calcium signaling pathway.

  10. Decapeptides as effective agonists from L-amino acids biologically equivalent to the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Folkers, K; Bowers, C Y; Tang, P F; Kubota, M

    1986-01-01

    Apparently, no agonist has been found that is comparable in potency to the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) for release of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) without substitutions with unnatural or D forms of natural amino acids. Of 139 known "agonist analogs" of LHRH, two were active in the range of 65%. The four LHRHs known to occur in nature involve a total of six amino acids (Tyr, His, Leu, Trp, Arg, Gln) in positions 5, 7, and 8. There are 16 possible peptides with these six amino acids in positions 5, 7, and 8, of which 4 are the known LHRHs, and 2 more were synthesized. We have synthesized the 10 new peptides and assayed 11 in vivo and in vitro, and we found not only 1 but a total of 5 that have activity equivalent to or greater than that of LHRH for the release of LH and/or FSH under at least one assay condition. These five are as follows: [His5,Trp7,Gln8]LHRH; [His5,Trp7,Leu8]LHRH; [His5,Trp7]LHRH; [Trp7]LHRH; [His5]LHRH. Two of these five agonists variably released relatively more FSH than LH. One or more of these five agonists may occur in nature and one may be follicle-stimulating hormone-releasing hormone. The two peptides with Gln8 and Leu8, if occurring in nature, may have different receptors according to radioreceptor assays and to the ratio of LH/FSH release in vivo. These structures are a basis for the design of antagonists without Arg8 toward avoiding histamine release. Complete inhibition of LH and FSH release in vivo may be induced by joint use of Arg8 and Gln8 or Leu8 antagonists. These potent agonists, related to LHRH, may be therapeutically useful in disorders of reproduction, the central nervous system, and for the control of hormone-dependent carcinomas. PMID:3081889

  11. Green tea proanthocyanidins cause impairment of hormone-regulated larval development and reproductive fitness via repression of juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase, insulin-like peptide and cytochrome P450 genes in Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto

    PubMed Central

    Nyanjom, Steven G.; Mutunga, James M.; Njeru, Sospeter N.; Bargul, Joel L.

    2017-01-01

    Successful optimization of plant-derived compounds into control of nuisance insects would benefit from scientifically validated targets. However, the close association between the genotypic responses and physiological toxicity effects mediated by these compounds remains underexplored. In this study, we evaluated the sublethal dose effects of proanthocyanidins (PAs) sourced from green tea (Camellia sinensis) on life history traits of Anopheles gambiae (sensu stricto) mosquitoes with an aim to unravel the probable molecular targets. Based on the induced phenotypic effects, genes selected for study targeted juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis, signal transduction, oxidative stress response and xenobiotic detoxification in addition to vitellogenesis in females. Our findings suggest that chronic exposure of larval stages (L3/L4) to sublethal dose of 5 ppm dramatically extended larval developmental period for up to 12 days, slowed down pupation rates, induced abnormal larval-pupal intermediates and caused 100% inhibition of adult emergence. Further, females exhibited significant interference of fecundity and egg hatchability relative to controls (p < 0.001). Using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), our findings show that PA-treated larvae exhibited significant repression of AgamJHAMT (p < 0.001), AgamILP1 (p < 0.001) and AgamCYP6M2 (p < 0.001) with up-regulation of Hsp70 (p < 0.001). Females exposed as larvae demonstrated down-regulation of AgamVg (p = 0.03), AgamILP1 (p = 0.009), AgamCYP6M2 (p = 0.05) and AgamJHAMT (p = 0.02). Our findings support that C. sinensis proanthocyanidins affect important vectorial capacity components such as mosquito survival rates and reproductive fitness thus could be potentially used for controlling populations of malaria vectors. PMID:28301607

  12. Green tea proanthocyanidins cause impairment of hormone-regulated larval development and reproductive fitness via repression of juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase, insulin-like peptide and cytochrome P450 genes in Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto.

    PubMed

    Muema, Jackson M; Nyanjom, Steven G; Mutunga, James M; Njeru, Sospeter N; Bargul, Joel L

    2017-01-01

    Successful optimization of plant-derived compounds into control of nuisance insects would benefit from scientifically validated targets. However, the close association between the genotypic responses and physiological toxicity effects mediated by these compounds remains underexplored. In this study, we evaluated the sublethal dose effects of proanthocyanidins (PAs) sourced from green tea (Camellia sinensis) on life history traits of Anopheles gambiae (sensu stricto) mosquitoes with an aim to unravel the probable molecular targets. Based on the induced phenotypic effects, genes selected for study targeted juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis, signal transduction, oxidative stress response and xenobiotic detoxification in addition to vitellogenesis in females. Our findings suggest that chronic exposure of larval stages (L3/L4) to sublethal dose of 5 ppm dramatically extended larval developmental period for up to 12 days, slowed down pupation rates, induced abnormal larval-pupal intermediates and caused 100% inhibition of adult emergence. Further, females exhibited significant interference of fecundity and egg hatchability relative to controls (p < 0.001). Using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), our findings show that PA-treated larvae exhibited significant repression of AgamJHAMT (p < 0.001), AgamILP1 (p < 0.001) and AgamCYP6M2 (p < 0.001) with up-regulation of Hsp70 (p < 0.001). Females exposed as larvae demonstrated down-regulation of AgamVg (p = 0.03), AgamILP1 (p = 0.009), AgamCYP6M2 (p = 0.05) and AgamJHAMT (p = 0.02). Our findings support that C. sinensis proanthocyanidins affect important vectorial capacity components such as mosquito survival rates and reproductive fitness thus could be potentially used for controlling populations of malaria vectors.

  13. Parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide regulate osteosarcoma cell functions: Focus on the extracellular matrix (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic, Dragana; Kavasi, Rafaela-Maria; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; Tsiaoussis, John; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Tsatsakis, Aristides M.; Tzanakakis, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a primary bone tumor of mesenchymal origin mostly affecting children and adolescents. The OS extracellular matrix (ECM) is extensively altered as compared to physiological bone tissue. Indeed, the main characteristic of the most common osteoblastic subtype of OS is non-mineralized osteoid production. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a polypeptide hormone secreted by the chief cells of the parathyroid glands. The PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) may be comprised of 139, 141 or 173 amino acids and exhibits considerate N-terminal amino acid sequence homology with PTH. The function of PTH/PTHrP is executed through the activation of the PTH receptor 1 (PTHR1) and respective downstream intracellular pathways which regulate skeletal development, bone turnover and mineral ion homeostasis. Both PTHR1 and its PTH/PTHrP ligands have been shown to be expressed in OS and to affect the functions of these tumor cells. This review aims to highlight the less well known aspects of PTH/PTHrP functions in the progression of OS by focusing on ECM-dependent signaling. PMID:27499459

  14. Targeted Melanoma Imaging and Therapy with Radiolabeled Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Thomas; Zhang, Xiuli; Miao, Yubin

    2010-01-01

    Radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) analogues have been used to define the expression, affinity and function of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R). The MC1-R is one of a family of five G-protein linker receptors, which is primarily involved in regulation of skin pigmentation. Over-expression of the MC1-R on melanoma tumor cells has made it an attractive target for the development of α-MSH peptide based imaging and therapeutic agents. Initially, the native α-MSH peptide was radiolabeled directly, but it suffered from low specific activity and poor stability. The addition of non-natural amino acids yielded α-MSH analogues with greater MC-1R affinity and stability. Furthermore, peptide cyclization via disulfide and lactam bond formation as well as site-specific metal coordination resulted in additional gains in receptor affinity and peptide stability in vitro and in vivo. Radiochemical stability of the α-MSH analogues was improved through the conjugation of metal chelators to the peptide’s N-terminus or lysine residues for radionuclide coordination. In vitro cell binding studies demonstrated that the radiolabeled α-MSH analogues had low to subnanomolar affinities for the MC1-R. Biodistribution and imaging studies in the B16 mouse melanoma modeled showed rapid tumor uptake of the radiolabeled peptides, with the cyclic peptides demonstrating prolonged tumor retention. Cyclic α-MSH analogues labeled with beta and alpha emitting radionuclides demonstrated melanoma therapeutic efficacy in the B16 melanoma mouse model. Strong pre-clinical imaging and therapy data highlight the clinical potential use of radiolabeled α-MSH peptides for melanoma imaging and treatment of disseminated disease. PMID:20467398

  15. [Critical aspects of peptide hormone abuse in exercise and sports: an update].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carlos Kusano Bucalen

    2013-01-01

    The hormonal abuse in physical exercise practioners is very common. Many pleople believe these substances can promote skeletal muscle hyperthrophy and improve physical fitness without health damaging effects. However, this is another myth that science unmasked. This article updates information regarding abuse of insulin, growth hormone, thyroid hormones, and erythropoitin. The peptide hormone abuse can cause motor paralysis, skeletal muscle damage and loss, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, arterial hypertension, sweating, headaches, vomiting and enhances the risk for atherosclerosis, thrombosis, osteoporosis, and cancer.

  16. Prediction of Scylla olivacea (Crustacea; Brachyura) peptide hormones using publicly accessible transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequences.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    The aquaculture of crabs from the genus Scylla is of increasing economic importance for many Southeast Asian countries. Expansion of Scylla farming has led to increased efforts to understand the physiology and behavior of these crabs, and as such, there are growing molecular resources for them. Here, publicly accessible Scylla olivacea transcriptomic data were mined for putative peptide-encoding transcripts; the proteins deduced from the identified sequences were then used to predict the structures of mature peptide hormones. Forty-nine pre/preprohormone-encoding transcripts were identified, allowing for the prediction of 187 distinct mature peptides. The identified peptides included isoforms of adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-like peptide, allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, bursicon β, CCHamide, corazonin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone/molt-inhibiting hormone, diuretic hormone 31, eclosion hormone, FMRFamide-like peptide, HIGSLYRamide, insulin-like peptide, intocin, leucokinin, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide F, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone, pyrokinin, red pigment concentrating hormone, RYamide, short neuropeptide F, SIFamide and tachykinin-related peptide, all well-known neuropeptide families. Surprisingly, the tissue used to generate the transcriptome mined here is reported to be testis. Whether or not the testis samples had neural contamination is unknown. However, if the peptides are truly produced by this reproductive organ, it could have far reaching consequences for the study of crustacean endocrinology, particularly in the area of reproductive control. Regardless, this peptidome is the largest thus far predicted for any brachyuran (true crab) species, and will serve as a foundation for future studies of peptidergic control in members of the commercially important genus Scylla.

  17. Identification of novel peptide hormones in the human proteome by hidden Markov model screening

    PubMed Central

    Mirabeau, Olivier; Perlas, Emerald; Severini, Cinzia; Audero, Enrica; Gascuel, Olivier; Possenti, Roberta; Birney, Ewan; Rosenthal, Nadia; Gross, Cornelius

    2007-01-01

    Peptide hormones are small, processed, and secreted peptides that signal via membrane receptors and play critical roles in normal and pathological physiology. The search for novel peptide hormones has been hampered by their small size, low or restricted expression, and lack of sequence similarity. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a bioinformatics search tool based on the hidden Markov model formalism that uses several peptide hormone sequence features to estimate the likelihood that a protein contains a processed and secreted peptide of this class. Application of this tool to an alignment of mammalian proteomes ranked 90% of known peptide hormones among the top 300 proteins. An analysis of the top scoring hypothetical and poorly annotated human proteins identified two novel candidate peptide hormones. Biochemical analysis of the two candidates, which we called spexin and augurin, showed that both were localized to secretory granules in a transfected pancreatic cell line and were recovered from the cell supernatant. Spexin was expressed in the submucosal layer of the mouse esophagus and stomach, and a predicted peptide from the spexin precursor induced muscle contraction in a rat stomach explant assay. Augurin was specifically expressed in mouse endocrine tissues, including pituitary and adrenal gland, choroid plexus, and the atrio-ventricular node of the heart. Our findings demonstrate the utility of a bioinformatics approach to identify novel biologically active peptides. Peptide hormones and their receptors are important diagnostic and therapeutic targets, and our results suggest that spexin and augurin are novel peptide hormones likely to be involved in physiological homeostasis. PMID:17284679

  18. Glucagon-related peptide 1 (GLP-1): hormone and neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Philip J; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-06-15

    The interest in glucagon-like petide-1 (GLP-1) and other pre-proglucagon derived peptides has risen almost exponentially since seminal papers in the early 1990s proposed to use GLP-1 agonists as therapeutic agents for treatment of type 2 diabetes. A wealth of interesting studies covering both normal and pathophysiological role of GLP-1 have been published over the last two decades and our understanding of GLP-1 action has widened considerably. In the present review, we have tried to cover our current understanding of GLP-1 actions both as a peripheral hormone and as a central neurotransmitter. From an initial focus on glycaemic control, GLP-1 research has been diverted to study its role in energy homeostasis, neurodegeneration, cognitive functions, anxiety and many more functions. With the upcoming introduction of GLP-1 agonists on the pharmaceutical venue, we have witnessed an outstanding example of how initial ideas from basic science laboratories have paved their way to become a novel therapeutic strategy to fight diabetes.

  19. The metabolic sensor Sirt1 and the hypothalamus: Interplay between peptide hormones and pro-hormone convertases.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Eduardo A

    2016-12-15

    The last decade had witnessed a tremendous progress in our understanding of the causes of metabolic diseases including obesity. Among the contributing factors regulating energy balance are nutrient sensors such as sirtuins. Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a NAD + - dependent deacetylase is affected by diet, environmental stress, and also plays a critical role in metabolic health by deacetylating proteins in many tissues, including liver, muscle, adipose tissue, heart, endothelium, and in the complexity of the hypothalamus. Because of its dependence on NAD+, Sirt1 also functions as a nutrient/redox sensor, and new novel data show a function of this enzyme in the maturation of hypothalamic peptide hormones controlling energy balance either through regulation of specific nuclear transcription factors or by regulating specific pro-hormone convertases (PCs) involved in the post-translational processing of pro-hormones. The post-translational processing mechanism of pro-hormones is critical in the pathogenesis of obesity as recently shown that metabolic and physiological triggers affect the biosynthesis and processing of many peptides hormones. Specific regulation of pro-hormone processing is likely another key step where final amounts of bioactive peptides can be tightly regulated. Different factors stimulate or inhibit pro-hormones biosynthesis in concert with an increase in the PCs involved in the maturation of bioactive hormones. Adding more complexity to the system, the new studies describe here suggest that Sirt1 could also regulate the fate of peptide hormone biosynthesis. The present review summarizes the recent progress in hypothalamic SIRT1 research with a particular emphasis on the tissue-specific control of neuropeptide hormone maturation. The series of studies done in mouse and rat models strongly advocate for the first time that a deacetylating enzyme could be a regulator in the maturation of peptide hormones and their processing enzymes. These discoveries are the

  20. Music increase altruism through regulating the secretion of steroid hormones and peptides.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hajime; Toyoshima, Kumiko

    2014-12-01

    Music is well known for its effect on human behavior especially of their bonding and empathy towards others. Music provokes one's emotion and activates mirror neurons and reward system. It also regulates social hormones such as steroid hormones or peptides, and increases empathy, pro-sociality and altruism. As a result, it improves one's reproductive success.

  1. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering.

    PubMed

    Neree, Armelle Tchoumi; Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Bourgault, Steve

    2015-11-16

    Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  2. Peptidal Sex Hormones Inducing Conjugation Tube Formation in Compatible Mating-Type Cells of Tremella mesenterica.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Y; Yoshida, M; Isogai, A; Suzuki, A

    1981-06-26

    The pair of peptidal sex hormones (tremerogen A-10 and tremerogen a-13) that induce conjugation tube formation in compatible type cells (A and a types) of Tremella mesenterica were isolated. Tremerogen A-10 is a dodecapeptide and tremerogen a-13, a tridecapeptide. In both peptides, the sulfiydryl group of the cysteines at the carboxyl terminus was blocked by farnesyl moieties.

  3. Genome-Wide Analyses Reveal a Role for Peptide Hormones in Planarian Germline Development

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Hou, Xiaowen; Romanova, Elena V.; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Miller, Claire M.; Saberi, Amir; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive peptides (i.e., neuropeptides or peptide hormones) represent the largest class of cell-cell signaling molecules in metazoans and are potent regulators of neural and physiological function. In vertebrates, peptide hormones play an integral role in endocrine signaling between the brain and the gonads that controls reproductive development, yet few of these molecules have been shown to influence reproductive development in invertebrates. Here, we define a role for peptide hormones in controlling reproductive physiology of the model flatworm, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Based on our observation that defective neuropeptide processing results in defects in reproductive system development, we employed peptidomic and functional genomic approaches to characterize the planarian peptide hormone complement, identifying 51 prohormone genes and validating 142 peptides biochemically. Comprehensive in situ hybridization analyses of prohormone gene expression revealed the unanticipated complexity of the flatworm nervous system and identified a prohormone specifically expressed in the nervous system of sexually reproducing planarians. We show that this member of the neuropeptide Y superfamily is required for the maintenance of mature reproductive organs and differentiated germ cells in the testes. Additionally, comparative analyses of our biochemically validated prohormones with the genomes of the parasitic flatworms Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum identified new schistosome prohormones and validated half of all predicted peptide-encoding genes in these parasites. These studies describe the peptide hormone complement of a flatworm on a genome-wide scale and reveal a previously uncharacterized role for peptide hormones in flatworm reproduction. Furthermore, they suggest new opportunities for using planarians as free-living models for understanding the reproductive biology of flatworm parasites. PMID:20967238

  4. Hormone-like peptides in the venoms of marine cone snails

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Li, Qing; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Gajewiak, Joanna; Yandell, Mark; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Norton, Raymond S.; Safavi-Hemami, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The venoms of cone snails (genus Conus) are remarkably complex, consisting of hundreds of typically short, disulfide-rich peptides termed conotoxins. These peptides have diverse pharmacological targets, with injection of venom eliciting a range of physiological responses, including sedation, paralysis and sensory overload. Most conotoxins target the prey’s nervous system but evidence of venom peptides targeting neuroendocrine processes is emerging. Examples include vasopressin, RFamide neuropeptides and recently also insulin. To investigate the diversity of hormone/neuropeptide-like molecules in the venoms of cone snails we systematically mined the venom gland transcriptomes of several cone snail species and examined secreted venom peptides in dissected and injected venom of the Australian cone snail Conus victoriae. Using this approach we identified several novel hormone/neuropeptide-like toxins, including peptides similar to the bee brain hormone prohormone-4, the mollusc ganglia neuropeptide elevenin, and thyrostimulin, a member of the glycoprotein hormone family, and confirmed the presence of insulin. We confirmed that at least two of these peptides are not only expressed in the venom gland but also form part of the injected venom cocktail, unambiguously demonstrating their role in envenomation. Our findings suggest that hormone/neuropeptide-like toxins are a diverse and integral part of the complex envenomation strategy of Conus. Exploration of this group of venom components offers an exciting new avenue for the discovery of novel pharmacological tools and drug candidates, complementary to conotoxins. PMID:26301480

  5. Hormone-like peptides in the venoms of marine cone snails.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Samuel D; Li, Qing; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Gajewiak, Joanna; Yandell, Mark; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Purcell, Anthony W; Norton, Raymond S; Safavi-Hemami, Helena

    2017-04-01

    The venoms of cone snails (genus Conus) are remarkably complex, consisting of hundreds of typically short, disulfide-rich peptides termed conotoxins. These peptides have diverse pharmacological targets, with injection of venom eliciting a range of physiological responses, including sedation, paralysis and sensory overload. Most conotoxins target the prey's nervous system but evidence of venom peptides targeting neuroendocrine processes is emerging. Examples include vasopressin, RFamide neuropeptides and recently also insulin. To investigate the diversity of hormone/neuropeptide-like molecules in the venoms of cone snails we systematically mined the venom gland transcriptomes of several cone snail species and examined secreted venom peptides in dissected and injected venom of the Australian cone snail Conus victoriae. Using this approach we identified several novel hormone/neuropeptide-like toxins, including peptides similar to the bee brain hormone prohormone-4, the mollusc ganglia neuropeptide elevenin, and thyrostimulin, a member of the glycoprotein hormone family, and confirmed the presence of insulin. We confirmed that at least two of these peptides are not only expressed in the venom gland but also form part of the injected venom cocktail, unambiguously demonstrating their role in envenomation. Our findings suggest that hormone/neuropeptide-like toxins are a diverse and integral part of the complex envenomation strategy of Conus. Exploration of this group of venom components offers an exciting new avenue for the discovery of novel pharmacological tools and drug candidates, complementary to conotoxins.

  6. Nanotechnology for delivery of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anisha; Bahal, Raman; Gupta, Meera; Glazer, Peter M; Saltzman, W Mark

    2016-10-28

    Over the past three decades, peptide nucleic acids have been employed in numerous chemical and biological applications. Peptide nucleic acids possess enormous potential because of their superior biophysical properties, compared to other oligonucleotide chemistries. However, for therapeutic applications, intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids remains a challenge. In this review, we summarize the progress that has been made in delivering peptide nucleic acids to intracellular targets. In addition, we emphasize recent nanoparticle-based strategies for efficient delivery of conventional and chemically-modified peptides nucleic acids.

  7. The CHH-superfamily of multifunctional peptide hormones controlling crustacean metabolism, osmoregulation, moulting, and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Webster, Simon George; Keller, Rainer; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2012-01-15

    Apart from providing an up-to-date review of the literature, considerable emphasis was placed in this article on the historical development of the field of "crustacean eyestalk hormones". A role of the neurosecretory eyestalk structures of crustaceans in endocrine regulation was recognized about 80 years ago, but it took another half a century until the first peptide hormones were identified. Following the identification of crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone (CHH) and moult-inhibiting hormone (MIH), a large number of homologous peptides have been identified to this date. They comprise a family of multifunctional peptides which can be divided, according to sequences and precursor structure, into two subfamilies, type-I and -II. Recent results on peptide sequences, structure of genes and precursors are described here. The best studied biological activities include metabolic control, moulting, gonad maturation, ionic and osmotic regulation and methyl farnesoate synthesis in mandibular glands. Accordingly, the names CHH, MIH, and GIH/VIH (gonad/vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone), MOIH (mandibular organ-inhibiting hormone) were coined. The identification of ITP (ion transport peptide) in insects showed, for the first time, that CHH-family peptides are not restricted to crustaceans, and data mining has recently inferred their occurrence in other ecdysozoan clades as well. The long-held tenet of exclusive association with the eyestalk X-organ-sinus gland tract has been challenged by the finding of several extra nervous system sites of expression of CHH-family peptides. Concerning mode of action and the question of target tissues, second messenger mechanisms are discussed, as well as binding sites and receptors. Future challenges are highlighted.

  8. Decapeptides as effective agonists from L-amino acids biologically equivalent to the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Folkers, K.; Bowers, C.Y.; Tang, P.L.; Kubota, M.

    1986-02-01

    Apparently, no agonist has been found that is comparable in potency to the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) for release of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) without substitutions with unnatural or D forms of natural amino acids. Of 139 known agonist analogs of LHRH, two were active in the range of 65%. The four LHRHs known to occur in nature involve a total of six amino acids (Tyr, His, Leu, Trp, Arg, Gln) in positions 5, 7, and 8. There are 16 possible peptides with these six amino acids in positions 5, 7, and 8, of which 4 are the known LHRHs, and 2 more were synthesized. The authors have synthesized the 10 new peptides and assayed 11 in vivo and in vitro, and they found not only 1 but a total of 5 that have activity equivalent to or greater than that of LHRH for the release of LH and/or FSH under at least one assay condition. These five are as follows: (HisV,TrpX,GlnY)LHRH; (HisV,TrpX,LeuY)LHRH; (HisV,TrpX)LHRH; (TrpX)LHRH; (HisV)LHRH. These structures are a basis for the design of antagonists without ArgY toward avoiding histamine release. Complete inhibition of LH and FSH release in vivo may be induced by joint use of ArgY and GlnY or LeuY antagonists. These potent agonists, related to LHRH, may be therapeutically useful in disorders of reproduction, the central nervous system, and for the control of hormone-dependent carcinomas. Radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays were utilized.

  9. A comparative protease stability study of synthetic macrocyclic peptides that mimic two endocrine hormones.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, John J; Gruskos, Jessica J; Goldwaser, Ari L; Decker, Megan E; Guarracino, Danielle A

    2013-02-15

    Peptide therapeutics have traditionally faced many challenges including low bioavailability, poor proteolytic stability and difficult cellular uptake. Conformationally constraining the backbone of a peptide into a macrocyclic ring often ameliorates these problems and allows for the development of a variety of new drugs. Such peptide-based pharmaceuticals can enhance the multi-faceted functionality of peptide side chains, permitting the peptides to bind cellular targets and receptors necessary to impart their role, while protecting them from degrading cellular influences. In the work described here, we developed three cyclic peptides, VP mimic1, VP mimic2 and OT mimic1, which mimic endocrine hormones vasopressin and oxytocin. Making notable changes to the overall structure and composition of the parent hormones, we synthesized the mimics and tested their durability against treatment with three proteases chosen for their specificity: pepsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and pronase. Vasopressin and oxytocin contain a disulfide linkage leaving them particularly vulnerable to deactivation from the reducing environment inside the cell. Thus, we increased the complexity of our assays by adding reducing agent glutathione to each mixture. Subsequently, we discovered each of our mimics withstood protease treatment with less degradation and/or a slower rate of degradation as compared to both parent hormones and a linear control peptide.

  10. Recombinant production, isotope labeling and purification of ENOD40B: a plant peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Kee; Tonneli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2012-08-01

    The plant peptide hormone ENOD40B was produced in a protein production strain of Escherichia coli harboring an induction controller plasmid (Rosetta(DE3)pLysS) as a His6-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein. The fusion protein product was denatured and refolded as part of the isolation procedure and purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography. The peptide hormone was released from its fusion partner by adding yeast ubiquitin hydrolase (YUH) and subsequently purified by reversed phase chromatography. The purity of the resulting peptide fragment was assayed by MALDITOF mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The final yields of the target peptide were 7.0 mg per liter of LB medium and 3.4 mg per liter of minimal medium.

  11. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  12. Mechanistic insight into a peptide hormone signaling complex mediating floral organ abscission

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Julia; Brandt, Benjamin; Wildhagen, Mari; Hohmann, Ulrich; Hothorn, Ludwig A; Butenko, Melinka A; Hothorn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Plants constantly renew during their life cycle and thus require to shed senescent and damaged organs. Floral abscission is controlled by the leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK) HAESA and the peptide hormone IDA. It is unknown how expression of IDA in the abscission zone leads to HAESA activation. Here we show that IDA is sensed directly by the HAESA ectodomain. Crystal structures of HAESA in complex with IDA reveal a hormone binding pocket that accommodates an active dodecamer peptide. A central hydroxyproline residue anchors IDA to the receptor. The HAESA co-receptor SERK1, a positive regulator of the floral abscission pathway, allows for high-affinity sensing of the peptide hormone by binding to an Arg-His-Asn motif in IDA. This sequence pattern is conserved among diverse plant peptides, suggesting that plant peptide hormone receptors may share a common ligand binding mode and activation mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15075.001 PMID:27058169

  13. Hormone fatty acid modifications: gram negative bacteria and vertebrates demonstrate common structure and function.

    PubMed

    Tizzano, Marco; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria are known to regulate diverse physiological processes through a mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). Prokaryotes communicate by extracellular signalling compounds, i.e. autoinducers (acyl homoserine lactone, AHL of Gram negative bacteria) or pheromones (post-translationally modified peptides of Gram positive bacteria), which activate genetic pathways when they reach a sufficient concentration (QS). A large number of Gram-negative quorum-sensing systems studied so far utilize N-acyl homoserine lactones as signal molecules. In vertebrates small synthetic molecules called growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) stimulate the release of growth hormone (GH) from the pituitary. GH release is stimulated by hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and ghrelin (endogenous ligand of the GHS-receptor, GHS-R). Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide, in which the serine-3 (Ser3) is n-octanoylated, and this modification is essential for ghrelin's activity. Ghrelin is the first known case of a peptide hormone modified by a fatty acid. The major active form of ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide with octanoylated Ser3; one of the more represented bacterial autoinducers is the N-Octanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C8-HL) molecule. The authors hypothesize that Gram-negative bacteria and vertebrates have a functional similarity in the search of food and an important structural homology of AHL and ghrelin for the highly conserved Serine-acylated motive in both molecules. Our suggestions could help one to understand the convergent origin and the biologic meaning of the Serine-acylated group in these organisms, a biologic meaning very important due to the high conservation in two kingdoms which are so different.

  14. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  15. In Silico Prediction of Neuropeptides/Peptide Hormone Transcripts in the Cheilostome Bryozoan Bugula neritina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The bryozoan Bugula neritina has a biphasic life cycle that consists of a planktonic larval stage and a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transition between these two stages is crucial for the development and recruitment of B. neritina. Metamorphosis in B. neritina is mediated by both the nervous system and the release of developmental signals. However, no research has been conducted to investigate the expression of neuropeptides (NP)/peptide hormones in B. neritina larvae. Here, we report a comprehensive study of the NP/peptide hormones in the marine bryozoan B. neritina based on in silico identification methods. We recovered 22 transcripts encompassing 11 NP/peptide hormone precursor transcript sequences. The transcript sequences of the 11 isolated NP precursors were validated by cDNA cloning using gene-specific primers. We also examined the expression of three peptide hormone precursor transcripts (BnFDSIG, BnILP1, BnGPB) in the coronate larvae of B. neritina, demonstrating their distinct expression patterns in the larvae. Overall, our findings serve as an important foundation for subsequent investigations of the peptidergic control of bryozoan larval behavior and settlement. PMID:27537380

  16. Fmoc/Trt-amino acids: comparison to Fmoc/tBu-amino acids in peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Gatos, D; Koutsogianni, S

    1998-03-01

    Model peptides containing the nucleophilic amino acids Trp and Met have been synthesized with the application of Fmoc/Trt- and Fmoc/tBu-amino acids, for comparison. The deprotection of the peptides synthesized using Fmoc/Trt-amino acids in all cases leads to crude peptides of higher purity than that of the same peptides synthesized using Fmoc/tBu-amino acids.

  17. Peptide and amino acid separation with nanofiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuru, Toshinori; Shutou, Takatoshi; Nakao, Shin-Ichi; Kimura, Shoji )

    1994-05-01

    Several nanofiltration membranes [UTC-20, 60 (Toray Industries), NF-40 (Film-Tech Corporation), Desal-5, G-20 (Desalination Systems), and NTR-7450 (Nitto Electric Industrial Co.)] were applied to separate amino acids and peptides on the basis of charge interaction with the membranes since most of them contain charged functional groups. Nanofiltration membranes having a molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) below 300 (UTC-20, 60, NF-40 and Desal-5) were not suitable for separation of amino acids. On the other hand, separation of amino acids and peptides with nanofiltration membranes having a MWCO around 2000-3000 (NTR-7450 and G-20) was satisfactory based on a charge effect mechanism; charged amino acids and peptides were rejected while neutral amino acids and peptides permeated through the membranes. Separation of peptides having different isoelectric points with nanofiltration membranes was possible by adjusting the pH. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Effects of spaceflight on hypothalamic peptide systems controlling pituitary growth hormone dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1992-01-01

    Possible effects of reduced gravity on central hypophysiotropic systems controlling growth hormone (GH) secretion were investigated in rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellites. Immunohistochemical (IHC)staining for the growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), somatostatin (SS), and other hypothalamic hormones was performed on hypothalami obtained from rats. IHC analysis was complemented by quantitative in situ assessments of mRNAs encoding the precursors for these hormones. Data obtained suggest that exposure to microgravity causes a preferential reduction in GRF peptide and mRNA levels in hypophysiotropic neurons, which may contribute to impared GH secretion in animals subjected to spaceflight. Effects of weightlessness are not mimicked by hindlimb suspension in this system.

  19. BIOACTIVE PROTEINS, PEPTIDES, AND AMINO ACIDS FROM MACROALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Harnedy, Pádraigín A; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2011-04-01

    Macroalgae are a diverse group of marine organisms that have developed complex and unique metabolic pathways to ensure survival in highly competitive marine environments. As a result, these organisms have been targeted for mining of natural biologically active components. The exploration of marine organisms has revealed numerous bioactive compounds that are proteinaceous in nature. These include proteins, linear peptides, cyclic peptides and depsipeptides, peptide derivatives, amino acids, and amino acid-like components. Furthermore, some species of macroalgae have been shown to contain significant levels of protein. While some protein-derived bioactive peptides have been characterized from macroalgae, macroalgal proteins currently still represent good candidate raw materials for biofunctional peptide mining. This review will provide an overview of the important bioactive amino-acid-containing compounds that have been identified in macroalgae. Moreover, the potential of macroalgal proteins as substrates for the generation of biofunctional peptides for utilization as functional foods to provide specific health benefits will be discussed.

  20. The effect of bariatric surgery on gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Meek, Claire L; Lewis, Hannah B; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M; Park, Adrian J

    2016-03-01

    Bariatric surgery for obesity has proved to be an extremely effective method of promoting long-term weight reduction with additional beneficial metabolic effects, such as improved glucose tolerance and remission of type 2 diabetes. A range of bariatric procedures are in common use, including gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Although the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of bariatric surgery are unclear, gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptides are thought to play an important role. The aim of this review is to summarise the effects of different bariatric surgery procedures upon gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptides, including ghrelin, gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucose-dependent insulinotropic hormone (GIP), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, insulin, glucagon and somatostatin.

  1. Anti-tumor effects of peptide analogs targeting neuropeptide hormone receptors on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Ullrich, M; Schally, A V; Bergmann, R; Pietzsch, J; Gebauer, L; Gondek, K; Qin, N; Pacak, K; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Eisenhofer, G; Bornstein, S R

    2013-05-22

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare but potentially lethal chromaffin cell tumor with currently no effective treatment. Peptide hormone receptors are frequently overexpressed on endocrine tumor cells and can be specifically targeted by various anti-tumor peptide analogs. The present study carried out on mouse pheochromocytoma cells (MPCs) and a more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived (MTT) cell line revealed that these cells are characterized by pronounced expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor and the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor. We further demonstrated significant anti-tumor effects mediated by cytotoxic somatostatin analogs, AN-162 and AN-238, by LHRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, by the cytotoxic LHRH analog, AN-152, and by recently developed GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, on MPC and for AN-152 and MIA-602 on MTT cells. Studies of novel anti-tumor compounds on these mouse cell lines serve as an important basis for mouse models of metastatic pheochromocytoma, which we are currently establishing.

  2. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  3. Effects of iodination on the distribution of peptide hormones in aqueous two-phase polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Desbuquois, B; Aurbach, G D

    1974-10-01

    1. The effect of iodination on the distribution of peptide hormones into the aqueous two-phase dextran-polyethylene glycol system and on the solubility of these hormones in aqueous polyethylene glycol and in water was assessed. Hormones that were studied included insulin, glucagon and parathyroid hormone. 2. The partition coefficient of native insulin in the dextran-polyethylene glycol system showed a minimum (about 1) near the isoelectric point of the hormone (pH 5). Partial iodination of insulin (one atom per molecule) caused little change in the distribution of the hormone. More extensive iodination markedly decreased the partition coefficient in the region of the isoelectric point and displaced the pH value at which the partition coefficient was a minimum towards lower values. 3. The solubility of native insulin in aqueous polyethylene glycol and in water showed a pH-dependence similar to that observed for the distribution in the dextran-polyethylene glycol system. Iodination of insulin decreased the solubility of the hormone in polyethylene glycol and in water in parallel, and decreased the pH value at which solubility was a minimum. The changes in solubility correlated with the degree of iodination and accounted for the changes in distribution observed at high concentrations of insulin. 4. Comparable effects of iodination on distribution and solubility were also observed with glucagon. 5. At concentrations of insulin below its maximum solubility, serum proteins caused a decrease in the partition coefficient of iodinated hormone, but not of native hormone. These effects correlated with the degree of iodination and resulted from a co-precipitation of iodinated insulin with serum proteins.

  4. The role of rosiglitazone treatment in the modulation of islet hormones and hormone-like peptides: a combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Sukriye; Bolkent, Sema; Sundler, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Rosiglitazone, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist, is an insulin sensitizing agent in peripheral tissues. This study investigated islet hormones and hormone-like peptides expression patterns in rosiglitazone treated streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats by using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization methods. Animals were divided into four groups. I. Group: Intact control rats. II. Group: Rosiglitazone-treated controls. III. Group: STZ-diabetic rats. IV. Group: Rosiglitazone-treated diabetic animals. Rosiglitazone was given for 7 days at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight. In the STZ-diabetic group, there were significant differences in islet hormones and hormone like peptides cell numbers compared to rosiglitazone control group and intact control group. There were significant differences in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cell numbers between rosiglitazone control group and rosiglitazone + STZ-diabetic group. We detected a significant decrease in glucagon mRNA signals in rosiglitazone-treated control group compared to intact controls. We found a statistically significant difference in islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) mRNA signals between the STZ-diabetic group and the rosiglitazone + STZ-diabetic group. Besides, we also demonstrated co-localization of peptides by using double and triple histochemistry. In conclusion, our results show that short-term rosiglitazone treatment had a preservative effect to some extent on the expression of islet hormones and hormone-like peptides to maintain the islet function.

  5. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barazzouk, Saïd; Daneault, Claude

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectroscopic techniques.

  6. The effects of parathyroid hormone peptides on the peripheral skeleton of postmenopausal women. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Louis M; Aspray, Terry J; McCloskey, Eugene V

    2017-03-09

    Given current developments in anabolic therapy for bone, we wished to document the effects of the only currently available anabolic therapy, parathyroid hormone (PTH) peptides, on the peripheral skeleton of postmenopausal women. We undertook a systematic review of English articles using MEDLINE, Scopus and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (final update 28th March 2016). Additional studies were identified through searches of bibliographies. Studies included those comparing PTH peptides with placebo, with anti-osteoporotic treatments and in combination therapies. Participants had to be postmenopausal women and outcomes included areal or volumetric bone mineral density (BMD) and measurements of bone microarchitecture at peripheral sites, such as the forearm and tibia. Data were extracted independently and reviewed by EVM and LMM. Data on study design were also collected for methodological risk of bias assessment. The heterogeneity between studies, regarding the drug dose and duration, and the site measured, prevented grouped meta-analysis. There were no significant differences in areal BMD between PTH peptides and placebo at peripheral skeletal sites at 12months. A decrease in aBMD occurred with PTH(1-34) (larger dose) and PTH(1-84) treatment at 18months follow-up in comparison to the placebo arms. Anti-resorptives seemed to attenuate losses of aBMD at peripheral sites when compared to PTH peptides monotherapy, likely mediated by lower cortical porosity. Finally, PTH peptides combined with bisphosphonates or denosumab attenuated peripheral BMD losses in comparison to PTH peptide monotherapy, with evidence of increased BMD at ultradistal peripheral sites when PTH(1-34) was combined with denosumab or hormone replacement therapy. This summary should act as a reference point for the comparison of new anabolic therapies, specifically in comparison to PTH(1-34).

  7. Peptide nucleic acid probes with charged photocleavable mass markers

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rachel J; Green, Philip S; Gale, Nittaya; Langley, G John

    2010-01-01

    Halogen-labelled peptide organic acid (HPOA) monomers have been synthesised and incorporated into sequence-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. Three different types of probe have been prepared; the unmodified PNA probe, the PNA probe with a mass marker, and the PNA probe with photocleavable mass marker. All three types of probe have been used in model studies to develop a mass spectrometry-based hybridisation assay for detection of point mutations in DNA. PMID:21687524

  8. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139 is activated by the peptides: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-, and β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH, and β-MSH), and the conserved core motif HFRW.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Shehata, Mohamed A; Hauser, Alexander S; Isberg, Vignir; Mokrosinski, Jacek; Andersen, Kirsten B; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Gloriam, David E; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that is expressed primarily in the brain. Not much is known regarding the function of GPR139. Recently we have shown that GPR139 is activated by the amino acids l-tryptophan and l-phenylalanine (EC50 values of 220 μM and 320 μM, respectively), as well as di-peptides comprised of aromatic amino acids. This led us to hypothesize that GPR139 may be activated by peptides. Sequence alignment of the binding cavities of all class A GPCRs, revealed that the binding pocket of the melanocortin 4 receptor is similar to that of GPR139. Based on the chemogenomics principle "similar targets bind similar ligands", we tested three known endogenous melanocortin 4 receptor agonists; adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and α- and β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH and β-MSH) on CHO-k1 cells stably expressing the human GPR139 in a Fluo-4 Ca(2+)-assay. All three peptides, as well as their conserved core motif HFRW, were found to activate GPR139 in the low micromolar range. Moreover, we found that peptides consisting of nine or ten N-terminal residues of α-MSH activate GPR139 in the submicromolar range. α-MSH1-9 was found to correspond to the product of a predicted cleavage site in the pre-pro-protein pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). Our results demonstrate that GPR139 is a peptide receptor, activated by ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, the conserved core motif HFRW as well as a potential endogenous peptide α-MSH1-9. Further studies are needed to determine the functional relevance of GPR139 mediated signaling by these peptides.

  9. Azapeptide analogues of the growth hormone releasing peptide 6 as cluster of differentiation 36 receptor ligands with reduced affinity for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Caroline; Picard, Émilie; Boeglin, Damien; Pohankova, Petra; Chemtob, Sylvain; Ong, Huy; Lubell, William D

    2012-07-26

    The synthetic hexapeptide growth hormone releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) exhibits dual affinity for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) and the cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) receptor. Azapeptide GHRP-6 analogues have been synthesized, exhibiting micromolar affinity to the CD36 receptor with reduced affinity toward the GHS-R1a. A combinatorial split-and-mix approach furnished aza-GHRP-6 leads, which were further examined by alanine scanning. Incorporation of an aza-amino acid residue respectively at the D-Trp(2), Ala(3), or Trp(4) position gave aza-GHRP-6 analogues with reduced affinity toward the GHS-R1a by at least a factor of 100 and in certain cases retained affinity for the CD36 receptor. In the latter cases, the D-Trp(2) residue proved important for CD36 receptor affinity; however, His(1) could be replaced by Ala(1) without considerable loss of binding. In a microvascular sprouting assay using a choroid explant, [azaTyr(4)]-GHRP-6 (15), [Ala(1), azaPhe(2)]-GHRP-6 (16), and [azaLeu(3), Ala(6)]-GHRP-6 (33) all exhibited antiangiogenic activity.

  10. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Alex G.; Young, Alex B.

    2006-09-01

    The fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid have been elucidated using MS2 and MS3 experiments and accurate mass measurements where necessary. The disposition of labile (N and O bonded) hydrogens in the fragmentation products has been studied by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium whereby the [MD]- ion is formed on electrospray ionization. [alpha]-Aspartyl and [beta]-aspartyl dipeptides give very similar fragment ion spectra on collisional activation, involving for both species primarily formation of the y1 ion and loss of H2O from [MH]- followed by further fragmentation, thus precluding the distinction of the isomeric species by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry. Dipeptides of sequence HXxxAspOH give characteristic spectra different from the [alpha]- and [beta]-isomers. For larger peptides containing aspartic acid a common fragmentation reaction involves nominal cleavage of the NC bond N-terminal to the aspartic acid residue to form a c ion (deprotonated amino acid amide (c1) or peptide amide (cn)) and the complimentary product involving elimination of a neutral amino acid amide or peptide amide. When aspartic acid is in the C-terminal position this fragmentation reaction occurs from the [MH]- ion while when the aspartic acid is not in the C-terminal position the fragmentation reaction occurs mainly from the [MHH2O]- ion. The products of this NC bond cleavage reaction serve to identify the position of the aspartic acid residue in the peptide.

  11. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  12. In vitro models for metabolic studies of small peptide hormones in sport drug testing.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Simone; Deventer, Koen; Geldof, Lore; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Peptide hormones represent an emerging class of potential doping agents. Detection of their misuse is difficult due to their short half-life in plasma and rapid elimination. Therefore, investigating their metabolism can improve detectability. Unfortunately, pharmacokinetic studies with human volunteers are often not allowed because of ethical constraints, and therefore alternative models are needed. This study was performed in order to evaluate in vitro models (human liver microsomes and S9 fraction) for the prediction of the metabolism of peptidic doping agents and to compare them with the established models. The peptides that were investigated include desmopressin, TB-500, GHRP-2, GHRP-6, hexarelin, LHRH and leuprolide. Several metabolites were detected for each peptide after incubation with human liver microsomes, S9 fraction, and serum, which all showed endopeptidase and exopeptidase activity. In vitro models from different organs (liver vs. kidney) were compared, but no significant differences were recorded. Deamidation was not observed in any of the models and was therefore evaluated by incubation with α-chymotrypsin. In conclusion, in vitro models are useful tools for forensic and clinical analysts to detect peptidic metabolic markers in biological fluids.

  13. Melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides inhibit TNF-alpha signaling in human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Hill, R P; MacNeil, S; Haycock, J W

    2006-02-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) has been identified as a potent anti-inflammatory in various tissues including the skin. It has previously been shown in skin cell keratinocytes and melanocytes/melanoma cells that MSH peptides inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) upregulation. However, the precise anti-inflammatory role of MSH peptides in dermal fibroblasts is unclear. Some studies report on pro-inflammatory responses, while others on anti-inflammatory responses. The present study confirms MC1R expression in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and reports that the MSH peptides alpha-MSH and KP(-D-)V inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity and ICAM-1 upregulation, consistent with an anti-inflammatory role. However, involvement of IkappaB-alpha regulation by either peptide was not confirmed, supporting a mechanism independent of the NF-kappaB inhibitor. In conclusion, alpha-MSH and KP(-D-)V peptides have an anti-inflammatory action on dermal fibroblast signaling by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF-alpha in vitro.

  14. Reducing renal uptake of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Fisher, Darrell R.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to improve the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-[1,2,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-Re-Cys,D-Phe,Arg]alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH), through coupling a negatively charged glutamic acid (Glu) to the peptide sequence. A new peptide of DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH was designed, synthesized and labeled with 90Y and 177Lu. Pharmacokinetics of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Glu,Arg)CCNSH were determined in B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Both exhibited significantly less renal uptake than 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH at 30 min and at 2, 3, and 24 h after dose administration. The renal uptake values of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH were 28.16% and 28.81% of those of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 hr post-injection. We also showed higher tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios 2.28 and 1.69 times that of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 h post-injection. The90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH activity accumulation was low in normal organs except for kidneys. Coupling a negatively charged amino acid (Glu) to the CCMSH peptide sequence dramatically reduced the renal uptake values and increased the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH, facilitating their potential applications as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  15. Evaluation of migration behaviour of therapeutic peptide hormones in capillary electrophoresis using polybrene-coated capillaries.

    PubMed

    Aptisa, Ghiulendan; Benavente, Fernando; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria; Chirila, Elisabeta; Barbosa, José

    2010-02-01

    Modelling electrophoretic mobility as a function of pH can be simultaneously used for determination of ionization constants and for rapid selection of the optimum pH for separation of mixtures of the modelled compounds. In this work, equations describing the effect of pH on electrophoretic behaviour were used to investigate migration of a series of polyprotic amphoteric peptide hormones between pH 2 and 12 in polybrene-coated capillaries. Polybrene (hexadimethrin bromide) is a polymer composed of quaternary amines that is strongly adsorbed by the fused-silica inner surface, preventing undesired interactions between the peptides and the inner capillary wall. In polybrene-coated capillaries the separation voltage must be reversed, because of the anodic electroosmotic flow promoted by the polycationic polymer attached to the inner capillary wall. The possibility of using polybrene-coated capillaries for determination of accurate ionization constants has been evaluated and the optimum pH for separation of a mixture of the peptide hormones studied has been selected. Advantages and disadvantages of using bare fused-silica and polybrene-coated capillaries for these purposes are discussed.

  16. Identification of a cDNA encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide from a human tumor associated with humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Mangin, M.; Webb, A.C.; Dreyer, B.E.; Posillico, J.T.; Ikeda, K.; Weir, E.C.; Stewart, A.F.; Bander, N.H.; Milstone, L.; Barton, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common paraneoplastic syndrome that appears to be mediated in many instances by a parathyroid hormone-like peptide. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from a human renal carcinoma associated with this syndrome was enriched by preparative electrophoresis and used to construct an enriched cDNA library in phage lambdagt10. The library was screened with a codon-preference oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of a partial N-terminal amino acid sequence from a human tumor-derived peptide, and a 2.0 kilo-base cDNA was identified. The cDNA encodes a 177 amino acid protein consisting of a 36 amino acid leader sequence and a 141 amino acid mature peptide. The first 13 amino acids of the deduced sequence of the mature peptide display strong homology to human PTH, with complete divergence thereafter. RNA blot-hybridization analysis revealed multiple transcripts in mRNA from tumors associated with the humor syndrome and also in mRNA from normal human keratinocytes. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from humans and rodents revealed a simple pattern compatible with a single-copy gene. The gene has been mapped to chromosome 12.

  17. Transcriptome and Peptidome Characterisation of the Main Neuropeptides and Peptidic Hormones of a Euphausiid: The Ice Krill, Euphausia crystallorophias

    PubMed Central

    Toullec, Jean-Yves; Corre, Erwan; Bernay, Benoît; Thorne, Michael A. S.; Cascella, Kévin; Ollivaux, Céline; Henry, Joël; Clark, Melody S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Ice krill, Euphausia crystallorophias is one of the species at the base of the Southern Ocean food chain. Given their significant contribution to the biomass of the Southern Ocean, it is vitally important to gain a better understanding of their physiology and, in particular, anticipate their responses to climate change effects in the warming seas around Antarctica. Methodology/Principal Findings Illumina sequencing was used to produce a transcriptome of the ice krill. Analysis of the assembled contigs via two different methods, produced 36 new pre-pro-peptides, coding for 61 neuropeptides or peptide hormones belonging to the following families: Allatostatins (A, B et C), Bursicon (α and β), Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormones (CHH and MIH/VIHs), Crustacean Cardioactive Peptide (CCAP), Corazonin, Diuretic Hormones (DH), the Eclosion Hormone (EH), Neuroparsin, Neuropeptide F (NPF), small Neuropeptide F (sNPF), Pigment Dispersing Hormone (PDH), Red Pigment Concentrating Hormone (RPCH) and finally Tachykinin. LC/MS/MS proteomics was also carried out on eyestalk extracts, which are the major site of neuropeptide synthesis in decapod crustaceans. Results confirmed the presence of six neuropeptides and six precursor-related peptides previously identified in the transcriptome analyses. Conclusions This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of neuropeptide hormones in a Eucarida non-decapod Malacostraca, several of which are described for the first time in a non-decapod crustacean. Additionally, there is a potential expansion of PDH and Neuropeptide F family members, which may reflect certain life history traits such as circadian rhythms associated with diurnal migrations and also the confirmation via mass spectrometry of several novel pre-pro-peptides, of unknown function. Knowledge of these essential hormones provides a vital framework for understanding the physiological response of this key Southern Ocean species to climate change and provides

  18. Genome-wide annotation and characterization of CLAVATA/ESR (CLE) peptide hormones of soybean (Glycine max) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and their orthologues of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hastwell, April H.; Gresshoff, Peter M.; Ferguson, Brett J.

    2015-01-01

    CLE peptides are key regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation in plant shoots, roots, vasculature, and legume nodules. They are C-terminally encoded peptides that are post-translationally cleaved and modified from their corresponding pre-propeptides to produce a final ligand that is 12–13 amino acids in length. In this study, an array of bionformatic and comparative genomic approaches was used to identify and characterize the complete family of CLE peptide-encoding genes in two of the world’s most important crop species, soybean and common bean. In total, there are 84 CLE peptide-encoding genes in soybean (considerably more than the 32 present in Arabidopsis), including three pseudogenes and two multi-CLE domain genes having six putative CLE domains each. In addition, 44 CLE peptide-encoding genes were identified in common bean. In silico characterization was used to establish all soybean homeologous pairs, and to identify corresponding gene orthologues present in common bean and Arabidopsis. The soybean CLE pre-propeptide family was further analysed and separated into seven distinct groups based on structure, with groupings strongly associated with the CLE domain sequence and function. These groups provide evolutionary insight into the CLE peptide families of soybean, common bean, and Arabidopsis, and represent a novel tool that can aid in the functional characterization of the peptides. Transcriptional evidence was also used to provide further insight into the location and function of all CLE peptide-encoding members currently available in gene atlases for the three species. Taken together, this in-depth analysis helped to identify and categorize the complete CLE peptide families of soybean and common bean, established gene orthologues within the two legume species, and Arabidopsis, and provided a platform to help compare, contrast, and identify the function of critical CLE peptide hormones in plant development. PMID:26188205

  19. Similarity of synthetic peptide from human tumor to parathyroid hormone in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, N; Caulfield, M P; Fisher, J E; Goldman, M E; McKee, R L; Reagan, J E; Levy, J J; Nutt, R F; Rodan, S B; Schofield, T L

    1987-12-11

    One mechanism considered responsible for the hypercalcemia that frequently accompanies malignancy is secretion by the tumor of a circulating factor that alters calcium metabolism. The structure of a tumor-secreted peptide was recently determined and found to be partially homologous to parathyroid hormone (PTH). The amino-terminal 1-34 region of the factor was synthesized and evaluated biologically. In vivo it produced hypercalcemia, acted on bone and kidney, and stimulated 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 formation. In vitro it interacted with PTH receptors and, in some systems, was more potent than PTH. These studies support a long-standing hypothesis regarding pathogenesis of malignancy-associated hypercalcemia.

  20. alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone and oxytocin: a peptide signalling cascade in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, N

    2006-09-01

    alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and oxytocin share remarkable similarities of effects on behaviour in rats; in particular, they both inhibit feeding behaviour and stimulate sexual behaviour. Recently, we showed that alpha-MSH interacts with the magnocellular oxytocin system in the supraoptic nucleus; alpha-MSH induces the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of magnocellular neurones but it inhibits the secretion of oxytocin from their nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary. This effect of alpha-MSH on supraoptic nucleus oxytocin neurones is remarkable for two reasons. First, it illustrates the capacity of magnocellular neurones to differentially regulate peptide release from dendrites and axons and, second, it emphasises the putative role of magnocellular neurones as a major source of central oxytocin release, and as a likely substrate of some oxytocin-mediated behaviours. The ability of peptides to differentially control secretion from different compartments of their targets indicates one way by which peptide signals might have a particularly significant effect on neuronal circuitry. This suggests a possible explanation for the striking way in which some peptides can influence specific, complex behaviours.

  1. Novel alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues with high candidacidal activity.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Paolo; Rossi, Claudia; Colombo, Gualtiero; Gatti, Stefano; Novellino, Ettore; Lipton, James M; Catania, Anna

    2003-02-27

    alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is an endogenous linear tridecapeptide with potent antiinflammatory effects. We recently demonstrated that alpha-MSH and its C-terminal sequence Lys-Pro-Val (alpha-MSH (11-13)) have antimicrobial effects against two major and representative pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. In an attempt to improve the candidacidal activity of alpha-MSH and to better understand the peptide structure-antifungal activity relations, we designed and synthesized novel peptide analogues. Because previous data suggested that antimicrobial effects of alpha-MSH were receptor-mediated, we chose to focus on the sequence alpha-MSH (6-13), which contains the invariant core sequence His-Phe-Arg-Trp (6-9) that is important for binding to the known melanocortin receptors and also contains the sequence Lys-Pro-Val (11-13) that is known to be important for antimicrobial activity. In this structure-activity study, we discovered several compounds that have greater candidacidal activity than alpha-MSH. The peptide [d-Nal-7,Phe-12]-alpha-MSH (6-13) was the most potent of the analogues tested. The present results are very encouraging because they show the great potential of these peptides as a truly novel class of candidacidal compounds.

  2. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland.

  3. Human renal carcinoma expresses two messages encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide: evidence for the alternative splicing of a single-copy gene.

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, M A; Strewler, G J; Nissenson, R A; Rosenblatt, M; Rodan, G A

    1988-01-01

    A peptide secreted by tumors associated with the clinical syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy was recently purified from human renal carcinoma cell line 786-0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this peptide has considerable similarity with those of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and of peptides isolated from human breast and lung carcinoma (cell line BEN). In this study we obtained the nucleotide sequence of a 1595-base cDNA complementary to mRNA encoding the PTH-like peptide produced by 786-0 cells. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a leader sequence of 36 amino acids and a 139-residue peptide, in which 8 of the first 13 residues are identical to the N terminus of PTH. Through the first 828 bases the sequence of this cDNA is identical with one recently isolated from a BEN cell cDNA library; however, beginning with base 829 the sequences diverge, shortening the open reading frame by 2 amino acids. Differential RNA blot analysis revealed that 786-0 cells express two major PTH-like peptide mRNAs with different 3' untranslated sequences, one of which hybridizes with the presently described sequence and the other one with that reported for the BEN cell PTH-like peptide cDNA. Primer-extension analysis of 786-0 poly(A)+ RNA together with Southern blot analysis of human DNA confirmed the presence of a single-copy gene coding for multiple mRNAs through alternate splicing. In addition, the 3' untranslated sequence of the cDNA described here has significant similarity to the c-myc protooncogene. Images PMID:3290897

  4. Prolonged Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Actions of a Pegylated Parathyroid Hormone (1-34) Peptide Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Khatri, Ashok; Maeda, Akira; Potts, John T; Jüppner, Harald; Gardella, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) addition can prolong the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of a bioactive peptide in vivo, in part by impeding rates of glomerular filtration. For parathyroid hormone (PTH) peptides, pegylation could help in exploring the actions of the hormone in the kidney; e.g., in dissecting the relative roles that filtered versus blood-borne PTH play in regulating phosphate transport. It could also lead to potential alternate forms of treatment for hypoparathyroidism. We thus synthesized the fluorescent pegylated PTH derivative [Lys13(tetramethyl rhodamine {TMR}), Cys35(PEG-20,000 Da)]PTH(1-35) (PEG-PTHTMR) and its non-pegylated counterpart [Lys13(TMR), Cys35]PTH(1-35) (PTHTMR) and assessed their properties in cells and in mice. In PTHR1-expressing HEK-293 cells, PEG-PTHTMR and PTHTMR exhibited similar potencies for inducing cAMP signaling, whereas when injected into mice, the pegylated analog persisted for much longer in the circulation (>24 hours versus ~1 hour) and induced markedly more prolonged calcemic and phosphaturic responses than did the non-pegylated control. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of kidney sections obtained from the injected mice revealed much less PEG-PTHTMR than PTHTMR on the luminal brush-border surfaces of renal proximal tubule cells (PTCs), on which PTH regulates phosphate transporter function, whereas immunostained phosphorylated PKA substrate, a marker of cAMP signaling, was increased to similar extents for the two ligands and for each, was localized to the basolateral portion of the PTCs. Pegylation of a bioactive PTH peptide thus led to prolonged pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties in vivo, as well as to new in vivo data that support a prominent role for PTH action at basolateral surfaces of renal proximal tubule cells. PMID:27428040

  5. Comparison of Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Collision Induced Dissociation of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, Scott A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to better characterize the fragmentation pathways promoted by ultraviolet photoexcitation in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), six adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) peptides in a range of charge states were subjected to 266 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD), 193 nm UVPD, and CID. Similar fragment ions and distributions were observed for 266 nm UVPD and 193 nm UVPD for all peptides investigated. While both UVPD and CID led to preferential cleavage of the Y-S bond for all ACTH peptides [except ACTH (1-39)], UVPD was far less dependent on charge state and location of basic sites for the production of C-terminal and N-terminal ions. For ACTH (1-16), ACTH (1-17), ACTH (1-24), and ACTH (1-39), changes in the distributions of fragment ion types ( a, b, c, x, y, z, and collectively N-terminal ions versus C-terminal ions) showed only minor changes upon UVPD for all charge states. In contrast, CID displayed significant changes in the fragment ion type distributions as a function of charge state, an outcome consistent with the dependence on the number and location of mobile protons that is not prominent for UVPD. Sequence coverages obtained by UVPD showed less dependence on charge state than those determined by CID, with the latter showing a consistent decrease in coverage as charge state increased.

  6. Acid-base titration of melanocortin peptides: evidence of Trp rotational conformers interconversion.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Roberto M; Vieira, Renata F F; Nakaie, Clóvis R; Lamy, M Teresa; Ito, Amando S

    2005-01-01

    Tryptophantime-resolved fluorescence was used to monitor acid-base titration properties of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and the biologically more potent analog [Nle4, D-Phe7]alpha -MSH (NDP-MSH), labeled or not with the paramagnetic amino acid probe 2,2,6,6-tetramthylpiperidine-N-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (Toac). Global analysis of fluorescence decay profiles measured in the pH range between 2.0 and 11.0 showed that, for each peptide, the data could be well fitted to three lifetimes whose values remained constant. The less populated short lifetime component changed little with pH and was ascribed to Trp g+ chi1 rotamer, in which electron transfer deactivation predominates over fluorescence. The long and intermediate lifetime preexponential factors interconverted along that pH interval and the result was interpreted as due to interconversion between Trp g- and trans chi1 rotamers, driven by conformational changes promoted by modifications in the ionization state of side-chain residues. The differences in the extent of interconversion in alpha-MSH and NDP-MSH are indicative of structural differences between the peptides, while titration curves suggest structural similarities between each peptide and its Toac-labeled species, in aqueous solution. Though less sensitive than fluorescence, the Toac electron spin resonance (ESR) isotropic hyperfine splitting parameter can also monitor the titration of side-chain residues located relatively far from the probe.

  7. Histidine-lysine peptides as carriers of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Leng, Qixin; Goldgeier, Lisa; Zhu, Jingsong; Cambell, Patricia; Ambulos, Nicholas; Mixson, A James

    2007-03-01

    With their biodegradability and diversity of permutations, peptides have significant potential as carriers of nucleic acids. This review will focus on the sequence and branching patterns of peptide carriers composed primarily of histidines and lysines. While lysines within peptides are important for binding to the negatively charged phosphates, histidines are critical for endosomal lysis enabling nucleic acids to reach the cytosol. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymers by either covalent or ionic bonds with liposomes augment transfection compared to liposome carriers alone. More recently, we have examined peptides as sole carriers of nucleic acids because of their intrinsic advantages compared to the bipartite HK/liposome carriers. With a protocol change and addition of a histidine-rich tail, HK peptides as sole carriers were more effective than liposomes alone in several cell lines. While four-branched polymers with a primary repeating sequence pattern of -HHK- were more effective as carriers of plasmids, eight-branched polymers with a sequence pattern of -HHHK- were more effective as carriers of siRNA. Compared to polyethylenimine, HK carriers of siRNA and plasmids had reduced toxicity. When injected intravenously, HK polymers in complex with plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins significantly decreased tumor growth. Furthermore, modification of HK polymers with polyethylene glycol and vascular-specific ligands increased specificity of the polyplex to the tumor by more than 40-fold. Together with further development and insight on the structure of HK polyplexes, HK peptides may prove to be useful as carriers of different forms of nucleic acids both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Chiral separation of amino acids and peptides by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wan, H; Blomberg, L G

    2000-04-14

    Chiral separation of amino acids and peptides by capillary electrophoresis (CE) is reviewed regarding the separation principles of different approaches, advantages and limitations, chiral recognition mechanisms and applications. The direct approach details various chiral selectors with an emphasis on cyclodextrins and their derivatives, antibiotics and chiral surfactants as the chiral selectors. The indirect approach deals with various chiral reagents applied for diastereomer formation and types of separation media such as micelles and polymeric pseudo-stationary phases. Many derivatization reagents used for high sensitivity detection of amino acids and peptides are also discussed and their characteristics are summarized in tables. A large number of relevant examples is presented illustrating the current status of enantiomeric and diastereomeric separation of amino acids and peptides. Strategies to enhance the selectivity and optimize separation parameters by the application of experimental designs are described. The reversal of enantiomeric elution order and the effects of organic modifiers on the selectivity are illustrated in both direct and indirect methods. Some applications of chiral amino acid and peptide analysis, in particular, regarding the determination of trace enantiomeric impurities, are given. This review selects more than 200 articles published between 1988 and 1999.

  9. Crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone (CHH)-like peptides and CHH-precursor-related peptides from pericardial organ neurosecretory cells in the shore crab, Carcinus maenas, are putatively spliced and modified products of multiple genes.

    PubMed Central

    Dircksen, H; Böcking, D; Heyn, U; Mandel, C; Chung, J S; Baggerman, G; Verhaert, P; Daufeldt, S; Plösch, T; Jaros, P P; Waelkens, E; Keller, R; Webster, S G

    2001-01-01

    About 24 intrinsic neurosecretory neurons within the pericardial organs (POs) of the crab Carcinus maenas produce a novel crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone (CHH)-like peptide (PO-CHH) and two CHH-precursor-related peptides (PO-CPRP I and II) as identified immunochemically and by peptide chemistry. Edman sequencing and MS revealed PO-CHH as a 73 amino acid peptide (8630 Da) with a free C-terminus. PO-CHH and sinus gland CHH (SG-CHH) share an identical N-terminal sequence, positions 1-40, but the remaining sequence, positions 41-73 or 41-72, differs considerably. PO-CHH may have different precursors, as cDNA cloning of PO-derived mRNAs has revealed several similar forms, one exactly encoding the peptide. All PO-CHH cDNAs contain a nucleotide stretch coding for the SG-CHH(41-76) sequence in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Cloning of crab testis genomic DNA revealed at least four CHH genes, the structure of which suggest that PO-CHH and SG-CHH arise by alternative splicing of precursors and possibly post-transcriptional modification of PO-CHH. The genes encode four exons, separated by three variable introns, encoding part of a signal peptide (exon I), the remaining signal peptide residues, a CPRP, the PO-CHH(1-40)/SG-CHH(1-40) sequences (exon II), the remaining PO-CHH residues (exon III) and the remaining SG-CHH residues and a 3'-UTR (exon IV). Precursor and gene structures are more closely related to those encoding related insect ion-transport peptides than to penaeid shrimp CHH genes. PO-CHH neither exhibits hyperglycaemic activity in vivo, nor does it inhibit Y-organ ecdysteroid synthesis in vitro. From the morphology of the neurons it seems likely that novel functions remain to be discovered. PMID:11336648

  10. Multiple antigen peptide dendrimer elicits antibodies for detecting rat and mouse growth hormone binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Roberto M.; Talamantes, Frank J.; Bustamante, Juan J.; Muñoz, Jesus; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-bound rat growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and an alternatively spliced isoform, the soluble rat GH binding protein (GH-BP), are comprised of identical N-terminal GH binding domains, however, their C-terminal sequences differ. Immunological reagents are needed to distinguish between the two isoforms in order to understand their respective roles in mediating the actions of GH. Accordingly, a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide (MAP) dendrimer with four identical branches of a C-terminal peptide sequence of the rat GH-BP (GH-BP263-279) was synthesized and used as an immunogen in rabbits. Solid-phase peptide synthesis of four GH-BP263-279 segments onto a tetravalent Lys2-Lys-β-Ala-OH core peptide was carried out using N-(9-fluorenyl)methoxycarbonyl chemistry. The mass of the RP-HPLC purified synthetic product, 8398 Da, determined by ESI-MS, was identical to expected mass. Three anti-rat GH-BP263-279 MAP antisera, BETO-8039, BETO-8040 and BETO-8041, at dilutions of 10-3, recognized both the rat GH-BP263-279 MAP and recombinant mouse GH-BP with ED50s within a range of 5-10 fmol but did not cross-react with BSA in dot blot analyses. BETO-8041 antisera (10-3 dilution) recognized GH-BPs of rat serum and liver having Mrs ranging from 35-130 kDa but did not recognize full-length rat GH-Rs. The antisera also detected recombinant mouse GH-BPs. In summary, the tetravalent rat GH-BP263-279 MAP dendrimer served as an effective immunogenic antigen in eliciting high titer antisera specific for the C-termini of both rat and mouse GH-BPs. The antisera will facilitate studies aimed at improving our understanding of the biology of GH-BPs. PMID:19089805

  11. Intestinal peptides as circulating hormones: release of tachykinin-related peptide from the locust and cockroach midgut.

    PubMed

    Winther, A M; Nässel, D R

    2001-04-01

    Tachykinin-related peptides (TRPs) in the locust Locusta migratoria and the cockroach Leucophaea maderae have stimulatory effects on some muscles that are not innervated by TRP-containing neurons. Thus, these tissues may be affected by circulating TRPs. Here, we have investigated whether the midgut is the source of circulating TRPs. TRP-immunoreactive material in the locust midgut is found only in the endocrine cells of the gut epithelium. In both species of insect, the endocrine cells contain several isoforms of TRPs, as determined by immunocytochemistry and a combination of chromatography (HPLC) and enzyme immunoassay (ELISA). The release of TRPs was investigated by ELISA using isolated midguts of the locust and cockroach. Elevated levels of K(+) in the bathing saline induced the release of TRP from the midgut of both species. To examine the release of TRPs into the circulation in vivo, we measured haemolymph levels of TRPs in fed and starved locusts. The concentration of TRP-immunoreactive material in fed locusts was estimated to be 0.15 nmol l(-1), and this increased approximately fourfold in insects starved for 24 h. In accordance with this observation, the content of TRP-immunoreactive material in the midgut was lower in starved locusts than in fed locusts. Although part of the increased blood concentration of TRPs may be due to reduced blood volume, our data suggest that TRPs are released as hormones from the midgut of the locust and cockroach and that this release may be linked to nutritional status.

  12. Metabolic surgery: action via hormonal milieu changes, changes in bile acids or gut microbiota? A summary of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Timothy E.; Morton, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes remain epidemic problems. Different bariatric surgical techniques causes weight loss and diabetes remission to varying degrees. The underlying mechanisms of the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery are complex, and include changes in diet and behavior, as well as changes in hormones, bile acid flow, and gut bacteria. We summarized the effects of multiple different bariatric procedures, and their resulting effects on several hormones (leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY, and glucagon), bile acid changes in the gut and the serum, and resulting changes to the gut microbiome. As much as possible, we have tried to incorporate multiple studies to try to explain underlying mechanistic changes. What emerges from the data is a picture of clear differences between restrictive and metabolic procedures. The latter, in particular the roux-en-Y gastric bypass, induces large and distinctive changes in most measured fat and gut hormones, including early and sustained increase in GLP-1, possible through intestinal bile acid signaling. The changes in bile flow and the gut microbiome are causally inseparable so far, but new studies show that each contributes to the effects of weight loss and diabetes resolution. PMID:25194186

  13. Richter's Syndrome with Hypercalcemia Induced by Tumor-Associated Production of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Naoki; Yasuda, Hajime; Morishita, Soji; Aota, Yasuo; Tomomatsu, Junichi; Tanaka, Masaru; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Humoral hypercalcemia due to parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) elevation is a well-known complication of various malignancies, but the situation is rare concerning hematological malignancies except for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. We report a case of Richter's syndrome with humoral hypercalcemia, and demonstrate by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that peripheral blood PTHrP levels were 2,500-fold higher compared to healthy controls. PTHrP production by tumor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Richter's syndrome has been previously demonstrated by nonquantitative methods such as immunohistochemistry and northern blot analysis, but this is the first report using the RT-PCR method. The presented case did not have hypercalcemia when initially diagnosed as small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), and as reported earlier, the development of hypercalcemia may be an indication of the transformation to Richter's syndrome in patients with CLL/SLL. PMID:28203174

  14. Cinacalcet for Hypercalcemia Caused by Pulmonary Squamous Cell Carcinoma Producing Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Bech, Anneke; Smolders, Koen; Telting, Darryl; de Boer, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background Current treatments for hypercalcemia caused by lung cell carcinomas producing parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTH-rp) have limited efficacy, probably because of their lack of effect on PTH-rp secretion. In this case study we explored the efficacy of the calcimimetic cinacalcet as suppressor of PTH-rp production. Patient A 57-year-old male with severe and recurrent hypercalcemia induced by a PTH-rp-producing squamous cell lung carcinoma, stage cT4N3M1b, poorly responding to standard treatments. Results Serum PTH-rp levels were not affected by saline, calcitonin or zoledronate. PTH-rp decreased during chemotherapy and cinacalcet monotherapy. The combination of chemotherapy plus cinacalcet was most effective in rapidly reducing serum calcium and PTH-rp. Conclusion This case study is the first to suggest that cinacalcet may be of value in some cases of PTH-rp-dependent hypercalcemia. Corroborative evidence is needed. PMID:22379470

  15. The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on adrenal steroid hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the rat adrenal cortex in close association with zona glomerulosa cells. We have studied the effects of VIP on steroid hormone secretion from the outer zones of the normal rat adrenal cortex. Intact capsule-glomerulosa preparations, consisting of the capsule, zona glomerulosa, and a small portion of the zona fasciculata were perifused in vitro. The secretory responsiveness was assessed by measuring aldosterone and corticosterone release following stimulation with the physiological secretagogues ACTH and angiotensin II. The distribution of adrenal VIP receptors was assessed by in vitro autoradiography of {sup 125}I-VIP binding. {sup 125}I-VIP (0.75 and 2.0 nM) binding was concentrated in the capsule and zone glomerulosa, coincident with the distribution of VIP nerve fibers which aborize extensively in this region. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated using unlabelled VIP, ACTH and angiotensin II.

  16. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 inhibits cerebellar cell death in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Pañeda, Covadonga; Arroba, Ana I; Frago, Laura M; Holm, Anne Mette; Rømer, John; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2003-08-26

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I is essential for cerebellar granule neuron survival and a decline in IGF-I is implicated in various age-dependent processes. Here we show that IGF-I mRNA levels are decreased in the cerebellum of old rats compared with young rats and this was associated with increased cell death and activation of caspases 3 and 9. Growth hormone-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6, a synthetic ligand for the ghrelin receptor, increased IGF-I mRNA levels, decreased cell death and inhibited caspase 3 and 9 activation in the cerebellum of aged rats. These results suggest that increasing IGF-I expression in the cerebellum can decrease cell death in aged rats via inhibition of caspase 3 and 9 activation.

  17. Analytical challenges in the detection of peptide hormones for anti-doping purposes.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Osquel; Handelsman, David J; Strasburger, Christian; Thevis, Mario

    2012-07-01

    Although significant progress has been achieved during the past few years with the introduction of new assays and analytical methodologies, the detection and quantification of protein analytes, in particular of peptide hormones, continues to pose analytical challenges for the World Anti-Doping Agency-accredited anti-doping laboratories. In this article, the latest achievements in the application of MS-based methodologies and specific biochemical and immunological assays to detect some of the prohibited substances listed in section S2 of the World Anti-Doping Agency List of Prohibited Substances and Methods are reviewed. In addition, we look towards the future by focusing on some of the most promising analytical approaches under development for the detection of so-called 'biomarkers of doping'.

  18. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide in lactation and in umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Khosla, S; Johansen, K L; Ory, S J; O'Brien, P C; Kao, P C

    1990-11-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) is expressed in lactating rat mammary glands after suckling, as a result of increases in prolactin rather than suckling per se. In addition, PTHrP produced in the fetal parathyroid glands and placenta may be responsible for stimulation of placental calcium transport. In the current study, we used a radioimmunoassay for human PTHrP to measure levels of the peptide in (1) human breast milk, cow's milk, and two infant formulas; (2) sequential plasma samples in prepartum and postpartum lactating women; (3) women with pathologic hyperprolactinemia; and (4) human umbilical cord blood. In normal subjects, plasma PTHrP levels ranged from less than 2 to 5 pmol/liter. In contrast, human breast milk contained substantially increased levels of immunoreactive PTHrP. Similar elevations were found in cow's milk and in one infant formula. Column chromatography of breast milk demonstrated that PTHrP immunoreactivity included a region of adenylate cyclase stimulating activity, consistent with the presence of biologically active PTHrP. Plasma prepartum PTHrP values did not differ from corresponding postpartum values in lactating women. Women with hyperprolactinemia had a mean plasma PTHrP value in the high-normal range. Umbilical cord blood had considerably suppressed parathyroid hormone values but PTHrP levels that were indistinguishable from those in normal human plasma. Thus, PTHrP is present in high concentrations in breast milk but apparently does not gain access to the maternal circulation in significant amounts. In addition, women with pathologic hyperprolactinemia seem not to have increased levels of circulating PTHrP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  20. Melanin-concentrating hormone: unique peptide neuronal systems in the rat brain and pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Zamir, N.; Skofitsch, G.; Bannon, M.J.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    A unique neuronal system was detected in the rat central nervous system by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay with antibodies to salmon melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). MCH-like immunoreactive (MCH-LI) cell bodies were confined to the hypothalamus. MCH-LI fibers were found throughout the brain but were most prevalent in hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and pons-medulla regions. High concentrations of MCH-LI were measured in the hypothalamic medial forebrain bundle (MFB), posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the diagonal band. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of MFB extracts from rat brain indicate that MCH-like peptide from the rat has a different retention time than that of the salmon MCH. An osmotic stimuls (2% NaCl as drinking water for 120 hr) caused a marked increase in MCH-LI concentrations in the lateral hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe. The present studies establish the presence of MCH-like peptide in the rat brain. The MCH-LI neuronal system is well situated to coordinate complex functions such as regulation of water intake.

  1. Endogenous excitatory amino acid neurotransmission regulates thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone secretion in conscious freely moving male rats.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; Durán, R; Perez-Vences, D; Alfonso, M

    2002-04-01

    The role of neurotransmission of endogenous excitatory amino acid (EAA) on serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels was examined in conscious and freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were cannulated at the third ventricle 2 d before the experiments. Several glutamate receptor agonists, such as kainic acid and domoic acid, and antagonists, such as 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and dizocilpine (MK-801) were administered into the third ventricle. Serum TSH levels were assesed by radioimmunoassay, and serum thyroid hormone levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that the administration of CNQX and MK-801 produced a decrease in serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. The administration of kainic acid and domoic acid increased TSH concentrations, whereas CNQX completely blocked the release of TSH induced by kainic acid and domoic acid. These results suggest the importance of endogenous EAA in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in the stimulatory effect of EAAs on the pituitary-thyroid axis.

  2. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors.

  3. Immunosuppressive activity of a novel peptide analog of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Edling, Andrea E; Gomes, Danilo; Weeden, Timothy; Dzuris, John; Stefano, Jim; Pan, Clark; Williams, John; Kaplan, Johanne; Perricone, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an inflammatory disorder of the eye that can lead to pain and vision loss. Steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are currently the only therapeutics for uveitis and have serious ocular and systemic toxicities. Therefore, safer alternative therapeutics are desired. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide that suppresses effector T cell functions, induces regulatory T cells and has beneficial effects in certain autoimmune and transplant models. A novel d-amino acid peptide analog of native α-MSH (dRI-α-MSH) was produced that was protected from protease digestion and had increased selectivity for the melanocortin-1 receptor. Systemic delivery of the dRI-α-MSH analog dramatically suppressed disease progression and retained retinal architecture in the experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) model. Local delivery by periorbital injection was equally effective. Importantly, treatment with the novel dRI-α-MSH analog suppressed uveitis with a similar magnitude to the corticosteroid, dexamethasone. Data indicate that the novel dRI-α-MSH analogs show anti-inflammatory activities and have potential therapeutic use in uveitis and other autoimmune diseases.

  4. The bioactive acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptide.

    PubMed

    Minamizaki, Tomoko; Yoshiko, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The organic component of the bone matrix comprises 40% dry weight of bone. The organic component is mostly composed of type I collagen and small amounts of non-collagenous proteins (NCPs) (10-15% of the total bone protein content). The small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family, a NCP, is considered to play a key role in bone mineralization. SIBLING family of proteins share common structural features and includes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif and acidic serine- and aspartic acid-rich motif (ASARM). Clinical manifestations of gene mutations and/or genetically modified mice indicate that SIBLINGs play diverse roles in bone and extraskeletal tissues. ASARM peptides might not be primary responsible for the functional diversity of SIBLINGs, but this motif is suggested to be a key domain of SIBLINGs. However, the exact function of ASARM peptides is poorly understood. In this article, we discuss the considerable progress made in understanding the role of ASARM as a bioactive peptide.

  5. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits substrate control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the cloning, sequencing, characterization, 3D modeling and docking of Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the enzyme that converts juvenile hormone acid (JHA) into juvenile hormone (JH). Purified recombinant AeaJHAMT was extensively characterized for enzym...

  6. Identification and distribution of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptides in the brain of horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huiyang; Li, Linming; Ye, Haihui; Feng, Biyun; Li, Shaojing

    2013-03-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a crucial peptide for the regulation of reproduction. Using immunological techniques, we investigated the presence of GnRH in horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Octopus GnRH-like immunoreactivity, tunicate GnRH-like immunoreactivity, and lamprey GnRH-I-like immunoreactivity were detected in the neurons and fibers of the protocerebrum. However, no mammal GnRH-like immunoreactivity or lamprey GnRH-III-like immunoreactivity was observed. Our results suggest that a GnRH-like factor, an ancient peptide, existed in the brain of T. tridentatus and may be involved in the reproductive endocrine system.

  7. Peptide YY Levels across Pubertal Stages and Associations with Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Benjamin; Ravi, Praful; Mendes, Nara; Klibanski, Anne; Misra, Madhusmita

    2010-01-01

    Context: Changes in appetite-regulating peptides may impact food intake during puberty and facilitate the pubertal growth spurt. Peptide YY (PYY) is an anorexigenic hormone that is high in anorexia nervosa and low in obesity, inhibits GnRH secretion, and is suppressed by GH administration. The relationship between PYY and GH has not been examined across puberty. Objectives: We hypothesized that PYY would be inversely associated with GH in adolescents and would be lowest when GH is highest. Design and Setting: We conducted a cross-sectional study at a Clinical Research Center. Subjects: We studied 87 children, 46 boys and 41 girls ages 9–17 yr at Tanner stages 1–5 of puberty (10th–90th percentiles for body mass index). Outcome Measures: We measured fasting PYY and nadir GH levels after administration of an oral glucose load. Leptin levels were also measured. Results: Fasting PYY was lowest and nadir GH highest in boys in Tanner stages 3–4 (P = 0.02) and in girls in Tanner stages 2–3 (P = 0.02). Leptin levels were highest in early pubertal boys and late pubertal girls. For the group as a whole and within genders, even after controlling for body mass index, log nadir GH correlated inversely with log PYY (P = 0.003, 0.07, and 0.02). PYY levels did not correlate with leptin levels. Conclusions: During mid-puberty, at a time when GH levels are the highest, PYY is at a nadir, and these low PYY levels may facilitate pubertal progression and growth. PMID:20375207

  8. Identification of the growth-hormone-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) in a nutritional supplement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Kohler, Maxie; Mester, Joachim; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Petrou, Michael; Thevis, Mario

    2010-03-01

    Black market products of a pharmaceutical nature and nutritional supplements have received substantial and increasing attention because of potential performance enhancement in elite and non-professional sports. In addition, improved general health is claimed for non-competing individuals. The risks and foreseeable dangers of the uncontrolled use of highly potent and non-approved pharmaceutical compounds in healthy individuals are of considerable concern. In the present case report, the emerging drug candidate GHRP-2 with verified growth-hormone-releasing properties was identified and quantified in tablets offered as an over-the-counter nutritional supplement. The impact of this orally active peptide on the hGH/IGF-axis has been established for several years and its illicit use in elite sports has been assumed. As a releasing factor for hGH, GHRP-2 belongs to the list of substances prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Unfortunately, to date there is no routinely performed assay for the determination of these peptides potentially occurring in biological fluids of competing athletes, but the present data will facilitate the implementation by providing principle analytical information on liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric behaviour. Qualitative identification of the target analyte after extraction from the tablet matrix was performed by high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry after liquid chromatographic separation under consideration of the accurate masses and the ratios of the protonated molecules and their fragment ions derived from their collisionally induced dissociation. Quantitative results were obtained by means of liquid chromatography coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and linear regression using an external calibration curve (with GHRP-2 reference compound) adjusted via internal standard (Hexarelin). Hereby, the content of GHRP-2 was determined with approximately 50 µg per tablet.

  9. Peptidomic profiling of secreted products from pancreatic islet culture results in a higher yield of full-length peptide hormones than found using cell lysis procedures.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven W; Nikoulina, Svetlana E; Andon, Nancy L; Lowe, Carolyn

    2013-08-02

    Peptide Hormone Acquisition through Smart Sampling Technique-Mass Spectrometry (PHASST-MS) is a peptidomics platform that employs high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) techniques to identify peptide hormones secreted from in vitro or ex vivo cultures enriched in endocrine cells. Application of the methodology to the study of murine pancreatic islets has permitted evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, as well as comparison of our results with published islet studies that employed traditional cellular lysis procedures. We found that, while our PHASST-MS approach identified fewer peptides in total, we had greater representation of intact peptide hormones. The technique was further refined to improve coverage of hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic peptides and subsequently applied to human pancreatic islet cultures derived from normal donors or donors with type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, in addition to the expected islet hormones, we identified alpha-cell-derived bioactive GLP-1, consistent with recent reports of paracrine effects of this hormone on beta-cell function. We also identified many novel peptides derived from neurohormonal precursors and proteins related to the cell secretory system. Taken together, these results suggest the PHASST-MS strategy of focusing on cellular secreted products rather than the total tissue peptidome may improve the probability of discovering novel bioactive peptides and also has the potential to offer important new insights into the secretion and function of known hormones.

  10. Proteins and insulin release: A dual role of amino-acids and intestinal hormones

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, R. J.; Graver, H. J.; Cohen, N. M.

    1969-01-01

    In two subjects concurrent infusion of amino-acids and the hormones secretin and pancreozymin provoked much higher plasma insulin levels than did administration of amino-acids or hormones individually. It is suggested that this may be a physiological phenomenon, augmenting the release of insulin from the pancreas after a meal containing protein. PMID:5356549

  11. Kojic Acid Peptide: A New Compound with Anti-Tyrosinase Potential

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Birendra Kumar; Park, Seok Hoon; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Goo, Young-Aae; Kim, Hyoung Shik; Cho, Seung Hee; Lee, Jeong Hun; Ahn, Ghe Whan; Kim, Jin Pyo; Kang, Su Myoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Kojic acid was used for decades in the cosmetic industry as an antimelanogenic agent. However, there are two major drawbacks of Kojic acid, one is cytotoxicity and second are instability on storage. These limitations led the scientist to synthesize the active Kojic acid peptides. Objective In the present study, we synthesize and investigate the effect of five Kojic acid peptides to overcome the limitation of Kojic acid. Methods The peptide was analyzed and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectroscopy. Further, the tyrosinase activities of the Kojic acid and Kojic acid peptides were compared. The toxicity was measured and the melanin content is recorded in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. Results Maximum tyrosinase activity was measured by Kojic acid peptides. Therefore, Kojic acid peptides were subjected to melanin assay and cytotoxicity assay and finally the stability of the Kojic acid peptide was measured. Conclusion It was observed that this newly synthesized Kojic acid peptide is stable and potent to inhibit the tyrosinase activity and melanin content of B16F10 mouse melanoma cells without exhibiting cell toxicity. Together, these preliminary results suggest that a further exploration is being needed to establish Kojic acid peptide as antimelanogenic agent. PMID:27746633

  12. Synthesis of Mono-PEGylated Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 and Investigation of its Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Xu, Beihua; Zhou, Ziniu

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate an efficient synthetic route to the mono-PEGylated growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) and its biological activity in vivo. The commercially available key PEGylating reagent, mPEG-NHS ester, was successfully utilized to the synthesis of mono-PEGylated GHRP-2, during which the PEGylation profiles of GHRP-2 were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The product was purified by cation exchange chromatography, and its biological activity was conducted in rats. The desired mono-PEGylated GHRP-2 as the major product was readily obtained in anhydrous aprotic solvent, such as dimethyl formamide (DMF) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), when the molar ratio of mPEG-NHS ester to GHRP-2 was fixed to be 0.8:1. The products were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The evaluation of the biological activity for the products showed that the mono-PEGylated GHRP-2 gave a more stable activity than GHRP-2, suggesting that PEGylation led to the increase in the half-life of GHRP-2 in plasma without greatly impairing the biological activity. PEGylation of the GHRP-2 is a good choice for the development of the GHRP-2 applications.

  13. A peptide hormone gene, GhPSK promotes fibre elongation and contributes to longer and finer cotton fibre.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Tan, Jiafu; Tu, Lili; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-09-01

    Cotton fibres, the single-celled trichomes derived from the ovule epidermis, provide the most important natural material for the global textile industry. A number of studies have demonstrated that regulating endogenous hormone levels through transgenic approaches can improve cotton fibre qualities. Phytosulfokine-α (PSK-α) is a novel peptide hormone in plants that is involved in regulating cell proliferation and elongation. However, its potential applications in crop genetic improvement have not been evaluated. In this study, we describe how exogenous PSK-α application promotes cotton fibre cell elongation in vitro. Chlorate, an effective inhibitor of peptide sulfation, suppressed fibre elongation in ovule culture. Exogenously applied PSK-α partly restored the chlorate-induced suppression. A putative PSK gene (GhPSK) was cloned from Gossypium hirsutum. Expression pattern analysis revealed that GhPSK is preferentially expressed in rapidly elongating fibre cells (5-20 days postanthesis). Overexpression of GhPSK in cotton increased the endogenous PSK-α level and promoted cotton fibre cell elongation, resulting in longer and finer fibres. Further results from electrophysiological and physiological analyses suggest that GhPSK affects fibre development through regulation of K(+) efflux. Digital gene expression (DGE) profile analysis of GhPSK overexpression lines indicates that PSK signalling may regulate the respiratory electron-transport chain and reactive oxygen species to affect cotton fibre development. These results imply that peptide hormones are involved in cotton fibre growth and suggest a new strategy for the biotechnological improvement of cotton fibre quality.

  14. Abscisic acid and other plant hormones: Methods to visualize distribution and signaling.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Hsu, Po-Kai; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-12-01

    The exploration of plant behavior on a cellular scale in a minimal invasive manner is key to understanding plant adaptations to their environment. Plant hormones regulate multiple aspects of growth and development and mediate environmental responses to ensure a successful life cycle. To monitor the dynamics of plant hormone actions in intact tissue, we need qualitative and quantitative tools with high temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we describe a set of biological instruments (reporters) for the analysis of the distribution and signaling of various plant hormones. Furthermore, we provide examples of their utility for gaining novel insights into plant hormone action with a deeper focus on the drought hormone abscisic acid.

  15. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  16. Induction of Thermal and Mechanical Hypersensitivity by Parathyroid Hormone-related Peptide (PTHrP) Through Upregulation of TRPV1 Function and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Mickle, Aaron D.; Shepherd, Andrew J.; Loo, Lipin; Mohapatra, Durga P.

    2016-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying chronic pain associated with cancers are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that factors specifically elevated in the tumor microenvironment sensitize adjacent nociceptive afferents. We show that parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), which is found at elevated levels in the tumor microenvironment of advanced breast and prostate cancers, is a critical modulator of sensory neurons. Intraplantar injection of PTHrP led to the development of thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity in both male and female mice, which were absent in mice lacking functional transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). The PTHrP treatment of cultured mouse sensory neurons enhanced action potential firing, and increased TRPV1 activation, which was dependent on protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide induced robust potentiation of TRPV1 activation and enhancement of neuronal firing at mild acidic pH that is relevant to acidic tumor microenvironment. We also observed an increase in plasma membrane TRPV1 protein levels after exposure to PTHrP, leading to upregulation in the proportion of TRPV1-responsive neurons, which was dependent on the activity of PKC and Src kinases. Furthermore, co-injection of PKC or Src inhibitors attenuated PTHrP-induced thermal but not mechanical hypersensitivity. Altogether, our results suggest that PTHrP and mild acidic conditions could induce constitutive pathological activation of sensory neurons through upregulation of TRPV1 function and trafficking, which could serve as a mechanism for peripheral sensitization of nociceptive afferents in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25970319

  17. A phase I clinical trial of CD1c (BDCA-1)+ dendritic cells pulsed with HLA-A*0201 peptides for immunotherapy of metastatic hormone refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Prue, Rebecca L; Vari, Frank; Radford, Kristen J; Tong, Hui; Hardy, Melinda Y; D'Rozario, Rachael; Waterhouse, Nigel J; Rossetti, Tony; Coleman, Robert; Tracey, Christopher; Goossen, Hans; Gounder, Vinay; Crosbie, Georgina; Hancock, Sonia; Diaz-Guilas, Stephanie; Mainwaring, Paul; Swindle, Peter; Hart, Derek N J

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that purified populations of CD1c (BDCA-1) blood-derived dendritic cells (BDC) loaded with tumor-specific peptides may be a feasible option for prostate cancer immunotherapy. We performed an open-label dose-finding Phase I study to evaluate the safe use of CD1c BDC in patients with advanced metastatic hormone refractory prostate cancer. HLA-A*0201-positive patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer were recruited and consented. The vaccine was manufactured by pulsing autologous CD1c BDC, prepared by magnetic bead immunoselection from apheresed peripheral blood mononuclear cells, with a cocktail of HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides (prostate-specific antigen, prostate acid phosphatase, prostate specific membrane antigen, and control influenza peptide) and keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The vaccine was administered intradermally or intravenously and peripheral blood was taken at predetermined intervals for clinical and immunologic monitoring. The vaccine was manufactured with a median purity of 82% CD1c BDC and administered successfully to 12 patients. Each patient received between 1 and 5 × 10 fresh CD1c BDC on day 0, followed by cryopreserved product in the same dose on days 28 and 56. The vaccine was well tolerated in all patients, with the most frequent adverse events being grade 1-2 fever, pain, or injection-site reactions. Vaccination with CD1c BDC is therefore feasible, safe, and well tolerated in patients with advanced-stage metastatic prostate cancer.

  18. Molecular self-assembly using peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Berger, Or; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are extensively studied for the control of genetic expression since their design in the 1990s. However, the application of PNAs in nanotechnology is much more recent. PNAs share the specific base-pair recognition characteristic of DNA together with material-like properties of polyamides, both proteins and synthetic polymers, such as Kevlar and Nylon. The first application of PNA was in the form of PNA-amphiphiles, resulting in the formation of either lipid integrated structures, hydrogels or fibrillary assemblies. Heteroduplex DNA-PNA assemblies allow the formation of hybrid structures with higher stability as compared with pure DNA. A systematic screen for minimal PNA building blocks resulted in the identification of guanine-containing di-PNA assemblies and protected guanine-PNA monomer spheres showing unique optical properties. Finally, the co-assembly of PNA with thymine-like three-faced cyanuric acid allowed the assembly of poly-adenine PNA into fibers. In summary, we believe that PNAs represent a new and important family of building blocks which converges the advantages of both DNA- and peptide-nanotechnologies.

  19. Targeting of follicle stimulating hormone peptide-conjugated dendrimers to ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Dimple A.; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Bugno, Jason; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Hong, Seungpyo; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side effects. To address these issues, we have designed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to selectively target the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), which is overexpressed by tumorigenic ovarian cancer cells but not by immature primordial follicles and other non-tumorigenic cells. Fluorescein-labeled generation 5 (G5) PAMAM dendrimers were conjugated with the binding peptide domain of FSH (FSH33) that has a high affinity to FSHR. The targeted dendrimers exhibited high receptor selectivity to FSHR-expressing OVCAR-3 cells, resulting in significant uptake and downregulation of an anti-apoptotic protein survivin, while showing minimal interactions with SKOV-3 cells that do not express FSHR. The selectivity of the FSH33-targeted dendrimers was further validated in 3D organ cultures of normal mouse ovaries. Immunostaining of the conjugates revealed their selective binding and uptake by ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells that express FSHR, while sparing the immature primordial follicles. In addition, an in vivo study monitoring tissue accumulation following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the conjugates showed significantly higher accumulation of FSH33-targeted dendrimers in the ovary and oviduct compared to the non-targeted conjugates. These proof-of-concept findings highlight the potential of these FSH33-targeted dendrimers to serve as a delivery platform for anti-ovarian cancer drugs, while reducing their systemic side effects by preventing nonspecific uptake by the primordial follicles.Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side

  20. Differential regulation of nuclear receptors, neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the hypothalamus and pituitary of food restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Jonas; Haitina, Tatjana; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2005-01-05

    Food restriction is associated with a number of endocrine disturbances. We validated the experimental conditions for several house-keeping genes and determined the effects of 12 day 50% food restriction on hypothalamic and pituitary transcription of genes involved in different neuroendocrine systems, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 7 nuclear receptors and 12 neuropeptides and peptide hormones were investigated in the dorsal and ventral hypothalamus and the pituitary gland in rats. In the hypothalamus, food restriction reduced mRNA levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor alpha and beta, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), growth hormone-releasing factor (GHRF), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), thyrotropin-releasing factor (TRF), somatostatin, and increased that of neuropeptide Y (NPY). In the pituitary, the treatment reduced growth hormone (GH), luteinizing hormone beta (LHbeta) and thyrotropin beta, but increased ERalpha mRNA levels. The study provides a map of how food restriction affects the regulation of a number of transcripts involved in neuroendocrine control.

  1. Haploinsufficiency of endogenous parathyroid hormone-related peptide impairs bone fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-He; Qiu, Yong; Han, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Jin; Chen, Yi-Xin; Shi, Hong-Fei; Karaplis, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that endogenous parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) plays a central role in the physiological regulation of bone formation. However, it is unclear whether endogenous PTHrP plays an important function in enhancing bone fracture healing. To determine whether endogenous PTHrP haploinsufficiency impaired bone fracture healing, closed mid-diaphyseal femur fractures were created in 8-week-old wild-type and Pthrp(+/-) mice. Callus tissue properties were analysed 1, 2 and 4 weeks after fracture by radiography, histology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and molecular biology. The size of the calluses was reduced 2 weeks after fracture, and the fracture repairs were poor 4 weeks after fractures, in Pthrp(+/-) compared with wild-type mice. Cartilaginous callus areas were reduced 1 week after fracture, but were increased 2 weeks after fracture in Pthrp(+/-) mice. There was a reduction in the number of ostoblasts, alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-positive areas, Type I collagen immunopositive areas, mRNA levels of ALP, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Type I collagen, Runx2 and insulin-like growth factor-1 protein levels, the number of osteoclasts and the surface in callus tissues in Pthrp(+/-) compared with wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that endogenous PTHrP haploinsufficiency impairs the fracture repair process by reducing cartilaginous and bony callus formation, with downregulation of osteoblastic gene and protein expression and a reduction in endochondral bone formation, osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Together, the results indicate that endogenous PTHrP plays an important role in fracture healing.

  2. Structural Basis for Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein Binding to the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and Design of Conformation-selective Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Gardella, Thomas J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) are two related peptides that control calcium/phosphate homeostasis and bone development, respectively, through activation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R), a class B G protein-coupled receptor. Both peptides hold clinical interest for their capacities to stimulate bone formation. PTH and PTHrP display different selectivity for two distinct PTH1R conformations, but how their binding to the receptor differs is unclear. The high resolution crystal structure of PTHrP bound to the extracellular domain (ECD) of PTH1R reveals that PTHrP binds as an amphipathic {alpha}-helix to the same hydrophobic groove in the ECD as occupied by PTH, but in contrast to a straight, continuous PTH helix, the PTHrP helix is gently curved and C-terminally 'unwound.' The receptor accommodates the altered binding modes by shifting the side chain conformations of two residues within the binding groove: Leu-41 and Ile-115, the former acting as a rotamer toggle switch to accommodate PTH/PTHrP sequence divergence, and the latter adapting to the PTHrP curvature. Binding studies performed with PTH/PTHrP hybrid ligands having reciprocal exchanges of residues involved in different contacts confirmed functional consequences for the altered interactions and enabled the design of altered PTH and PTHrP peptides that adopt the ECD-binding mode of the opposite peptide. Hybrid peptides that bound the ECD poorly were selective for the G protein-coupled PTH1R conformation. These results establish a molecular model for better understanding of how two biologically distinct ligands can act through a single receptor and provide a template for designing better PTH/PTHrP therapeutics.

  3. Disruption of disulfide bond formation alters the trafficking of prothyrotropin releasing hormone (proTRH)-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Barker, Alison J; Nillni, Eduardo A

    2006-01-15

    Rat prothyrotropin releasing hormone (proTRH) is processed in the regulated secretory pathway (RSP) of neuroendocrine cells yielding five TRH peptides and several non-TRH peptides. It is not understood how these peptides are targeted to the RSP. We show here that a disulfide bond in the carboxy-terminus of proTRH plays an important role in the trafficking of this prohormone. Recombinant proTRH was observed to migrate faster on a native gel when treated with dithiothreitol (DTT) suggesting the presence of a disulfide bond. In vitro disulfide bond formation was prevented either by DTT treatment or by mutating cysteines 213 and 219 to glycines. In both cases the peptides derived from these mutants exhibited increased constitutive release and processing defects when expressed in AtT20 cells, a neuroendocrine cell line used in our prior studies on proTRH processing. Immunocytochemistry revealed that wild-type proTRH and mutant proTRH localized in a punctate pattern typical of proteins sorted to the regulated secretory pathway. These data suggest that the proposed disulfide bond of proTRH is involved in sorting of proTRH-derived peptides and in their retention within maturing secretory granules. This is the first evidence of structural motifs being important for the sorting of proTRH.

  4. Evaluation of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Secretion in E. coli using the L-asparaginase II Signal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Mozhdeh; Nezafat, Navid; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the recent years, there has been an increasing interest in secretory production of recombinant proteins, due to its various advantages compared with intracellular expression. Signal peptides play a critical role in prosperous secretion of recombinant proteins. Accordingly, different signal peptides have been assessed for their ability to produce secretory proteins by trial-and-error experiments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of L-asparaginase II signal peptide on the recombinant human Growth Hormone (hGH) protein secretion in the Escherichia coli (E. coli) host. Methods: Cloning and expression of a synthetic hGH gene, containing L-asparaginase II signal sequence was performed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) using 0.1mM IPTG as an inducer at 23°C overnight. Periplasmic protein extraction was performed using three methods, including osmotic shock, osmotic shock in the presence of glycine and combined Lysozyme/EDTA osmotic shock. Afterwards, the hGH expression was determined by SDS-PAGE. Results: Based on experimentally obtained results, hGH protein is expressed as inclusion body even in the presence of L-asparaginase II signal peptide. Conclusion: Therefore, this signal peptide is not effective for secretory production of the recombinant hGH. PMID:27920886

  5. In vitro selection of a peptide antagonist of growth hormone secretagogue receptor using cDNA display

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Shingo; Yoshida, Sayaka; Mondal, Anupom; Nishina, Kazuya; Koyama, Makoto; Sakata, Ichiro; Miura, Kenju; Hayashi, Yujiro; Nemoto, Naoto; Nishigaki, Koichi; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are major drug targets, and their ligands are currently being explored and developed by many pharmaceutical companies and independent researchers. Class A (rhodopsin-like) GPCRs compose a predominant GPCR family; therefore, class A GPCR ligands are in demand. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) is a class A GPCR that stimulates food intake by binding to its peptide ligand, ghrelin. Therefore, antagonists of GHS-R are expected to exert antiobesity function. In this article, we describe the use of cDNA display to screen for successfully and identify an antagonistic peptide of GHS-R. The antagonistic peptide inhibited the ghrelin-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ in vitro (IC50 = approximately 10 μM) and repressed the contraction of isolated animal stomach in response to ghrelin. Furthermore, peripheral administration of the peptide inhibited the food intake of mice. This work provides new insight into the development of antiobesity drugs and describes a method for the discovery of unique peptide ligands for class A GPCRs. PMID:22723348

  6. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the ...

  7. Amino acid sequence of atrial natriuretic peptides in human coronary sinus plasma.

    PubMed

    Yandle, T; Crozier, I; Nicholls, G; Espiner, E; Carne, A; Brennan, S

    1987-07-31

    Two atrial natriuretic peptides were purified from pooled human coronary sinus plasma by Sep-Pak extraction, immunoaffinity chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The amino acid sequences of the two peptides were homologous with 99-126 human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP) and 106-126 hANP, the latter being most probably linked to 99-105 ANP by the disulphide bond. The molar ratio of the peptides in plasma, as assessed by radioimmunoassay was 10:3.

  8. Determination of growth hormone releasing peptides metabolites in human urine after nasal administration of GHRP-1, GHRP-2, GHRP-6, Hexarelin, and Ipamorelin.

    PubMed

    Semenistaya, Ekaterina; Zvereva, Irina; Thomas, Andreas; Thevis, Mario; Krotov, Grigory; Rodchenkov, Grigory

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone releasing peptides (GHRPs) stimulate secretion of endogenous growth hormone and are listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List. To develop an effective method for GHRPs anti-doping control we have investigated metabolites of GHRP-1, GHRP-2, GHRP-6, Hexarelin, and Ipamorelin in urine after nasal administration. Each compound was administrated to one volunteer. Samples were collected for 2 days after administration, processed by solid-phase extraction on weak cation exchange cartridges and analyzed by means of nano-liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry. Six metabolites of GHRP-1 were identified. GHRP-1 in the parent form was not detected. GHRP-1 (2-4) free acid was detected in urine up to 27 h. GHRP-2, GHRP-2 free acid and GHRP-2 (1-3) free acid were detected in urine up to 47 h after administration. GHRP-6 was mostly excreted unchanged and detected in urine 23 h after administration, its metabolites were detectable for 12 h only. Hexarelin and Ipamorelin metabolized intensively and were excreted as a set of parent compounds with metabolites. Hexarelin (1-3) free acid and Ipamorelin (1-4) free acid were detected in urine samples after complete withdrawal of parent substances. GHRPs and their most prominent metabolites were included into routine ultra-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry procedure. The method was fully validated, calibration curves of targeted analytes were obtained and excretion curves of GHRPs and their metabolites were plotted. Our results confirm that the detection window after GHRPs administration depends on individual metabolism, drug preparation form and the way of administration.

  9. Di-heterometalation of thiol-functionalized peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Patra, Malay; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As a proof-of-principle, two hetero-bimetallic PNA oligomers containing a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl and a cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex have been prepared by serial combination of solid-phase peptide coupling and in-solution thiol chemistry. Solid-phase N-terminus attachment of Ru(II)-polypyridyl carboxylic acid derivative, C1, onto the thiol-functionalized PNA backbone (H-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) has been performed by standard peptide coupling method. As two parallel approaches, the strong affinity of thiols for maleimide and haloacetyl group has been exploited for subsequent post-SPPS addition of cymantrene-based organometallic cores, C2 and C3. Michael-like addition and thioether ligation of thiol functionalized PNA1 (H-gly-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) and PNA2 (C1-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) to cymantrene maleimide and chloroacetyl derivatives, C2 and C3, respectively, has been performed. The synthesized ruthenium(II)-cymantrenyl PNA oligomers have been characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and IR spectroscopy. The distinct Mn-CO vibrational IR stretches, between 1,924–2,074 cm−1, have been used as markers to confirm the presence of cymantrenyl units in the PNA sequences and the purity of the HPLC-purified PNA thioethers assessed using LC-MS. PMID:23422249

  10. The C-terminal fragment of parathyroid hormone-related peptide promotes bone formation in diabetic mice with low-turnover osteopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, D; Fernández-de-Castro, L; Portal-Núñez, S; López-Herradón, A; Dapía, S; Gómez-Barrena, E; Esbrit, P

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Current data suggest that parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide (PTHrP) domains other than the N-terminal PTH-like domain contribute to its role as an endogenous bone anabolic factor. PTHrP-107-139 inhibits bone resorption, a fact which has precluded an unequivocal demonstration of its possible anabolic action in vivo. We thus sought to characterize the osteogenic effects of this peptide using a mouse model of diabetic low-turnover osteopaenia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH PTHrP-107-139 was administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, with or without bone marrow ablation, for 13 days. Osteopaenia was confirmed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and microcomputed tomography analysis. Histological analysis was performed on paraffin-embedded bone tissue sections by haematoxylin/eosin and Masson's staining, and tartrate-resistent acid phosphatase immunohistochemistry. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured in normal and/or high glucose (HG) medium. Osteogenic and adipogenic markers were assessed by real-time PCR, and PTHrP and the PTH1 receptor protein expression by Western blot analysis. KEY RESULTS PTHrP-107-139 reversed the alterations in bone structure and osteoblast function, and also promoted bone healing after marrow ablation without affecting the number of osteoclast-like cells in diabetic mice. This peptide also reversed the high-glucose-induced changes in osteogenic differentiation in both bone marrow stromal cells and the more differentiated MC3T3-E1 cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings demonstrate that PTHrP-107-139 promotes bone formation in diabetic mice. This mouse model and in vitro cell cultures allowed us to identify various anabolic effects of this peptide in this scenario. PMID:21175568

  11. Synthesis of hybrid hydrazino peptides: protected vs unprotected chiral α-hydrazino acids.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Jerić, Ivanka

    2015-01-01

    Peptidomimetics based on hydrazino derivatives of α-amino acids represent an important class of peptidic foldamers with promising biological activities, like protease inhibition and antimicrobial activity. However, the lack of straightforward method for the synthesis of optically pure hydrazino acids and efficient incorporation of hydrazino building blocks into peptide sequence hamper wider exploitation of hydrazino peptidomimetics. Here we described the utility of N (α)-benzyl protected and unprotected hydrazino derivatives of natural α-amino acids in synthesis of peptidomimetics. While incorporation of N (α)-benzyl-hydrazino acids into peptide chain and deprotection of benzyl moiety proceeded with difficulties, unprotected hydrazino acids allowed fast and simple construction of hybrid peptidomimetics.

  12. Thyroid hormone activation of retinoic acid synthesis in hypothalamic tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Stoney, Patrick N.; Helfer, Gisela; Rodrigues, Diana; Morgan, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for adult brain function and its actions include several key roles in the hypothalamus. Although TH controls gene expression via specific TH receptors of the nuclear receptor class, surprisingly few genes have been demonstrated to be directly regulated by TH in the hypothalamus, or the adult brain as a whole. This study explored the rapid induction by TH of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1), encoding a retinoic acid (RA)‐synthesizing enzyme, as a gene specifically expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, cells that mediate a number of actions of TH in the hypothalamus. The resulting increase in RA may then regulate gene expression via the RA receptors, also of the nuclear receptor class. In vivo exposure of the rat to TH led to a significant and rapid increase in hypothalamic Raldh1 within 4 hours. That this may lead to an in vivo increase in RA is suggested by the later induction by TH of the RA‐responsive gene Cyp26b1. To explore the actions of RA in the hypothalamus as a potential mediator of TH control of gene regulation, an ex vivo hypothalamic rat slice culture method was developed in which the Raldh1‐expressing tanycytes were maintained. These slice cultures confirmed that TH did not act on genes regulating energy balance but could induce Raldh1. RA has the potential to upregulate expression of genes involved in growth and appetite, Ghrh and Agrp. This regulation is acutely sensitive to epigenetic changes, as has been shown for TH action in vivo. These results indicate that sequential triggering of two nuclear receptor signalling systems has the capability to mediate some of the functions of TH in the hypothalamus. GLIA 2016;64:425–439 PMID:26527258

  13. Pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid homologues: effect of ring size on hybridization properties.

    PubMed

    Mansawat, Woraluk; Vilaivan, Chotima; Balázs, Árpád; Aitken, David J; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2012-03-16

    The effect of ring size of four- to six-membered cyclic β-amino acid on the hybridization properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid with an alternating α/β peptide backbone is reported. The cyclobutane derivatives (acbcPNA) show the highest T(m) and excellent specificity with cDNA and RNA.

  14. The effect of exercise training on body weight and peptide hormone patterns in normal weight college-age men.

    PubMed

    Hurley, R S; Bossetti, B M; O'Dorisio, T M; Tenison, E B; Welch, M A; Rice, R R

    1991-03-01

    Resting and peak glucose, insulin, glucagon, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) levels were evaluated pretraining, 3 weeks and 10 weeks posttraining in seven college age males. The exercise consisted of thrice weekly session of jogging at 70% VO2max for 20 minutes plus warmup and cool down. Following the 10 weeks, VO2max increased significantly. Body weight remained constant and body fat decreased significantly. Fasting and peak blood glucose levels were normal at the beginning of the study yet improved with training. As expected, fasting and peak insulin levels decreased significantly with training. Although GIP did not change significantly with training, an uncoupling of GIP and insulin peak responses was observed. Glucagon levels were essentially unchanged. Fasting and peak PP levels increased slightly as training occurred. These hormone responses suggest that perhaps body weight and/or changes in body fat stores and fuel use might influence peptide hormone responses with training.

  15. In vitro release study of mono-PEGylated growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 from PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Ji; Na, Dong Hee; Lee, Kang Choon

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vitro release property of mono-PEGylated growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) microspheres. The microspheres encapsulating native GHRP-6 or mono-PEG-GHRP-6 were prepared using the single oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation method. In vitro release study was performed in 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, containing 0.02% Tween 80 and sodium azide at 37 or 55 degrees C. The mono-PEG-GHRP-6 microspheres showed a lower initial burst compared with native GHRP-6 microspheres and zero-order release profile for a 1-month period. The release period was dependent on the PEG size attached to the GHRP-6 with more rapid drug release being observed with the smaller PEG size. This study suggests that PEGylated peptide has good potential as a source for a sustained release microsphere delivery system.

  16. Receptor-level interrelationships of amino acids and the adequate amino acid type hormones in Tetrahymena: a receptor evolution model.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z

    1986-01-01

    Histidine stimulates the phagocytosis of Tetrahymena to the same extent as histamine, and also stimulates its division, which histamine does not. Tyrosine and diiodotyrosine equally stimulate the growth of the Tetrahymena. Both amino acids inhibit the characteristic influence of the adequate amino acid hormone when added to Tetrahymena culture 72 h in advance of it. Primary interaction with diiodotyrosine and tyrosine notably increases the cellular growth rate. Histamine has a similar, although less notable effect than histidine. In the light of these experimental observations there is reason to postulate that the receptors of the amino acid hormones have developed from amino acid receptors.

  17. Melanoma Therapy with Rhenium-Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas P Quinn

    2005-11-22

    Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with {sup 188}Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, {sup 188}Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The {sup 177}Lu

  18. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  19. Desalted duck egg white peptides promote calcium uptake by counteracting the adverse effects of phytic acid.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Wen; Ma, Zhili; He, Hui

    2017-03-15

    The structure of the desalted duck egg white peptides-calcium chelate was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Characterization results showed structural folding and aggregation of amino acids or oligopeptides during the chelation process. Desalted duck egg white peptides enhanced the calcium uptake in the presence of oxalate, phosphate and zinc ions in Caco-2 monolayers. Animal model indicated that desalted duck egg white peptides effectively enhanced the mineral absorption and counteracted the deleterious effects of phytic acid. These findings suggested that desalted duck egg white peptides might promote calcium uptake in three pathways: 1) desalted duck egg white peptides bind with calcium to form soluble chelate and avoid precipitate; 2) the chelate is absorbed as small peptides by enterocyte; and 3) desalted duck egg white peptides regulate the proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes through the interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 calcium channel.

  20. Similar hormone-rich peptides from thyroglobulins of five vertebrate classes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, P.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Kaiser, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    Thyroglobulins (Tgs) were purified from five species (rat, chicken, turtle, frog, and goldfish), each representing a different vertebrate class. On reduction with mercaptoethanol, each Tg produced five major iodopeptides, designated A-E, with ranges of estimated molecular mass, in kilodaltons (K), as follows: A, more than 300K; B, 210-280K; C, 30-42K; D, 19-28K; and E, 10-23K. Of these, the two smallest, D and E, had 40-80% of their iodine as iodothyronine, compared with 15-20% for the parent Tgs. They contained 25-63% of Tg's total iodothyronines but only a few percent of its peptide material. Calculations from amino acid analyses and iodine contents showed approximately 1 mol each of D and E/mol 660,000 dalton Tg. In comparisons of amino acid compositions by cluster analysis, iodopeptides D and E resembled each other and their counterparts in other species more than they resembled their parent Tgs. Also, the Tgs from different species were more similar to each other and to iodopeptides D and E than to nonthyroidal proteins randomly selected from the literature. /sup 125/ was injected into rats and turtles, and compared its distribution among the iodopeptides to that of /sup 127/I. These dual isotope experiments showed that as Tg was iodinated in vivo, iodopeptide B decreased both in molecular size and in its share of Tg's iodine, while the sum of iodopeptides D and E increased, indicating that B may be the precursor of D and E. In vivo iodination of rat Tg with /sup 125/I for different periods of time suggested that iodopeptide E and its iodothyronines are derived from a larger portion of the Tg molecule, perhaps iodopeptide B. The amount of /sup 125/I in iodopeptide D also increased with time.

  1. Accumulation of leginsulin, a hormone-like bioactive peptide, is drastically higher in Asian than in North American soybean accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leginsulin, a peptide made up of 37 amino acids, is homologous to pea albumin (PA1b) and belongs to the cysteine-knot family. Even though the physiological function and three-dimensional structure of leginsulin have been explored, little is known about their expression, accumulation and distribution...

  2. Comparative studies of adhesion peptides based on l- or d-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Sergey; Palmer, Daniel; Meldal, Morten; Diness, Frederik

    2016-10-01

    Detailed studies comparing solid-supported l- or d-amino acid adhesion peptides based on the sequence KLHRIRA were performed. Stability towards proteases and levels of cellular adhesion to the otherwise inert surface of PEGA resin were compared by using fluorescently labelled peptides. A clear difference in the peptide stability towards cleavage by subtilisin, trypsin, or papain was observed. However, all of the on-bead peptides provided an optimal surface for cell adhesion and proliferation. In long-term experiments, these properties were still found to be similar on the resins modified either with l- or with d-amino acids and unaffected by the nature of their fluorescence labelling at either terminus. These results support that the more accessible l-amino acids can be utilized for cell adhesion experiments and confirm the nonspecific interaction mechanism of cell binding to these peptides on the bead surface. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Seasonal plasticity in the peptide neuronal systems: potential roles of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone, neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide in the regulation of the reproductive axis in subtropical Indian weaver birds.

    PubMed

    Surbhi; Rastogi, A; Rani, S; Kumar, V

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments examined the expression of gonadotrophin-releasing and inhibiting hormones (GnRH-I, GnRH-II and GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in subtropical Indian weaver birds, which demonstrate relative photorefractoriness. Experiment 1 measured peptide expression levels in the form of immunoreactive (-IR) cells, percentage cell area and cell optical density in the preoptic area (GnRH-I), midbrain (GnRH-II), paraventricular nucleus (GnIH), mediobasal hypothalamus [dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), infundibular complex (INc), NPY and VIP] and lateral septal organ (VIP) during the progressive, breeding, regressive and nonbreeding phases of the annual reproductive cycle. GnRH-I was decreased in the nonbreeding and VIP was increased in INc in the breeding and regressive states. GnRH-II and NPY levels did not differ between the testicular phases. Double-labelled immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed a close association between the GnRH/GnIH, GnRH/NPY, GnRH/VIP and GnIH/NPY peptide systems, implicating them interacting and playing roles in the reproductive regulation in weaver birds. Experiment 2 further measured these peptide levels in the middle of day and night in weaver birds that were maintained under short days (8 : 16 h light /dark cycle; photosensitive), exposed to ten long days (16 : 8 h light /dark cycle; photostimulated) or maintained for approximately 2 years on a 16 : 8 h light /dark cycle (photorefractory). Reproductively immature testes in these groups precluded the possible effect of an enhanced gonadal feedback on the hypothalamic peptide expression. There were group differences in the GnRH-I (not GnRH-II), GnIH, NPY and VIP immunoreactivity, albeit with variations in immunoreactivity measures in the present study. These results, which are consistent with those reported in birds with relative photorefractoriness, show the distribution and possibly a complex interaction of key neuropeptides in the regulation of the

  4. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  5. Humoral immune responses against gonadotropin releasing hormone elicited by immunization with phage-peptide constructs obtained via phage display.

    PubMed

    Samoylov, Alexandre; Cochran, Anna; Schemera, Bettina; Kutzler, Michelle; Donovan, Caitlin; Petrenko, Valery; Bartol, Frank; Samoylova, Tatiana

    2015-12-20

    Phage display is based on genetic engineering of phage coat proteins resulting in fusion peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles. The technology is widely used for generation of phages with novel characteristics for numerous applications in biomedicine and far beyond. The focus of this study was on development of phage-peptide constructs that stimulate production of antibodies against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Phage-peptide constructs that elicit production of neutralizing GnRH antibodies can be used for anti-fertility and anti-cancer applications. Phage-GnRH constructs were generated via selection from a phage display library using several types of GnRH antibodies as selection targets. Such phage constructs were characterized for sequence similarities to GnRH peptide and frequency of their occurrence in the selection rounds. Five of the constructs with suitable characteristics were tested in mice as a single dose 5×10(11) virions (vir) vaccine and were found to be able to stimulate production of GnRH-specific antibodies, but not to suppress testosterone (indirect indicator of GnRH antibody neutralizing properties). Next, one of the constructs was tested at a higher dose of 2×10(12) vir per mouse in combination with a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based adjuvant. This resulted in multifold increase in GnRH antibody production and significant reduction of serum testosterone, indicating that antibodies produced in response to the phage-GnRH immunization possess neutralizing properties. To achieve optimal immune responses for desired applications, phage-GnRH constructs can be modified with respect to flanking sequences of GnRH-like peptides displayed on phage. Anticipated therapeutic effects also might be attained using optimized phage doses, a combination of several constructs in a single treatment, or application of adjuvants and advanced phage delivery systems.

  6. Regulation of rat luteinizing hormone subunit messenger ribonucleic acids by gonadal steroid hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, S D; Bowers, S M; Need, L R; Chin, W W

    1986-01-01

    Little is known about the hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) biosynthesis. We have studied the regulation of LH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels by gonadal-steroid hormones in the rat. In one set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically gonadectomized (GDX) and killed 1, 3, 7, 14, 22, and 31 d postoperatively. In another set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically GDX and were injected subcutaneously with testosterone propionate (500 micrograms/100 g body wt per d) or 17 beta-estradiol 3-benzoate (10 micrograms/100 g body wt per d), respectively, beginning 3 wk postoperatively. Levels of serum LH were determined by radioimmunoassay and levels of LH subunit mRNAs in single pituitary glands were determined by blot hybridization analysis using labeled synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes that correspond to portions of the coding regions of the rat alpha- and LH beta-subunit mRNAs. 4 wk after gonadectomy, serum LH levels rose nine- and 20-fold, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels rose six- and 10-fold, and LH beta-subunit levels rose seven- and 14-fold, compared with controls in males and females, respectively. In gonadal-steroid hormone-treated male and female GDX rats, serum LH levels fell to 8 and 36% of control values, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels declined to 22 and 19%, and LH beta-subunit mRNA levels declined to 6 and 10% of control values, 48 h after injections were initiated, in males and females, respectively. We conclude that gonadal-steroid hormones negatively regulate the levels of both subunit mRNAs in GDX rats in a pattern that parallels the changes in serum LH values. These data suggest that gonadal-steroid hormone regulation of LH biosynthesis occurs, at least in part, at the level of LH subunit mRNAs due to effects at the transcriptional and/or RNA stability levels. Images PMID:2418065

  7. Age- and hormone-regulation of opioid peptides and synaptic proteins in the rat dorsal hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tanya J; Mitterling, Katherine L; Thompson, Louisa I; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Waters, Elizabeth M; McEwen, Bruce S; Gore, Andrea C; Milner, Teresa A

    2011-03-16

    Circulating estrogen levels and hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions decline with aging. Moreover, the responses of hippocampal synaptic structure to estrogens differ between aged and young rats. We recently reported that estrogens increase levels of post-synaptic proteins, including PSD-95, and opioid peptides leu-enkephalin and dynorphin in the hippocampus of young animals. However, the influence of ovarian hormones on synaptic protein and opioid peptide levels in the aging hippocampus is understudied. Here, young (3- to 5-month-old), middle-aged (9- to 12-month-old), and aged (about 22-month-old) female rats were ovariectomized and then, 4 weeks later, subcutaneously implanted with a silastic capsule containing vehicle or 17β-estradiol. After 48 h, rats were subcutaneously injected with progesterone or vehicle and sacrificed 1 day later. Coronal sections through the dorsal hippocampus were processed for quantitative peroxidase immunohistochemistry of leu-enkephalin, dynorphin, synaptophysin, and PSD-95. With age, females showed opposing changes in leu-enkephalin and dynorphin levels in the mossy fiber pathway, particularly within the hilus, and regionally specific changes in synaptic protein levels. 17β-estradiol, with or without progesterone, altered leu-enkephalin levels in the dentate gyrus and synaptophysin levels in the CA1 of young but not middle-aged or aged females. Additionally, 17β-estradiol decreased synaptophysin levels in the CA3 of middle-aged females. Our results support and extend previous findings indicating 17β-estradiol modulation of hippocampal opioid peptides and synaptic proteins while demonstrating regional and age-specific effects. Moreover, they lend credence to the "window of opportunity" hypothesis during which hormone replacement can modulate hippocampal structure and circuitry to improve cognitive outcomes.

  8. Mutual Amino Acid Catalysis in Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Supports this Mechanism's Role in Prebiotic Peptide Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1999-10-01

    The presence of some amino acids and dipeptides under the conditions of the salt-induced peptide formation reaction (aqueous solution at 85 °C, Cu(II) and NaCl) has been found to catalyze the formation of homopeptides of other amino acids, which are otherwise produced only in traces or not at all by this reaction. The condensation of Val, Leu and Lys to form their homodipeptides can occur to a considerable extent due to catalytic effects of other amino acids and related compounds, among which glycine, histidine, diglycine and diketopiperazine exhibit the most remarkable activity. These findings also lead to a modification of the table of amino acid sequences preferentially formed by the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction, previously used for a comparison with the sequence preferences in membrane proteins of primitive organisms

  9. 203Pb-Labeled Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide as an Imaging Probe for Melanoma Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yubin, Miao; Figueroa, Said D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Moore, Herbert A.; Testa, Richard F.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2008-05-01

    Abbreviations: a-MSH; alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone, DOTA; 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid, Re(Arg11)CCMSH; DOTA-[Cys3,4,10, D-Phe7, Arg11]a-MSH3-13, NDP; [Nle4,d-Phe7] a-MSH3-13. Abstract Peptide-targeted alpha therapy with 200 mCi of 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH cured 45% of B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice in a 120-day study, highlighting its melanoma treatment potential. However, there is a need to develop an imaging surrogate for patient specific dosimetry and to monitor the tumor response to 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH as a matched-pair SPECT imaging agent for 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH. Method: DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was labeled with 203Pb in 0.5 M NH4OAc buffer at pH 5.4. The internalization and efflux of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were examined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. A micro-SPECT/CT imaging study was performed with 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in a B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mouse at 2 h post-injection. Results: 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was easily prepared in NH4OAc buffer and completely separated from the excess non-radiolabeled peptide by RP-HPLC. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH displayed fast internalization and extended retention in B16/F1 cells. Approximately 73% of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH activity internalized after a 20-min incubation at 25C. After incubating the cells in culture media for 20 min, 78% of internalized activity remained in the cells. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited similar biodistribution pattern with 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor uptake of 12.00 +/- 3.20 %ID/g at 1 h post-injection. The tumor uptake gradually decreased to 3.43 +/- 1.12 %ID/g at 48 h post-injection. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor to kidney

  10. Anorexia induction by the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) is mediated by the release of the gut satiety hormone peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Brenna M; Clark, Erica S; Pestka, James J

    2012-12-01

    Consumption of deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin known to commonly contaminate grain-based foods, suppresses growth of experimental animals, thus raising concerns over its potential to adversely affect young children. Although this growth impairment is believed to result from anorexia, the initiating mechanisms for appetite suppression remain unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DON induces the release of satiety hormones and that this response corresponds to the toxin's anorectic action. Acute ip exposure to DON had no effect on plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, amylin, pancreatic polypeptide, gastric inhibitory peptide, or ghrelin; however, the toxin was found to robustly elevate peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin (CCK). Specifically, ip exposure to DON at 1 and 5mg/kg bw induced PYY by up to 2.5-fold and CCK by up to 4.1-fold. These responses peaked within 15-120 min and lasted up to 120 min (CCK) and 240 min (PPY), corresponding with depressed rates of food intake. Direct administration of exogenous PYY or CCK similarly caused reduced food intake. Food intake experiments using the NPY2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 and the CCK1A receptor antagonist devazepide, individually, suggested that PYY mediated DON-induced anorexia but CCK did not. Orolingual exposure to DON induced plasma PYY and CCK elevation and anorexia comparable with that observed for ip exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that PYY might be one critical mediator of DON-induced anorexia and, ultimately, growth suppression.

  11. Formation of acylated growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 by poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Na, Dong Hee; Lee, Jeong Eun; Jang, Sun Woo; Lee, Kang Choon

    2007-06-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the formation of acylated impurity resulting from a chemical reaction between the growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and the effect of peptide acylation on the in vivo biological activity of GHRP-6. The peptide acylation pattern of GHRP-6 by hydrophilic PLGA polymers with different molecular weights was characterized by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Higher levels of acylated GHRP-6 were produced with the higher molecular weight PLGA, which might be due to the slower degradation rate of the polymer. The evaluation of the biological activity in rats showed that the acylated GHRP-6 had a much lower activity than the intact GHRP-6. This finding suggests that the acylation reaction would decrease the effectiveness of the GHRP-6 formulation such as PLGA microspheres. Therefore, a strategy for stabilizing the GHRP-6 will be necessary for the development of a successful formulation of PLGA microspheres.

  12. Isolation and nature of intracellular alpha-aminoadipic acid-containing peptides from Paecilomyces persicinus P-10.

    PubMed Central

    Eriquez, L A; Pisano, M A

    1979-01-01

    Small intracellular peptides containing alpha-aminoadipic acid, cysteine, and a valine moiety were obtained from mycelia of Paecilomyces persicinus P-10 by ethanol or trichloroacetic acid extraction. After performic acid oxidation and ion-exchange chromatography, analysis of the peptide fractions by two-dimensional thin-layer electrophoresis and chromatography revealed the presence of three related peptides, as sulfonic acid derivatives, each containing alpha-aminoadipic acid. Each peptide was isolated in chromatographically pure form by semipreparative thin-layer electrophoresis and chromatography. The purified peptides were subjected to differential hydrolysis, dansylation, and combined dansylation-phenylisothiocyanate sequence analysis. Based on these studies, the structures of the isolated peptides were determined to be (i) glycl-delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinyl-beta-hydroxyvaline, (ii) glycyl-delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinylvaline, and (iii) delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinylvaline. The peptides isolated from Paecilomyces are similar to the alpha-aminoadipic acid-cysteine-valine moiety complex peptides isolated from Cephalosporium. PMID:574371

  13. Phospholipid conjugate for intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gang; Fang, Huafeng; Song, Yinyin; Bielska, Agata A.; Wang, Zhenghui; Taylor, John-Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have a number of attractive features that have made them an ideal choice for antisense and antigene-based tools, probes and drugs, but their poor membrane permeability has limited their application as therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Herein we report a general method for the synthesis of phospholipid-PNAs (LP-PNAs), and compare the effect of non-cleavable lipids and bioreductively cleavable lipids (L and LSS) and phospholipid (LP) on the splice-correcting bioactivity of a PNA bearing the cell penetrating Arg9 group (PNA-R9). While the three constructs show similar and increasing bioactivity at 1–3 μM, the activity of LP-PNA-R9 continues to increase from 4–6 μM while the activity of L-PNA-R9 remains constant and LSS-PNA-R9 decreases rapidly in parallel with their relative cytotoxicity. The activity of both LP-PNA-R9 and L-PNA-R9 were found to dramatically increase with chloroquine, as expected for an endocytotic entry mechanism. Both constructs were also found to have CMC values of 1.0 and 4.5 μM in 150 mM NaCl, pH 7 water, suggesting that micelle formation may play a hitherto unrecognized role in modulating toxicity and/or facilitating endocytosis. PMID:19678628

  14. Supramolecular control of self-assembling terthiophene-peptide conjugates through the amino acid side chain

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, Jessica A.; Cui, Honggang; Tsai, Wei-Wen; Moyer, Tyson J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2013-07-30

    The self-assembly of oligothiophene–peptide conjugates can be directed through the systematic variation of the peptide sequence into different nanostructures, including flat spicules, nanotubes, spiral sheets, and giant, flat sheets. Furthermore, the assembly of these molecules is not controlled by steric interactions between the amino acid side chains.

  15. MOD-4023, a long-acting carboxy-terminal peptide-modified human growth hormone: results of a Phase 2 study in growth hormone-deficient adults

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Christian J; Vanuga, Peter; Payer, Juraj; Pfeifer, Marija; Popovic, Vera; Bajnok, László; Góth, Miklós; Olšovská, Veˇra; Trejbalová, L‘udmila; Vadasz, Janos; Fima, Eyal; Koren, Ronit; Amitzi, Leanne; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Hershkovitz, Oren; Biller, Beverly M K

    2016-01-01

    Objective Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy currently requires daily injections, which may cause distress and low compliance. C-terminal peptide (CTP)-modified growth hormone (MOD-4023) is being developed as a once-weekly dosing regimen in patients with GH deficiency (GHD). This study’s objective is to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and efficacy of MOD-4023 administered once-weekly in GHD adults. Design 54 adults with GHD currently treated with daily GH were normalized and randomized into 4 weekly dosing cohorts of MOD-4023 at 18.5%, 37%, 55.5% or 123.4% of individual cumulative weekly molar hGH dose. The study included 2 stages: Stage A assessed the effectiveness and PK/PD profiles of the 4 dosing regimens of MOD-4023. Stage B was an extension period of once-weekly MOD-4023 administration (61.7% molar hGH content) to collect further safety data and confirm the results from Stage A. Results Dose-dependent response was observed for both PK and PD data of weekly MOD-4023 treatment. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) SDS levels were maintained within normal range. The 18.5% cohort was discontinued due to low efficacy. MOD-4023 was well tolerated and exhibited favorable safety profile in all dose cohorts. The reported adverse events were consistent with known GH-related side effects. Conclusions Once-weekly MOD-4023 administration in GHD adults was found to be clinically effective while maintaining a favorable safety profile and may obviate the need for daily injections. Weekly GH injections may improve compliance and overall outcome. The promising results achieved in this Phase 2 study led to a pivotal Phase 3 trial, which is currently ongoing. PMID:27932411

  16. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  17. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons.

  18. Solution NMR studies of the plant peptide hormone CEP inform function.

    PubMed

    Bobay, Benjamin G; DiGennaro, Peter; Scholl, Elizabeth; Imin, Nijat; Djordjevic, Michael A; Mck Bird, David

    2013-12-11

    The C-terminally Encoded Peptide (CEP) family of regulatory peptides controls root development in vascular plants. Here, we present the first NMR structures of CEP. We show that root-knot nematode (RKN: Meloidogyne spp.) also encodes CEP, presumably to mimic plant CEP as part of their stereotypic, parasitic interaction with vascular plants. Molecular dynamics simulations of plant- and nematode-encoded CEP displaying known posttranslational modifications (PTM) provided insight into the structural effects of PTM and the conformational plasticity and rigidity of CEP. Potential mechanisms of action are discussed with respect to the structure and sampling of conformational space.

  19. Fatty acid intake in relation to reproductive hormones and testicular volume among young healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Chavarro, Jorge E; Mendiola, Jaime; Roca, Manuela; Tanrikut, Cigdem; Vioque, Jesús; Jørgensen, Niels; Torres-Cantero, Alberto M

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dietary fats may influence testicular function. However, most of the published literature on this field has used semen quality parameters as the only proxy for testicular function. We examined the association of fat intake with circulating reproductive hormone levels and testicular volume among healthy young Spanish men. This is a cross-sectional study among 209 healthy male volunteers conducted between October 2010 and November 2011 in Murcia Region of Spain. Participants completed questionnaires on lifestyle, diet, and smoking, and each underwent a physical examination, and provided a blood sample. Linear regression was used to examine the association between each fatty acid type and reproductive hormone levels and testicular volumes. Monounsaturated fatty acids intake was inversely associated with serum blood levels of calculated free testosterone, total testosterone, and inhibin B. A positive association was observed between the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and luteinizing hormone concentrations. In addition, the intake of trans fatty acids was associated with lower total testosterone and calculated free testosterone concentrations (Ptrend = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was positively related to testicular volume while the intake of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids was inversely related to testicular volume. These data suggest that fat intake, and particularly intake of omega 3, omega 6, and trans fatty acids, may influence testicular function. PMID:27834316

  20. Systematic studies of the mass spectrometric properties of alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küjckelmann, Ulrich; Müller, Dietrich; Weber, Carsten

    1997-07-01

    The results of a systematic study of the gas phase interactions of α-amino acids and peptides (4-15 amino acids) with alkaline earth metals, observed with mass spectrometric techniques, are presented. Furthermore, a model for the cationization with calcium at the C-terminal amino acid arginine in rotaviral polypeptides is presented.

  1. Efficacy of peptide nucleic acid and selected conjugates against specific cellular pathologies of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Elisse C; Parakh, Sonam; Duncan, Luke F; Langford, Steven J; Atkin, Julie D; Abbott, Belinda M

    2016-04-01

    Cellular studies have been undertaken on a nonamer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence, which binds to mRNA encoding superoxide dismutase 1, and a series of peptide nucleic acids conjugated to synthetic lipophilic vitamin analogs including a recently prepared menadione (vitamin K) analog. Reduction of both mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusion formation and endoplasmic reticulum stress, two of the key cellular pathological hallmarks in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by two of the prepared PNA oligomers is reported for the first time.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acid Exhibit Potent Bactericidal Activity against ESKAPE Pathogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides containing unnatural amino acid exhibit potent bactericidal activity against ESKAPE pathogens R. P. Hicks a, J. J. Abercrombie...tic classes, membrane-disruptors and non -membrane-disrup- tors.30,31 Five different mechanisms have been proposed at one time or another to explain...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acid Exhibit Potent Bactericidal Activity Against

  3. Simultaneous separation of acid and basic bioactive peptides by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Jean-François; Amiot, Jean; Bazinet, Laurent

    2006-05-29

    beta-Lactoglobulin (beta-lg), one of the major whey components, can release by enzymatic hydrolysis different bioactive peptidic sequences according to the enzyme used. However, these protein hydrolysates have to be fractionated to obtain peptides in a more purified form. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the feasibility of separating peptides from a beta-lg hydrolysate using an ultrafiltration (UF) membrane stacked in an electrodialysis (ED) cell and to study the effect of pH on the migration of basic/cationic and acid/anionic peptides in the ED configuration. Electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) appeared to be a selective method of separation since amongst a total of 40 peptides in the raw hydrolysate, only 13 were recovered in the separated adjacent solutions (KCl 1 and KCl 2). Amongst these 13 migrating peptides, 3 acid/anionic peptides migrated only in one compartment (KCl 1), while 3 basic/cationic peptides migrated only in the second compartment (KCl 2) and that whatever the pH conditions of the hydrolysate solution. Furthermore, the highest migration was obtained for the ACE-inhibitory peptide beta-lg 142-148, with a value of 10.75%. The integrity of the UF membrane was kept and EDUF would minimize the fouling of UF membrane.

  4. CycloPs: generating virtual libraries of cyclized and constrained peptides including nonnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; Verniere, Mélanie; Devocelle, Marc; Bernard, Elise; Shields, Denis C; Chubb, Anthony J

    2011-04-25

    We introduce CycloPs, software for the generation of virtual libraries of constrained peptides including natural and nonnatural commercially available amino acids. The software is written in the cross-platform Python programming language, and features include generating virtual libraries in one-dimensional SMILES and three-dimensional SDF formats, suitable for virtual screening. The stand-alone software is capable of filtering the virtual libraries using empirical measurements, including peptide synthesizability by standard peptide synthesis techniques, stability, and the druglike properties of the peptide. The software and accompanying Web interface is designed to enable the rapid generation of large, structurally diverse, synthesizable virtual libraries of constrained peptides quickly and conveniently, for use in virtual screening experiments. The stand-alone software, and the Web interface for evaluating these empirical properties of a single peptide, are available at http://bioware.ucd.ie .

  5. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-02-02

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature's most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments.

  6. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature’s most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  7. DISRUPTION OF THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS BY PERFLUROALKYL ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) are man-made chemicals found ubiquitously in humans and wildlife; the major representatives of these are those with an 8-carbon chain (C-8, perfluorooctane sulfonate, PFOS and perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). Presently, we have investigated the effects o...

  8. Effect of excitatory amino acids on serum TSH and thyroid hormone levels in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, M; Durán, R; Arufe, M C

    2000-01-01

    The actions of glutamate (L-Glu), and glutamate receptor agonists on serum thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) and TSH levels have been studied in conscious and freely moving adult male rats. The excitatory amino acids (EAA), L-Glu, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainic acid (KA) and domoic acid (Dom) were administered intraperitoneally. Blood samples were collected through a cannula implanted in the rats jugular 0--60 min after injection. Thyroid hormone concentrations were measured by enzyme immunoassay, and thyrotrophin (TSH) concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. The results showed that L-Glu (20 and 25 mg/kg) and NMDA (25 mg/kg) increased serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and TSH concentrations. Serum thyroid hormone levels increased 30 min after treatment, while serum TSH levels increased 5 min after i.p. administration, in both cases serum levels remained elevated during one hour. Injection of the non-NMDA glutamatergic agonists KA (30 mg/kg) and Dom (1 mg/kg) produced an increase in serum thyroid hormones and TSH levels. These results suggest the importance of EAAs in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the importance of the NMDA and non-NMDA receptors in this stimulatory effect.

  9. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  10. Galanin-Like peptide elicits a robust discharge of growth hormone in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Shahab, Muhammad; Cunningham, Matthew J; Steiner, Robert A; Plant, Tony M

    2005-01-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) stimulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in rodent and primate species. The widespread distribution of GALP fibers in the hypothalamus suggests that this neuropeptide may influence hypophysiotropic factors that control other aspects of adenohypophysial function. Here we studied the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of GALP on serum levels of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) in adult male monkeys. The animals (n = 5) were orchidectomized and implanted with testosterone-containing Silastic capsules to maintain the circulating testosterone levels (approximately 9 ng/ml) within the physiological range. The animals were implanted with an intracerebroventricular cannula and venous catheter for continuous access to the cerebroventricular and the venous circulation, respectively. GALP (500 microg), or vehicle alone, was administered as a bolus intracerebroventricular injection, and sequential blood samples were collected at 20-min intervals for 3 h before and after the injections. Within 20 min following GALP injection, the GH concentrations increased 3.5-fold, and a peak level (12.9 +/- 2.7 ng/ml) was observed 40 min after injection. The GH levels remained elevated until 60 min after injection and thereafter declined to values similar to those observed at 0 min. The GH concentrations were not changed by vehicle alone. A decline in PRL levels was observed following GALP administration, with significantly reduced concentrations occurring between 60 and 120 min following the injection of the neuropeptide. We conclude that in the monkey GALP is a potent secretagogue for GH and an inhibitor of PRL secretion and that GALP may, therefore, interact with the hypothalamic circuitry involved in the regulation of these pituitary hormones.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of the ghrelin agonist growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, M Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-03-01

    Chronic arthritis induces hypermetabolism and cachexia. Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal hormone that has been proposed as a treatment to prevent cachexia. The aim of this work was to examine the effect of administration of the ghrelin agonist growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) to arthritic rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with Freund's adjuvant, and 15 days later arthritic and control rats were daily injected with GHRP-2 (100 microg/kg) or with saline for 8 days. Arthritis induced an increase in serum ghrelin (P < 0.01) and a decrease in serum concentrations of leptin (P < 0.01), whereas GHRP-2 administration increased serum concentrations of leptin. GHRP-2 increased food intake in control rats but not in arthritic rats. However, in arthritic rats GHRP-2 administration ameliorated the external symptoms of arthritis, as it decreased the arthritis score (10.4 +/- 0.8 vs. 13.42 +/- 0.47, P < 0.01) and the paw volume. In addition, circulating IL-6 and nitrites/nitrates were increased by arthritis, and GHRP-2 treatment decreased the serum IL-6 levels (P < 0.01). To elucidate whether GHRP-2 is able to modulate IL-6 release directly on immune cells, peritoneal macrophage cultures were incubated with GHRP-2 or ghrelin, the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor. Both GHRP-2 (10(-7) M) and ghrelin (10(-7) M) prevented endotoxin-induced IL-6 and decreased nitrite/nitrate release from peritoneal macrophages in vitro. These data suggest that GHRP-2 administration has an anti-inflammatory effect in arthritic rats that seems to be mediated by ghrelin receptors directly on immune cells.

  12. Control of larval and egg development in Aedes aegypti with Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) against juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including mosquitoes and many other insects. Little has been done, however, to harness this approach in order to control adult and larval mosquitoes. Juvenile hormone (JH) plays a pi...

  13. The peptide hormone pQDLDHVFLRFamide (crustacean myosuppressin) modulates the Homarus americanus cardiac neuromuscular system at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J S; Cashman, C R; Smith, C M; Beale, K M; Towle, D W; Christie, A E; Dickinson, P S

    2009-12-01

    pQDLDHVFLRFamide is a highly conserved crustacean neuropeptide with a structure that places it within the myosuppressin subfamily of the FMRFamide-like peptides. Despite its apparent ubiquitous conservation in decapod crustaceans, the paracrine and/or endocrine roles played by pQDLDHVFLRFamide remain largely unknown. We have examined the actions of this peptide on the cardiac neuromuscular system of the American lobster Homarus americanus using four preparations: the intact animal, the heart in vitro, the isolated cardiac ganglion (CG), and a stimulated heart muscle preparation. In the intact animal, injection of myosuppressin caused a decrease in heartbeat frequency. Perfusion of the in vitro heart with pQDLDHVFLRFamide elicited a decrease in the frequency and an increase in the amplitude of heart contractions. In the isolated CG, myosuppressin induced a hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential of cardiac motor neurons and a decrease in the cycle frequency of their bursting. In the stimulated heart muscle preparation, pQDLDHVFLRFamide increased the amplitude of the induced contractions, suggesting that myosuppressin modulates not only the CG, but also peripheral sites. For at least the in vitro heart and the isolated CG, the effects of myosuppressin were dose-dependent (10(-9) to 10(-6) mol l(-1) tested), with threshold concentrations (10(-8)-10(-7) mol l(-1)) consistent with the peptide serving as a circulating hormone. Although cycle frequency, a parameter directly determined by the CG, consistently decreased when pQDLDHVFLRFamide was applied to all preparation types, the magnitudes of this decrease differed, suggesting the possibility that, because myosuppressin modulates the CG and the periphery, it also alters peripheral feedback to the CG.

  14. The peptide hormone pQDLDHVFLRFamide (crustacean myosuppressin) modulates the Homarus americanus cardiac neuromuscular system at multiple sites

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, J. S.; Cashman, C. R.; Smith, C. M.; Beale, K. M.; Towle, D. W.; Christie, A. E.; Dickinson, P. S.

    2009-01-01

    pQDLDHVFLRFamide is a highly conserved crustacean neuropeptide with a structure that places it within the myosuppressin subfamily of the FMRFamide-like peptides. Despite its apparent ubiquitous conservation in decapod crustaceans, the paracrine and/or endocrine roles played by pQDLDHVFLRFamide remain largely unknown. We have examined the actions of this peptide on the cardiac neuromuscular system of the American lobster Homarus americanus using four preparations: the intact animal, the heart in vitro, the isolated cardiac ganglion (CG), and a stimulated heart muscle preparation. In the intact animal, injection of myosuppressin caused a decrease in heartbeat frequency. Perfusion of the in vitro heart with pQDLDHVFLRFamide elicited a decrease in the frequency and an increase in the amplitude of heart contractions. In the isolated CG, myosuppressin induced a hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential of cardiac motor neurons and a decrease in the cycle frequency of their bursting. In the stimulated heart muscle preparation, pQDLDHVFLRFamide increased the amplitude of the induced contractions, suggesting that myosuppressin modulates not only the CG, but also peripheral sites. For at least the in vitro heart and the isolated CG, the effects of myosuppressin were dose-dependent (10−9 to 10−6 mol l−1 tested), with threshold concentrations (10−8−10−7 mol l−1) consistent with the peptide serving as a circulating hormone. Although cycle frequency, a parameter directly determined by the CG, consistently decreased when pQDLDHVFLRFamide was applied to all preparation types, the magnitudes of this decrease differed, suggesting the possibility that, because myosuppressin modulates the CG and the periphery, it also alters peripheral feedback to the CG. PMID:19946074

  15. Molecular mechanics and dynamics studies on the interaction of gallic acid with collagen-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Ramasami, T.

    2001-10-01

    Molecular modelling approaches have been used to understand the interaction of collagen-like peptides with gallic acid, which mimic vegetable tanning processes involved in protein stabilization. Several interaction sites have been identified and the binding energies of the complexes have been calculated. The calculated binding energies for various geometries are in the range 6-13 kcal/mol. It is found that some complexes exhibit hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interaction plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the peptide by gallic acid. The π-OH type of interaction is also observed in the peptide stabilization. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for 600 ps revealed the possibility of hydrogen bonding between the collagen-like peptide and gallic acid.

  16. Noninvasive molecular imaging of MYC mRNA expression in human breast cancer xenografts with a [99mTc]peptide-peptide nucleic acid-peptide chimera.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaobing; Aruva, Mohan R; Qin, Wenyi; Zhu, Weizhu; Sauter, Edward R; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells typically display elevated levels of Myc protein due to overexpression of MYC mRNA, and elevated insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) due to overexpression of IGF1R mRNA. We hypothesized that scintigraphic detection of MYC peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes with an IGF1 peptide loop on the C-terminus, and a [99mTc]chelator peptide on the N-terminus, could measure levels of MYC mRNA noninvasively in human IGF1R-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer xenografts in nude mice. We prepared the chelator-MYC PNA-IGF1 peptide, as well as a 4-nt mismatch PNA control, by solid-phase synthesis. We imaged MCF7 xenografts scintigraphically and measured the distribution of [99mTc]probes by scintillation counting of dissected tissues. MCF7 xenografts in nude mice were visualized at 4 and 24 h after tail vein administration of the [99mTc]PNA probe specific for MYC mRNA, but not with the mismatch control. The [99mTc]probes distributed normally to the kidneys, livers, tumors, and other tissues. Molecular imaging of oncogene mRNAs in solid tumors with radiolabel-PNA-peptide chimeras might provide additional genetic characterization of preinvasive and invasive breast cancers.

  17. A Peptide Hormone and Its Receptor Protein Kinase Regulate Plant Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sabat, Grzegorz; Stecker, Kelly; Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells are immobile; thus, plant growth and development depend on cell expansion rather than cell migration. The molecular mechanism by which the plasma membrane initiates changes in the cell expansion rate remains elusive. We found that a secreted peptide, RALF (rapid alkalinization factor), suppresses cell elongation of the primary root by activating the cell surface receptor FERONIA in Arabidopsis thaliana. A direct peptide-receptor interaction is supported by specific binding of RALF to FERONIA and reduced binding and insensitivity to RALF-induced growth inhibition in feronia mutants. Phosphoproteome measurements demonstrate that the RALF-FERONIA interaction causes phosphorylation of plasma membrane H+–adenosine triphosphatase 2 at Ser899, mediating the inhibition of proton transport. The results reveal a molecular mechanism for RALF-induced extracellular alkalinization and a signaling pathway that regulates cell expansion. PMID:24458638

  18. Activation of carboxyl group with cyanate: peptide bond formation from dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Danger, Grégoire; Charlot, Solenne; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The reaction of cyanate with C-terminal carboxyl groups of peptides in aqueous solution was considered as a potential pathway for the abiotic formation of peptide bonds under the condition of the primitive Earth. The catalytic effect of dicarboxylic acids on cyanate hydrolysis was definitely attributed to intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis by the observation of the 1H-NMR signal of succinic anhydride when reacting succinic acid with KOCN in aqueous solution (pH 2.2-5.5). The formation of amide bonds was noticed when adding amino acids or amino acid derivatives into the solution. The reaction of N-acyl aspartic acid derivatives was observed to proceed similarly and the scope of the cyanate-promoted reaction was analyzed from the standpoint of prebiotic peptide formation. The role of cyanate in activating peptide C-terminus constitutes a proof of principle that intramolecular reactions of adducts of peptides C-terminal carboxyl groups with activating agents represent a pathway for peptide activation in aqueous solution, the relevance of which is discussed in connexion with the issue of the emergence of homochirality.

  19. Amino Acid- vs. Peptide-Odorants: Responses of Individual Olfactory Receptor Neurons in an Aquatic Species

    PubMed Central

    Hassenklöver, Thomas; Pallesen, Lars P.; Schild, Detlev; Manzini, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are widely used waterborne olfactory stimuli proposed to serve as cues in the search for food. In natural waters the main source of amino acids is the decomposition of proteins. But this process also produces a variety of small peptides as intermediate cleavage products. In the present study we tested whether amino acids actually are the natural and adequate stimuli for the olfactory receptors they bind to. Alternatively, these olfactory receptors could be peptide receptors which also bind amino acids though at lower affinity. Employing calcium imaging in acute slices of the main olfactory epithelium of the fully aquatic larvae of Xenopus laevis we show that amino acids, and not peptides, are more effective waterborne odorants. PMID:23300867

  20. Synthesis and biological properties of amino acids and peptides containing a tetrazolyl moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Trifonov, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    Literature data published mainly in the last 15 years on the synthesis and biological properties of amino acid analogues and derivatives containing tetrazolyl moieties are analyzed. Tetrazolyl analogues and derivatives of amino acids and peptides are shown to be promising for medicinal chemistry. Being polynitrogen heterocyclic systems comprising four endocyclic nitrogen atoms, tetrazoles can behave as acids and bases and form strong hydrogen bonds with proton donors (more rarely, with acceptors). They have high metabolic stability and are able to penetrate biological membranes. The review also considers the synthesis and properties of linear and cyclic peptides based on modified amino acids incorporating a tetrazolyl moiety. A special issue is the discussion of the biological properties of tetrazole-containing amino acids and peptides, which exhibit high biological activity and can be used to design new drugs. The bibliography includes 200 references.

  1. The positive effects of growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 on weight gain and fat mass accrual depend on the insulin/glucose status.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Frago, Laura M; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2010-05-01

    Ghrelin and GH secretagogues, including GH-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6, stimulate food intake and adiposity. Because insulin modulates the hypothalamic response to GH secretagogues and acts synergistically with ghrelin on lipogenesis in vitro, we analyzed whether insulin plays a role in the metabolic effects of GHRP-6 in vivo. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats received saline, GHRP-6, insulin, or insulin plus GHRP-6 once daily for 8 wk. Rats receiving saline suffered hyperglycemia, hyperphagia, polydipsia, and weight loss. Insulin, but not GHRP-6, improved these parameters (P < 0.001 for all), as well as the diabetes-induced increase in hypothalamic mRNA levels of neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide and decrease in proopiomelanocortin. Cocaine amphetamine-related transcript mRNA levels were also reduced in diabetic rats, with GHRP-6 inducing a further decrease (P < 0.03) and insulin an increase. Diabetic rats receiving insulin plus GHRP-6 gained more weight and had increased epididymal fat mass and serum leptin levels compared with all other groups (P < 0.001). In epididymal adipose tissue, diabetic rats injected with saline had smaller adipocytes (P < 0.001), decreased fatty acid synthase (FAS; P < 0.001), and glucose transporter-4 (P < 0.001) and increased hormone sensitive lipase (P < 0.001) and proliferator-activated receptor-gamma mRNA levels (P < 0.01). Insulin normalized these parameters to control values. GHRP-6 treatment increased FAS and glucose transporter-4 gene expression and potentiated insulin's effect on epididymal fat mass, adipocyte size (P < 0.001), FAS (P < 0.001), and glucose transporter-4 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, GHRP-6 and insulin exert an additive effect on weight gain and visceral fat mass accrual in diabetic rats, indicating that some of GHRP-6's metabolic effects depend on the insulin/glucose status.

  2. A toy model of prebiotic peptide evolution: the possible role of relative amino acid abundances.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical-computational toy model based on the assumed dynamic principles of prebiotic peptide evolution. Starting from a pool of amino acid monomers, the model describes in a generalized manner the generation of peptides and their sequential information. The model integrates the intrinsic and dynamic key elements of the initiation of biopolymerization, such as the relative amino acid abundances and polarities, as well as the oligomer reversibility, i.e. fragmentation and recombination, and peptide self-replication. Our modeling results suggest that the relative amino acid abundances, as indicated by Miller-Urey type electric discharge experiments, played a principal role in the early sequential information of peptide profiles. Moreover, the computed profiles display an astonishing similarity to peptide profiles observed in so-called biological common ancestors found in the following three microorganisms; E. coli, M. jannaschii, and S. cereviasiae. The prebiotic peptide fingerprint was obtained by the so-called polarity index method that was earlier reported as a tool for the identification of cationic amphipathic antibacterial short peptides.

  3. Identification of parathyroid hormone-related protein-derived peptides immunogenic in human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-A24+ prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yao, A; Harada, M; Matsueda, S; Ishihara, Y; Shomura, H; Noguchi, M; Matsuoka, K; Hara, I; Kamidono, S; Itoh, K

    2004-07-19

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a key factor in the development of bone metastases, which are a major barrier in treating prostate cancer patients. In this study, we attempted to identify PTHrP-derived peptides immunogenic in human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A24(+) prostate cancer patients. Among four different PTHrP peptides carrying the HLA-A24 binding motif, both the PTHrP(36-44) and PTHrP(102-111) peptides efficiently induced peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HLA-A24(+) prostate cancer patients. Peptide-stimulated PBMCs showed cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cells in an HLA-A24-restricted manner. Experiments using antibodies and cold inhibition targets confirmed that their cytotoxicity was dependent on PTHrP peptide-specific and CD8(+) T cells. Immunoglobulin G reactive to the PTHrP(102-111) or PTHrP(110-119) peptide was frequently detected in the plasma of prostate cancer patients, suggesting that the PTHrP(102-111) peptide is able to elicit cellular and humoral immune responses in cancer patients. These results indicate that the PTHrP could be a promising target molecule for specific immunotherapy of HLA-A24(+) prostate cancer patients with metastases.

  4. Analysis of Endogenous D-Amino Acid-Containing Peptides in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lu; Sheeley, Sarah; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are chiral molecules with their structure determined by the composition and configuration of their amino acid building blocks. The naturally occurring amino acids, except glycine, possess two chiral forms. This allows the formation of multiple peptide diastereomers that have the same sequence. Although living organisms use L-amino acids to make proteins, a group of D-amino acid-containing peptides (DAACPs) has been discovered in animals that have at least one of their residues isomerized to the D-form via an enzyme-catalyzed process. In many cases, the biological functions of these peptides are enhanced due to this structural conversion. These DAACPs are different from those known to occur in bacterial cell wall and antibiotic peptides, the latter of which are synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner. DAACPs have now also been identified in a number of distinct groups throughout the Metazoa. Their serendipitous discovery has often resulted from discrepancies observed in bioassays or in chromatographic behavior between natural peptide fractions and peptides synthesized according to a presumed all-L sequence. Because this L-to-D post-translational modification is subtle and not detectable by most sequence determination approaches, it is reasonable to suspect that many studies have overlooked this change; accordingly, DAACPs may be more prevalent than currently thought. Although diastereomer separation techniques developed with synthetic peptides in recent years have greatly aided in the discovery of natural DAACPs, there is a need for new, more robust methods for naturally complex samples. In this review, a brief history of DAACPs in animals is presented, followed by discussion of a variety of analytical methods that have been used for diastereomeric separation and detection of peptides. PMID:20490347

  5. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  6. Effects of lamprey PQRFamide peptides on brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone concentrations and pituitary gonadotropin-β mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Daukss, Dana; Gazda, Kristen; Kosugi, Takayoshi; Osugi, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Sower, Stacia A

    2012-06-01

    Within the RFamide peptide family, PQRFamide peptides that include neuropeptide FF and AF possess a C-terminal Pro-Gln-Arg-Phe-NH(2) motif. We previously identified PQRFamide peptides, lamprey PQRFa, PQRFa-related peptide (RP)-1 and -RP-2 by immunoaffinity purification in the brain of lamprey, one of the most ancient vertebrate species [13]. Lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA was expressed in regions predicted to be involved in neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus. However, the putative function(s) of lamprey PQRFamide peptides (PQRFa, PQRFa-RP-1 and PQRFa-RP-2) were not examined nor was the distribution of PQRFamide peptides examined in other tissues besides the brain. The objective of this study was to determine tissue distribution of lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA, and to examine the effects of PQRFamide peptides on brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-I, -II, and -III protein concentrations, and pituitary gonadotropin (GTH)-β mRNA expression in adult lampreys. Lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA was expressed in the eye and the brain. Lamprey PQRFa at 100 μg/kg increased brain concentrations of lamprey GnRH-II compared with controls. PQRFa, PQRFa-RP-1 and PQRFa-RP-2 did not significantly change brain protein concentrations of either lamprey GnRH-I, -III, or lamprey GTH-β mRNA expression in the pituitary. These data suggest that one of the PQRFamide peptides may act as a neuroregulator of at least the lamprey GnRH-II system in adult female lamprey.

  7. A method for the 32P labeling of peptides or peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A novel approach to the radioactive labeling of peptides and PNA oligomers is described. It is based on the conjugation of a deoxynucleoside 3'-phosphate with the terminal amine of the substrate, followed by phosphorylation of the 5'-hydroxyl group of the nucleotide using T4 polynucleotide kinase and [gamma-32P]ATP.

  8. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA): a model structure for the primordial genetic material?

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P E

    1993-12-01

    It is proposed that the primordial genetic material could have been peptide nucleic acids, i.e., DNA analogues having a peptide backbone. PNA monomers based on the amino acid, alpha, gamma-diaminobutyric acid or ornithine are suggested as compounds that could have been formed in the prebiotic soup. Finally, the possibility of a PNA/RNA world is presented, in which PNA constitutes the stable genetic material, while RNA which may be polymerized using the PNA as template accounts for enzymatic activities including PNA replication.

  9. Insulin resistance and delayed clearance of peptide hormones in cirrhotic rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, T.P.; Drake, S.; Solomon, S.S.

    1987-06-01

    Clearance of porcine insulin, glucagon, and human growth hormone was measured in intact perfused cirrhotic and normal rat livers. Binding and degradation of /sup 125/I-insulin by hepatocytes isolated from cirrhotic and normal livers were also studied. The half-lives (t/sub 1/2/) of immunoreactive insulin and glucagon were 14.0 +/- 3.1 and 9.6 +/- 2.1 min in normal livers and 26.0 +/- 6.1 and 25.0 +/- 7.1 min in cirrhotic livers. Insulin binding and degradation by hepatocytes from control and cirrhotic livers showed no significant differences. Intraportal insulin infusion in perfusion studies suppressed glucagon-stimulated increases in glucose output from control livers but failed to suppress glucose production by cirrhotic livers, suggesting the presence of hepatic insulin resistance in cirrhosis. Impaired clearance of insulin and glucagon by the intact cirrhotic liver and normal binding and degradation of insulin by isolated hepatocytes suggest that factors such as intrahepatic fibrosis and shunting and postbinding defects may be responsible for the impaired hormone clearance and hepatic insulin resistance.

  10. The enthalpies of formation and sublimation of amino acids and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagadeev, E. V.; Gimadeev, A. A.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2010-02-01

    The experimental enthalpies of formation of L-amino acids and peptides were analyzed using the additive scheme and group contributions. Group contributions to the enthalpies of formation were calculated (increment denotations corresponded to the Benson-Buss symbols). The thermochemical characteristics of a wide range of amino acids and their derivatives were calculated.

  11. Vasoactive intestinal peptide enhanced aromatase activity in the neonatal rat ovary before development of primary follicles or responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    George, F.W.; Ojeda, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have investigated the factors that regulate aromatase activity in fetal-neonatal rat ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity (assessed by measuring the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed from (1..beta..-/sup 3/H)testosterone) is low prior to birth and increases to values greater than 30 pmol/hr per mg of protein between days 8 and 12 after birth. The appearance of ovarian aromatase coincides with the development of primordial follicles. Fetal-neonatal ovaries maintained in serum-free organ culture do not develop aromatase activity at the expected time. Ovine follicle-stimulating hormone, ovine luteinizing hormone, or their combination failed to induce the enzyme activity in cultured fetal ovaries, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone is effective in preventing the decline in aromatase activity when postnatal day 8 ovaries are placed in culture. In contrast to follicle-stimulating hormone, dibutyryl-cAMP markedly enhances ovarian aromatase in cultured fetal ovaries. Likewise, enhancement of endogenouse cAMP formation with forskolin or cholera toxin caused an increase in enzyme activity within 24 hr. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a peptide known to occur in ovarian nerves, caused a dose-dependent increase in aromatase activity in fetal ovaries prior to folliculogenesis. Of related peptides tested, only the peptide having N-terminal histidine and C-terminal isoleucine amide was capable of inducing aromatase activity in fetal ovaries. The fact that VIP can induce aromatase activity in fetal rat ovaries prior to follicle formation and prior to responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone suggests that this neuropeptide may play a critical role in ovarian differentiation.

  12. Homologous down-regulation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Aleppo, G; Moskal, S F; De Grandis, P A; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1997-03-01

    Repeated stimulation of pituitary cell cultures with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) results in diminished responsiveness, a phenomenon referred to as homologous desensitization. One component of GHRH-induced desensitization is a reduction in GHRH-binding sites, which is reflected by the decreased ability of GHRH to stimulate a rise in intracellular cAMP. In the present study, we sought to determine if homologous down-regulation of GHRH receptor number is due to a decrease in GHRH receptor synthesis. To this end, we developed and validated a quantitative RT-PCR assay system that was capable of assessing differences in GHRH-R messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in total RNA samples obtained from rat pituitary cell cultures. Treatment of pituitary cells with GHRH, for as little as 4 h, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GHRH-R mRNA levels. The maximum effect was observed with 0.1 and 1 nM GHRH, which reduced GHRH-R mRNA levels to 49 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) and 54 +/- 11% of control values, respectively (n = three separate experiments; P < 0.05). Accompanying the decline in GHRH-R mRNA levels was a rise in GH release; reaching 320 +/- 31% of control values (P < 0.01). Because of the possibility that the rise in medium GH level is the primary regulator of GHRH-R mRNA, we pretreated pituitary cultures for 4 h with GH to achieve a concentration comparable with that induced by a maximal stimulation with GHRH (8 micrograms GH/ml medium). Following pretreatment, cultures were stimulated for 15 min with GHRH and intracellular cAMP accumulation was measured by RIA. GH pretreatment did not impair the ability of GHRH to induce a rise in cAMP concentrations. However, as anticipated, GHRH pretreatment (10 nM) significantly reduced subsequent GHRH-stimulated cAMP to 46% of untreated controls. These data suggest that GHRH, but not GH, directly reduces GHRH-R mRNA levels. To determine whether this effect was mediated through cAMP, cultures were treated with forskolin, a direct stimulator of

  13. Dose-related effects of lauric acid on antropyloroduodenal motility, gastrointestinal hormone release, appetite, and energy intake in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Little, Tanya J; Feltrin, Kate L; Horowitz, Michael; Smout, Andre J P M; Rades, Thomas; Meyer, James H; Pilichiewicz, Amelia N; Wishart, Judith; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2005-10-01

    We recently reported that intraduodenal infusion of lauric acid (C12) (0.375 kcal/min, 106 mM) stimulates isolated pyloric pressure waves (IPPWs), inhibits antral and duodenal pressure waves (PWs), stimulates release of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and suppresses energy intake and that these effects are much greater than those seen in response to isocaloric decanoic acid (C10) infusion. Administration of C12 was, however, associated with nausea, confounding interpretation of the results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different intraduodenal doses of C12 on antropyloroduodenal (APD) motility, plasma CCK and GLP-1 concentrations, appetite, and energy intake. Thirteen healthy males were studied on 4 days in double-blind, randomized fashion. APD pressures, plasma CCK and GLP-1 concentrations, and appetite perceptions were measured during 90-min ID infusion of C12 at 0.1 (14 mM), 0.2 (28 mM), or 0.4 (56 mM) kcal/min or saline (control; rate 4 ml/min). Energy intake was determined at a buffet meal immediately following infusion. C12 dose-dependently stimulated IPPWs, decreased antral and duodenal motility, and stimulated secretion of CCK and GLP-1 (r > 0.4, P < 0.05 for all). C12 (0.4 kcal/min) suppressed energy intake compared with control, C12 (0.1 kcal/min), and C12 (0.2 kcal/min) (P < 0.05). These effects were observed in the absence of nausea. In conclusion, intraduodenal C12 dose-dependently modulated APD motility and gastrointestinal hormone release in healthy male subjects, whereas effects on energy intake were only apparent with the highest dose infused (0.4 kcal/min), possibly because only at this dose was modulation of APD motility and gastrointestinal hormone secretion sufficient for a suppressant effect on energy intake.

  14. Hormonal control of somatic embryo development from cultured cells of caraway: interactions of abscisic Acid, zeatin, and gibberellic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ammirato, P V

    1977-04-01

    The effects of abscisic acid, zeatin, and gibberellic acid on the development of somatic embryos from cultured cells of caraway (Carum carvi L.) were observed.Somatic embryos complete development on a basal medium without exogenous hormones, but some are subject to developmental abnormalities including malformed cotyledons and accessory embryos. Both zeatin and gibberellic acid, especially in combination, stimulate growth and increase the frequency of aberrant forms. Zeatin causes the formation of multiple shoots, leafy and abnormal cotyledons, and in the dark, enlarged hypocotyls; gibberellic acid effects root elongation, polycotyledony, and some callus formation. In contrast, abscisic acid, at concentrations which do not inhibit embryo maturation, selectively suppresses abnormal proliferations. With abscisic acid, and especially in the dark, a high percentage of embryos complete development with two fleshy cotyledons on unelongated axes free of accessory embryos.In the light, zeatin eliminates abscisic acid inhibition while gibberellic acid only partially counters its effect, promoting elongated radicles and green rather than white cotyledons. In the dark, zeatin in combination with abscisic acid stimulates extensive callusing. Gibberellic acid does not reverse the effects of abscisic acid but rather enhances them and can counter the disruptive effects of zeatin.The results demonstrate that the balance between abscisic acid on the one hand and zeatin and gibberellic acid on the other can effectively control somatic embryo development and either disrupt or ensure normal maturation.

  15. Predicting three-dimensional conformations of peptides constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  16. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  17. Atypical behavior in the electron capture induced dissociation of biologically relevant transition metal ion complexes of the peptide hormone oxytocin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J.; Mihalca, Romulus; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Doubly protonated ions of the disulfide bond containing nonapeptide hormone oxytocin and oxytocin complexes with different transition metal ions, that have biological relevance under physiological conditions, were subjected to electron capture dissociation (ECD) to probe their structural features in the gas phase. Although, all the ECD spectra were strikingly different, typical ECD behavior was observed for complexes of the nonapeptide hormone oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, i.e., abundant c/z' and a'/y backbone cleavages and ECD characteristic S-S and S-C bond cleavages were observed. We propose that, although in the oxytocin-transition metal ion complexes the metal ions serve as the main initial capture site, the captured electron is transferred to other sites in the complex to form a hydrogen radical, which drives the subsequent typical ECD fragmentations. The complex of oxytocin with Cu2+ displayed noticeably different ECD behavior. The fragment ions were similar to fragment ions typically observed with low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). We propose that the electrons captured by the oxytocin-Cu2+ complex might be favorably involved in reducing the Cu2+ metal ion to Cu+. Subsequent energy redistribution would explain the observed low-energy CID-type fragmentations. Electron capture resulted also in quite different specific cleavage sites for the complexes of oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. This is an indication for structural differences in these complexes possibly linked to their significantly different biological effects on oxytocin-receptor binding, and suggests that ECD may be used to study subtle structural differences in transition metal ion-peptide complexes.

  18. Estradiol Regulates GH Releasing-Peptide's Interactions with GH-Releasing Hormone and Somatostatin in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Catalina; Rollene, Nanette L.; Erickson, Dana; Miles, John M.; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Estrogen stimulates pulsatile secretion of growth hormone (GH), albeit via mechanisms that are largely unknown. An untested hypothesis is that estradiol (E2) drives GH secretion by amplifying interactions among GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), somatostatin (SS) and GH-releasing peptide (GHRP). Design The design comprised double-blind randomized prospective administration of transdermal E2 vs placebo to healthy postmenopausal women (N=24) followed by pulsatile GHRH or SS infusions for 13 hr overnight with or without continuous GHRP-2 stimulation. Methods Endpoints were mean GH concentration, deconvolved GH secretion, and GH ApEn (a regularity measure). Results By generalized ANOVA models, E2 vs placebo supplementation: (1) augmented mean (13-hr) GH concentrations (P=0.023), GHRH-induced pulsatile GH secretion over the first 3.0 hr (P=0.0085) and pulsatile GH secretion over the next 10 hr (P=0.054); (2) increased GHRP- (P=0.022) and SS- (P<0.001) modulated GH ApEn; and (3) did not amplify GHRH/GHRP synergy on pulsatile GH secretion. By linear regression, E2 concentrations correlated positively with GH secretion during GHRP-2 infusion (P=0.022), whereas BMI correlated negatively with GH secretion during GHRH (P=0.006) and combined GHRH/GHRP (P=0.015) stimulation. E2 and BMI jointly determined triple (combined L-arginine, GHRH, GHRP-2) stimulation of GH secretion after saline (R2=0.44, P=0.003) and pulsatile GHRH (R2=0.39, P=0.013) infusions. Conclusion In summary, in postmenopausal individuals, E2 supplementation augments the amount (mass) and alters the pattern (regularity) of GH secretion via interactions among GHRH, SS, GHRP, and BMI. These outcomes introduce a more complex model of E2 supplementation in coordinating GH secretion in aging women. PMID:24114435

  19. REACTION OF AMINO-ACIDS AND PEPTIDE BONDS WITH FORMALDEHYDE AS MEASURED BY CHANGES IN THE ULTRA-VIOLET SPECTRA,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AMINO ACIDS , CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*PEPTIDES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*FORMALDEHYDE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY, PROTEINS), ABSORPTION SPECTRA, CHEMICAL BONDS, AMIDES, CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM, REACTION KINETICS

  20. Functional C‐TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) plant hormone domains evolved de novo in the plant parasite Rotylenchulus reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Eves‐Van Den Akker, Sebastian; Lilley, Catherine J.; Yusup, Hazijah B.; Jones, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sedentary plant‐parasitic nematodes (PPNs) induce and maintain an intimate relationship with their host, stimulating cells adjacent to root vascular tissue to re‐differentiate into unique and metabolically active ‘feeding sites’. The interaction between PPNs and their host is mediated by nematode effectors. We describe the discovery of a large and diverse family of effector genes, encoding C‐TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) plant hormone mimics (RrCEPs), in the syncytia‐forming plant parasite Rotylenchulus reniformis. The particular attributes of RrCEPs distinguish them from all other CEPs, regardless of origin. Together with the distant phylogenetic relationship of R. reniformis to the only other CEP‐encoding nematode genus identified to date (Meloidogyne), this suggests that CEPs probably evolved de novo in R. reniformis. We have characterized the first member of this large gene family (RrCEP1), demonstrating its significant up‐regulation during the plant–nematode interaction and expression in the effector‐producing pharyngeal gland cell. All internal CEP domains of multi‐domain RrCEPs are followed by di‐basic residues, suggesting a mechanism for cleavage. A synthetic peptide corresponding to RrCEP1 domain 1 is biologically active and capable of up‐regulating plant nitrate transporter (AtNRT2.1) expression, whilst simultaneously reducing primary root elongation. When a non‐CEP‐containing, syncytia‐forming PPN species (Heterodera schachtii) infects Arabidopsis in a CEP‐rich environment, a smaller feeding site is produced. We hypothesize that CEPs of R. reniformis represent a two‐fold adaptation to sustained biotrophy in this species: (i) increasing host nitrate uptake, whilst (ii) limiting the size of the syncytial feeding site produced. PMID:26996971

  1. Changes in satiety hormone concentrations and feed intake in rats in response to lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Forssten, Sofia D; Korczyńska, Marta Z; Zwijsen, Renate M L; Noordman, Wouter H; Madetoja, Mari; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2013-12-01

    A negative energy balance can be accomplished by reducing the caloric intake which results in an increased feeling of hunger. This physiological state is regulated by secretion of satiety hormones. The secretion of these hormones can be influenced by ingestion of e.g. fat. Fat, dairy beverage and synbiotic mixture have been found to have satiety-inducing effects in humans and rats. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the change of satiety hormone concentration in rats in response to feeding of fermented milks containing lactic acid bacteria. Two studies were conducted with Wistar rats randomly allocated into groups receiving Lactobacillus fermented (2 L. acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. salivarius and L. rhamnosus) milk. A single isocaloric oral dose with the test item or control was given to the rats. Blood samples were taken after dosing with the test product and the satiety hormones were measured. For the test groups, significant changes could be detected in PYY concentrations after 60 min, although some groups had a significant lower feed intake. In conclusion, some probiotic Lactobacillus strains may modify satiety hormones production. However, more studies are needed to evaluate their potential of prolonging satiety.

  2. Retinoic acid induces expression of the thyroid hormone transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8).

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takahiko; Liu, Yan-Yun; Richter, Laura L; Mody, Kaizeen; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Brent, Gregory A

    2010-08-27

    Retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone are critical for differentiation and organogenesis in the embryo. Mct8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8), expressed predominantly in the brain and placenta, mediates thyroid hormone uptake from the circulation and is required for normal neural development. RA induces differentiation of F9 mouse teratocarcinoma cells toward neurons as well as extraembryonal endoderm. We hypothesized that Mct8 is functionally expressed in F9 cells and induced by RA. All-trans-RA (tRA) and other RA receptor (RAR) agonists dramatically (>300-fold) induced Mct8. tRA treatment significantly increased uptake of triiodothyronine and thyroxine (4.1- and 4.3-fold, respectively), which was abolished by a selective Mct8 inhibitor, bromosulfophthalein. Sequence inspection of the Mct8 promoter region and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR analysis in F9 cells identified 11 transcription start sites and a proximal Sp1 site but no TATA box. tRA significantly enhanced Mct8 promoter activity through a consensus RA-responsive element located 6.6 kilobases upstream of the coding region. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated binding of RAR and retinoid X receptor to the RA response element. The promotion of thyroid hormone uptake through the transcriptional up-regulation of Mct8 by RAR is likely to be important for extraembryonic endoderm development and neural differentiation. This finding demonstrates cross-talk between RA signaling and thyroid hormone signaling in early development at the level of the thyroid hormone transporter.

  3. Peptide modules for overcoming barriers of nucleic acids transport to cells.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Anna A; Kiselev, Anton V

    2016-01-01

    Absence of safe and efficient methods of nucleic acids delivery is one of the major issues which limits the development of human gene therapy. Highly efficient viral vectors raise questions due to safety reasons. Among non-viral vectors peptide-based carriers can be considered as good candidates for the development of "artificial viruses"--multifunctional polyplexes that mimic viruses. Suggested strategy to obtain multifunctionality is to combine several peptide modules into one modular carrier. Different kinds of peptide modules are needed for successful overcoming barriers of nucleic acids transport into the cells. Design of such modules and establishment of structure-function relationships are issues of importance to researchers working in the field of nucleic acids delivery.

  4. Effect of Fatty Acid Conjugation on Antimicrobial Peptide Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    killing mechanism of antimicrobial peptides makes them an interesting alternative to traditional antibiotics, as target bacteria may be less able...C14-AKK and C16-AKK to within a 7% error are 220 and 16mM respectively. Since amphipathicity is requisite for antimicrobial action KAK is not...Schnaare, 2000: Antimicrobial evaluation of N-alkyl betaines and N-alkyl-N,N-dimethylamine oxides with variations in chain length. Antimicrobial Agents

  5. Targeting pre-miRNA by Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Avitabile, Concetta; Saviano, Michele; D'Andrea, Luca; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Brognara, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    PNAs conjugated to carrier peptides have been employed for the targeting of miRNA precursor, with the aim to develop molecules able to interfere in the pre-miRNA processing. The capability of the molecules to bind pre-miRNA has been tested in vitro by fluorescence assayes on Thiazole Orange labeled molecules and in vivo, in K562 cells, evaluating the amount of miRNA produced after treatment of cells with two amounts of PNAs. PMID:22699795

  6. Hormonal and hydroxycinnamic acids profiles in banana leaves in response to various periods of water stress.

    PubMed

    Mahouachi, Jalel; López-Climent, María F; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. "Grand Nain") subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress.

  7. Hormonal and Hydroxycinnamic Acids Profiles in Banana Leaves in Response to Various Periods of Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    López-Climent, María F.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. “Grand Nain”) subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress. PMID:24977208

  8. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Culhane, Kelly J.; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs. PMID:26594176

  9. Effects of Acidic Peptide Size and Sequence on Trivalent Praseodymium Adduction and Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Commodore, Juliette J; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2017-02-07

    Using the lanthanide ion praseodymium, Pr(III), metallated ion formation and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) were studied for 25 biological and model acidic peptides. For chain lengths of seven or more residues, even highly acidic peptides that can be difficult to protonate by electrospray ionization will metallate and undergo abundant ETD fragmentation. Peptides composed of predominantly acidic residues form only the deprotonated ion, [M + Pr - H](2+) ; this ion yields near complete ETD sequence coverage for larger peptides. Peptides with a mixture of acidic and neutral residues, generate [M + Pr](3+) , which cleaves between every residue for many peptides. Acidic peptides that contain at least one residue with a basic side chain also produce the protonated ion, [M + Pr + H](4+) ; this ion undergoes the most extensive sequence coverage by ETD. Primarily metallated and non-metallated c- and z-ions form for all peptides investigated. Metal adducted product ions are only present when at least half of the peptide sequence can be incorporated into the ion; this suggests that the metal ion simultaneously attaches to more than one acidic site. The only site consistently lacking dissociation is at the N-terminal side of a proline residue. Increasing peptide chain length generates more backbone cleavage for metal-peptide complexes with the same charge state. For acidic peptides with the same length, increasing the precursor ion charge state from 2+ to 3+ also leads to more cleavage. The results of this study indicate that highly acidic peptides can be sequenced by ETD of complexes formed with Pr(III).

  10. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures.

  11. Predicting anticancer peptides with Chou's pseudo amino acid composition and investigating their mutagenicity via Ames test.

    PubMed

    Hajisharifi, Zohre; Piryaiee, Moien; Mohammad Beigi, Majid; Behbahani, Mandana; Mohabatkar, Hassan

    2014-01-21

    Cancer is an important reason of death worldwide. Traditional cytotoxic therapies, such as radiation and chemotherapy, are expensive and cause severe side effects. Currently, design of anticancer peptides is a more effective way for cancer treatment. So there is a need to develop a computational method for predicting the anticancer peptides. In the present study, two methods have been developed to predict these peptides using support vector machine (SVM) as a powerful machine learning algorithm. Classifiers have been applied based on the concept of Chou's pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and local alignment kernel. Since a number of HIV-1 proteins have cytotoxic effect, therefore we predicted the anticancer effect of HIV-1 p24 protein with these methods. After the prediction, mutagenicity of 2 anticancer peptides and 2 non-anticancer peptides was investigated by Ames test. Our results show that, the accuracy and the specificity of local alignment kernel based method are 89.7% and 92.68%, respectively. The accuracy and specificity of PseAAC-based method are 83.82% and 85.36%, respectively. By computational analysis, out of 22 peptides of p24 protein, 4 peptides are anticancer and 18 are non-anticancer. In the Ames test results, it is clear that anticancer peptides (ARP788.8 and ARP788.21) are not mutagenic. Therefore the results demonstrate that the described computation methods are useful to identify potential anticancer peptides, which are worthy of further experimental validation and 2 peptides (ARP788.8 and ARP788.21) of HIV-1 p24 protein can be used as new anticancer candidates without mutagenicity.

  12. Production of recombinant human growth hormone conjugated with a transcytotic peptide in Pichia pastoris for effective oral protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Yeong; Kang, Sang-Kee; Li, Hui-Shan; Choi, Chang-Yun; Park, Tae-Eun; Bok, Jin-Duck; Lee, Seung-Ho; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2015-05-01

    Among the possible delivery routes, the oral administration of a protein is simple and achieves high patient compliance without pain. However, the low bioavailability of a protein drug in the intestine due to the physical barriers of the intestinal epithelia is the most critical problem that needs to be solved. To overcome the low bioavailability of a protein drug in the intestine, we aimed to construct a recombinant Pichia pastoris expressing a human growth hormone (hGH) fusion protein conjugated with a transcytotic peptide (TP) that was screened through peroral phage display to target goblet cells in the intestinal epithelia. The TP-conjugated hGH was successfully produced in P. pastoris in a secreted form at concentrations of up to 0.79 g/l. The function of the TP-conjugated hGH was validated by in vitro and in vivo assays. The transcytotic function of the TP through the intestinal epithelia was verified only in the C terminus conjugated hGH, which demonstrated the induction of IGF-1 in a HepG2 cell culture assay, a higher translocation of recombinant hGH into the ileal villi after oral administration in rats and both IGF-1 induction and higher body weight gain in rats after oral administration. The present study introduces the possibility for the development of an effective oral protein delivery system in the pharmaceutical and animal industries through the introduction of an effective TP into hGH.

  13. Hormonal response to enteral feeding and the possible role of peptide YY in pathogenesis of enteral feeding-related diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Bowling, T E; Silk, D B

    1996-12-01

    Diarrhoea is a common complication of enteral feeding. Previous studies have demonstrated a secretion of water and electrolytes in the ascending colon during intragastric but not intraduodenal enteral feeding. The cause of this secretion is likely to be neurohumoral in origin. This study was designed to examine the hormonal responses to enteral feeding. In vivo segmental colonic perfusion studies were undertaken. Before and at hourly intervals during these studies serum was taken for estimations of neurotensin (NT), pancreatic glucagon (PG), peptide YY (PYY) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). During fasting there was a median ascending colonic absorption of water in all groups. During feeding there was a net secretion in the ascending colon in both gastric groups and in the high load duodenal group, but not in the low load duodenal group. During these studies the PYY levels remained unchanged from fasting in the low and high load gastric groups. In the low and high load duodenal groups the PYY levels increased. The NT levels increased only in the high load duodenal group. There were no other changes in NT or in PG or VIP levels either between fasting and feeding, or between the gastric and duodenal groups. PYY is known to stimulate intestinal absorption. The absence of a rise during intragastric feeding may be important in the underlying mechanisms of enteral feeding-induced colonic secretion and hence enteral feeding-related diarrhoea.

  14. Zfp521 Is a Target Gene and Key Effector of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide Signaling in Growth Plate Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Diego; Hesse, Eric; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Kiviranta, Riku; Saito, Hiroaki; Yamana, Kei; Neff, Lynn; Atfi, Azeddine; Coillard, Lucie; Sitara, Despina; Maeda, Yukiko; Warming, Soren; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Horne, William C.; Lanske, Beate; Baron, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the growth plate, the interplay between Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide (PTHrP) and Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) signaling tightly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during longitudinal bone growth. We found that PTHrP increases the expression of Zfp521, a zinc finger transcriptional co-regulator, in pre-hypertrophic chondrocytes. Mice with chondrocyte-targeted deletion of Zfp521 resembled PTHrP-/- and chondrocyte-specific PTHR1-/- mice, with decreased chondrocyte proliferation, early hypertrophic transition and reduced growth plate thickness. Deleting Zfp521 increased expression of Runx2 and Runx2 target genes, and decreased cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 expression while increasing caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Zfp521 associated with Runx2 in chondrocytes, antagonizing its activity via an HDAC4-dependent mechanism. PTHrP failed to up-regulate cyclin D1 and to antagonize Runx2, Ihh and Collagen X expression when Zfp521 was absent. Thus, Zfp521 is an important PTHrP target gene that regulates growth plate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. PMID:20951345

  15. Growth Hormone-Releasing Peptide 6 Enhances the Healing Process and Improves the Esthetic Outcome of the Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Marí, Yssel; Fernández Mayola, Maday; Aguilera Barreto, Ana; García Ojalvo, Ariana; Bermúdez Alvarez, Yilian; Mir Benítez, Ana Janet; Berlanga Acosta, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its cytoprotective effects, growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) proved to reduce liver fibrotic induration. CD36 as one of the GHRP-6 receptors appears abundantly represented in cutaneous wounds granulation tissue. The healing response in a scenario of CD36 agonistic stimulation had not been previously investigated. Excisional full-thickness wounds (6 mmØ) were created in the dorsum of Wistar rats and topically treated twice a day for 5 days. The universal model of rabbit's ears hypertrophic scars was implemented and the animals were treated daily for 30 days. Treatments for both species were based on a CMC jelly composition containing GHRP-6 400 μg/mL. Wounds response characterization included closure dynamic, RT-PCR transcriptional profile, histology, and histomorphometric procedures. The rats experiment indicated that GHRP-6 pharmacodynamics involves attenuation of immunoinflammatory mediators, their effector cells, and the reduction of the expression of fibrotic cytokines. Importantly, in the hypertrophic scars rabbit's model, GHRP-6 intervention dramatically reduced the onset of exuberant scars by activating PPARγ and reducing the expression of fibrogenic cytokines. GHRP-6 showed no effect on the reversion of consolidated lesions. This evidence supports the notion that CD36 is an active and pharmacologically approachable receptor to attenuate wound inflammation and accelerate its closure so as to improve wound esthetic. PMID:27200188

  16. A novel subtilisin-like serine protease of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is induced by thyroid hormone and degrades antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Thekkiniath, Jose C; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; San Francisco, Susan K; San Francisco, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (B. dendrobatidis), a chytrid fungus, is one of the major contributors to the global amphibian decline. The fungus infects both tadpoles and adult amphibians. Tadpoles are infected in their keratinized mouthparts, and infected adults exhibit hyperkeratosis and loss of righting reflex. Infections of adults may result in death from cardiac arrest in susceptible species. Thyroid hormone plays a key role in amphibian metamorphosis. The occurrence of B. dendrobatidis in tadpoles during metamorphosis may result in exposure of the fungus to host morphogens including TH. This exposure may induce gene expression in the fungus contributing to invasion and colonization of the host. Here, we demonstrate movement of fungal zoospores toward TH. Additionally, expression of a subtilisin-like serine protease is up-regulated in B. dendrobatidis cells exposed to TH. A gene encoding this protease was cloned from B. dendrobatidis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was partially purified and characterized. The similarity between subtilases of human dermatophytes and the B. dendrobatidis subtilisin-like serine protease suggests the importance of this enzyme in B. dendrobatidis pathogenicity. Cleavage of frog skin antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) by this B. dendrobatidis subtilisin-like serine protease suggests a role for this enzyme in fungal survival and colonization.

  17. Growth Hormone-Releasing Peptide 6 Enhances the Healing Process and Improves the Esthetic Outcome of the Wounds.

    PubMed

    Mendoza Marí, Yssel; Fernández Mayola, Maday; Aguilera Barreto, Ana; García Ojalvo, Ariana; Bermúdez Alvarez, Yilian; Mir Benítez, Ana Janet; Berlanga Acosta, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its cytoprotective effects, growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) proved to reduce liver fibrotic induration. CD36 as one of the GHRP-6 receptors appears abundantly represented in cutaneous wounds granulation tissue. The healing response in a scenario of CD36 agonistic stimulation had not been previously investigated. Excisional full-thickness wounds (6 mmØ) were created in the dorsum of Wistar rats and topically treated twice a day for 5 days. The universal model of rabbit's ears hypertrophic scars was implemented and the animals were treated daily for 30 days. Treatments for both species were based on a CMC jelly composition containing GHRP-6 400 μg/mL. Wounds response characterization included closure dynamic, RT-PCR transcriptional profile, histology, and histomorphometric procedures. The rats experiment indicated that GHRP-6 pharmacodynamics involves attenuation of immunoinflammatory mediators, their effector cells, and the reduction of the expression of fibrotic cytokines. Importantly, in the hypertrophic scars rabbit's model, GHRP-6 intervention dramatically reduced the onset of exuberant scars by activating PPARγ and reducing the expression of fibrogenic cytokines. GHRP-6 showed no effect on the reversion of consolidated lesions. This evidence supports the notion that CD36 is an active and pharmacologically approachable receptor to attenuate wound inflammation and accelerate its closure so as to improve wound esthetic.

  18. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J.; Petrie, Emma J.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the LDLa-LRR linker, essential for the high affinity of H2 relaxin for the ectodomain of RXFP1, and show that residues within the LDLa-LRR linker are critical for receptor activation. We propose H2 relaxin binds and stabilizes a helical conformation of the LDLa-LRR linker that positions residues of both the linker and the LDLa module to bind the transmembrane domain and activate RXFP1. PMID:27088579

  19. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  20. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA): A model structure for the primordial genetic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Peter Egil

    1993-12-01

    It is proposed that the primordial genetic material could have been peptide nucleic aicds,i.e., DNA analogues having a peptide backbone. PNA momomers based on the amino acid, α, γ-diaminobutyric acid or ornithine are suggested as compounds that could have been formed in the prebiotic soup. Finally, the possibility of a PNA/RNA world is presented, in which PNA constitutes the stable genetic material, while RNA which may be polymerized using the PNA as template accounts for enzymatic activities including PNA replication.

  1. [Antiaggregation activity of arachidonic acid conjugates with neurotropic peptides proglyprol and semax].

    PubMed

    Bezuglov, V V; Gretskaia, N M; Vasil'eva, T M; Petrukhina, G N; Andreeva, L A; Miasoedov, N F; Makarov, V A

    2014-01-01

    The influence two original derivatives of a therapeutically important peptide, bearing arachidonic acid residue with semax and proglyprol, upon platelet aggregation have been studied in vitro. It is established that both derivatives, in contrast to the parent peptide, possess moderate anti-aggregant properties and produce a dose-dependent decrease in the interplatelet interaction induced by ADP, epinephrine, and arachidonic acid within the concentration range of 0.018 - 1.8 mM. This activity was more pronounced for arachidonoylsemax in comparison with arachidonoylproglyprol.

  2. Peptide interfacial biomaterials improve endothelial cell adhesion and spreading on synthetic polyglycolic acid materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Zauscher, Stefan; Klitzman, Bruce; Truskey, George A; Reichert, William M; Kenan, Daniel J; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2010-06-01

    Resorbable scaffolds such as polyglycolic acid (PGA) are employed in a number of clinical and tissue engineering applications owing to their desirable property of allowing remodeling to form native tissue over time. However, native PGA does not promote endothelial cell adhesion. Here we describe a novel treatment with hetero-bifunctional peptide linkers, termed "interfacial biomaterials" (IFBMs), which are used to alter the surface of PGA to provide appropriate biological cues. IFBMs couple an affinity peptide for the material with a biologically active peptide that promotes desired cellular responses. One such PGA affinity peptide was coupled to the integrin binding domain, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), to build a chemically synthesized bimodular 27 amino acid peptide that mediated interactions between PGA and integrin receptors on endothelial cells. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCMD) was used to determine the association constant (K (A) 1 x 10(7) M(-1)) and surface thickness (~3.5 nm). Cell binding studies indicated that IFBM efficiently mediated adhesion, spreading, and cytoskeletal organization of endothelial cells on PGA in an integrin-dependent manner. We show that the IFBM peptide promotes a 200% increase in endothelial cell binding to PGA as well as 70-120% increase in cell spreading from 30 to 60 minutes after plating.

  3. Elevation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with Gsalpha protein mutation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoyuki; Kim, Kyongsong; Sanno, Naoko; Yoshida, Daizo; Teramoto, Akira; Shibasaki, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates not only the synthesis and secretion of GH but also the proliferation of normal somatotrophs. The expression of GHRH receptor (GHRHR) is regulated by GHRH, both of which are known to be expressed in human GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells. Somatic mutations in the subunit of Gsalpha protein (gsp), lead to the constitutive activation of adenylyl cyclase in pituitary adenomas that secrete GH. It has not been examined how gsp mutations influence GHRHR expression in GH-secreting adenomas. We therefore analyzed the expression levels of GHRHR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in GH-secreting pituitary adenomas focusing on a gsp mutation. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of GHRH on the expression of GHRHR mRNA in primary cultures of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells. GHRHR mRNA expression levels were significantly elevated in gsp mutation-positive GH-secreting adenomas compared with those in gsp mutation-negative ones. In primary-cultured GH-secreting adenoma cells, the increase of GH secretion in response to GHRH was shown in both gsp mutation-positive and -negative adenoma cells with a significantly higher response in the latter adenoma cells. GHRH increased GHRHR mRNA expression level in gsp mutation-negative adenoma cells while it was not influenced by GHRH in gsp mutation-positive adenoma cells. These results suggest that gsp mutations up-regulate GHRHR mRNA expression in GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells, and that gsp mutations desensitize the adenoma cells to GHRH in terms of their GHRHR mRNA expression probably because of their saturation of GHRH signaling.

  4. Pharmacokinetic study of Growth Hormone-Releasing Peptide 6 (GHRP-6) in nine male healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cabrales, Ania; Gil, Jeovanis; Fernández, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Carmen; Hernández, Francisco; García, Idrián; Hernández, Ariadna; Besada, Vladimir; Reyes, Osvaldo; Padrón, Gabriel; Berlanga, Jorge; Guillén, Gerardo; González, Luis Javier

    2013-01-23

    GHRP-6 is a growth hormone secretagogue that also enhances tissue viability in different organs. In the present work, we studied the pharmacokinetics of this short therapeutic hexapeptide (His-(D-Trp)-Ala-Trp-(D-Phe)-Lys-NH(2,) MW=872.44 Da) in nine male healthy volunteers after a single intravenous bolus administration of 100, 200 and 400 μg/kg of body weight. GHRP-6 was quantified in human plasma by a specific LC-MS method, previously developed and validated following FDA guidelines, using (13)C(3)Ala-GHRP-6 as internal standard (Gil et al., 2012, J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 60, 19-25). The Lower Limit of Quantification (5 ng/mL) was reached in all subjects at 12h post-administration, which was sufficient for modeling a pharmacokinetic profile including over 85% of the Area under the Curve (AUC). Disposition of GHRP-6 best fitted a bi-exponential function with R(2) higher than 0.99, according to a mathematic modeling and confirmed by an Akaike index (AIC) lower than that of the corresponding one-compartment model for all subjects. Averaging all three dose levels, the distribution and elimination half-life of GHRP-6 were 7.6 ± 1.9 min and 2.5 ± 1.1h, respectively. These values are coherent with existing data for other drugs whose disposition also fits this model. Dose dependence analysis revealed a noticeable trend for AUC to increase proportionally with administered dose. Atypical GHRP-6 concentration spikes were observed during the elimination phase in four out of the nine subjects studied.

  5. Rat androgen-binding protein: evidence for identical subunits and amino acid sequence homology with human sex hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D R; Hall, S H; French, F S

    1987-01-01

    The cDNA for rat androgen-binding protein (ABP) was previously isolated from a bacteriophage lambda gt11 rat testis cDNA library and its identity was confirmed by epitope selection. Hybrid-arrested translation studies have now demonstrated the identity of the isolates. The nucleotide sequence of a near full-length cDNA encodes a 403-amino acid precursor (Mr = 44,539), which agrees in size with the cell-free translation product (Mr = 45,000) of ABP mRNA. Putative sites of N-glycosylation and signal peptide cleavage were identified. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of rat ABP with the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of human sex hormone-binding globulin revealed that 17 of 25 residues are identical. On the basis of the predicted amino acid sequence the molecular weight of the primary translation product, lacking the signal peptide, was 41,183. Hybridization analyses indicated that the two subunits of ABP are coded for by a single gene and a single mRNA species. Our results suggest that ABP consists of two subunits with identical primary sequences and that differences in post-translational processing result in the production of 47,000 and 41,000 molecular weight monomers.

  6. Synthesis of lipoic acid-peptide conjugates and their effect on collagen and melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chichong; Kim, Bo Mi; Lee, Duckhee; Lee, Min Hee; Kim, Jin Hwa; Pyo, Hyeong-Bae; Chai, Kyu Yun

    2013-11-01

    We report new examples of lipoic acid (LA)-peptide conjugates, their potential as codrugs having anti-melanogenic and anti-aging properties was evaluated. These multifunctional molecules were prepared by linking lipophilic moiety (LA) to the pentapeptide KTTKS. The inhibitory effect of LA-peptide conjugates on melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity is stronger than that of LA or the pentapeptide alone. Importantly, the conjugates display no cytotoxicity at a high concentration. LA-KTTKS and LA-PEG-KTTKS also inhibit UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression up to 49.5% and 69.5% at 0.5 mM, respectively. LA-peptide conjugates stimulate collagen biosynthesis in fibroblasts more efficiently than their parent molecules do. These data suggest that LA-peptide conjugates may have cosmeceutical application as anti-melanogenic and anti-aging agents.

  7. Surface Functionalization of Piezoelectric Aluminum Nitride with Selected Amino Acid and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edmund Ho Man

    In the present contribution, we elaborate on the covalent attachment of the amino acid cysteine and selected cysteine-bearing peptides, in aqueous buffered media, onto AlN surfaces modified with adlayers of one of our homemade bifunctional alkyltrichlorosilane cross-linking molecules bearing the benzenethiosulfonate head group. Surface characterizations confirmed the successful covalent immobilization of cysteine in buffered media, whereas the attachment of the peptides proved to be difficult as the undesired partial destruction of the adlayer on AlN by hydrolysis in aqueous/buffered solvent systems, which was confirmed in a separate study, appeared to have interfered with the covalent attachment and resulted in one of the peptides failing to immobilize. Future directions from this will focus on optimizing the solvent conditions for the cysteine/peptide immobilizations and the implementation of the surface chemistry to the covalent functionalization of AlN with biologically significant protein fragments, among them the antigen-binding fragment of antibodies.

  8. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-09-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C-H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C-H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four ‘chiral pool’ amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C-H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C-H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  9. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis.

    PubMed

    Osberger, Thomas J; Rogness, Donald C; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Stepan, Antonia F; White, M Christina

    2016-09-08

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C-H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C-H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four 'chiral pool' amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C-H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C-H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  10. Salicylic Acid, a Plant Defense Hormone, Is Specifically Secreted by a Molluscan Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Kästner, Julia; von Knorre, Dietrich; Himanshu, Himanshu; Erb, Matthias; Baldwin, Ian T.; Meldau, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Slugs and snails are important herbivores in many ecosystems. They differ from other herbivores by their characteristic mucus trail. As the mucus is secreted at the interface between the plants and the herbivores, its chemical composition may play an essential role in plant responses to slug and snail attack. Based on our current knowledge about host-manipulation strategies employed by pathogens and insects, we hypothesized that mollusks may excrete phytohormone-like substances into their mucus. We therefore screened locomotion mucus from thirteen molluscan herbivores for the presence of the plant defense hormones jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). We found that the locomotion mucus of one slug, Deroceras reticulatum, contained significant amounts of SA, a plant hormone that is known to induce resistance to pathogens and to suppress plant immunity against herbivores. None of the other slugs and snails contained SA or any other hormone in their locomotion mucus. When the mucus of D. reticulatum was applied to wounded leaves of A. thaliana, the promotor of the SA-responsive gene pathogenesis related 1 (PR1) was activated, demonstrating the potential of the mucus to regulate plant defenses. We discuss the potential ecological, agricultural and medical implications of this finding. PMID:24466122

  11. Characterization of bioactive RGD peptide immobilized onto poly(acrylic acid) thin films by plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyun Suk; Ko, Yeong Mu; Shim, Jae Won; Lim, Yun Kyong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Cho, Dong-Lyun; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2010-11-01

    Plasma surface modification can be used to improve the surface properties of commercial pure Ti by creating functional groups to produce bioactive materials with different surface topography. In this study, a titanium surface was modified with acrylic acid (AA) using a plasma treatment and immobilized with bioactive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, which may accelerate the tissue integration of bone implants. Both terminals containing the -NH2 of RGD peptide sequence and -COOH of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) thin film were combined with a covalent bond in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). The chemical structure and morphology of AA film and RGD immobilized surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All chemical analysis showed full coverage of the Ti substrate with the PAA thin film containing COOH groups and the RGD peptide. The MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on each specimen, and the cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were examined. The surface-immobilized RGD peptide has a significantly increased the ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results suggest that the RGD peptide immobilization on the titanium surface has an effect on osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and potential use in osteo-conductive bone implants.

  12. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  13. Functional Assessment of Residues in the Amino- and Carboxyl-Termini of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) in the Mud Crab Scylla olivacea Using Point-Mutated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Huang, Shiau-Shan; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To assess functional importance of the residues in the amino- and carboxyl-termini of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the mud crab Scylla olivacea (Sco-CHH), both wild-type and point-mutated CHH peptides were produced with an amidated C-terminal end. Spectral analyses of circular dichroism, chromatographic retention time, and mass spectrometric analysis of the recombinant peptides indicate that they were close in conformation to native CHH and were produced with the intended substitutions. The recombinant peptides were subsequently used for an in vivo hyperglycemic assay. Two mutants (R13A and I69A rSco-CHH) completely lacked hyperglycemic activity, with temporal profiles similar to that of vehicle control. Temporal profiles of hyperglycemic responses elicited by 4 mutants (I2A, F3A, D12A, and D60A Sco-CHH) were different from that elicited by wild-type Sco-CHH; I2A was unique in that it exhibited significantly higher hyperglycemic activity, whereas the remaining 3 mutants showed lower activity. Four mutants (D4A, Q51A, E54A, and V72A rSco-CHH) elicited hyperglycemic responses with temporal profiles similar to those evoked by wild-type Sco-CHH. In contrast, the glycine-extended version of V72A rSco-CHH (V72A rSco-CHH-Gly) completely lost hyperglycemic activity. By comparing our study with previous ones of ion-transport peptide (ITP) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) using deleted or point-mutated mutants, detail discussion is made regarding functionally important residues that are shared by both CHH and ITP (members of Group I of the CHH family), and those that discriminate CHH from ITP, and Group-I from Group-II peptides. Conclusions summarized in the present study provide insights into understanding of how functional diversification occurred within a peptide family of multifunctional members. PMID:26261986

  14. Beta-aminobutyric acid priming of plant defense: the role of ABA and other hormones.

    PubMed

    Baccelli, Ivan; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2016-08-01

    Plants are exposed to recurring biotic and abiotic stresses that can, in extreme situations, lead to substantial yield losses. With the changing environment, the stress pressure is likely to increase and sustainable measures to alleviate the effect on our crops are sought. Priming plants for better stress resistance is one of the sustainable possibilities to reach this goal. Here, we report on the effects of beta-aminobutyric acid, a priming agent with an exceptionally wide range of action and describe its way of preparing plants to defend themselves against various attacks, among others through the modulation of their hormonal defense signaling, and highlight the special role of abscisic acid in this process.

  15. Synthesis of peptides from amino acids and ATP with lysine-rich proteinoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the synthesis of peptides from aminoacids and ATP with a lysine-rich protenoid. The latter in aqueous solution catalyzes the formation of peptides from free amino acids and ATP; this catalytic activity is not found in acidic protenoids, even though the latter contain a basic aminoacid. The pH optimum for the synthesis is about 11, but it is appreciable below 8 and above 13. Temperature data indicate an optimum at 20 C or above, with little increase in rate up to 60 C. Pyrophosphate can be used instead of ATP, but the yields are lower. The ATP-aided syntheses of peptides in aqueous solution occur with several types of proteinous aminoacids.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides incorporating non-natural amino acids as agents for plant protection.

    PubMed

    Ng-Choi, Iteng; Soler, Marta; Güell, Imma; Badosa, Esther; Cabrefiga, Jordi; Bardaji, Eduard; Montesinos, Emilio; Planas, Marta; Feliu, Lidia

    2014-04-01

    The control of plant pathogens is mainly based on copper compounds and antibiotics. However, the use of these compounds has some limitations. They have a high environmental impact and the use of antibiotics is not allowed in several countries. Moreover, resistance has been developed to these pathogens. The identification of new agents able to fight plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi will represent an alternative to currently used antibiotics or pesticides. Antimicrobial peptides are widely recognized as promising candidates, however naturally occurring sequences present drawbacks that limit their development. These include susceptibility to protease degradation and low bioavailability. To overcome these problems, research has focused on the introduction of unnatural amino acids into lead peptide sequences. In particular, we have improved the biological profile of antimicrobial peptides active against plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi by incorporating triazolyl, biaryl and D-amino acids into their sequence. These modifications and their influence on the biological activity are summarized.

  17. Computational analysis and structure predictions of CHH-related peptides from Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, G Purna Chandra; Kumari, N Siva; Prasad, G L V; Naik, B Reddya; Borst, D W

    2011-03-01

    The crustaceans produce several related peptides that belong to the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family. While these peptides have similar amino acid sequences, they have diverse biological functions that must arise, in part, from differences in the 3D shape of these peptides. However, it is generally accepted that peptides with a high degree of sequence similarity also have a similar 3-D structure. We used the solution structure of one peptide in the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone family, the molt-inhibiting hormone of the kuruma prawn (Marsupenaeus japonicus), to predict the shape of the five known peptides related to CHH in the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The high similarity of the 3-D structures of these peptides suggests a common fold for the entire family. Nevertheless, minor differences in the shape of these peptides were observed, which may be the basis for their different biological properties.

  18. Release of free amino acids upon oxidation of peptides and proteins by hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Tong, Haijie; Lakey, Pascale S J; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Weller, Michael G; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of proteins and peptides can lead to the cleavage of the peptide, leading to a release of fragments. Here, we used high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and pre-column online ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) derivatization-based amino acid analysis by HPLC with diode array detection and fluorescence detection to identify and quantify free amino acids released upon oxidation of proteins and peptides by hydroxyl radicals. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) as model proteins, and synthetic tripeptides (comprised of varying compositions of the amino acids Gly, Ala, Ser, and Met) were used for reactions with hydroxyl radicals, which were generated by the Fenton reaction of iron ions and hydrogen peroxide. The molar yields of free glycine, aspartic acid, asparagine, and alanine per peptide or protein varied between 4 and 55%. For protein oxidation reactions, the molar yields of Gly (∼32-55% for BSA, ∼10-21% for OVA) were substantially higher than those for the other identified amino acids (∼5-12% for BSA, ∼4-6% for OVA). Upon oxidation of tripeptides with Gly in C-terminal, mid-chain, or N-terminal positions, Gly was preferentially released when it was located at the C-terminal site. Overall, we observe evidence for a site-selective formation of free amino acids in the OH radical-induced oxidation of peptides and proteins, which may be due to a reaction pathway involving nitrogen-centered radicals.

  19. Mass spectral characterization of peptide transmitters/hormones in the nervous system and neuroendocrine organs of the American lobster Homarus americanus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mingming; Chen, Ruibing; Sousa, Gregory L.; Bors, Eleanor K.; Kwiatkowski, Molly; Goiney, Christopher C.; Goy, Michael F.; Christie, Andrew E.; Li, Lingjun

    2008-01-01

    The American lobster Homarus americanus is a decapod crustacean with both high economic and scientific importance. To facilitate physiological investigations of peptide transmitter/hormone function in this species, we have used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) to elucidate the peptidome present in its nervous system and neuroendocrine organs. In total, 84 peptides were identified, including 27 previously known H. americanus peptides (e.g. VYRKPPFNGSIFamide [Val1-SIFamide]), 23 peptides characterized previously from other decapods, but new to the American lobster (e.g. pQTFQYSRGWTNamide [Arg7-corazonin]), and 34 new peptides de novo sequenced/detected for the first time in this study. Of particular note are a novel B-type allatostatin (TNWNKFQGSWamide) and several novel FMRFamide-related peptides, including an unsulfated analog of sulfakinin (GGGEYDDYGHLRFamide), two myosuppressins (QDLDHVFLRFamide and pQDLDHVFLRFamide), and a collection of short neuropeptide F isoforms (e.g. DTSTPALRLRFamide, and FEPSLRLRFamide). Our data also include the first detection of multiple tachykinin-related peptides in a non-brachyuran decapod, as well as the identification of potential individual-specific variants of orcokinin and orcomyotropin-related peptide. Taken collectively, our results not only expand greatly the number of known H. americanus neuropeptides, but also provide a framework for future studies on the physiological roles played by these molecules in this commercially and scientifically important species. PMID:18304551

  20. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-12-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues.

  1. 2-Chlorotrityl chloride resin. Studies on anchoring of Fmoc-amino acids and peptide cleavage.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Chatzi, O; Gatos, D; Stavropoulos, G

    1991-06-01

    The esterification of 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin with Fmoc-amino acids in the presence of DIEA is studied under various conditions. High esterification yields are obtained using 0.6 equiv. Fmoc-amino acid/mmol resin in DCM or DCE, in 25 min, at room temperature. The reaction proceeds without by product formation even in the case of Fmoc-Asn and Fmoc-Gln. The quantitative and easy cleavage of amino acids and peptides from 2-chlorotrityl resin, by using AcOH/TFE/DCM mixtures, is accomplished within 15-60 min at room temperature, while t-butyl type protecting groups remain unaffected. Under these exceptionally mild conditions 2-chlorotrityl cations generated during the cleavage of amino acids and peptides from resin do not attack the nucleophilic side chains of Trp, Met, and Tyr.

  2. Cloning of precursors for two MIH/VIH-related peptides in the prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Yang, W J; Rao, K R

    2001-11-30

    Two cDNA clones (634 and 1366 bp) encoding MIH/VIH (molt-inhibiting hormone/vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone)-related peptides were isolated and sequenced from a Macrobrachium rosenbergii eyestalk ganglia cDNA library. The clones contain a 360 and 339 bp open-reading frame, and their conceptually translated peptides consist of a 41 and 34 amino acid signal peptide, respectively, and a 78 amino acid residue mature peptide hormone. The amino acid sequences of the peptides exhibit higher identities with other known MIHs and VIH (44-69%) than with CHHs (28-33%). This is the first report describing the cloning and sequencing of two MIH/VIH-related peptides in a single crustacean species. Transcription of these mRNAs was detected in the eyestalk ganglia, but not in the thoracic ganglia, hepatopancreas, gut, gill, heart, or muscle.

  3. A requirement for fatty acid oxidation in the hormone-induced meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Valsangkar, Deepa; Downs, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    We have previously shown that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is required for AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKA)-induced maturation in vitro. In the present study, we have further investigated the role of this metabolic pathway in hormone-induced meiotic maturation. Incorporating an assay with (3)H-palmitic acid as the substrate, we first examined the effect of PRKA activators on FAO levels. There was a significant stimulation of FAO in cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and RSVA405. In denuded oocytes (DO), AICAR stimulated FAO only in the presence of carnitine, the molecule that facilitates fatty acyl CoA entry into the mitochondria. The carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 activator C75 successfully stimulated FAO in CEO. All three of these activators trigger germinal vesicle breakdown. Meiotic resumption induced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or amphiregulin was completely inhibited by the FAO inhibitors etomoxir, mercaptoacetate, and malonyl CoA. Importantly, FAO was increased in CEO stimulated by FSH and epidermal growth factor, and this increase was blocked by FAO inhibitors. Moreover, compound C, a PRKA inhibitor, prevented the FSH-induced increase in FAO. Both carnitine and palmitic acid augmented hormonal induction of maturation. In a more physiological setting, etomoxir eliminated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced maturation in follicle-enclosed oocytes. In addition, CEO and DO from hCG-treated mice displayed an etomoxir-sensitive increase in FAO, indicating that this pathway was stimulated during in vivo meiotic resumption. Taken together, our data indicate that hormone-induced maturation in mice requires a PRKA-dependent increase in FAO.

  4. Effects of domoic acid on serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; Arias, B; Durán, R; Alfonso, M

    1995-08-01

    The actions of Domoic Acid (Dom), a marine toxin, on the levels of serum TSH and thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) has been studied to determine if these actions could be mediated by the serotoninergic system. In all the experiments, adult male Wistar rats were used. The Dom dissolved in saline was administered via i.p. in doses of 0.5 and 1 mg/kg. The T4 and T3 concentrations were determined by enzimoinmunoassay and TSH concentration was determined by radioinmunoassay. The results show that Dom 1 mg/kg increases the serum T4 levels one hour after treatment and decreases these levels 2 and 3 hr after treatment. Dom 0.5 mg/kg decreased the serum T4 levels 2 and 3 hr after treatment. The concentrations of T3 in serum were unchanged by both doses of Dom. The concentration of TSH was increased by Dom. In order to study the possible mediation of the serotoninergic system in the effect of Dom on the hormone levels, PCPA, a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, was administered i.p. 90 min before blood sampling. In this case, with both doses of Dom a decrease in the levels of both hormones occurred with respect to the PCPA group. These results indicate that the serotoninergic system could affect the actions of Dom on TSH and thyroid hormone secretion.

  5. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  6. Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria Synthesize Antioxidant Peptides during Sourdough Fermentation of Cereal Flours

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Rossana; Pinto, Daniela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    A pool of selected lactic acid bacteria was used for the sourdough fermentation of various cereal flours with the aim of synthesizing antioxidant peptides. The radical-scavenging activity of water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from sourdoughs was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that of chemically acidified doughs. The highest activity was found for whole wheat, spelt, rye, and kamut sourdoughs. Almost the same results were found for the inhibition of linoleic acid autoxidation. WSE were subjected to reverse-phase fast protein liquid chromatography. Thirty-seven fractions were collected and assayed in vitro. The most active fractions were resistant to further hydrolysis by digestive enzymes. Twenty-five peptides of 8 to 57 amino acid residues were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Almost all of the sequences shared compositional features which are typical of antioxidant peptides. All of the purified fractions showed ex vivo antioxidant activity on mouse fibroblasts artificially subjected to oxidative stress. This study demonstrates the capacity of sourdough lactic acid bacteria to release peptides with antioxidant activity through the proteolysis of native cereal proteins. PMID:22156436

  7. Aminoaciduria, but normal thyroid hormone levels and signalling, in mice lacking the amino acid and thyroid hormone transporter Slc7a8.

    PubMed

    Braun, Doreen; Wirth, Eva K; Wohlgemuth, Franziska; Reix, Nathalie; Klein, Marc O; Grüters, Annette; Köhrle, Josef; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2011-10-15

    LAT2 (system L amino acid transporter 2) is composed of the subunits Slc7a8/Lat2 and Slc3a2/4F2hc. This transporter is highly expressed along the basolateral membranes of absorptive epithelia in kidney and small intestine, but is also abundant in the brain. Lat2 is an energy-independent exchanger of neutral amino acids, and was shown to transport thyroid hormones. We report in the present paper that targeted inactivation of Slc7a8 leads to increased urinary loss of small neutral amino acids. Development and growth of Slc7a8(-/-) mice appears normal, suggesting functional compensation of neutral amino acid transport by alternative transporters in kidney, intestine and placenta. Movement co-ordination is slightly impaired in mutant mice, although cerebellar development and structure remained inconspicuous. Circulating thyroid hormones, thyrotropin and thyroid hormone-responsive genes remained unchanged in Slc7a8(-/-) mice, possibly because of functional compensation by the thyroid hormone transporter Mct8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8), which is co-expressed in many cell types. The reason for the mild neurological phenotype remains unresolved.

  8. Recognition of core and flanking amino acids of MHC class II-bound peptides by the T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Robinson, Eve; Janeway, Charles A; Denzin, Lisa K

    2002-09-01

    CD4 T cells recognize peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Most MHC class II molecules have four binding pockets occupied by amino acids 1, 4, 6, and 9 of the minimal peptide epitope, while the residues at positions 2, 3, 5, 7, and 8 are available to interact with the T cell receptor (TCR). In addition MHC class II bound peptides have flanking residues situated outside of this peptide core. Here we demonstrate that the flanking residues of the conalbumin peptide bound to I-A(k) have no effect on recognition by the D10 TCR. To study the role of peptide flanks for recognition by a second TCR, we determined the MHC and TCR contacting amino acids of the I-A(b) bound Ealpha peptide. The Ealpha peptide is shown to bind I-A(b) using four alanines as anchor residues. TCR recognition of Ealpha peptides with altered flanking residues again suggested that, in general, no specific interactions occurred with the peptide flanks. However, using an HLA-DM-mediated technique to measure peptide binding to MHC class II molecules, we found that the peptide flanking residues contribute substantially to MHC binding.

  9. Isolation, cloning, and expression mapping of a gene encoding an antidiuretic hormone and other CAPA-related peptides in the disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Jean-Paul; Russell, William K; Nachman, Ronald J; Orchard, Ian

    2008-09-01

    After a blood meal, Rhodnius prolixus undergoes a rapid diuresis to eliminate excess water and salts. During the voiding of this primary urine, R. prolixus acts as a vector of Chagas' disease, with the causative agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, infecting the human host via the urine. Diuresis in R. prolixus is under the neurohormonal control of serotonin and peptidergic diuretic hormones, and thus, diuretic hormones play an important role in the transmission of Chagas' disease. Although diuretic hormones may be degraded or excreted, resulting in the termination of diuresis, it would also seem appropriate, given the high rates of secretion, that a potent antidiuretic factor could be present and act to prevent excessive loss of water and salts after the postgorging diuresis. Despite the medical importance of R. prolixus, no genes for any neuropeptides have been cloned, including obviously, those that control diuresis. Here, using molecular biology in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the sequence of the CAPA gene and CAPA-related peptides in R. prolixus, which includes a peptide with anti-diuretic activity. We have characterized the expression of mRNA encoding these peptides in various developmental stage and also examined the tissue-specific distribution in fifth-instars. The expression is localized to numerous bilaterally paired cell bodies within the central nervous system. In addition, our results show that RhoprCAPA gene expression is also associated with the testes, suggesting a novel role for this family of peptides in reproduction.

  10. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 is coupled to hormonally regulated release of arachidonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, L L; Lin, A Y; Knopf, J L

    1992-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) binds to natural membrane vesicles in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, resulting in the selective release of arachidonic acid, thus implicating cPLA2 in the hormonally regulated production of eicosanoids. Here we report that the treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells overexpressing cPLA2 with ATP or thrombin resulted in an increased release of arachidonic acid as compared with parental CHO cells, demonstrating the hormonal coupling of cPLA2. In contrast, CHO cells overexpressing a secreted form of mammalian PLA2 (sPLA2-II) failed to show any increased hormonal responsiveness. Interestingly, we have noted that the activation of cPLA2 with a wide variety of agents stimulates the phosphorylation of cPLA2 on serine residues. Pretreatment of cells with staurosporin blocked the ATP-mediated phosphorylation of cPLA2 and strongly inhibited the activation of the enzyme. Increased cPLA2 activity was also observed in lysates prepared from ATP-treated cells and was sensitive to phosphatase treatment. These results suggest that in addition to Ca2+, the phosphorylation of cPLA2 plays an important role in the agonist-induced activation of cPLA2. Images PMID:1631101

  11. Laser ion beam photodissociation studies of model amino acids and peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Techlenburg, R.E. Jr.; Miller, M.N.; Russell, D.H. )

    1989-02-15

    Visible (458-514.5 nm) and uv (333-385 nm) photodissociation of the (M + H){sup +} ions of dinitrophenyl (DNP) derivatized amino acids and peptides is reported. Photoexcitation of the DNP peptides by a visible proton results in fragmentation of the peptide chain with little fragmentation within the chromophore. Conversely, uv photoexcitation of the DNP peptides results in fragmentation of the chromophore as well as the peptide chain, but loss of NO or NO{sub 2} (within the chromophore) often dominates the photofragment ion spectrum. These results are rationalized with particular emphasis on energy-selective dissociation channels of large ionic systems. DNP-leucine and DNP-isoleucine (M + H){sup +} can be differentiated on the basis of photodissociation reactions which yield distonic radical cations. The rate of dissociation of photoexcited ions of DNP peptides is shown to decrease with increasing molecular weight (degrees of freedom). Lastly, comparisons between photodissociation and collision-induced dissociation as a structural probe are presented. 55 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Single amino acid fingerprinting of the human antibody repertoire with high density peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Weber, Laura K; Palermo, Andrea; Kügler, Jonas; Armant, Olivier; Isse, Awale; Rentschler, Simone; Jaenisch, Thomas; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Dübel, Stefan; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Breitling, Frank; Loeffler, Felix F

    2017-04-01

    The antibody species that patrol in a patient's blood are an invaluable part of the immune system. While most of them shield us from life-threatening infections, some of them do harm in autoimmune diseases. If we knew exactly all the antigens that elicited all the antibody species within a group of patients, we could learn which ones correlate with immune protection, are irrelevant, or do harm. Here, we demonstrate an approach to this question: First, we use a plethora of phage-displayed peptides to identify many different serum antibody binding peptides. Next, we synthesize identified peptides in the array format and rescreen the serum used for phage panning to validate antibody binding peptides. Finally, we systematically vary the sequence of validated antibody binding peptides to identify those amino acids within the peptides that are crucial for binding "their" antibody species. The resulting immune fingerprints can then be used to trace them back to potential antigens. We investigated the serum of an individual in this pipeline, which led to the identification of 73 antibody fingerprints. Some fingerprints could be traced back to their most likely antigen, for example the immunodominant capsid protein VP1 of enteroviruses, most likely elicited by the ubiquitous poliovirus vaccination. Thus, with our approach, it is possible, to pinpoint those antibody species that correlate with a certain antigen, without any pre-information. This can help to unravel hitherto enigmatic diseases.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-negative Pathogens, Produced and Delivered by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Volzing, Katherine; Borrero, Juan; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2014-01-01

    We present results of tests with recombinant Lactococcus lactis that produce and secrete heterologous antimicrobial peptides with activity against Gram-negative pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella. In an initial screening, the activities of numerous candidate antimicrobial peptides, made by solid state synthesis, were assessed against several indicator pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella strains. Peptides A3APO and Alyteserin were selected as top performers based on high antimicrobial activity against the pathogens tested and on significantly lower antimicrobial activity against L. lactis. Expression cassettes containing the signal peptide of the protein Usp45 fused to the codon optimized sequence of mature A3APO and Alyteserin were cloned under the control of a nisin-inducible promoter nisA and transformed into L. lactis IL1403. The resulting recombinant strains were induced to express and secrete both peptides. A3APO- and Alyteserin-containing supernatants from these recombinant L. lactis inhibited the growth of pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella by up to 20-fold, while maintaining the host’s viability. This system may serve as a model for the production and delivery of antimicrobial peptides by lactic acid bacteria to target Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria populations. PMID:23808914

  14. HIV-1 enhancing effect of prostatic acid phosphatase peptides is reduced in human seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Martellini, Julie A; Cole, Amy L; Svoboda, Pavel; Stuchlik, Olga; Chen, Li-Mei; Chai, Karl X; Gangrade, Bhushan K; Sørensen, Ole E; Pohl, Jan; Cole, Alexander M

    2011-01-20

    We recently reported that HIV-1 infection can be inhibited by innate antimicrobial components of human seminal plasma (SP). Conversely, naturally occurring peptidic fragments from the SP-derived prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) have been reported to form amyloid fibrils called "SEVI" and enhance HIV-1 infection in vitro. In order to understand the biological consequence of this proviral effect, we extended these studies in the presence of human SP. PAP-derived peptides were agitated to form SEVI and incubated in the presence or absence of SP. While PAP-derived peptides and SEVI alone were proviral, the presence of 1% SP ablated their proviral activity in several different anti-HIV-1 assays. The anti-HIV-1 activity of SP was concentration dependent and was reduced following filtration. Supraphysiological concentrations of PAP peptides and SEVI incubated with diluted SP were degraded within hours, with SP exhibiting proteolytic activity at dilutions as high as 1:200. Sub-physiological concentrations of two prominent proteases of SP, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and matriptase, could degrade physiological and supraphysiological concentrations of PAP peptides and SEVI. While human SP is a complex biological fluid, containing both antiviral and proviral factors, our results suggest that PAP peptides and SEVI may be subject to naturally occurring proteolytic components capable of reducing their proviral activity.

  15. Use of growth-hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) for the prevention of multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Cibrián, Danay; Ajamieh, Hussam; Berlanga, Jorge; León, Olga S; Alba, Jose S; Kim, Micheal J-T; Marchbank, Tania; Boyle, Joseph J; Freyre, Freya; Garcia Del Barco, Diana; Lopez-Saura, Pedro; Guillen, Gerardo; Ghosh, Subrata; Goodlad, Robert A; Playford, Raymond J

    2006-05-01

    Novel therapies for the treatment of MOF (multiple organ failure) are required. In the present study, we examined the effect of synthetic GHRP-6 (growth hormone-releasing peptide-6) on cell migration and proliferation using rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) and human colonic cancer (HT29) cells as in vitro models of injury. In addition, we examined its efficacy when given alone and in combination with the potent protective factor EGF (epidermal growth factor) in an in vivo model of MOF (using two hepatic vessel ischaemia/reperfusion protocols; 45 min of ischaemia and 45 min of reperfusion or 90 min of ischaemia and 120 min of reperfusion). In vitro studies showed that GHRP-6 directly influenced gut epithelial function as its addition caused a 3-fold increase in the rate of cell migration of IEC-6 and HT29 cells (P<0.01), but did not increase proliferation ([3H]thymidine incorporation). In vivo studies showed that, compared with baseline values, ischaemia/reperfusion caused marked hepatic and intestinal damage (histological scoring), neutrophilic infiltration (myeloperoxidase assay; 5-fold increase) and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde assay; 4-fold increase). Pre-treatment with GHRP-6 (120 microg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneally) alone truncated these effects by 50-85% (all P<0.05) and an additional benefit was seen when GHRP-6 was used in combination with EGF (1 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneally). Lung and renal injuries were also reduced by these pre-treatments. In conclusion, administration of GHRP-6, given alone or in combination with EGF to enhance its effects, may provide a novel simple approach for the prevention and treatment of MOF and other injuries of the gastrointestinal tract. In view of these findings, further studies appear justified.

  16. Aromatic amino acids providing characteristic motifs in the Raman and SERS spectroscopy of peptides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Zhang, Dongmao; Halas, Naomi J; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2008-07-31

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies (SERS) are potentially important tools in the characterization of biomolecules such as proteins and DNA. In this work, SERS spectra of three cysteine-containing aromatic peptides: tryptophan-cysteine, tyrosine-cysteine, and phenylalanine-cysteine, bound to Au nanoshell substrates, were obtained, and compared to their respective normal Raman spectra. While the linewidths of the SERS peaks are significantly broadened (up to 70%), no significant spectral shifts (<6 cm (-1)) of the major Stokes modes were observed between the two modalities. We show that the Raman and SERS spectra of penetratin, a cell-penetrating peptide oligomer, can be comprised quite reliably from the spectra of its constituent aromatic amino acids except in the backbone regions where the spectral intensities are critically dependent on the length and conformations of the probed molecules. From this study we conclude that, together with protein backbone groups, aromatic amino acid residues provide the overwhelmingly dominant features in the Raman and SERS spectra of peptides and proteins when present. It follows that the Raman modes of these three small constructed peptides may likely apply to the assignment of Raman and SERS features in the spectra of other peptides and proteins.

  17. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) display diverse and complex topologies and possess an impressive range of biological activities1,2 Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails the oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds pre-3 and post-assembly2. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis.4 However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized outside of nature.5 In this manuscript, we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C—H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-center chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins, and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C—H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four 'chiral pool' amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids (UAAs) representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C—H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different UAAs. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C—H oxidation to one containing a linear UAA. PMID:27479323

  18. Interaction of cationic peptides with lipoteichoic acid and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Scott, M G; Gold, M R; Hancock, R E

    1999-12-01

    Compounds with antiendotoxin properties have been extensively studied for their potential as therapeutic agents for sepsis attributable to gram-negative bacteria. However, with the increasing incidence of gram-positive sepsis, there is interest in identifying compounds with a broad spectrum of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A series of synthetic alpha-helical cationic peptides related to bee melittin and silk moth cecropin have previously been shown to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with high affinity, inhibit LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in vitro and in vivo, and kill gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we analyzed whether these peptides were active against gram-positive bacteria; whether they could bind to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), the major proinflammatory structure on gram-positive bacteria; and whether they could block the ability of LTA to promote the release of cytokines by the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. We found that the cationic peptides demonstrated moderate growth-inhibitory activity toward gram-positive bacteria. In addition, the peptides bound LTA with high affinity. This correlated with the ability of the peptides to block LTA-induced production of TNF and interleukin-6 by RAW 264.7 cells but did not correlate with their ability to kill the bacteria. The peptides also effectively inhibited LTA-induced TNF production in a whole human blood assay. The peptides were also able to partly block the ability of heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus, as well as soluble products of live S. aureus, to stimulate cytokine production by macrophages. Our results indicate that these cationic peptides may be useful to prevent sepsis and inflammation caused by both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  19. Stable Isotope Peptide Mass Spectrometry To Decipher Amino Acid Metabolism in Dehalococcoides Strain CBDB1

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Urrea, Ernest; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Dehalococcoides species are key players in the anaerobic transformation of halogenated solvents at contaminated sites. Here, we analyze isotopologue distributions in amino acid pools from peptides of Dehalococcoides strain CBDB1 after incubation with 13C-labeled acetate or bicarbonate as a carbon source. The resulting data were interpreted with regard to genome annotations to identify amino acid biosynthesis pathways. In addition to using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for analyzing derivatized amino acids after protein hydrolysis, we introduce a second, much milder method, in which we directly analyze peptide masses after tryptic digest and peptide fragments by nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS). With this method, we identify isotope incorporation patterns for 17 proteinaceous amino acids, including proline, cysteine, lysine, and arginine, which escaped previous analyses in Dehalococcoides. Our results confirmed lysine biosynthesis via the α-aminoadipate pathway, precluding lysine formation from aspartate. Similarly, the isotopologue pattern obtained for arginine provided biochemical evidence of its synthesis from glutamate. Direct peptide MS/MS analysis of the labeling patterns of glutamine and asparagine, which were converted to glutamate and aspartate during protein hydrolysis, gave biochemical evidence of their precursors and confirmed glutamate biosynthesis via a Re-specific citrate synthase. By addition of unlabeled free amino acids to labeled cells, we show that in strain CBDB1 none of the 17 tested amino acids was incorporated into cell mass, indicating that they are all synthesized de novo. Our approach is widely applicable and provides a means to analyze amino acid metabolism by studying specific proteins even in mixed consortia. PMID:22661690

  20. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-07

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  1. The Unexpected Advantages of Using D-Amino Acids for Peptide Self-Assembly into Nanostructured Hydrogels for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Melchionna, Michele; Styan, Katie E.; Marchesan, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled peptide hydrogels have brought innovation to the medicinal field, not only as responsive biomaterials but also as nanostructured therapeutic agents or as smart drug delivery systems. D-amino acids are typically introduced to increase the peptide enzymatic stability. However, there are several reports of unexpected effects on peptide conformation, self-assembly behavior, cytotoxicity and even therapeutic activity. This mini-review discusses all the surprising twists of heterochiral self-assembled peptide hydrogels, and delineates emerging key findings to exploit all the benefits of D-amino acids in this novel medicinal area. PMID:26876522

  2. Question 1: Peptide nucleic acids and the origin and homochirality of life.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2007-10-01

    The possibilities of pseudo peptide DNA mimics like PNA (peptide nucleic acid) having a role for the prebiotic origin of life prior to an RNA world is discussed. In particular a scenario is proposed in which protocells with an achiral genetic material through several generations stepwise is converted into a chiral genetic material, e.g., by incorporation of RNA units. Provided that a sufficiently large sequence space is occupied, a selection process based on catalytic function in which a single cell (first common ancestor) has a definite evolutionary advantage, selection of this cell would by contingency also lock it into homochirality.

  3. Applications of hydrophilic interaction chromatography to amino acids, peptides, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Periat, Aurélie; Krull, Ira S; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-02-01

    This review summarizes the recent advances in the analysis of amino acids, peptides, and proteins using hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Various reports demonstrate the successful analysis of amino acids under such conditions. However, a baseline resolution of the 20 natural amino acids has not yet been published and for this reason, there is often a need to use mass spectrometry for detection to further improve selectivity. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography is also recognized as a powerful technique for peptide analysis, and there are a lot of papers showing its applicability for proteomic applications (peptide mapping). It is expected that its use for peptide mapping will continue to grow in the future, particularly because this analytical strategy can be combined with reversed-phase liquid chromatography, in a two-dimensional setup, to reach very high resolving power. Finally, the interest in hydrophilic interaction chromatography for intact proteins analysis is less evident due to possible solubility issues and a lack of suitable hydrophilic interaction chromatography stationary phases. To date, it has been successfully employed only for the characterization of membrane proteins, histones, and the separation of glycosylated isoforms of an intact glycoprotein. From our point of view, the number of hydrophilic interaction chromatography columns compatible with intact proteins (higher upper temperature limit, large pore size, etc.) is still too limited.

  4. Unique roles of glucagon and glucagon-like peptides: Parallels in understanding the functions of adipokinetic hormones in stress responses in insects.

    PubMed

    Bednářová, Andrea; Kodrík, Dalibor; Krishnan, Natraj

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon is conventionally regarded as a hormone, counter regulatory in function to insulin and plays a critical anti-hypoglycemic role by maintaining glucose homeostasis in both animals and humans. Glucagon performs this function by increasing hepatic glucose output to the blood by stimulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in response to starvation. Additionally it plays a homeostatic role by decreasing glycogenesis and glycolysis in tandem to try and maintain optimal glucose levels. To perform this action, it also increases energy expenditure which is contrary to what one would expect and has actions which are unique and not entirely in agreement with its role in protection from hypoglycemia. Interestingly, glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and GLP-2) from the major fragment of proglucagon (in non-mammalian vertebrates, as well as in mammals) may also modulate response to stress in addition to their other physiological actions. These unique modes of action occur in response to psychological, metabolic and other stress situations and mirror the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) in insects which perform a similar function. The findings on the anti-stress roles of glucagon and glucagon-like peptides in mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates may throw light on the multiple stress responsive mechanisms which operate in a concerted manner under regulation by AKH in insects thus functioning as a stress responsive hormone while also maintaining organismal homeostasis.

  5. Stabilization Effect of Amino Acid Side Chains in Peptide Assemblies on Graphite Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Hou, Jingfei; Zhang, Xuemei; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2017-02-03

    An analysis is presented of the effects of amino acid side chains on peptide assemblies in ambient conditions on a graphite surface. The molecularly resolved assemblies of binary peptides are examined with scanning tunneling microscopy. A comparative analysis of the assembly structures reveals that the lamellae width has an appreciable dependence on the peptide sequence, which could be considered as a manifestation of a stabilizing effect of side-chain moieties of amino acids with high (phenylalanine) and low (alanine, asparagine, histidine and aspartic acid) propensities for aggregation. These amino acids are representative for the chemical structures involving the side chains of charged (histidine and aspartic acid), aromatic (phenylalanine), hydrophobic (alanine), and hydrophilic (asparagine) amino acids. These results might provide useful insight for understanding the effects of sequence on the assembly of surface-bound peptides.

  6. Enhancement of acid tolerance in Zymomonas mobilis by a proton-buffering peptide.

    PubMed

    Baumler, David J; Hung, Kai F; Bose, Jeffrey L; Vykhodets, Boris M; Cheng, Chorng M; Jeong, Kwang-Cheol; Kaspar, Charles W

    2006-07-01

    A portion of the cbpA gene from Escherichia coli K-12 encoding a 24 amino acid proton-buffering peptide (Pbp) was cloned via the shuttle vector pJB99 into E. coli JM105 and subsequently into Zymomonas mobilis CP4. Expression of Pbp was confirmed in both JM105 and CP4 by HPLC. Z. mobilis CP4 carrying pJB99-2 (Pbp) exhibited increased acid tolerance (p < 0.05) in acidified TSB (HCl [pH 3.0] or acetic acid [pH 3.5]), glycine-HCl buffer (pH 3.0), and sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer (pH 3.5) in comparison to the parent strain (CP4) and CP4 with pJB99 (control plasmid). Although the expression of Pbp influenced survival at a low pH, the minimum growth pH was unaffected. Growth of Z. mobilis in the presence of ampicillin also significantly increased acid tolerance by an unknown mechanism. Results from this study demonstrate that the production of a peptide with a high proportion of basic amino acids can contribute to protection from low pH and weak organic acids such as acetic acid.

  7. Mass spectral study of hybrid peptides derived from (R)-aminoxy ester and [beta]-amino acids: The influence of aminoxy peptide bond (CO-NH-O) on peptide fragmentation under electrospray ionization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, V.; Ramesh, M.; Srinivas, R.; Sharma, G. V. M.; Manohar, V.

    2009-04-01

    A new class of Boc-protected aminoxy hybrid peptides containing repeats of [beta]-hAla-(R)-Ama-, and [beta]-Caa-(R)-Ama- ([beta]-hAla = [beta]3-(S)-hAlanine, (R)-Ama = (R)-aminoxy ester, and [beta]-Caa = (R)-C-linked carbo-[beta]3-amino acid) have been studied by electrospray ionization (ESI) ion-trap and quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) of their protonated, cationized, and negative ions. MS3 CID of protonated aminoxy peptides of [beta]-hAla-(R)-Ama- yield intense [beta]-amino acid characteristic retro-Mannich fragmentation. The bn+ and [bn-methyl imine]+ (n = 3, 5) ions formed by cleavage of aminoxy peptide bond (CO-NH-O) are more intense than bn+ (n = 2, 4) formed by that of peptide bond (CO-NH-C) cleavage. Another characteristic ion observed is due to loss of H3NO from yn+ ions. The cationized (Li+, and Na+) peptides dissociate differently compared to protonated peptides. Intense cationized cn and zn ions are formed due to the cleavage of N-O bond. The deprotonated peptides also show abundant cn- and zn- ions (n = 1, 3, 5) and do not form any yn- ions. All these results clearly indicate the influence of aminoxy peptide bond on fragmentation of these hybrid peptides.

  8. Responses in gut hormones and hunger to diets with either high protein or a mixture of protein plus free amino acids supplied under weight-loss conditions.

    PubMed

    Lobley, Gerald E; Holtrop, Grietje; Horgan, Graham W; Bremner, David M; Fyfe, Claire; Johnstone, Alexandra M

    2015-04-28

    High-protein diets are an effective means for weight loss (WL), but the mechanisms are unclear. One hypothesis relates to the release of gut hormones by either protein or amino acids (AA). The present study involved overweight and obese male volunteers (n 18, mean BMI 36·8 kg/m2) who consumed a maintenance diet for 7 d followed by fully randomised 10 d treatments with three iso-energetic WL diets, i.e. with either normal protein (NP, 15% of energy) or high protein (HP, 30%) or with a combination of protein and free AA, each 15% of energy (NPAA). Psychometric ratings of appetite were recorded hourly. On day 10, plasma samples were taken at 30 min intervals over two consecutive 5 h periods (covering post-breakfast and post-lunch) and analysed for AA, glucose and hormones (insulin, total glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, active ghrelin and total peptide YY (PYY)) plus leucine kinetics (first 5 h only). Composite hunger was 16% lower for the HP diet than for the NP diet (P<0·01) in the 5 h period after both meals. Plasma essential AA concentrations were greatest within 60 min of each meal for the NPAA diet, but remained elevated for 3-5 h after the HP diet. The three WL diets showed no difference for either fasting concentrations or the postprandial net incremental AUC (net AUCi) for insulin, ghrelin or PYY. No strong correlations were observed between composite hunger scores and net AUCi for either AA or gut peptides. Regulation of hunger may involve subtle interactions, and a range of signals may need to be integrated to produce the overall response.

  9. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Gene Expression in Primary Cerebrocortical Cells: Role of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Subtypes and Interactions with Retinoic Acid and Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on brain development and function are largely mediated by the binding of 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) to its nuclear receptors (TR) to regulate positively or negatively gene expression. We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction the effect of T3 on primary cultured cells from the embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, on the expression of Hr, Klf9, Shh, Dio3, Aldh1a1, and Aldh1a3. In particular we focused on T3 receptor specificity, and on the crosstalk between T3, retinoic acid and dexamethasone. To check for receptor subtype specificity we used cerebrocortical cells derived from wild type mice and from mice deficient in thyroid hormone receptor subtypes. Receptor subtype specificity was found for Dio3 and Aldh1a1, which were induced by T3 only in cells expressing the T3 receptor alpha 1 subtype. Interactions of T3 with retinoic acid signaling through the control of retinoic acid metabolism are likely to be important during development. T3 had opposing influences on retinoic acid synthesizing enzymes, increasing the expression of Aldh1a1, and decreasing Aldh1a3, while increasing the retinoic acid degrading enzyme Cyp26b1. Dexamethasone increased Klf9 and Aldh1a1 expression. The effects of T3 and dexamethasone on Aldh1a1 were highly synergistic, with mRNA increments of up to 20 fold. The results provide new data on thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression and underscore the importance of thyroid hormone interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids during neural development. PMID:24618783

  10. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    PubMed

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  11. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of an orally available enteric-microencapsulated parathyroid hormone (1-34)-deoxycholic acid nanocomplex

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seung Rim; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    The N-terminal 34-amino-acid peptide fragment of human parathyroid hormone PTH (1-34), is used clinically to treat osteoporosis; however, it is currently administered by a once-daily subcutaneous injection, resulting in poor patient compliance. We have developed enteric microcapsules containing an ionic nanocomplex between PTH (1-34) and lysine-linked deoxycholic acid (LysDOCA) for the oral delivery of PTH (1-34). We measured the particle size of the PTH/LysDOCA complex and assessed its biological activity by determining the cAMP content in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also assessed its permeability across a Caco-2 cell monolayer and the bioavailability of the intrajejunally administered PTH/LysDOCA complex compared with PTH (1-34) in rats. In addition, the antiosteoporotic activity of the PTH/LysDOCA complex, encapsulated in an enteric carrier by coaxial ultrasonic atomization, was evaluated after it was orally administered to ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The formation of an ionic complex between PTH (1-34) and LysDOCA produced nanoparticles of diameter 33.0±3.36 nm, and the bioactivity of the complex was comparable with that of PTH (1-34). The Caco-2 cell permeability and AUClast value of the PTH/LysDOCA (1:10) nanocomplex increased by 2.87- and 16.3-fold, respectively, compared with PTH (1-34) alone. Furthermore, the OVX rats treated with oral PTH/LysDOCA-loaded enteric microcapsules showed an increase in bone mineral density (159%), bone volume fraction (175%), and trabecular number (174%) compared with those in the OVX control group. Therefore, the PTH/LysDOCA nanocomplex oral delivery system is a promising treatment modality for osteoporosis because it improves osteogenesis and trabecular connectivity. PMID:27621618

  12. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of an orally available enteric-microencapsulated parathyroid hormone (1-34)-deoxycholic acid nanocomplex.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung Rim; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    The N-terminal 34-amino-acid peptide fragment of human parathyroid hormone PTH (1-34), is used clinically to treat osteoporosis; however, it is currently administered by a once-daily subcutaneous injection, resulting in poor patient compliance. We have developed enteric microcapsules containing an ionic nanocomplex between PTH (1-34) and lysine-linked deoxycholic acid (LysDOCA) for the oral delivery of PTH (1-34). We measured the particle size of the PTH/LysDOCA complex and assessed its biological activity by determining the cAMP content in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also assessed its permeability across a Caco-2 cell monolayer and the bioavailability of the intrajejunally administered PTH/LysDOCA complex compared with PTH (1-34) in rats. In addition, the antiosteoporotic activity of the PTH/LysDOCA complex, encapsulated in an enteric carrier by coaxial ultrasonic atomization, was evaluated after it was orally administered to ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The formation of an ionic complex between PTH (1-34) and LysDOCA produced nanoparticles of diameter 33.0±3.36 nm, and the bioactivity of the complex was comparable with that of PTH (1-34). The Caco-2 cell permeability and AUClast value of the PTH/LysDOCA (1:10) nanocomplex increased by 2.87- and 16.3-fold, respectively, compared with PTH (1-34) alone. Furthermore, the OVX rats treated with oral PTH/LysDOCA-loaded enteric microcapsules showed an increase in bone mineral density (159%), bone volume fraction (175%), and trabecular number (174%) compared with those in the OVX control group. Therefore, the PTH/LysDOCA nanocomplex oral delivery system is a promising treatment modality for osteoporosis because it improves osteogenesis and trabecular connectivity.

  13. Properties of synthetic ferrihydrite as an amino acid adsorbent and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Matrajt, G; Blanot, D

    2004-03-01

    Ferrihydrite, an iron oxide hydroxide, is found in all kinds of environments, from hydrothermal hot springs to extraterrestrial materials. It has been shown that this material is nanoporous, and because of its high surface area, it has outstanding adsorption properties and in some cases catalysis properties. In this work we studied the adsorption properties of ferrihydrite with respect to amino acids. Samples of pure ferrihydrite were synthesised and exposed to solutions of amino acids including both proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous species. These experiments revealed important characteristics of this mineral as both an adsorbent of amino acids and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

  14. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, C.T.; Hua, R.L.; Souers, P.C.; Coronado, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21 K and 9 K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenyl-alanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritium are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Coronado, P.R.; Peng, C.T.; Hua, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21/degree/K and 9/degree/K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenylalanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritiums are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins.

  16. Cortisol, growth hormone, free fatty acids, and experimentally evoked affective arousal.

    PubMed

    Brown, W A; Heninger, G

    1975-11-01

    Eight male volunteers who viewed selected control, suspense, and erotic films experienced significant changes in affect that were limited to fatigue, anxiety, and sexual arousal, respectively. All subjects showed free fatty acid elevations with the suspense and erotic films and those subjects with the most anxiety and sexual arousal showed cortisol elevation with the suspense and erotic films, respectively. Growth hormone elevations occurred independently of cortisol elevations and were not clearly related to film or affect. Thus, activation of the pituitary-adrenocortical and sympathetic nervous systems appears to occur not in relation to a specific dysphoric state but rather with nonspecific affective arousal.

  17. Biological Activity of Aminophosphonic Acids and Their Short Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejczak, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel

    The biological activity and natural occurrence of the aminophosphonic acids were described half a century ago. Since then the chemistry and biology of this class of compounds have developed into the separate field of phosphorus chemistry. Today it is well acknowledged that these compounds possess a wide variety of promising, and in some cases commercially useful, physiological activities. Thus, they have found applications ranging from agrochemical (with the herbicides glyphosate and bialaphos being the most prominent examples) to medicinal (with the potent antihypertensive fosinopril and antiosteoporetic bisphosphonates being examples).

  18. Role of Amino Acid Insertions on Intermolecular Forces between Arginine Peptide Condensed DNA Helices

    PubMed Central

    DeRouchey, Jason E.; Rau, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads. PMID:21994948

  19. Lactic Acid Bacteria as Cell Factories for the Generation of Bioactive Peptides.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lucia; Pingitore, Esteban Vera; Mozzi, Fernanda; Saavedra, Lucila; Villegas, Josefina M; Hebert, Elvira M

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the incorporation of functional foods in the daily diet to achieve health promotion and disease risk reduction. Numerous studies have focused on the production of biologically active peptides as nutraceuticals and functional food ingredients due to their health benefits. These short peptides, displaying antihypertensive, antioxidant, mineral binding, immunomodulatory and antimicrobial activities are hidden in a latent state within the primary sequences of food proteins requiring enzymatic proteolysis for their release. While microbial fermentation is one of the major and economically most convenient processes used to generate bioactive peptides, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures for the production of diverse fermented foods. This article reviews the current knowledge on LAB as cell factories for the production of bioactive peptides from a variety of food protein sources. These microorganisms depend on a complex proteolytic system to ensure successful fermentation processes. In the dairy industry, LAB containing cell envelope-associated proteinases (CEPs) are employed as biocatalysts for the first step of casein breakdown releasing bioactive peptides during milk fermentation. A better understanding of the functionality and regulation of the proteolytic system of LAB opens up future opportunities for the production of novel food-derived compounds with potential health-promoting properties.

  20. Transporters for ammonium, amino acids and peptides are expressed in pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, W; Frommer, W B; Ward, J M

    1999-03-01

    Insect capture and digestion contribute substantially to the nitrogen budget of carnivorous plants. In Nepenthes, insect-derived nitrogenous compounds are imported from the pitcher fluid and transported throughout the plant via the vascular tissue to support growth. Import and distribution of nutrients may require transmembrane nitrogen transporters. Representatives of three classes of genes encoding transporters for the nitrogenous compounds ammonium, amino acids and peptides were identified in Nepenthes pitchers. The expression at the cellular level of an ammonium transporter gene, three amino acid transporter genes, and one peptide transporter gene were investigated in the insect trapping organs of Nepenthes. Expression of the ammonium transporter gene NaAMT1 was detected in the head cells of digestive glands in the lower part of the pitcher where NaAMT1 may function in ammonium uptake from the pitcher fluid. One amino acid transporter gene, NaAAP1, was expressed in bundle sheath cells surrounding the vascular tissue. To understand the locations where transmembrane transport could be required within the pitcher, symplasmic and apoplasmic continuity was probed using fluorescent dyes. Symplasmic connections were not found between cortical cells and vascular bundles. Therefore, the amino acid transporter encoded by NaAAP1 may be involved in transport of amino acids into the vascular tissue. In contrast, expression of the peptide transporter gene NaNTR1 was detected in phloem cells of the vascular tissue within pitchers. NaNTR1 may function in the export of nitrogen from the pitcher by loading peptides into the phloem.

  1. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  2. Characterisation of neuroprotective efficacy of modified poly-arginine-9 (R9) peptides using a neuronal glutamic acid excitotoxicity model.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Knuckey, Neville W; Meloni, Bruno P

    2017-02-01

    In a recent study, we highlighted the importance of cationic charge and arginine residues for the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides. In this study, using cortical neuronal cultures and an in vitro glutamic acid excitotoxicity model, we examined the neuroprotective efficacy of different modifications to the poly-arginine-9 peptide (R9). We compared an unmodified R9 peptide with R9 peptides containing the following modifications: (i) C-terminal amidation (R9-NH2); (ii) N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9); (iii) C-terminal amidation with N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9-NH2); and (iv) C-terminal amidation with D-amino acids (R9D-NH2). The three C-terminal amidated peptides (R9-NH2, Ac-R9-NH2, and R9D-NH2) displayed neuroprotective effects greater than the unmodified R9 peptide, while the N-terminal acetylated peptide (Ac-R9) had reduced efficacy. Using the R9-NH2 peptide, neuroprotection could be induced with a 10 min peptide pre-treatment, 1-6 h before glutamic acid insult, or when added to neuronal cultures up to 45 min post-insult. In addition, all peptides were capable of reducing glutamic acid-mediated neuronal intracellular calcium influx, in a manner that reflected their neuroprotective efficacy. This study further highlights the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine peptides and provides insight into peptide modifications that affect efficacy.

  3. Coupling of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis to peptide hormone receptors expressed from adrenal and pituitary mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, R.P.; Catt, K.J.

    1987-12-01

    The expression of several neurotransmitter and drug receptors from injected exogenous mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes has been demonstrated by electrophysiological measurements of ion channel activation. The expression of specific receptors for peptide hormones in such a translation system would facilitate studies on the structure and regulation of cell-surface receptors as well as their coupling to membrane transduction mechanisms. The expression of receptors for calcium-mobilizing hormones in Xenopus oocytes was sought by analysis of phospholipid turnover in hormone-stimulated oocytes. For this purpose, Xenopus oocytes were injected with mRNA extracted from bovine adrenal and pituitary glands and incubated with myo-(/sup 3/H)inositol to label plasma-membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. The expression of functionally active receptors for angiotensin II (AII) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was demonstrated by the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate production by AII and TRH in the mRNA-injected, (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled oocytes. The ability of AII and TRH to act by way of newly synthesized receptors from mammalian endocrine tissues to stimulate phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate hydrolysis in Xenopus oocytes suggests a generalized and conserved mechanism of receptor coupling to the transduction mechanism responsible for activation of phospholipase C in the plasma membrane.

  4. The p27 Pathway Modulates the Regulation of Skeletal Growth and Osteoblastic Bone Formation by Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Zhan; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Rong; Karaplis, Andrew; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-11-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) 1-84 knock-in mice (Pthrp KI) develop skeletal growth retardation and defective osteoblastic bone formation. To further examine the mechanisms underlying this phenotype, microarray analyses of differential gene expression profiles were performed in long bone extracts from Pthrp KI mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. We found that the expression levels of p27, p16, and p53 were significantly upregulated in Pthrp KI mice relative to WT littermates. To determine whether p27 was involved in the regulation by PTHrP of skeletal growth and development in vivo, we generated compound mutant mice, which were homozygous for both p27 deletion and the Pthrp KI mutation (p27(-/-) Pthrp KI). We then compared p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice with p27(-/-), Pthrp KI, and WT littermates. Deletion of p27 in Pthrp KI mice resulted in a longer lifespan, increased body weight, and improvement in skeletal growth. At 2 weeks of age, skeletal parameters, including length of long bones, size of epiphyses, numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive chondrocytes, bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-, type I collagen-, and osteocalcin-positive bone areas were increased in p27(-/-) mice and reduced in both Pthrp KI and p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with WT mice; however, these parameters were increased in p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with Pthrp KI mice. As well, protein expression levels of PTHR, IGF-1, and Bmi-1, and the numbers of total colony-forming unit fibroblastic (CFU-f) and ALP-positive CFU-f were similarly increased in p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with Pthrp KI mice. Our results demonstrate that deletion of p27 in Pthrp KI mice can partially rescue defects in skeletal growth and osteoblastic bone formation by enhancing endochondral bone formation and osteogenesis. These studies, therefore, indicate that the p27 pathway may function downstream in the action

  5. LPXRFamide peptide stimulates growth hormone and prolactin gene expression during the spawning period in the grass puffer, a semi-lunar synchronized spawner.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2016-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) plays as a multifunctional neurohormone that controls reproduction in birds and mammals. LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) peptide, the fish ortholog of GnIH, has been shown to regulate the secretion of not only gonadotropin (GTH) but also growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), which are potentially important for gonadal function. To investigate the role of LPXRFa peptide on reproduction of the grass puffer, which spawns in semilunar cycles, we examined changes in the levels of gh and prl expression over the several months during the reproductive cycle, and the effects of goldfish LPXRFa peptide-1 (gfLPXRFa-1) on their expression were examined using primary pituitary cultures. The expression levels of both gh and prl showed significant changes during the reproductive cycle in both sexes with one peak in the spawning and pre-spawning periods for gh and prl, respectively. Particularly, gh showed substantial increase in expression in the spawning and post-spawning periods, indicative of its essentiality in the advanced stage of reproduction. gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated the expression of both gh and prl but there was a marked difference in response between them: gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated gh expression at a relatively low dose but little effect was observed on prl. Combined with the previous results of daily and circadian oscillations of lpxrfa expression, the present results suggest that LPXRFa peptide is important in the control of the cyclic reproduction by serving as a multifunctional hypophysiotropic factor that regulates the expression of gh and prl as well as GTH subunit genes.

  6. Effect of fatty acid administration on plasma thyroid hormones in the domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Chua Teco, G N; Chopra, I J

    1988-06-01

    In birds a severe stress is associated with a reduction in concentrations of plasma thyroxine. Studies in man and the rat have demonstrated that severe illness is associated with an increase in serum concentrations of free fatty acids, notably oleic acid, and that they are associated with a reduction in concentrations of serum thyroxine (T4) and/or triiodothyronine (T3). Since stress is associated with increased fatty acids in birds, we have, in the present study, examined the role of oleic acid and another polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, on thyroid function tests (plasma thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and T3 resin uptake (RT3U) index) and on the thyroidal response to exogenous thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in the domestic fowl. In the first study we observed that the iv administration of arachidonic (10 mg/kg) or oleic acid (15 mg/kg) to groups of 10-week-old cockerels (six per group) was associated with a significant reduction in concentrations of plasma T4, whereas there was little change in saline-injected controls. However, administration of fatty acids to chickens was not associated with a significant change in RT3U index or in the levels of plasma T3. In the second study, groups of animals (n = 6) were injected with bovine TSH (0.5 IU/kg, im) or saline 2.5 hr after the fatty acid injection and blood samples were obtained at -2.5 to 24 hr after the TSH injection. A similar progressive increase in serum T4 was observed for the three groups studied whereas there was little change in the concentrations of plasma T3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Systematic amino acid substitutions improved efficiency of GD2-peptide mimotope vaccination against neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bleeke, Matthias; Fest, Stefan; Huebener, Nicole; Landgraf, Christiane; Schraven, Burkhart; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Volkmer, Rudolf; Lode, Holger N

    2009-11-01

    The likelihood of identifying peptides of sufficient quality for the development of effective cancer vaccines by screening of phage display libraries is low. Here, we introduce the sequential application of systematic amino acid substitution by SPOT synthesis. After the substitution of two amino acids within the sequence of a phage display-derived mimotope of disialoganglioside GD2 (mimotope MA), the novel mimotope C3 showed improved GD2 mimicry in vitro. Peptide vaccination with the C3 mimotope induced an 18-fold increased anti-GD2 serum response associated with reduction of primary tumour growth and spontaneous metastasis in contrast to MA mimotope controls in a syngeneic neuroblastoma model. In summary, SPOT provides an ideal optimisation tool for the development of phage display-derived cancer vaccines.

  8. [Use of peptide bioregulators in intoxication with the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, S N; Zhamsaranova, S D

    2004-01-01

    The paper shows it promising to use peptide bioregulators--fractions obtained from the cattle immune system (thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes) during immunotherapy for intoxication experimentally caused by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Oral administration of the fractions in a dose of 0.1 mg/kg body weight eliminated the suppressive effect of the herbicide on murine cellular and humoral immune reactions, which manifested by the recovery of the studied parameters to those in control animals.

  9. Selection and characterization of single stranded DNA aptamers for the hormone abscisic Acid.

    PubMed

    Grozio, Alessia; Gonzalez, Victor M; Millo, Enrico; Sturla, Laura; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Bagnasco, Luca; Guida, Lucrezia; D'Arrigo, Cristina; De Flora, Antonio; Salis, Annalisa; Martin, Elena M; Bellotti, Marta; Zocchi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    The hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a small molecule involved in pivotal physiological functions in higher plants. Recently, ABA has been also identified as an endogenous hormone in mammals, regulating different cell functions including inflammatory processes, stem cell expansion, insulin release, and glucose uptake. Aptamers are short, single-stranded (ss) oligonucleotidesable to recognize target molecules with high affinity. The small size of the ABA molecule represented a challenge for aptamer development and the aim of this study was to develop specific anti-ABA DNA aptamers. Biotinylated abscisic acid (bio-ABA) was immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. DNA aptamers against bio-ABA were selected with 7 iterative rounds of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment method (SELEX), each round comprising incubation of the ABA-binding beads with the ssDNA sequences, DNA elution, electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The binding affinity of several clones was determined using bio-ABA immobilized on streptavidin-coated plates. Aptamer 2 and aptamer 9 showed the highest binding affinity, with dissociation constants values of 0.98 ± 0.14 μM and 0.80 ± 0.07 μM, respectively. Aptamers 2 and 9 were also able to bind free, unmodified ABA and to discriminate between different ABA enantiomers and isomers. Our findings indicate that ssDNA aptamers can selectively bind ABA and could be used for the development of ABA quantitation assays.

  10. Assessing the Chemical Accuracy of Protein Structures via Peptide Acidity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Janet S.; Hernández, Griselda; LeMaster, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Although the protein native state is a Boltzmann conformational ensemble, practical applications often require a representative model from the most populated region of that distribution. The acidity of the backbone amides, as reflected in hydrogen exchange rates, is exquisitely sensitive to the surrounding charge and dielectric volume distribution. For each of four proteins, three independently determined X-ray structures of differing crystallographic resolution were used to predict exchange for the static solvent-exposed amide hydrogens. The average correlation coefficients range from 0.74 for ubiquitin to 0.93 for Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin, reflecting the larger range of experimental exchange rates exhibited by the latter protein. The exchange prediction errors modestly correlate with the crystallographic resolution. MODELLER 9v6-derived homology models at ~60% sequence identity (36% identity for chymotrypsin inhibitor CI2) yielded correlation coefficients that are ~0.1 smaller than for the cognate X-ray structures. The most recently deposited NOE-based ubiquitin structure and the original NMR structure of CI2 fail to provide statistically significant predictions of hydrogen exchange. However, the more recent RECOORD refinement study of CI2 yielded predictions comparable to the X-ray and homology model-based analyses. PMID:23182463

  11. Recombinant growth hormone enhances muscle myosin heavy-chain mRNA accumulation and amino acid accrual in humans.

    PubMed

    Fong, Y; Rosenbaum, M; Tracey, K J; Raman, G; Hesse, D G; Matthews, D E; Leibel, R L; Gertner, J M; Fischman, D A; Lowry, S F

    1989-05-01

    A potentially lethal complication of trauma, malignancy, and infection is a progressive erosion of muscle protein mass that is not readily reversed by nutritional support. Growth hormone is capable of improving total body nitrogen balance, but its role in myofibrillar protein synthesis in humans is unknown. The acute, in situ muscle protein response to an infusion of methionyl human growth hormone was investigated in the limbs of nutritionally depleted subjects during a period of intravenous refeeding. A 6-hr methionyl growth hormone infusion achieved steady-state serum levels comparable to normal physiologic peaks and was associated with a significant increase in limb amino acid uptake, without a change in body amino acid oxidation. Myosin heavy-chain mRNA levels, measured by quantitative dot blot hybridization, were also significantly elevated after growth hormone administration. The data indicate that methionyl growth hormone can induce intracellular amino acid accrual and increased levels of myofibrillar protein mRNA during hospitalized nutritional support and suggest growth hormone to be a potential therapy of lean body wasting.

  12. Development of SI-traceable C-peptide certified reference material NMIJ CRM 6901-a using isotope-dilution mass spectrometry-based amino acid analyses.

    PubMed

    Kinumi, Tomoya; Goto, Mari; Eyama, Sakae; Kato, Megumi; Kasama, Takeshi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2012-07-01

    A certified reference material (CRM) is a higher-order calibration material used to enable a traceable analysis. This paper describes the development of a C-peptide CRM (NMIJ CRM 6901-a) by the National Metrology Institute of Japan using two independent methods for amino acid analysis based on isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. C-peptide is a 31-mer peptide that is utilized for the evaluation of β-cell function in the pancreas in clinical testing. This CRM is a lyophilized synthetic peptide having the human C-peptide sequence, and contains deamidated and pyroglutamylated forms of C-peptide. By adding water (1.00 ± 0.01) g into the vial containing the CRM, the C-peptide solution in 10 mM phosphate buffer saline (pH 6.6) is reconstituted. We assigned two certified values that represent the concentrations of total C-peptide (mixture of C-peptide, deamidated C-peptide, and pyroglutamylated C-peptide) and C-peptide. The certified concentration of total C-peptide was determined by two amino acid analyses using pre-column derivatization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and hydrophilic chromatography-mass spectrometry following acid hydrolysis. The certified concentration of C-peptide was determined by multiplying the concentration of total C-peptide by the ratio of the relative area of C-peptide to that of the total C-peptide measured by liquid chromatography. The certified value of C-peptide (80.7 ± 5.0) mg/L represents the concentration of the specific entity of C-peptide; on the other hand, the certified value of total C-peptide, (81.7 ± 5.1) mg/L can be used for analyses that does not differentiate deamidated and pyroglutamylated C-peptide from C-peptide itself, such as amino acid analyses and immunochemical assays.

  13. Investigating the inclusion properties of aromatic amino acids complexing beta-cyclodextrins in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Caso, Jolanda Valentina; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Malgieri, Gaetano; Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Isernia, Carla; Iacovino, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are commonly used as complexing agents in biological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications since they have an effect on protein thermal and proteolytic stability, refolding yields, solubility, and taste masking. β-cyclodextrins (β-CD), because of their cavity size are a perfectly suited complexing agent for many common guest moieties. In the case of peptide-cyclodextrin and protein-cyclodextrin host-guest complexes the aromatic amino acids are reported to be the principal responsible of the interaction. For these reasons, we have investigated the inclusion properties of nine designed tripeptides, obtained permuting the position of two L-alanines (Ala, A) with that of one L-tryptophan (Trp, W), L-phenylalanine (Phe, F), or L-tyrosine (Tyr, Y), respectively. Interestingly, the position of the aromatic side-chain in the sequence appears to modulate the β-CD:peptide binding constants, determined via UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopy, which in turn assumes values higher than those reported for the single amino acid. The tripeptides containing a tyrosine showed the highest binding constants, with the central position in the Ac-AYA-NH2 peptide becoming the most favorite for the interaction. A combined NMR and Molecular Docking approach permitted to build detailed complex models, highlighting the stabilizing interactions of the neighboring amino acids backbone atoms with the upper rim of the β-CD.

  14. Remote Enantioselection Transmitted by an Achiral Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, Igor A.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2000-01-01

    short homochiral segment of DNA into a PNA helix could have guaranteed that the next short segment of DNA to be incorporated would have the same handedness as the first. Once two segments of the same handedness were present, the probability that a third segment would have the same handedness would increase, and so on. Evolution could then slowly dilute out the PNA part. This scenario would ultimately allow the formation of a chiral oligonucleotide by processes that are largely resistant to enantiomeric crossinhibition. It is important to note that the ligation of homochiral dinucleotides on a nucleic acid template would probably be at least as enantiospecific as the reaction that we have studied. The disadvantage of using chiral monomers as components of a replicating system arises from the difficulty of generating a first long homochiral template from a racemic mixture of monomers, although results of experiments designed to overcome this difficulty by employing homochiral tetramers have been reported.l l The probability of obtaining a homochiral n-mer from achiral substrates is approximately 1P-I if the nontemplate-directed extension of the primer is not enantioselective. Hence, it would be very hard to get started with a homochiral 40-mer, for example. No such difficulty exists in a scenario that originates with an achiral genetic material and in which the incorporation of very few chiral monomers in this achiral background gradually progresses towards homochirality. It seems possible that some PNA sequences could act as catalysts, analogous to ribozymes, even though PNA lacks clear metal binding sites. Although such catalysts could not be enantioselective, the incorporation of as few as two chiral nucleotides could then impose chiral specificity on the system. Furthermore, such patch chimeras could help to bridge the gap in catalytic potential between PNA and RNA, while guaranteeing enantioselectivity.

  15. Application of hydrophilic interaction chromatography retention coefficients for predicting peptide elution with TFA and methanesulfonic acid ion-pairing reagents.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, Chad E; Tweed, Joseph; Kadar, Eugene P

    2010-03-01

    Hydrophilic retention coefficients for 17 peptides were calculated based on retention coefficients previously published for TSKgel silica-60 and were compared with the experimental elution profile on a Waters Atlantis HILIC silica column using TFA and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as ion-pairing reagents. Relative peptide retention could be accurately determined with both counter-ions. Peptide retention and chromatographic behavior were influenced by the percent acid modifier used with increases in both retention and peak symmetry observed at increasing modifier concentrations. The enhancement of net peptide polarity through MSA pairing shifted retention out by nearly five-fold for the earliest eluting peptide, compared with TFA. Despite improvements in retention and efficiency (N(eff)) for MSA over TFA, a consistent reduction in calculated selectivity (alpha) was observed. This result is believed to be attributed to the stronger polar contribution of MSA masking and diminishing the underlying influence of the amino acid residues of each associated peptide. Finally, post-column infusion of propionic acid and acetic acid was evaluated for their potential to recover signal intensity for TFA and MSA counter-ions for LC-ESI-MS applications. Acetic acid generally yielded more substantial signal improvements over propionic acid on the TFA system while minimal benefits and some further reductions were noted with MSA.

  16. Engineering a Recombinant Baculovirus with a Peptide Hormone Gene and its Effect on the Corn Earworm, Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The helicokinins are peptides identified from Helicoverpa zea that when injected into the larvae were found to cause excessive diuresis and loss of feeding activity. Of the three peptides, helicokinin II (HezK-II) was found to be most potent. A synthetic gene encoding HezK-II was constructed based o...

  17. Formation pathways and opioid activity data for 3-hydroxypyridinium compounds derived from glucuronic acid and opioid peptides by Maillard processes.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Stefica; Roscić, Maja; Lemieux, Carole; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Schiller, Peter W

    2007-07-01

    The kinetics of formation and identity of the reaction products of the glucuronic acid with three representative opioid peptides were investigated in vitro. Peptides were conjugated with glucuronic acid either in solution or under dry-heating conditions. From the incubations performed in solution N-(1-deoxy-D-fructofuranos-1-yluronic acid)-peptide derivatives (Amadori compounds) were isolated, whereas from the dry-heated reactions products containing the 3-hydroxypyridinium moiety at the N-terminal of the peptide chain were obtained. Experiments performed under mild dry-heating conditions (40 degrees C) in model systems based on Leu-enkephalin and glucuronic acid, and in environment of either 40% or 75% relative humidity, revealed that the higher level of humidity promoted a process that enhanced 3-hydroxypyridinium compound generation. The mechanism of 3-hydroxypyridinium formation is discussed. In comparison with their respective parent peptides, the N-(1-deoxy-D-fructofuranosyl-uronic acid) derivatives of the opioid peptides showed three- to 11-fold lower mu- and delta-receptor-binding affinities and agonist potencies in the functional assays, likely as a consequence of the steric bulk introduced at the N-terminal amino group. The further decrease in opioid activity observed with the 3-hydroxypyridinium-containing peptides may be due to the lower pK(a) of the 3-hydroxypyridinium moiety and to delocalization of the positive charge in the pyridinium ring system.

  18. Anticoagulant Effects of Heparin Complexes with Prolyl-Glycine Peptide and Glycine and Proline Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, M E; Obergan, T Yu; Maystrenko, E S; Kalugina, M D

    2016-05-01

    The study demonstrates the formation of heparin complexes with prolyl-glycine peptide and proline and glycine amino acids. The method was developed for in vitro production of these complexes at 1:1 dipeptide to heparin molar ratio and 2:1 amino acid to heparin molar ratio. These complexes, unlike the constituents, proline and glycine, exhibited significant anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and fibrin-depolymerization activities of varying degree in vitro and in vivo. The heparin-dipeptide complex produced maximum effect. The dipeptide by itself also showed anticoagulant properties, but less pronounced than in the complex with heparin.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a peptide nucleic acid conjugated to a D-peptide analog of insulin-like growth factor 1 for increased cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Basu, S; Wickstrom, E

    1997-01-01

    DNA therapeutics show great potential for gene-specific, nontoxic therapy of a wide variety of diseases. The deoxyribose phosphate backbone of DNA has been modified in a number of ways to improve nuclease stability and cell membrane permeability. Recently, a new DNA derivative with an amide backbone instead of a deoxyribose phosphate backbone, peptide nucleic acid (PNA), has shown tremendous potential as an antisense agent. Although PNAs hybridize very strongly and specifically to RNA and DNA, they are taken up by cells very poorly, limiting their potential as nucleic acid binding agents. To improve cellular uptake of a PNA sequence, it was conjugated to a D-amino acid analog of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), which binds selectively to the cell surface receptor for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1R). The IGF1 D-peptide analog was assembled on (4-methylbenzhydryl)amine resin, and then the PNA was extended as a continuation of the peptide. The conjugate and control sequences were radiolabeled with 14C or fluorescently labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Cellular uptake of the PNA-peptide conjugate, a control with two alanines in the peptide, and a control PNA without the peptide segment were studied in murine BALB/c 3T3 cells, which express low levels of murine IGF1R, in p6 cells, which are BALB/c 3T3 cells which overexpress a transfected human IGF1R gene, and in human Jurkat cells, which do not express IGF1R, as a negative control. The specific PNA-peptide conjugate displayed much higher uptake than the control PNA, but only in cells expressing IGF1R. This approach may allow cell-specific and tissue-specific application of PNAs as gene-regulating agents in vivo.

  20. QSAR models for predicting the activity of non-peptide luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) antagonists derived from erythromycin A using quantum chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Michael; Caballero, Julio

    2007-04-01

    Multiple linear regression (MLR) combined with genetic algorithm (GA) and Bayesian-regularized Genetic Neural Networks (BRGNNs) were used to model the binding affinity (pK(I)) of 38 11,12-cyclic carbamate derivatives of 6-O-methylerythromycin A for the Human Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) receptor using quantum chemical descriptors. A multiparametric MLR equation with good statistical quality was obtained that describes the features relevant for antagonistic activity when the substituent at the position 3 of the erythronolide core was varied. In addition, four-descriptor linear and nonlinear models were established for the whole dataset. Such models showed high statistical quality. However, the BRGNN model was better than the linear model according to the external validation process. In general, our linear and nonlinear models reveal that the binding affinity of the compounds studied for the LHRH receptor is modulated by electron-related terms.

  1. Plant Hormone Salicylic Acid Produced by a Malaria Parasite Controls Host Immunity and Cerebral Malaria Outcome.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Ryuma; Aonuma, Hiroka; Kojima, Mikiko; Tahara, Michiru; Andrabi, Syed Bilal Ahmad; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Nagamune, Kisaburo

    2015-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii produces the plant hormone abscisic acid, but it is unclear if phytohormones are produced by the malaria parasite Plasmodium spp., the most important parasite of this phylum. Here, we report detection of salicylic acid, an immune-related phytohormone of land plants, in P. berghei ANKA and T. gondii cell lysates. However, addition of salicylic acid to P. falciparum and T. gondii culture had no effect. We transfected P. falciparum 3D7 with the nahG gene, which encodes a salicylic acid-degrading enzyme isolated from plant-infecting Pseudomonas sp., and established a salicylic acid-deficient mutant. The mutant had a significantly decreased concentration of parasite-synthesized prostaglandin E2, which potentially modulates host immunity as an adaptive evolution of Plasmodium spp. To investigate the function of salicylic acid and prostaglandin E2 on host immunity, we established P. berghei ANKA mutants expressing nahG. C57BL/6 mice infected with nahG transfectants developed enhanced cerebral malaria, as assessed by Evans blue leakage and brain histological observation. The nahG-transfectant also significantly increased the mortality rate of mice. Prostaglandin E2 reduced the brain symptoms by induction of T helper-2 cytokines. As expected, T helper-1 cytokines including interferon-γ and interleukin-2 were significantly elevated by infection with the nahG transfectant. Thus, salicylic acid of Plasmodium spp. may be a new pathogenic factor of this threatening parasite and may modulate immune function via parasite-produced prostaglandin E2.

  2. Synthesis and Activity of Dafachronic Acid Ligands for the C. elegans DAF-12 Nuclear Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kamalesh K.; Wang, Zhu; Motola, Daniel L.; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 from Caenorhabditis elegans is activated by dafachronic acids, which derive from sterols upon oxidation by DAF-9, a cytochrome P450. DAF-12 activation is a critical checkpoint in C. elegans for acquisition of reproductive competence and for entry into adulthood rather than dauer diapause. Previous studies implicated the (25S)-Δ7-dafachronic acid isomer as the most potent compound, but the (25S)-Δ4-isomer was also identified as an activator of DAF-12. To explore the tolerance of DAF-12 for structural variations in the ligand and to enable further studies requiring large amounts of ligands for DAF-12 and homologs in other nematodes, we synthesized (25R)- and (25S)-isomers of five dafachronic acids differing in A/B-ring configurations. Both the (25S)- and (25R)-Δ7-dafachronic acids are potent transcriptional activators in a Gal4-transactivation assay using HEK-293 cells, with EC50 values of 23 and 33 nm, respectively, as are (25S)- and (25R)-Δ4-dafachronic acids, with EC50 values of 23 and 66 nm, respectively. The (25S)- and (25R)-Δ5-isomers were much less potent, with EC50 values approaching 1000 nm, and saturated 5α- and 5β-dafachronic acids showed mostly intermediate potencies. Rescue assays using daf- 9-null mutants confirmed the results from transactivation experiments, but this in vivo assay accentuated the greater potencies of the (25S)-epimers, particularly for the (25S)-Δ7-isomer. We conclude that DAF-12 accommodates a large range of structural variation in ligand geometry, but (25S)-Δ7-dafachronic acid is the most potent and probably biologically relevant isomer. Potency derives more from the A/B-ring configuration than from the stereochemistry at C-25. PMID:19196833

  3. Amino acid sequence of homologous rat atrial peptides: natriuretic activity of native and synthetic forms.

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, N G; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Thibault, G; Garcia, R; Cantin, M; Genest, J; Nutt, R F; Brady, S F; Lyle, T A

    1984-01-01

    A substance called atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), localized in secretory granules of atrial cardiocytes, was isolated as four homologous natriuretic peptides from homogenates of rat atria. The complete sequence of the longest form showed that it is composed of 33 amino acids. The three other shorter forms (2-33, 3-33, and 8-33) represent amino-terminally truncated versions of the 33 amino acid parent molecule as shown by analysis of sequence, amino acid composition, or both. The proposed primary structure agrees entirely with the amino acid composition and reveals no significant sequence homology with any known protein or segment of protein. The short form ANF-(8-33) was synthesized by a multi-fragment condensation approach and the synthetic product was shown to exhibit specific activity comparable to that of the natural ANF-(3-33). PMID:6232612

  4. Ribosomal Synthesis of Macrocyclic Peptides in Vitro and in Vivo Mediated by Genetically Encoded Amino-Thiol Unnatural Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Frost, John R.; Jacob, Nicholas T.; Papa, Louis J.; Owens, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile method for orchestrating the formation of side-chain-to-tail cyclic peptides from ribosomally derived polypeptide precursors is reported. Upon ribosomal incorporation into intein-containing precursor proteins, designer unnatural amino acids bearing side-chain 1,3- or 1,2-aminothiol functionalities are able to promote the cyclization of a downstream target peptide sequence via a C-terminal ligation/ring contraction mechanism. Using this approach, peptide macrocycles of variable size and composition could be generated in a pH-triggered manner in vitro, or directly in living bacterial cells. This methodology furnishes a new platform for the creation and screening of genetically encoded libraries of conformationally constrained peptides. This strategy was applied to identify and isolate a low micromolar streptavidin binder (KD = 1.1 µM) from a library of cyclic peptides produced in E. coli, thereby illustrating its potential toward aiding the discovery of functional peptide macrocycles. PMID:25933125

  5. Blockade of the growth hormone (GH) receptor unmasks rapid GH-releasing peptide-6-mediated tissue-specific insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Muller, A F; Janssen, J A; Hofland, L J; Lamberts, S W; Bidlingmaier, M; Strasburger, C J; van der Lely, A J

    2001-02-01

    The roles of GH and its receptor (GHR) in metabolic control are not yet fully understood. We studied the roles of GH and the GHR using the GHR antagonist pegvisomant for metabolic control of healthy nonobese men in fasting and nonfasting conditions. Ten healthy subjects were enrolled in a double blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of pegvisomant on GHRH and GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6)-induced GH secretion before and after 3 days of fasting and under nonfasting conditions (n = 5). Under the condition of GHR blockade by pegvisomant in the nonfasting state, GHRP-6 (1 microg/kg) caused a increase in serum insulin (10.3 +/- 2.1 vs. 81.3 +/- 25.4 mU/L; P < 0.001) and glucose (4.2 +/- 0.3 vs. 6.0 +/- 0.6 mmol/L; P < 0.05) concentrations. In this group, a rapid decrease in serum free fatty acids levels was also observed. These changes were not observed under GHR blockade during fasting or in the absence of pegvisomant. We conclude that although these results were obtained from an acute study, and long-term administration of pegvisomant could render different results, blockade of the GHR in the nonfasting state induces tissue-specific changes in insulin sensitivity, resulting in an increase in glucose and insulin levels (indicating insulin resistance of liver/muscle), but probably also in an increase in lipogenesis (indicating normal insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue). These GHRP-6-mediated changes indicate that low GH bioactivity on the tissue level can induce changes in metabolic control, which are characterized by an increase in fat mass and a decrease in lean body mass. As a mechanism of these GHRP-6-mediated metabolic changes in the nonfasting state, direct nonpituitary-mediated GHRP-6 effects on the gastroentero-hepatic axis seem probable.

  6. Juvenile Hormone Synthesis: “esterify then epoxidize” or “epoxidize then esterify”? Insights from the Structural Characterization of Juvenile Hormone Acid Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, L.A; Dolghih, E.; Roitberg, A.E.; Nouzova, M.; Mayoral, J.G; Noriega, F.G.; Turjanski, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile hormones (JHs) play key roles in regulating metamorphosis and reproduction in insects. The last two steps of JH synthesis diverge depending on the insect order. In Lepidoptera, epoxidation by a P450 monooxygenase precedes esterification by a juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase (JHAMT). In Orthoptera, Dictyoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera epoxidation follows methylation. The aim of our study was to gain insight into the structural basis of JHAMT’s substrate recognition as a means to understand the divergence of these pathways. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of Aedes aegypti JHAMT. The substrate binding site was identified, as well as the residues that interact with the methyl donor (S-adenosylmethionine) and the carboxylic acid of the substrate methyl acceptors, farnesoic acid (FA) and juvenile hormone acid (JHA). To gain further insight we generated the structures of Anopheles gambiae, Bombyx mori, Drosophila melanogaster and Tribolium castaneum JHAMTs. The modeling results were compared with previous experimental studies using recombinant proteins, whole insects, corpora allata or tissue extracts. The computational study helps explain the selectivity towards the (10R)-JHA isomer and the reduced activity for palmitic and lauric acids. The analysis of our results supports the hypothesis that all insect JHAMTs are able to recognize both FA and JHA as substrates. Therefore, the order of the methylation/epoxidation reactions may be primarily imposed by the epoxidase’s substrate specificity. In Lepidoptera, epoxidase might have higher affinity than JHAMT for FA, so epoxidation precedes methylation, while in most other insects there is no epoxidation of FA, but esterification of FA to form MF, followed by epoxidation to JH III. PMID:21195763

  7. Acetylation dictates the morphology of nanophase biosilica precipitated by a 14-amino acid leucine-lysine peptide.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Helmut; Jaeger, Vance; Bonn, Mischa; Pfaendtner, Jim; Weidner, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    N-terminal acetylation is a commonly used modification technique for synthetic peptides, mostly applied for reasons of enhanced stability, and in many cases regarded as inconsequential. In engineered biosilification - the controlled deposition of silica for nanotechnology applications by designed peptides - charged groups often play a deciding role. Here we report that changing the charge by acetylation of a 14-amino acid leucine-lysine (LK) peptide dramatically changes the morphology of precipitated biosilica; acetylated LK peptides produce nano-spheres, whereas nano-wires are precipitated by the same peptide in a non-acetylated form. By using interface-specific vibrational spectroscopy and coarse-grained molecular simulations, we show that this change in morphology is not the result of modified peptide-silica interactions, but rather caused by the stabilization of the hydrophobic core of peptide aggregates created by the removal of a peptide charge upon acetylation. These results should raise awareness of the potential impact of N-terminal modifications in peptide applications. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Regulation of feeding behavior and food intake by appetite-regulating peptides in wild-type and growth hormone-transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    White, Samantha L; Volkoff, Helene; Devlin, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    Survival, competition, growth and reproductive success in fishes are highly dependent on food intake, food availability and feeding behavior and are all influenced by a complex set of metabolic and neuroendocrine mechanisms. Overexpression of growth hormone (GH) in transgenic fish can result in greatly enhanced growth rates, feed conversion, feeding motivation and food intake. The objectives of this study were to compare seasonal feeding behavior of non-transgenic wild-type (NT) and GH-transgenic (T) coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and to examine the effects of intraperitoneal injections of the appetite-regulating peptides cholecystokinin (CCK-8), bombesin (BBS), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) on feeding behavior. T salmon fed consistently across all seasons, whereas NT dramatically reduced their food intake in winter, indicating the seasonal regulation of appetite can be altered by overexpression of GH in T fish. Intraperitoneal injections of CCK-8 and BBS caused a significant and rapid decrease in food intake for both genotypes. Treatment with either GLP-1 or α-MSH resulted in a significant suppression of food intake for NT but had no effect in T coho salmon. The differential response of T and NT fish to α-MSH is consistent with the melanocortin-4 receptor system being a significant pathway by which GH acts to stimulate appetite. Taken together, these results suggest that chronically increased levels of GH alter feeding regulatory pathways to different extents for individual peptides, and that altered feeding behavior in transgenic coho salmon may arise, in part, from changes in sensitivity to peripheral appetite-regulating signals.

  9. The Perseus Exobiology mission on MIR: behaviour of amino acids and peptides in Earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Boillot, F; Chabin, A; Buré, C; Venet, M; Belsky, A; Bertrand-Urbaniak, M; Delmas, A; Brack, A; Barbier, B

    2002-08-01

    Leucine, alpha-methyl leucine and two peptides were exposed to space conditions on board the MIR station during the Perseus-Exobiology mission. This long duration space mission was aimed at testing the delivery of prebiotic building blocks. During this mission, two amino acids (leucine and alpha-methyl leucine) and two peptides (leucine-diketopiperazine and trileucine thioethylester) were exposed in Earth orbit for three months. Basalt, clay and meteorite powder were also mixed with the samples in order to simulate the effects of potential meteorite protection. Analysis of the material after the flight did not reveal any racemization or polymerisation but did provide information regarding photochemical pathways for the degradation of leucine and of the tripeptide. Amino acids appeared to be more sensitive to UV radiation than peptides, the cyclic dipeptide being found to be as particularly resistant. Meteorite powder which exhibits the highest absorption in Vacuum UltraViolet (VUV) afforded the best protection to the organic molecules whereas montmorillonite clay, almost transparent in VUV, was the least efficient. By varying the thickness of the meteorite, we found that the threshold for efficient protection against radiation was about 5 microm. The possible exogenous origin of biological building blocks is discussed with respect to the stability to the molecules and the nature of the associated minerals.

  10. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Karsten; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Xu, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Park, Sang-Youl; Weiner, Joshua J; Fujii, Hiroaki; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kovach, Amanda; Li, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Peterson, Francis C; Jensen, Davin R; Yong, Eu-Leong; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved β-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling.

  11. Controlled long-term release of small peptide hormones using a new microporous polypropylene polymer: its application for vasopressin in the Brattleboro rat and potential perinatal use

    SciTech Connect

    Kruisbrink, J.; Boer, G.J.

    1984-12-01

    Based on drug release by microporous hollow fibers and the recent introduction of microporous polymers, a new technique was developed for controlled delivery of peptides. Small-diameter microporous polypropylene tubing, lumen-loaded with microgram quantities of vasopressin, and coated with collodion, releases vasopressin after in vitro immersion slowly (1-100 ng/d) and constantly for months. The mechanism of pseudo-zero-order delivery is based on high adsorption of vasopressin, keeping the void volume concentration of dissolved vasopressin constant, which is consequently a constant driving force of outward diffusion. The collodion coating prevents the entry of proteinaceous compounds which would result in rapid desorption of vasopressin. The present delivery module provides a lasting release for other peptides as well (lysine-vasopressin, oxytocin, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and, to a lesser extent, Met-enkephalin). The microporous polymer-collodion device is biocompatible and, loaded with vasopressin, successfully alleviates the diabetes insipidus of Brattleboro rats deficient for vasopressin. Subcutaneous implantation normalized diuresis for a period of 60 d and constant urine vasopressin excretion is observed. When the commercially available osmotic minipump is too large for implantation, the small size of the present controlled-delivery system allows peptide treatment of young and immature laboratory rats, even if located in utero.

  12. Oral administration of omega-7 palmitoleic acid induces satiety and the release of appetite-related hormones in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Hong; Takeo, Jiro; Katayama, Masashi

    2013-06-01

    We have analyzed the effect of palmitoleic acid on short-term food intake in male rats. Administration of omega-7 palmitoleic acid by oral gavage significantly decreased food intake compared to palmitic acid, omega-9 oleic acid, or a vehicle control. Palmitoleic acid exhibited a dose-dependent effect in this context and did not cause general malaise. A triglyceride form of palmitoleate also decreased food intake, whereas olive oil, which is rich in oleic acid, did not. Palmitoleic acid accumulated within the small intestine in a dose-dependent fashion and elevated levels of the satiety hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Both protein and mRNA levels of CCK were affected in this context. The suppression of food intake by palmitoleic acid was attenuated by intravenous injection of devazepide, a selective peripheral CCK receptor antagonist. Palmitoleic acid did not alter the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) target genes, and a PPARα antagonist did not affect palmitoleic acid-induced satiety. This suggests that the PPARα pathway might not be involved in suppressing food intake in response to palmitoleic acid. We have shown that orally administered palmitoleic acid induced satiety, enhanced the release of satiety hormones in rats.

  13. Programmable Multivalent Display of Receptor Ligands using Peptide Nucleic Acid Nanoscaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Ethan A.; Wang, Deyun; Fujigaki, Hidetsugu; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Micklitsch, Christopher M.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Martin-Manso, Gema; Pendrak, Michael L.; Roberts, David D.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Multivalent effects dictate the binding affinity of multiple ligands on one molecular entity to receptors. Integrins are receptors that mediate cell attachment through multivalent binding to peptide sequences within the extracellular matrix, and overexpression promotes the metastasis of some cancers. Multivalent display of integrin antagonists enhances their efficacy, but current scaffolds have limited ranges and precision for the display of ligands. Here we present an approach to study multivalent effects across wide ranges of ligand number, density, and three-dimensional arrangement. Using L-lysine γ-substituted peptide nucleic acids, the multivalent effects of an integrin antagonist were examined over a range of 1 to 45 ligands. The optimal construct improves the inhibitory activity of the antagonist by two orders of magnitude against the binding of melanoma cells to the extracellular matrix in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22233624

  14. A descriptor of amino acids: SVRG and its application to peptide quantitative structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Tong, J; Che, T; Li, Y; Wang, P; Xu, X; Chen, Y

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a descriptor, SVRG (principal component scores vector of radial distribution function descriptors and geometrical descriptors), was derived from principal component analysis (PCA) of a matrix of two structural variables of coded amino acids, including radial distribution function index (RDF) and geometrical index. SVRG scales were then applied in three panels of peptide quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) which were modelled by partial least squares regression (PLS). The obtained models with the correlation coefficient (R²(cum)), cross-validation correlation coefficient (Q²(LOO)) were 0.910 and 0.863 for 48 bitter-tasting dipeptides; 0.968 and 0.931 for 21 oxytocin analogues; and 0.992 and 0.954 for 20 thromboplastin inhibitors. Satisfactory results showed that SVRG contained much chemical information relating to bioactivities. The approach may be a useful structural expression methodology for studies on peptide QSAR.

  15. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel non-peptide boronic acid derivatives as proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ying; Li, Aibo; Wu, Jianwei; Feng, Haiwei; Wang, Letian; Liu, Hongwu; Xu, Yungen; Xu, Qingxiang; Zhao, Li; Li, Yuyan

    2017-03-10

    A novel series of non-peptide proteasome inhibitors bearing the 1, 4-naphthoquinone scaffold and boronic acid warhead was developed. In the biological evaluation on the chymotrypsin-like activity of human 20S proteasome, five compounds showed IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Docking experiments into the yeast 20S proteasome rationalized their biological activities and allowed further optimization of this interesting class of inhibitors. Within the cellular proliferation inhibition assay and western blot analysis, compound 3e demonstrated excellent anti-proliferative activity against solid tumor cells and clear accumulation of ubiquitinated cellular proteins. Furthermore, in the microsomal stability assay compound 3e demonstrated much improved metabolic stability compared to bortezomib, emerging as a promising lead compound for further design of non-peptide proteasome inhibitors.

  16. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  17. Formation of peptides from amino acids by single or multiple additions of ATP to suspensions of nucleoproteinoid microparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of peptides from individual amino acids or pairs of amino acids and ATP in the presence of catalysis by nucleoproteinoid microparticles is investigated. Experiments were performed with suspensions formed from the condensation of lysine-rich and acidic proteinoids with polyadenylic acid, to which were added glycine, phenylalanine, proline, lysine or glycine-phenylalanine mixtures, and ATP either at once or serially. Peptide yields are found to be greatest for equal amounts of acidic and basic proteinoids. The addition of imidazole is found to alter the preference of glycine-phenylalanine mixtures to form mixed heteropeptides rather than homopeptides. A rapid ATP decay in the peptide synthesis reaction is observed, and a greater yield is obtained for repeated small additions than for a single addition of ATP. The experimental system has properties similar to modern cells, and represents an organizational unit ready for the evolution of associated biochemical pathways.

  18. Synthesis of stable C-linked ferrocenyl amino acids and their use in solution-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Philip, Anijamol T; Chacko, Shibin; Ramapanicker, Ramesh

    2015-12-01

    Incorporation of ferrocenyl group to peptides is an efficient method to alter their hydrophobicity. Ferrocenyl group can also act as an electrochemical probe when incorporated onto functional peptides. Most often, ferrocene is incorporated onto peptides post-synthesis via amide, ester or triazole linkages. Stable amino acids containing ferrocene as a C-linked side chain are potentially useful building units for the synthesis of ferrocene-containing peptides. We report here an efficient route to synthesize ferrocene-containing amino acids that are stable and can be used in peptide synthesis. Coupling of 2-ferrocenyl-1,3-dithiane and iodides derived from aspartic acid or glutamic acid using n-butyllithium leads to the incorporation of a ferrocenyl unit to the δ-position or ε-position of an α-amino acid. The reduction or hydrolysis of the dithiane group yields an alkyl or an oxo derivative. The usability of the synthesized amino acids is demonstrated by incorporating one of the amino acids in both C-terminus and N-terminus of tripeptides in solution phase.

  19. Peptides released from acid goat whey by a yeast-lactobacillus association isolated from cheese microflora.

    PubMed

    Didelot, Sandrine; Bordenave-Juchereau, Stephanie; Rosenfeld, Eric; Piot, Jean-Marie; Sannier, Frederic

    2006-05-01

    Seven lactobacilli and a variety of microflora extracted from twenty five commercial cheeses were grown on unsupplemented acid goat whey and screened for their capacity to hydrolyse whey proteins [alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-la) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg)] and to generate peptides. Fermentations were performed aerobically or anaerobically at 37 degrees C using crude or pre-heated whey (10 min at 65, 75 or 85 degrees C). Under aerobic conditions, growth of lactobacilli was poor and protein hydrolysis did not occur. Anaerobic conditions slightly increased lactobacilli growth but neither beta-lg hydrolysis nor peptide generation were observed. More than 50% of alpha-la was digested into a truncated form of alpha-la (+/- 12 kDa) in crude whey and whey pre-heated at 65 degrees C. Twenty-five microflora extracted from raw milk cheeses were screened for their proteolytic activities on acid goat whey under the conditions previously described. Eight of them were able to hydrolyse up to 50% of alpha-la mainly during aerobic growth on crude or pre-heated whey. The corresponding hydrolysates were enriched in peptides. The hydrolysate involving microflora extracted from Comté cheese after or at 18 months ripening was the only one to exhibit hydrolysis of both alpha-la and beta-lg. Microbiological analysis showed that microorganisms originating from Comté cheese and capable of growth on unsupplemented whey consisted of Candida parapsilosis and Lactobacillus paracasei. Fermentation kinetic profiles suggested that peptides were released from alpha-la hydrolysis. The co-culture of both microorganisms was required for alpha-la hydrolysis that occurred concomitantly with the pH decrease. During whey fermentation, Cand. parapsilosis excrete at least one protease responsible for alpha-la hydrolysis, and Lb. paracasei is responsible for medium acidification that is required for protease activation.

  20. Solvation thermodynamics of amino acid side chains on a short peptide backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Hajari, Timir; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der

    2015-04-14

    The hydration process of side chain analogue molecules differs from that of the actual amino acid side chains in peptides and proteins owing to the effects of the peptide backbone on the aqueous solvent environment. A recent molecular simulation study has provided evidence that all nonpolar side chains, attached to a short peptide backbone, are considerably less hydrophobic than the free side chain analogue molecules. In contrast to this, the hydrophilicity of the polar side chains is hardly affected by the backbone. To analyze the origin of these observations, we here present a molecular simulation study on temperature dependent solvation free energies of nonpolar and polar side chains attached to a short peptide backbone. The estimated solvation entropies and enthalpies of the various amino acid side chains are compared with existing side chain analogue data. The solvation entropies and enthalpies of the polar side chains are negative, but in absolute magnitude smaller compared with the corresponding analogue data. The observed differences are large; however, owing to a nearly perfect enthalpy-entropy compensation, the solvation free energies of polar side chains remain largely unaffected by the peptide backbone. We find that a similar compensation does not apply to the nonpolar side chains; while the backbone greatly reduces the unfavorable solvation entropies, the solvation enthalpies are either more favorable or only marginally affected. This results in a very small unfavorable free energy cost, or even free energy gain, of solvating the nonpolar side chains in strong contrast to solvation of small hydrophobic or nonpolar molecules in bulk water. The solvation free energies of nonpolar side chains have been furthermore decomposed into a repulsive cavity formation contribution and an attractive dispersion free energy contribution. We find that cavity formation next to the peptide backbone is entropically favored over formation of similar sized nonpolar side

  1. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Single Amino Acid Variant Peptides Associated with Pancreatic Cancer in Serum by an Isobaric Labeling Quantitative Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single amino acid variations are highly associated with many human diseases. The direct detection of peptides containing single amino acid variants (SAAVs) derived from nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in serum can provide unique opportunities for SAAV associated biomarker discovery. In the present study, an isobaric labeling quantitative strategy was applied to identify and quantify variant peptides in serum samples of pancreatic cancer patients and other benign controls. The largest number of SAAV peptides to date in serum including 96 unique variant peptides were quantified in this quantitative analysis, of which five variant peptides showed a statistically significant difference between pancreatic cancer and other controls (p-value < 0.05). Significant differences in the variant peptide SDNCEDTPEAGYFAVAVVK from serotransferrin were detected between pancreatic cancer and controls, which was further validated by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. The novel biomarker panel obtained by combining α-1-antichymotrypsin (AACT), Thrombospondin-1 (THBS1) and this variant peptide showed an excellent diagnostic performance in discriminating pancreatic cancer from healthy controls (AUC = 0.98) and chronic pancreatitis (AUC = 0.90). These results suggest that large-scale analysis of SAAV peptides in serum may provide a new direction for biomarker discovery research. PMID:25393578

  3. Enhanced Anti-Tumoral Activity of Methotrexate-Human Serum Albumin Conjugated Nanoparticles by Targeting with Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Azade; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ahadi, Fatemeh; Nouri, Farank Salman; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Borougeni, Atefeh Taheri; Mansoori, Pooria

    2011-01-01

    Active targeting could increase the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Methotrexate-human serum albumin (MTX-HSA) conjugates, functionalized by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) as targeting moieties, with the aim of specifically targeting the cancer cells, were prepared. Owing to the high expression of LHRH receptors in many cancer cells as compared to normal cells, LHRH was used as the targeting ligand in this study. LHRH was conjugated to MTX-HSA nanoparticles via a cross-linker. Three types of LHRH targeted nanoparticles with a mean particle size between 120–138 nm were prepared. The cytotoxicity of LHRH targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles were determined on the LHRH positive and negative cell lines. The internalization of the targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles in LHRH receptor positive and negative cells was investigated using flow cytometry analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The cytotoxicity of the LHRH targeted nanoparticles on the LHRH receptor positive cells were significantly more than non-targeted nanoparticles. LHRH targeted nanoparticles were also internalized by LHRH receptor positive cells significantly more than non-targeted nanoparticles. There were no significant differences between the uptake of targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles to the LHRH receptor negative cells. The active targeting procedure using LHRH targeted MTX-HSA nanoparticles could increase the anti-tumoral activity of MTX. PMID:21845098

  4. Effect of growth hormone on renal and systemic acid-base homeostasis in humans.

    PubMed

    Sicuro, A; Mahlbacher, K; Hulter, H N; Krapf, R

    1998-04-01

    The effects of recombinant human growth hormone (GH, 0.1 U.kg body wt-1.12 h-1) on systemic and renal acid-base homeostasis were investigated in six normal subjects with preexisting sustained chronic metabolic acidosis, induced by NH4Cl administration (4.2 mmol.kg body wt-1.day-1). GH administration increased and maintained plasma bicarbonate concentration from 14.1 +/- 1.4 to 18.6 +/- 1.1 mmol/l (P < 0.001). The GH-induced increase in plasma bicarbonate concentration was the consequence of a significant increase in net acid excretion that was accounted for largely by an increase in renal NH+4 excretion sufficient in magnitude to override a decrease in urinary titratable acid excretion. During GH administration, urinary pH increased and correlated directly and significantly with urinary NH4+ concentration. Urinary net acid excretion rates were not different during the steady-state periods of acidosis and acidosis with GH administration. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid activities increased significantly in response to acidosis and were suppressed (glucocorticoid) or decreased to control levels (mineralocorticoid) by GH. The partial correction of metabolic acidosis occurred despite GH-induced renal sodium retention (180 mmol; gain in weight of 1.8 +/- 0.2 kg, P < 0.005) and decreased glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid activities. Thus GH (and/or insulin-like growth factor I) increased plasma bicarbonate concentration and partially corrected metabolic acidosis. This effect was generated in large part by and maintained fully by a renal mechanism (i.e., increased renal NH3 production and NH+4/net acid excretion).

  5. Highly efficient peptide formation from N-acetylaminoacyl-AMP anhydride and free amino acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of the N-blocked dipeptide, N-acetylglycylglycine, from N-acetylglycyl adenylate anhydride and glycine in aqueous solution at 25 C, and at various PH's are reported. The reaction is of interest in that over a physiologically relevant pH range (6-8), peptide synthesis proceeds more rapidly than hydrolysis, even at those pH's at which this compound becomes increasingly susceptible to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. Under similar conditions, the corresponding unblocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides are considerably more unstable, and undergo appreciable hydrlysis in the presence of free amino acid. Because N-blocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides serve as model compounds of peptidyl adenylate anhydrides, these results suggest that primitive amino acid polymerization systems may have operated by cyclic reactivation of the peptidyl carboxyl group, rather than that of the incoming amino acid.

  6. Stereochemical Sequence Ion Selectivity: Proline versus Pipecolic-acid-containing Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Guan, Shanshan; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    Substitution of proline by pipecolic acid, the six-membered ring congener of proline, results in vastly different tandem mass spectra. The well-known proline effect is eliminated and amide bond cleavage C-terminal to pipecolic acid dominates instead. Why do these two ostensibly similar residues produce dramatically differing spectra? Recent evidence indicates that the proton affinities of these residues are similar, so are unlikely to explain the result [Raulfs et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 1705-1715 (2014)]. An additional hypothesis based on increased flexibility was also advocated. Here, we provide a computational investigation of the "pipecolic acid effect," to test this and other hypotheses to determine if theory can shed additional light on this fascinating result. Our calculations provide evidence for both the increased flexibility of pipecolic-acid-containing peptides, and structural changes in the transition structures necessary to produce the sequence ions. The most striking computational finding is inversion of the stereochemistry of the transition structures leading to "proline effect"-type amide bond fragmentation between the proline/pipecolic acid-congeners: R (proline) to S (pipecolic acid). Additionally, our calculations predict substantial stabilization of the amide bond cleavage barriers for the pipecolic acid congeners by reduction in deleterious steric interactions and provide evidence for the importance of experimental energy regime in rationalizing the spectra.

  7. In Vitro Assessment of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) - Peptide Conjugate Labeled With an Auger-Emitting Radionuclide for Prostate Cell Killing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    synthesis of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) that has an Auger-emitter (1-125) incorporated. By design the PNA will bind with mRNA and DNA associated with...bind with cell surface gastrin -releasing peptide receptors and be internalized (3). Binding with mRNA and nuclear DNA specific to the insulin-like...route proposed to prepare 10 is shown in Figure 1 (compounds 1-10). This synthesis began with the preparation of the base-reactive intermediate 5

  8. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Abushahba, Mostafa FN; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  9. Importance of backbone angles versus amino acid configurations in peptide vibrational Raman optical activity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Carmen; Ruud, Kenneth; Reiher, Markus

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigate whether the differential scattering of right- and left-circularly polarized light in peptide Raman optical activity spectra are uniquely dominated by the backbone conformation, or whether the configurations of the individual amino acid also play a significant role. This is achieved by calculating Raman optical activity spectra using density functional theory for four structurally related peptides with a common backbone conformation, but with different sequences of amino acid configurations. Furthermore, the ROA signals of the amide normal modes are decomposed into contributions from groups of individual atoms. It is found that the amino acid configuration has a considerable influence on the ROA peaks in the amide I, II, and III regions, although the local decomposition reveals that the side-chain atoms only contribute to those peaks directly in the case of the amide II vibrations. Furthermore, small changes in the amide normal modes may lead to large and irregular modifications in the ROA intensity differences, making it difficult to establish transferable ROA intensity differences even for structurally similar vibrations.

  10. Cα-C bond cleavage of the peptide backbone in MALDI in-source decay using salicylic acid derivative matrices.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as novel matrices for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described. The use of 5-FSA and 5-NSA generated a- and x-series ions accompanied by oxidized peptides [M - 2 H + H](+). The preferential formation of a- and x-series ions was found to be dependent on the hydrogen-accepting ability of matrix. The hydrogen-accepting ability estimated from the ratio of signal intensity of oxidized product [M - 2 H + H](+) to that of non-oxidized protonated molecule [M + H](+) of peptide was of the order 5-NSA > 5-FSA > 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) ≒ 2,5-dihydroxyl benzoic acid (2,5-DHB) ≒ 0. The results suggest that the hydrogen transfer reaction from peptide to 5-FSA and 5-NSA occurs during the MALDI-ISD processes. The hydrogen abstraction from peptides results in the formation of oxidized peptides containing a radical site on the amide nitrogen with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the Cα-C bond, leading to the formation of a- and x-series ions. The most significant feature of MALDI-ISD with 5-FSA and 5-NSA is the specific cleavage of the Cα-C bond of the peptide backbone without degradation of side-chain and post-translational modifications (PTM). The matrix provides a useful complementary method to conventional MALDI-ISD for amino acid sequencing and site localization of PTMs in peptides.

  11. Fluorescent amino acid undergoing excited state intramolecular proton transfer for site-specific probing and imaging of peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Sholokh, Marianna; Zamotaiev, Oleksandr M; Das, Ranjan; Postupalenko, Viktoriia Y; Richert, Ludovic; Dujardin, Denis; Zaporozhets, Olga A; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2015-02-12

    Fluorescent amino acids bearing environment-sensitive fluorophores are highly valuable tools for site-selective probing of peptide/ligand interactions. Herein, we synthesized a fluorescent l-amino acid bearing the 4'-methoxy-3-hydroxyflavone fluorophore (M3HFaa) that shows dual emission, as a result of an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The dual emission of M3HFaa was found to be substantially more sensitive to hydration as compared to previous analogues. By replacing the Ala30 and Trp37 residues of a HIV-1 nucleocapsid peptide, M3HFaa was observed to preserve the peptide structure and functions. Interaction of the labeled peptides with nucleic acids and lipid vesicles produced a strong switch in their dual emission, favoring the emission of the ESIPT product. This switch was associated with the appearance of long-lived fluorescence lifetimes for the ESIPT product, as a consequence of the rigid environment in the complexes that restricted the relative motions of the M3HFaa aromatic moieties. The strongest restriction and thus the longest fluorescence lifetimes were observed at position 37 in complexes with nucleic acids, where the probe likely stacks with the nucleobases. Based on the dependence of the lifetime values on the nature of the ligand and the labeled position, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to identify the binding partners of the labeled peptides microinjected into living cells. Thus, M3HFaa appears as a sensitive tool for monitoring site selectively peptide interactions in solution and living cells.

  12. Melanoma targeting with [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogs: Effects of cyclization on the radiopharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Carta, Davide; Salvarese, Nicola; Morellato, Nicolò; Gao, Feng; Sihver, Wiebke; Pietzsch, Hans Jurgen; Biondi, Barbara; Ruzza, Paolo; Refosco, Fiorenzo; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio; Bolzati, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of cyclization on the biological profile of a [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analog. A lactam bridge-cyclized H-Cys-Ahx-βAla(3)-c[Lys(4)-Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Glu(10)]-Arg(11)-Pro-Val-NH2 (NAP-NS2) and the corresponding linear H-Cys-Ahx-βAla-Nle-Asp-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-NH2 (NAP-NS1) peptide were synthetized, characterized by ESI-MS spectroscopy and their melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) binding affinity was determined in B16/F10 melanoma cells. The consistent [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled compounds were readily obtained in high specific activity and their stability and biological properties were assessed. As an example, the chemical identity of [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) was confirmed by carrier added experiments supported by radio/UV HPLC analysis combined with ESI(+)-MS. Compared with the linear peptide, cyclization negatively affected the biological properties of NAP-NS2 peptide by reducing its binding affinity for MC1R and by decreasing the overall excretion rate of the corresponding [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled peptide from the body as well as its in vivo stability. [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) was evaluated for its potential as melanoma imaging probe in murine melanoma model. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies on B16/F10 melanoma model of [(99m)Tc(N)(NAP-NS1)(PNP3)](+) clearly evidenced that the radiolabeled linear peptide keeps its biological properties up on the conjugation to the [(99m)Tc(N)(PNP3)]-building block. The progressive increase of the tumor-to-nontarget ratios over the time indicates a quite stable interaction between the radio-complex and the MC1R.

  13. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA using triple helix-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are attractive targets for molecular recognition because of the central role they play in gene expression. Since most noncoding RNAs are in a double-helical conformation, recognition of such structures is a formidable problem. Herein, we describe a method for sequence-selective recognition of biologically relevant double-helical RNA (illustrated on ribosomal A-site RNA) using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) that form a triple helix in the major grove of RNA under physiologically relevant conditions. Protocols for PNA preparation and binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry are described in detail.

  14. Convenient and Scalable Synthesis of Fmoc-Protected Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Feagin, Trevor A.; Shah, Nirmal I.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  15. Room temperature N-arylation of amino acids and peptides using copper(I) and β-diketone.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Krishna K; Sharma, Swagat; Kudwal, Anurag; Jain, Rahul

    2015-04-28

    A mild and efficient method for the N-arylation of zwitterionic amino acids, amino acid esters and peptides is described. The procedure provides the first room temperature synthesis of N-arylated amino acids and peptides using CuI as a catalyst, diketone as a ligand, and aryl iodides as coupling partners. The method is equally applicable for using relatively inexpensive aryl bromides as coupling partners at 80 °C. Using this procedure, electronically and sterically diverse aryl halides, containing reactive functional groups were efficiently coupled in good to excellent yields.

  16. Topical Delivery of Hyaluronic Acid into Skin using SPACE-peptide Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Gupta, Vivek; Anselmo, Aaron C.; Muraski, John A.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Topical penetration of macromolecules into skin is limited by their low permeability. Here, we report the use of a skin penetrating peptide, SPACE peptide, to enhance topical delivery of a macromolecule, hyaluronic acid (HA, MW: 200–325 kDa). The peptide was conjugated to phospholipids and used to prepare an ethosomal carrier system (~110 nm diameter), encapsulating HA. The SPACE-ethosomal system (SES) enhanced HA penetration into porcine skin in vitro by 7.8+/−1.1-fold compared to PBS. The system also enhanced penetration of HA in human skin in vitro, penetrating deep into the epidermis and dermis in skin of both species. In vivo experiments performed using SKH1 hairless mice also confirmed increased dermal penetration of HA using the delivery system; a 5-fold enhancement in penetration was found compared to PBS control. Concentrations of HA in skin were about 1000-fold higher than those in blood; confirming the localized nature of HA delivery into skin. The SPACE-ethosomal delivery system provides a formulation for topical delivery of macromolecules that are otherwise difficult to deliver into skin. PMID:24129342

  17. Black mamba venom peptides target acid-sensing ion channels to abolish pain.

    PubMed

    Diochot, Sylvie; Baron, Anne; Salinas, Miguel; Douguet, Dominique; Scarzello, Sabine; Dabert-Gay, Anne-Sophie; Debayle, Delphine; Friend, Valérie; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Lazdunski, Michel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2012-10-25

    Polypeptide toxins have played a central part in understanding physiological and physiopathological functions of ion channels. In the field of pain, they led to important advances in basic research and even to clinical applications. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are generally considered principal players in the pain pathway, including in humans. A snake toxin activating peripheral ASICs in nociceptive neurons has been recently shown to evoke pain. Here we show that a new class of three-finger peptides from another snake, the black mamba, is able to abolish pain through inhibition of ASICs expressed either in central or peripheral neurons. These peptides, which we call mambalgins, are not toxic in mice but show a potent analgesic effect upon central and peripheral injection that can be as strong as morphine. This effect is, however, resistant to naloxone, and mambalgins cause much less tolerance than morphine and no respiratory distress. Pharmacological inhibition by mambalgins combined with the use of knockdown and knockout animals indicates that blockade of heteromeric channels made of ASIC1a and ASIC2a subunits in central neurons and of ASIC1b-containing channels in nociceptors is involved in the analgesic effect of mambalgins. These findings identify new potential therapeutic targets for pain and introduce natural peptides that block them to produce a potent analgesia.

  18. Novel poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) nanofibrous biomaterials for peptide synthesis and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Bei; Sun, Gang; Lam, Kit S; Xiao, Kai

    2010-10-01

    Poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) (PE-co-AA) fibers in sizes of 200-500 nm were prepared by using a novel melt-extrusion-extraction fabrication process. The thermoplastic nanofibers could be controllably dispersed and reassembled by a novel solvent exchange filtration method. The dispersed PE-co-AA nanofibers possess active surface areas and could directly conduct chemical reactions on surfaces. Surface modifications and organic synthesis on the nanofibers were proven effective and controllable after the dispersion. Multistep synthesis of biomolecules, such as peptide ligand HWRGWV against Fc portion of human IgG, was successful. The surface-anchored ligand has shown bioactivity through selective binding to and staining by human IgG-alkaline phosphatase conjugate. Another peptide, LXY3, a selective cyclic peptide ligand against alpha3beta1 integrin of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, was also prepared on the surfaces of the dispersed nanofibers. The results showed that MDA-MB-231 cells were able to specifically bind to and grow on surfaces of the nanofibers that were functionalized with LXY3.

  19. Differentiating amino acid residues and side chain orientations in peptides using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Claridge, Shelley A; Thomas, John C; Silverman, Miles A; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-12-11

    Single-molecule measurements of complex biological structures such as proteins are an attractive route for determining structures of the large number of important biomolecules that have proved refractory to analysis through standard techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. We use a custom-built low-current scanning tunneling microscope to image peptide structures at the single-molecule scale in a model peptide that forms β sheets, a structural motif common in protein misfolding diseases. We successfully differentiate between histidine and alanine amino acid residues, and further differentiate side chain orientations in individual histidine residues, by correlating features in scanning tunneling microscope images with those in energy-optimized models. Beta sheets containing histidine residues are used as a model system due to the role histidine plays in transition metal binding associated with amyloid oligomerization in Alzheimer's and other diseases. Such measurements are a first step toward analyzing peptide and protein structures at the single-molecule level.

  20. Peptide bond formation does not involve acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues.

    PubMed

    Bieling, Peter; Beringer, Malte; Adio, Sarah; Rodnina, Marina V

    2006-05-01

    Ribosomes catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between aminoacyl esters of transfer RNAs within a catalytic center composed of ribosomal RNA only. Here we show that the reaction of P-site formylmethionine (fMet)-tRNA(fMet) with a modified A-site tRNA substrate, Phelac-tRNA(Phe), in which the nucleophilic amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl group, does not show the pH dependence observed with small substrate analogs such as puromycin and hydroxypuromycin. This indicates that acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues is not important in the reaction with the full-size substrate. Rather, the ribosome catalyzes peptide bond formation by positioning the tRNAs, or their 3' termini, through interactions with rRNA that induce and/or stabilize a pH-insensitive conformation of the active site and provide a preorganized environment facilitating the reaction. The rate of peptide bond formation with unmodified Phe-tRNA(Phe) is estimated to be >300 s(-1).

  1. Influence of the yeast strain on the changes of the amino acids, peptides and proteins during sparkling wine production by the traditional method.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, A J; Carrascosa, A V; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Moreno-Arribas, V; Polo, M C

    2002-12-01

    The influence of five yeast strains on the nitrogen fractions, amino acids, peptides and proteins, during 12 months of aging of sparkling wines produced by the traditional or Champenoise method, was studied. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques were used for analysis of the amino acid and peptide fractions. Proteins plus polypeptides were determined by the colorimetric Bradford method. Four main stages were detected in the aging of wines with yeast. In the first stage, a second fermentation took place; amino acids and proteins plus polypeptides diminished, and peptides were liberated. In the second stage, there was a release of amino acids and proteins, and peptides were degraded. In the third stage, the release of proteins and peptides predominated. In the fourth stage, the amino acid concentration diminished. The yeast strain used influenced the content of free amino acids and peptides and the aging time in all the nitrogen fractions.

  2. Fermentation of peptides and amino acids by a monensin-sensitive ruminal Peptostreptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G J; Russell, J B

    1988-01-01

    A monensin-sensitive ruminal peptostreptococcus was able to grow rapidly (growth rate of 0.5/h) on an enzymatic hydrolysate of casein, but less than 23% of the amino acid nitrogen was ever utilized. When an acid hydrolysate was substituted for the enzymatic digest, more than 31% of the nitrogen was converted to ammonia and cell protein. Coculture experiments and synergisms with peptide-degrading strains of Bacteroides ruminicola and Streptococcus bovis indicated that the peptostreptococcus was unable to transport certain peptides or hydrolyze them extracellularly. Leucine, serine, phenylalanine, threonine, and glutamine were deaminated at rates of 349, 258, 102, 95, and 91 nmol/mg of protein per min, respectively. Deamination rates for some other amino acids were increased when the amino acids were provided as pairs of oxidized and reduced amino acids (Stickland reactions), but these rates were still less than 80 nmol/mg of protein per min. In continuous culture (dilution rate of 0.1/h), bacterial dry matter and ammonia production decreased dramatically at a pH of less than 6.0. When dilution rates were increased from 0.08 to 0.32/h (pH 7.0), ammonia production increased while production of bacterial dry matter and protein decreased. These rather peculiar kinetics resulted in a slightly negative estimate of maintenance energy and could not be explained by a change in fermentation products. Approximately 80% of the cell dry matter was protein. When corrections were made for cell composition, the yield of ATP was higher than the theoretical maximum value. It is possible that mechanisms other than substrate-level phosphorylation contributed to the energetics of growth. PMID:2975156

  3. The neuroendocrine-derived peptide parathyroid hormone-related protein promotes prostate cancer cell growth by stabilizing the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, John; Gioeli, Daniel; Weber, Michael J; Parsons, Sarah J

    2009-09-15

    During progression to an androgen-independent state following androgen ablation therapy, prostate cancer cells continue to express the androgen receptor (AR) and androgen-regulated genes, indicating that AR is critical for the proliferation of hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for the development of AR-dependent hormone-refractory disease, including changes in expression of AR coregulatory proteins, AR mutation, growth factor-mediated activation of AR, and AR protein up-regulation. The most prominent of these progressive changes is the up-regulation of AR that occurs in >90% of prostate cancers. A common feature of the most aggressive hormone-refractory prostate cancers is the accumulation of cells with neuroendocrine characteristics that produce paracrine factors and may provide a novel mechanism for the regulation of AR during advanced stages of the disease. In this study, we show that neuroendocrine-derived parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP)-mediated signaling through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Src pathways contributes to the phenotype of advanced prostate cancer by reducing AR protein turnover. PTHrP-induced accumulation of AR depended on the activity of Src and EGFR and consequent phosphorylation of the AR on Tyr(534). PTHrP-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of AR resulted in reduced AR ubiquitination and interaction with the ubiquitin ligase COOH terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein. These events result in increased accumulation of AR and thus enhanced growth of prostate cancer cells at low levels of androgen.

  4. Radical S-adenosyl methionine epimerases: regioselective introduction of diverse D-amino acid patterns into peptide natural products.

    PubMed

    Morinaka, Brandon I; Vagstad, Anna L; Helf, Maximilian J; Gugger, Muriel; Kegler, Carsten; Freeman, Michael F; Bode, Helge B; Piel, Jörn

    2014-08-04

    PoyD is a radical S-adenosyl methionine epimerase that introduces multiple D-configured amino acids at alternating positions into the highly complex marine peptides polytheonamide A and B. This novel post-translational modification contributes to the ability of the polytheonamides to form unimolecular minimalistic ion channels and its cytotoxic activity at picomolar levels. Using a genome mining approach we have identified additional PoyD homologues in various bacteria. Three enzymes were expressed in E. coli with their cognate as well as engineered peptide precursors and shown to introduce diverse D-amino acid patterns into all-L peptides. The data reveal a family of architecturally and functionally distinct enzymes that exhibit high regioselectivity, substrate promiscuity, and irreversible action and thus provide attractive opportunities for peptide engineering.

  5. NF-kappaB mediated transcriptional repression of acid modifying hormone gastrin.

    PubMed

    Datta De, Dipanjana; Datta, Arindam; Bhattacharjya, Sumana; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major pathogen associated with the development of gastroduodenal diseases. It has been reported that H. pylori induced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1B is one of the various modulators of acid secretion in the gut. Earlier we reported that IL1B-activated NFkB down-regulates gastrin, the major hormonal regulator of acid secretion. In this study, the probable pathway by which IL1B induces NFkB and affects gastrin expression has been elucidated. IL1B-treated AGS cells showed nine-fold activation of MyD88 followed by phosphorylation of TAK1 within 15 min of IL1B treatment. Furthermore, it was observed that activated TAK1 significantly up-regulates the NFkB subunits p50 and p65. Ectopic expression of NFkB p65 in AGS cells resulted in about nine-fold transcriptional repression of gastrin both in the presence and absence of IL1B. The S536A mutant of NFkB p65 is significantly less effective in repressing gastrin. These observations show that a functional NFkB p65 is important for IL1B-mediated repression of gastrin. ChIP assays revealed the presence of HDAC1 and NFkB p65 along with NCoR on the gastrin promoter. Thus, the study provides mechanistic insight into the IL1B-mediated gastrin repression via NFkB.

  6. Purification and amino acid composition of a peptide with molt-inhibiting activity from the lobster, Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Chang, E S; Bruce, M J; Newcomb, R W

    1987-01-01

    A peptide was isolated and purified from sinus glands of the lobster, Homarus americanus, that was able to decrease circulating titers of ecdysteroids and increase the molt interval of eyestalk-ablated juvenile lobsters. This molt-inhibiting activity was demonstrated to consist of two very closely related peptides by means of high-performance liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis. By means of amino acid analyses, a molecular weight of approximately 8700 was obtained.

  7. Development of a method for environmentally friendly chemical peptide synthesis in water using water-dispersible amino acid nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Due to the vast importance of peptides in biological processes, there is an escalating need for synthetic peptides to be used in a wide variety of applications. However, the consumption of organic solvent is extremely large in chemical peptide syntheses because of the multiple condensation steps in organic solvents. That is, the current synthesis method is not environmentally friendly. From the viewpoint of green sustainable chemistry, we focused on developing an organic solvent-free synthetic method using water, an environmentally friendly solvent. Here we described in-water synthesis technology using water-dispersible protected amino acids. PMID:21867548

  8. Black widow spider α-latrotoxin: a presynaptic neurotoxin that shares structural homology with the glucagon-like peptide-1 family of insulin secretagogic hormones

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.; Habener, Joel F.

    2010-01-01

    α-Latrotoxin is a presynaptic neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the black widow spider Latrodectus tredecimguttatus. It exerts toxic effects in the vertebrate central nervous system by depolarizing neurons, by increasing [Ca2+]i and by stimulating uncontrolled exocytosis of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals. The actions of α-latrotoxin are mediated, in part, by a GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor referred to as CIRL or latrophilin. Exendin-4 is also a venom toxin, and it is derived from the salivary gland of the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. It acts as an agonist at the receptor for glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide (GLP-1), thereby stimulating secretion of insulin from pancreatic β-cells of the islets of Langerhans. Here is reported a surprising structural homology between α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 that is also apparent amongst all members of the GLP-1-like family of secretagogic hormones (GLP-1, glucagon, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, secretin, pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide). On the basis of this homology, we report the synthesis and initial characterization of a chimeric peptide (Black Widow GLP-1) that stimulates Ca2+ signaling and insulin secretion in human β-cells and MIN6 insulinoma cells. It is also reported here that the GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors for α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 share highly significant structural similarity in their extracellularly-oriented amino-termini. We propose that molecular mimicry has generated conserved structural motifs in secretagogic toxins and their receptors, thereby explaining the evolution of defense or predatory strategies that are shared in common amongst distantly related species including spiders, lizards, and snakes. Evidently, the toxic effects of α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 are explained by their ability to interact with GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors that normally mediate the actions of endogenous hormones or neuropeptides. PMID:9972293

  9. The Nutrient-Responsive Hormone CCHamide-2 Controls Growth by Regulating Insulin-like Peptides in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Hiroko; Nakamura, Akira; Texada, Michael J.; Truman, James W.; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kamikouchi, Azusa; Nibu, Yutaka; Kume, Kazuhiko; Ida, Takanori; Kojima, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of growth with nutritional status is essential for proper development and physiology. Nutritional information is mostly perceived by peripheral organs before being relayed to the brain, which modulates physiological responses. Hormonal signaling ensures this organ-to-organ communication, and the failure of endocrine regulation in humans can cause diseases including obesity and diabetes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the fat body (adipose tissue) has been suggested to play an important role in coupling growth with nutritional status. Here, we show that the peripheral tissue-derived peptide hormone CCHamide-2 (CCHa2) acts as a nutrient-dependent regulator of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (Dilps). A BAC-based transgenic reporter revealed strong expression of CCHa2 receptor (CCHa2-R) in insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the brain. Calcium imaging of brain explants and IPC-specific CCHa2-R knockdown demonstrated that peripheral-tissue derived CCHa2 directly activates IPCs. Interestingly, genetic disruption of either CCHa2 or CCHa2-R caused almost identical defects in larval growth and developmental timing. Consistent with these phenotypes, the expression of dilp5, and the release of both Dilp2 and Dilp5, were severely reduced. Furthermore, transcription of CCHa2 is altered in response to nutritional levels, particularly of glucose. These findings demonstrate that CCHa2 and CCHa2-R form a direct link between peripheral tissues and the brain, and that this pathway is essential for the coordination of systemic growth with nutritional availability. A mammalian homologue of CCHa2-R, Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (Brs3), is an orphan receptor that is expressed in the islet β-cells; however, the role of Brs3 in insulin regulation remains elusive. Our genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bombesin receptor signaling with its endogenous ligand promotes insulin production. PMID:26020940

  10. Effects of small peptides or amino acids infused to a perfused area of the skin of Angora goats on mohair growth.

    PubMed

    Puchala, R; Pierzynowski, S G; Wuliji, T; Goetsch, A L; Sahlu, T; Lachica, M; Soto-Navarro, S A

    2002-04-01

    The effect of infusing dipeptides or their amino acids on mohair growth of Angora goats was investigated using a skin perfusion technique. Seven Angora wethers (average BW 24 +/- 2.5 kg) were implanted bilaterally with silicon catheters into the superficial branches of the deep circumflex iliac artery and vein and carotid artery. The experiment consisted of three 28-d phases. In the first 14 d of Phases 1 and 3, saline was infused into deep circumflex iliac arteries supplying skin and in Phase 2 a mixture of dipeptides (methionine-leucine [Met-Leu], lysine-leucine [Lys-Leu]) was infused into the artery on one side, and free amino acids were administered on the other side. Infusion rates of peptides were 0.85 mg/h Met-Leu and 0.85 mg/h Lys-Leu in 2.4 mL saline. Infusion rates of amino acids were 0.474 mg/h Lys, 0.483 mg/h Met, and 0.743 mg/h Leu in 2.4 mL saline. A 100-cm2 area within the perfused region was used to determine mohair growth. Two weeks after the cessation of infusions, perfused areas were shorn. Clean mohair production from the dipeptide- and amino acids-perfused regions were similar (4.21 vs 4.35 g/[100 cm2 +/- 28 d], respectively; P > 0.05). However, clean mohair production during dipeptides and amino acids infusions was greater (P < 0.01) than that observed during saline infusions (3.63 g/[100 cm2 +/- 28 d]). There were no significant differences between dipeptides and free amino acids in concentrations of various hormones and metabolites in blood from deep circumflex iliac veins (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the studied small dipeptides and amino acids similarly increased mohair fiber growth, presumably through supplying limiting amino acids directly to the fiber follicle.

  11. Beta2-amino acids-syntheses, occurrence in natural products, and components of beta-peptides1,2.

    PubMed

    Lelais, Gérald; Seebach, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    Although they are less abundant than their alpha-analogues, beta-amino acids occur in nature both in free form and bound to peptides. Oligomers composed exclusively of beta-amino acids (so-called beta-peptides) might be the most thoroughly investigated peptidomimetics. Beside the facts that they are stable to metabolism, exhibit slow microbial degradation, and are inherently stable to proteases and peptidases, they fold into well-ordered secondary structures consisting of helices, turns, and sheets. In this respect, the most intriguing effects have been observed when beta2-amino acids are present in the beta-peptide backbone. This review gives an overview of the occurrence and importance of beta2-amino acids in nature, placing emphasis on the metabolic pathways of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-Aib) and the appearance of beta2-amino acids as secondary metabolites or as components of more complex natural products, such as peptides, depsipeptides, lactones, and alkaloids. In addition, a compilation of the syntheses of both achiral and chiral beta2-amino acids is presented. While there are numerous routes to achiral beta2-amino acids, their EPC synthesis is currently the subject of many investigations. These include the diastereoselective alkylation and Mannich-type reactions of cyclic- or acyclic beta-homoglycine derivatives containing chiral auxiliaries, the Curtius degradation, the employment of transition-metal catalyzed reactions such as enantioselective hydrogenations, reductions, C-H insertions, and Michael-type additions, and the resolution of rac. beta2-amino acids, as well as several miscellaneous methods. In the last part of the review, the importance of beta2-amino acids in the formation of beta-peptide secondary structures is discussed.

  12. How does the multifaceted plant hormone salicylic acid combat disease in plants and are similar mechanisms utilized in humans?

    PubMed

    Dempsey, D'Maris Amick; Klessig, Daniel F

    2017-03-23

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone that regulates many aspects of plant growth and development, as well as resistance to (a)biotic stress. Efforts to identify SA effector proteins have revealed that SA binds to and alters the activity of multiple plant proteins-this represents a shift from the paradigm that hormones mediate their functions via one or a few receptors. SA and its derivatives also have multiple targets in animals; some of these proteins, like their plant counterparts, are associated with pathological processes. Together, these findings suggest that SA exerts its defense-associated effects in both kingdoms via a large number of targets.

  13. Information transfer from peptide nucleic acids to RNA by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are uncharged analogs of DNA and RNA in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is substituted by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. A PNA C10 oligomer has been shown to act as template for efficient formation of oligoguanylates from activated guanosine ribonucleotides. In a previous paper we used heterosequences of DNA as templates in sequence-dependent polymerization of PNA dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from PNA to RNA. We describe the reactions of activated mononucleotides on heterosequences of PNA. Adenylic, cytidylic and guanylic acids were incorporated into the products opposite their complement on PNA, although less efficiently than on DNA templates.

  14. Preparation of surfactant-stabilized gold nanoparticle-peptide nucleic acid conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy, Janice; Connell, Laurie B.; Eck, Wolfgang; Collins, Scott D.; Smith, Rosemary L.

    2010-09-01

    A simple, two-step method of producing stable and functional peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-conjugated gold nanoparticles using a surfactant stabilization step is presented. PNA are DNA analogs with superior chemical stability and target discrimination, but their use in metallic nanoparticle systems has been limited by the difficulty of producing stable colloids of nanoparticle-PNA conjugates. In this work, the nonionic surfactant Tween 20 (polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate) was used to sterically shield gold surfaces prior to the addition of thiolated PNA, producing conjugates which remain dispersed in solution and retain the ability to hybridize to complementary nucleic acid sequences. The conjugates were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy. PNA attachment to gold nanoparticles was confirmed with an enzyme-linked immunoassay, while the ability of nanoparticle-bound PNA to hybridize to its complement was demonstrated using labeled DNA.

  15. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  16. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  17. An extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaves and purified gymnemic acid inhibits glucose-stimulated gastric inhibitory peptide secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fushiki, T; Kojima, A; Imoto, T; Inoue, K; Sugimoto, E

    1992-12-01

    Gastric inhibitory peptide release into the portal vein in response to duodenal infusion of D-glucose was studied in the presence of a leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and inhibitors of some putative glucose sensors and carriers in the intestinal lumen. Intraduodenal infusion of D-glucose significantly increased the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentration in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide induced by glucose was significantly depressed by concomitantly infused leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin but not by cytochalasin B. Mannoheptulose, which inhibits glycolysis, and procaine and lidocaine, which inhibit the vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen, did not affect portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentrations. These results suggest that a glucose receptor, which interacts with the leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin, exists for the release of immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide and that the glucose receptor for gastric inhibitory peptide release is not likely to be identical with a glucose transporter or a vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen.

  18. Standardization of hormone determinations.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2013-12-01

    Standardization of hormone determinations is important because it simplifies interpretation of results and facilitates the use of common reference values for different assays. Progress in standardization has been achieved through the introduction of more homogeneous hormone standards for peptide and protein hormones. However, many automated methods for determinations of steroid hormones do not provide satisfactory result. Isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (ID-MS) has been used to establish reference methods for steroid hormone determinations and is now increasingly used for routine determinations of steroids and other low molecular weight compounds. Reference methods for protein hormones based on MS are being developed and these promise to improve standardization.

  19. Bioplex technology: novel synthetic gene delivery pharmaceutical based on peptides anchored to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Svahn, Mathias G; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Lundin, Karin E; Smith, C I E

    2005-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery is an important approach in order to establish safe in vivo gene therapy in the clinic. Although viral vectors currently exhibit superior gene transfer efficacy, the safety aspect of viral gene delivery is a concern. In order to improve non-viral in vivo gene delivery we have designed a pharmaceutical platform called Bioplex (biological complex). The concept of Bioplex is to link functional entities via hybridising anchors, such as Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA), directly to naked DNA. In order to promote delivery functional entities consisting of biologically active peptides or carbohydrates, are linked to the PNA anchor. The PNA acts as genetic glue and hybridises with DNA in a sequence specific manner. By using functional entities, which elicit receptor-mediated endocytosis, improved endosomal escape and enhance nuclear entry we wish to improve the transfer of genetic material into the cell. An important aspect is that the functional entities should also have tissue-targeting properties in vivo. Examples of functional entities investigated to date are the Simian virus 40 nuclear localisation signal to improve nuclear uptake and different carbohydrate ligands in order to achieve receptor specific uptake. The delivery system is also endowed with regulatory capability, since the release of functional entities can be controlled. The aim is to create a safe, pharmaceutically defined and stable delivery system for nucleic acids with enhanced transfection properties that can be used in the clinic.

  20. In situ synthesis of peptide nucleic acids in porous silicon for drug delivery and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Mares, Jeremy W; Swartz, Caleb M; Zhao, Yiliang; Weiss, Sharon M; Duvall, Craig L

    2014-07-16

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are a unique class of synthetic molecules that have a peptide backbone and can hybridize with nucleic acids. Here, a versatile method has been developed for the automated, in situ synthesis of PNA from a porous silicon (PSi) substrate for applications in gene therapy and biosensing. Nondestructive optical measurements were performed to monitor single base additions of PNA initiated from (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane attached to the surface of PSi films, and mass spectrometry was conducted to verify synthesis of the desired sequence. Comparison of in situ synthesis to postsynthesis surface conjugation of the full PNA molecules showed that surface mediated, in situ PNA synthesis increased loading 8-fold. For therapeutic proof-of-concept, controlled PNA release from PSi films was characterized in phosphate buffered saline, and PSi nanoparticles fabricated from PSi films containing in situ grown PNA complementary to micro-RNA (miR) 122 generated significant anti-miR activity in a Huh7 psiCHECK-miR122 cell line. The applicability of this platform for biosensing was also demonstrated using optical measurements that indicated selective hybridization of complementary DNA target molecules to PNA synthesized in situ on PSi films. These collective data confirm that we have established a novel PNA-PSi platform with broad utility in drug delivery and biosensing.

  1. Peptide nucleic acids rather than RNA may have been the first genetic molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, K. E.; Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous problems exist with the current thinking of RNA as the first genetic material. No plausible prebiotic processes have yet been demonstrated to produce the nucleosides or nucleotides or for efficient two-way nonenzymatic replication. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a promising precursor to RNA, consisting of N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and the adenine, uracil, guanine, and cytosine-N-acetic acids. However, PNA has not yet been demonstrated to be prebiotic. We show here that AEG is produced directly in electric discharge reactions from CH(4), N(2), NH(3), and H(2)O. Electric discharges also produce ethylenediamine, as do NH(4)CN polymerizations. AEG is produced from the robust Strecker synthesis with ethylenediamine. The NH(4)CN polymerization in the presence of glycine leads to the adenine and guanine-N(9)-acetic acids, and the cytosine and uracil-N(1)-acetic acids are produced in high yield from the reaction of cyanoacetaldehyde with hydantoic acid, rather than urea. Preliminary experiments suggest that AEG may polymerize rapidly at 100 degrees C to give the polypeptide backbone of PNA. The ease of synthesis of the components of PNA and possibility of polymerization of AEG reinforce the possibility that PNA may have been the first genetic material.

  2. A non-canonical peptide synthetase adenylates 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid for auriculamide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Daniel; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Auriculamide is the first natural product known from the predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus. It is composed of three unusual building blocks, including the non-proteinogenic amino acid 3-chloro-L-tyrosine, the α-hydroxy acid L-isoleucic acid, and a methylmalonyl-CoA-derived ethane unit. A candidate genetic locus for auriculamide biosynthesis was identified and encodes four enzymes. Among them, the non-canonical 199 kDa four-domain nonribosomal peptide synthetase, AulA, is extraordinary in that it features two consecutive adenylation domains. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinantly produced AulA. The observed activation of 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid by the enzyme supports the hypothesis that it participates in the biosynthesis of auriculamide. An artificially truncated version of AulA that lacks the first adenylation domain activated this substrate like the full-length enzyme which shows that the first adenylation domain is dispensable. Additionally, we provide evidence that the enzyme tolerates structural variation of the substrate. α-Carbon substituents significantly affected the substrate turnover. While all tested aliphatic α-keto acids were accepted by the enzyme and minor differences in chain size and branches did not interfere with the enzymatic activity, molecules with methylene α-carbons led to low turnover. Such enzymatic plasticity is an important attribute to help in the perpetual search for novel molecules and to access a greater structural diversity by mutasynthesis. PMID:28144348

  3. Flufenamic acid modulates multiple currents in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Kuehl-Kovarik, M. Cathleen

    2010-01-01

    Reproduction in mammals is dependent upon the appropriate neurosecretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), yet the endogenous generation of activity underlying GnRH secretion remains poorly understood. We have demonstrated that the depolarizing afterpotential (DAP), which modulates bursting activity, is reduced in isolated GnRH neurons from aged animals. Calcium-activated non-specific cation (CAN) channels contribute to the DAP in other vertebrate neurosecretory cells. We used the CAN channel blocker flufenamic acid (FFA) to examine the contribution of CAN channels to the DAP in GnRH neurons during aging. Recordings were performed on isolated fluorescent GnRH neurons from young, middle-aged and aged female mice. Flufenamic acid inhibited spontaneous activity, but significantly increased the DAP in neurons from young and middle-aged animals. Apamin did not significantly potentiate the DAP, but did reduce the effects of FFA, suggesting that the increased DAP is partially due to blockade of apamin-sensitive SK channels. Flufenamic acid increased the current underlying the DAP (IADP) and decreased the preceding fast outward current (IOUT) at all ages. These current responses were not affected by apamin, but TEA evoked similar changes. Thus, a potassium current, likely mediated through BK channels, contributes to the fast AHP and appears to offset the DAP; this current is sensitive to FFA, but insensitive to age. The effect of FFA on the DAP, but not IADP, is diminished in aged animals, possibly reflecting an age-related modulation of the apamin-sensitive SK channel. Future studies will examine the expression of SK channels during the aging process in GnRH neurons. PMID:20655884

  4. Conformational characterization of the 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid residue in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Gatos, M; Formaggio, F; Crisma, M; Toniolo, C; Bonora, G M; Benedetti, Z; Di Blasio, B; Iacovino, R; Santini, A; Saviano, M; Kamphuis, J

    1997-01-01

    A series of N- and C-protected, monodispersed homo-oligopeptides (to the dodecamer level) from the small-ring alicyclic C alpha, alpha-dialkylated glycine 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (Ac4c) and two Ala/Ac4c tripeptides were synthesized by solution methods and fully characterized. The conformational preferences of all the model peptides were determined in deuterochloroform solution by FT-IR absorption and 1H-NMR. The molecular structures of the amino acid derivatives Z-Ac4c-OH and Z2-Ac4c-OH, the tripeptides Z-(Ac4c)3-OtBu, Z-Ac4c-(L-Ala)2-OMe and Z-L-Ala-Ac4c-L-Ala-OMe, and the tetrapeptide Z-(Ac4c)4-OtBu were determined in the crystal state by X-ray diffraction. The average geometry of the cyclobutyl moiety of the Ac4c residue was assessed and the tau(N-C alpha-C') bond angle was found to be significantly expanded from the regular tetrahedral value. The conformational data are strongly in favour of the conclusion that the Ac4c residue is an effective beta-turn and helix former. A comparison with the structural propensities of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, the prototype of C alpha, alpha-dialkylated glycines, and the other extensively investigated members of the family of 1-aminocycloalkane-1-carboxylic acids (Acnc, with n = 3, 5-8) is made and the implications for the use of the Ac4c residue in conformationally constrained peptide analogues are briefly examined.

  5. New insights into the role of cAMP in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1).

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2010-01-01

    The proglucagon gene (gcg) encodes both glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), produced in pancreatic alpha cells and intestinal endocrine L cells, respectively. The incretin hormone GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion and pro-insulin gene transcription. GLP-1 also enhances pancreatic beta-cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. A long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist, Byetta, has now been developed as the drug in treating type II diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. The expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP, and the crosstalk between PKA and the Wnt signaling pathway, are involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg transcription and GLP-1 production as well. Finally, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic beta cells are also mediated by PKA, Epac, as well as the effector of the Wnt signaling pathway. Together, these novel findings bring us a new insight into the role of cAMP in the production and function of the incretin hormone GLP-1.

  6. Treatment with N- and C-Terminal Peptides of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Partly Compensate the Skeletal Abnormalities in IGF-I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Lozano, Daniel; Cediel, Rafael; Esbrit, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency causes growth delay, and IGF-I has been shown to partially mediate bone anabolism by parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is abundant in bone, and has osteogenic features by poorly defined mechanisms. We here examined the capacity of PTHrP (1–36) and PTHrP (107–111) (osteostatin) to reverse the skeletal alterations associated with IGF-I deficiency. Igf1-null mice and their wild type littermates were treated with each PTHrP peptide (80 µg/Kg/every other day/2 weeks; 2 males and 4 females for each genotype) or saline vehicle (3 males and 3 females for each genotype). We found that treatment with either PTHrP peptide ameliorated trabecular structure in the femur in both genotypes. However, these peptides were ineffective in normalizing the altered cortical structure at this bone site in Igf1-null mice. An aberrant gene expression of factors associated with osteoblast differentiation and function, namely runx2, osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of NF-κB ligand ratio, Wnt3a, cyclin D1, connexin 43, catalase and Gadd45, as well as in osteocyte sclerostin, was found in the long bones of Igf1-null mice. These mice also displayed a lower amount of trabecular osteoblasts and osteoclasts in the tibial metaphysis than those in wild type mice. These alterations in Igf1-null mice were only partially corrected by each PTHrP peptide treatment. The skeletal expression of Igf2, Igf1 receptor and Irs2 was increased in Igf1-null mice, and this compensatory profile was further improved by treatment with each PTHrP peptide related to ERK1/2 and FoxM1 activation. In vitro, PTHrP (1–36) and osteostatin were effective in promoting bone marrow stromal cell mineralization in normal mice but not in IGF-I-deficient mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that PTHrP (1–36) and osteostatin can exert several osteogenic actions even in the absence of IGF-I in the mouse bone. PMID:24503961

  7. Role of SbmA in the uptake of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptide conjugates in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Vitali, Ally; Stach, James E M; Nielsen, Peter E

    2013-02-15

    Antisense PNA oligomers targeting essential genes (acpP or ftsZ) and conjugated to the delivery peptide L((KFF)(3)K) show complete growth inhibition of wild type E. coli strain (MG1655) with submicromolar MIC. In this study we show that resistant mutants generated against such PNA-peptide conjugates had disruptions in the region of sbmA, a gene encoding an inner membrane peptide transporter. The wild type sensitivity to the PNA conjugates was re-established in the resistance mutants by complementation with sbmA. Furthermore, deletion of sbmA in E. coli AS19, a strain that is sensitive to unmodified PNA, resulted in resistance to PNA. Finally, PNA conjugated with the corresponding non-biological H-D((KFF)(3)K) peptide retained antibacterial activity in sbmA deletion strains, whereas the same conjugate with a protease-sensitive linker did not. These results clearly identify SbmA as a carrier of naked PNA over the inner bacterial membrane and thereby infer that the peptide is transporting the PNA conjugates over the outer membrane. Strains lacking SbmA were used to screen novel peptide-PNA carriers that were SbmA-independent. Four such PNA-peptide conjugates, H-D((KFF)(3)K), H-(RFR)(4)-Ahx-βAla, H-(R-Ahx-R)(4)-Ahx-βAla, and H-(R-Ahx)(6)-βAla, were identified that utilize an alternative uptake mechanism but retain their antimicrobial potency. In addition SbmA is the first protein identified to recognize PNA.

  8. Attenuation of monocyte chemotaxis--a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of action for the cardio-protective hormone B-type natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Glezeva, Nadezhda; Collier, Patrick; Voon, Victor; Ledwidge, Mark; McDonald, Kenneth; Watson, Chris; Baugh, John

    2013-08-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a prognostic and diagnostic marker for heart failure (HF). An anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective role for BNP was proposed. In cardiovascular diseases including pressure overload-induced HF, perivascular inflammation and cardiac fibrosis are, in part, mediated by monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)1-driven monocyte migration. We aimed to determine the role of BNP in monocyte motility to MCP1. A functional BNP receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) was identified in human monocytes. BNP treatment inhibited MCP1-induced THP1 (monocytic leukemia cells) and primary monocyte chemotaxis (70 and 50 %, respectively). BNP did not interfere with MCP1 receptor expression or with calcium. BNP inhibited activation of the cytoskeletal protein RhoA in MCP1-stimulated THP1 (70 %). Finally, BNP failed to inhibit MCP1-directed motility of monocytes from patients with hypertension (n = 10) and HF (n = 6) suggesting attenuation of this anti-inflammatory mechanism in chronic heart disease. We provide novel evidence for a direct role of BNP/NPRA in opposing human monocyte migration and support a role for BNP as a cardio-protective hormone up-regulated as part of an adaptive compensatory response to combat excess inflammation.

  9. In Vitro and in Vivo Characterization of MOD-4023, a Long-Acting Carboxy-Terminal Peptide (CTP)-Modified Human Growth Hormone.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Oren; Bar-Ilan, Ahuva; Guy, Rachel; Felikman, Yana; Moschcovich, Laura; Hwa, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Ron G; Fima, Eyal; Hart, Gili

    2016-02-01

    MOD-4023 is a novel long-acting version of human growth hormone (hGH), containing the carboxy-terminal peptide (CTP) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). MOD-4023 is being developed as a treatment for adults and children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), which would require fewer injections than currently available GH formulations and thus reduce patient discomfort and increase compliance. This study characterizes MOD-4023's binding affinities for the growth hormone receptor, as well as the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics, toxicology, and safety profiles of repeated dosing of MOD-4023 in Sprague-Dawley rats and Rhesus monkeys. Although MOD-4023 exhibited reduced in vitro potency and lower affinity to the GH receptor than recombinant hGH (rhGH), administration of MOD-4023 every 5 days in rats and monkeys resulted in exposure comparable to daily rhGH, and the serum half-life of MOD-4023 was significantly longer. Repeated administration of MOD-4023 led to elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and twice-weekly injections of MOD-4023 resulted in larger increase in weight gain with fewer injections and a lower accumulative hGH dose. Thus, the increased half-life of MOD-4023 in comparison to hGH may increase the frequency of protein-receptor interactions and compensate for its decreased in vitro potency. MOD-4023 was found to be well-tolerated in rats and monkeys, with minimal adverse events, suggesting an acceptable safety profile. These results provide a basis for the continued clinical development of MOD-4023 as a novel treatment of GHD in children and adults.

  10. FERONIA interacts with ABI2-type phosphatases to facilitate signaling cross-talk between abscisic acid and RALF peptide in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Yu, Feng; Liu, Ying; Du, Changqing; Li, Xiushan; Zhu, Sirui; Wang, Xianchun; Lan, Wenzhi; Rodriguez, Pedro L.; Liu, Xuanming; Li, Dongping; Chen, Liangbi; Luan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like kinase FERONIA (FER) plays a crucial role in plant response to small molecule hormones [e.g., auxin and abscisic acid (ABA)] and peptide signals [e.g., rapid alkalinization factor (RALF)]. It remains unknown how FER integrates these different signaling events in the control of cell growth and stress responses. Under stress conditions, increased levels of ABA will inhibit cell elongation in the roots. In our previous work, we have shown that FER, through activation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1)/4/10-Rho of Plant 11 (ROP11) pathway, enhances the activity of the phosphatase ABA Insensitive 2 (ABI2), a negative regulator of ABA signaling, thereby inhibiting ABA response. In this study, we found that both RALF and ABA activated FER by increasing the phosphorylation level of FER. The FER loss-of-function mutant displayed strong hypersensitivity to both ABA and abiotic stresses such as salt and cold conditions, indicating that FER plays a key role in ABA and stress responses. We further showed that ABI2 directly interacted with and dephosphorylated FER, leading to inhibition of FER activity. Several other ABI2-like phosphatases also function in this pathway, and ABA-dependent FER activation required PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE (PYR)/PYR1-LIKE (PYL)/REGULATORY COMPONENTS OF ABA RECEPTORS (RCAR)–A-type protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2CA) modules. Furthermore, suppression of RALF1 gene expression, similar to disruption of the FER gene, rendered plants hypersensitive to ABA. These results formulated a mechanism for ABA activation of FER and for cross-talk between ABA and peptide hormone RALF in the control of plant growth and responses to stress signals. PMID:27566404

  11. Regulation of hormone metabolism in Arabidopsis seeds: phytochrome regulation of abscisic acid metabolism and abscisic acid regulation of gibberellin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mitsunori; Hanada, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Endo, Akira; Okamoto, Masanori; Yamauchi, Yukika; North, Helen; Marion-Poll, Annie; Sun, Tai-Ping; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Nambara, Eiji

    2006-11-01

    In a wide range of plant species, seed germination is regulated antagonistically by two plant hormones, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA). In the present study, we have revealed that ABA metabolism (both biosynthesis and inactivation) was phytochrome-regulated in an opposite fashion to GA metabolism during photoreversible seed germination in Arabidopsis. Endogenous ABA levels were decreased by irradiation with a red (R) light pulse in dark-imbibed seeds pre-treated with a far-red (FR) light pulse, and the reduction in ABA levels in response to R light was inhibited in a phytochrome B (PHYB)-deficient mutant. Expression of an ABA biosynthesis gene, AtNCED6, and the inactivation gene, CYP707A2, was regulated in a photoreversible manner, suggesting a key role for the genes in PHYB-mediated regulation of ABA metabolism. Abscisic acid-deficient mutants such as nced6-1, aba2-2 and aao3-4 exhibited an enhanced ability to germinate relative to wild type when imbibed in the dark after irradiation with an FR light pulse. In addition, the ability to synthesize GA was improved in the aba2-2 mutant compared with wild type during dark-imbibition after an FR light pulse. Activation of GA biosynthesis in the aba2-2 mutant was also observed during seed development. These data indicate that ABA is involved in the suppression of GA biosynthesis in both imbibed and developing seeds. Spatial expression patterns of the AtABA2 and AAO3 genes, responsible for last two steps of ABA biosynthesis, were distinct from that of the GA biosynthesis gene, AtGA3ox2, in both imbibed and developing seeds, suggesting that biosynthesis of ABA and GA in seeds occurs in different cell types.

  12. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  13. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Watts, Richard E.; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid (“imino acid”), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3–6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNAPhe depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNAPro isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the “tRNA abundance” hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  14. Hydration studies of electrospray ions from amino acids and small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong (Steve)

    This project was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the hydration behaviors of gas phase ions from solutions containing amino acids and peptides. In order to characterize their hydration behavior, the molecules of interest in solutions were first converted into gas phase ions by electrospray ionization (ESI). The completely desolvated ions were then deliberately dispersed into an inert bath gas, usually nitrogen, containing accurately known concentrations of solvent vapor. The resulting mixtures of ions and bath gas were subsequently passed into a vacuum chamber by way of an adiabatic supersonic free jet expansion. The cooling during that expansion caused solvation of the ions, the extent of which was determined by a quadrupole mass analyzer. Mass analysis of the solute ions in the absence of vapor showed peaks with the mass to charge ratios corresponding to the desolvated ions. On the other hand, mass spectrometric analyses of ions in the presence of solvent vapor showed sequences of peaks corresponding to the solvated ions with varying numbers of water molecules. The extent of the ion solvation was controlled by varying the concentration of solvent vapor in the bath gas. Two different scales were proposed for the evaluation of the relative affinities of amino acids for water molecules. One was based primarily on the assumption that the affinities of amino acids for water molecules are directly proportional to their gas phase solvation rate constants ( k). An alternative approach produced an affinity scale based on the extent of ion hydration occurred during the free jet expansion. It was found that the addition of a polar solvent vapor to the bath gas at low concentrations substantially enhanced the production of the bare solute ions from the evaporating charged droplets. This remarkable result not only provided a means to increase the ion production and thus detection sensitivity of mass spectrometric analyses, but also yielded important information

  15. Acidity and metal (Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+) affinity of L-γ-carboxyglutamic acid and its peptide analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Remková, Anna; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2014-10-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP and B97D functionals with triple-zeta 6-311++G(d,p) basis set have been used to study the acidity, basicity and metal affinity of L-γ-carboxyglutamic acid (GLA) and its peptide derivative [2-acetylamino-3-(methylamino)-3-oxopropyl]malonic acid (AMD-GLA). The Gibbs interaction energies of the GLA2-…M2+ and AMD-GLA2-…M2+ (M = Mg, Ca, Zn) complexes show an increasing binding affinity in the order Ca2+ < Mg2+ < Zn2+ The transition metal Zn2+ is most effectively recognized by the dianions of GLA and AMD-GLA. Of the dianions studied the AMD-GLA dianion is the strongest Lewis base. Computations that include the effect of solvation showed that in water the relative stability of GLA2-…M2+ and AMD-GLA2-…M2+ ionic bonds is rapidly diminished. The computed interaction Gibbs energy in water is small and negative.

  16. Ion-pair mediated transport of small model peptides in liquid phase micro extraction under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Reubsaet, J Léon E; Paulsen, Jonas V

    2005-02-01

    This paper discusses the behaviour of five small model peptides in a three phase (aqueous donor-organic-aqueous acceptor) liquid phase micro extraction system in relation to their physico-chemical properties (charge, hydrophobicity). It is proved that for all peptides transport over the organic phase is mediated by aliphatic sulphonic acids. Heptane-1-sulphonic acid gave the best overall recoveries. It appeared that peptides with hydrophobic properties (IPI) and a high number of positive charges (KYK) show good recoveries and are enriched in the acceptor phase. Variation in the pH (1.6-4.4) of the donor phase shows that there are peptide-dependent optimal pH-values for their recovery. Increasing pH in the acceptor phase shows that in most cases the recovery decreases due to decreased ion-pair mediated membrane transport. For KYK the partition between the organic phase and the aqueous acceptor-phase is also driven by the solubility in the aqueous acceptor phase. Increase of the ion strength of the acceptor phase did not affect the recovery of the peptides. Except for KYK, which showed decreased recovery when the ion strength increased. Another finding is that delocalisation of positive charge causes bad recovery, probably due to incomplete ion-pair-peptide complex formation.

  17. Histological organization of the central nervous system and distribution of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptide in the blue crab, Portunus pelagicus.

    PubMed

    Saetan, Jirawat; Senarai, Thanyaporn; Tamtin, Montakan; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Chavadej, Jittipan; Hanna, Peter J; Parhar, Ishwar; Sobhon, Prasert; Sretarugsa, Prapee

    2013-09-01

    We present a detailed histological description of the central nervous system (CNS: brain, subesophageal ganglion, thoracic ganglia, abdominal ganglia) of the blue crab, Portunus pelagicus. Because the presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in crustaceans has been disputed, we examine the presence and localization of a GnRH-like peptide in the CNS of the blue crab by using antibodies against lamprey GnRH (lGnRH)-III, octopus GnRH (octGnRH) and tunicate GnRH (tGnRH)-I. These antibodies showed no cross-reactivity with red-pigment-concentrating hormone, adipokinetic hormone, or corazonin. In the brain, strong lGnRH-III immunoreactivity (-ir) was detected in small (7-17 μm diameter) neurons of clusters 8, 9 and 10, in medium-sized (21-36 μm diameter) neurons of clusters 6, 7 and 11 and in the anterior and posterior median protocerebral neuropils, olfactory neuropil, median and lateral antenna I neuropils, tegumentary neuropil and antenna II neuropil. In the subesophageal ganglion, lGnRH-III-ir was detected in medium-sized neurons and in the subesophageal neuropil. In the thoracic and abdominal ganglia, lGnRH-III-ir was detected in medium-sized and small neurons and in the neuropils. OctGnRH-ir was observed in neurons of the same clusters with moderate staining, particularly in the deutocerebrum, whereas tGnRH-I-ir was only detected in medium-sized neurons of cluster 11 in the brain. Thus, anti-lGnRH-III shows greater immunoreactivity in the crab CNS than anti-octGnRH and anti-tGnRH-I. Moreover, our functional bioassay demonstrates that only lGnRH-III has significant stimulatory effects on ovarian growth and maturation. We therefore conclude that, although the true identity of the crab GnRH eludes us, crabs possess a putative GnRH hormone similar to lGnRH-III. The identification and characterization of this molecule is part of our ongoing research.

  18. Design of protease-resistant myelin basic protein-derived peptides by cleavage site directed amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Burster, Timo; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Boehm, Bernhard O; Dunn, Shannon; Rotzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Weber, Ekkehard; Verhelst, Steven H L; Kalbacher, Hubert; Driessen, Christoph

    2007-11-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. An attractive strategy to prevent activation of autoaggressive T cells in MS, is the use of altered peptide ligands (APL), which bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. To be of clinical use, APL must be capable of resisting hostile environments including the proteolytic machinery of antigen presenting cells (APC). The current design of APL relies on cost- and labour-intensive strategies. To overcome these major drawbacks, we used a deductive approach which involved modifying proteolytic cleavage sites in APL. Cleavage site-directed amino acid substitution of the autoantigen myelin basic protein (MBP) resulted in lysosomal protease-resistant, high-affinity binding peptides. In addition, these peptides mitigated T cell activation in a similar fashion as conventional APL. The strategy outlined allows the development of protease-resistant APL and provides a universal design strategy to improve peptide-based immunotherapeutics.

  19. The Prebiotic C-Terminal Elongation of Peptides can be Initiated by N-Carbamoyl Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Abou Mrad, Ninette; Ajram, Ghinwa; Rossi, Jean-Christophe; Boiteau, Laurent; Duvernay, Fabrice; Pascal, Robert; Danger, Gregoire

    2017-04-05

    The formation of peptides upon EDC promoted activation of N-carbamoylamino acids (CAA), was considered in the scope of our recent works on carbodiimide promoted C-terminus elongation of peptides in a prebiotic context. Thus EDC promoted activation of CAA derivatives of Tyr(Me) or Ala in dilute aqueous medium pH 5.5-6.5 in the presence of excess of AA, resulted in peptide formation via C-terminus activation / elongation. Kinetic results similar to those of EDC-mediated activation of N-acyl-AA lead us to postulate the formation of a 2-amino-5(4H)-oxazolone intermediate by cyclization of the activated CAA, in spite of the absence of epimerization occurred at CAA residues. Thus, in a prebiotic context, CAA may have played a similar role as N-acyl-AA in the initiation of C-terminus peptide elongation.

  20. Single Amino Acid Variation Underlies Species-Specific Sensitivity to Amphibian Skin-Derived Opioid-like Peptides.

    PubMed

    Vardy, Eyal; Sassano, Maria F; Rennekamp, Andrew J; Kroeze, Wesley K; Mosier, Philip D; Westkaemper, Richard B; Stevens, Craig W; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C; Peterson, Randall T; Roth, Bryan L

    2015-06-18

    It has been suggested that the evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors (ORs) follow a vector of increased functionality. Here, we test this idea by comparing human and frog ORs. Interestingly, some of the most potent opioid peptides known have been isolated from amphibian skin secretions. Here we show that such peptides (dermorphin and deltorphin) are highly potent in the human receptors and inactive in frog ORs. The molecular basis for the insensitivity of the frog ORs to these peptides was studied using chimeras and molecular modeling. The insensitivity of the delta OR (DOR) to deltorphin was due to variation of a single amino acid, Trp7.35, which is a leucine in mammalian DORs. Notably, Trp7.35 is completely conserved in all known DOR sequences from lamprey, fish, and amphibians. The deltorphin-insensitive phenotype was verified in fish. Our results provide a molecular explanation for the species selectivity of skin-derived opioid peptides.

  1. β-Amino acids containing peptides and click-cyclized peptide as β-turn mimics: a comparative study with 'conventional' lactam- and disulfide-bridged hexapeptides.

    PubMed

    Larregola, Maud; Lequin, Olivier; Karoyan, Philippe; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Lavielle, Solange

    2011-09-01

    The increasing interest in click chemistry and its use to stabilize turn structures led us to compare the propensity for β-turn stabilization of different analogs designed as mimics of the β-turn structure found in tendamistat. The β-turn conformation of linear β-amino acid-containing peptides and triazole-cyclized analogs were compared to 'conventional' lactam- and disulfide-bridged hexapeptide analogs. Their 3D structures and their propensity to fold in β-turns in solution, and for those not structured in solution in the presence of α-amylase, were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and by restrained molecular dynamics with energy minimization. The linear tetrapeptide Ac-Ser-Trp-Arg-Tyr-NH(2) and both the amide bond-cyclized, c[Pro-Ser-Trp-Arg-Tyr-D-Ala] and the disulfide-bridged, Ac-c[Cys-Ser-Trp-Arg-Tyr-Cys]-NH(2) hexapeptides adopt dominantly in solution a β-turn conformation closely related to the one observed in tendamistat. On the contrary, the β-amino acid-containing peptides such as Ac-(R)-β(3) -hSer-(S)-Trp-(S)-β(3) -hArg-(S)-β(3) -hTyr-NH(2) , and the triazole cyclic peptide, c[Lys-Ser-Trp-Arg-Tyr-βtA]-NH(2) , both specifically designed to mimic this β-turn, do not adopt stable structures in solution and do not show any characteristics of β-turn conformation. However, these unstructured peptides specifically interact in the active site of α-amylase, as shown by TrNOESY and saturation transfer difference NMR experiments performed in the presence of the enzyme, and are displaced by acarbose, a specific α-amylase inhibitor. Thus, in contrast to amide-cyclized or disulfide-bridged hexapeptides, β-amino acid-containing peptides and click-cyclized peptides may not be regarded as β-turn stabilizers, but can be considered as potential β-turn inducers.

  2. Gamma Peptide Nucleic Acids: As Orthogonal Nucleic Acid Recognition Codes for Organizing Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sacui, Iulia; Hsieh, Wei-Che; Manna, Arunava; Sahu, Bichismita; Ly, Danith H

    2015-07-08

    Nucleic acids are an attractive platform for organizing molecular self-assembly because of their specific nucleobase interactions and defined length scale. Routinely employed in the organization and assembly of materials in vitro, however, they have rarely been exploited in vivo, due to the concerns for enzymatic degradation and cross-hybridization with the host's genetic materials. Herein we report the development of a tight-binding, orthogonal, synthetically versatile, and informationally interfaced nucleic acid platform for programming molecular interactions, with implications for in vivo molecular assembly and computing. The system consists of three molecular entities: the right-handed and left-handed conformers and a nonhelical domain. The first two are orthogonal to each other in recognition, while the third is capable of binding to both, providing a means for interfacing the two conformers as well as the natural nucleic acid biopolymers (i.e., DNA and RNA). The three molecular entities are prepared from the same monomeric chemical scaffold, with the exception of the stereochemistry or lack thereof at the γ-backbone that determines if the corresponding oligo adopts a right-handed or left-handed helix, or a nonhelical motif. These conformers hybridize to each other with exquisite affinity, sequence selectivity, and level of orthogonality. Recognition modules as short as five nucleotides in length are capable of organizing molecular assembly.

  3. Pipa carvalhoi skin secretion profiling: absence of peptides and identification of kynurenic acid as the major constitutive component.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Douglas Oscar Ceolin; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko; Jared, Carlos; Antoniazzi, Marta Maria; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Pimenta, Daniel Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    The presence of peptides has been identified in all African pipid genera; nevertheless, little is known about skin secretion of South American frog genus Pipa. Skin secretion from captive and wild Pipa carvalhoi were obtained in the presence or absence of norepinephrine stimulation. The <10 kDa fraction was analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, searching for peptides. Chromatographic profiles show the presence of a major component in this secretion, regardless of the stimulation method (norepinephrine or mechanical stimulation) and the origin of the animal (captivity or wild), as well as in the absence of any stimulus. The general mass distribution profile in P. carvalhoi skin secretion shows numerous components below 800 Da. Moreover, no peptide could be identified, regardless of the chromatographic approach. The major component was purified and identified as kynurenic acid, an L-tryptophan derivative. P. carvalhoi does not secrete peptides as toxins in its skin. In addition, we here report that kynurenic acid is the main component of P. carvalhoi skin secretion. Although no biological activity was associated with kynurenic acid, we propose that this molecule is a pheromone that signals the presence of a co-specific in the shady environment in which this animal lives. In this study we demonstrate the absence of peptidic toxins in the skin secretion of P. carvalhoi, a break of paradigm in the pipid family.

  4. Rhizobins, a Group of Peptides in the Free-Amino-Acid Pool of the Soybean-Rhizobium System †

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Andrew S.; Ahlgren, Joy A.; Gonzalez, Mark A.; Stasney, Mark A.; Madtes, Paul C.

    1986-01-01

    Free-living Rhizobium (according to Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, [1984, The Williams & Wilkins Co., Baltimore], Bradyrhizobium) japonicum was found to release a peptide into the nutrient media. Soybean nodules contained this peptide and exuded it into the soil. The name “rhizobin A” is suggested for this peptide. Nodules also contained another peptide, rhizobin B, as well as an unidentified, ninhydrin-positive compound, rhizobin C. The three peptides were confined to the free-amino-acid pool of the soluble fraction and eluted consecutively from a cation-exchange column. Rhizobin A was isolated in a highly purified form; its molecular mass was approximately 1,600 daltons as determined by Sephadex gel filtration and mass spectrometry. The amino-acid composition could be determined only approximately, because a long time was necessary for acid hydrolysis, possibly due to unusual linkages. The rhizobin concentration in soybean nodules continually increased during 50 days of growth, from 2 to approximately 400 μg/g (fresh weight). When combined nitrogen was added to nodulated soybean and subsequently removed, nitrogenase activity, nodulation, and nodule growth first decreased and then recovered. The relative amount of rhizobin A followed a similar pattern. Rhizobins were not detected in the roots, stems, and leaves of nodulated soybean plants. They were present in Lupinus nodules, but absent in alder nodules. PMID:16347004

  5. Effect of environment on the free and peptide amino acids in rice, wheat, and soybeans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, D J; Adeola, O; Nielsen, S S

    2001-01-01

    Controlled environments (CE) in which light, carbon dioxide, and nutrients are regulated are known to affect the chemical composition of plants. Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) environments are required for a Mars or lunar base where food resupply is both impractical and risky. Astronauts in a CELSS would need to grow and process edible biomass into foods. The complete nature of the changes in chemical composition of CE-grown plants is unknown but must be determined to ensure a safe and nutritionally adequate diet. In this article, we report the changes that occur in free and peptide-bound amino acids (AA) of select CELSS crops (rice, wheat, and soybean) grown in the field or in CE. The nonnitrate nonprotein nitrogen fraction was extracted and then analyzed for free and peptide AA. For grain or seeds, AA levels tended to increase from field to CE conditions; however, for vegetative material, AA levels remained the same or decreased from field to CE conditions. As such compositional changes are identified, researchers will be better able to design safe and nutritious diets for astronauts while minimizing needed energy and other resources.

  6. Solid-phase peptide head-to-side chain cyclodimerization: discovery of C(2)-symmetric cyclic lactam hybrid α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)/agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) analogues with potent activities at the human melanocortin receptors.

    PubMed

    Mayorov, Alexander V; Cai, Minying; Palmer, Erin S; Liu, Zhihua; Cain, James P; Vagner, Josef; Trivedi, Dev; Hruby, Victor J

    2010-10-01

    A novel hybrid melanocortin pharmacophore was designed based on the pharmacophores of the agouti-signaling protein (ASIP), an endogenous melanocortin antagonist, and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), an endogenous melanocortin agonist. The designed hybrid ASIP/MSH pharmacophore was explored in monomeric cyclic, and cyclodimeric templates. The monomeric cyclic disulfide series yielded peptides with hMC3R-selective non-competitive binding affinities. The direct on-resin peptide lactam cyclodimerization yielded nanomolar range (25-120 nM) hMC1R-selective full and partial agonists in the cyclodimeric lactam series which demonstrates an improvement over the previous attempts at hybridization of MSH and agouti protein sequences. The secondary structure-oriented pharmacophore hybridization strategy will prove useful in development of unique allosteric and orthosteric melanocortin receptor modulators. This report also illustrates the utility of peptide cyclodimerization for the development of novel GPCR peptide ligands.

  7. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  8. Effect of dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids on urinary eicosanoids and sex hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled feeding trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substantial evidence relates increased sex hormone concentrations with increased breast cancer risk. Varying omega-3 fatty acid (n-3) intake may lead to alterations in eicosanoid balance and subsequent changes in circulating sex hormones that reduce risk. To clarify effects of dietary fat and n-3 i...

  9. D-amino acid residue in a defensin-like peptide from platypus venom: effect on structure and chromatographic properties.

    PubMed

    Torres, Allan M; Tsampazi, Chryssanthi; Geraghty, Dominic P; Bansal, Paramjit S; Alewood, Paul F; Kuchel, Philip W

    2005-10-15

    The recent discovery that the natriuretic peptide OvCNPb (Ornithorhynchus venom C-type natriuretic peptide B) from platypus (Ornithorynchus anatinus) venom contains a D-amino acid residue suggested that other D-amino-acid-containing peptides might be present in the venom. In the present study, we show that DLP-2 (defensin-like peptide-2), a 42-amino-acid residue polypeptide in the platypus venom, also contains a D-amino acid residue, D-methionine, at position 2, while DLP-4, which has an identical amino acid sequence, has all amino acids in the L-form. These findings were supported further by the detection of isomerase activity in the platypus gland venom extract that converts DLP-4 into DLP-2. In the light of this new information, the tertiary structure of DLP-2 was recalculated using a new structural template with D-Met2. The structure of DLP-4 was also determined in order to evaluate the effect of a D-amino acid at position 2 on the structure and possibly to explain the large retention time difference observed for the two molecules in reverse-phase HPLC. The solution structures of the DLP-2 and DLP-4 are very similar to each other and to the earlier reported structure of DLP-2, which assumed that all amino acids were in the L-form. Our results suggest that the incorporation of the D-amino acid at position 2 has minimal effect on the overall fold in solution.

  10. Anionic magnetite nanoparticle conjugated with pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid for DNA base discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadsai, Sudarat; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Nakkuntod, Maliwan; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2016-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were surface modified with anionic poly( N-acryloyl glycine) (PNAG) and streptavidin for specific interaction with biotin-conjugated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Hydrodynamic size ( D h) of PNAG-grafted MNPs varied from 334 to 496 nm depending on the loading ratio of the MNP to NAG in the reaction. UV-visible and fluorescence spectrophotometries were used to confirm the successful immobilization of streptavidin and PNA on the MNPs. About 291 pmol of the PNA/mg MNP was immobilized on the particle surface. The PNA-functionalized MNPs were effectively used as solid supports to differentiate between fully complementary and non-complementary/single-base mismatch DNA using the PNA probe. These novel anionic MNPs can be efficiently applicable for use as a magnetically guidable support for DNA base discrimination.

  11. Development of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of the HER2 Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young K.; Evangelista, Jennifer; Aschenbach, Konrad; Johansson, Peter; Wen, Xinyu; Chen, Qingrong; Lee, Albert; Hempel, Heidi; Gheeya, Jinesh S.; Getty, Stephanie; Gomez, Romel; Khan, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have gained much interest as molecular recognition tools in biology, medicine and chemistry. This is due to high hybridization efficiency to complimentary oligonucleotides and stability of the duplexes with RNA or DNA. We have synthesized 15/16-mer PNA probes to detect the HER2 mRNA. The performance of these probes to detect the HER2 target was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence bead assays. The PNA probes have sufficiently discriminated between the wild type HER2 target and the mutant target with single base mismatches. Furthermore, the probes exhibited excellent linear concentration dependence between 0.4 to 400 fmol for the target gene. The results demonstrate potential application of PNAs as diagnostic probes with high specificity for quantitative measurements of amplifications or over-expressions of oncogenes. PMID:23593123

  12. Enduracididine, a rare amino acid component of peptide antibiotics: Natural products and synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Darcy J; Naysmith, Briar J; Furkert, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Rising resistance to current clinical antibacterial agents is an imminent threat to global public health and highlights the demand for new lead compounds for drug discovery. One such potential lead compound, the peptide antibiotic teixobactin, was recently isolated from an uncultured bacterial source, and demonstrates remarkably high potency against a wide range of resistant pathogens without apparent development of resistance. A rare amino acid residue component of teixobactin, enduracididine, is only known to occur in a small number of natural products that also possess promising antibiotic activity. This review highlights the presence of enduracididine in natural products, its biosynthesis together with a review of analogues of enduracididine. Reported synthetic approaches to the cyclic guanidine structure of enduracididine are discussed, illustrating the challenges encountered to date in the development of efficient synthetic routes to facilitate drug discovery efforts inspired by the discovery of teixobactin. PMID:28144300

  13. Stability analysis of glutamic acid linked peptides coupled to NOTA through different chemical linkages.

    PubMed

    Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-11-03

    Glutamic acid is a commonly used linker to form dimeric peptides with enhanced binding affinity than their corresponding monomeric counterparts. We have previously labeled NOTA-Bn-NCS-PEG3-E[c(RGDyK)]2 (NOTA-PRGD2) [1] with [(18)F]AlF and (68)Ga for imaging tumor angiogenesis. The p-SCN-Bn-NOTA was attached to E[c(RGDyK)]2 [2] through a mini-PEG with a thiourea linkage, and the product [1] was stable at radiolabeling condition of 100 °C and pH 4.0 acetate buffer. However, when the same p-SCN-Bn-NOTA was directly attached to the α-amine of E[c(RGDfK)]2 [3], the product NOTA-Bn-NCS-E[c(RGDfK)]2 [4] became unstable under similar conditions and the release of monomeric c(RGDfK) [5] was observed. The purpose of this work was to use HPLC and LC-MS to monitor the decomposition of glutamic acid linked dimeric peptides and their NOTA derivatives. A c(RGDyK) [6] and bombesin (BBN) [7] heterodimer c(RGDyK)-E-BBN [8], and a dimeric bombesin E(BBN)2 [9], both with a glutamic acid as the linker, along with a model compound PhSCN-E[c(RGDfK)] [10] were also studied. All the compounds were dissolved in 0.5 M pH 4.0 acetate buffer at the concentration of 1 mg/mL, and 0.1 mL of each sample was heated at 100 °C for 10 min and the more stable compounds were heated for another 30 min. The samples at both time points were analyzed with analytical HPLC to monitor the decomposition of the heated samples. The samples with decomposition were further analyzed by LC-MS to determine the mass of products from the decomposition for possible structure elucidation. After 10 min heating, the obvious release of c(RGDfK) [5] was observed for NOTA-Bn-NCS-E[c(RGDfK)]2 [4] and Ph-SCN-E[c(RGDfK)] [10]. Little or no release of monomers was observed for the remaining samples at this time point. After further heating, the release of monomers was clearly observed for E[c(RGDyK)]2 [2], E[c(RGDfK)]2 [3], c(RGDyK)-E-BBN [8], and E(BBN)2 [9]. No decomposition or little decomposition was observed for NOTA

  14. Roles of d-Amino Acids on the Bioactivity of Host Defense Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E. S.; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are positively-charged and amphipathic components of the innate immune system that have demonstrated great potential to become the next generation of broad spectrum therapeutic agents effective against a vast array of pathogens and tumor. As such, many approaches have been taken to improve the therapeutic efficacy of HDPs. Amongst these methods, the incorporation of d-amino acids (d-AA) is an approach that has demonstrated consistent success in improving HDPs. Although, virtually all HDP review articles briefly mentioned about the role of d-AA, however it is rather surprising that no systematic review specifically dedicated to this topic exists. Given the impact that d-AA incorporation has on HDPs, this review aims to fill that void with a systematic discussion of the impact of d-AA on HDPs. PMID:27376281

  15. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  16. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A; Wepasnick, Kevin A; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  17. Site-Selective Binding of Nanoparticles to Double-Stranded DNA via Peptide Nucleic Acid "Invasion"

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, A.L.; van der Lelie, D.; Sun, D.; Maye, M. M.; Gang, O.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for by-design placement of nano-objects along double-stranded (ds) DNA. A molecular intercalator, designed as a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA chimera, is able to invade dsDNA at the PNA-side due to the hybridization specificity between PNA and one of the duplex strands. At the same time, the single-stranded (ss) DNA tail of the chimera, allows for anchoring of nano-objects that have been functionalized with complementary ssDNA. The developed method is applied for interparticle attachment and for the fabrication of particle clusters using a dsDNA template. This method significantly broadens the molecular toolbox for constructing nanoscale systems by including the most conventional not yet utilized DNA motif, double helix DNA.

  18. Adsorption of peptide nucleic acid and DNA decamers at electrically charged surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Fojta, M; Vetterl, V; Tomschik, M; Jelen, F; Nielsen, P; Wang, J; Palecek, E

    1997-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and DNA decamers (GTAGATCACT and the complementary sequence) on a mercury surface was studied by means of AC impedance measurements at a hanging mercury drop electrode. The nucleic acid was first attached to the electrode by adsorption from a 5-microliter drop of PNA (or DNA) solution, and the electrode with the adsorbed nucleic acid layer was then washed and immersed in the blank background electrolyte where the differential capacity C of the electrode double layer was measured as a function of the applied potential E. It was found that the adsorption behavior of the PNA with an electrically neutral backbone differs greatly from that of the DNA (with a negatively charged backbone), whereas the DNA-PNA hybrid shows intermediate behavior. At higher surface coverage PNA molecules associate at the surface, and the minimum value of C is shifted to negative potentials because of intermolecular interactions of PNA at the surface. Prolonged exposure of PNA to highly negative potentials does not result in PNA desorption, whereas almost all of the DNA is removed from the surface at these potentials. Adsorption of PNA decreases with increasing NaCl concentration in the range from 0 to 50 mM NaCl, in contrast to DNA, the adsorption of which increases under the same conditions. PMID:9129832

  19. Tetanus toxin production is triggered by the transition from amino acid consumption to peptides.

    PubMed

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Steen, Jennifer A; Zaragoza, Nicolas E; Moonen, Glenn; Moutafis, George; Hodson, Mark P; Power, John; Nielsen, Lars K; Marcellin, Esteban

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria produce some of the most potent biomolecules known, of which many cause serious diseases such as tetanus. For prevention, billions of people and countless animals are immunised with the highly effective vaccine, industrially produced by large-scale fermentation. However, toxin production is often hampered by low yields and batch-to-batch variability. Improved productivity has been constrained by a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling toxin production. Here we have developed a reproducible experimental framework for screening phenotypic determinants in Clostridium tetani under a process that mimics an industrial setting. We show that amino acid depletion induces production of the tetanus toxin. Using time-course transcriptomics and extracellular metabolomics to generate a 'fermentation atlas' that ascribe growth behaviour, nutrient consumption and gene expression to the fermentation phases, we found a subset of preferred amino acids. Exponential growth is characterised by the consumption of those amino acids followed by a slower exponential growth phase where peptides are consumed, and toxin is produced. The results aim at assisting in fermentation medium design towards the improvement of vaccine production yields and reproducibility. In conclusion, our work not only provides deep fermentation dynamics but represents the foundation for bioprocess design based on C. tetani physiological behaviour under industrial settings.

  20. Quantification of glycated N-terminal peptide of hemoglobin using derivatization for multiple functional groups of amino acids followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yohei; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2016-02-01

    A novel method of amino acid analysis using derivatization of multiple functional groups (amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups) was applied to measure glycated amino acids in order to quantify glycated peptides and evaluate the degree of glycation of peptide. Amino and carboxyl groups of amino acids were derivatized with 1-bromobutane so that the hydrophobicities and basicities of the amino acids, including glycated amino acids, were improved. These derivatized amino acids could be detected with high sensitivity using LC-MS/MS. In this study, 1-deoxyfructosyl-VHLTPE and VHLTPE, which are N-terminal peptides of the β-chains of hemoglobin, were selected as target compounds. After reducing the peptide sample solution with sodium borohydride, the obtained peptides were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid. The released amino acids were then derivatized with 1-bromobutane and analyzed with LC-MS/MS. The derivatized amino acids, including glycated amino acids, could be separated using an octadecyl silylated silica column and good sharp peaks were detected. We show a confirmatory experiment that the proposed method can be applied to evaluate the degree of glycation of peptides, using mixtures of glycated and non-glycated peptide.

  1. Capric acid and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose increase the immunogenicity of nasally administered peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nordone, Sushila K; Peacock, James W; Kirwan, Shaun M; Staats, Herman F

    2006-06-01

    Immunization by the nasal route is an established method for the induction of mucosal and systemic humoral and cell-mediated antigen-specific responses. However, the effectiveness of nasal immunization is often hampered by the need for increased doses of antigen. Bioadhesives and absorption enhancers were investigated for their ability to enhance immune responses in mice after nasal immunization with model HIV-1 peptide and protein immunogens. Two additives, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and capric acid, consistently enhanced antigen-specific serum IgG endpoint titers under conditions in which antigen dose was limiting. Nasal immunization of mice with 20 microg of an HIV-1 peptide immunogen plus cholera toxin (CT) as adjuvant induced serum antipeptide IgG titers of 1:9.5log2 after four immunizations while the addition of CA or HPMC to the vaccine formulation increased serum antipeptide IgG titers to 1:15.4log2 and 1:17.6log2, respectively. When 5 microg recombinant HIV-1 gp41 was used as the immunogen, the addition of CA or HPMC to the vaccine formulation increased serum anti-gp41 IgG titers to 1:11.6log2 and 1:8.8log2, respectively, compared to 1:5.2log2 after three nasal immunizations with 5 microg gp41 + CT alone. Thus, HPMC and capric acid may be useful additives that increase the immunogenicity of nasally administered vaccines and permit less antigen to be used with each immunization.

  2. Electrostatic binding and hydrophobic collapse of peptide-nucleic acid aggregates quantified using force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Frutos, Silvia; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Lorenzo, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramón; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2013-06-25

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide that contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interactions. From the measured pulling curves we determine the spectrum of binding affinities, kinetic barriers, and lengths of DNA segments sequestered within the KF-DNA complex. We find there is a capture distance beyond which the complex collapses into compact aggregates stabilized by strong hydrophobic forces and discuss how the bending rigidity of the nucleic acid affects this process. We hypothesize that within an in vivo context, the enhanced electrostatic interaction of KF due to its aggregation might mediate the binding to other polyanions. The proposed methodology should be useful to quantitatively characterize other compounds or proteins in which the formation of aggregates is relevant.

  3. An arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase is a hormone-dependent and obligatory protein in the signal transduction pathway of steroidogenic hormones.

    PubMed

    Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Maloberti, Paula; Neuman, Isabel; Cano, Florencia; Castilla, Rocío; Castillo, Fernanda; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2005-06-01

    We have described that, in adrenal and Leydig cells, the hormonal regulation of free arachidonic acid (AA) concentration is mediated by the concerted action of two enzymes: an acyl-CoA thioesterase (MTE-I or ARTISt) and an acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS4). In this study we analyzed the potential regulation of these proteins by hormonal action in steroidogenic cells. We demonstrated that ACS4 is rapidly induced by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cAMP in Y1 adrenocortical cells. The hormone and its second messenger increased ACS4 protein levels in a time and concentration dependent way. Maximal concentration of ACTH (10 mIU/ml) produced a significant effect after 15 min of treatment and exerted the highest increase (3-fold) after 30 min. Moreover, (35)S-methionine incorporation showed that the increase in ACS4 protein levels is due to an increase in the de novo synthesis of the protein. On the contrary MTE-I protein levels in Y1 and MA-10 cells did not change after steroidogenic stimuli. In contrast with the effect observed on protein levels, stimulation of both cell lines did not change ACS4 RNA levels during the first hour of treatment, indicating that the effect of both stimuli is exerted at the level of ACS4 protein synthesis.StAR protein induction has a key role on the activation of steroidogenesis since this protein increases the rate of the limiting step of the whole process. In agreement with the fact that the inhibition of ACS4 activity by triacsin C blocks cAMP-stimulated progesterone production by MA-10 Leydig cells, here we demonstrated that ACS4 inhibition also reduces StAR protein levels. Moreover, exogenous AA was able to overcome the effect of triacsin C on both events, StAR induction and steroidogenesis. These results were confirmed by experiments using ACS4-targeted siRNA which result in a reduction in both ACS4 and StAR protein levels. The concomitant decrease in steroid production was overcome by the addition of AA to the knocked-out cells. In summary

  4. Dose response of whey protein isolate in addition to a typical mixed meal on blood amino acids and hormonal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Scott C; McCargar, Linda; Jelen, Paul; Bell, Gordon J

    2014-04-01

    The purpose was to investigate the effects of a controlled typical 1-day diet supplemented with two different doses of whey protein isolate on blood amino acid profiles and hormonal concentrations following the final meal. Nine males (age: 29.6 ± 6.3 yrs) completed four conditions in random order: a control (C) condition of a typical mixed diet containing ~10% protein (0.8 g·kg1), 65% carbohydrate, and 25% fat; a placebo (P) condition calorically matched with carbohydrate to the whey protein conditions; a low-dose condition of 0.8 grams of whey protein isolate per kilogram body mass per day (g·kg1·d1; W1) in addition to the typical mixed diet; or a high-dose condition of 1.6 g·kg1·d1 (W2) of supplemental whey protein in addition to the typical mixed diet. Following the final meal, significant (p < .05) increases in total amino acids, essential amino acids (EAA), branch-chained amino acids (BCAA), and leucine were observed in plasma with whey protein supplementation while no changes were observed in the control and placebo conditions. There was no significant group difference for glucose, insulin, testosterone, cortisol, or growth hormone. In conclusion, supplementing a typical daily food intake consisting of 0.8 g of protein·kg1·d1 with a whey protein isolate (an additional 0.8 or 1.6 g·kg1·d1) significantly elevated total amino acids, EAA, BCAA, and leucine but had no effect on glucose, insulin, testosterone, cortisol, or growth hormone following the final meal. Future acute and chronic supplementation research examining the physiological and health outcomes associated with elevated amino acid profiles is warranted.

  5. Incorporation of extra amino acids in peptide recognition probe to improve specificity and selectivity of an electrochemical peptide-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Zaitouna, Anita J; Maben, Alex J; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2015-07-30

    We investigated the effect of incorporating extra amino acids (AA) at the n-terminus of the thiolated and methylene blue-modified peptide probe on both specificity and selectivity of an electrochemical peptide-based (E-PB) HIV sensor. The addition of a flexible (SG)3 hexapeptide is, in particular, useful in improving sensor selectivity, whereas the addition of a highly hydrophilic (EK)3 hexapeptide has shown to be effective in enhancing sensor specificity. Overall, both E-PB sensors fabricated using peptide probes with the added AA (SG-EAA and EK-EAA) showed better specificity and selectivity, especially when compared to the sensor fabricated using a peptide probe without the extra AA (EAA). For example, the selectivity factor recorded in the 50% saliva was ∼2.5 for the EAA sensor, whereas the selectivity factor was 7.8 for both the SG-EAA and EK-EAA sensors. Other sensor properties such as the limit of detection and dynamic range were minimally affected by the addition of the six AA sequence. The limit of detection was 0.5 nM for the EAA sensor and 1 nM for both SG-EAA and EK-EAA sensors. The saturation target concentration was ∼200 nM for all three sensors. Unlike previously reported E-PB HIV sensors, the peptide probe functions as both the recognition element and antifouling passivating agent; this modification eliminates the need to include an additional antifouling diluent, which simplifies the sensor design and fabrication protocol.

  6. Global analysis of myocardial peptides containing cysteines with irreversible sulfinic and sulfonic acid post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Paulech, Jana; Liddy, Kiersten A; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; White, Melanie Y; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine (Cys) oxidation is a crucial post-translational modification (PTM) associated with redox signaling and oxidative stress. As Cys is highly reactive to oxidants it forms a range of post-translational modifications, some that are biologically reversible (e.g. disulfides, Cys sulfenic acid) and others (Cys sulfinic [Cys-SO2H] and sulfonic [Cys-SO3H] acids) that are considered "irreversible." We developed an enrichment method to isolate Cys-SO2H/SO3H-containing peptides from complex tissue lysates that is compatible with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acidity of these post-translational modification (pKa Cys-SO3H < 0) creates a unique charge distribution when localized on tryptic peptides at acidic pH that can be utilized for their purification. The method is based on electrostatic repulsion of Cys-SO2H/SO3H-containing peptides from cationic resins (i.e. "negative" selection) followed by "positive" selection using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Modification of strong cation exchange protocols decreased the complexity of initial flowthrough fractions by allowing for hydrophobic retention of neutral peptides. Coupling of strong cation exchange and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography allowed for increased enrichment of Cys-SO2H/SO3H (up to 80%) from other modified peptides. We identified 181 Cys-SO2H/SO3H sites from rat myocardial tissue subjected to physiologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 (<100 μm) or to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury via Langendorff perfusion. I/R significantly increased Cys-SO2H/SO3H-modified peptides from proteins involved in energy utilization and contractility, as well as those involved in oxidative damage and repair.

  7. Cleavage of arginyl-arginine and lysyl-arginine from the C-terminus of pro-hormone peptides by human germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and the C-domain of human somatic ACE.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R E; Williams, T A; Sajid, M; Corvol, P; Coates, D

    1997-01-01

    Mammalian germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) is a single-domain dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase found exclusively in male germ cells, which has almost identical sequence and enzymic properties with the C-domain of the two-domain somatic ACE. Mutant mice that do not express gACE are infertile, suggesting a role for the enzyme in the processing of undefined peptides involved in fertilization. A number of spermatid peptides [e.g. cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin] are processed from pro-hormones by endo- and exo-proteolytic cleavages which might generate substrates for gACE. We have shown that peptide hormone intermediates with Lys/Arg-Arg at the C-terminus are high-affinity substrates for human gACE. gACE from human sperm cleaved Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of the CCK5-GRR (GWMDFGRR), a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of a CCK-gastrin prohormone intermediate. Hydrolysis of CCK5-GRR by recombinant human C-domain ACE was Cl- dependent, with maximal activity achieved in 5-10 mM NaCl at pH 6.4. C-Domain ACE cleaved Lys/Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of dynorphin-(1-7), a pro-TRH peptide KRQHPGKR, and two insect peptides FSPRLGKR and FSPRLGRR. C-Domain ACE displayed high affinity towards all these substrates with Vmax/Km values between 14 and 113 times greater than the Vmax/Km for the conversion of the best known ACE substrate, angiotensin I, into angiotensin II. In conclusion, we have identified a new class of substrates for human gACE, and we suggest that gACE might be an alternative to carboxypeptidase E for the trimming of basic dipeptides from the C-terminus of intermediates generated from pro-hormones by subtilisin-like convertases in human male germ cells. PMID:9371719

  8. Hormone therapy in acne.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2013-01-01

    Underlying hormone imbalances may render acne unresponsive to conventional therapy. Relevant investigations followed by initiation of hormonal therapy in combination with regular anti-acne therapy may be necessary if signs of hyperandrogenism are present. In addition to other factors, androgen-stimulated sebum production plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acne in women. Sebum production is also regulated by other hormones, including estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, glucocorticoids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins. Hormonal therapy may also be beneficial in female acne patients with normal serum androgen levels. An understanding of the sebaceous gland and the hormonal influences in the pathogenesis of acne would be essential for optimizing hormonal therapy. Sebocytes form the sebaceous gland. Human sebocytes express a multitude of receptors, including receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters and the receptors for steroid and thyroid hormones. Various hormones and mediators acting through the sebocyte receptors play a role in the orchestration of pathogenetic lesions of acne. Thus, the goal of hormonal treatment is a reduction in sebum production. This review shall focus on hormonal influences in the elicitation of acne via the sebocyte receptors, pathways of cutaneous androgen metabolism, various clinical scenarios and syndromes associated with acne, and the available therapeutic armamentarium of hormones and drugs having hormone-like actions in the treatment of acne.

  9. Insulin and growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) have differential beneficial effects on cell turnover in the pituitary, hypothalamus and cerebellum of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Tuda, María; Frago, Laura M; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús

    2011-04-30

    Poorly controlled type1 diabetes is associated with hormonal imbalances and increased cell death in different tissues, including the pituitary, hypothalamus and cerebellum. In the pituitary, lactotrophs are the cell population with the greatest increase in cell death, whereas in the hypothalamus and cerebellum astrocytes are most highly affected. Insulin treatment can delay, but does not prevent, diabetic complications. As ghrelin and growth hormone (GH) secretagogues are reported to prevent apoptosis in different tissues, and to modulate glucose homeostasis, a combined hormonal treatment may be beneficial. Hence, we analyzed the effect of insulin and GH-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) on diabetes-induced apoptosis in the pituitary, hypothalamus and cerebellum of diabetic rats. Adult male Wistar rats were made diabetic by streptozotocin injection (65 mg/kg ip) and divided into four groups from diabetes onset: those receiving a daily sc injection of saline (1 ml/kg/day), GHRP-6 (150 μg/kg/day), insulin (1-8U/day) or insulin plus GHRP-6 for 8 weeks. Control non-diabetic rats received saline (1 ml/kg/day). Diabetes increased cell death in the pituitary, hypothalamus and cerebellum (P<0.05). In the pituitary, insulin treatment prevented diabetes-induced apoptosis (P<0.01), as well as the decline in prolactin and GH mRNA levels (P<0.05). In the hypothalamus, neither insulin nor GHRP-6 decreased diabetes-induced cell death. However, the combined treatment of insulin+GHRP-6 prevented the diabetes induced-decrease in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels (P<0.05). In the cerebellum, although insulin treatment increased GFAP levels (P<0.01), only the combined treatment of insulin+ GHRP-6 decreased diabetes-induced apoptosis (P<0.05). In conclusion, insulin and GHRP-6 exert tissue specific effects in STZ-diabetic rats and act synergistically on some processes. Indeed, insulin treatment does not seem to be effective on preventing some of the diabetes-induced alterations

  10. Observation of the side chain O-methylation of glutamic acid or aspartic acid containing model peptides by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Atik, A Emin; Guray, Melda Z; Yalcin, Talat

    2017-03-15

    O-methylation of the side chains of glutamic acid (E) and aspartic acid (D) residues is generally observed modification when an acidified methanol/water (MeOH/dH2O) mixture is used as a solvent system during sample preparation for proteomic research. This chemical modification may result misidentification with endogenous protein methylation; therefore, a special care should be taken during sample handling prior to mass spectrometric analysis. In the current study, we systematically examined the extent of E/D methylation and C-terminus carboxyl group of synthetic model peptides in terms of different incubation temperatures, storage times, and added acid types as well as its percentages. To monitor these effects, C-terminus amidated and free acid forms of synthetic model peptides comprised of E or D residue(s) have been analyzed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Additionally, LC-MS/MS experiments were performed to confirm the formation of methylated peptide product. The results showed that the rate of methylation was increased as the temperature increases along with prolong incubation times. Moreover, the extent of methylation was remarkably high when formic acid (FA) used as a protonation agent instead of acetic acid (AA). In addition, it was found that the degree of methylation was significantly decreased by lowering acid percentages in ESI solution. More than one acidic residue containing model peptides have been also used to explore the extent of multiple methylation reaction. Lastly, the ethanol (EtOH) and isopropanol (iPrOH) have been substituted separately with MeOH in sample preparation step to investigate the extent of esterification reaction under the same experimental conditions. However, in the positive perspective of view, this method can be used as a simple, rapid and cheap method for methylation of acidic residues under normal laboratory conditions.

  11. Potent and selective peptide agonists of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH) action at human melanocortin receptor 5; their synthesis and biological evaluation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Maria A; MacNeil, Tanya; Tang, Rui; Fong, Tung M; Angeles Cabello, M; Maroto, Marta; Teran, Ana

    2007-05-01

    Melanocortin receptors (MC1-5R) and their endogenous ligands (melanocyte-stimulating hormones and adrenocorticotropic hormone) are involved in many physiological processes in humans. Of those receptors, the actions of MC5R are the least understood despite its broad presence in the numerous peripheral tissues and brain. In this study, we describe synthesis and pharmacological properties in vitro (receptor-binding affinity and agonist activity) of several cyclic analogs of alphaMSH which are potent agonists at hMC5R (EC(50) below 1 nM) and of enhanced receptor subtype selectivity (more than 2000-fold versus hMC1b,3R and about 70- to 200-fold versus hMC4R). These compounds are analogs of Ac-Nle(4)-cyclo[Asp(5)-His(6)-D-Nal(2')(7)-Pip(8)-Trp(9)-Lys(10)]-NH(2) (Pip: pipecolic acid) in which His(6) has been replaced with sterically hindered amino acids. They may be useful tools in the elucidation of the MC5R role in skin disorders and in immunomodulatory and in anti-inflammatory actions of alphaMSH.

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Antimicrobial Peptides Developed Using an Amino Acid-Based Activity Prediction Method

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Xiaolu; Fan, Yingzi; He, Gu; Wan, Yang; Yu, Chaoheng; Tang, Jianying; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Hailong; Xiang, Rong; Pan, Ying; Liu, Yan; Lu, Lian

    2014-01-01

    To design and discover new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with high levels of antimicrobial activity, a number of machine-learning methods and prediction methods have been developed. Here, we present a new prediction method that can identify novel AMPs that are highly similar in sequence to known peptides but offer improved antimicrobial activity along with lower host cytotoxicity. Using previously generated AMP amino acid substitution data, we developed an amino acid activity contribution matrix that contained an activity contribution value for each amino acid in each position of the model peptide. A series of AMPs were designed with this method. After evaluating the antimicrobial activities of these novel AMPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, DP7 was chosen for further analysis. Compared to the parent peptide HH2, this novel AMP showed broad-spectrum, improved antimicrobial activity, and in a cytotoxicity assay it showed lower toxicity against human cells. The in vivo antimicrobial activity of DP7 was tested in a Staphylococcus aureus infection murine model. When inoculated and treated via intraperitoneal injection, DP7 reduced the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage solution. Electron microscope imaging and the results indicated disruption of the S. aureus outer membrane by DP7. Our new prediction method can therefore be employed to identify AMPs possessing minor amino acid differences with improved antimicrobial activities, potentially increasing the therapeutic agents available to combat multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:24982064

  13. In vitro and in vivo activities of antimicrobial peptides developed using an amino acid-based activity prediction method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Xiaolu; Fan, Yingzi; He, Gu; Wan, Yang; Yu, Chaoheng; Tang, Jianying; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Hailong; Xiang, Rong; Pan, Ying; Liu, Yan; Lu, Lian; Yang, Li

    2014-09-01

    To design and discover new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with high levels of antimicrobial activity, a number of machine-learning methods and prediction methods have been developed. Here, we present a new prediction method that can identify novel AMPs that are highly similar in sequence to known peptides but offer improved antimicrobial activity along with lower host cytotoxicity. Using previously generated AMP amino acid substitution data, we developed an amino acid activity contribution matrix that contained an activity contribution value for each amino acid in each position of the model peptide. A series of AMPs were designed with this method. After evaluating the antimicrobial activities of these novel AMPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, DP7 was chosen for further analysis. Compared to the parent peptide HH2, this novel AMP showed broad-spectrum, improved antimicrobial activity, and in a cytotoxicity assay it showed lower toxicity against human cells. The in vivo antimicrobial activity of DP7 was tested in a Staphylococcus aureus infection murine model. When inoculated and treated via intraperitoneal injection, DP7 reduced the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage solution. Electron microscope imaging and the results indicated disruption of the S. aureus outer membrane by DP7. Our new prediction method can therefore be employed to identify AMPs possessing minor amino acid differences with improved antimicrobial activities, potentially increasing the therapeutic agents available to combat multidrug-resistant infections.

  14. A bottom-up approach to build the hyperpolarizability of peptides and proteins from their amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duboisset, Julien; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Benichou, Emmanuel; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Lascoux, Noelle; Jonin, Christian; Hache, François; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2013-08-29

    We experimentally demonstrate that some peptides and proteins lend themselves to an elementary analysis where their first hyperpolarizability can be decomposed into the coherent superposition of the first hyperpolarizability of their elementary units. We then show that those elementary units can be associated with the amino acids themselves in the case of nonaromatic amino acids and nonresonant second harmonic generation. As a case study, this work investigates the experimentally determined first hyperpolarizability of rat tail Type I collagen and compares it to that of the shorter peptide [(PPG)10]3, where P and G are the one-letter code for Proline and Glycine, respectively, and that of the triamino acid peptides PPG and GGG. An absolute value of (0.16 ± 0.01) × 10(-30) esu for the first hyperpolarizability of nonaromatic amino acids is then obtained by using the newly defined 0.087 × 10(-30) esu reference value for water. By using a collagen like model, the microscopic hyperpolarizability along the peptide bond can be evaluated at (0.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-30) esu.

  15. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve intestina...

  16. Formulation of pH responsive peptides as inhalable dry powders for pulmonary delivery of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wanling; Kwok, Philip C.L.; Chow, Michael Y.T.; Tang, Patricia; Mason, A. James; Chan, Hak-Kim; Lam, Jenny. K.W.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids have the potential to be used as therapies or vaccines for many different types of disease but delivery remains the most significant challenge to their clinical adoption. pH responsive peptides containing either histidine or derivatives of 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) can mediate effective DNA transfection in lung epithelial cells with the latter remaining effective even in the presence of lung surfactant containing bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF), making this class of peptides attractive candidates for delivering nucleic acids to lung tissues. To further assess the suitability of pH responsive peptides for pulmonary delivery by inhalation, dry powder formulations of pH responsive peptides and plasmid DNA, with mannitol as carrier, were produced by either spray drying (SD) or spray freeze drying (SFD). The properties of the two types of powders were characterised and compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), next generation impaction (NGI), gel retardation and in vitro transfection via a twin-stage impinger (TSI) following aerosolisation by a dry powder inhaler (Osmohaler™). Although the aerodynamic performance and transfection efficacy of both powders were good, the overall performance revealed SD powders to have a number of advantages over SFD powders and are the more effective formulation with potential for efficient nucleic acid delivery through inhalation. PMID:23702276

  17. VCD studies on cyclic peptides assembled from L-α-amino acids and a trans-2-aminocyclopentane- or trans-2-aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Vass, E; Strijowski, U; Wollschläger, K; Mándity, I M; Szilvágyi, G; Jewgiński, M; Gaus, K; Royo, S; Majer, Z; Sewald, N; Hollósi, M

    2010-11-01

    The increasing interest in peptidomimetics of biological relevance prompted us to synthesize a series of cyclic peptides comprising trans-2-aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid (Achc) or trans-2-aminocyclopentane carboxylic acid (Acpc). NMR experiments in combination with MD calculations were performed to investigate the three-dimensional structure of the cyclic peptides. These data were compared to the conformational information obtained by electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy. Experimental VCD spectra were compared to theoretical VCD spectra computed quantum chemically at B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional theory (DFT) level. The good agreement between the structural features derived from the VCD spectra and the NMR-based structures underlines the applicability of VCD in studying the conformation of small cyclic peptides.

  18. Synthesis and Splice-Redirecting Activity of Branched, Arginine-Rich Peptide Dendrimer Conjugates of Peptide Nucleic Acid Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides have found excellent utility in cell and in vivo models for enhancement of delivery of attached charge-neutral PNA or PMO oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis of dendrimeric peptides containing 2- or 4-branched arms each having one or more R-Ahx-R motifs and their disulfide conjugation to a PNA705 splice-redirecting oligonucleotide. Conjugates were assayed in a HeLa pLuc705 cell assay for luciferase up-regulation and splicing redirection. Whereas 8-Arg branched peptide−PNA conjugates showed poor activity compared to a linear (R-Ahx-R)4−PNA conjugate, 2-branched and some 4-branched 12 and 16 Arg peptide−PNA conjugates showed activity similar to that of the corresponding linear peptide−PNA conjugates. Many of the 12- and 16-Arg conjugates retained significant activity in the presence of serum. Evidence showed that biological activity in HeLa pLuc705 cells of the PNA conjugates of branched and linear (R-Ahx-R) peptides is associated with an energy-dependent uptake pathway, predominantly clathrin-dependent, but also with some caveolae dependence. PMID:20879728

  19. Stability improvement of natural food colors: Impact of amino acid and peptide addition on anthocyanin stability in model beverages.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2017-03-01

    Anthocyanins are prone to chemical degradation and color fading in the presence of vitamin C. The potential of three amino acids (l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, l-tryptophan) and a polypeptide (ε-poly-l-lysine) in prolonging the color stability of purple carrot anthocyanins (0.025%) in model beverages (0.05% l-ascorbic acid, citric acid, pH 3.0) stored at elevated temperature (40°C/7 days) was examined. In the absence of amino acids or peptides, anthocyanin degraded at first-order reaction rate. Addition of amino acids or peptide (0.1%) increased the color stability of anthocyanins, with the most significant improvement observed for l-tryptophan. The average half-life of anthocyanin color increased from 2 days to 6 days with l-tryptophan addition. Fluorescence quenching measurements revealed that the l-tryptophan interacted with anthocyanins mainly through hydrogen bonding, although some hydrophobic interaction may also have been involved. Overall, this study suggests that amino acid or peptide addition may prolong the color stability of anthocyanin in beverage products.

  20. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Giudetti, Anna M.; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Gnoni, Gabriele V.; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs). The citrate carrier (CiC) and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27231907

  1. Nisin-induced expression of a recombinant antihypertensive peptide in dairy lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptides with antihypertensive activity have been identified from the enzymatic hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. A 12-residue peptide (FFVAPFPEVFGK) shown to inhibit the angiotensin I-converting enzyme is released from the enzymatic breakdown of aS1-casein. A synthetic gene encoding this peptid...

  2. Partial d-amino acid substitution: Improved enzymatic stability and preserved Ab recognition of a MUC2 epitope peptide

    PubMed Central

    Tugyi, Regina; Uray, Katalin; Iván, Dóra; Fellinger, Erzsébet; Perkins, Alan; Hudecz, Ferenc

    2005-01-01

    The stability of an immunogen against enzymatic degradation is considered an important factor for the design of synthetic vaccines. For our studies, we have selected an epitope from the tandem-repeat unit of the high-molecular-weight MUC2 mucin glycoprotein, which can be underglycosylated in case of colon cancer. In this study, we prepared a MUC2 peptide containing the PTGTQ epitope of a MUC2 protein backbone-specific mAb 996 and its derivatives. In these peptides, the N- and C-terminal flanking regions were systematically substituted by up to three d-amino acids. Peptides prepared by solid-phase synthesis were tested for their mAb 996 binding in competitive ELISA experiments, and their stability was studied in serum and lysosomal preparation. Our data show that the epitope function of peptide 15TPTPTGTQTPT25 is retained even in the presence of two d-amino acid residues at its N-terminal flanking region and up to three at its C-terminal flanking region (tpTPTGTQtpt). Also, this partly d peptide shows high resistance against proteolytic degradation in diluted human serum and in lysosomal preparation. These findings suggest that, by appropriate combination of structural modifications (namely, d-amino acid substitution) in the flanks of an Ab epitope, it is feasible to construct a synthetic antigen with preserved recognition properties and high stability against enzymatic degradation. Peptides tPTPTGTQTpt and tpTPTGTQTpt derived from this study can be used for immunization experiments and as potential components of synthetic vaccines for tumor therapy. PMID:15630090

  3. Information transfer from DNA to peptide nucleic acids by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Christensen, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are analogs of nucleic acids in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is replaced by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. Oligocytidylates have been shown to act as templates for formation of longer oligomers of G from PNA G2 dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from DNA to PNA. DNA C4T2C4 is an efficient template for synthesis of PNA G4A2G4 using G2 and A2 units as substrates. The corresponding synthesis of PNA G4C2G4 on DNA C4G2C4 is less efficient. Incorporation of PNA T2 into PNA products on DNA C4A2C4 is the least efficient of the three reactions. These results, obtained using PNA dimers as substrates, parallel those obtained using monomeric activated nucleotides.

  4. Progress in nanoparticulate systems for peptide, proteins and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Gosecki, Mateusz

    2011-11-01

    Progress in many therapies, in particular in the therapies based on peptides, proteins and nucleic acids used as bioactive compounds, strongly depends on development of appropriate carriers which would be suitable for controlled delivery of the intact abovementioned compounds to required tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. This review presents last ten years' achievements and problems in development and application of synthetic polymer nanoparticulate carriers for oral, pulmonary and nasal delivery routes of oligopeptides and proteins. Whereas some traditional synthetic polymer carriers are only briefly recalled the main attention is concentrated on nanoparticles produced from functional copolymers mostly with hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups, suitable for immobilization of targeting moieties and for assuring prolonged circulation of nanoparticles in blood. Formulations of various nanoparticulate systems are described, including solid particles, polymer micelles, nanovesicles and nanogels, especially systems allowing drug release induced by external stimuli. Discussed are properties of these species, in particular stability in buffers and models of body fluids, loading with drugs and with drug models, drug release processes and results of biological studies. There are also discussed systems for gene delivery with special attention devoted to polymers suitable for compacting nucleic acids into nanoparticles as well as the relations between chemical structure of polymer carriers and ability of the latter for crossing cell membranes and for endosomal escape.

  5. Squaric Acid-Based Peptidic Inhibitors of Matrix Metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Onaran, M. Burak; Comeau, Anthony B.; Seto, Christopher T.

    2008-01-01

    A series of squaric acid-peptide conjugates were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of MMP-1. The cyclobut-3-enedione core was substituted at the 3-position with several functional groups, such as -N(alkyl)OH, -NHOH and –OH, that are designed to bind to the zinc atom in the active site of the metalloprotease. The 4-position of the cyclobut-3-enedione was derivatized with mono- or dipeptides that are designed to bind in the S1′ and S2′ subsites of the enzyme, and position the metal chelating group appropriately in the active site for binding to zinc. Positional scanning revealed that -N(Me)OH provided the highest level of inhibition among the chelating groups that were tested, and Leu-Tle-NHMe was the preferred amino acid sequence. A combination of these groups yielded an inhibitor with an IC50 value of 95 μM. For one inhibitor, conversion of one of the carbonyl groups on the cyclobut-3-enedione core to a thiocarbonyl group resulted in a 18-fold increase in potency, and yielded a compound with an IC50 value of 15 μM. PMID:16356002

  6. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label

    PubMed Central

    Yotapan, Nattawut; Charoenpakdee, Chayan; Wathanathavorn, Pawinee; Ditmangklo, Boonsong

    2014-01-01

    Summary DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA–DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes. PMID:25246975

  7. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label.

    PubMed

    Yotapan, Nattawut; Charoenpakdee, Chayan; Wathanathavorn, Pawinee; Ditmangklo, Boonsong; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2014-01-01

    DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA-DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes.

  8. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  9. Disrupting Protein Expression with Peptide Nucleic Acids Reduces Infection by Obligate Intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Pelc, Rebecca S.; McClure, Jennifer C.; Kaur, Simran J.; Sears, Khandra T.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Ceraul, Shane M.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) are single-stranded synthetic nucleic acids with a pseudopeptide backbone in lieu of the phosphodiester linked sugar and phosphate found in traditional oligos. PNA designed complementary to the bacterial Shine-Dalgarno or start codon regions of mRNA disrupts translation resulting in the transient reduction in protein expression. This study examines the use of PNA technology to interrupt protein expression in obligate intracellular Rickettsia sp. Their historically intractable genetic system limits characterization of protein function. We designed PNA targeting mRNA for rOmpB from Rickettsia typhi and rickA from Rickettsia montanensis, ubiquitous factors important for infection. Using an in vitro translation system and competitive binding assays, we determined that our PNAs bind target regions. Electroporation of R. typhi and R. montanensis with PNA specific to rOmpB and rickA, respectively, reduced the bacteria’s ability to infect host cells. These studies open the possibility of using PNA to suppress protein synthesis in obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:25781160

  10. Hormonal Neuroendocrine and Vasoconstrictor Peptide Responses of Ball Game and Cyclic Sport Elite Athletes by Treadmill Test

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate complex hormonal response in ball game and cyclic sport elite athletes through an incremental treadmill test, since, so far, variables in experimental procedures have often hampered comparisons of data. Methods We determined anthropometric data, heart rate, maximal oxygen uptake, workload, plasma levels of lactate, adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, cortisol, angiontensinogen and endothelin in control (n = 6), soccer (n = 8), handball (n = 12), kayaking (n = 9) and triathlon (n = 9) groups based on a Bruce protocol through a maximal exercise type of spiroergometric test. Results We obtained significant increases for adrenaline, 2.9- and 3.9-fold by comparing the normalized means for soccer players and kayakers and soccer players and triathletes after/before test, respectively. For noradrenaline, we observed an even stronger, three-time significant difference between each type of ball game and cyclic sport activity. Conclusions Exercise related adrenaline and noradrenaline changes were more pronounced than dopamine plasma level changes and revealed an opportunity to differentiate cyclic and ball game activities and control group upon these parameters. Normalization of concentration ratios of the monitored compounds by the corresponding maximal oxygen uptake reflected better the differences in the response level of adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and cortisol. PMID:26717409

  11. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting and N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequencing of Glycosylated Cysteine Protease of Euphorbia nivulia Buch.-Ham.

    PubMed Central

    Badgujar, Shamkant B.; Mahajan, Raghunath T.

    2013-01-01

    A new cysteine protease named Nivulian-II has been purified from the latex of Euphorbia nivulia Buch.-Ham. The apparent molecular mass of Nivulian-II is 43670.846 Da (MALDI TOF/MS). Peptide mass fingerprint analysis revealed peptide matches to Maturase K (Q52ZV1_9MAGN) of Banksia quercifolia. The N-terminal sequence (DFPPNTCCCICC) showed partial homology with those of other cysteine proteinases of biological origin. This is the first paper to characterize a Nivulian-II of E. nivulia latex with respect to amino acid sequencing. PMID:23476742

  12. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium.

  13. Assimilation of peptides and amino acids and dissimilation of lactate during submerged pure cultures of Penicillium camembertii and Geotrichum candidum.

    PubMed

    Aziza, M; Adour, L; Amrane, A

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of Penicillium camembertii and Geotrichum candidum growing in submerged pure cultures on simple (glutamate) or complex (peptones) substrates as nitrogen and carbon sources and an lactate as a second carbon source was examined. Similar to the behavior previously recorded on a simple substrate (glutamate), a clear differentiation between the carbon source and the energy source was also shown on peptones and lactate during P. camembertii growth, since throughout growth, lactate was only dissimilated, viz., used for energy supply by oxidation into CO2, whereas peptides and amino acids from peptones were used for carbon (and nitrogen) assimilation. Because of its deaminating activity, G. candidum preferred peptides and amino acids to lactate as energy sources, in addition to being assimilated as carbon and nitrogen sources. From this, on peptones and lactate, G. candidum grew faster than P. camembertii (0.19 and 0.08 g/l/h, respectively) by assimilating the most readily utilizable peptides and amino acids; however, owing to its lower proteolytic activity, the maximum biomass was lower than that of P. camembertii (3.7 and 5.5 g/l, respectively), for which continuous proteolysis and assimilation of peptides were shown.

  14. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 501-506] PMID:25644636

  15. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition.

  16. Regulation of plant vascular stem cells by endodermis-derived EPFL-family peptide hormones and phloem-expressed ERECTA-family receptor kinases.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoyuki; Tasaka, Masao

    2013-12-01

    Plant vasculatures are complex tissues consisting of (pro)cambium, phloem, and xylem. The (pro)cambium serves as vascular stem cells that produce all vascular cells. The Arabidopsis ERECTA (ER) receptor kinase is known to regulate the architecture of inflorescence stems. It was recently reported that the er mutation enhances a vascular phenotype induced by a mutation of TDR/PXY, which plays a significant role in procambial proliferation, suggesting that ER participates in vascular development. However, detailed molecular mechanisms of the ER-dependent vascular regulation are largely unknown. Here, this work found that ER and its paralogue, ER-LIKE1, were redundantly involved in procambial development of inflorescence stems. Interestingly, their activity in the phloem was sufficient for vascular regulation. Furthermore, two endodermis-derived peptide hormones, EPFL4 and EPFL6, were redundantly involved in such regulation. It has been previously reported that EPFL4 and EPFL6 act as ligands of phloem-expressed ER for stem elongation. Therefore, these findings indicate that cell-cell communication between the endodermis and the phloem plays an important role in procambial development as well as stem elongation. Interestingly, similar EPFL-ER modules control two distinct developmental events by slightly changing their components: the EPFL4/6-ER module for stem elongation and the EPFL4/6-ER/ERL1 module for vascular development.

  17. The peptide hormone cholecystokinin modulates the tonus and compliance of the bulbus arteriosus and pre-branchial vessels of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Seth, Henrik; Axelsson, Michael; Gräns, Albin

    2014-12-01

    The bulbus arteriosus is a compliant structure between the ventricle and ventral aorta of teleost fish. It serves as a "wind-kessel" that dampens pressure variations during the cardiac cycle allowing a continuous flow of blood into the gills. The bulbus arteriosus receives sympathetic innervation and is affected by several circulating substances, indicating neurohumoral control. We have previously shown that the peptide hormone, cholecystokinin (CCK), affects the hemodynamics of the cardiovascular system in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by increasing flow pulse amplitude without affecting cardiac output. We hypothesized that this could be explained by an altered tonus or compliance/distensibility of the bulbus arteriosus. Our results show that there is a substantial effect of CCK on the bulbus arteriosus. Concentrations of CCK that altered the cardiac function of in situ perfused hearts also contracted the bulbus arteriosus in vitro. Pressure-volume curves revealed a change in both the tonus and the compliance/distensibility of this structure. Furthermore, the stimulatory (constricting) effect of CCK was also evident in the ventricle and vasculature leading to the gills, but absent in the atrium, efferent branchial arteries and dorsal aorta. In conclusion, CCK alters the mechanical properties of the ventricle, bulbus arteriosus, ventral aorta and afferent gill vasculature, thus maintaining adequate branchial and systemic blood flow and pressure when cardiorespiratory demands change, such as after feeding.

  18. Unraveling the Mechanisms of Peptide-Mediated Delivery of Nucleic Acids Using Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Margus, Helerin; Juks, Carmen; Pooga, Margus

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are efficient non-viral delivery vectors for bioactive cargos, both in vitro and in vivo. Cargo molecules can be attached to CPPs either via covalent conjugation or by complex formation using co-incubation, which is typically used for charged molecules such as nucleic acids. The latter technique is efficiently used in case of CADY, MPG, Pep peptides, NickFects and PepFects that condense oligonucleotides (ONs) into nanoparticles, which efficiently enter cells and induce biological effects. Despite being highly promising candidates for developing new-generation medicines, CPPs' internalization mechanisms and intracellular trafficking are still far from being well-understood, and obtained data are often controversial. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an informative and valuable tool for examining the mechanisms of CPP-ON nanoparticles. TEM enables to visualize nanoparticles or single molecules labeled with Nanogold™ tag, and follow their association with cells and intracellular localization. In this chapter, we present methods for preparation of CPP-ON nanoparticles for TEM analysis and for examination of their interactions with the plasma membrane, and subsequent cellular uptake either by direct translocation or endocytosis. In case of endocytosis, ONs have to be released from endosomes and reach their target site in nucleus or cytoplasm to reveal their activity. TEM enables to estimate when the endosomal escape begins, from which type of endosomal vesicles it occurs, whether the vesicles are broken, or nanocomplexes translocate across the membrane into cytosol. Since single ONs could be followed, the time-frame that is necessary for the splice-switching nucleotides to translocate into cell nucleus can be analyzed by TEM.

  19. Helix 69 of E. coli 23S ribosomal RNA as a peptide nucleic acid target.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Wojciechowska, Monika; Grzela, Renata; Wituła, Tomasz; Trylska, Joanna

    2017-04-07

    A fragment of 23S ribosomal RNA (nucleotides 1906-1924 in E. coli), termed Helix 69, forms a hairpin that is essential for ribosome function. Helix 69 forms a conformationally flexible inter-subunit connection with helix 44 of 16S ribosomal RNA, and the nucleotide A1913 of Helix 69 influences decoding accuracy. Nucleotides U1911 and U1917 are post-transcriptionally modified with pseudouridines () and U1915 with 3-methyl-. We investigated Helix 69 as a target for a complementary synthetic oligonucleotide - peptide nucleic acid (PNA). We determined thermodynamic properties of Helix 69 and its complexes with PNA. We also verified the performance of PNA targeted at Helix 69 in inhibiting translation in cell-free extracts and growth of E. coli cells. First, we examined the interactions of a PNA oligomer complementary to the G1907-A1919 fragment of Helix 69 with the sequences corresponding to human and bacterial species (with or without pseudouridine modifications). PNA invades the Helix 69 hairpin creating stable complexes and PNA binding to the pseudouridylated bacterial sequence is stronger than to Helix 69 without any modifications. Second, we confirmed the binding of PNA to 23S rRNA and 70S ribosomes. Third, we verified the efficiency of translation inhibition of these PNA oligomers in the cell-free translation/transcription E. coli system, which turned out to be in a similar range as tetracycline. Next, we confirmed that PNA conjugated to the (KFF)3K transporter peptide inhibited E. coli growth in micromolar concentrations. Overall, targeting Helix 69 with PNA or other sequence-specific oligomers could be a promising way to inhibit bacterial translation.

  20. The incretin hormone glucagon‐like peptide 1 increases mitral cell excitability by decreasing conductance of a voltage‐dependent potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn‐Smith, Ida J.; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Trapp, Stefan; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2016-01-01

    Key points The gut hormone called glucagon‐like peptide 1 (GLP‐1) is a strong moderator of energy homeostasis and communication between the peripheral organs and the brain.GLP‐1 signalling occurs in the brain; using a newly developed genetic reporter line of mice, we have discovered GLP‐synthesizing cells in the olfactory bulb.GLP‐1 increases the firing frequency of neurons (mitral cells) that encode olfactory information by decreasing activity of voltage‐dependent K channels (Kv1.3).Modifying GLP‐1 levels, either therapeutically or following the ingestion of food, could alter the excitability of neurons in the olfactory bulb in a nutrition or energy state‐dependent manner to influence olfactory detection or metabolic sensing.The results of the present study uncover a new function for an olfactory bulb neuron (deep short axon cells, Cajal cells) that could be capable of modifying mitral cell activity through the release of GLP‐1. This might be of relevance for the action of GLP‐1 mimetics now widely used in the treatment of diabetes. Abstract The olfactory system is intricately linked with the endocrine system where it may serve as a detector of the internal metabolic state or energy homeostasis in addition to its classical function as a sensor of external olfactory information. The recent development of transgenic mGLU‐yellow fluorescent protein mice that express a genetic reporter under the control of the preproglucagon reporter suggested the presence of the gut hormone, glucagon‐like peptide (GLP‐1), in deep short axon cells (Cajal cells) of the olfactory bulb and its neuromodulatory effect on mitral cell (MC) first‐order neurons. A MC target for the peptide was determined using GLP‐1 receptor binding assays, immunocytochemistry for the receptor and injection of fluorescence‐labelled GLP‐1 analogue exendin‐4. Using patch clamp recording of olfactory bulb slices in the whole‐cell configuration, we report that GLP‐1 and its

  1. Delivery of Antisense Peptide Nucleic Acids to Cells by Conjugation with Small Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide (R/W)9

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, Céline; Boutimah, Fatima; Bourdeloux, Mathilde; Dupuy, Florian; Met, Elisabeth; Alberti, Patrizia; Loll, François; Chassaing, Gérard; Burlina, Fabienne; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are very attractive antisense and antigene agents, but these molecules are not passively taken into cells. Here, using a functional cell assay and fluorescent-based methods, we investigated cell uptake and antisense activity of a tridecamer PNA that targets the HIV-1 polypurine tract sequence delivered using the arginine-rich (R/W)9 peptide (RRWWRRWRR). At micromolar concentrations, without use of any transfection agents, almost 80% inhibition of the target gene expression was obtained with the conjugate in the presence of the endosomolytic agent chloroquine. We show that chloroquine not only induced escape from endosomes but also enhanced the cellular uptake of the conjugate. Mechanistic studies revealed that (R/W)9-PNA conjugates were internalized via pinocytosis. Replacement of arginines with lysines reduced the uptake of the conjugate by six-fold, resulting in the abolition of intracellular target inhibition. Our results show that the arginines play a crucial role in the conjugate uptake and antisense activity. To determine whether specificity of the interactions of arginines with cell surface proteoglycans result in the internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich conjugates in wild-type CHO-K1 and proteoglycan-deficient A745 cells. The uptake of both conjugates was decreased by four fold in CHO-745 cells; therefore proteoglycans promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Our results show that arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, especially (R/W)9, are a promising tool for PNA internalization. PMID:25127364

  2. Construction of peptides with nucleobase amino acids: design and synthesis of the nucleobase-conjugated peptides derived from HIV-1 Rev and their binding properties to HIV-1 RRE RNA.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hamasaki, K; Ueno, A; Mihara, H

    2001-04-01

    In order to develop a novel molecule that recognizes a specific structure of RNA, we have attempted to design peptides having L-alpha-amino acids with a nucleobase at the side chain (nucleobase amino acid (NBA)), expecting that the function of a nucleobase which can specifically recognize a base in RNA is regulated in a peptide conformation. In this study, to demonstrate the applicability of the NBA units in the peptide to RNA recognition, we designed and synthesized a variety of NBA-conjugated peptides, derived from HIV-1 Rev. Circular dichroism study revealed that the conjugation of the Rev peptide with an NBA unit did not disturb the peptide conformation. RNA-binding affinities of the designed peptides with RRE IIB RNA were dependent on the structure of the nucleobase moieties in the peptides. The peptide having the cytosine NBA at the position of the Asn40 site in the Rev showed a higher binding ability for RRE IIB RNA, despite the diminishing the Asn40 function. Furthermore, the peptide having the guanine NBA at the position of the Arg44 site, which is the most important residue for the RNA binding in the Rev, bound to RRE IIB RNA in an ability similar to Rev34-50 with native sequence. These results demonstrate that an appropriate NBA unit in the peptide plays an important role in the RNA binding with a specific contact such as hydrogen bonding, and the interaction between the nucleobase in the peptide and the base in the RNA can enhance the RNA-binding affinity and specificity.

  3. A thyroid hormone analogue, triiodothyroacetic acid, corrects corticosteroid-downregulated collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yazdanparast, Parviz; Carlsson, Bo; Oikarinen, Aarne; Risteli, Juha; Faergemann, Jan

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the change in collagen synthesis between topical treatments with two doses of triiodothyroacetic acid (TRIAC), a thyroid hormone analogue, and placebo, after pretreatment with topical betamethasone 17-valerate (BM). Eighteen healthy volunteers were pretreated with BM on abdominal skin for 3 days, and were then treated for 14 days with a cream containing TRIAC (0.03% or 0.1%) or a placebo cream. Collagen production was assessed by quantifying the amino terminal propeptides of human type I and type III procollagen (PINP and PIIINP) in fluids from suction-induced blisters on the treated skin. Three days of treatment with BM led to an average reduction of PINP of 70% and of PIIINP of 50%. Seven days after treatment, the median increase in PINP was 230% (p = 0.03) in the Triac 0.03% group, 148% (p = 0.2) in the TRIAC 0.1% and 5% in the placebo group. The median increase in PINP in the skin area from the start of treatment to the end of treatment was 521% (p = 0.06) in the TRIAC 0.03% group, 339% (p = 0.2) in the TRIAC 0.1% group, and 55% in the placebo group (the p values are related to baseline). Seven days after treatment, the median increase in PIIINP was 24% (p = 0.6) in the Triac 0.03% group, 23% (p = 0.6) in the TRIAC 0.1% group, and -12% in the placebo group. The median increase in PIIINP in the skin area from the start of treatment to the end of treatment was 137% (p = 0.7) in the TRIAC 0.03% group, 230% (p = 0.9) in the TRIAC 0.1% group and 58% in the placebo group (the p values are related to baseline). Histologic examinations of sections from punch biopsies taken at the end of the treatment showed more thickened collagen fibers and increased density of PINP-producing dermal fibroblasts in the TRIAC groups compared to the placebo group. The result suggests a potential role for TRIAC-containing cream concomitant with anti-inflammatory topical treatment with potent glucocorticoids to prevent their suppressive activity on

  4. Hormonal diterpenoids derived from ent-kaurenoic acid are involved in the blue-light avoidance response of Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid hormones that regulate growth and development in flowering plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens has part of the GA biosynthetic pathway from geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurenoic acid via ent-kaurene, but it does not produce GA. Disruption of the ent-kaurene synthase gene in P. patens suppressed caulonemal differentiation. Application of ent-kaurene or ent-kaurenoic acid restored differentiation, suggesting that derivative(s) of ent-kaurenoic acid, but not GAs, are endogenous regulator(s) of caulonemal cell differentiation. The protonemal growth of P. patens shows an avoidance response under unilateral blue light. Physiological studies using gene mutants involved in ent-kaurene biosynthesis confirmed that diterpenoid(s) regulate the blue-light response. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings, and provide data for the ent-kaurene oxidase gene-disrupted mutant.

  5. Effect of zoledronic Acid on bone mineral density in men with prostate cancer receiving gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Anoop; Gupta, Ankur; Desai, Nilay; Ahn, Hongshik

    2011-01-01

    Background. Loss of bone density with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer is well recognized. We assessed the effects of quarterly infusion of zoledronic acid on bone mineral density (BMD) and markers of bone turnover over a one-year period in men receiving gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRH-a) for prostate cancer. Methods. 41 subjects were randomly assigned to treatment with zoledronic acid (4 mg) IV infusion or placebo every 3 months. The primary endpoint was the change in the lumbar spine BMD after 12 months of treatment. Results. The change in vertebral BMD in the zoledronic acid group (+7.93 ± 1.4%) was significantly (P < .05) greater than the change in the placebo group (+0.82 ± 1.7%) as was the change in left femoral neck BMD (+5.05 ± 1.4% for the zoledronic acid group versus -0.48 ± 1.4% for the placebo group). The decrease in biochemical markers of bone turnover was significantly (P < .05) greater in the zoledronic acid group compared to the placebo group. Conclusion. Quarterly infusion of zoledronic acid for 1 year improved vertebral and left femoral neck BMD with a decrease in bone turnover markers in men on GnRH-a treatment. Zoledronic acid treatment appears to be promising in men with low BMD receiving GnRH-a treatment.

  6. Oleic acid induces specific alterations in the morphology, gene expression and steroid hormone production of cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Yenuganti, Vengala Rao; Viergutz, Torsten; Vanselow, Jens

    2016-06-01

    After parturition, one of the major problems related to nutritional management that is faced by the majority of dairy cows is negative energy balance (NEB). During NEB, excessive lipid mobilization takes place and hence the levels of free fatty acids, among them oleic acid, increase in the blood, but also in the follicular fluid. This accumulation can be associated with serious metabolic and reproductive disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of physiological concentrations of oleic acid on cell morphology, apoptosis, necrosis, proliferation and steroid production, and on the abundance of selected transcripts in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Increasing oleic acid concentrations induced intracellular lipid droplet accumulation, thus resulting in a foam cell-like morphology, but had no effects on apoptosis, necrosis or proliferation. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the transcript abundance of the gonadotropin hormone receptors, FSHR and LHCGR, steroidogenic genes STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B1 and CYP19A1, the cell cycle regulator CCND2, but not of the proliferation marker PCNA. In addition, treatment increased the transcript levels of the fatty acid transporters CD36 and SLC27A1, and decreased the production of 17-beta-estradiol and progesterone. From these data it can be concluded that oleic acid specifically affects morphological and physiological features and gene expression levels thus altering the functionality of granulosa cells. Suggestively, these effects might be partly due to the reduced expression of FSHR and thus the reduced responsiveness to FSH stimulation.

  7. ArrayPitope: Automated Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions for Peptide Microarray-Based Antibody Epitope Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christian Skjødt; Østerbye, Thomas; Marcatili, Paolo; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Identification of epitopes targeted by antibodies (B cell epitopes) is of critical importance for the development of many diagnostic and therapeutic tools. For clinical usage, such epitopes must be extensively characterized in order to validate specificity and to document potential cross-reactivity. B cell epitopes are typically classified as either linear epitopes, i.e. short consecutive segments from the protein sequence or conformational epitopes adapted through native protein folding. Recent advances in high-density peptide microarrays enable high-throughput, high-resolution identification and characterization of linear B cell epitopes. Using exhaustive amino acid substitution analysis of peptides originating from target antigens, these microarrays can be used to address the specificity of polyclonal antibodies raised against such antigens containing hundreds of epitopes. However, the interpretation of the data provided in such large-scale screenings is far from trivial and in most cases it requires advanced computational and statistical skills. Here, we present an online application for automated identification of linear B cell epitopes, allowing the non-expert user to analyse peptide microarray data. The application takes as input quantitative peptide data of fully or partially substituted overlapping peptides from a given antigen sequence and identifies epitope residues (residues that are significantly affected by substitutions) and visualize the selectivity towards each residue by sequence logo plots. Demonstrating utility, the application was used to identify and address the antibody specificity of 18 linear epitope regions in Human Serum Albumin (HSA), using peptide microarray data consisting of fully substituted peptides spanning the entire sequence of HSA and incubated with polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA (and mouse anti-rabbit-Cy3). The application is made available at: www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ArrayPitope. PMID:28095436

  8. Primary structure of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin. II. Amino acid sequence of the tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1980-04-10

    Amino acid sequence studies of tryptic peptides isolated from a histidine-rich fragment (Cp F5) of human ceruloplasmin are described. Nineteen tryptic peptides were isolated from unmodified Cp F5 and five tryptic peptides were isolated from citraconylated Cp F5. These peptides, together with the cyanogen bromide fragments reported previously, allowed the assembly of the complete sequence of Cp F5. The fragment has 159 residues and a molecular weight of 18,650; it lacks carbohydrate, is rich in histidine, and contains 1 free cysteine that may be part of a copper-binding site. Human ceruloplasmin is a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of about 130,000 that is readily cleaved to large fragments by proteolytic enzymes; the relationships of Cp F5 to intact ceruloplasmin and to structural subunits earlier proposed is described. Cp F5 probably is an intact globular domain that is attached to the COOH-terminal end of ceruloplasmin by a labile interdomain peptide bond.

  9. Highly sensitive detection of influenza virus by boron-doped diamond electrode terminated with sialic acid-mimic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Ujie, Michiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Akahori, Miku; Einaga, Yasuaki; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The progression of influenza varies according to age and the presence of an underlying disease; appropriate treatment is therefore required to prevent severe disease. Anti-influenza therapy, such as with neuraminidase inhibitors, is effective, but diagnosis at an early phase of infection before viral propagation is critical. Here, we show that several dozen plaque-forming units (pfu) of influenza virus (IFV) can be detected using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode terminated with a sialic acid-mimic peptide. The peptide was used instead of the sialyloligosaccharide receptor, which is the common receptor of influenza A and B viruses required during the early phase of infection, to capture IFV particles. The peptide, which was previously identified by phage-display technology, was immobilized by click chemistry on the BDD electrode, which has excellent electrochemical characteristics such as low background current and weak adsorption of biomolecules. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that H1N1 and H3N2 IFVs were detectable in the range of 20–500 pfu by using the peptide-terminated BDD electrode. Our results demonstrate that the BDD device integrated with the receptor-mimic peptide has high sensitivity for detection of a low number of virus particles in the early phase of infection. PMID:27457924

  10. Gender Differences in Rat Erythrocyte and Brain Docosahexaenoic Acid Composition: Role of Ovarian Hormones and Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K.; Able, Jessica; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The two-fold higher prevalence rate of major depression in females may involve vulnerability to omega-3 fatty acid deficiency secondary to a dysregulation in ovarian hormones. However, the role of ovarian hormones in the regulation of brain omega-3 fatty acid composition has not been directly evaluated. Here we determined erythrocyte and regional brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in intact male and female rats, and in chronically ovariectomized (OVX) rats with or without cyclic estradiol treatment (2 μg/4 d). All groups were maintained on diets with or without the DHA precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3). We report that both male (−21%) and OVX (−19%) rats on ALA+ diet exhibited significantly lower erythrocyte DHA composition relative to female controls. Females on ALA+ diet exhibited lower DHA composition in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) relative males (−5%). OVX rats on ALA+ diet exhibited significantly lower DHA composition in the hippocampus (−6%), but not in the PFC, hypothalamus, or midbrain. Lower erythrocyte and hippocampus DHA composition in OVX rats was not prevented by estrogen replacement. All groups maintained on ALA− diet exhibited significantly lower erythrocyte and regional brain DHA composition relative to groups on ALA+ diet, and these reductions were greater in males but not in OVX rats. These preclinical data corroborate clinical evidence for gender differences in peripheral DHA composition (female>male), demonstrate gender differences in PFC DHA composition (male>female), and support a link between ovarian hormones and erythrocyte and region-specific brain DHA composition. PMID:19046819

  11. Ascorbic acid treatment elevates follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone plasma levels and enhances sperm quality in albino Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Uduak Akpan; Utuk, Ikponoabasi Ibanga

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility issues have been linked to the effect of oxidative reaction in the reproductive system. This study evaluated the effect of ascorbic acid, on fertility parameters of male albino Wistar rats was studied. Materials and Methods: Eighteen albino Wistar rats weighed between 178 g and 241 g were used, randomly assigned into three groups. Group 1 was the control group; oral gavaged 5 ml of distilled water; Groups 2 and 3 were administered medium dose (250 mg/kg) and high dose of ascorbic acid (400 mg/kg), respectively; twice daily for 21 days. Blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture, and blood serum was obtained for hormonal assay, and the testes were harvested for sperm analysis. Results: Follicle stimulating hormone levels significantly increased in the high-dose group as compared to both the control and medium dose groups. Luteinizing hormone levels in the medium dose group decreased significantly as compared to the control group. Testosterone significantly increased in both the medium- and high-dose groups as compared to the control group. Sperm motility increased significantly in the high-dose group as compared to both control and medium-dose groups. Percentage sperm concentration decreased significantly in the medium-dose group when compared to the control and increased significantly in the high-dose group as compared to the medium-dose group. For percentage normal morphology, there was a dose-dependent increase in the test groups when compared to control group. Conclusion: These results are indicative of a positive influence of ascorbic acid on male fertility modulators and may therefore, serve as a potential adjuvant treatment for male infertility cases. PMID:27185976

  12. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Koehbach, Johannes; Gruber, Christian W; Becker, Christian; Kreil, David P; Jilek, Alexander

    2016-05-06

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods.

  13. Killing of Mycobacterium avium by Lactoferricin Peptides: Improved Activity of Arginine- and d-Amino-Acid-Containing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tânia; Magalhães, Bárbara; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Rodrigues, Pedro N.; Bastos, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes respiratory disease in susceptible individuals, as well as disseminated infections in immunocompromised hosts, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality among these populations. Current therapies consist of a combination of antibiotics taken for at least 6 months, with no more than 60% overall clinical success. Furthermore, mycobacterial antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, urging the need to develop novel classes of antimicrobial drugs. One potential and interesting alternative strategy is the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMP). These are present in almost all living organisms as part of their immune system, acting as a first barrier against invading pathogens. In this context, we investigated the effect of several lactoferrin-derived AMP against M. avium. Short peptide sequences from both human and bovine lactoferricins, namely, hLFcin1-11 and LFcin17-30, as well as variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, were evaluated. All tested peptides significantly inhibited the axenic growth of M. avium, the bovine peptides being more active than the human. Arginine residues were found to be crucial for the display of antimycobacterial activity, whereas the all-d-amino-acid analogue of the bovine sequence displayed the highest mycobactericidal activity. These findings reveal the promising potential of lactoferricins against mycobacteria, thus opening the way for further research on their development and use as a new weapon against mycobacterial infections. PMID:24709266

  14. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  15. Analysis of peptide-protein binding using amino acid descriptors: prediction and experimental verification for human histocompatibility complex HLA-A0201.

    PubMed

    Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2005-11-17

    Amino acid descriptors are often used in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of proteins and peptides. In the present study, descriptors were used to characterize peptides binding to the human MHC allele HLA-A0201. Two sets of amino