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Sample records for acid peptide sequence

  1. Facile Analysis and Sequencing of Linear and Branched Peptide Boronic Acids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton, Jason; Zhang, Wenyu; Santos, Webster

    2011-01-01

    Interest in peptides incorporating boronic acid moieties is increasing due to their potential as therapeutics/diagnostics for a variety of diseases such as cancer. The utility of peptide boronic acids may be expanded with access to vast libraries that can be deconvoluted rapidly and economically. Unfortunately, current detection protocols using mass spectrometry are laborious and confounded by boronic acid trimerization, which requires time consuming analysis of dehydration products. These issues are exacerbated when the peptide sequence is unknown, as with de novo sequencing, and especially when multiple boronic acid moieties are present. Thus, a rapid, reliable and simple method for peptide identification is of utmost importance. Herein, we report the identification and sequencing of linear and branched peptide boronic acids containing up to five boronic acid groups by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Protocols for preparation of pinacol boronic esters were adapted for efficient MALDI analysis of peptides. Additionally, a novel peptide boronic acid detection strategy was developed in which 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) served as both matrix and derivatizing agent in a convenient, in situ, on-plate esterification. Finally, we demonstrate that DHB-modified peptide boronic acids from a single bead can be analyzed by MALDI-MSMS analysis, validating our approach for the identification and sequencing of branched peptide boronic acid libraries. PMID:21449540

  2. The amino-acid sequences of sculpin islet somatostatin-28 and peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Cutfield, J F

    1987-04-01

    Two pancreatic peptides, somatostatin-28 and peptide YY, have been isolated from the Brockmann bodies of the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin). Following purification by reverse-phase HPLC, each peptide was sequenced completely through to the carboxyl-terminus by gas-phase Edman degradation. Somatostatin-28 was the major form of somatostatin detected and is similar to the gene II product from anglerfish. Peptide YY (36 amino acids) more closely resembles porcine neuropeptide YY and intestinal peptide YY than it does the pancreatic polypeptides. PMID:2883025

  3. From amino acid sequence to bioactivity: The biomedical potential of antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Gutiérrez-Jácome, Alberto; Pérez-Pérez, Martín; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gael; Catalán-García, Sandra; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-06-01

    Chemoprevention is the use of natural and/or synthetic substances to block, reverse, or retard the process of carcinogenesis. In this field, the use of antitumor peptides is of interest as, (i) these molecules are small in size, (ii) they show good cell diffusion and permeability, (iii) they affect one or more specific molecular pathways involved in carcinogenesis, and (iv) they are not usually genotoxic. We have checked the Web of Science Database (23/11/2015) in order to collect papers reporting on bioactive peptide (1691 registers), which was further filtered searching terms such as "antiproliferative," "antitumoral," or "apoptosis" among others. Works reporting the amino acid sequence of an antiproliferative peptide were kept (60 registers), and this was complemented with the peptides included in CancerPPD, an extensive resource for antiproliferative peptides and proteins. Peptides were grouped according to one of the following mechanism of action: inhibition of cell migration, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, antioxidative mechanisms, inhibition of gene transcription/cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, disorganization of tubulin structure, cytotoxicity, or unknown mechanisms. The main mechanisms of action of those antiproliferative peptides with known amino acid sequences are presented and finally, their potential clinical usefulness and future challenges on their application is discussed.

  4. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  5. A new antifungal peptide from the seeds of Phytolacca americana: characterization, amino acid sequence and cDNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Shao, F; Hu, Z; Xiong, Y M; Huang, Q Z; WangCG; Zhu, R H; Wang, D C

    1999-03-19

    An antifungal peptide from seeds of Phytolacca americana, designated PAFP-s, has been isolated. The peptide is highly basic and consists of 38 residues with three disulfide bridges. Its molecular mass of 3929.0 was determined by mass spectrometry. The complete amino acid sequence was obtained from automated Edman degradation, and cDNA cloning was successfully performed by 3'-RACE. The deduced amino acid sequence of a partial cDNA corresponded to the amino acid sequence from chemical sequencing. PAFP-s exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity, and its activities differed among various fungi. PAFP-s displayed no inhibitory activity towards Escherichia coli. PAFP-s shows significant sequence similarities and the same cysteine motif with Mj-AMPs, antimicrobial peptides from seeds of Mirabilis jalapa belonging to the knottin-type antimicrobial peptide.

  6. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA using triple helix-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are attractive targets for molecular recognition because of the central role they play in gene expression. Since most noncoding RNAs are in a double-helical conformation, recognition of such structures is a formidable problem. Herein, we describe a method for sequence-selective recognition of biologically relevant double-helical RNA (illustrated on ribosomal A-site RNA) using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) that form a triple helix in the major grove of RNA under physiologically relevant conditions. Protocols for PNA preparation and binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry are described in detail.

  7. Sequence selective double strand DNA cleavage by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting using nuclease S1.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, V; Frank-Kamenetskii, M D; Egholm, M; Buchardt, O; Nielsen, P E

    1993-01-01

    A novel method for sequence specific double strand DNA cleavage using PNA (peptide nucleic acid) targeting is described. Nuclease S1 digestion of double stranded DNA gives rise to double strand cleavage at an occupied PNA strand displacement binding site, and under optimized conditions complete cleavage can be obtained. The efficiency of this cleavage is more than 10 fold enhanced when a tandem PNA site is targeted, and additionally enhanced if this site is in trans rather than in cis orientation. Thus in effect, the PNA targeting makes the single strand specific nuclease S1 behave like a pseudo restriction endonuclease. Images PMID:8502550

  8. Boronic acid functionalized peptidyl synthetic lectins: Combinatorial library design, peptide sequencing, and selective glycoprotein recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bicker, Kevin L.; Sun, Jing; Lavigne, John J.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of cell membrane and secreted glycoproteins is a hallmark of various disease states, including cancer. The natural lectins currently used in the recognition of these glycoproteins are costly, difficult to produce, and unstable towards rigorous use. Herein we describe the design and synthesis of several boronic acid functionalized peptide-based synthetic lectin (SL) libraries, as well as the optimized methodology for obtaining peptide sequences of these SLs. SL libraries were subsequently used to identify SLs with as high as 5-fold selectivity for various glycoproteins. SLs will inevitably find a role in cancer diagnositics, given that they do not suffer from the drawbacks of natural lectins and that the combinatorial nature of these libraries allows for the identification of an SL for nearly any glycosylated biomolecule. PMID:21405093

  9. Update of PROFEAT: a web server for computing structural and physicochemical features of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Rao, H B; Zhu, F; Yang, G B; Li, Z R; Chen, Y Z

    2011-07-01

    Sequence-derived structural and physicochemical features have been extensively used for analyzing and predicting structural, functional, expression and interaction profiles of proteins and peptides. PROFEAT has been developed as a web server for computing commonly used features of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence. To facilitate more extensive studies of protein and peptides, numerous improvements and updates have been made to PROFEAT. We added new functions for computing descriptors of protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions, segment descriptors for local properties of protein sequences, topological descriptors for peptide sequences and small molecule structures. We also added new feature groups for proteins and peptides (pseudo-amino acid composition, amphiphilic pseudo-amino acid composition, total amino acid properties and atomic-level topological descriptors) as well as for small molecules (atomic-level topological descriptors). Overall, PROFEAT computes 11 feature groups of descriptors for proteins and peptides, and a feature group of more than 400 descriptors for small molecules plus the derived features for protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. Our computational algorithms have been extensively tested and used in a number of published works for predicting proteins of specific structural or functional classes, protein-protein interactions, peptides of specific functions and quantitative structure activity relationships of small molecules. PROFEAT is accessible free of charge at http://bidd.cz3.nus.edu.sg/cgi-bin/prof/protein/profnew.cgi.

  10. Stereochemical Sequence Ion Selectivity: Proline versus Pipecolic-acid-containing Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Guan, Shanshan; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-10-01

    Substitution of proline by pipecolic acid, the six-membered ring congener of proline, results in vastly different tandem mass spectra. The well-known proline effect is eliminated and amide bond cleavage C-terminal to pipecolic acid dominates instead. Why do these two ostensibly similar residues produce dramatically differing spectra? Recent evidence indicates that the proton affinities of these residues are similar, so are unlikely to explain the result [Raulfs et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 1705-1715 (2014)]. An additional hypothesis based on increased flexibility was also advocated. Here, we provide a computational investigation of the "pipecolic acid effect," to test this and other hypotheses to determine if theory can shed additional light on this fascinating result. Our calculations provide evidence for both the increased flexibility of pipecolic-acid-containing peptides, and structural changes in the transition structures necessary to produce the sequence ions. The most striking computational finding is inversion of the stereochemistry of the transition structures leading to "proline effect"-type amide bond fragmentation between the proline/pipecolic acid-congeners: R (proline) to S (pipecolic acid). Additionally, our calculations predict substantial stabilization of the amide bond cleavage barriers for the pipecolic acid congeners by reduction in deleterious steric interactions and provide evidence for the importance of experimental energy regime in rationalizing the spectra.

  11. Enzymatic generation of peptides flanked by basic amino acids to obtain MS/MS spectra with 2× sequence coverage

    PubMed Central

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Nan, Jie; Chaulk, Steven G; Fahlman, Richard P; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) typically lack redundant peptide sequence information in the form of e.g. b- and y-ion series due to frequent use of sequence-specific endopeptidases cleaving C- or N-terminal to Arg or Lys residues. METHODS Here we introduce arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE, EC 2.3.2.8) for proteomics. ATE recognizes acidic amino acids or oxidized Cys at the N-terminus of a substrate peptide and conjugates an arginine from an aminoacylated tRNAArg onto the N-terminus of the substrate peptide. This enzymatic reaction is carried out under physiological conditions and, in combination with Lys-C/Asp-N double digest, results in arginylated peptides with basic amino acids on both termini. RESULTS We demonstrate that in vitro arginylation of peptides using yeast arginyl tRNA protein transferase 1 (yATE1) is a robust enzymatic reaction, specific to only modifying N-terminal acidic amino acids. Precursors originating from arginylated peptides generally have an increased protonation state compared with their non-arginylated forms. Furthermore, the product ion spectra of arginylated peptides show near complete 2× fragment ladders within the same MS/MS spectrum using commonly available electrospray ionization peptide fragmentation modes. Unexpectedly, arginylated peptides generate complete y- and c-ion series using electron transfer dissociation (ETD) despite having an internal proline residue. CONCLUSIONS We introduce a rapid enzymatic method to generate peptides flanked on either terminus by basic amino acids, resulting in a rich, redundant MS/MS fragment pattern. © 2014 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25380496

  12. Isolation and amino acid sequence of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone precursor-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Tensen, C P; Verhoeven, A H; Gaus, G; Janssen, K P; Keller, R; Van Herp, F

    1991-01-01

    The crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is synthesized as part of a larger preprohormone in which the sequence of CHH is N-terminally flanked by a peptide for which the name CPRP (CHH precursor-related peptide) is proposed. Both CHH and CPRP are present in the sinus gland, the neurohemal organ of neurosecretory cells located in the eyestalk of decapod crustaceans. This paper describes the isolation and sequence analysis of CPRPs isolated from sinus glands of the crab Carcinus maenas, the crayfish Orconectes limosus and the lobster Homarus americanus. The published sequence of "peptide H" isolated from the land crab, Cardisoma carnifex, has now been recognized as a CPRP in this species. Sequence comparison reveals a high level of identity for the N-terminal region (residues 1-13) between all four peptides, while identity in the C-terminal domain is high between lobster and crayfish CPRP on the one hand, and between both crab species on the other. Conserved N-terminal residues include a putative monobasic processing site at position 11, which suggests that CPRP may be a biosynthetic intermediate from which a potentially bioactive decapeptide can be derived.

  13. Sequence dependent N-terminal rearrangement and degradation of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, M.; Christensen, L.; Schmidt, J.; Haaima, G.; Orgel, L.; Nielsen, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of the PNA (peptide nucleic acid) thymine monomer inverted question markN-[2-(thymin-1-ylacetyl)]-N-(2-aminoaminoethyl)glycine inverted question mark and those of various PNA oligomers (5-8-mers) have been measured at room temperature (20 degrees C) as a function of pH. The thymine monomer undergoes N-acyl transfer rearrangement with a half-life of 34 days at pH 11 as analyzed by 1H NMR; and two reactions, the N-acyl transfer and a sequential degradation, are found by HPLC analysis to occur at measurable rates for the oligomers at pH 9 or above. Dependent on the amino-terminal sequence, half-lives of 350 h to 163 days were found at pH 9. At pH 12 the half-lives ranged from 1.5 h to 21 days. The results are discussed in terms of PNA as a gene therapeutic drug as well as a possible prebiotic genetic material.

  14. Serology in the Digital Age: Using Long Synthetic Peptides Created from Nucleic Acid Sequences as Antigens in Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Rönnberg, Bengt; Cistjakovs, Maksims; Lundkvist, Åke; Pipkorn, Rudiger; Blomberg, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibodies to microbes, or to autoantigens, are important markers of disease. Antibody detection (serology) can reveal both past and recent infections. There is a great need for development of rational ways of detecting and quantifying antibodies, both for humans and animals. Traditionally, serology using synthetic antigens covers linear epitopes using up to 30 amino acid peptides. Methods: We here report that peptides of 100 amino acids or longer (“megapeptides”), designed and synthesized for optimal serological performance, can successfully be used as detection antigens in a suspension multiplex immunoassay (SMIA). Megapeptides can quickly be created just from pathogen sequences. A combination of rational sequencing and bioinformatic routines for definition of diagnostically-relevant antigens can, thus, rapidly yield efficient serological diagnostic tools for an emerging infectious pathogen. Results: We designed megapeptides using bioinformatics and viral genome sequences. These long peptides were tested as antigens for the presence of antibodies in human serum to the filo-, herpes-, and polyoma virus families in a multiplex microarray system. All of these virus families contain recently discovered or emerging infectious viruses. Conclusion: Long synthetic peptides can be useful as serological diagnostic antigens, serving as biomarkers, in suspension microarrays. PMID:27600087

  15. Isolation of alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula) glucagon, oxyntomodulin, and glucagon-like peptide: amino acid sequences of oxyntomodulin and glucagon-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Pollock, H G; Kimmel, J R; Ebner, K E; Hamilton, J W; Rouse, J B; Lance, V; Rawitch, A B

    1988-01-01

    Oxyntomodulin, glucagon, and a glucagon-like peptide (GLP) have been isolated from the endocrine pancreas of the alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula), a ganoid fish. The three peptides were isolated by gel filtration and HPLC and were identified by size, composition, and glucagon-like immunoreactivity. The amino acid sequences of the oxyntomodulin and GLP were determined. The oxyntomodulin contains 36 amino acid residues and its sequence is H S Q G T F T N D Y S K Y L D T R R A Q D F V Q W L M S T K R S G G I T. The composition of the glucagon is identical to the N-terminal 29 residues of the gar oxyntomodulin. The single form of GLP found contains 34 amino acid residues in the following sequence: H A D G T Y T S D V S S Y L Q D Q A A K K F V T W L K Q G Q D R R E. These findings suggest that all three peptides are derived from a common precursor. PMID:3282974

  16. Isolation of alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula) glucagon, oxyntomodulin, and glucagon-like peptide: amino acid sequences of oxyntomodulin and glucagon-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Pollock, H G; Kimmel, J R; Ebner, K E; Hamilton, J W; Rouse, J B; Lance, V; Rawitch, A B

    1988-01-01

    Oxyntomodulin, glucagon, and a glucagon-like peptide (GLP) have been isolated from the endocrine pancreas of the alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula), a ganoid fish. The three peptides were isolated by gel filtration and HPLC and were identified by size, composition, and glucagon-like immunoreactivity. The amino acid sequences of the oxyntomodulin and GLP were determined. The oxyntomodulin contains 36 amino acid residues and its sequence is H S Q G T F T N D Y S K Y L D T R R A Q D F V Q W L M S T K R S G G I T. The composition of the glucagon is identical to the N-terminal 29 residues of the gar oxyntomodulin. The single form of GLP found contains 34 amino acid residues in the following sequence: H A D G T Y T S D V S S Y L Q D Q A A K K F V T W L K Q G Q D R R E. These findings suggest that all three peptides are derived from a common precursor.

  17. Detection of peptidic sequences in the ancient acidic sediments of Río Tinto, Spain.

    PubMed

    Colín-García, María; Kanawati, Basem; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Phillippe; Amils, Ricardo; Parro, Victor; García, Miriam; Fernández-Remolar, David

    2011-12-01

    Biomarkers are molecules that are produced by or can be associated with biological activities. They can be used as tracers that give us an idea of the ancient biological communities that produced them, the paleoenvironmental conditions where they lived, or the mechanism involved in their transformation and preservation. As a consequence, the preservation potential of molecules over time depends largely on their nature, but also on the conditions of the environment, which controls the decomposition kinetics. In this context, proteins and nucleic acids, which are biomolecules bearing biological information, are among the most labile molecules. In this research, we report the presence of short-chained peptides obtained from extracts of ferruginous sedimentary deposits that have been produced under the acidic and oxidizing solutions of Río Tinto, Spain. These preliminary results go against the paradigmatic idea that considers the acidic and oxidizing environments inappropriate for the preservation of molecular information.

  18. Site-directed gene mutation at mixed sequence targets by psoralen-conjugated pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules such as triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide a means for inducing site-specific mutagenesis and recombination at chromosomal sites in mammalian cells. However, the utility of TFOs is limited by the requirement for homopurine stretches in the target duplex DNA. Here, we report the use of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs) for intracellular gene targeting at mixed sequence sites. Due to steric hindrance, pcPNAs are unable to form pcPNA–pcPNA duplexes but can bind to complementary DNA sequences by Watson–Crick pairing via double duplex-invasion complex formation. We show that psoralen-conjugated pcPNAs can deliver site-specific photoadducts and mediate targeted gene modification within both episomal and chromosomal DNA in mammalian cells without detectable off-target effects. Most of the induced psoralen-pcPNA mutations were single-base substitutions and deletions at the predicted pcPNA-binding sites. The pcPNA-directed mutagenesis was found to be dependent on PNA concentration and UVA dose and required matched pairs of pcPNAs. Neither of the individual pcPNAs alone had any effect nor did complementary PNA pairs of the same sequence. These results identify pcPNAs as new tools for site-specific gene modification in mammalian cells without purine sequence restriction, thereby providing a general strategy for designing gene targeting molecules. PMID:17977869

  19. Using Triple Helix Forming Peptide Nucleic Acids for Sequence-selective Recognition of Double-stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; Cheruiyot, Samwel K.; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in regulation of gene expression. Specific recognition and inhibition of these biologically important RNAs that form complex double-helical structures will be highly useful for fundamental studies in biology and practical applications in medicine. This protocol describes a strategy developed in our laboratory for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using triple helix forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that bind in the major grove of RNA helix. The strategy developed uses chemically modified nucleobases, such as 2-aminopyridine (M) that enables strong triple helical binding at physiologically relevant conditions, and 2-pyrimidinone (P) and 3-oxo-2,3-dihydropyridazine (E) that enable recognition of isolated pyrimidines in the purine rich strand of the RNA duplex. Detailed protocols for preparation of modified PNA monomers, solid-phase synthesis and HPLC purification of PNA oligomers, and measuring dsRNA binding affinity using isothermal titration calorimetry are included. PMID:25199637

  20. Peptide based diagnostics: are random-sequence peptides more useful than tiling proteome sequences?

    PubMed

    Navalkar, Krupa Arun; Johnston, Stephan Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostics using peptide ligands have been available for decades. However, their adoption in diagnostics has been limited, not because of poor sensitivity but in many cases due to diminished specificity. Numerous reports suggest that protein-based rather than peptide-based disease detection is more specific. We examined two different approaches to peptide-based diagnostics using Coccidioides (aka Valley Fever) as the disease model. Although the pathogen was discovered more than a century ago, a highly sensitive diagnostic remains unavailable. We present a case study where two different approaches to diagnosing Valley Fever were used: first, overlapping Valley Fever epitopes representing immunodominant Coccidioides antigens were tiled using a microarray format of presynthesized peptides. Second, a set of random sequence peptides identified using a 10,000 peptide immunosignaturing microarray was compared for sensitivity and specificity. The scientific hypothesis tested was that actual epitope peptides from Coccidioides would provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic. Results demonstrated that random sequence peptides exhibited higher accuracy when classifying different stages of Valley Fever infection vs. epitope peptides. The epitope peptide array did provide better performance than the existing immunodiffusion array, but when directly compared to the random sequence peptides, reported lower overall accuracy. This study suggests that there are competing aspects of antibody recognition that involve conservation of pathogen sequence and aspects of mimotope recognition and amino acid substitutions. These factors may prove critical when developing the next generation of high-performance immunodiagnostics.

  1. Effects of amino acid sequence, buffers, and ionic strength on the rate and mechanism of deamidation of asparagine residues in small peptides.

    PubMed

    Tyler-Cross, R; Schirch, V

    1991-11-25

    The nonenzymatic rates of deamidation of Asn residues in a series of pentapeptides with the sequences VSNXV and VXNSV, where X is one of 10 different amino acids, were determined at neutral, alkaline, and acid pH values. The results demonstrate that in neutral and alkaline solutions the amino acid residue on the amino side of the Asn had little or no effect on the rate of deamidation regardless of its charge or size. The group on the carboxyl side of Asn affected the rate of deamidation significantly. Increasing size and branching in the side chain of this residue decreased the rate of deamidation by as much as 70-fold compared to glycine in the N-G sequence, which had the greatest rate of deamidation. In acidic solution, the rate of deamidation of the Asn residue was not affected by the amino acid sequence of the peptide. The products for each deamidation reaction were tested for the formation of isoAsp residues. In neutral and alkaline solutions, all products showed that the isoAsp:Asp peptide products were formed in about a 3:1 ratio. In acidic solution, the Asp peptide was the only deamidation product formed. All peptides in which a Ser residue follows the Asn residue were found to undergo a peptide cleavage reaction in neutral and alkaline solutions, yielding a tripeptide and a dipeptide. The rate of the cleavage reaction was about 10% of the rate of the deamidation pathway at neutral and alkaline pH values. The rates of deamidation of Asn residues in the peptides studied were not affected by ionic strength, and were not specific base catalyzed. General base catalysis was observed for small bases like ammonia. A model for the deamidation reaction is proposed to account for the observed effects. PMID:1939272

  2. Mode of membrane insertion and sequence of a 32-amino acid peptide stretch of the penicillin-binding protein 4 of Enterococcus hirae.

    PubMed

    Jacques, P; el Kharroubi, A; Van Beeumen, J; Piras, G; Coyette, J; Ghuysen, J M

    1991-08-01

    Analysis of water-soluble derivatives of the Enterococcus hirae 75-kDa membrane-bound penicillin-binding protein 4 (PBP4) has yielded the amino acid sequence of a 32-amino acid polypeptide stretch. This peptide is similar to peptide segments known to occur in the N-terminal domain of high-Mr PBPs of class B. The E. hirae PBP4 probably belongs to the same class. It is anchored in the membrane at the N-terminus of the polypeptide chain. PMID:1936941

  3. Peptide mapping and amino acid sequencing of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Ha, K S

    1997-10-31

    The partial amino acid sequences of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24 have been determined by analysis of peptides after cleavages with endopeptidase Lys-C, endopeptidase Glu-C, trypsin, and chemicals (cyanogen bromide and BNPS-skatole). They include 248 amino acid sequences (4 fragments) of CD I1 and 211 amino acid sequences (5 fragments) of CD I2. Two enzymes have more than 50% sequence homology with type I catechol 1,2-dioxygenases and less than 30% sequence homology with type II catechol 1,2-dioxygenases. Two enzymes have similar hydropathy profiles in the N-terminal region, suggesting that they have similar secondary structures. PMID:9387151

  4. Using triple-helix-forming Peptide nucleic acids for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; Cheruiyot, Samwel K; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-09-08

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in regulation of gene expression. Specific recognition and inhibition of these biologically important RNAs that form complex double-helical structures will be highly useful for fundamental studies in biology and practical applications in medicine. This protocol describes a strategy developed in our laboratory for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using triple-helix-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that bind in the major grove of the RNA helix. The strategy developed uses chemically modified nucleobases, such as 2-aminopyridine (M), which enables strong triple-helical binding under physiologically relevant conditions, and 2-pyrimidinone (P) and 3-oxo-2,3-dihydropyridazine (E), which enable recognition of isolated pyrimidines in the purine-rich strand of the RNA duplex. Detailed protocols for preparation of modified PNA monomers, solid-phase synthesis, HPLC purification of PNA oligomers, and measuring dsRNA binding affinity using isothermal titration calorimetry are included.

  5. Moving Away from the Reference Genome: Evaluating a Peptide Sequencing Tagging Approach for Single Amino Acid Polymorphism Identifications in the Genus Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Paul E; Adams, Rachel M; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity across natural populations of the model organism, Populus, is extensive, containing a single nucleotide polymorphism roughly every 200 base pairs. When deviations from the reference genome occur in coding regions, they can impact protein sequences. Rather than relying on a static reference database to profile protein expression, we employed a peptide sequence tagging (PST) approach capable of decoding the plasticity of the Populus proteome. Using shotgun proteomics data from two genotypes of P. trichocarpa, a tag-based approach enabled the detection of 6,653 unexpected sequence variants. Through manual validation, our study investigated how the most abundant chemical modification (methionine oxidation) could masquerade as a sequence variant (AlaSer) when few site-determining ions existed. In fact, precise localization of an oxidation site for peptides with more than one potential placement was indeterminate for 70% of the MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate that additional fragment ions made available by high energy collisional dissociation enhances the robustness of the peptide sequence tagging approach (81% of oxidation events could be exclusively localized to a methionine). We are confident that augmenting fragmentation processes for a PST approach will further improve the identification of single amino acid polymorphism in Populus and potentially other species as well.

  6. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  7. Fluorogenic peptide sequences--transformation of short peptides into fluorophores under ambient photooxidative conditions.

    PubMed

    Juskowiak, Gary L; Stachel, Shawn J; Tivitmahaisoon, Parcharee; Van Vranken, David L

    2004-01-21

    Long-lived proteins are susceptible to nonenzymatic chemical reactions and the evolution of fluorescence; however, little is known about the sequence-dependence of fluorogenesis. We synthesized a library of over half a million octapeptides and exposed it to light and air in pH 7.4 buffer to identify fluorogenic peptides that evolve under mild oxidative conditions. The bead-based peptide library was composed of the general sequence H(2)N-Ala-(Xxx)(6)-Ala-resin, where Xxx was one of nine representative amino acids: Asp, Gly, His, Leu, Lys, Pro, Ser, Trp, and Tyr. Next, we selected five highly fluorescent beads from the library and subjected them to microsequencing, revealing the sequence of the unreacted peptide. All five of the fluorogenic sequences were ionic; lacked Tyr, His, and Leu; and most of the sequences contained only one Trp. We then synthesized the five soluble peptides corresponding to the fluorogenic peptide sequences and exposed them to photooxidative conditions. In general, the soluble peptides reacted slowly, generating nonfluorescent monooxygenated and dioxygenated products. However, one peptide (H(2)N-AlaLysProTrpGlyGlyAspAla-CONH(2)) evolved into a highly fluorescent photoproduct as well as a nonfluorescent monooxygenated photoproduct. The fluorescent photoproduct consisted of a 2-carboxy-quinolin-4-yl moiety fused to the N-terminus of GlyGlyAspAla. The formation of this photoproduct requires cleavage of the peptide backbone and a dramatic reorganization of tryptophan. This work demonstrates that sequencing unreacted peptide on beads can reveal sequences with unique nonenzymatic reactivity. The study also confirms that peptide fluorogenesis is dependent on sequence and not merely on the presence of tryptophan. The potential importance of fluorogenic peptide sequences is two-fold. First, fluorogenic sequences that arise through mutation could prove to be hot spots for human aging. Second, fluorogenic sequences, particularly those compatible with

  8. On the activation of bovine plasma factor XIII. Amino acid sequence of the peptide released by thrombin and the terminal residues of the subunit polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Iwanaga, S; Suzuki, T

    1975-12-01

    A blood coagulation factor, Factor XIII, was highly purified from bovine fresh plasma by a method similar to those used for human plasma Factor XIII. The isolated Factor XIII consisted of two subunit polypeptides, a and b chains, with molecular weights of 79,000 +/- 2,000 and 75,000 +/- 2,000, respectively. In the conversion of Factor XIII to the active enzyme, Factor XIIIa, by bovine thrombin [EC 3.4.21.5], a peptide was liberated. This peptide, designated tentatively as "activation peptide," was isolated by gel-filtration on a Sephadex G-75 column. It contained a total of 37 amino acid residues with a masked N-terminal residue and C-terminal arginine. The whole amino acid sequence of "Activation peptide" was established by the dansyl-Edman method and standard enzymatic techniques, and the masked N-terminal residue was identified as N-acetylserine by using a rat liver acylamino acid-releasing enzyme. This enzyme specifically cleaved the N-acetylserylglutamyl peptide bond serine and the remaining peptide, which was now reactive to 1-dimethylamino-naphthalene-5-sulfonyl chloride. A comparison of the sequences of human and bovine "Activation peptide" revealed five amino acids replacements, Ser-3 to Thr; Gly-5 to Arg; Ile-14 to Val; Thr-18 to Asn, and Pro-26 to Leu. Another difference was the deletion of Leu-34 in the human peptide. Adsorption chromatography on a hydroxylapatite column in the presence of 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate was developed as a preparative procedure for the resolution of the two subunit polypeptides, a or a' chain and b chain, constituting the protein molecule of Factor XIII or Factor XIIIa. End group analyses on the isolated pure chains revealed that the structural change of Factor XIII during activation with thrombin occurs only in the N-terminal portion of the a chain, not in the N-terminal end of the b chain or in the C-terminal ends of the a and b chains. From these results, it was concluded that the activation of bovine plasma Factor XIII

  9. Multiplex De Novo Sequencing of Peptide Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Liu, Wei-Ting; Yang, Yu-Liang; Gaudêncio, Susana P.; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    Proliferation of drug-resistant diseases raises the challenge of searching for new, more efficient antibiotics. Currently, some of the most effective antibiotics (i.e., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. The isolation and sequencing of cyclic peptide antibiotics, unlike the same activity with linear peptides, is time-consuming and error-prone. The dominant technique for sequencing cyclic peptides is NMR-based and requires large amounts (milligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Given these facts, there is a need for new tools to sequence cyclic NRPs using picograms of material. Since nearly all cyclic NRPs are produced along with related analogs, we develop a mass spectrometry approach for sequencing all related peptides at once (in contrast to the existing approach that analyzes individual peptides). Our results suggest that instead of attempting to isolate and NMR-sequence the most abundant compound, one should acquire spectra of many related compounds and sequence all of them simultaneously using tandem mass spectrometry. We illustrate applications of this approach by sequencing new variants of cyclic peptide antibiotics from Bacillus brevis, as well as sequencing a previously unknown familiy of cyclic NRPs produced by marine bacteria.

  10. Identification of non-random sequence properties in groups of signature peptides obtained in random sequence peptide microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor B

    2016-05-01

    Immunosignaturing is an emerging experimental technique that uses random sequence peptide microarrays to detect antibodies produced by the immune system in response to a particular disease. Two important questions regarding immunosignaturing are "Do microarray peptides that exhibit a strong affinity to a given type of antibodies share common sequence properties?" and "If so, what are those properties?" In this work, three statistical tests designed to detect non-random patterns in the amino acid makeup of a group of microarray peptides are presented. One test detects patterns of significantly biased amino acid usage, whereas the other two detect patterns of significant bias in the biochemical properties. These tests do not require a large number of peptides per group. The tests were applied to analyze 19 groups of peptides identified in immunosignaturing experiments as being specific for antibodies produced in response to various types of cancer and other diseases. The positional distribution of the biochemical properties of the amino acids in these 19 peptide groups was also studied. Remarkably, despite the random nature of the sequence libraries used to design the microarrays, a unique group-specific non-random pattern was identified in the majority of the peptide groups studied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 318-329, 2016. PMID:27037995

  11. Multifunctional hybrid networks based on self assembling peptide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Sameer

    The overall aim of this dissertation is to achieve a comprehensive correlation between the molecular level changes in primary amino acid sequences of amphiphilic beta-hairpin peptides and their consequent solution-assembly properties and bulk network hydrogel behavior. This has been accomplished using two broad approaches. In the first approach, amino acid substitutions were made to peptide sequence MAX1 such that the hydrophobic surfaces of the folded beta-hairpins from the peptides demonstrate shape specificity in hydrophobic interactions with other beta-hairpins during the assembly process, thereby causing changes to the peptide nanostructure and bulk rheological properties of hydrogels formed from the peptides. Steric lock and key complementary hydrophobic interactions were designed to occur between two beta-hairpin molecules of a single molecule, LNK1 during beta-sheet fibrillar assembly of LNK1. Experimental results from circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy and oscillatory rheology collectively indicate that the molecular design of the LNK1 peptide can be assigned the cause of the drastically different behavior of the networks relative to MAX1. The results indicate elimination or significant reduction of fibrillar branching due to steric complementarity in LNK1 that does not exist in MAX1, thus supporting the original hypothesis. As an extension of the designed steric lock and key complementarity between two beta-hairpin molecules of the same peptide molecule. LNK1, three new pairs of peptide molecules LP1-KP1, LP2-KP2 and LP3-KP3 that resemble complementary 'wedge' and 'trough' shapes when folded into beta-hairpins were designed and studied. All six peptides individually and when blended with their corresponding shape complement formed fibrillar nanostructures with non-uniform thickness values. Loose packing in the assembled structures was observed in all the new peptides as compared to the uniform tight packing in MAX1 by SANS analysis. This

  12. Multifunctional hybrid networks based on self assembling peptide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Sameer

    The overall aim of this dissertation is to achieve a comprehensive correlation between the molecular level changes in primary amino acid sequences of amphiphilic beta-hairpin peptides and their consequent solution-assembly properties and bulk network hydrogel behavior. This has been accomplished using two broad approaches. In the first approach, amino acid substitutions were made to peptide sequence MAX1 such that the hydrophobic surfaces of the folded beta-hairpins from the peptides demonstrate shape specificity in hydrophobic interactions with other beta-hairpins during the assembly process, thereby causing changes to the peptide nanostructure and bulk rheological properties of hydrogels formed from the peptides. Steric lock and key complementary hydrophobic interactions were designed to occur between two beta-hairpin molecules of a single molecule, LNK1 during beta-sheet fibrillar assembly of LNK1. Experimental results from circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy and oscillatory rheology collectively indicate that the molecular design of the LNK1 peptide can be assigned the cause of the drastically different behavior of the networks relative to MAX1. The results indicate elimination or significant reduction of fibrillar branching due to steric complementarity in LNK1 that does not exist in MAX1, thus supporting the original hypothesis. As an extension of the designed steric lock and key complementarity between two beta-hairpin molecules of the same peptide molecule. LNK1, three new pairs of peptide molecules LP1-KP1, LP2-KP2 and LP3-KP3 that resemble complementary 'wedge' and 'trough' shapes when folded into beta-hairpins were designed and studied. All six peptides individually and when blended with their corresponding shape complement formed fibrillar nanostructures with non-uniform thickness values. Loose packing in the assembled structures was observed in all the new peptides as compared to the uniform tight packing in MAX1 by SANS analysis. This

  13. Engineering short peptide sequences for uranyl binding.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Colette; Starck, Matthieu; Gathu, Vicky; Chenavier, Yves; Delangle, Pascale

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are interesting tools to rationalize uranyl-protein interactions, which are relevant to uranium toxicity in vivo. Structured cyclic peptide scaffolds were chosen as promising candidates to coordinate uranyl thanks to four amino acid side chains pre-oriented towards the dioxo cation equatorial plane. The binding of uranyl by a series of decapeptides has been investigated with complementary analytical and spectroscopic methods to determine the key parameters for the formation of stable uranyl-peptide complexes. The molar ellipticity of the uranyl complex at 195 nm is directly correlated to its stability, which demonstrates that the β-sheet structure is optimal for high stability in the peptide series. Cyclodecapeptides with four glutamate residues exhibit the highest affinities for uranyl with log KC =8.0-8.4 and, therefore, appear as good starting points for the design of high-affinity uranyl-chelating peptides. PMID:25324194

  14. Dissociation pathways of alkali-cationized peptides: opportunities for C-terminal peptide sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lin, T; Payne, A H; Glish, G L

    2001-05-01

    Dissociation pathways of alkali-cationized peptides have been studied using multiple stages of mass spectrometry (MSx) with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Over 100 peptide ions ranging from 2 to 10 residues in length and containing each of the 20 common amino acids have been examined. The formation of the [b(n-1) + Na + OH]+ product ion is the predominant dissociation pathway for the majority of the common amino acids. This product corresponds to a sodium-cationized peptide one residue shorter in length than the original peptide. In a few cases, product ions such as [b(n-1) + Na - H]+ and those formed by loss, or partial loss, of a sidechain are observed. Both [b(n-1) + Na + OH]+ and [b(n-1) + Na - H]+ product ions can be selected as parent ions for a subsequent stage of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). It is shown that these dissociation patterns provide opportunities for peptide sequencing by successive dissociation from the C-terminus of alkali-cationized peptides. Up to seven stages of MS/MS have been performed on a series of [b + Na + OH]+ ions to provide sequence information from the C-terminus. This method is analogous to Edman degradation except that the cleavage occurs from the C-terminus instead of the N-terminus, making it more attractive for N-terminal blocked peptides. The isomers leucine and isoleucine cannot be differentiated by this method but the isobars lysine and glutamine can.

  15. Induction of severe experimental autoimmune neuritis with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 53-78 amino acid sequence of the myelin P2 protein.

    PubMed

    Rostami, A; Gregorian, S K; Brown, M J; Pleasure, D E

    1990-12-01

    We generated a synthetic peptide (SP-26), corresponding to the amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein, which induced severe clinical and pathological characteristics of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats. Lymph node cell populations from SP-26-immunized rats elicited a proliferative response to the peptide and to the P2 protein. After 16 cycles of antigen stimulation with the peptide, the SP-26 T cell line shows a decreased response to P2, but not to SP-26. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of a SP-26 T cell line indicated the majority of cells to be of CD4+ CD8-. This report demonstrates that the synthetic peptide SP-26 can induce severe EAN in Lewis rats in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, specific T cell lines reactive to SP-26 can be generated from the lymph nodes of SP-26-immunized rats. PMID:1699975

  16. Induction of severe experimental autoimmune neuritis with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 53-78 amino acid sequence of the myelin P2 protein.

    PubMed

    Rostami, A; Gregorian, S K; Brown, M J; Pleasure, D E

    1990-12-01

    We generated a synthetic peptide (SP-26), corresponding to the amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein, which induced severe clinical and pathological characteristics of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats. Lymph node cell populations from SP-26-immunized rats elicited a proliferative response to the peptide and to the P2 protein. After 16 cycles of antigen stimulation with the peptide, the SP-26 T cell line shows a decreased response to P2, but not to SP-26. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of a SP-26 T cell line indicated the majority of cells to be of CD4+ CD8-. This report demonstrates that the synthetic peptide SP-26 can induce severe EAN in Lewis rats in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, specific T cell lines reactive to SP-26 can be generated from the lymph nodes of SP-26-immunized rats.

  17. Improved peptide elution time prediction for reversed-phase liquid chromatography-MS by incorporating peptide sequence information

    SciTech Connect

    Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Yan, Bo; Monroe, Matthew E.; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Qian, Weijun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Moore, Ronald J.; Xu, Ying; Lipton, Mary S.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-07-15

    We describe an improved artificial neural network (ANN)-based method for predicting peptide retention times in reversed phase liquid chromatography. In addition to the peptide amino acid composition, this study investigated several other peptide descriptors to improve the predictive capability, such as peptide length, sequence, hydrophobicity and hydrophobic moment, and nearest neighbor amino acid, as well as peptide predicted structural configurations (i.e., helix, sheet, coil). An ANN architecture that consisted of 1052 input nodes, 24 hidden nodes, and 1 output node was used to fully consider the amino acid residue sequence in each peptide. The network was trained using {approx}345,000 non-redundant peptides identified from a total of 12,059 LC-MS/MS analyses of more than 20 different organisms, and the predictive capability of the model was tested using 1303 confidently identified peptides that were not included in the training set. The model demonstrated an average elution time precision of {approx}1.5% and was able to distinguish among isomeric peptides based upon the inclusion of peptide sequence information. The prediction power represents a significant improvement over our earlier report (Petritis et al., Anal. Chem. 2003, 75, 1039-1048) and other previously reported models.

  18. Multidomain Peptides: Sequence-Nanostructure Relationships and Biological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakota, Erica Laraine

    2011-12-01

    Peptides are materials that, as a result of their polymeric nature, possess enormous versatility and customizability. Multidomain peptides are a class of peptides that self-assemble to form stable, cytocompatible hydrogels. They have an ABA block motif, in which the A block is composed of charged amino acids, such as lysine, and the B block consists of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids, such as glutamine and leucine. The B block forms a facial amphiphile that drives self-assembly. The charged A blocks simultaneously limit self-assembly and improve solubility. Self-assembly is triggered by charge screening of these charged amino acids, enabling the formation of beta-sheet fibers. The development of an extended nanofiber network can result in the formation of a hydrogel. Systematic modifications to both the A and B blocks were investigated, and it was found that sequence modifications have a large impact on peptide nanostructure and hydrogel rheology. The first modification examined is the substitution of amino acids within the hydrophilic positions of the B block. The second set of modifications investigated was the incorporation of aromatic amino acids in the B block. Finally, the charged block was varied to generate different net charges on the peptides, a change which impacted the ability to use these peptides in cell culture. Two applications of multidomain peptide nanofibers are explored, the first of which is the delivery of novel therapies in vivo. One multidomain peptide is able to form hydrogels that undergo shear-thinning and rapid recovery. This gel can be loaded with cytokines and growth factors that have been secreted by embryonic stem cells, and these molecules can be subsequently released in a therapeutic setting. Another application for multidomain peptide is their use as biocompatible surfactants. Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been widely investigated for their unique optical and electrical properties, but their solubility in

  19. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions.

  20. Sequence diversity and evolution of antimicrobial peptides in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Amparyup, Piti

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are evolutionarily ancient molecules that act as the key components in the invertebrate innate immunity against invading pathogens. Several AMPs have been identified and characterized in invertebrates, and found to display considerable diversity in their amino acid sequence, structure and biological activity. AMP genes appear to have rapidly evolved, which might have arisen from the co-evolutionary arms race between host and pathogens, and enabled organisms to survive in different microbial environments. Here, the sequence diversity of invertebrate AMPs (defensins, cecropins, crustins and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors) are presented to provide a better understanding of the evolution pattern of these peptides that play a major role in host defense mechanisms.

  1. Engineering Short Preorganized Peptide Sequences for Metal Ion Coordination: Copper(II) a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Lima, L M P; Iranzo, O

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are multidentate chiral ligands capable of coordinating different metal ions. Nowadays, they can be obtained with high yield and purity, thanks to the advances on peptide/protein chemistry as well as in equipment (peptide synthesizers). Based on the identity and length of their amino acid sequences, peptides can present different degrees of flexibility and folding. Although short peptide sequences (<20 amino acids) usually lack structure in solution, different levels of structural preorganization can be induced by introducing conformational constraints, such as β-turn/loop template sequences and backbone cyclization. For all these reasons, and the fact that one is not restricted to use proteinogenic amino acids, small peptidic scaffolds constitute a simple and versatile platform for the development of inorganic systems with tailor-made properties and functions. Here we outline a general approach to the design of short preorganized peptide sequences (10-16 amino acids) for metal ion coordination. Based on our experience, we present a general scheme for the design, synthesis, and characterization of these peptidic scaffolds and provide protocols for the study of their metal ion coordination properties. PMID:27586340

  2. Engineering Short Preorganized Peptide Sequences for Metal Ion Coordination: Copper(II) a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Lima, L M P; Iranzo, O

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are multidentate chiral ligands capable of coordinating different metal ions. Nowadays, they can be obtained with high yield and purity, thanks to the advances on peptide/protein chemistry as well as in equipment (peptide synthesizers). Based on the identity and length of their amino acid sequences, peptides can present different degrees of flexibility and folding. Although short peptide sequences (<20 amino acids) usually lack structure in solution, different levels of structural preorganization can be induced by introducing conformational constraints, such as β-turn/loop template sequences and backbone cyclization. For all these reasons, and the fact that one is not restricted to use proteinogenic amino acids, small peptidic scaffolds constitute a simple and versatile platform for the development of inorganic systems with tailor-made properties and functions. Here we outline a general approach to the design of short preorganized peptide sequences (10-16 amino acids) for metal ion coordination. Based on our experience, we present a general scheme for the design, synthesis, and characterization of these peptidic scaffolds and provide protocols for the study of their metal ion coordination properties.

  3. The H-Index of `An Approach to Correlate Tandem Mass Spectral Data of Peptides with Amino Acid Sequences in a Protein Database'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Over 20 years ago a remarkable paper was published in the Journal of American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This paper from Jimmy Eng, Ashley McCormack, and John Yates described the use of protein databases to drive the interpretation of tandem mass spectra of peptides. This paper now has over 3660 citations and continues to average more than 260 per year over the last decade. This is an amazing scientific achievement. The reason for this is the paper was a cutting edge development at the moment in time when genomes of organisms were being sequenced, protein and peptide mass spectrometry was growing into the field of proteomics, and the power of computing was growing quickly in accordance with Moore's law. This work by the Yates lab grew in importance as genomics, proteomics, and computation all advanced and eventually resulted in the widely used SEQUEST algorithm and platform for the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. This commentary provides an analysis of the impact of this paper by analyzing the citations it has generated and the impact of these citing papers.

  4. The H-index of 'an approach to correlate tandem mass spectral data of peptides with amino acid sequences in a protein database'.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Over 20 years ago a remarkable paper was published in the Journal of American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This paper from Jimmy Eng, Ashley McCormack, and John Yates described the use of protein databases to drive the interpretation of tandem mass spectra of peptides. This paper now has over 3660 citations and continues to average more than 260 per year over the last decade. This is an amazing scientific achievement. The reason for this is the paper was a cutting edge development at the moment in time when genomes of organisms were being sequenced, protein and peptide mass spectrometry was growing into the field of proteomics, and the power of computing was growing quickly in accordance with Moore's law. This work by the Yates lab grew in importance as genomics, proteomics, and computation all advanced and eventually resulted in the widely used SEQUEST algorithm and platform for the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. This commentary provides an analysis of the impact of this paper by analyzing the citations it has generated and the impact of these citing papers. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Histidine-lysine peptides as carriers of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Leng, Qixin; Goldgeier, Lisa; Zhu, Jingsong; Cambell, Patricia; Ambulos, Nicholas; Mixson, A James

    2007-03-01

    With their biodegradability and diversity of permutations, peptides have significant potential as carriers of nucleic acids. This review will focus on the sequence and branching patterns of peptide carriers composed primarily of histidines and lysines. While lysines within peptides are important for binding to the negatively charged phosphates, histidines are critical for endosomal lysis enabling nucleic acids to reach the cytosol. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymers by either covalent or ionic bonds with liposomes augment transfection compared to liposome carriers alone. More recently, we have examined peptides as sole carriers of nucleic acids because of their intrinsic advantages compared to the bipartite HK/liposome carriers. With a protocol change and addition of a histidine-rich tail, HK peptides as sole carriers were more effective than liposomes alone in several cell lines. While four-branched polymers with a primary repeating sequence pattern of -HHK- were more effective as carriers of plasmids, eight-branched polymers with a sequence pattern of -HHHK- were more effective as carriers of siRNA. Compared to polyethylenimine, HK carriers of siRNA and plasmids had reduced toxicity. When injected intravenously, HK polymers in complex with plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins significantly decreased tumor growth. Furthermore, modification of HK polymers with polyethylene glycol and vascular-specific ligands increased specificity of the polyplex to the tumor by more than 40-fold. Together with further development and insight on the structure of HK polyplexes, HK peptides may prove to be useful as carriers of different forms of nucleic acids both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17440630

  6. Can natural proteins designed with 'inverted' peptide sequences adopt native-like protein folds?

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Settu; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic computational analysis on a representative dataset of proteins of known three-dimensional structure, in order to evaluate whether it would possible to 'swap' certain short peptide sequences in naturally occurring proteins with their corresponding 'inverted' peptides and generate 'artificial' proteins that are predicted to retain native-like protein fold. The analysis of 3,967 representative proteins from the Protein Data Bank revealed 102,677 unique identical inverted peptide sequence pairs that vary in sequence length between 5-12 and 18 amino acid residues. Our analysis illustrates with examples that such 'artificial' proteins may be generated by identifying peptides with 'similar structural environment' and by using comparative protein modeling and validation studies. Our analysis suggests that natural proteins may be tolerant to accommodating such peptides.

  7. Sequence-dependent Internalization of Aggregating Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, José R.; Gallardo, Rodrigo; De Smet, Frederik; De Baets, Greet; Baatsen, Pieter; Annaert, Wim; Roose, Kenny; Saelens, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a number of aggregation disease polypeptides have been shown to spread from cell to cell, thereby displaying prionoid behavior. Studying aggregate internalization, however, is often hampered by the complex kinetics of the aggregation process, resulting in the concomitant uptake of aggregates of different sizes by competing mechanisms, which makes it difficult to isolate pathway-specific responses to aggregates. We designed synthetic aggregating peptides bearing different aggregation propensities with the aim of producing modes of uptake that are sufficiently distinct to differentially analyze the cellular response to internalization. We found that small acidic aggregates (≤500 nm in diameter) were taken up by nonspecific endocytosis as part of the fluid phase and traveled through the endosomal compartment to lysosomes. By contrast, bigger basic aggregates (>1 μm) were taken up through a mechanism dependent on cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane remodeling with the morphological hallmarks of phagocytosis. Importantly, the properties of these aggregates determined not only the mechanism of internalization but also the involvement of the proteostatic machinery (the assembly of interconnected networks that control the biogenesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation of proteins) in the process; whereas the internalization of small acidic aggregates is HSF1-independent, the uptake of larger basic aggregates was HSF1-dependent, requiring Hsp70. Our results show that the biophysical properties of aggregates determine both their mechanism of internalization and proteostatic response. It remains to be seen whether these differences in cellular response contribute to the particular role of specific aggregated proteins in disease. PMID:25391649

  8. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; Kamei, Daniel T.; Wong, Gerard C.L.; Deming, Timothy J.

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess low cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.

  9. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; Kamei, Daniel T.; Wong, Gerard C.L.; Deming, Timothy J.

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess lowmore » cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.« less

  10. Folding and activity of hybrid sequence, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, J.H.B.; Storrs, R.W.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Peptides have been synthesized that have hybrid sequences, partially derived from the bee venom peptide apamin and partially from the S peptide of ribonuclease A. The hybrid peptides were demonstrated by NMR spectroscopy to fold, forming the same disulfides and basic three-dimensional structure as native apamin, containing a {beta}-turn and an {alpha}-helix. These hybrids were active in complementing S protein, reactivating nuclease activity. In addition, the hybrid peptide was effective in inducing antibodies that cross-react with the RNase, without conjugation to a carrier protein. The stability of the folded structure of this peptide suggests that it should be possible to elicit antibodies that will react not only with a specific sequence, but also with a specific secondary structure. Hybrid sequence peptides also provide opportunities to study separately nucleation and propagation steps in formation of secondary structure. The authors show that in S peptide the {alpha}-helix does not end abruptly but rather terminates gradually over four or five residues. In general, these hybrid sequence peptides, which fold predictably because of disulfide bond formation, can provide opportunities for examining structure - function relationships for many biologically active sequences.

  11. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  12. Sequence-Specific Peptide Nucleic Acid-Based Antisense Inhibitors of TEM-1 β-Lactamase and Mechanism of Adaptive Resistance.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Colleen M; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-06-12

    The recent surge of drug-resistant superbugs and shrinking antibiotic pipeline are serious challenges to global health. In particular, the emergence of β-lactamases has caused extensive resistance against the most frequently prescribed class of β-lactam antibiotics. Here, we develop novel synthetic peptide nucleic acid-based antisense inhibitors that target the start codon and ribosomal binding site of the TEM-1 β-lactamase transcript and act via translation inhibition mechanism. We show that these antisense inhibitors are capable of resensitizing drug-resistant Escherichia coli to β-lactam antibiotics exhibiting 10-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). To study the mechanism of resistance, we adapted E. coli at MIC levels of the β-lactam/antisense inhibitor combination and observed a nonmutational, bet-hedging based adaptive antibiotic resistance response as evidenced by phenotypic heterogeneity as well as heterogeneous expression of key stress response genes. Our data show that both the development of new antimicrobials and an understanding of cellular response during the development of tolerance could aid in mitigating the impending antibiotic crisis. PMID:27622741

  13. Bromine isotopic signature facilitates de novo sequencing of peptides in free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jungjoo; Kwon, Hyuksu; Jang, Inae; Jeon, Aeran; Moon, Jingyu; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Han, Sang Yun; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2015-02-01

    We recently showed that free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing mass spectrometry (FRIPS MS) assisted by the remarkable thermochemical stability of (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) is another attractive radical-driven peptide fragmentation MS tool. Facile homolytic cleavage of the bond between the benzylic carbon and the oxygen of the TEMPO moiety in o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide and the high reactivity of the benzylic radical species generated in •Bz-C(O)-peptide are key elements leading to extensive radical-driven peptide backbone fragmentation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the incorporation of bromine into the benzene ring, i.e. o-TEMPO-Bz(Br)-C(O)-peptide, allows unambiguous distinction of the N-terminal peptide fragments from the C-terminal fragments through the unique bromine doublet isotopic signature. Furthermore, bromine substitution does not alter the overall radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation pathways of o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide. From a practical perspective, the presence of the bromine isotopic signature in the N-terminal peptide fragments in TEMPO-assisted FRIPS MS represents a useful and cost-effective opportunity for de novo peptide sequencing.

  14. Peptide nucleic acid films and capsules: assembly and enzymatic degradation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Alisa L; Johnston, Angus P R; Caruso, Frank

    2010-05-14

    Sequence-directed hybridization of nucleic acids provides a high level of control for the bottom-up assembly of nanostructured materials. Altering the DNA sequence affords control and versatility over the film structure, but is limited by the chemical and physical properties of DNA. Here, we use DNA analogues, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), to introduce new properties to multilayered thin films and retain the advantages of sequence-directed assembly. Thin films, formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of PNA strands, were assembled from short PNA sequences on planar and colloidal substrates. In the case of PNA-coated particles, hollow capsules were obtained following removal of the sacrificial particle template. The PNA films were stable to both nuclease and protease degradation, and the nuclease degradation rate could be tuned by varying the amount of DNA incorporated into the films. These thin films may find use in biomedical applications.

  15. Induction of neonatal lupus in pups of mice immunized with synthetic peptides derived from amino acid sequences of the serotoninergic 5-HT4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, P; Roegel, J C; Lezoualc'h, F; Fischmeister, R; Imbs, J L; Hoebeke, J

    2001-02-01

    We have previously suggested that the recognition of a cross-reactive epitope on the 5-HT4 receptor and the 52-kDa SSA/Ro protein by serotonin-antagonizing autoantibodies could explain the electrophysiological symptoms of congenital heart block in neonatal lupus. To confirm this hypothesis, we immunized female mice with four synthetic peptides corresponding to the recognized epitopes. All mice developed anti-peptide antibodies, which cross-reacted with the Ro52 and 5-HT4 receptor peptides and recognized both cognate proteins. Peptide-immune mice were mated. The pups from mice immunized with the Ro52 peptides had no symptoms of neonatal lupus apart from bradycardia. However, pups from mice immunized with the 5-HT4 receptor peptides and bradycardia, atrioventricular block of type I or II, longer QT intervals, skin rashes and neuromotor problems. The 5-HT4 receptor was detectable in the different fetal tissues affected (heart, skin and brain) by immunohistochemistry. Hearts from diseased pups were less developed and showed disorganized myocardial hyperplasia, compared to the normal littermates. These results demonstrate that the serotoninergic 5-HT4 receptor is the antigenic target of physiopathological autoantibodies in neonatal lupus.

  16. Characterization and sequencing of an active-site cysteine-containing peptide from the xylanase of a thermotolerant Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Keskar, S S; Rao, M B; Deshpande, V V

    1992-02-01

    The kinetics of chemical modification of the xylanase from a thermotolerant Streptomyces T7 indicated the involvement of 1 mol of cysteine residue/mol of enzyme [Keskar, Srinivasan & Deshpande (1989) Biochem. J. 261, 49-55]. The chromophoric reagent N-(2,4-dinitroanilino)maleimide (DAM) reacts covalently with thiol groups of xylanase with complete inactivation. Protection against inactivation was provided by the substrate (xylan). The purified xylanase that had been modified with DAM was digested with pepsin and the peptides were purified by gel filtration followed by peptide mapping. The active-site peptide was distinguished from the other thiol-containing peptides by comparison of the peptides generated by labelling the enzyme in the presence and in the absence of the substrate. The peptide mapping of the modified enzyme in the absence of xylan showed three yellow peptides, whereas in the presence of xylan only two yellow peptides were detected. The active-site peptide protected by the substrate failed to form the complex with DAM. The modified active-site peptide was isolated and sequenced. Gas-phase sequencing provided the following sequence: Ser-Val-Ile-Met-Xaa-Ile-Asp-His-Ile-Arg-Phe. This is the first report on the isolation and sequencing of the active-site peptide from a xylanase. The comparison of reactive cysteine-containing peptide sequence with the catalytic regions of other glucanases revealed the presence of a conserved aspartic acid residue.

  17. Gene delivery using ternary lipopolyplexes incorporating branched cationic peptides: the role of Peptide sequence and branching.

    PubMed

    Welser, Katharina; Campbell, Frederick; Kudsiova, Laila; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Dawson, Natalie; Hart, Stephen L; Barlow, David J; Hailes, Helen C; Lawrence, M Jayne; Tabor, Alethea B

    2013-01-01

    Cationic peptide sequences, whether linear, branched, or dendritic, are widely used to condense and protect DNA in both polyplex and lipopolyplex gene delivery vectors. How these peptides behave within these particles and the consequences this has on transfection efficiency remain poorly understood. We have compared, in parallel, a complete series of cationic peptides, both branched and linear, coformulated with plasmid DNA to give polyplexes, or with plasmid DNA and the cationic lipid, DOTMA, mixed with 50% of the neutral helper lipid, DOPE, to give lipopolyplexes, and correlated the transfection efficiencies of these complexes to their biophysical properties. Lipopolyplexes formulated from branched Arg-rich peptides, or linear Lys-rich peptides, show the best transfection efficiencies in an alveolar epithelial cell line, with His-rich peptides being relatively ineffective. The majority of the biophysical studies (circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, small angle neutron scattering, and gel band shift assay) indicated that all of the formulations were similar in size, surface charge, and lipid bilayer structure, and longer cationic sequences, in general, gave better transfection efficiencies. Whereas lipopolyplexes formulated from branched Arg-containing peptides were more effective than those formulated from linear Arg-containing sequences, the reverse was true for Lys-containing sequences, which may be related to differences in DNA condensation between Arg-rich and Lys-rich peptides observed in the CD studies.

  18. Peptide array on cellulose support--a screening tool to identify peptides with dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitory activity within the sequence of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Isabelle M E; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2014-11-13

    The inhibition of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is an effective pharmacotherapeutic approach for the management of type 2 diabetes. Recent findings have suggested that dietary proteins, including bovine α-lactalbumin, could be precursors of peptides able to inhibit DPP-IV. However, information on the location of active peptide sequences within the proteins is far from being comprehensive. Moreover, the traditional approach to identify bioactive peptides from foods can be tedious and long. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use peptide arrays to screen α-lactalbumin-derived peptides for their interaction with DPP-IV. Deca-peptides spanning the entire α-lactalbumin sequence, with a frame shift of 1 amino acid between successive sequences, were synthesized on cellulose membranes using "SPOT" technology, and their binding to and inhibition of DPP-IV was studied. Among the 114 α-lactalbumin-derived decamers investigated, the peptides 60WCKDDQNPHS69 (αK(i) = 76 µM), 105LAHKALCSEK114 (K(i) = 217 µM) and 110LCSEKLDQWL119 (K(i) = 217 µM) were among the strongest DPP-IV inhibitors. While the SPOT- and traditionally-synthesized peptides showed consistent trends in DPP-IV inhibitory activity, the cellulose-bound peptides' binding behavior was not correlated to their ability to inhibit the enzyme. This research showed, for the first time, that peptide arrays are useful screening tools to identify DPP-IV inhibitory peptides from dietary proteins.

  19. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  20. Supramolecular control of self-assembling terthiophene-peptide conjugates through the amino acid side chain

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, Jessica A.; Cui, Honggang; Tsai, Wei-Wen; Moyer, Tyson J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2013-07-30

    The self-assembly of oligothiophene–peptide conjugates can be directed through the systematic variation of the peptide sequence into different nanostructures, including flat spicules, nanotubes, spiral sheets, and giant, flat sheets. Furthermore, the assembly of these molecules is not controlled by steric interactions between the amino acid side chains.

  1. The amino acid sequence of Escherichia coli cyanase.

    PubMed

    Chin, C C; Anderson, P M; Wold, F

    1983-01-10

    The amino acid sequence of the enzyme cyanase (cyanate hydrolase) from Escherichia coli has been determined by automatic Edman degradation of the intact protein and of its component peptides. The primary peptides used in the sequencing were produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage at the methionine residues, yielding 4 peptides plus free homoserine from the NH2-terminal methionine, and by trypsin cleavage at the 7 arginine residues after acetylation of the lysines. Secondary peptides required for overlaps and COOH-terminal sequences were produced by chymotrypsin or clostripain cleavage of some of the larger peptides. The complete sequence of the cyanase subunit consists of 156 amino acid residues (Mr 16,350). Based on the observation that the cysteine-containing peptide is obtained as a disulfide-linked dimer, it is proposed that the covalent structure of cyanase is made up of two subunits linked by a disulfide bond between the single cystine residue in each subunit. The native enzyme (Mr 150,000) then appears to be a complex of four or five such subunit dimers.

  2. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  3. Isolation and sequence analysis of peptides from the venom of Protonectarina sylveirae (Hymenoptera-Vespidae).

    PubMed

    Dohtsu, K; Okumura, K; Hagiwara, K; Palma, M S; Nakajima, T

    1993-01-01

    Three new venom peptides were isolated from the Brazilian wasp; Protonectarina sylveirae and their complete amino acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation as well as by FAB-mass spectrometry. One (P-8) of them was a new analog of mastoparan family; therefore, we named it Protonectarina mastoparan. Another peptide (P-10) had an amino acid sequence homology with Ves-CP-T, a chemotactic peptide of wasp venom, and bombolitin-V, the venom peptide from bumblebee. The third peptide (P-6) was structurally unique, possessing an intramolecular disulfide bond. Not only Protonectarina mastoparan (P-8) but also P-6 and P-10 caused histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells as potently as mastoparan (EC50s were about 1 x 10(-6) M for P-6 and 2 x 10(-6) M for P-10). In addition, P-10 in a concentration higher than 1 x 10(-5) M induced hemolysis though whose hemolytic activity was about a half potency of that of mastoparan. However, P-6 did not cause hemolysis up to the concentration of 10 microM. We have named them sylverin for the peptide P-6 and protonectin for the peptide P-10.

  4. Novor: Real-Time Peptide de Novo Sequencing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin

    2015-11-01

    De novo sequencing software has been widely used in proteomics to sequence new peptides from tandem mass spectrometry data. This study presents a new software tool, Novor, to greatly improve both the speed and accuracy of today's peptide de novo sequencing analyses. To improve the accuracy, Novor's scoring functions are based on two large decision trees built from a peptide spectral library with more than 300,000 spectra with machine learning. Important knowledge about peptide fragmentation is extracted automatically from the library and incorporated into the scoring functions. The decision tree model also enables efficient score calculation and contributes to the speed improvement. To further improve the speed, a two-stage algorithmic approach, namely dynamic programming and refinement, is used. The software program was also carefully optimized. On the testing datasets, Novor sequenced 7%-37% more correct residues than the state-of-the-art de novo sequencing tool, PEAKS, while being an order of magnitude faster. Novor can de novo sequence more than 300 MS/MS spectra per second on a laptop computer. The speed surpasses the acquisition speed of today's mass spectrometer and, therefore, opens a new possibility to de novo sequence in real time while the spectrometer is acquiring the spectral data.

  5. Novor: real-time peptide de novo sequencing software.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin

    2015-11-01

    De novo sequencing software has been widely used in proteomics to sequence new peptides from tandem mass spectrometry data. This study presents a new software tool, Novor, to greatly improve both the speed and accuracy of today's peptide de novo sequencing analyses. To improve the accuracy, Novor's scoring functions are based on two large decision trees built from a peptide spectral library with more than 300,000 spectra with machine learning. Important knowledge about peptide fragmentation is extracted automatically from the library and incorporated into the scoring functions. The decision tree model also enables efficient score calculation and contributes to the speed improvement. To further improve the speed, a two-stage algorithmic approach, namely dynamic programming and refinement, is used. The software program was also carefully optimized. On the testing datasets, Novor sequenced 7%-37% more correct residues than the state-of-the-art de novo sequencing tool, PEAKS, while being an order of magnitude faster. Novor can de novo sequence more than 300 MS/MS spectra per second on a laptop computer. The speed surpasses the acquisition speed of today's mass spectrometer and, therefore, opens a new possibility to de novo sequence in real time while the spectrometer is acquiring the spectral data. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. LESSONS IN DE NOVO PEPTIDE SEQUENCING BY TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Chalkley, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become the method of choice for the qualitative and quantitative characterization of protein mixtures isolated from all kinds of living organisms. The raw data in these studies are MS/MS spectra, usually of peptides produced by proteolytic digestion of a protein. These spectra are “translated” into peptide sequences, normally with the help of various search engines. Data acquisition and interpretation have both been automated, and most researchers look only at the summary of the identifications without ever viewing the underlying raw data used for assignments. Automated analysis of data is essential due to the volume produced. However, being familiar with the finer intricacies of peptide fragmentation processes, and experiencing the difficulties of manual data interpretation allow a researcher to be able to more critically evaluate key results, particularly because there are many known rules of peptide fragmentation that are not incorporated into search engine scoring. Since the most commonly used MS/MS activation method is collision-induced dissociation (CID), in this article we present a brief review of the history of peptide CID analysis. Next, we provide a detailed tutorial on how to determine peptide sequences from CID data. Although the focus of the tutorial is de novo sequencing, the lessons learned and resources supplied are useful for data interpretation in general. PMID:25667941

  7. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins using diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Nikfarjam, F.; Shenoy, N. R.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins and peptides can be sequenced from the carboxy-terminus with isothiocyanate reagents to produce amino acid thiohydantoin derivatives. Previous studies in our laboratory have focused on the automation of the thiocyanate chemistry using acetic anhydride and trimethylsilylisothiocyanate (TMS-ITC) to derivatize the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin and sodium trimethylsilanolate for specific hydrolysis of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid (Bailey, J.M., Shenoy, N.R., Ronk, M., & Shively, J.E., 1992, Protein Sci. 1, 68-80). A major limitation of this approach was the need to activate the C-terminus with acetic anhydride. We now describe the use of a new reagent, diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate (DPP-ITC) and pyridine, which combines the activation and derivatization steps to produce peptidylthiohydantoins. Previous work by Kenner et al. (Kenner, G.W., Khorana, H.G., & Stedman, R.J., 1953, Chem. Soc. J., 673-678) with this reagent demonstrated slow kinetics. Several days were required for complete reaction. We show here that the inclusion of pyridine was found to promote the formation of C-terminal thiohydantoins by DPP-ITC resulting in complete conversion of the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin in less than 1 h. Reagents such as imidazole, triazine, and tetrazole were also found to promote the reaction with DPP-ITC as effectively as pyridine. General base catalysts, such as triethylamine, do not promote the reaction, but are required to convert the C-terminal carboxylic acid to a salt prior to the reaction with DPP-ITC and pyridine. By introducing the DPP-ITC reagent and pyridine in separate steps in an automated sequencer, we observed improved sequencing yields for amino acids normally found difficult to derivatize with acetic anhydride/TMS-ITC. This was particularly true for aspartic acid, which now can be sequenced in yields comparable to most of the other amino acids. Automated programs are described for the C-terminal sequencing of

  8. Catalytic center of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase: isolation and sequence of diisopropyl fluorophosphate-labeled peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.B.; Yueksel, U.G.; Gracy, R.W.; Lacko, A.G.

    1987-02-27

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was purified from hog plasma and subsequently reacted with (/sup 3/H)-Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). The labeled enzyme was digested with pepsin and the peptides separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two radioactive peptides were isolated, subjected to automated amino acid sequencing and yielded the following data: A) Ile-Ser-Leu-Gly-Ala-Pro-Trp-Gly-Gly-Ser, and B) Tyr-Ile-Phe-Asp-x-Gly-Phe-Pro-Tyr-x-Asp-Pro-Val. Both of these sequences represent very highly conserved regions of the enzyme when compared to the sequence of human LCAT. Peptide (A) is considered to represent the catalytic center of LCAT based on comparisons with data reported in the literature.

  9. The amino acid sequence of Staphylococcus aureus penicillinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P

    1975-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the penicillinase (penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) from Staphylococcus aureus strain PC1 was determined. The protein consists of a single polypeptide chain of 257 residues, and the sequence was determined by characterization of tryptic, chymotryptic, peptic and CNBr peptides, with some additional evidence from thermolysin and S. aureus proteinase peptides. A mistake in the preliminary report of the sequence is corrected; residues 113-116 are now thought to be -Lys-Lys-Val-Lys- rather than -Lys-Val-Lys-Lys-. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50056 (91 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1218078

  10. Mutual Amino Acid Catalysis in Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Supports this Mechanism's Role in Prebiotic Peptide Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1999-10-01

    The presence of some amino acids and dipeptides under the conditions of the salt-induced peptide formation reaction (aqueous solution at 85 °C, Cu(II) and NaCl) has been found to catalyze the formation of homopeptides of other amino acids, which are otherwise produced only in traces or not at all by this reaction. The condensation of Val, Leu and Lys to form their homodipeptides can occur to a considerable extent due to catalytic effects of other amino acids and related compounds, among which glycine, histidine, diglycine and diketopiperazine exhibit the most remarkable activity. These findings also lead to a modification of the table of amino acid sequences preferentially formed by the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction, previously used for a comparison with the sequence preferences in membrane proteins of primitive organisms

  11. Peptide Synthesis on a Next-Generation DNA Sequencing Platform.

    PubMed

    Svensen, Nina; Peersen, Olve B; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2016-09-01

    Methods for displaying large numbers of peptides on solid surfaces are essential for high-throughput characterization of peptide function and binding properties. Here we describe a method for converting the >10(7) flow cell-bound clusters of identical DNA strands generated by the Illumina DNA sequencing technology into clusters of complementary RNA, and subsequently peptide clusters. We modified the flow-cell-bound primers with ribonucleotides thus enabling them to be used by poliovirus polymerase 3D(pol) . The primers hybridize to the clustered DNA thus leading to RNA clusters. The RNAs fold into functional protein- or small molecule-binding aptamers. We used the mRNA-display approach to synthesize flow-cell-tethered peptides from these RNA clusters. The peptides showed selective binding to cognate antibodies. The methods described here provide an approach for using DNA clusters to template peptide synthesis on an Illumina flow cell, thus providing new opportunities for massively parallel peptide-based assays.

  12. Selective Deletion of the Internal Lysine Residue from the Peptide Sequence by Collisional Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-11-01

    The gas-phase peptide ion fragmentation chemistry is always the center of attraction in proteomics to analyze the amino acid sequence of peptides and proteins. In this work, we describe the formation of an anomalous fragment ion, which corresponds to the selective deletion of the internal lysine residue from a series of lysine containing peptides upon collisional activation in the ion trap. We detected several water-loss fragment ions and the maximum number of water molecules lost from a particular fragment ion was equal to the number of lysine residues in that fragment. As a consequence of this water-loss phenomenon, internal lysine residues were found to be deleted from the peptide ion. The N,N-dimethylation of all the amine functional groups of the peptide stopped the internal lysine deletion reaction, but selective N-terminal α-amino acetylation had no effect on this process indicating involvement of the side chains of the lysine residues. The detailed mechanism of the lysine deletion was investigated by multistage CID of the modified and unmodified peptides, by isotope labeling and by energy resolved CID studies. The results suggest that the lysine deletion might occur through a unimolecular multistep mechanism involving a seven-membered cyclic imine intermediate formed by the loss of water from a lysine residue in the protonated peptide. This intermediate subsequently undergoes degradation reaction to deplete the interior imine ring from the peptide backbone leading to the deletion of an internal lysine residue.

  13. Identification of novel Arabidopsis thaliana upstream open reading frames that control expression of the main coding sequences in a peptide sequence-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Isao; Takemoto-Tsutsumi, Mariko; Watanabe, Shun; Koyama, Hiroaki; Endo, Yayoi; Kimata, Kaori; Igarashi, Takuya; Murakami, Karin; Kudo, Rin; Ohsumi, Arisa; Noh, Abdul Latif; Takahashi, Hiro; Naito, Satoshi; Onouchi, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are often found in the 5′-leader regions of eukaryotic mRNAs and can negatively modulate the translational efficiency of the downstream main ORF. Although the effects of most uORFs are thought to be independent of their encoded peptide sequences, certain uORFs control translation of the main ORF in a peptide sequence-dependent manner. For genome-wide identification of such peptide sequence-dependent regulatory uORFs, exhaustive searches for uORFs with conserved amino acid sequences have been conducted using bioinformatic analyses. However, whether the conserved uORFs identified by these bioinformatic approaches encode regulatory peptides has not been experimentally determined. Here we analyzed 16 recently identified Arabidopsis thaliana conserved uORFs for the effects of their amino acid sequences on the expression of the main ORF using a transient expression assay. We identified five novel uORFs that repress main ORF expression in a peptide sequence-dependent manner. Mutational analysis revealed that, in four of them, the C-terminal region of the uORF-encoded peptide is critical for the repression of main ORF expression. Intriguingly, we also identified one exceptional sequence-dependent regulatory uORF, in which the stop codon position is not conserved and the C-terminal region is not important for the repression of main ORF expression. PMID:25618853

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against an identical short peptide sequence shared by two unrelated proteins.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Gahmen, U; Wilson, I A

    1989-01-01

    Antipeptide antibodies provide the opportunity to explore the molecular basis for antigen-antibody recognition and to test theories of immune recognition. We investigated the possibility of raising monoclonal antipeptide antibodies against a specific epitope consisting of six amino acid residues, which is common to two unrelated proteins. The goal of this investigation was to analyze the reactivity of these epitope specific antibodies towards the same sequence in these two different proteins. A correlation between antibody reactivity and secondary structures of the same peptide sequence in different proteins could help to understand the ability of antipeptide antibodies to react with their cognate sequence in intact folded proteins. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against one hexamer sequence, PGTAPK, that is present in both thioredoxin and Fab New lambda-light chain. The antipeptide antibodies reacted only with thioredoxin but not with Fab New in ELISA's, immune precipitation and Western blots. Determination of the antibody specificity through binding tests with peptide analogs revealed the influence of the residue N-terminal from the hexamer epitope on antibody binding. Because of the observed influence of the N-1 adjacent residue in peptide analogs, the discrimination between the protein antigens could not be interpreted clearly as the result of the different hexamer conformations present in the native structures of the two proteins. However, analysis of the antibody reactivity with peptide analogs with varying "frame residues" surrounding the hexamer epitope indicates the possible discrimination of different peptide conformations by the antibody.

  15. Estimating the diversity of peptide populations from limited sequence data.

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Soares, A.; Biosciences Division; BNL

    2003-03-01

    Combinatorial libraries of peptides such as those displayed on the surface of a bacteriophage particle have become widely used tools for characterizing protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. The quality of a library frequently depends on its completeness, or diversity -- the proportion of possible sequences actually present in the library. The diversity of these libraries is frequently quoted on the basis of phage titers that provide little information about their completeness. Here, an analytical expression for diversity is introduced and a method for estimating the diversity of a peptide library from the sequences of a limited number of the members of the library is demonstrated. The diversities of a number of computationally constructed and actual peptide libraries are estimated using this method.

  16. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  17. Peptides containing β-amino acid patterns: challenges and successes in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cabrele, Chiara; Martinek, Tamás A; Reiser, Oliver; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2014-12-11

    The construction of bioactive peptides using β-amino acid-containing sequence patterns is a very promising strategy to obtain analogues that exhibit properties of high interest for medicinal chemistry applications. β-Amino acids have been shown to modulate the conformation, dynamics, and proteolytic susceptibility of native peptides. They can be either combined with α-amino acids by following specific patterns, which results in backbone architectures with well-defined orientations of the side chain functional groups, or assembled in de novo-designed bioactive β- or α,β-peptidic sequences. Such peptides display various biological functions, including antimicrobial activity, inhibition of protein-protein interactions, agonism/antagonism of GPCR ligands, and anti-angiogenic activity.

  18. The sequences of the coenzyme-binding peptide in the cytoplasmic and the mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases from sheep liver.

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Cavieres, M; Milstein, C P

    1975-01-01

    The sequences of the coenzyme-binding peptide of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases from sheep liver were determined. The holoenzymes were treated with NaBH4 and digested with chymotrypsin; peptides containing bound pyridoxal phosphate were then isolated. One phosphopyridoxyl peptide was obtained from sheep liver cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase. Its sequence was Ser-Ne-(phosphopyridoxyl)-Lys-Asn-Phe. This sequence is identical with that reported for the homologous peptide from pig heart cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase. Two phosphopyridoxyl peptides with different RF values were isolated from the sheep liver mitochondrial isoenzyme. They had the same N-terminal amino acid and similar amino acid composition. The mitochondrial phosphopyridoxyl peptide of highest yield and purity had the sequence Ala-Ne-(phosphopyridoxyl)-Lys-Asx-Met-Gly-Leu-Tyr. The sequence of the first four amino acids is identical with that already reported for the phosphopyridoxyl tetrapeptide from the pig heart mitochondrial isoenzyme. The heptapeptide found for the sheep liver mitochondrial isoenzyme closely resembles the corresponding sequence taken from the primary structure of the pig heart cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase. PMID:1180894

  19. ATP selection in a random peptide library consisting of prebiotic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shou-Kai; Chen, Bai-Xue; Tian, Tian; Jia, Xi-Shuai; Chu, Xin-Yi; Liu, Rong; Dong, Peng-Fei; Yang, Qing-Yong; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2015-10-23

    Based upon many theoretical findings on protein evolution, we proposed a ligand-selection model for the origin of proteins, in which the most ancient proteins originated from ATP selection in a pool of random peptides. To test this ligand-selection model, we constructed a random peptide library consisting of 15 types of prebiotic amino acids and then used cDNA display to perform six rounds of in vitro selection with ATP. By means of next-generation sequencing, the most prevalent sequence was defined. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the selected peptide showed that it was stable and foldable and had ATP-hydrolysis activity as well.

  20. Differential 14N/15N-Labeling of Peptides Using N-Terminal Charge Derivatization with a High-Proton Affinity for Straightforward de novo Peptide Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nihashi, Yoichiro; Miyashita, Masahiro; Awane, Hiroyuki; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    While de novo peptide sequencing is essential in many situations, it remains a difficult task. This is because peptide fragmentation results in complicated and often incomplete product ion spectra. In a previous study, we demonstrated that N-terminal charge derivatization with 4-amidinobenzoic acid (Aba) resulted in improved peptide fragmentation under low-energy CID conditions. However, even with this derivatization, some ambiguity exists, due to difficulties in discriminating between N- and C-terminal fragments. In this study, to specifically identify b-ions from complex product ion spectra, the differential 14N/15N-labeling of peptides was performed using Aba derivatization. 15N-Labeled Aba was synthesized in the form of a succinimide ester. Peptides were derivatized individually with 14N-Aba or 15N-Aba and analyzed by ESI-MS/MS using a linear ion trap-Orbitrap hybrid FTMS system. The N-terminal fragments (i.e., b-ions) were then identified based on m/z differences arising from isotope labeling. By comparing the spectra between 14N- and 15N-Aba derivatized peptides, b-ions could be successfully identified based on the m/z shifts, which provided reliable sequencing results for all of the peptides examined in this study. The method developed in this study allows the easy and reliable de novo sequencing of peptides, which is useful in peptidomics and proteomics studies. PMID:24860714

  1. Rational Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acids to Combat Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Jue

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have long been raised as a promising strategy to combat bacterial infection in burn wounds. Here, we attempted to rationally design small antimicrobial peptides containing unnatural amino acids by integrating in silico analysis and in vitro assay. Predictive quantitative sequence-activity models were established and validated rigorously based on a large panel of nonamer antimicrobial peptides with known antibacterial activity. The best quantitative sequence-activity model predictor was employed to guide genetic evolution of a peptide population. In the evolution procedure, a number of unnatural amino acids with desired physicochemical properties were introduced, resulting in a genetic evolution-improved population, from which seven peptide candidates with top scores, containing 1-3 unnatural amino acids, and having diverse structures were successfully identified, and their antibacterial potencies against two antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains isolated from infected burn wounds were measured using in vitro susceptibility test. Consequently, four (WL-Orn-LARKIV-NH2 , ARKRWF-Dab-FL-NH2 , KFI-Hag-IWR-Orn-R-NH2 and YW-Hag-R-Cit-RF-Orn-N-NH2 ) of the seven tested peptides were found to be more potent than reference Bac2A, the smallest naturally occurring broad spectrum antimicrobial peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the designed peptides can fold into amphipathic helical structure that allows them to interact directly with microbial membranes. PMID:27062533

  2. N-Terminal Peptide Detection with Optimized Peptide-Spectrum Matching and Streamlined Sequence Libraries.

    PubMed

    Lycette, Brynne E; Glickman, Jacob W; Roth, Samuel J; Cram, Abigail E; Kim, Tae Hee; Krizanc, Danny; Weir, Michael P

    2016-09-01

    We identified tryptic peptides in yeast cell lysates that map to translation initiation sites downstream of the annotated start sites using the peptide-spectrum matching algorithms OMSSA and Mascot. To increase the accuracy of peptide-spectrum matching, both algorithms were run using several standardized parameter sets, and Mascot was run utilizing a, b, and y ions from collision-induced dissociation. A large fraction (22%) of the detected N-terminal peptides mapped to translation initiation downstream of the annotated initiation sites. Expression of several truncated proteins from downstream initiation in the same reading frame as the full-length protein (frame 1) was verified by western analysis. To facilitate analysis of the larger proteome of Drosophila, we created a streamlined sequence library from which all duplicated trypsin fragments had been removed. OMSSA assessment using this "stripped" library revealed 171 peptides that map to downstream translation initiation sites, 76% of which are in the same reading frame as the full-length annotated proteins, although some are in different reading frames creating new protein sequences not in the annotated proteome. Sequences surrounding implicated downstream AUG start codons are associated with nucleotide preferences with a pronounced three-base periodicity N1^G2^A3.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); confirmation of the GM-CSF amino acid sequence by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsarbopoulos, A.; Pramanik, B. N.; Labdon, J. E.; Reichert, P.; Gitlin, G.; Patel, S.; Sardana, V.; Nagabhushan, T. L.; Trotta, P. P.

    1993-01-01

    A trypsin-resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was isolated and analyzed by high-energy Cs+ liquid secondary-ion (LSI) mass spectrometric analysis. This analysis provided successful detection of the high-mass disulfide-linked core peptide as well as information confirming the existence of disulfide pairing. Similarly, LSI mass spectrometric analysis of the peptide fragments isolated chromatographically from a Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digest of rhGM-CSF provided rapid confirmation of the cDNA-derived sequence and determination of the existing disulfide bonds between cysteine residues 54-96 and 88-121. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to measure the molecular weight of the intact protein and to determine the number of the disulfide bonds in the protein molecule by comparative analysis of the protein before and after reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol. PMID:8268804

  4. Modeling of the Ebola virus delta peptide reveals a potential lytic sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, William R; Garry, Robert F

    2015-01-20

    Filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg viruses, cause severe outbreaks of human infection, including the extensive epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa in 2014. In the course of examining mutations in the glycoprotein gene associated with 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) sequences, a differential level of conservation was noted between the soluble form of glycoprotein (sGP) and the full length glycoprotein (GP), which are both encoded by the GP gene via RNA editing. In the region of the proteins encoded after the RNA editing site sGP was more conserved than the overlapping region of GP when compared to a distant outlier species, Tai Forest ebolavirus. Half of the amino acids comprising the "delta peptide", a 40 amino acid carboxy-terminal fragment of sGP, were identical between otherwise widely divergent species. A lysine-rich amphipathic peptide motif was noted at the carboxyl terminus of delta peptide with high structural relatedness to the cytolytic peptide of the non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) of rotavirus. EBOV delta peptide is a candidate viroporin, a cationic pore-forming peptide, and may contribute to EBOV pathogenesis.

  5. Length and Amino Acid Sequence of Peptides Substituted for the 5-HT3A Receptor M3M4 Loop May Affect Channel Expression and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Nicole K.; Bali, Moez; Akabas, Myles H.

    2012-01-01

    5-HT3A receptors are pentameric neurotransmitter-gated ion channels in the Cys-loop receptor family. Each subunit contains an extracellular domain, four transmembrane segments (M1, M2, M3, M4) and a 115 residue intracellular loop between M3 and M4. In contrast, the M3M4 loop in prokaryotic homologues is <15 residues. To investigate the limits of M3M4 loop length and composition on channel function we replaced the 5-HT3A M3M4 loop with two to seven alanine residues (5-HT3A-An = 2–7). Mutants were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized using two electrode voltage clamp recording. All mutants were functional. The 5-HT EC50's were at most 5-fold greater than wild-type (WT). The desensitization rate differed significantly among the mutants. Desensitization rates for 5-HT3A-A2, 5-HT3A-A4, 5-HT3A-A6, and 5-HT3A-A7 were similar to WT. In contrast, 5-HT3A-A3 and 5-HT3A-A5 had desensitization rates at least an order of magnitude faster than WT. The one Ala loop construct, 5-HT3A-A1, entered a non-functional state from which it did not recover after the first 5-HT application. These results suggest that the large M3M4 loop of eukaryotic Cys-loop channels is not required for receptor assembly or function. However, loop length and amino acid composition can effect channel expression and desensitization. We infer that the cytoplasmic ends of the M3 and M4 segments may undergo conformational changes during channel gating and desensitization and/or the loop may influence the position and mobility of these segments as they undergo gating-induced conformational changes. Altering structure or conformational mobility of the cytoplasmic ends of M3 and M4 may be the basis by which phosphorylation or protein binding to the cytoplasmic loop alters channel function. PMID:22539982

  6. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. III. Amino acid sequence of the major component.

    PubMed

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    The primary structure of the major parvalbumin (pI = 4.52) from coelacanth muscle (Latimeria chalumnae) has been determined. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides, in some cases obtained with beta-trypsin, accounts for the total amino acid content of the protein. Chymotryptic peptides provide appropriate sequence overlaps, to complete the localization of the tryptic peptides. Examination of the amino acid sequence of this protein shows the typical structure of a beta-parvalbumin. Its position in the dendrogram of related calcium-binding proteins corresponds to that usually accepted for crossopterygians.

  7. Analysis of Endogenous D-Amino Acid-Containing Peptides in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lu; Sheeley, Sarah; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are chiral molecules with their structure determined by the composition and configuration of their amino acid building blocks. The naturally occurring amino acids, except glycine, possess two chiral forms. This allows the formation of multiple peptide diastereomers that have the same sequence. Although living organisms use L-amino acids to make proteins, a group of D-amino acid-containing peptides (DAACPs) has been discovered in animals that have at least one of their residues isomerized to the D-form via an enzyme-catalyzed process. In many cases, the biological functions of these peptides are enhanced due to this structural conversion. These DAACPs are different from those known to occur in bacterial cell wall and antibiotic peptides, the latter of which are synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner. DAACPs have now also been identified in a number of distinct groups throughout the Metazoa. Their serendipitous discovery has often resulted from discrepancies observed in bioassays or in chromatographic behavior between natural peptide fractions and peptides synthesized according to a presumed all-L sequence. Because this L-to-D post-translational modification is subtle and not detectable by most sequence determination approaches, it is reasonable to suspect that many studies have overlooked this change; accordingly, DAACPs may be more prevalent than currently thought. Although diastereomer separation techniques developed with synthetic peptides in recent years have greatly aided in the discovery of natural DAACPs, there is a need for new, more robust methods for naturally complex samples. In this review, a brief history of DAACPs in animals is presented, followed by discussion of a variety of analytical methods that have been used for diastereomeric separation and detection of peptides. PMID:20490347

  8. Viral morphogenesis is the dominant source of sequence censorship in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Soares, A. S.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; BNL

    2002-01-01

    Novel statistical methods have been developed and used to quantitate and annotate the sequence diversity within combinatorial peptide libraries on the basis of small numbers (1-200) of sequences selected at random from commercially available M13 p3-based phage display libraries. These libraries behave statistically as though they correspond to populations containing roughly 4.0{+-}1.6% of the random dodecapeptides and 7.9{+-}2.6% of the random constrained heptapeptides that are theoretically possible within the phage populations. Analysis of amino acid residue occurrence patterns shows no demonstrable influence on sequence censorship by Escherichia coli tRNA isoacceptor profiles or either overall codon or Class II codon usage patterns, suggesting no metabolic constraints on recombinant p3 synthesis. There is an overall depression in the occurrence of cysteine, arginine and glycine residues and an overabundance of proline, threonine and histidine residues. The majority of position-dependent amino acid sequence bias is clustered at three positions within the inserted peptides of the dodecapeptide library, +1, +3 and +12 downstream from the signal peptidase cleavage site. Conformational tendency measures of the peptides indicate a significant preference for inserts favoring a {beta}-turn conformation. The observed protein sequence limitations can primarily be attributed to genetic codon degeneracy and signal peptidase cleavage preferences. These data suggest that for applications in which maximal sequence diversity is essential, such as epitope mapping or novel receptor identification, combinatorial peptide libraries should be constructed using codon-corrected trinucleotide cassettes within vector-host systems designed to minimize morphogenesis-related censorship.

  9. Location and conformation of amyloid β(25-35) peptide and its sequence-shuffled peptides within membranes: implications for aggregation and toxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Lee, Jian-Bin; Shih, Yuan-Ci; Wan, Lei; Shieh, Fa-Kuen; Chen, Chin-Yu

    2014-05-01

    Extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates in the brain is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. We present the configurations (location and conformation) and the interfacial folding and membrane insertion mechanisms of Aβ fragments, wild-type Aβ(25-35), Aβ(35-25), and a sequence-shuffled peptide [Aβ(25-35)-shuffled] from Aβ(25-35) within membranes by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations. Although these peptides have the same amino acid composition, simulations show they have distinct locations and conformations within membranes. Moreover, our in vitro experiments show that these peptides have distinct neurotoxicities. We rationalize the distinct neurotoxicities of these peptides in terms of their simulated locations and conformations in membranes. This work provides another view that complements the general hydrophobicity-toxicity views, to better explain the neurotoxicity of Aβ peptides.

  10. Sequence Elucidation of an Unknown Cyclic Peptide of High Doping Potential by ETD and CID Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fuyu; Uboh, Cornelius E.; Soma, Lawrence R.; Rudy, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    Identification of an unknown substance without any information remains a daunting challenge despite advances in chemistry and mass spectrometry. However, an unknown cyclic peptide in a sample with very limited volume seized at a Pennsylvania racetrack has been successfully identified. The unknown sample was determined by accurate mass measurements to contain a small unknown peptide as the major component. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the unknown peptide revealed the presence of Lys (not Gln, by accurate mass), Phe, and Arg residues, and absence of any y-type product ion. The latter, together with the tryptic digestion results of the unusual deamidation and absence of any tryptic cleavage, suggests a cyclic structure for the peptide. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) of the unknown peptide indicated the presence of Gln (not Lys, by the unusual deamidation), Phe, and Arg residues and their connectivity. After all the results were pieced together, a cyclic tetrapeptide, cyclo[Arg-Lys-N(C6H9)Gln-Phe], is proposed for the unknown peptide. Observations of different amino acid residues from CID and ETD experiments for the peptide were interpreted by a fragmentation pathway proposed, as was preferential CID loss of a Lys residue from the peptide. ETD was used for the first time in sequencing of a cyclic peptide; product ions resulting from ETD of the peptide identified were categorized into two types and named pseudo-b and pseudo-z ions that are important for sequencing of cyclic peptides. The ETD product ions were interpreted by fragmentation pathways proposed. Additionally, multi-stage CID mass spectrometry cannot provide complete sequence information for cyclic peptides containing adjacent Arg and Lys residues. The identified cyclic peptide has not been documented in the literature, its pharmacological effects are unknown, but it might be a "designer" drug with athletic performance-enhancing effects.

  11. The investigation of the secondary structures of various peptide sequences of β-casein by the multicanonical simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaşar, F.; Çelik, S.; Köksel, H.

    2006-05-01

    The structural properties of Arginine-Glutamic acid-Leucine-Glutamic acid-Glutamic acid-Leucine-Asparagine-Valine-Proline-Glycine (RELEELNVPG, in one letter code), Glutamic acid-Glutamic acid-Glutamine-Glutamine-Glutamine-Threonine-Glutamic acid (EEQQQTE) and Glutamic acid-Aspartic acid-Glutamic acid-Leucine-Glutamine-Aspartic acid-Lysine-Isoleucine (EDELQDKI) peptide sequences of β-casein were studied by three-dimensional molecular modeling. In this work, the three-dimensional conformations of each peptide from their primary sequences were obtained by multicanonical simulations. With using major advantage of this simulation technique, Ramachandran plots were prepared and analysed to predict the relative occurrence probabilities of β-turn, γ-turn and helical structures. Structural predictions of these sequences of β-casein molecule indicate the presence of high level of helical structures and βIII-turns. The occurrence probabilities of inverse and classical β-turns were low. The probability of helical structure of each sequence significantly decreased when the temperature increased. Our results show these peptides have highly helical structure and better agreement with the results of spectroscopic techniques and other prediction methods.

  12. Design and synthesis of cationic antibacterial peptide based on Leucrocin I sequence, antibacterial peptide from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Yaraksa, Nualyai; Anunthawan, Thitiporn; Theansungnoen, Tinnakorn; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2014-03-01

    Leucrocin I is an antibacterial peptide isolated from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts. Based on Leucrocin I sequence, cationic peptide, NY15, was designed, synthesized and evaluated for antibacterial activity against Bacillus sphaericus TISTR 678, Bacillus megaterium (clinical isolate), Vibrio cholerae (clinical isolate), Salmonella typhi (clinical isolate), Salmonella typhi ATCC 5784 and Escherichia coli 0157:H7. The efficacy of the peptide made from all L-amino acids was also compared with all D-amino acids. The peptide made from all D-amino acids was more active than the corresponding L-enantiomer. In our detailed study, the interaction between peptides and the cell membrane of Vibrio cholerae as part of their killing mechanism was studied by fluorescence and electron microscopy. The results show that the membrane was the target of action of the peptides. Finally, the cytotoxicity assays revealed that both L-NY15 and D-NY15 peptides are non-toxic to mammalian cells at bacteriolytic concentrations.

  13. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  14. Modeling of the Ebola Virus Delta Peptide Reveals a Potential Lytic Sequence Motif

    PubMed Central

    Gallaher, William R.; Garry, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg viruses, cause severe outbreaks of human infection, including the extensive epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa in 2014. In the course of examining mutations in the glycoprotein gene associated with 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) sequences, a differential level of conservation was noted between the soluble form of glycoprotein (sGP) and the full length glycoprotein (GP), which are both encoded by the GP gene via RNA editing. In the region of the proteins encoded after the RNA editing site sGP was more conserved than the overlapping region of GP when compared to a distant outlier species, Tai Forest ebolavirus. Half of the amino acids comprising the “delta peptide”, a 40 amino acid carboxy-terminal fragment of sGP, were identical between otherwise widely divergent species. A lysine-rich amphipathic peptide motif was noted at the carboxyl terminus of delta peptide with high structural relatedness to the cytolytic peptide of the non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) of rotavirus. EBOV delta peptide is a candidate viroporin, a cationic pore-forming peptide, and may contribute to EBOV pathogenesis. PMID:25609303

  15. Exploiting protected maleimides to modify oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Paris, Clément; Brun, Omar; Pedroso, Enrique; Grandas, Anna

    2015-04-10

    This manuscript reviews the possibilities offered by 2,5-dimethylfuran-protected maleimides. Suitably derivatized building blocks incorporating the exo Diels-Alder cycloadduct can be introduced at any position of oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, peptides and peptoids, making use of standard solid-phase procedures. Maleimide deprotection takes place upon heating, which can be followed by either Michael-type or Diels-Alder click conjugation reactions. However, the one-pot procedure in which maleimide deprotection and conjugation are simultaneously carried out provides the target conjugate more quickly and, more importantly, in better yield. This procedure is compatible with conjugates involving oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids. A variety of cyclic peptides and oligonucleotides can be obtained from peptide and oligonucleotide precursors incorporating protected maleimides and thiols.

  16. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  17. Sequence dependent proton conduction in self-assembled peptide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner Yardeni, Jenny; Amit, Moran; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of diverse electrochemistry technologies depends on the development of novel proton conducting polymers. Inspired by the efficacy of proton transport through proteins, we show in this work that self-assembling peptide nanostructures may be a promising alternative for such organic proton conducting materials. We demonstrate that aromatic amino acids, which participate in charge transport in nature, unprecedentedly promote proton conduction under both high and low relative humidity conditions for d,l α-cyclic peptide nanotubes. For dehydrated networks long-range order of the assemblies, induced by the aromatic side chains, is shown to be a dominating factor for promoting conductivity. However, for hydrated networks this order of effect is less significant and conductivity can be improved by the introduction of proton donating carboxylic acid peptide side chains in addition to the aromatic side chains despite the lower order of the assemblies. Based on these observations, a novel cyclic peptide that incorporates non-natural naphthyl side chains was designed. Self-assembled nanotubes of this peptide show greatly improved dehydrated conductivity, while maintaining high conductivity under hydrated conditions. We envision that the demonstrated modularity and versatility of these bio inspired nanostructures will make them extremely attractive building blocks for the fabrication of devices for energy conversion and storage applications, as well as other applications that involve proton transport, whether dry or wet conductivity is desired.The advancement of diverse electrochemistry technologies depends on the development of novel proton conducting polymers. Inspired by the efficacy of proton transport through proteins, we show in this work that self-assembling peptide nanostructures may be a promising alternative for such organic proton conducting materials. We demonstrate that aromatic amino acids, which participate in charge transport in nature

  18. Radical stability directs electron capture and transfer dissociation of β-amino acids in peptides.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Vorobyev, Aleksey; Larregola, Maud; Lukaszuk, Aneta; Tourwé, Dirk; Lavielle, Solange; Karoyan, Philippe; Tsybin, Yury O

    2010-04-19

    We report on the characteristics of the radical-ion-driven dissociation of a diverse array of β-amino acids incorporated into α-peptides, as probed by tandem electron-capture and electron-transfer dissociation (ECD/ETD) mass spectrometry. The reported results demonstrate a stronger ECD/ETD dependence on the nature of the amino acid side chain for β-amino acids than for their α-form counterparts. In particular, only aromatic (e.g., β-Phe), and to a substantially lower extent, carbonyl-containing (e.g., β-Glu and β-Gln) amino acid side chains, lead to N-Cβ bond cleavage in the corresponding β-amino acids. We conclude that radical stabilization must be provided by the side chain to enable the radical-driven fragmentation from the nearby backbone carbonyl carbon to proceed. In contrast with the cleavage of backbones derived from α-amino acids, ECD of peptides composed mainly of β-amino acids reveals a shift in cleavage priority from the N-Cβ to the Cα-C bond. The incorporation of CH2 groups into the peptide backbone may thus drastically influence the backbone charge solvation preference. The characteristics of radical-driven β-amino acid dissociation described herein are of particular importance to methods development, applications in peptide sequencing, and peptide and protein modification (e.g., deamidation and isomerization) analysis in life science research.

  19. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  20. Isolation of cross-linked peptides by diagonal strong cation exchange chromatography for protein complex topology studies by peptide fragment fingerprinting from large sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Buncherd, Hansuk; Roseboom, Winfried; Ghavim, Behrad; Du, Weina; de Koning, Leo J; de Koster, Chris G; de Jong, Luitzen

    2014-06-27

    Knowledge of spatial proximity of amino acid residues obtained by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometric analysis provides information about protein folding, protein-protein interactions and topology of macromolecular assemblies. We show that the use of bis(succinimidyl)-3-azidomethyl glutarate as a cross-linker provides a solution for two major analytical problems of cross-link mapping by peptide fragment fingerprinting (PFF) from complex sequence databases, i.e., low abundance of protease-generated target peptides and lack of knowledge of the masses of linked peptides. Tris(carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) reduces the azido group in cross-linked peptides to an amine group in competition with cleavage of an amide bond formed in the cross-link reaction. TCEP-induced reaction products were separated by diagonal strong cation exchange (SCX) from unmodified peptides. The relation between the sum of the masses of the cleavage products and the mass of the parent cross-linked peptide enables determination of the masses of candidate linked peptides. By reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis of secondary SCX fractions, we identified several intraprotein and interprotein cross-links in a HeLa cell nuclear extract, aided by software tools supporting PFF from the entire human sequence database. The data provide new information about interacting protein domains, among others from assemblies involved in splicing.

  1. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity.

  2. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity. PMID:27621684

  3. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity.

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity. PMID:27621684

  5. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Storrs, R.W.

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by {sup 31}P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 {Angstrom} of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an {alpha}-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  6. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Storrs, R.W.

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by [sup 31]P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 [Angstrom] of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an [alpha]-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  7. Sequence-selective DNA recognition with peptide-bisbenzamidine conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mateo I; Vázquez, Olalla; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2013-07-22

    Transcription factors (TFs) are specialized proteins that play a key role in the regulation of genetic expression. Their mechanism of action involves the interaction with specific DNA sequences, which usually takes place through specialized domains of the protein. However, achieving an efficient binding usually requires the presence of the full protein. This is the case for bZIP and zinc finger TF families, which cannot interact with their target sites when the DNA binding fragments are presented as isolated monomers. Herein it is demonstrated that the DNA binding of these monomeric peptides can be restored when conjugated to aza-bisbenzamidines, which are readily accessible molecules that interact with A/T-rich sites by insertion into their minor groove. Importantly, the fluorogenic properties of the aza-benzamidine unit provide details of the DNA interaction that are eluded in electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA). The hybrids based on the GCN4 bZIP protein preferentially bind to composite sequences containing tandem bisbenzamidine-GCN4 binding sites (TCAT⋅AAATT). Fluorescence reverse titrations show an interesting multiphasic profile consistent with the formation of competitive nonspecific complexes at low DNA/peptide ratios. On the other hand, the conjugate with the DNA binding domain of the zinc finger protein GAGA binds with high affinity (KD≈12 nM) and specificity to a composite AATTT⋅GAGA sequence containing both the bisbenzamidine and the TF consensus binding sites.

  8. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  9. The gene cloning and sequencing of Bm-12, a chlorotoxin-like peptide from the scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch.

    PubMed

    Wu, J J; Dai, L; Lan, Z D; Chi, C W

    2000-05-01

    According to the known amino acid sequence of Bm-12, a short chain insect neurotoxin from the venom of the scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch (BmK) with considerable primary sequence homology to chlorotoxin, the gene specific primers were designed and synthesized for 3' and 5'RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends). The two partial cDNA fragments obtained by 3' and 5'RACE were cloned and sequenced, and the full length cDNA sequence of Bm-12 was then completed by overlapping these two partial cDNA sequences. The predicted amino acid sequence consists of 59 amino acid residues including a putative signal peptide of 24 residues and a mature toxin of 35 residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of Bm-12 was almost consistent with the determined, different only in one residue at position 27, Lys was replaced by Gly. Based on the determined cDNA sequence, and using the total DNA isolated from the scorpion venom glands as a template, the genomic DNA of Bm-12 was also amplified by PCR and sequenced. The genomic DNA sequence revealed an intron of 93 bp present within the signal peptide region.

  10. Di-heterometalation of thiol-functionalized peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Patra, Malay; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As a proof-of-principle, two hetero-bimetallic PNA oligomers containing a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl and a cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex have been prepared by serial combination of solid-phase peptide coupling and in-solution thiol chemistry. Solid-phase N-terminus attachment of Ru(II)-polypyridyl carboxylic acid derivative, C1, onto the thiol-functionalized PNA backbone (H-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) has been performed by standard peptide coupling method. As two parallel approaches, the strong affinity of thiols for maleimide and haloacetyl group has been exploited for subsequent post-SPPS addition of cymantrene-based organometallic cores, C2 and C3. Michael-like addition and thioether ligation of thiol functionalized PNA1 (H-gly-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) and PNA2 (C1-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) to cymantrene maleimide and chloroacetyl derivatives, C2 and C3, respectively, has been performed. The synthesized ruthenium(II)-cymantrenyl PNA oligomers have been characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and IR spectroscopy. The distinct Mn-CO vibrational IR stretches, between 1,924–2,074 cm−1, have been used as markers to confirm the presence of cymantrenyl units in the PNA sequences and the purity of the HPLC-purified PNA thioethers assessed using LC-MS. PMID:23422249

  11. Isolation and sequence determination of trichorzianines A antifungal peptides from Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    el Hajji, M; Rebuffat, S; Lecommandeur, D; Bodo, B

    1987-02-01

    Trichorzianines A, membrane active peptides of the peptaibol class, were isolated from cultures of the mould Trichoderma harzianum. Trichorzianines A were separated into pure components by HPLC on octadecyl bonded and SiO2 phases successively. Nine trichorzianines A (IIa, IIIa, IIIb, IIIc, IVb, Vb, VIa, VIb and VII) were isolated from the complex microheterogeneous mixture. Their N-terminal amino acid is acetylated, the C-terminal amino alcohol is either tryptophanol or phenylalaninol, 7 to 8 of the 19 residues are alpha-aminoisobutyric acid. Gas chromatography on a chiral phase showed isovaline to have the D-configuration and all the other optically active amino acids and amino alcohols to have the L-configuration. The amino acid sequences were determined from their positive ion FAB mass spectra which exhibited the preferential cleavage of the Aib 12-Pro 13 amide bond as a main fragmentation. The resulting fragments subsequently underwent amide bond ruptures that generated two series of abundant acylium ions which enabled direct determination of the 1-19 sequence. The relative position of the isomeric amino acids in the sequence of trichorzianine AVII was assigned from analysis of the N- and C-terminal oligopeptides yielded by its selective acidic hydrolysis. The microheterogeneity of trichorzianines A results mainly from single or multiple substitution of amino acids at the specific positions 5, 14, 16 and 19. PMID:3570662

  12. Effects of KLK Peptide on Adjuvanticity of Different ODN Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Chikh, Ghania; Luu, Rachel; Patel, Shobhna; Davis, Heather L.; Weeratna, Risini D.

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLR) such as TLR3, 7, 8 and 9 recognize pathogen associated nucleic acids. While DNA sequence does influence degree of binding to and activation of TLR9, it also appears to influence the ability of the ligand to reach the intracellular endosomal compartment. The KLK (KLKL5KLK) antimicrobial peptide, which is immunostimulatory itself, can translocate into cells without cell membrane permeabilization and thus can be used for endosomal delivery of TLR agonists, as has been shown with the IC31 formulation that contains an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist. We evaluated the adjuvant activity of KLK combined with CpG or non-CpG (GpC) ODN synthesized with nuclease resistant phosphorothioate (S) or native phosphodiester (O) backbones with ovalbumin (OVA) antigen in mice. As single adjuvants, CpG(S) gave the strongest enhancement of OVA-specific immunity and the addition of KLK provided no benefit and was actually detrimental for some readouts. In contrast, KLK enhanced the adjuvant effects of CpG(O) and to a lesser extent of GpC (S), which on their own had little or no activity. Indeed while CD8 T cells, IFN-γ secretion and humoral response to vaccine antigen were enhanced when CpG(O) was combined with KLK, only IFN-γ secretion was enhanced when GpC (S) was combined to KLK. The synergistic adjuvant effects with KLK/ODN combinations were TLR9-mediated since they did not occur in TLR9 knock-out mice. We hypothesize that a nuclease resistant ODN with CpG motifs has its own mechanism for entering cells to reach the endosome. For ODN without CpG motifs, KLK appears to provide an alternate mechanism for accessing the endosome, where it can activate TLR9, albeit with lower potency than a CpG ODN. For nuclease sensitive (O) backbone ODN, KLK may also provide protection from nucleases in the tissues. PMID:27153098

  13. Effects of KLK Peptide on Adjuvanticity of Different ODN Sequences.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Ghania; Luu, Rachel; Patel, Shobhna; Davis, Heather L; Weeratna, Risini D

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLR) such as TLR3, 7, 8 and 9 recognize pathogen associated nucleic acids. While DNA sequence does influence degree of binding to and activation of TLR9, it also appears to influence the ability of the ligand to reach the intracellular endosomal compartment. The KLK (KLKL5KLK) antimicrobial peptide, which is immunostimulatory itself, can translocate into cells without cell membrane permeabilization and thus can be used for endosomal delivery of TLR agonists, as has been shown with the IC31 formulation that contains an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist. We evaluated the adjuvant activity of KLK combined with CpG or non-CpG (GpC) ODN synthesized with nuclease resistant phosphorothioate (S) or native phosphodiester (O) backbones with ovalbumin (OVA) antigen in mice. As single adjuvants, CpG(S) gave the strongest enhancement of OVA-specific immunity and the addition of KLK provided no benefit and was actually detrimental for some readouts. In contrast, KLK enhanced the adjuvant effects of CpG(O) and to a lesser extent of GpC (S), which on their own had little or no activity. Indeed while CD8 T cells, IFN-γ secretion and humoral response to vaccine antigen were enhanced when CpG(O) was combined with KLK, only IFN-γ secretion was enhanced when GpC (S) was combined to KLK. The synergistic adjuvant effects with KLK/ODN combinations were TLR9-mediated since they did not occur in TLR9 knock-out mice. We hypothesize that a nuclease resistant ODN with CpG motifs has its own mechanism for entering cells to reach the endosome. For ODN without CpG motifs, KLK appears to provide an alternate mechanism for accessing the endosome, where it can activate TLR9, albeit with lower potency than a CpG ODN. For nuclease sensitive (O) backbone ODN, KLK may also provide protection from nucleases in the tissues. PMID:27153098

  14. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  15. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  16. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  17. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  18. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore. PMID:27161341

  19. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore.

  20. Amino acid sequence of horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle troponin C.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kagami, O; Takagi, T; Konishi, K

    1989-05-01

    The amino acid sequence of troponin C obtained from horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle was determined by sequence analysis and alignments of chemically and enzymatically cleaved peptides. Troponin C is composed of 153 amino acid residues with a blocked N-terminus and contains no tryptophan or cysteine residue. The site I, one of the four Ca2+-binding sites, is considered to have lost its ability to bind Ca2+ owing to the replacements of certain amino acid residues.

  1. Separation of a Set of Peptide Sequence Isomers Using Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2011-08-15

    Protein identification in bottom-up proteomics requires disentangling isomers of proteolytic peptides, a major class of which are sequence inversions. Separation of sequence isomers using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been reported, but limited to pairs of species. Here we demonstrate baseline separation of all seven sequences for a tryptic peptide with eight residues using differential IMS or FAIMS. Evaluations of peak capacity of the method indicate that even larger libraries should generally be separated for heavier peptides with higher charge states.

  2. Development of SI-traceable C-peptide certified reference material NMIJ CRM 6901-a using isotope-dilution mass spectrometry-based amino acid analyses.

    PubMed

    Kinumi, Tomoya; Goto, Mari; Eyama, Sakae; Kato, Megumi; Kasama, Takeshi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2012-07-01

    A certified reference material (CRM) is a higher-order calibration material used to enable a traceable analysis. This paper describes the development of a C-peptide CRM (NMIJ CRM 6901-a) by the National Metrology Institute of Japan using two independent methods for amino acid analysis based on isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. C-peptide is a 31-mer peptide that is utilized for the evaluation of β-cell function in the pancreas in clinical testing. This CRM is a lyophilized synthetic peptide having the human C-peptide sequence, and contains deamidated and pyroglutamylated forms of C-peptide. By adding water (1.00 ± 0.01) g into the vial containing the CRM, the C-peptide solution in 10 mM phosphate buffer saline (pH 6.6) is reconstituted. We assigned two certified values that represent the concentrations of total C-peptide (mixture of C-peptide, deamidated C-peptide, and pyroglutamylated C-peptide) and C-peptide. The certified concentration of total C-peptide was determined by two amino acid analyses using pre-column derivatization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and hydrophilic chromatography-mass spectrometry following acid hydrolysis. The certified concentration of C-peptide was determined by multiplying the concentration of total C-peptide by the ratio of the relative area of C-peptide to that of the total C-peptide measured by liquid chromatography. The certified value of C-peptide (80.7 ± 5.0) mg/L represents the concentration of the specific entity of C-peptide; on the other hand, the certified value of total C-peptide, (81.7 ± 5.1) mg/L can be used for analyses that does not differentiate deamidated and pyroglutamylated C-peptide from C-peptide itself, such as amino acid analyses and immunochemical assays.

  3. Sequence-selective DNA recognition and enhanced cellular up-take by peptide-steroid conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ruiz García, Yara; Iyer, Abhishek; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Pabon, Y Vladimir; Louage, Benoit; Honcharenko, Malgorzata; De Geest, Bruno G; Smith, C I Edvard; Strömberg, Roger; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-12-25

    Several GCN4 bZIP TF models have previously been designed and synthesized. However, the synthetic routes towards these constructs are typically tedious and difficult. We here describe the substitution of the Leucine zipper domain of the protein by a deoxycholic acid derivative appending the two GCN4 binding region peptides through an optimized double azide-alkyne cycloaddition click reaction. In addition to achieving sequence specific dsDNA binding, we have investigated the potential of these compounds to enter cells. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry show the beneficial influence of the steroid on cell uptake. This unique synthetic model of the bZIP TF thus combines sequence specific dsDNA binding properties with enhanced cell-uptake. Given the unique properties of deoxycholic acid and the convergent nature of the synthesis, we believe this work represents a key achievement in the field of TF mimicry.

  4. Analysis of Peptides and Conjugates by Amino Acid Analysis.

    PubMed

    Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is a highly accurate method for characterization of the composition of synthetic peptides. Together with mass spectrometry, it gives a reliable control of peptide quality and quantity before conjugation and immunization. Peptides are hydrolyzed, preferably in gas phase, with 6 M HCl at 110 °C for 20-24 h and the resulting amino acids analyzed by ion-exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions, tryptophan is destroyed, and cysteine also, unless derivatized, and the amides, glutamine and asparagine, are deamidated to glutamic acid and aspartic acid, respectively. Three different ways of calculating results are suggested, and taking the above limitations into account, a quantitation better than 5% can usually be obtained. PMID:26424264

  5. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found.

  6. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  7. Naturally processed HLA class II peptides reveal highly conserved immunogenic flanking region sequence preferences that reflect antigen processing rather than peptide-MHC interactions.

    PubMed

    Godkin, A J; Smith, K J; Willis, A; Tejada-Simon, M V; Zhang, J; Elliott, T; Hill, A V

    2001-06-01

    MHC class II heterodimers bind peptides 12-20 aa in length. The peptide flanking residues (PFRs) of these ligands extend from a central binding core consisting of nine amino acids. Increasing evidence suggests that the PFRs can alter the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes. We have previously noted that eluted peptide pool sequence data derived from an MHC class II Ag reflect patterns of enrichment not only in the core binding region but also in the PFRS: We sought to distinguish whether these enrichments reflect cellular processes or direct MHC-peptide interactions. Using the multiple sclerosis-associated allele HLA-DR2, pool sequence data from naturally processed ligands were compared with the patterns of enrichment obtained by binding semicombinatorial peptide libraries to empty HLA-DR2 molecules. Naturally processed ligands revealed patterns of enrichment reflecting both the binding motif of HLA-DR2 (position (P)1, aliphatic; P4, bulky hydrophobic; and P6, polar) as well as the nonbound flanking regions, including acidic residues at the N terminus and basic residues at the C terminus. These PFR enrichments were independent of MHC-peptide interactions. Further studies revealed similar patterns in nine other HLA alleles, with the C-terminal basic residues being as highly conserved as the previously described N-terminal prolines of MHC class II ligands. There is evidence that addition of C-terminal basic PFRs to known peptide epitopes is able to enhance both processing as well as T cell activation. Recognition of these allele-transcending patterns in the PFRs may prove useful in epitope identification and vaccine design.

  8. Variable major proteins of Borrelia hermsii. Epitope mapping and partial sequence analysis of CNBr peptides

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The variable major proteins (VMP) of serotypes 7 and 21 of the relapsing fever agent Borrelia hermsii were isolated by detergent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. Cyanogen bromide (CNBr) digestion of the isolated VMP yielded two peptides of apparent molecular weights 20,000 (20 K) and 16 K from VMP7, and three peptides of 14.5, 14, and 7 K mol wt from VMP21. Serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies bound in Western blots to one of each of the two or three CNBr fragments from the homologous VMP. A single monoclonal antibody bound to the whole cells, the isolated VMP, and a CNBr fragment of both serotype 7 and serotype 21. (This crossreactive antibody did not, however, bind to any of four other serotypes examined.) Regional conservation of structure between VMP7 and VMP21 was also shown by amino acid sequence analysis of the N-termini of the five CNBr fragments. One pair of aligned fragments from VMP7 and VMP21 had 80% amino acid homology in sequence; a second pair had 40% homology. The partial amino acid homologies between two VMP suggest that these proteins are products of members of a polygene family. PMID:2409197

  9. N-Terminal Peptide Sequence Repetition Influences the Kinetics of Backbone Fragmentation: A Manifestation of the Jahn-Teller Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, David M.; Yang, Hongqian; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of large (>10,000 entries) databases consisting of high-resolution tandem mass spectra of peptide dications revealed with high statistical significance ( P < 1ṡ10-3) that peptides with non-identical first two N-terminal amino acids undergo cleavages of the second peptide bond at higher rates than repetitive sequences composed of the same amino acids (i.e., in general AB- and BA- bonds cleave more often than AA- and BB- bonds). This effect seems to depend upon the collisional energy, being stronger at lower energies. The phenomenon is likely to indicate the presence of the diketopiperazine structure for at least some b2 + ions. When consisting of two identical amino acids, these species should form through intermediates that have a symmetric geometry and, thus, must be subject to the Jahn-Teller effect that reduces the stability of such systems.

  10. Influence of pH and sequence in peptide aggregation via molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Enciso, Marta; Schütte, Christof; Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-12-28

    We employ a recently developed coarse-grained model for peptides and proteins where the effect of pH is automatically included. We explore the effect of pH in the aggregation process of the amyloidogenic peptide KTVIIE and two related sequences, using three different pH environments. Simulations using large systems (24 peptides chains per box) allow us to describe the formation of realistic peptide aggregates. We evaluate the thermodynamic and kinetic implications of changes in sequence and pH upon peptide aggregation, and we discuss how a minimalistic coarse-grained model can account for these details.

  11. Prediction of nucleating sequences from amyloidogenic propensities of tau-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Rojas Quijano, Federico A; Morrow, Dana; Wise, Barry M; Brancia, Francesco L; Goux, Warren J

    2006-04-11

    Physical properties, including amyloid morphology, FTIR and CD spectra, enhancement of Congo red absorbance, polymerization rate, critical monomer concentration, free energy of stabilization, hydrophobicity, and the partition coefficient between soluble and amyloid states, were measured for the tau-related peptide Ac-VQIVYK amide (AcPHF6) and its single site mutants Ac-VQIVXK amide (X not equal Cys). Transmission electron microscopy showed that 15 out of the 19 peptides formed amyloid in buffer, with morphologies ranging from straight and twisted filaments to sheets and rolled sheets. Using principal component analysis (PCA), measured properties were treated in a comprehensive manner, and scores along the most significant principal components were used to define individual amino acid amyloidogenic propensities. Quantitative structure-activity modeling (QSAM) showed that residues with greater size and hydrophobicity made the largest contributions to the propensity of peptides to form amyloid. Using individual amino acid propensities, sequences within tau with high amyloid-forming potential were estimated and found to include 226VAVVR230 in the proline-rich region, 275VQIINK280 (PHF6) and 306VQIVYK311 (PHF6) within the microtubule binding region, and 392IVYK395 in the C-tail region of the protein. The results suggest that regions outside the microtubule-binding region may play important roles in tau aggregation kinetics or paired helical filament structure.

  12. SH2 Domains Recognize Contextual Peptide Sequence Information to Determine Selectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bernard A.; Jablonowski, Karl; Shah, Eshana E.; Engelmann, Brett W.; Jones, Richard B.; Nash, Piers D.

    2010-01-01

    Selective ligand recognition by modular protein interaction domains is a primary determinant of specificity in signaling pathways. Src homology 2 (SH2) domains fulfill this capacity immediately downstream of tyrosine kinases, acting to recruit their host polypeptides to ligand proteins harboring phosphorylated tyrosine residues. The degree to which SH2 domains are selective and the mechanisms underlying selectivity are fundamental to understanding phosphotyrosine signaling networks. An examination of interactions between 50 SH2 domains and a set of 192 phosphotyrosine peptides corresponding to physiological motifs within FGF, insulin, and IGF-1 receptor pathways indicates that individual SH2 domains have distinct recognition properties and exhibit a remarkable degree of selectivity beyond that predicted by previously described binding motifs. The underlying basis for such selectivity is the ability of SH2 domains to recognize both permissive amino acid residues that enhance binding and non-permissive amino acid residues that oppose binding in the vicinity of the essential phosphotyrosine. Neighboring positions affect one another so local sequence context matters to SH2 domains. This complex linguistics allows SH2 domains to distinguish subtle differences in peptide ligands. This newly appreciated contextual dependence substantially increases the accessible information content embedded in the peptide ligands that can be effectively integrated to determine binding. This concept may serve more broadly as a paradigm for subtle recognition of physiological ligands by protein interaction domains. PMID:20627867

  13. A Combinational Strategy upon RNA Sequencing and Peptidomics Unravels a Set of Novel Toxin Peptides in Scorpion Mesobuthus martensii

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Ning; Shen, Wang; Liu, Jie; Wen, Bo; Lin, Zhilong; Yang, Shilong; Lai, Ren; Liu, Siqi; Rong, Mingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom is deemed to contain many toxic peptides as an important source of natural compounds. Out of the two hundred proteins identified in Mesobuthus martensii (M. martensii), only a few peptide toxins have been found so far. Herein, a combinational approach based upon RNA sequencing and Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS) was employed to explore the venom peptides in M. martensii. A total of 153 proteins were identified from the scorpion venom, 26 previously known and 127 newly identified. Of the novel toxins, 97 proteins exhibited sequence similarities to known toxins, and 30 were never reported. Combining peptidomic and transcriptomic analyses, the peptide sequence of BmKKx1 was reannotated and four disulfide bridges were confirmed within it. In light of the comparison of conservation and variety of toxin amino acid sequences, highly conserved and variable regions were perceived in 24 toxins that were parts of two sodium channel and two potassium channel toxins families. Taking all of this evidences together, the peptidomic analysis on M. martensii indeed identified numerous novel scorpion peptides, expanded our knowledge towards the venom diversity, and afforded a set of pharmaceutical candidates. PMID:27782050

  14. Development of an expert system for amino acid sequence identification.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Saulinskas, E F; Johnson, P; Harrington, P B

    1996-08-01

    An expert system for amino acid sequence identification has been developed. The algorithm uses heuristic rules developed by human experts in protein sequencing. The system is applied to the chromatographic data of phenylthiohydantoin-amino acids acquired from an automated sequencer. The peak intensities in the current cycle are compared with those in the previous cycle, while the calibration and succeeding cycles are used as ancillary identification criteria when necessary. The retention time for each chromatographic peak in each cycle is corrected by the corresponding peak in the calibration cycle at the same run. The main improvement of our system compared with the onboard software used by the Applied Biosystems 477A Protein/Peptide Sequencer is that each peak in each cycle is assigned an identification name according to the corrected retention time to be used for the comparison with different cycles. The system was developed from analyses of ribonuclease A and evaluated by runs of four other protein samples that were not used in rule development. This paper demonstrates that rules developed by human experts can be automatically applied to sequence assignment. The expert system performed more accurately than the onboard software of the protein sequencer, in that the misidentification rates for the expert system were around 7%, whereas those for the onboard software were between 13 and 21%.

  15. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-09-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues.

  16. Question 1: Peptide nucleic acids and the origin and homochirality of life.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2007-10-01

    The possibilities of pseudo peptide DNA mimics like PNA (peptide nucleic acid) having a role for the prebiotic origin of life prior to an RNA world is discussed. In particular a scenario is proposed in which protocells with an achiral genetic material through several generations stepwise is converted into a chiral genetic material, e.g., by incorporation of RNA units. Provided that a sufficiently large sequence space is occupied, a selection process based on catalytic function in which a single cell (first common ancestor) has a definite evolutionary advantage, selection of this cell would by contingency also lock it into homochirality.

  17. Question 1: Peptide Nucleic Acids and the Origin and Homochirality of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2007-10-01

    The possibilities of pseudo peptide DNA mimics like PNA (peptide nucleic acid) having a role for the prebiotic origin of life prior to an RNA world is discussed. In particular a scenario is proposed in which protocells with an achiral genetic material through several generations stepwise is converted into a chiral genetic material, e.g., by incorporation of RNA units. Provided that a sufficiently large sequence space is occupied, a selection process based on catalytic function in which a single cell (first common ancestor) has a definite evolutionary advantage, selection of this cell would by contingency also lock it into homochirality.

  18. How amino acids and peptides shaped the RNA world.

    PubMed

    van der Gulik, Peter T S; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The "RNA world" hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a "pure RNA ribosome" evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems "RNA only", we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the "RNA world" view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  19. Bovine Parathyroid Hormone: Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, H. Bryan; Ronan, Rosemary

    1970-01-01

    Bovine parathyroid hormone has been isolated in homogeneous form, and its complete amino acid sequence determined. The bovine hormone is a single chain, 84 amino acids long. It contains amino-terminal alanine, and carboxyl-terminal glutamine. The bovine parathyroid hormone is approximately three times the length of the newly discovered hormone, thyrocalcitonin, whose action is reciprocal to parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:5275384

  20. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs. PMID:21334357

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs.

  2. Amino acid sequences of neuropeptides in the sinus gland of the land crab Cardisoma carnifex: a novel neuropeptide proteolysis site.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, R W

    1987-08-01

    The sinus gland is a major neurosecretory structure in Crustacea. Five peptides, labeled C, D, E, F, and I, isolated from the sinus gland of the land crab have been hypothesized to arise from the incomplete proteolysis at two internal sites on a single biosynthetic intermediate peptide "H", based on amino acid composition additivities and pulse-chase radiolabeling studies. The presence of only a single major precursor for the sinus gland peptides implies that peptide H may be synthesized on a common precursor with crustacean hyperglycemic hormone forms, "J" and "L," and a peptide, "K," similar to peptides with molt inhibiting activity. Here I report amino acid sequences of these peptides. The amino terminal sequence of the parent peptide, H, (and the homologous fragments) proved refractory to Edman degradation. Data from amino acid analysis and carboxypeptidase digestion of the naturally occurring fragments and of fragments produced by endopeptidase digestion were used together with Edman degradation to obtain the sequences. Amino acid analysis of fragments of the naturally occurring "overlap" peptides (those produced by internal cleavage at one site on H) was used to obtain the sequences across the cleavage sites. The amino acid sequence of the land crab peptide H is Arg-Ser-Ala-Asp-Gly-Phe-Gly-Arg-Met-Glu-Ser-Leu-Leu-Thr-Ser-Leu-Arg-Gly- Ser-Ala-Glu- Ser-Pro-Ala-Ala-Leu-Gly-Glu-Ala-Ser-Ala-Ala-His-Pro-Leu-Glu. In vivo cleavage at one site involves excision of arginine from the sequence Leu-Arg-Gly, whereas cleavage at the other site involves excision of serine from the sequence Glu-Ser-Leu. Proteolysis at the latter sequence has not been previously reported in intact secretory granules. The aspartate at position 4 is possibly covalently modified.

  3. Dissociation Behavior of a TEMPO-Active Ester Cross-Linker for Peptide Structure Analysis by Free Radical Initiated Peptide Sequencing (FRIPS) in Negative ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Christoph; Ihling, Christian H.; Götze, Michael; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linking reagent, containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) and a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker, to derive three-dimensional structural information of proteins. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate the mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). In an initial study, we had investigated the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-derivatized peptides upon collision activation in (+)-electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) experiments. In addition to the homolytic NO-C bond cleavage FRIPS pathway delivering the desired odd-electron product ions, an alternative heterolytic NO-C bond cleavage, resulting in even-electron product ions mechanism was found to be relevant. The latter fragmentation route clearly depends on the protonation of the TEMPO-Bz-moiety itself, which motivated us to conduct (-)-ESI-MS, CID-MS/MS, and MS3 experiments of TEMPO-Bz-cross-linked peptides to further clarify the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-peptide molecular ions. We show that the TEMPO-Bz-linker is highly beneficial for conducting FRIPS in negative ionization mode as the desired homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond is the major fragmentation pathway. Based on characteristic fragments, the isomeric amino acids leucine and isoleucine could be discriminated. Interestingly, we observed pronounced amino acid side chain losses in cross-linked peptides if the cross-linked peptides contain a high number of acidic amino acids.

  4. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  5. Error analysis of deep sequencing of phage libraries: peptides censored in sequencing.

    PubMed

    Matochko, Wadim L; Derda, Ratmir

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N × 1 frequency vector n = ||ni||, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N × N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa). The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq). Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq = Sa IN, where IN is a N × N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN), which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process. PMID:24416071

  6. Peptide Vocabulary Analysis Reveals Ultra-Conservation and Homonymity in Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gatherer, Derek

    2007-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for vocabulary analysis (word detection) in texts of human origin. It performs at 60%–70% overall accuracy and greater than 80% accuracy for longer words, and approximately 85% sensitivity on Alice in Wonderland, a considerable improvement on previous methods. When applied to protein sequences, it detects short sequences analogous to words in human texts, i.e. intolerant to changes in spelling (mutation), and relatively context-independent in their meaning (function). Some of these are homonyms of up to 7 amino acids, which can assume different structures in different proteins. Others are ultra-conserved stretches of up to 18 amino acids within proteins of less than 40% overall identity, reflecting extreme constraint or convergent evolution. Different species are found to have qualitatively different major peptide vocabularies, e.g. some are dominated by large gene families, while others are rich in simple repeats or dominated by internally repetitive proteins. This suggests the possibility of a peptide vocabulary signature, analogous to genome signatures in DNA. Homonyms may be useful in detecting convergent evolution and positive selection in protein evolution. Ultra-conserved words may be useful in identifying structures intolerant to substitution over long periods of evolutionary time. PMID:20066129

  7. An intimate link between antimicrobial peptide sequence diversity and binding to essential components of bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Paulina; Rosa, Rafael D; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are widespread in the living kingdom. They are key effectors of defense reactions and mediators of competitions between organisms. They are often cationic and amphiphilic, which favors their interactions with the anionic membranes of microorganisms. Several AMP families do not directly alter membrane integrity but rather target conserved components of the bacterial membranes in a process that provides them with potent and specific antimicrobial activities. Thus, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), lipoteichoic acids (LTA) and the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II are targeted by a broad series of AMPs. Studying the functional diversity of immune effectors tells us about the essential residues involved in AMP mechanism of action. Marine invertebrates have been found to produce a remarkable diversity of AMPs. Molluscan defensins and crustacean anti-LPS factors (ALF) are diverse in terms of amino acid sequence and show contrasted phenotypes in terms of antimicrobial activity. Their activity is directed essentially against Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria due to their specific interactions with Lipid II or Lipid A, respectively. Through those interesting examples, we discuss here how sequence diversity generated throughout evolution informs us on residues required for essential molecular interaction at the bacterial membranes and subsequent antibacterial activity. Through the analysis of molecular variants having lost antibacterial activity or shaped novel functions, we also discuss the molecular bases of functional divergence in AMPs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26498397

  8. Amino Acid and Peptide Requirement of Fusiformis necrophorus

    PubMed Central

    Wahren, Ann; Holme, Tord

    1973-01-01

    Uptake of individual amino acids and peptides by Fusiformis necrophorus was studied in growing cultures and resting cell suspensions. The cells were able to incorporate 16 of 17 14C-labeled amino acids into cell protein, the exception being proline. Proline could neither be formed by the cells from any of the other tested amino acids nor be synthesized from glucose or serine when these were used as energy sources. The addition of di- and tripeptides, the octapeptides vasopressin and oxytocin, and the poly (24) peptide ACTH did not stimulate cell growth, but a marked stimulatory effect was noted after the addition of poly-l-proline (mean molecular weight 2,000). It is concluded that cells of F. necrophorus (i) possess transport systems for most amino acids but not for proline, (ii) are dependent on exogenous proline in the form of proline-containing peptides for growth, and (iii) may be cultivated in a defined amino acid medium provided the proline requirement is met by the addition of a proline-containing peptide. PMID:4745417

  9. Structural analysis of the N- and C-termini in a peptide with consensus sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Y.; Zhou, H. X.; Guo, M.; Kallenbach, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    We present a structural analysis of a peptide, the sequence of which includes amino acids that show preferences for specific positions near the N- and C-termini in protein helices. This peptide has the sequence ac-YMSEDELKAAEAAFKRHGVP-amide, which includes a strong version of an N-terminal Harper-Rose capping box structure as well as a Gly located close to the C-terminus designed to elucidate its role in C-terminal capping. The sequence of five residues at the middle is inserted to separate effects at the two ends via a helix-stabilizing linker. Application of a simulated annealing procedure using interproton distance constraints derived from 1H NOESY experiments in water reveals the presence of a C-terminal structure in this model. The C-terminus forms a folded back structure in a significant fraction of structures generated by the annealing, in most of which Gly assumes an alpha L conformation. This structure occurs within a highly flexible region of the molecule and hence is occupied only a fraction of the time. PMID:8520470

  10. Novel nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes sequenced from intertidal mudflat bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tambadou, Fatoumata; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Sablé, Sophie; Klein, Géraldine L; Doghri, Ibtissem; Sopéna, Valérie; Didelot, Sandrine; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Thiéry, Valérie; Chevrot, Romain

    2014-08-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) are actively sought out, due to pharmacologically important activities of their metabolites. In marine environment, the most prevalent nonribosomal peptide antibiotic producers are sponges inhabiting microorganisms. Conversely, strains from marine sediments and more especially from intertidal mudflats have not been extensively screened for the presence of new NRPS. In this study, for the first time, a collection of one hundred intertidal mudflat bacterial isolates (Marennes-Oléron Bay, France) was assessed for (1) the presence of NRPS genes by degenerated PCR targeting conserved adenylation domains and (2) for their production of antimicrobial molecules. (1) Bacteria with adenylation domains (14 strains) were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and grouped into Firmicutes (one strain) and Proteobacteria (13 strains). In silico analysis of the NRPS amino acid sequences (n = 7) showed 41-58% ID with sequences found in the NCBI database. Three new putative adenylation domain signatures were found. (2) The culture supernatant of one of these strains, identified as a Bacillus, was shown to strongly inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, and Enterococcus faecalis. This study portends that the intertidal mudflat niche could be of interest for the discovery of new NRPS genes and antimicrobial producing strains. PMID:25039651

  11. The Interaction of Polyglutamine Peptides with Lipid Membranes Is Regulated by Flanking Sequences Associated with Huntingtin*

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Kauffman, Karlina J.; Umbaugh, C. Samuel; Frey, Shelli L.; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (poly(Q)) repeat near the N terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded poly(Q) facilitates formation of htt aggregates, eventually leading to deposition of cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies containing htt. Flanking sequences directly adjacent to the poly(Q) domain, such as the first 17 amino acids on the N terminus (Nt17) and the polyproline (poly(P)) domain on the C-terminal side of the poly(Q) domain, heavily influence aggregation. Additionally, htt interacts with a variety of membraneous structures within the cell, and Nt17 is implicated in lipid binding. To investigate the interaction between htt exon1 and lipid membranes, a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy, Langmuir trough techniques, and vesicle permeability assays were used to directly monitor the interaction of a variety of synthetic poly(Q) peptides with different combinations of flanking sequences (KK-Q35-KK, KK-Q35-P10-KK, Nt17-Q35-KK, and Nt17-Q35-P10-KK) on model membranes and surfaces. Each peptide aggregated on mica, predominately forming extended, fibrillar aggregates. In contrast, poly(Q) peptides that lacked the Nt17 domain did not appreciably aggregate on or insert into lipid membranes. Nt17 facilitated the interaction of peptides with lipid surfaces, whereas the poly(P) region enhanced this interaction. The aggregation of Nt17-Q35-P10-KK on the lipid bilayer closely resembled that of a htt exon1 construct containing 35 repeat glutamines. Collectively, this data suggests that the Nt17 domain plays a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes, and this lipid/htt interaction can be further modulated by the presence of the poly(P) domain. PMID:23572526

  12. Ribosomal Synthesis of Macrocyclic Peptides in Vitro and in Vivo Mediated by Genetically Encoded Amino-Thiol Unnatural Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Frost, John R.; Jacob, Nicholas T.; Papa, Louis J.; Owens, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile method for orchestrating the formation of side-chain-to-tail cyclic peptides from ribosomally derived polypeptide precursors is reported. Upon ribosomal incorporation into intein-containing precursor proteins, designer unnatural amino acids bearing side-chain 1,3- or 1,2-aminothiol functionalities are able to promote the cyclization of a downstream target peptide sequence via a C-terminal ligation/ring contraction mechanism. Using this approach, peptide macrocycles of variable size and composition could be generated in a pH-triggered manner in vitro, or directly in living bacterial cells. This methodology furnishes a new platform for the creation and screening of genetically encoded libraries of conformationally constrained peptides. This strategy was applied to identify and isolate a low micromolar streptavidin binder (KD = 1.1 µM) from a library of cyclic peptides produced in E. coli, thereby illustrating its potential toward aiding the discovery of functional peptide macrocycles. PMID:25933125

  13. Meta sequence analysis of human blood peptides and their parent proteins.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Peter; Pendrak, Voitek; Zhu, Peihong; Marshall, John G

    2010-04-18

    Sequence analysis of the blood peptides and their qualities will be key to understanding the mechanisms that contribute to error in LC-ESI-MS/MS. Analysis of peptides and their proteins at the level of sequences is much more direct and informative than the comparison of disparate accession numbers. A portable database of all blood peptide and protein sequences with descriptor fields and gene ontology terms might be useful for designing immunological or MRM assays from human blood. The results of twelve studies of human blood peptides and/or proteins identified by LC-MS/MS and correlated against a disparate array of genetic libraries were parsed and matched to proteins from the human ENSEMBL, SwissProt and RefSeq databases by SQL. The reported peptide and protein sequences were organized into an SQL database with full protein sequences and up to five unique peptides in order of prevalence along with the peptide count for each protein. Structured query language or BLAST was used to acquire descriptive information in current databases. Sampling error at the level of peptides is the largest source of disparity between groups. Chi Square analysis of peptide to protein distributions confirmed the significant agreement between groups on identified proteins.

  14. Identification of novel peptide substrates for protein farnesyltransferase reveals two substrate classes with distinct sequence selectivities

    PubMed Central

    Hougland, James L.; Hicks, Katherine A.; Hartman, Heather L.; Kelly, Rebekah A.; Watt, Terry J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Prenylation is a post-translational modification essential for the proper localization and function of many proteins. Farnesylation, the attachment of a 15-carbon farnesyl group near the C-terminus of protein substrates, is catalyzed by protein farnesyltransferase (FTase). Farnesylation has received significant interest as a target for pharmaceutical development and farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics. However, as the total complement of prenylated proteins is unknown, the FTase substrates responsible for FTI efficacy are not yet understood. Identifying novel prenylated proteins within the human proteome constitutes an important step towards understanding prenylation-dependent cellular processes. Based on sequence preferences for FTase derived from analysis of known farnesylated proteins, we selected and screened a library of small peptides representing the C-termini of 213 human proteins for activity with FTase. We identified 77 novel FTase substrates that exhibit multiple-turnover reactivity within this library; our library also contained 85 peptides that can be farnesylated by FTase only under single-turnover conditions. Based on these results, a second library was designed that yielded an additional 29 novel multiple-turnover FTase substrates and 45 single-turnover substrates. The two classes of substrates exhibit different specificity requirements. Efficient multiple-turnover reactivity correlates with the presence of a nonpolar amino acid at the a2 position and a Phe, Met, or Gln at the terminal X residue, consistent with the proposed Ca1a2X sequence model. In contrast, the sequences of the single-turnover substrates vary significantly more at both the a2 and X residues and are not well-described by current farnesylation algorithms. These results improve the definition of prenyltransferase substrate specificity, test the efficacy of substrate algorithms, and provide valuable information about therapeutic targets

  15. Antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-negative pathogens, produced and delivered by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Volzing, Katherine; Borrero, Juan; Sadowsky, Michael J; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2013-11-15

    We present results of tests with recombinant Lactococcus lactis that produce and secrete heterologous antimicrobial peptides with activity against Gram-negative pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella . In an initial screening, the activities of numerous candidate antimicrobial peptides, made by solid state synthesis, were assessed against several indicator pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella strains. Peptides A3APO and Alyteserin were selected as top performers based on high antimicrobial activity against the pathogens tested and on significantly lower antimicrobial activity against L. lactis . Expression cassettes containing the signal peptide of the protein Usp45 fused to the codon-optimized sequence of mature A3APO and Alyteserin were cloned under the control of a nisin-inducible promoter PnisA and transformed into L. lactis IL1403. The resulting recombinant strains were induced to express and secrete both peptides. A3APO- and Alyteserin-containing supernatants from these recombinant L. lactis inhibited the growth of pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella by up to 20-fold, while maintaining the host's viability. This system may serve as a model for the production and delivery of antimicrobial peptides by lactic acid bacteria to target Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria populations.

  16. A novel sea anemone peptide that inhibits acid-sensing ion channels.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Armando Alexei; Salceda, Emilio; Garateix, Anoland Georgina; Zaharenko, André Junqueira; Peigneur, Steve; López, Omar; Pons, Tirso; Richardson, Michael; Díaz, Maylín; Hernández, Yasnay; Ständker, Ludger; Tytgat, Jan; Soto, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    Sea anemones produce ion channels peptide toxins of pharmacological and biomedical interest. However, peptides acting on ligand-gated ion channels, including acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) toxins, remain poorly explored. PhcrTx1 is the first compound characterized from the sea anemone Phymanthus crucifer, and it constitutes a novel ASIC inhibitor. This peptide was purified by gel filtration, ion-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography followed by biological evaluation on ion channels of isolated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons using patch clamp techniques. PhcrTx1 partially inhibited ASIC currents (IC50∼100 nM), and also voltage-gated K(+) currents but the effects on the peak and on the steady state currents were lower than 20% in DRG neurons, at concentrations in the micromolar range. No significant effect was observed on Na(+) voltage-gated currents in DRG neurons. The N-terminal sequencing yielded 32 amino acid residues, with a molecular mass of 3477 Da by mass spectrometry. No sequence identity to other sea anemone peptides was found. Interestingly, the bioinformatic analysis of Cys-pattern and secondary structure arrangement suggested that this peptide presents an Inhibitor Cystine Knot (ICK) scaffold, which has been found in other venomous organisms such as spider, scorpions and cone snails. Our results show that PhcrTx1 represents the first member of a new structural group of sea anemones toxins acting on ASIC and, with much lower potency, on Kv channels. Moreover, this is the first report of an ICK peptide in cnidarians, suggesting that the occurrence of this motif in venomous animals is more ancient than expected.

  17. Combinations of long peptide sequence blocks can be used to describe toxin diversification in venomous animals.

    PubMed

    Starcevic, Antonio; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M; Cullum, John; Hranueli, Daslav; Long, Paul F

    2015-03-01

    An important mechanism for the evolution of toxins in venomous animals is believed to be the acquisition of genes encoding proteins that switch from physiological to toxic roles following gene duplication. The 'reverse recruitment' hypothesis pertains that these genes can also revert back to physiological functions, although such events are thought to be rare. A non-supervised homology searching method was developed which allowed the peptide diversity of animal toxins to be described as combinations between limited numbers of amino-acid sequence blocks we called 'tox-bits'. Taking the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) protein family as an example, a Bernoulli Trial was used to test if 'tox-bits' were robust enough to distinguish between peptides with physiological or toxin functions. The analysis revealed that discrimination was indeed possible, and supports the very recent 'restriction' hypothesis whereby genes with the potential to encode toxic functions have likely been independently recruited into venom systems and therefore require few, if any, reverse recruitment events. The development of 'tox-bits' provides a novel bioinformatics tool to allow recognition of toxins from other proteins in genome sequences, facilitating the study of gene recruitment and duplication strategies in venom diversification. The 'tox-bits' library is freely available at http://bioserv.pbf.hr/blocks.zip.

  18. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  19. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  20. Separation of a set of peptide sequence isomers using differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Creese, Andrew J; Smith, Richard D; Cooper, Helen J

    2011-09-15

    Protein identification in bottom-up proteomics requires disentangling isomers of proteolytic peptides, a major class of which are sequence inversions. Their separation using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been limited to isomeric pairs. Here we demonstrate baseline separation of all seven 8-mer tryptic peptide isomers using differential IMS. Evaluation of peak capacity implies that even larger libraries should be resolved for heavier peptides with higher charge states.

  1. Dissociation behavior of a bifunctional tempo-active ester reagent for peptide structure analysis by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihling, Christian; Falvo, Francesco; Kratochvil, Isabel; Sinz, Andrea; Schäfer, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional active ester cross-linking reagent containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) moiety connected to a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate MS analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). The TEMPO-Bz-linker was reacted with all 20 proteinogenic amino acids as well as with model peptides to gain detailed insights into its fragmentation mechanism upon collision activation. The final goal of this proof-of-principle study was to evaluate the potential of the TEMPO-Bz-linker for chemical cross-linking studies to derive 3D-structure information of proteins. Our studies were motivated by the well documented instability of the central NO-C bond of TEMPO-Bz reagents upon collision activation. The fragmentation of this specific bond was investigated in respect to charge states and amino acid composition of a large set of precursor ions resulting in the identification of two distinct fragmentation pathways. Molecular ions with highly basic residues are able to keep the charge carriers located, i.e. protons or sodium cations, and consequently decompose via a homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond of the TEMPO-Bz-linker. This leads to the formation of complementary open-shell peptide radical cations, while precursor ions that are protonated at the TEMPO-Bz-linker itself exhibit a charge-driven formation of even-electron product ions upon collision activation. MS(3) product ion experiments provided amino acid sequence information and allowed determining the cross-linking site. Our study fully characterizes the CID behavior of the TEMPO-Bz-linker and demonstrates its potential, but also its limitations for chemical cross-linking applications utilizing the special features of open-shell peptide ions on the basis of selective tandem MS analysis.

  2. Biological activity and biotechnological aspects of peptide nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Karin E; Good, Liam; Strömberg, Roger; Gräslund, Astrid; Smith, C I Edvard

    2006-01-01

    During the latest decades a number of different nucleic acid analogs containing natural nucleobases on a modified backbone have been synthesized. An example of this is peptide nucleic acid (PNA), a DNA mimic with a noncyclic peptide-like backbone, which was first synthesized in 1991. Owing to its flexible and neutral backbone PNA displays very good hybridization properties also at low-ion concentrations and has subsequently attracted large interest both in biotechnology and biomedicine. Numerous modifications have been made, which could be of value for particular settings. However, the original PNA does so far perform well in many diverse applications. The high biostability makes it interesting for in vivo use, although the very limited diffusion over lipid membranes requires further modifications in order to make it suitable for treatment in eukaryotic cells. The possibility to use this nucleic acid analog for gene regulation and gene editing is discussed. Peptide nucleic acid is now also used for specific genetic detection in a number of diagnostic techniques, as well as for site-specific labeling and hybridization of functional molecules to both DNA and RNA, areas that are also discussed in this chapter.

  3. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  4. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  5. Sequence-selective DNA binding with cell-permeable oligoguanidinium-peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Jesús; Sánchez, Mateo I; Valero, Julián; de Mendoza, Javier; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2015-03-21

    Conjugation of a short peptide fragment from a bZIP protein to an oligoguanidinium tail results in a DNA-binding miniprotein that selectively interacts with composite sequences containing the peptide-binding site next to an A/T-rich tract. In addition to stabilizing the complex with the target DNA, the oligoguanidinium unit also endows the conjugate with cell internalization properties.

  6. Effect of D-amino acid substitutions on Ni(II)-assisted peptide bond hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ariani, Hanieh H; Polkowska-Nowakowska, Agnieszka; Bal, Wojciech

    2013-03-01

    Previously we demonstrated the sequence-specific hydrolysis of the R1-(Ser/Thr)-peptide bond in Ni(II) complexes of peptides with a general R1-(Ser/Thr)-Xaa-His-Zaa-R2 sequence (R1 and R2 being any sequences) (Kopera, E.; Krezel, A.; Protas, A. M.; Belczyk, A.; Bonna, A.; Wyslouch-Cieszynska, A.; Poznanski, J.; Bal, W. Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 6636). In order to refine our understanding of the mechanism of this reaction and to find ways to accelerate it, we undertook a systematic study of effects of d-amino acid substitutions in the template Ac-Gly-Ala-Ser-Arg-His-Trp-Lys-Phe-Leu-NH2 peptide on the hydrolysis rate constants. We found that all stereochemical alterations made around the Ni(II) chelate plane resulted in the decrease of the reaction rate. However, the Ni(II) coordination, a prerequisite to the reaction, was not compromised by these substitutions. We demonstrated that the reaction is only possible when either the side chain of the crucial Ser (or Thr) residue is on the same part of the chelate plane as the next residue in the sequence (Arg), or the side chain of the residue following His (Trp) resides on the opposite side of the plane. The rate of reaction is the fastest when both these conditions are fulfilled. Another novel effect is the strong dependence of the rate of the acyl shift step on the character of the leaving group. PMID:23427909

  7. Delivery of siRNA using ternary complexes containing branched cationic peptides: the role of peptide sequence, branching and targeting.

    PubMed

    Kudsiova, Laila; Welser, Katharina; Campbell, Frederick; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Dawson, Natalie; Cui, Lili; Hailes, Helen C; Lawrence, M Jayne; Tabor, Alethea B

    2016-03-01

    Ternary nanocomplexes, composed of bifunctional cationic peptides, lipids and siRNA, as delivery vehicles for siRNA have been investigated. The study is the first to determine the optimal sequence and architecture of the bifunctional cationic peptide used for siRNA packaging and delivery using lipopolyplexes. Specifically three series of cationic peptides of differing sequence, degrees of branching and cell-targeting sequences were co-formulated with siRNA and vesicles prepared from a 1 : 1 molar ratio of the cationic lipid DOTMA and the helper lipid, DOPE. The level of siRNA knockdown achieved in the human alveolar cell line, A549-luc cells, in both reduced serum and in serum supplemented media was evaluated, and the results correlated to the nanocomplex structure (established using a range of physico-chemical tools, namely small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurement); the conformational properties of each component (circular dichroism); the degree of protection of the siRNA in the lipopolyplex (using gel shift assays) and to the cellular uptake, localisation and toxicity of the nanocomplexes (confocal microscopy). Although the size, charge, structure and stability of the various lipopolyplexes were broadly similar, it was clear that lipopolyplexes formulated from branched peptides containing His-Lys sequences perform best as siRNA delivery agents in serum, with protection of the siRNA in serum balanced against efficient release of the siRNA into the cytoplasm of the cell.

  8. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  9. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2016-07-12

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  10. Identification and nucleotide sequence of genes involved in the synthesis of lactocin 705, a two-peptide bacteriocin from Lactobacillus casei CRL 705.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, S A; Sesma, F; Palacios, J M; de Ruíz Holgado, A P; Raya, R R

    2000-04-15

    The structural gene determinants of lactocin 705, a bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus casei CRL 705, have been amplified from a plasmid of approximately 35 kb and sequenced. Lactocin 705 is a class IIb bacteriocin, whose activity depends upon the complementation of two peptides (705alpha and 705beta) of 33 amino acid residues each. These peptides are synthesized as precursors with signal sequences of the double-glycine type, which exhibited high identities with the leader peptides of plantaricin S and J from Lactobacillus plantarum, brochocin C from Brochotrix campestris, sakacin P from Lactobacillus sake, and the competence stimulating peptides from Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mitis. However, the two mature bacteriocins 705alpha and 705beta do not show significant similarity to other sequences in the databases. PMID:10754241

  11. Optimization of short amino acid sequences classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcz, Aleksy; Szymański, Zbigniew

    This article describes processing methods used for short amino acid sequences classification. The data processed are 9-symbols string representations of amino acid sequences, divided into 49 data sets - each one containing samples labeled as reacting or not with given enzyme. The goal of the classification is to determine for a single enzyme, whether an amino acid sequence would react with it or not. Each data set is processed separately. Feature selection is performed to reduce the number of dimensions for each data set. The method used for feature selection consists of two phases. During the first phase, significant positions are selected using Classification and Regression Trees. Afterwards, symbols appearing at the selected positions are substituted with numeric values of amino acid properties taken from the AAindex database. In the second phase the new set of features is reduced using a correlation-based ranking formula and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Finally, the preprocessed data is used for training LS-SVM classifiers. SPDE, an evolutionary algorithm, is used to obtain optimal hyperparameters for the LS-SVM classifier, such as error penalty parameter C and kernel-specific hyperparameters. A simple score penalty is used to adapt the SPDE algorithm to the task of selecting classifiers with best performance measures values.

  12. The amino acid sequence of mitogenic lectin-B from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Yurino, N; Kino, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1997-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed lectin-B (PL-B) has been analyzed by first sequencing seven lysylendopeptidase peptides derived from the reduced and S-pyridylethylated PL-B and then connecting them by analyzing the arginylendopeptidase peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated PL-B. PL-B consists of 295 amino acid residues and two oligosaccharides linked to Asn96 and Asn139, and has a molecular mass of 34,493 Da. PL-B is composed of seven repetitive chitin-binding domains having 48-79% sequence homology with each other. Twelve amino acid residues including eight cysteine residues in these domains are absolutely conserved in all other chitin-binding domains of plant lectins and class I chitinases. Also, it was strongly suggested that the extremely high hemagglutinating and mitogenic activities of PL-B may be ascribed to its seven-domain structure.

  13. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  14. G-CSF receptor-binding cyclic peptides designed with artificial amino-acid linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Kenji . E-mail: kshibata@kyowa.co.jp; Maruyama-Takahashi, Kumiko; Yamasaki, Motoo; Hirayama, Noriaki . E-mail: hirayama@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp

    2006-03-10

    Designing small molecules that mimic the receptor-binding local surface structure of large proteins such as cytokines or growth factors is fascinating and challenging. In this study, we designed cyclic peptides that reproduce the receptor-binding loop structures of G-CSF. We found it is important to select a suitable linker to join two or more discontinuous sequences and both termini of the peptide corresponding to the receptor-binding loop. Structural simulations based on the crystallographic structure of KW-2228, a stable and potent analog of human G-CSF, led us to choose 4-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) as a part of the linker. A combination of 4-Abz with {beta}-alanine or glycine, and disulfide bridges between cysteins or homocysteins, gave a structure suitable for receptor binding. In this structure, the side-chains of several amino acids important for the interactions with the receptor are protruding from one side of the peptide ring. This artificial peptide showed G-CSF antagonistic activity in a cell proliferation assay.

  15. Solid-phase peptide synthesis: from standard procedures to the synthesis of difficult sequences.

    PubMed

    Coin, Irene; Beyermann, Michael; Bienert, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This protocol for solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is based on the widely used Fmoc/tBu strategy, activation of the carboxyl groups by aminium-derived coupling reagents and use of PEG-modified polystyrene resins. A standard protocol is described, which was successfully applied in our lab for the synthesis of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), >400 CRF analogs and a countless number of other peptides. The 41-mer peptide CRF is obtained within approximately 80 working hours. To achieve the so-called difficult sequences, special techniques have to be applied in order to reduce aggregation of the growing peptide chain, which is the main cause of failure for peptide chemosynthesis. Exemplary application of depsipeptide and pseudoproline units is shown for synthesizing an extremely difficult sequence, the Asn(15) analog of the WW domain FBP28, which is impossible to obtain using the standard protocol.

  16. Role of donor-acceptor macrocycles in sequence specific peptide recognition and their optoelectronic properties: a detailed computational insight.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-07-27

    In this study, we have considered an experimentally synthesized organic donor-acceptor (D-A) macrocycle (CPP-TCAQ) and have modified it by incorporating different acceptor groups. We have performed density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics studies on these D-A macrocycles. We have clearly shown that cyclo[10]paraphenylene-2,6-tetracyanoanthraquinodimethanylene (CPP-TCAQ) isomers interact specifically with one particular peptide sequence tyr-leu-ala, over its structural isomer, tyr-ala-leu. However, other functionalized macrocycles bind to the tyr-ala-leu peptide sequence over tyr-leu-ala. Our calculations show that the presence of hydrogen bonds as well as π-π interactions responsible for this specific selection. Interestingly, it is the additional charge transfer induced dipolar interactions that favour binding of the tripeptide with the bulky C-terminal leucine amino acid, tyr-ala-leu. We confirmed that these host-guest complexes are stable in water medium as well as at room temperature. Thus, these hosts can bind effectively to any protein fragment bearing a particular tripeptide. Interestingly, the macrocycle, which recognizes the peptide sequence with a bulky C-terminal amino acid, also shows photophysical properties. The reasons for this happen to be the same (dipolar interactions introduce dipole allowed states for optical absorption as well as attracting the oppositely oriented dipolar groups). Recognition of the peptide sequence with a bulky C-terminal group is carried out for the first time with this functionalised macrocycle, which in addition shows photophysical properties. PMID:27412849

  17. De novo sequencing of peptides from top-down tandem mass spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Vyatkina, Kira; Wu, Si; Dekker, Leendert J.; vanDuijn, Martijn M.; Liu, Xiaowen; Tolic, Nikola; Dvorkin, Mikhail; Alexandrova, Sonya; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2015-09-28

    De novo sequencing of proteins and peptides is one of the most important problems in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics. A variety of methods have been developed to accomplish this task from a set of bottom-up tandem (MS/MS) mass spectra. However, a more recently emerged top-down technology, now gaining more and more popularity, opens new perspectives for protein analysis and characterization, implying a need in efficient algorithms for processing this kind of MS/MS data. Here we describe a method that allows to retrieve from a set of top-down MS/MS spectra long and accurate sequence fragments of the proteins contained in a sample. To this end, we outline a strategy for generating high-quality sequence tags from top-down spectra, and introduce the concept of a T-Bruijn graph by adapting to the case of tags the notion of an A-Bruijn graph widely used in genomics. The output of the proposed approach represents the set of amino acid strings spelled out by optimal paths in the connected components of a T-Bruijn graph. We illustrate its performance on top-down datasets acquired from carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAH2) and the Fab region of alemtuzumab.

  18. Specific DNA binding to a major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence by a synthetic 57-residue double zinc finger peptide from a human enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-04-15

    Two 57-residue peptides containing one pair of "zinc fingers" from a human enhancer binding protein were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. One peptide (MBP-DF) contained the native sequence, while the second peptide ([Abu11]MBP-DF) has an alpha-aminobutyric acid residue substituted for a nonconserved cysteine residue at position 11. The peptides were characterized by several chemical and physical methods, and their DNA binding properties were evaluated using gel retardation experiments. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that addition of metal ions such as zinc and cobalt resulted in specific conformational changes in both peptides, indicating that cysteine-11 does not appear to be involved in metal chelation. One-dimensional 1H NMR studies indicate that a stable folded structure is formed upon addition of zinc, and the chemical shift pattern is consistent with that previously observed for one constituent single finger (Omichinski, J., Clore, G. M., Appella, E., Sakaguchi, K., and Gronenborn, A. M. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9324-9334). Gel retardation experiments demonstrate that the peptides are capable of interacting with a 15-mer oligonucleotide comprising a portion of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence and that the interaction is zinc-dependent. The dissociation constant for the [Abu11]MBP-DF peptide is 1.4 x 10(-7) M with maximal binding occurring at a zinc-to-peptide ratio of 2 to 1. The binding specificity observed with respect to related enhancer sequences exhibits the same relative order as noted previously for the whole protein. Studies with point mutants of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer binding sequence indicate that the last GC base pair in a four-guanine stretch plays a pivotal role in the interaction between the peptide and DNA. PMID:2016331

  19. Investigating the inclusion properties of aromatic amino acids complexing beta-cyclodextrins in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Caso, Jolanda Valentina; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Malgieri, Gaetano; Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Isernia, Carla; Iacovino, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are commonly used as complexing agents in biological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications since they have an effect on protein thermal and proteolytic stability, refolding yields, solubility, and taste masking. β-cyclodextrins (β-CD), because of their cavity size are a perfectly suited complexing agent for many common guest moieties. In the case of peptide-cyclodextrin and protein-cyclodextrin host-guest complexes the aromatic amino acids are reported to be the principal responsible of the interaction. For these reasons, we have investigated the inclusion properties of nine designed tripeptides, obtained permuting the position of two L-alanines (Ala, A) with that of one L-tryptophan (Trp, W), L-phenylalanine (Phe, F), or L-tyrosine (Tyr, Y), respectively. Interestingly, the position of the aromatic side-chain in the sequence appears to modulate the β-CD:peptide binding constants, determined via UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopy, which in turn assumes values higher than those reported for the single amino acid. The tripeptides containing a tyrosine showed the highest binding constants, with the central position in the Ac-AYA-NH2 peptide becoming the most favorite for the interaction. A combined NMR and Molecular Docking approach permitted to build detailed complex models, highlighting the stabilizing interactions of the neighboring amino acids backbone atoms with the upper rim of the β-CD.

  20. Cα-C bond cleavage of the peptide backbone in MALDI in-source decay using salicylic acid derivative matrices.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as novel matrices for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described. The use of 5-FSA and 5-NSA generated a- and x-series ions accompanied by oxidized peptides [M - 2 H + H](+). The preferential formation of a- and x-series ions was found to be dependent on the hydrogen-accepting ability of matrix. The hydrogen-accepting ability estimated from the ratio of signal intensity of oxidized product [M - 2 H + H](+) to that of non-oxidized protonated molecule [M + H](+) of peptide was of the order 5-NSA > 5-FSA > 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) ≒ 2,5-dihydroxyl benzoic acid (2,5-DHB) ≒ 0. The results suggest that the hydrogen transfer reaction from peptide to 5-FSA and 5-NSA occurs during the MALDI-ISD processes. The hydrogen abstraction from peptides results in the formation of oxidized peptides containing a radical site on the amide nitrogen with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the Cα-C bond, leading to the formation of a- and x-series ions. The most significant feature of MALDI-ISD with 5-FSA and 5-NSA is the specific cleavage of the Cα-C bond of the peptide backbone without degradation of side-chain and post-translational modifications (PTM). The matrix provides a useful complementary method to conventional MALDI-ISD for amino acid sequencing and site localization of PTMs in peptides.

  1. Engineering and analysis of peptide-recognition domain specificities by phage display and deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Megan E; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2013-01-01

    Protein interaction networks depend in part on the specific recognition of unstructured peptides by folded domains. Understanding how members of a domain family use a similar fold to recognize different peptide sequences selectively is a fundamental question. One way to advance our understanding of peptide recognition is to apply an existing model of peptide recognition for a particular domain toward engineering synthetic domain variants with desired properties. Successes, failures, and unintended outcomes can help refine the model and can illuminate more general principles of peptide recognition. Using the PDZ domain fold as an example, we describe methods for (1) structure-based combinatorial library design and directed evolution of domain variants and (2) specificity profiling of large repertoires of synthetic variants using multiplexed deep sequencing. Peptide-binding preferences for hundreds of variants can be decoded in parallel, enabling comparisons between different library designs and selection pressures. The tremendous depth of coverage of the binding peptide profiles also permits robust computational analysis. This approach to studying peptide recognition can be applied to other domains and to a variety of structural and functional models by tailoring the combinatorial library design and selection pressures accordingly.

  2. Kojic Acid Peptide: A New Compound with Anti-Tyrosinase Potential

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Birendra Kumar; Park, Seok Hoon; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Goo, Young-Aae; Kim, Hyoung Shik; Cho, Seung Hee; Lee, Jeong Hun; Ahn, Ghe Whan; Kim, Jin Pyo; Kang, Su Myoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Kojic acid was used for decades in the cosmetic industry as an antimelanogenic agent. However, there are two major drawbacks of Kojic acid, one is cytotoxicity and second are instability on storage. These limitations led the scientist to synthesize the active Kojic acid peptides. Objective In the present study, we synthesize and investigate the effect of five Kojic acid peptides to overcome the limitation of Kojic acid. Methods The peptide was analyzed and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectroscopy. Further, the tyrosinase activities of the Kojic acid and Kojic acid peptides were compared. The toxicity was measured and the melanin content is recorded in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. Results Maximum tyrosinase activity was measured by Kojic acid peptides. Therefore, Kojic acid peptides were subjected to melanin assay and cytotoxicity assay and finally the stability of the Kojic acid peptide was measured. Conclusion It was observed that this newly synthesized Kojic acid peptide is stable and potent to inhibit the tyrosinase activity and melanin content of B16F10 mouse melanoma cells without exhibiting cell toxicity. Together, these preliminary results suggest that a further exploration is being needed to establish Kojic acid peptide as antimelanogenic agent. PMID:27746633

  3. Sequence-based design and discovery of peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase: insight into the binding mode of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Yuan; Zawahir, Zahrah; Song, Lai-Dong; Long, Ya-Qiu; Neamati, Nouri

    2006-07-27

    Integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome is an essential step in the HIV life cycle. This process is mediated by integrase (IN), a 32 kDa viral enzyme that has no mammalian counterpart, rendering it an attractive target for antiviral drug design. Herein, we present a novel approach toward elucidating "hot spots" of protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions of IN through the design of peptides that encompass conserved amino acids and residues known to be important for enzymatic activity. We designed small peptides (7-17 residues) containing at least one amino acid residue that is important for IN catalytic activities (3'-processing and strand transfer) or viral replication. All these peptides were synthesized on solid phase by fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry and evaluated for their inhibition of IN catalytic activities. Such specific sites of interest (i.e., protein-DNA or protein-drug interactions) could potentially be used as drug targets. This novel "sequence walk" strategy across the entire 288 residues of IN has allowed the identification of two peptides NL-6 and NL-9 with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2.7 and 56 microM for strand transfer activity, respectively. Amino acid substitution analysis on these peptides revealed essential residues for activity, and the rational truncation of NL-6 produced a novel hexapeptide (peptide NL6-5) with inhibitory potency equal to that of the parent dodecapeptide (peptide NL-6). More significantly, the retroinverso analogue of NL-6 (peptide RDNL-6) in which the direction of the sequence is reversed and the chirality of each amino acid residue is inverted displayed improved inhibitory potency against 3'-processing of HIV-1 IN by 6-fold relative to the parent NL-6, serving as a metabolically stable derivative for further in vitro and in vivo analyses.

  4. The complete amino acid sequence of chitinase-B from the leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, M; Yamagami, T; Funatsu, G

    1995-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed leaf chitinase-B (PLC-B) has been determined by first sequencing all 19 tryptic peptides derived from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated (RCm-) PLC-B and then connecting them by analyzing the chymotryptic peptides from three fragments produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage of RCm-PLC-B. PLC-B consists of 274 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 29,473 Da. Six cysteine residues are linked by disulfide bonds between Cys20 and Cys67, Cys50 and Cys57, and Cys159 and Cys188. From 58-68% sequence homology of PLC-B with five class III chitinases, it was concluded that PLC-B is a basic class III chitinase.

  5. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  6. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  7. Cloning, sequencing and overexpression of the gene for prokaryotic factor EF-P involved in peptide bond synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, H; Adams, S L; Chung, D G; Yaguchi, M; Chuang, S E; Ganoza, M C

    1991-01-01

    A soluble protein EF-P (elongation factor P) from Escherichia coli has been purified and shown to stimulate efficient translation and peptide-bond synthesis on native or reconstituted 70S ribosomes in vitro. Based on the partial amino acid sequence of EF-P, 18- and 24-nucleotide DNA probes were synthesized and used to screen lambda phage clones from the Kohara Gene Bank. The entire EF-P gene was detected on lambda clone #650 which contains sequences from the 94 minute region of the E.coli genome. Two DNA fragments, 3.0 and 0.78 kilobases in length encompassing the gene, were isolated and cloned into pUC18 and pUC19. Partially purified extracts from cells transformed with these plasmids overrepresented a protein which co-migrates with EF-P upon SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and also exhibited increased EF-P mediated peptide-bond synthetic activity. Based on DNA sequence analysis of this gene, the EF-P protein consists of 187 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 20,447. The sequence and chromosomal location of EF-P establishes it as a unique gene product. Images PMID:1956781

  8. The interaction of amino acids, peptides, and proteins with DNA.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Andrey Y; Tarnovskaya, Svetlana I; Chernova, Irina A; Shataeva, Larisa K; Skorik, Yury A

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids that carry charges on their side groups can bind to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) and change the strength of the double helix. Measurement of the DNA melting temperature (Tm) confirmed that acidic amino acids (Glu, Asp) weaken the H-bonds between DNA strands, whereas basic amino acids (Arg, Lys) strengthen the interaction between the strands. A rank correlation exists between the amino acid isoelectric points and the observed changes in Tm. A similar dependence of the hyperchromic effect on the isoelectric point of a protein (pepsin, insulin, cortexin, and protamine) was observed for DNA-protein complexes at room temperature. Short peptides (KE, AEDG, and KEDP) containing a mixture of acidic and basic amino acid residues also affect Tm and the stability of the double helix. A model for binding Glu and Lys to dsDNA was explored by a docking simulation. The model shows that Glu, in an untwisted shape, binds to dsDNA in its major groove and disrupts three H-bonds between the strands, thereby destabilizing the double helix. Lys, in an untwisted shape, binds to the external side of the dsDNA and forms two bonds with O atoms of neighboring phosphodiester groups, thereby strengthening the DNA helix.

  9. Β-defensin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus): Sequence, tissue expression, and anti-bacterial activity of synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun-Jian; Wu, Fang; Ye, Xing; Sun, Cheng-Fei; Tian, Yuan-Yuan; Lu, Mai-Xin; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Zhi-Hang

    2015-07-15

    Beta-defensins (β-defensins) are small cationic amphiphilic peptides that are widely distributed in plants, insects, and vertebrates, and are important for their antimicrobial properties. In this study, the β-defensin (Onβ-defensin) gene of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was cloned from spleen tissue. Onβ-defensin has a genomic DNA sequence of 674 bp and produces a cDNA of 454 bp. Sequence alignments showed that Onβ-defensin contains three exons and two introns. Sequence analysis of the cDNA identified an open reading frame of 201 bp, encoding 66 amino acids. Bioinformatic analysis showed that Onβ-defensin encodes a cytoplasmic protein molecule containing a signal peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of this peptide contains six conserved cysteine residues and two conserved glycine residues, and shows 81.82% and 78.33% sequence similarities with β-defensin-1 of fugu (Takifugu rubripes) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), respectively. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that the level of Onβ-defensin expression was highest in the skin (307.1-fold), followed by the spleen (77.3-fold), kidney (17.8-fold), and muscle (16.5-fold) compared to controls. By contrast, low levels of expression were found in the liver, heart, intestine, stomach, and gill (<3.0-fold). Artificial infection of tilapia with Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS] strain) resulted in a significantly upregulated expression of Onβ-defensin in the skin, muscle, kidney, and gill. In vitro antimicrobial experiments showed that a synthetic Onβ-defensin polypeptide had a certain degree of inhibitory effect on the growth of Escherichia coli DH5α and S. agalactiae. The results indicate that Onβ-defensin plays a role in immune responses that suppress or kill pathogens.

  10. Programmable Multivalent Display of Receptor Ligands using Peptide Nucleic Acid Nanoscaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Ethan A.; Wang, Deyun; Fujigaki, Hidetsugu; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Micklitsch, Christopher M.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Martin-Manso, Gema; Pendrak, Michael L.; Roberts, David D.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Multivalent effects dictate the binding affinity of multiple ligands on one molecular entity to receptors. Integrins are receptors that mediate cell attachment through multivalent binding to peptide sequences within the extracellular matrix, and overexpression promotes the metastasis of some cancers. Multivalent display of integrin antagonists enhances their efficacy, but current scaffolds have limited ranges and precision for the display of ligands. Here we present an approach to study multivalent effects across wide ranges of ligand number, density, and three-dimensional arrangement. Using L-lysine γ-substituted peptide nucleic acids, the multivalent effects of an integrin antagonist were examined over a range of 1 to 45 ligands. The optimal construct improves the inhibitory activity of the antagonist by two orders of magnitude against the binding of melanoma cells to the extracellular matrix in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22233624

  11. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  12. Peptide binding landscapes: Specificity and homophilicity across sequence space in a lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Peptide aggregation frequently involves sequences with strong homophilic binding character, i.e., sequences that self-assemble with like species in a crowded cellular environment, in the face of a multitude of other peptides or proteins as potential heterophilic binding partners. What kinds of sequences display a strong tendency towards homophilic binding and self-assembly, and what are the origins of this behavior? Here, we consider how sequence specificity in oligomerization processes plays out in a simple two-dimensional (2D) lattice statistical-thermodynamic peptide model that permits exhaustive examination of the entire sequence and configurational landscapes. We find that sequences with strong self-specificities have either alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues or short patches of hydrophobic residues, both which minimize intramolecular hydrophobic interactions in part due to the constraints of the 2D lattice. We also find that these specificities are highly sensitive to entropic and free energetic features of the unbound conformational state, such that direct binding interaction energies alone do not capture the complete behavior. These results suggest that the ability of particular peptide sequences to self-assemble and aggregate in a many-protein environment reflects a precise balance of direct binding interactions and behavior in the unbound (monomeric) state.

  13. Conserved sequences of sperm-activating peptide and its receptor throughout evolution, despite speciation in the sea star Asterias amurensis and closely related species.

    PubMed

    Nakachi, Mia; Hoshi, Motonori; Matsumoto, Midori; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2008-08-01

    The asteroidal sperm-activating peptides (asterosaps) from the egg jelly bind to their sperm receptor, a membrane-bound guanylate cyclase, on the tail to activate sperm in sea stars. Asterosaps are produced as single peptides and then cleaved into shorter peptides. Sperm activation is followed by the acrosome reaction, which is subfamily specific. In order to investigate the molecular details of the asterosap-receptor interaction, corresponding cDNAs have been cloned, sequenced and analysed from the Asteriinae subfamily including Asterias amurensis, A. rubens, A. forbesi and Aphelasterias japonica, as well as Distolasterias nipon from the Coscinasteriinae subfamily. Averages of 29% and 86% identity were found from the deduced amino acid sequences in asterosap and its receptor extracellular domains, respectively, across all species examined. The phylogenic tree topology for asterosap and its receptor was similar to that of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I. In spite of a certain homology, the amino acid sequences exhibited speciation. Conservation was found in the asterosap residues involved in disulphide bonding and proteinase-cleaving sites. Conversely, similarities were detected between potential asterosap-binding sites and the structure of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor. Although the sperm-activating peptide and its receptor share certain common sequences, they may serve as barriers that ensure speciation in the sea star A. amurensis and closely related species.

  14. Attractors in Sequence Space: Agent-Based Exploration of MHC I Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Natalie; Wisniewska, Joanna M; Hiss, Jan A; Freier, Anja; Losch, Florian O; Walden, Peter; Wrede, Paul; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-01-12

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a meta-heuristic that utilizes a computational analogue of ant trail pheromones to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The size of the ant colony and the representation of the ants' pheromone trails is unique referring to the given optimization problem. In the present study, we employed ACO to generate novel peptides that stabilize MHC I protein on the plasma membrane of a murine lymphoma cell line. A jury of feedforward neural network classifiers served as fitness function for peptide design by ACO. Bioactive murine MHC I H-2K(b) stabilizing as well as nonstabilizing octapeptides were designed, synthesized and tested. These peptides reveal residue motifs that are relevant for MHC I receptor binding. We demonstrate how the performance of the implemented ACO algorithm depends on the colony size and the size of the search space. The actual peptide design process by ACO constitutes a search path in sequence space that can be visualized as trajectories on a self-organizing map (SOM). By projecting the sequence space on a SOM we visualize the convergence of the different solutions that emerge during the optimization process in sequence space. The SOM representation reveals attractors in sequence space for MHC I binding peptides. The combination of ACO and SOM enables systematic peptide optimization. This technique allows for the rational design of various types of bioactive peptides with minimal experimental effort. Here, we demonstrate its successful application to the design of MHC-I binding and nonbinding peptides which exhibit substantial bioactivity in a cell-based assay.

  15. Attractors in Sequence Space: Agent-Based Exploration of MHC I Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Natalie; Wisniewska, Joanna M; Hiss, Jan A; Freier, Anja; Losch, Florian O; Walden, Peter; Wrede, Paul; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-01-12

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a meta-heuristic that utilizes a computational analogue of ant trail pheromones to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The size of the ant colony and the representation of the ants' pheromone trails is unique referring to the given optimization problem. In the present study, we employed ACO to generate novel peptides that stabilize MHC I protein on the plasma membrane of a murine lymphoma cell line. A jury of feedforward neural network classifiers served as fitness function for peptide design by ACO. Bioactive murine MHC I H-2K(b) stabilizing as well as nonstabilizing octapeptides were designed, synthesized and tested. These peptides reveal residue motifs that are relevant for MHC I receptor binding. We demonstrate how the performance of the implemented ACO algorithm depends on the colony size and the size of the search space. The actual peptide design process by ACO constitutes a search path in sequence space that can be visualized as trajectories on a self-organizing map (SOM). By projecting the sequence space on a SOM we visualize the convergence of the different solutions that emerge during the optimization process in sequence space. The SOM representation reveals attractors in sequence space for MHC I binding peptides. The combination of ACO and SOM enables systematic peptide optimization. This technique allows for the rational design of various types of bioactive peptides with minimal experimental effort. Here, we demonstrate its successful application to the design of MHC-I binding and nonbinding peptides which exhibit substantial bioactivity in a cell-based assay. PMID:27463849

  16. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Sophocleous, Andreas M; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H; Mazzara, J Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2013-12-28

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in a 0.1M HEPES buffer, pH7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37°C for 24h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging, and microtome sectioning techniques were used to examine peptide penetration into the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST+0.02% sodium azide, 37°C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but also can be internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt.% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for >2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides.

  17. CycloBranch: De Novo Sequencing of Nonribosomal Peptides from Accurate Product Ion Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Schug, Kevin A.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-07-01

    Nonribosomal peptides have a wide range of biological and medical applications. Their identification by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenging task. A new open-source de novo peptide identification engine CycloBranch was developed and successfully applied in identification or detailed characterization of 11 linear, cyclic, branched, and branch-cyclic peptides. CycloBranch is based on annotated building block databases the size of which is defined by the user according to ribosomal or nonribosomal peptide origin. The current number of involved nonisobaric and isobaric building blocks is 287 and 521, respectively. Contrary to all other peptide sequencing tools utilizing either peptide libraries or peptide fragment libraries, CycloBranch represents a true de novo sequencing engine developed for accurate mass spectrometric data. It is a stand-alone and cross-platform application with a graphical and user-friendly interface; it supports mzML, mzXML, mgf, txt, and baf file formats and can be run in parallel on multiple threads. It can be downloaded for free from http://ms.biomed.cas.cz/cyclobranch/, where the User's manual and video tutorials can be found.

  18. Epitope Identification from Fixed-complexity Random-sequence Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Josh; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies play an important role in modern science and medicine. They are essential in many biological assays and have emerged as an important class of therapeutics. Unfortunately, current methods for mapping antibody epitopes require costly synthesis or enrichment steps, and no low-cost universal platform exists. In order to address this, we tested a random-sequence peptide microarray consisting of over 330,000 unique peptide sequences sampling 83% of all possible tetramers and 27% of pentamers. It is a single, unbiased platform that can be used in many different types of tests, it does not rely on informatic selection of peptides for a particular proteome, and it does not require iterative rounds of selection. In order to optimize the platform, we developed an algorithm that considers the significance of k-length peptide subsequences (k-mers) within selected peptides that come from the microarray. We tested eight monoclonal antibodies and seven infectious disease cohorts. The method correctly identified five of the eight monoclonal epitopes and identified both reported and unreported epitope candidates in the infectious disease cohorts. This algorithm could greatly enhance the utility of random-sequence peptide microarrays by enabling rapid epitope mapping and antigen identification. PMID:25368412

  19. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  20. [Cellular delivery of modified peptide nucleic acids: a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chundong; Wang, Jianhua; Zeng, Fang

    2016-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA surrogate in which the phosphate deoxyribose backbone of DNA is replaced by repeating N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine units. PNA can hybridize to the complementary DNA and RNA with higher affinity than their oligonucleotide counterparts. This character of PNA not only makes it a new tool for the studies of molecular biology but also the potential candidate for gene-targeting drugs. The non-ionic backbone of PNA leads to stable hybrids with the nucleic acids, but at the same time, the neutral backbone results in poor cellular uptake. To address this problem, studies on modified PNA progress rapidly in recent years. We reviewed literature reports combined with our study about the delivery methods, including backbone modified PNA and PNA-ligand conjugates, and the cellular uptake of modified PNA. In addition, we summarized the problems and future prospect of the cellular delivery of modified PNA.

  1. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  2. Improving surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides by chemical modification with fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Matemu, Athanasia Oswald; Katayama, Shigeru; Kayahara, Hisataka; Murasawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2012-04-01

    Effect of acylation with saturated fatty acids on surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides was investigated. Tofu whey (TW) and soy proteins (7S, 11S, and acid-precipitated soy protein [APP]) were hydrolyzed by Protease M 'Amano' G, and resulting peptide mixtures were acylated with esterified fatty acids of different chain length (6C to 18C) to form a covalent linkage between the carboxyl group of fatty acid and the free amino groups of peptide. Acylation significantly (P < 0.05) increased emulsifying properties of 7S, 11S, and APP peptides independent of fatty acid chain length. Acylation decreased water binding capacity although oil binding capacity of acylated tofu whey ultra filtered fraction (UFTW < 3 kDa), 7S- and 11S-peptides were improved compared to native peptides. 7S peptides acylated with long chain fatty acids had shown significant higher surface hydrophobicity as in contrast with acylated UFTW < 3 kDa and APP peptides. Fluorescence spectra studies revealed structural conformation of acylated soy peptides as compared to native peptides. This study shows that chemical modification with fatty acids can further affect functional properties of soy proteins.

  3. Protein fatty acid acylation: enzymatic synthesis of an N-myristoylglycyl peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Towler, D.; Glaser, L.

    1986-05-01

    Incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain JR153 with either (/sup 3/H)myristate or (/sup 3/H)palmitate demonstrates the synthesis of proteins that contain covalently bound fatty acids. A unique set of proteins is labeled by each fatty acid. Detailed analysis of a 20-kDa protein labeled with myristic acid demonstrates that myristate is linked to the amino-terminal glycine. We describe an enzymatic activity in yeast that will transfer myristic acid to the amino terminus of the octapeptide Gly-Asn-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Arg-Arg, whose sequence was derived from a known N-myristoylated acyl protein, the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase of bovine cardiac muscle. The acylation reaction is dependent on ATP and CoA, is enriched in a crude membrane fraction, and will use myristate but not palmitate as the acyl donor. Specificity of the glycyl peptide substrate is demonstrated by the observation that other glycyl peptides do not competitively inhibit myristoylation of Gly-Asn-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Arg-Arg.

  4. Complete amino acid sequence of a human monocyte chemoattractant, a putative mediator of cellular immune reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, E A; Yoshimura, T; Leonard, E J; Tanaka, S; Griffin, P R; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Appella, E

    1989-01-01

    In a study of the structural basis for leukocyte specificity of chemoattractants, we determined the complete amino acid sequence of human glioma-derived monocyte chemotactic factor (GDCF-2), a peptide that attracts human monocytes but not neutrophils. The choice of a tumor cell product for analysis was dictated by its relative abundance and an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor (LDCF), the agonist thought to account for monocyte accumulation in cellular immune reactions. By a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry, it was established that GDCF-2 comprises 76 amino acid residues, commencing at the N terminus with pyroglutamic acid. The peptide contains four half-cystines, at positions 11, 12, 36, and 52, which create a pair of loops, clustered at the disulfide bridges. The relative positions of the half-cystines are almost identical to those of monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MDNCF), a peptide of similar mass but with only 24% sequence identity to GDCF. Thus, GDCF and MDNCF have a similar gross secondary structure because of the loops formed by the clustered disulfides, and their different leukocyte specificities are most likely determined by the large differences in primary sequence. PMID:2648385

  5. Computational Design of the Sequence and Structure of a Protein-Binding Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Bosch, Dustin E.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Purbeck, Carrie; Machius, Mischa; Siderovski, David P.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2012-08-10

    The de novo design of protein-binding peptides is challenging because it requires the identification of both a sequence and a backbone conformation favorable for binding. We used a computational strategy that iterates between structure and sequence optimization to redesign the C-terminal portion of the RGS14 GoLoco motif peptide so that it adopts a new conformation when bound to G{alpha}{sub i1}. An X-ray crystal structure of the redesigned complex closely matches the computational model, with a backbone root-mean-square deviation of 1.1 {angstrom}.

  6. The amino-acid sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chains of red kangaroo and Virginia opossum.

    PubMed

    De Jong, W W; Terwindt, E C

    1976-08-16

    The amino acid sequence of the A chain of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was completely determined by manual Edman degradation of tryptic, thermolytic and cyanogen bromide peptides. The sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chain from the Virginia opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) was deduced from amino acid analyses and partial Edman degradation of peptides. The 173-residue A chains of kangaroo and opossum differ in six positions, whereas comparison with the bovine alpha-crystallin A chain reveals 17 and 22 substitutions, respectively. Most substitutions occur in the COOH-terminal part of the chain.

  7. Light-up probes: thiazole orange-conjugated peptide nucleic acid for detection of target nucleic acid in homogeneous solution.

    PubMed

    Svanvik, N; Westman, G; Wang, D; Kubista, M

    2000-05-15

    We have constructed light-up probes for nucleic acid detection. The light-up probe is a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotide to which the asymmetric cyanine dye thiazole orange (TO) is tethered. It combines the excellent hybridization properties of PNA and the large fluorescence enhancement of TO upon binding to DNA. When the PNA hybridizes to target DNA, the dye binds and becomes fluorescent. Free probes have low fluorescence, which may increase almost 50-fold upon hybridization to complementary nucleic acid. This makes the light-up probes particularly suitable for homogeneous hybridization assays, where separation of the bound and free probe is not necessary. We find that the fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization varies among different probes, which is mainly due to variations in free probe fluorescence. For eight probes studied the fluorescence quantum yield at 25 degrees C in the unbound state ranged from 0.0015 to 0.08 and seemed to depend mainly on the PNA sequence. The binding of the light-up probes to target DNA is highly sequence specific and a single mismatch in a 10-mer target sequence was readily identified.

  8. Ion/ion reactions of MALDI-derived peptide ions: increased sequence coverage via covalent and electrostatic modification upon charge inversion.

    PubMed

    Stutzman, John R; McLuckey, Scott A

    2012-12-18

    Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (AP-MALDI)-derived tryptic peptide ions have been subjected to ion/ion reactions with doubly deprotonated 4-formyl-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (FBDSA) in the gas-phase. The ion/ion reaction produces a negatively charged electrostatic complex composed of the peptide cation and reagent dianion, whereupon dehydration of the complex via collision-induced dissociation (CID) produces a Schiff base product anion. Collisional activation of modified lysine-terminated tryptic peptide anions is consistent with a covalent modification of unprotonated primary amines (i.e., N-terminus and ε-NH(2) of lysine). Modified arginine-terminated tryptic peptides have shown evidence of a covalent modification at the N-terminus and a noncovalent interaction with the arginine residue. The modified anions yield at least as much sequence information upon CID as the unmodified cations for the small tryptic peptides examined here and more sequence information for the large tryptic peptides. This study represents the first demonstration of gas-phase ion/ion reactions involving MALDI-derived ions. In this case, covalent and electrostatic modification charge inversion is shown to enhance MALDI tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides. PMID:23078018

  9. Prediction of Scylla olivacea (Crustacea; Brachyura) peptide hormones using publicly accessible transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequences.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    The aquaculture of crabs from the genus Scylla is of increasing economic importance for many Southeast Asian countries. Expansion of Scylla farming has led to increased efforts to understand the physiology and behavior of these crabs, and as such, there are growing molecular resources for them. Here, publicly accessible Scylla olivacea transcriptomic data were mined for putative peptide-encoding transcripts; the proteins deduced from the identified sequences were then used to predict the structures of mature peptide hormones. Forty-nine pre/preprohormone-encoding transcripts were identified, allowing for the prediction of 187 distinct mature peptides. The identified peptides included isoforms of adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-like peptide, allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, bursicon β, CCHamide, corazonin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone/molt-inhibiting hormone, diuretic hormone 31, eclosion hormone, FMRFamide-like peptide, HIGSLYRamide, insulin-like peptide, intocin, leucokinin, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide F, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone, pyrokinin, red pigment concentrating hormone, RYamide, short neuropeptide F, SIFamide and tachykinin-related peptide, all well-known neuropeptide families. Surprisingly, the tissue used to generate the transcriptome mined here is reported to be testis. Whether or not the testis samples had neural contamination is unknown. However, if the peptides are truly produced by this reproductive organ, it could have far reaching consequences for the study of crustacean endocrinology, particularly in the area of reproductive control. Regardless, this peptidome is the largest thus far predicted for any brachyuran (true crab) species, and will serve as a foundation for future studies of peptidergic control in members of the commercially important genus Scylla.

  10. Viral Coat Protein Peptides with Limited Sequence Homology Bind Similar Domains of Alfalfa Mosaic Virus and Tobacco Streak Virus RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Maud M.; Ansel-McKinney, Patricia; Houser-Scott, Felicia; Yusibov, Vidadi; Loesch-Fries, L. Sue; Gehrke, Lee

    1998-01-01

    An unusual and distinguishing feature of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarviruses such as tobacco streak virus (TSV) is that the viral coat protein is required to activate the early stages of viral RNA replication, a phenomenon known as genome activation. AMV-TSV coat protein homology is limited; however, they are functionally interchangeable in activating virus replication. For example, TSV coat protein will activate AMV RNA replication and vice versa. Although AMV and TSV coat proteins have little obvious amino acid homology, we recently reported that they share an N-terminal RNA binding consensus sequence (Ansel-McKinney et al., EMBO J. 15:5077–5084, 1996). Here, we biochemically compare the binding of chemically synthesized peptides that include the consensus RNA binding sequence and lysine-rich (AMV) or arginine-rich (TSV) environment to 3′-terminal TSV and AMV RNA fragments. The arginine-rich TSV coat protein peptide binds viral RNA with lower affinity than the lysine-rich AMV coat protein peptides; however, the ribose moieties protected from hydroxyl radical attack by the two different peptides are localized in the same area of the predicted RNA structures. When included in an infectious inoculum, both AMV and TSV 3′-terminal RNA fragments inhibited AMV RNA replication, while variant RNAs unable to bind coat protein did not affect replication significantly. The data suggest that RNA binding and genome activation functions may reside in the consensus RNA binding sequence that is apparently unique to AMV and ilarvirus coat proteins. PMID:9525649

  11. Amino acid sequence of human cholinesterase. Annual report, 30 September 1984-30 September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, O.

    1985-10-01

    The active-site serine residue is located 198 amino acids from the N-terminal. The active-site peptide was isolated from three different genetic types of human serum cholinesterase: from usual, atypical, and atypical-silent genotypes. It was found that the amino acid sequence of the active-site peptide was identical in all three genotypes. Comparison of the complete sequences of cholinesterase from human serum and acetylcholinesterase from the electric organ of Torpedo californica shows an identity of 53%. Cholinesterase is of interest to the Department of Defense because cholinesterase protects against organophosphate poisons of the type used in chemical warfare. The structural results presented here will serve as the basis for cloning the gene for cholinesterase. The potential uses of large amounts of cholinesterase would be for cleaning up spills of organophosphates and possibly for detoxifying exposed personnel.

  12. Heterogeneity of amino acid sequence in hippopotamus cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B; Borden, D; Tarr, G E; Margoliash, E

    1978-12-25

    The amino acid sequences of chymotryptic and tryptic peptides of Hippopotamus amphibius cytochrome c were determined by a recent modification of the manual Edman sequential degradation procedure. They were ordered by comparison with the structure of the hog protein. The hippopotamus protein differs in three positions: serine, alanine, and glutamine replace alanine, glutamic acid, and lysine in positions 43, 92, and 100, respectively. Since the artiodactyl suborders diverged in the mid-Eocene some 50 million years ago, the fact that representatives of some of them show no differences in their cytochromes c (cow, sheep, and hog), while another exhibits as many as three such differences, verifies that even in relatively closely related lines of descent the rate at which cytochrome c changes in the course of evolution is not constant. Furthermore, 10.6% of the hippopotamus cytochrome c preparation was shown to contain isoleucine instead of valine at position 3, indicating that one of the four animals from which the protein was obtained was heterozygous in the cytochrome c gene. Such heterogeneity is a necessary condition of evolutionary variation and has not been previously observed in the cytochrome c of a wild mammalian population.

  13. Gas-phase ion isomer analysis reveals the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-03-18

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values, which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M → (c)b) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored.

  14. The interplay of peptide sequence and local structure in TiO2 biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Choi, Noori; Tan, Lihan; Jang, Ji-ryang; Um, Yu Mi; Yoo, Pil J; Choe, Woo-Seok

    2012-10-01

    Using cyclic constrained TiO(2) binding peptides STB1 (CHKKPSKSC), RSTB1 (CHRRPSRSC) and linear peptide LSTB1 (AHKKPSKSA), it was shown that while affinity of the peptide to TiO(2) is essential to enable TiO(2) biomineralization, other factors such as biomineralization kinetics and peptide local structure need to be considered to predict biomineralization efficacy. Cyclic and linear TiO(2) binding peptides show significantly different biomineralization activities. Cyclic STB1 and RSTB1 could induce TiO(2) precipitation in the presence of titanium(IV)-bis-ammonium-lactato-dihydroxide (TiBALDH) precursor in water or tris buffer at pH 8. In contrast, linear LSTB1 was unable to mineralize TiO(2) under the same experimental conditions despite its high affinity to TiO(2) comparable with STB1 and/or RSTB1. LSTB1 being a flexible molecule could not render the stable condensation of TiBALDH precursor to form TiO(2) particles. However, in the presence of phosphate buffer ions, the structure of LSTB1 is stabilized, leading to efficient condensation of TiBALDH and TiO(2) particle formation. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated TiO(2) mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure, kinetics and the presence of mineralizing aider such as phosphate ions.

  15. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  16. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  17. Identification of protein N-termini in Cyanophora paradoxa cyanelles: transit peptide composition and sequence determinants for precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Helm, Stefan; Steiner, Jürgen M.; Baginsky, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and chloroplastida represent the three main evolutionary lineages that diverged from a common ancestor after primary endosymbiosis. Comparative analyses between members of these three lineages are a rich source of information on ancestral plastid features. We analyzed the composition and the cleavage site of cyanelle transit peptides from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa by terminal amine labeling of substrates (TAILS), and compared their characteristics to those of representatives of the chloroplastida. Our data show that transit peptide architecture is similar between members of these two lineages. This entails a comparable modular structure, an overrepresentation of serine or alanine and similarities in the amino acid composition around the processing peptidase cleavage site. The most distinctive difference is the overrepresentation of phenylalanine in the N-terminal 1–10 amino acids of cyanelle transit peptides. A quantitative proteome analysis with periplasm-free cyanelles identified 42 out of 262 proteins without the N-terminal phenylalanine, suggesting that the requirement for phenylalanine in the N-terminal region is not absolute. Proteins in this set are on average of low abundance, suggesting that either alternative import pathways are operating specifically for low abundance proteins or that the gene model annotation is incorrect for proteins with fewer EST sequences. We discuss these two possibilities and provide examples for both interpretations. PMID:26257763

  18. Information transfer from peptide nucleic acids to RNA by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are uncharged analogs of DNA and RNA in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is substituted by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. A PNA C10 oligomer has been shown to act as template for efficient formation of oligoguanylates from activated guanosine ribonucleotides. In a previous paper we used heterosequences of DNA as templates in sequence-dependent polymerization of PNA dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from PNA to RNA. We describe the reactions of activated mononucleotides on heterosequences of PNA. Adenylic, cytidylic and guanylic acids were incorporated into the products opposite their complement on PNA, although less efficiently than on DNA templates.

  19. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  20. Exploration of the arrest peptide sequence space reveals arrest-enhanced variants.

    PubMed

    Cymer, Florian; Hedman, Rickard; Ismail, Nurzian; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-04-17

    Translational arrest peptides (APs) are short stretches of polypeptides that induce translational stalling when synthesized on a ribosome. Mechanical pulling forces acting on the nascent chain can weaken or even abolish stalling. APs can therefore be used as in vivo force sensors, making it possible to measure the forces that act on a nascent chain during translation with single-residue resolution. It is also possible to score the relative strengths of APs by subjecting them to a given pulling force and ranking them according to stalling efficiency. Using the latter approach, we now report an extensive mutagenesis scan of a strong mutant variant of the Mannheimia succiniciproducens SecM AP and identify mutations that further increase the stalling efficiency. Combining three such mutations, we designed an AP that withstands the strongest pulling force we are able to generate at present. We further show that diproline stretches in a nascent protein act as very strong APs when translation is carried out in the absence of elongation factor P. Our findings highlight critical residues in APs, show that certain amino acid sequences induce very strong translational arrest and provide a toolbox of APs of varying strengths that can be used for in vivo force measurements.

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor. PMID:24338313

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor.

  3. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  4. Single sequence of a helix-loop peptide confers functional anticodon recognition on two tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Auld, D S; Schmimmel, P

    1996-01-01

    The specific aminoacylation of RNA oligonucleotides whose sequences are based on the acceptor stems of tRNAs can be viewed as an operational RNA code for amino acids that may be related to the development of the genetic code. Many synthetases also have direct interactions with tRNA anticodon triplets and, in some cases, these interactions are thought to be essential for aminoacylation specificity. In these instances, an unresolved question is whether interactions with parts of the tRNA outside of the anticodon are sufficient for decoding genetic information. Escherichia coli isoleucyl- and methionyl-tRNA synthetases are closely related enzymes that interact with their respective anticodons. We used binary combinatorial mutagenesis of a 10 amino acid anticodon binding peptide in these two enzymes to identify composite sequences that would confer function to both enzymes despite their recognizing different anticodons. A single peptide was found that confers function to both enzymes in vivo and in vitro. Thus, even in enzymes where anticodon interactions are normally important for distinguishing one tRNA from another, these interactions can be 'neutralized' without losing specificity of amino-acylation. We suggest that acceptor helix interactions may play a role in providing the needed specificity. Images PMID:8605884

  5. Peptide nucleic acid probe detection of mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes associated with drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bockstahler, L E; Li, Z; Nguyen, N Y; Van Houten, K A; Brennan, M J; Langone, J J; Morris, S L

    2002-03-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a serious public health problem. Many of the specific gene mutations that cause drug resistance in M. tuberculosis are point mutations. We are developing a PCR-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based ELISA as a diagnostic method to recognize point mutations in genes associated with isoniazid and rifampin resistance in M. tuberculosis. Specific point mutation-containing sequences and wild-type sequences of cloned mycobacterial genes were PCR-amplified, denatured, and hybridized with PNA probes bound to microplate wells. Using 15-base PNA probes, we established the hybridization temperatures (50 degrees C-55 degrees C) and other experimental conditions suitable for detecting clinically relevant point mutations in the katG and rpoB genes. Hybridization of PCR-amplified sequences that contained these point mutations with complementary mutation-specific PNAs resulted in significant increases in ELISA response compared with hybridization using wild-type-specific PNAs. Conversely, PCR-amplified wild-type sequences hybridized much more efficiently with wild-type PNAs than with the mutation-specific PNAs. Using the M. tuberculosis cloned genes and PCR-PNA-ELISA format developed here, M. tuberculosis sequences containing point mutations associated with drug resistance can be identified in less than 24 h. PMID:11926172

  6. Biosynthesis of a D-amino acid in peptide linkage by an enzyme from frog skin secretions

    PubMed Central

    Jilek, Alexander; Mollay, Christa; Tippelt, Christa; Grassi, Jacques; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Müllegger, Johannes; Sander, Veronika; Fehrer, Christine; Barra, Donatella; Kreil, Günther

    2005-01-01

    d-amino acids are present in some peptides from amphibian skin. These residues are derived from the corresponding l-amino acids present in the respective precursors. From skin secretions of Bombinae, we have isolated an enzyme that catalyzes the isomerization of an l-Ile in position 2 of a model peptide to d-allo-Ile. In the course of this reaction, which proceeds without the addition of a cofactor, radioactivity from tritiated water is incorporated into the second position of the product. The amino acid sequence of this isomerase could be deduced from cloned cDNA and genomic DNA. After expression of this cDNA in oocytes of Xenopus laevis, isomerase activity could be detected. Polypeptides related to the frog skin enzyme are present in several vertebrate species, including humans. PMID:15758070

  7. Amino acid microsequencing of internal tryptic peptides of heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha subunit kinase: homology to protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J J; Pal, J K; Petryshyn, R; Kuo, I; Yang, J M; Throop, M S; Gehrke, L; London, I M

    1991-01-01

    We have purified the heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha subunit (eIF-2 alpha) kinase (HRI) from rabbit reticulocytes for amino acid microsequencing. This kinase is a single 92-kDa polypeptide and migrates in perfect alignment with 32P-labeled HRI on SDS/PAGE. Its functions of binding ATP and of autophosphorylation and eIF-2 alpha phosphorylation are inhibited by hemin. The amino acid sequences of three tryptic peptides of HRI have been obtained. A search of the data base of the National Biomedical Research Foundation reveals that these amino acid sequences are unique and that two of these three sequences show homology to protein kinases. HRI peptide P-52 contains Asp-Phe-Gly, which is the most highly conserved short stretch of amino acids in catalytic domain VII of protein kinases. HRI peptide P-74 contains the conserved amino acid residues Asp-(Met)-Tyr-Ser-(Val)-Gly-Val found in catalytic domain IX of protein kinases [Hanks, S. K., Quinn, A. M. & Hunter, T. (1988) Science 241, 42-52]. These findings are consistent with the autokinase and eIF-2 alpha kinase activities of HRI. Synthetic HRI peptide P-74 is a very potent inhibitor of eIF-2 alpha phosphorylation by HRI. Since little is known about the function of conserved domain IX, P-74 peptide may be useful in elucidating the role of this domain of protein kinases. Images PMID:1671169

  8. Accumulation of triosephosphate isomerase, with sequence homology to Beta amyloid peptides, in vessel walls of the newborn piglet hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Takashi; Ueno, Masaki; Miki, Takanori; Kanenishi, Kenji; Nagai, Yukiko; Huang, Cheng-Long; Okamoto, Yasuo; Ogawa, Takafumi; Onodera, Masayuki; Itoh, Susumu; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Sakamoto, Haruhiko

    2007-07-01

    We investigated whether beta-amyloid (Abeta)-like immunoreactivity was seen in the brains of newborn piglets. The immunoreactivity for Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40) proteins, but not Abeta precursor protein, was present in CD68-positive perivascular cells of the hippocampus and in parts of the meninges. It was colocalized with immunoreactivity for receptor for advanced glycation end product and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The protein with a molecular mass of 27 kDa, which was recognized by the Abeta antibodies, was identified as triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) with sequence homology to Abeta peptides by N-terminal amino acid sequencing, mass fingerprint analysis using matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, and Western blotting. Western blotting assay also revealed that detectable expression of Abeta proteins were not seen in the piglet brains. These findings indicate that TPI with sequence homology to Abeta peptides accumulates in perivascular cells of the microglia/macrophage lineage located around arterial vessels of the newborn piglet hippocampus.

  9. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of tryptophan in peptides of different length and sequence.

    PubMed

    Radotić, Ksenija; Melø, Thor Bernt; Leblanc, Roger M; Yousef, Yaser A; Naqvi, K Razi

    2016-04-01

    To interpret accurately protein fluorescence and phosphorescence, it is essential to achieve a better understanding of the luminescence properties of tryptophan (Trp, or W) in peptides. In published literature data on luminescence of peptides of varied length are scarce. This article describes studies of fluorescence and phosphorescence properties of the eight Trp-containing synthetic peptides: WAK, AWK, SWA, KYLWE, AVSWK, WVSWAK, WAKLAWE, and AVSWAKLARE. The aim was to investigate which factors influence the fluorescence yield and phosphorescence-spectra and lifetimes. Absorption spectra, room temperature fluorescence emission and corresponding excitation spectra and time-resolved phosphorescence spectra (77K) have been recorded; the dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield on the specific peptide and its variation with the wavelength of excitation has been studied. The changes in fluorescence yield and shape of phosphorescence spectra are explained in terms of internal electron and proton transfer. The structured phosphorescence spectrum originates from proton transfer occurring upon excitation of Trp, while electron transfer gives rise to a non-structured luminescence spectrum. There is also electron transfer from higher vibronic S1 states. In the peptides there is higher probability of electron transfer than in Trp alone. The obtained data are interpreted in light of the peptides' sequence, length and conformation.

  10. Oostatic peptides containing D-amino acids: synthesis, oostatic activity, degradation, accumulation in ovaries and NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hlaváček, Jan; Tykva, Richard; Holík, Josef; Bennettová, Blanka; Buděšínský, Miloš; Vlasáková, Věra; Cerný, Bohuslav; Slaninová, Jiřina

    2012-05-01

    Analogs of the H-Tyr-Asp-Pro-Ala-Pro-OH pentapeptide with D-amino acid residues either in differing or in all of the positions of the sequences were prepared and their oostatic potency was compared with that of the parent pentapeptide. The D-amino acid residue containing analogs exhibited an equal or even higher oostatic effect in the flesh fly Neobellieria bullata than the parent peptide. Contrary to the rapid incorporation of radioactivity from the labeled H-Tyr-Asp-[3H]Pro-Ala-Pro-OH pentapeptide into the ovaries of N. bullata in vitro, the radioactivity incorporation from the labeled pentapeptides with either D-aspartic acid or D-alanine was significantly delayed. As compared to the parent pentapeptide, also the degradation of both the D-amino acid-containing analogs mentioned above proceeded at a significantly lower rate. The decreased intake of radioactivity, the lower degradation and finally also the high oostatic effect may be ascribed to the decreased enzymatic degradation of the peptide bonds neighboring the D-amino acid residues in the corresponding peptides. The introduction of the non-coded D: -amino acids thus enhances the oostatic effect in N. bullata owing to the prolonged half-life of the corresponding pentapeptides, which can thus affect more ovarian cells.

  11. The Periplasmic Bacterial Molecular Chaperone SurA Adapts Its Structure to Bind Peptides in Different Conformations to Assert a Sequence Preference for Aromatic Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Wang, S.; Hu, Y.-X.; McKay, D.B.

    2009-06-04

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone protein SurA facilitates correct folding and maturation of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. It preferentially binds peptides that have a high fraction of aromatic amino acids. Phage display selections, isothermal titration calorimetry and crystallographic structure determination have been used to elucidate the basis of the binding specificity. The peptide recognition is imparted by the first peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) domain of SurA. Crystal structures of complexes between peptides of sequence WEYIPNV and NFTLKFWDIFRK with the first PPIase domain of the Escherichia coli SurA protein at 1.3 A resolution, and of a complex between the dodecapeptide and a SurA fragment lacking the second PPIase domain at 3.4 A resolution, have been solved. SurA binds as a monomer to the heptapeptide in an extended conformation. It binds as a dimer to the dodecapeptide in an alpha-helical conformation, predicated on a substantial structural rearrangement of the SurA protein. In both cases, side-chains of aromatic residues of the peptides contribute a large fraction of the binding interactions. SurA therefore asserts a recognition preference for aromatic amino acids in a variety of sequence configurations by adopting alternative tertiary and quaternary structures to bind peptides in different conformations.

  12. Synthesis and structural characterization of amino acid and peptide derivatives featuring N-( p-bromobenzoyl) substituents as promising connection unit for bio-inspired hybrid compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eißmann, Frank; Weber, Edwin

    2011-05-01

    Using a sequence of activation, blocking and peptide coupling procedures, a series of ten amino acid and peptide derivatives 1- 6 ( a, b, respectively) featuring a p-bromobenzoyl substituent attached to the amino group of the parent compound has been synthesized. X-ray crystal structures of two corresponding amino acid ( 1a, 1b), two amino acid ester ( 3a, 3b) and three peptide ester derivatives ( 4a, 4b, 5b) are reported, with the amide and peptide bonds of the molecules all being planar and trans configurated. Intramolecular interactions dominating the packing motifs and thus giving rise to the formation of strands ( 1a, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b), molecular pairs ( 1b) or sheets ( 5b) derive from N-H⋯O contacts, being further assisted by O-H⋯O and weaker C-H⋯O interactions, while bromo involved contacts are of minor importance.

  13. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  14. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, R J; Pittman, D D; Toole, J J; Kriz, R W; Aldape, R A; Hewick, R M; Kaufman, R J; Mann, K G

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approximately equal to 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approximately 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approximately 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues. Images PMID:3110773

  15. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  16. Bioplex technology: novel synthetic gene delivery pharmaceutical based on peptides anchored to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Svahn, Mathias G; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Lundin, Karin E; Smith, C I E

    2005-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery is an important approach in order to establish safe in vivo gene therapy in the clinic. Although viral vectors currently exhibit superior gene transfer efficacy, the safety aspect of viral gene delivery is a concern. In order to improve non-viral in vivo gene delivery we have designed a pharmaceutical platform called Bioplex (biological complex). The concept of Bioplex is to link functional entities via hybridising anchors, such as Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA), directly to naked DNA. In order to promote delivery functional entities consisting of biologically active peptides or carbohydrates, are linked to the PNA anchor. The PNA acts as genetic glue and hybridises with DNA in a sequence specific manner. By using functional entities, which elicit receptor-mediated endocytosis, improved endosomal escape and enhance nuclear entry we wish to improve the transfer of genetic material into the cell. An important aspect is that the functional entities should also have tissue-targeting properties in vivo. Examples of functional entities investigated to date are the Simian virus 40 nuclear localisation signal to improve nuclear uptake and different carbohydrate ligands in order to achieve receptor specific uptake. The delivery system is also endowed with regulatory capability, since the release of functional entities can be controlled. The aim is to create a safe, pharmaceutically defined and stable delivery system for nucleic acids with enhanced transfection properties that can be used in the clinic.

  17. In situ synthesis of peptide nucleic acids in porous silicon for drug delivery and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Mares, Jeremy W; Swartz, Caleb M; Zhao, Yiliang; Weiss, Sharon M; Duvall, Craig L

    2014-07-16

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are a unique class of synthetic molecules that have a peptide backbone and can hybridize with nucleic acids. Here, a versatile method has been developed for the automated, in situ synthesis of PNA from a porous silicon (PSi) substrate for applications in gene therapy and biosensing. Nondestructive optical measurements were performed to monitor single base additions of PNA initiated from (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane attached to the surface of PSi films, and mass spectrometry was conducted to verify synthesis of the desired sequence. Comparison of in situ synthesis to postsynthesis surface conjugation of the full PNA molecules showed that surface mediated, in situ PNA synthesis increased loading 8-fold. For therapeutic proof-of-concept, controlled PNA release from PSi films was characterized in phosphate buffered saline, and PSi nanoparticles fabricated from PSi films containing in situ grown PNA complementary to micro-RNA (miR) 122 generated significant anti-miR activity in a Huh7 psiCHECK-miR122 cell line. The applicability of this platform for biosensing was also demonstrated using optical measurements that indicated selective hybridization of complementary DNA target molecules to PNA synthesized in situ on PSi films. These collective data confirm that we have established a novel PNA-PSi platform with broad utility in drug delivery and biosensing.

  18. The value of short amino acid sequence matches for prediction of protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Silvanovich, Andre; Nemeth, Margaret A; Song, Ping; Herman, Rod; Tagliani, Laura; Bannon, Gary A

    2006-03-01

    Typically, genetically engineered crops contain traits encoded by one or a few newly expressed proteins. The allergenicity assessment of newly expressed proteins is an important component in the safety evaluation of genetically engineered plants. One aspect of this assessment involves sequence searches that compare the amino acid sequence of the protein to all known allergens. Analyses are performed to determine the potential for immunologically based cross-reactivity where IgE directed against a known allergen could bind to the protein and elicit a clinical reaction in sensitized individuals. Bioinformatic searches are designed to detect global sequence similarity and short contiguous amino acid sequence identity. It has been suggested that potential allergen cross-reactivity may be predicted by identifying matches as short as six to eight contiguous amino acids between the protein of interest and a known allergen. A series of analyses were performed, and match probabilities were calculated for different size peptides to determine if there was a scientifically justified search window size that identified allergen sequence characteristics. Four probability modeling methods were tested: (1) a mock protein and a mock allergen database, (2) a mock protein and genuine allergen database, (3) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database, and (4) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database combined with a correction for repeating peptides. These analyses indicated that searches for short amino acid sequence matches of eight amino acids or fewer to identify proteins as potential cross-reactive allergens is a product of chance and adds little value to allergy assessments for newly expressed proteins.

  19. Inhibition of pepsin by analogues of pepsinogen-(1-12)-peptide with substitutions in the 4-7 sequence region.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B M; Lewitt, M; Pham, C

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the 1-12 sequence of pig pepsinogen were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The three derivatives contain substitutions in the 4-7 region of the 1-12 sequence. Glycine was used to replace the hydrophobic residues -Val-Pro-Leu-Val- in pairs. After cleavage and purification, the synthetic peptides were compared with a synthetic peptide of the native sequence, prepared at the same time, with respect to their ability to inhibit the pepsin-catalysed clotting of milk. Inhibitory potency, determined from plots of percentage inhibition versus concentration of synthetic peptide, is inversely correlated with the substitution of glycine residues for the hydrophobic residues. Therefore the equilibrium inhibition of pepsin by these peptides is dominated by the hydrophobic nature of the 4-7 sequence region. PMID:6405735

  20. Sequence-specific formation of d-amino acids in a monoclonal antibody during light exposure.

    PubMed

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The photoirradiation of a monoclonal antibody 1 (mAb1) at λ = 254 nm and λmax = 305 nm resulted in the sequence-specific generation of d-Val, d-Tyr, and potentially d-Ala and d-Arg, in the heavy chain sequence [95-101] YCARVVY. d-Amino acid formation is most likely the product of reversible intermediary carbon-centered radical formation at the (α)C-positions of the respective amino acids ((α)C(•) radicals) through the action of Cys thiyl radicals (CysS(•)). The latter can be generated photochemically either through direct homolysis of cystine or through photoinduced electron transfer from Trp and/or Tyr residues. The potential of mAb1 sequences to undergo epimerization was first evaluated through covalent H/D exchange during photoirradiation in D2O, and proteolytic peptides exhibiting deuterium incorporation were monitored by HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Subsequently, mAb1 was photoirradiated in H2O, and peptides, for which deuterium incorporation in D2O had been documented, were purified by HPLC and subjected to hydrolysis and amino acid analysis. Importantly, not all peptide sequences which incorporated deuterium during photoirradiation in D2O also exhibited photoinduced d-amino acid formation. For example, the heavy chain sequence [12-18] VQPGGSL showed significant deuterium incorporation during photoirradiation in D2O, but no photoinduced formation of d-amino acids was detected. Instead this sequence contained ca. 22% d-Val in both a photoirradiated and a control sample. This observation could indicate that d-Val may have been generated either during production and/or storage or during sample preparation. While sample preparation did not lead to the formation of d-Val or other d-amino acids in the control sample for the heavy chain sequence [95-101] YCARVVY, we may have to consider that during hydrolysis N-terminal residues (such as in VQPGGSL) may be more prone to epimerization. We conclude that the photoinduced, radical-dependent formation of d-amino acids

  1. Sequence-specific DNA binding by glucocorticoid receptor "zinc finger peptides".

    PubMed

    Archer, T K; Hager, G L; Omichinski, J G

    1990-10-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can activate or repress transcription from responsive loci by binding to DNA. We have examined the mechanism of DNA binding by individually synthesizing the putative "zinc finger peptides" from the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Atomic absorption studies show that the peptides will bind zinc on an equimolar basis, and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate a significant alteration in secondary structure in the presence of zinc. The results from a series of experiments establish that metal ion is required for binding to DNA and that the amino-terminal zinc finger shows a significantly greater affinity for glucocorticoid response element-containing DNA over control DNA. These observations indicate that a single synthetic "zinc finger peptide" is able to bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. PMID:2120703

  2. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  3. End invasion of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) with mixed-base composition into linear DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Smolina, Irina V; Demidov, Vadim V; Soldatenkov, Viatcheslav A; Chasovskikh, Sergey G; Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D

    2005-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a synthetic DNA mimic with valuable properties and a rapidly growing scope of applications. With the exception of recently introduced pseudocomplementary PNAs, binding of common PNA oligomers to target sites located inside linear double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs) is essentially restricted to homopurine-homopyrimidine sequence motifs, which significantly hampers some of the PNA applications. Here, we suggest an approach to bypass this limitation of common PNAs. We demonstrate that PNA with mixed composition of ordinary nucleobases is capable of sequence-specific targeting of complementary dsDNA sites if they are located at the very termini of DNA duplex. We then show that such targeting makes it possible to perform capturing of designated dsDNA fragments via the DNA-bound biotinylated PNA as well as to signal the presence of a specific dsDNA sequence, in the case a PNA beacon is employed. We also examine the PNA-DNA conjugate and prove that it can initiate the primer-extension reaction starting from the duplex DNA termini when a DNA polymerase with the strand-displacement ability is used. We thus conclude that recognition of duplex DNA by mixed-base PNAs via the end invasion has a promising potential for site-specific and sequence-unrestricted DNA manipulation and detection.

  4. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  5. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  6. Hydration studies of electrospray ions from amino acids and small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong (Steve)

    This project was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the hydration behaviors of gas phase ions from solutions containing amino acids and peptides. In order to characterize their hydration behavior, the molecules of interest in solutions were first converted into gas phase ions by electrospray ionization (ESI). The completely desolvated ions were then deliberately dispersed into an inert bath gas, usually nitrogen, containing accurately known concentrations of solvent vapor. The resulting mixtures of ions and bath gas were subsequently passed into a vacuum chamber by way of an adiabatic supersonic free jet expansion. The cooling during that expansion caused solvation of the ions, the extent of which was determined by a quadrupole mass analyzer. Mass analysis of the solute ions in the absence of vapor showed peaks with the mass to charge ratios corresponding to the desolvated ions. On the other hand, mass spectrometric analyses of ions in the presence of solvent vapor showed sequences of peaks corresponding to the solvated ions with varying numbers of water molecules. The extent of the ion solvation was controlled by varying the concentration of solvent vapor in the bath gas. Two different scales were proposed for the evaluation of the relative affinities of amino acids for water molecules. One was based primarily on the assumption that the affinities of amino acids for water molecules are directly proportional to their gas phase solvation rate constants ( k). An alternative approach produced an affinity scale based on the extent of ion hydration occurred during the free jet expansion. It was found that the addition of a polar solvent vapor to the bath gas at low concentrations substantially enhanced the production of the bare solute ions from the evaporating charged droplets. This remarkable result not only provided a means to increase the ion production and thus detection sensitivity of mass spectrometric analyses, but also yielded important information

  7. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  8. Peptide immobilization onto radiation grafted PVDF-g-poly(acrylic acid) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clochard, M.-C.; Betz, N.; Goncalves, M.; Bittencourt, C.; Pireaux, J.-J.; Gionnet, K.; Déléris, G.; Moël, A. Le

    2005-07-01

    Introducing hydrophilic functions on poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) films surface allows the covalent immobilization of peptides. Therefore radiation grafting of acrylic acid (AA) in pre-irradiated PVDF films was achieved to allow surface functionalization with linear and cyclic peptides. Peptides were bound via spacer molecules using EDC as a coupling agent. The reactions were followed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode. The amount of immobilized peptides was determined by UV spectroscopy. As well, an uncommon method for PVDF characterization and reactions quantification was used: high-resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear mass spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR). Spacer saturation of the film surface corresponded to 25 mol% yield meaning that one spacer on 4 carboxylic acids was covalently bound. XPS experiments were also performed to deepen analysis of the surface composition. Peptide density is governed by steric hindrance. ELISA tests showed that the peptides' activity is maintained.

  9. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group.

  10. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group. PMID:1368578

  11. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA sequence encoding the precursor of a chlorotoxin-like peptide from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X C; Li, W X; Zhu, S Y; Peng, F; Zhu, Z H; Wu, K L; Yiang, F H

    2000-08-01

    A full-length cDNA sequence encoding the precursor of a venom peptide with homology to chlorotoxin (named BmKCT) was isolated from a cDNA library made from the venom glands of the Chinese Scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. The encoded precursor of BmKCT was 59 amino acid residues long including a signal peptide of 24 residues and a mature toxin of 35 residues with four disulfide bridges. The sequence of BmKCT is similar (68% identities) to that of chlorotoxin isolated from Leiurus quinguestriatus quinquestriatus. BmKCT is the first report of the cDNA sequences encoding four-disulfide-bridged short-chain toxins from Buthus martensuii Karsch so far.

  12. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  13. DNA detection using water-soluble conjugated polymers and peptide nucleic acid probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylord, Brent S.; Heeger, Alan J.; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2002-08-01

    The light-harvesting properties of cationic conjugated polymers are used to sensitize the emission of a dye on a specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence for the purpose of homogeneous, "real-time" DNA detection. Signal transduction is controlled by hybridization of the neutral PNA probe and the negative DNA target. Electrostatic interactions bring the hybrid complex and cationic polymer within distances required for Förster energy transfer. Conjugated polymer excitation provides fluorescein emission >25 times higher than that obtained by exciting the dye, allowing detection of target DNA at concentrations of 10 pM with a standard fluorometer. A simple and highly sensitive assay with optical amplification that uses the improved hybridization behavior of PNA/DNA complexes is thus demonstrated.

  14. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  15. Long-range heteronuclear spin locking (HSL) and its application to peptide sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokles, Maritherese; Hatvany, Gerard S.; Rinaldi, Peter L.

    In this paper, the utility of heteronuclear-spin-locking 2D NMR experiments for structure elucidation from long-range interactions is demonstrated. Long-range { 1H} 13C heteronuclear-shift-correlation spectra via spin locking provides peptide-sequencing information for gramicidin-S with considerably better sensitivity than was previously obtained with other long-range shift-correlation methods such as HOESY and COLOC.

  16. The world of beta- and gamma-peptides comprised of homologated proteinogenic amino acids and other components.

    PubMed

    Seebach, Dieter; Beck, Albert K; Bierbaum, Daniel J

    2004-08-01

    The origins of our nearly ten-year research program of chemical and biological investigations into peptides based on homologated proteinogenic amino acids are described. The road from the biopolymer poly[ethyl (R)-3-hydroxybutanoate] to the beta-peptides was primarily a step from organic synthesis methodology (the preparation of enantiomerically pure compounds (EPCs)) to supramolecular chemistry (higher-order structures maintained through non-covalent interactions). The performing of biochemical and biological tests on the beta- and gamma-peptides, which differ from natural peptides/proteins by a single or two additional CH(2) groups per amino acid, then led into bioorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry. The individual chapters of this review article begin with descriptions of work on beta-amino acids, beta-peptides, and polymers (Nylon-3) that dates back to the 1960s, even to the times of Emil Fischer, but did not yield insights into structures or biological properties. The numerous, often highly physiologically active, or even toxic, natural products containing beta- and gamma-amino acid moieties are then presented. Chapters on the preparation of homologated amino acids with proteinogenic side chains, their coupling to provide the corresponding peptides, both in solution (including thioligation) and on the solid phase, their isolation by preparative HPLC, and their characterization by mass spectrometry (HR-MS and MS sequencing) follow. After that, their structures, predominantly determined by NMR spectroscopy in methanolic solution, are described: helices, pleated sheets, and turns, together with stack-, crankshaft-, paddlewheel-, and staircase-like patterns. The presence of the additional C--C bonds in the backbones of the new peptides did not give rise to a chaotic increase in their secondary structures as many protein specialists might have expected: while there are indeed more structure types than are observed in the alpha-peptide realm - three different

  17. Self-assembling properties of all γ-cyclic peptides containing sugar amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Arcadio; Brea, Roberto J; Amorín, Manuel; Castedo, Luis; Granja, Juan R

    2012-11-28

    In this study, a novel dimer-forming cyclic peptide composed exclusively by cyclic γ-amino acids with a saccharide-like outer surface is described. The antiparallel β-sheet type hydrogen bonding interactions responsible for the large association constant in non-polar solvents constitute a suitable model for a novel class of self-assembling peptide nanotubes.

  18. Self-assembling properties of all γ-cyclic peptides containing sugar amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Arcadio; Brea, Roberto J; Amorín, Manuel; Castedo, Luis; Granja, Juan R

    2012-11-28

    In this study, a novel dimer-forming cyclic peptide composed exclusively by cyclic γ-amino acids with a saccharide-like outer surface is described. The antiparallel β-sheet type hydrogen bonding interactions responsible for the large association constant in non-polar solvents constitute a suitable model for a novel class of self-assembling peptide nanotubes. PMID:23060041

  19. CYCLONE—A Utility for De Novo Sequencing of Microbial Cyclic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavan, Daniel; Kuzma, Marek; Lemr, Karel; Schug, Kevin A.; Havlicek, Vladimir

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a de novo sequencing software tool (CYCLONE) and applied it for determination of cyclic peptides. The program uses a non-redundant database of 312 nonribosomal building blocks identified to date in bacteria and fungi (more than 230 additional residues in the database list were isobaric). The software was used to fully characterize the tandem mass spectrum of several cyclic peptides and provide sequence tags. The general strategy of the script was based on fragment ion pre-characterization to accomplish unambiguous b-ion series assignments. Showcase examples were a cyclic tetradepsipeptide beauverolide, a cyclic hexadepsipeptide roseotoxin A, a lasso-like hexapeptide pseudacyclin A, and a cyclic undecapeptide cyclosporin A. The extent of ion scrambling in smaller peptides was as low as 5 % of total ion current; this demonstrated the feasibility of CYCLONE de novo sequencing. The robustness of the script was also tested against database sets of various sizes and isotope-containing data. It can be downloaded from the http://ms.biomed.cas.cz/MSTools/.

  20. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    PubMed

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  1. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  2. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  3. Incorporation of extra amino acids in peptide recognition probe to improve specificity and selectivity of an electrochemical peptide-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Zaitouna, Anita J; Maben, Alex J; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2015-07-30

    We investigated the effect of incorporating extra amino acids (AA) at the n-terminus of the thiolated and methylene blue-modified peptide probe on both specificity and selectivity of an electrochemical peptide-based (E-PB) HIV sensor. The addition of a flexible (SG)3 hexapeptide is, in particular, useful in improving sensor selectivity, whereas the addition of a highly hydrophilic (EK)3 hexapeptide has shown to be effective in enhancing sensor specificity. Overall, both E-PB sensors fabricated using peptide probes with the added AA (SG-EAA and EK-EAA) showed better specificity and selectivity, especially when compared to the sensor fabricated using a peptide probe without the extra AA (EAA). For example, the selectivity factor recorded in the 50% saliva was ∼2.5 for the EAA sensor, whereas the selectivity factor was 7.8 for both the SG-EAA and EK-EAA sensors. Other sensor properties such as the limit of detection and dynamic range were minimally affected by the addition of the six AA sequence. The limit of detection was 0.5 nM for the EAA sensor and 1 nM for both SG-EAA and EK-EAA sensors. The saturation target concentration was ∼200 nM for all three sensors. Unlike previously reported E-PB HIV sensors, the peptide probe functions as both the recognition element and antifouling passivating agent; this modification eliminates the need to include an additional antifouling diluent, which simplifies the sensor design and fabrication protocol.

  4. Redesigning Channel-Forming Peptides: Amino Acid Substitutions that Enhance Rates of Supramolecular Self-Assembly and Raise Ion Transport Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shank, Lalida P.; Broughman, James R.; Takeguchi, Wade; Cook, Gabriel; Robbins, Ashley S.; Hahn, Lindsey; Radke, Gary; Iwamoto, Takeo; Schultz, Bruce D.; Tomich, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Three series of 22-residue peptides derived from the transmembrane M2 segment of the glycine receptor α1-subunit (M2GlyR) have been designed, synthesized, and tested to determine the plasticity of a channel-forming sequence and to define whether channel pores with enhanced conductive properties could be created. Sixteen sequences were examined for aqueous solubility, solution-association tendency, secondary structure, and half-maximal concentration for supramolecular assembly, channel activity, and ion transport properties across epithelial monolayers. All peptides interact strongly with membranes: associating with, inserting across, and assembling to form homooligomeric bundles when in micromolar concentrations. Single and double amino acid replacements involving arginine and/or aromatic amino acids within the final five C-terminal residues of the peptide cause dramatic effects on the concentration dependence, yielding a range of K1/2 values from 36 ± 5 to 390 ± 220 μM for transport activity. New water/lipid interfacial boundaries were established for the transmembrane segment using charged or aromatic amino acids, thus limiting the peptides' ability to move perpendicularly to the plane of the bilayer. Formation of discrete water/lipid interfacial boundaries appears to be necessary for efficient supramolecular assembly and high anion transport activity. A peptide sequence is identified that may show efficacy in channel replacement therapy for channelopathies such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:16387776

  5. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  6. Some properties and amino acid sequence of plastocyanin from a green alga, Ulva arasakii.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, F; Fukazawa, T; Mishina, Y; Sugimura, Y

    1989-08-01

    Plastocyanin was purified from a multicellular, marine green alga, Ulva arasakii, by conventional methods to homogeneity. The oxidized plastocyanin showed absorption maxima at 252, 276.8, 460, 595.3, and 775 nm, and shoulders at 259, 265, 269, and 282.5 nm; the ratio A276.8/A595.3 was 1.5. The midpoint redox potential was determined to be 0.356 V at pH 7.0 with a ferri- and ferrocyanide system. The molecular weight was estimated to be 10,200 and 11,000 by SDS-PAGE and by gel filtration, respectively. U. arasakii also has a small amount of cytochrome c6, like Enteromorpha prolifera. The amino acid sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin was determined by Edman degradation and by carboxypeptidase digestion of the plastocyanin, six tryptic peptides, and five staphylococcal protease peptides. The plastocyanin contained 98 amino acid residues, giving a molecular weight of 10,236 including one copper atom. The complete sequence is as follows: AQIVKLGGDDGALAFVPSKISVAAGEAIEFVNNAGFPHNIVFDEDAVPAGVDADAISYDDYLNSKGETV VRKLSTPGVY G VYCEPHAGAGMKMTITVQ. The sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin is closet to that of the E. prolifera protein (85% homology). A phylogenetic tree of five algal and two higher plant plastocyanins was constructed by comparing the amino acid differences. The branching order is considered to be as follows: a blue-green alga, unicellular green algae, multicellular green algae, and higher plants. PMID:2509442

  7. Complete amino acid sequence of chitinase-A from leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamagami, T; Tanigawa, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1998-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed leaf chitinase-A was determined. First all 11 tryptic peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated form of the enzyme were sequenced. Then the same form of the enzyme was cleaved with cyanogen bromide, giving three fragments. The fragments were digested with chymotrypsin or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. Last, the 11 tryptic peptides were put in order. Of seven cysteine residues, six were linked by disulfide bonds (between Cys25 and Cys74, Cys89 and Cys98, and Cys195 and Cys208); Cys176 was free. The enzyme consisted of 208 amino acid residues and had a molecular weight of 22,391. It consisted of only one polypeptide chain without a chitin-binding domain. The length of the chain was almost the same as that of the catalytic domains of class IL chitinases. These findings suggested that this enzyme is a new kind of class IIL chitinase, although its sequence resembles that of catalytic domains of class IL chitinases more than that of the class IIL chitinases reported so far. Discussion on the involvement of specific tryptophan residue in the active site of PLC-A is also given based on the sequence similarity with rye seed chitinase-c.

  8. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  9. Probability-Based Pattern Recognition and Statistical Framework for Randomization: Modeling Tandem Mass Spectrum/Peptide Sequence False Match Frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimating and controlling the frequency of false matches between a peptide tandem mass spectrum and candidate peptide sequences is an issue pervading proteomics research. To solve this problem, we designed an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm for detecting patterns with various lengths fr...

  10. Tetrazine-Containing Amino Acid for Peptide Modification and Live Cell Labeling.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Lanxia; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Shouliang

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino acid derivative 3-(4-(1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine-3-yl) phenyl)-2-aminopropanoic acid was synthesized in this study. The compound possessed better water-solubility and was synthesized more easily compared with the well-known and commercially available 3-(p-benzylamino)-1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine. Tetrazine-containing amino acid showed excellent stability in biological media and might be used for cancer cell labeling. Moreover, the compound remained relatively stable in 50% TFA/DCM with little decomposition after prolonged exposure at room temperature. The compound could be utilized as phenylalanine or tyrosine analogue in peptide modification, and the tetrazine-containing peptide demonstrated more significant biological activity than that of the parent peptide. The combination of tetrazine group and amino acid offered broad development prospects of the bioorthogonal labeling and peptide synthesis.

  11. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  12. Tetrazine-Containing Amino Acid for Peptide Modification and Live Cell Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Lanxia; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Shouliang

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino acid derivative 3-(4-(1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine-3-yl) phenyl)-2-aminopropanoic acid was synthesized in this study. The compound possessed better water-solubility and was synthesized more easily compared with the well-known and commercially available 3-(p-benzylamino)-1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine. Tetrazine-containing amino acid showed excellent stability in biological media and might be used for cancer cell labeling. Moreover, the compound remained relatively stable in 50% TFA/DCM with little decomposition after prolonged exposure at room temperature. The compound could be utilized as phenylalanine or tyrosine analogue in peptide modification, and the tetrazine-containing peptide demonstrated more significant biological activity than that of the parent peptide. The combination of tetrazine group and amino acid offered broad development prospects of the bioorthogonal labeling and peptide synthesis. PMID:26536589

  13. Peptide nucleic acids inhibit growth of Brucella suis in pure culture and in infected murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Alexander, Jeffry C.; Seleem, Mohamed N.; Jain, Neeta; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Wattam, Alice R.; Setubal, João C.; Boyle, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are single-stranded, synthetic nucleic acid analogues containing a pseudopeptide backbone in place of the phosphodiester sugar–phosphate. When PNAs are covalently linked to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) they readily penetrate the bacterial cell envelope, inhibit expression of targeted genes and cause growth inhibition both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. However, the effectiveness of PNAs against Brucella, a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, was unknown. The susceptibility of a virulent Brucella suis strain to a variety of PNAs was assessed in pure culture as well as in murine macrophages. The studies showed that some of the PNAs targeted to Brucella genes involved in DNA (polA, dnaG, gyrA), RNA (rpoB), cell envelope (asd), fatty acid (kdtA, acpP) and protein (tsf) synthesis inhibit the growth of B. suis in culture and in macrophages after 24 h of treatment. PNA treatment inhibited Brucella growth by interfering with gene expression in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner at micromolar concentrations. The most effective PNA in broth culture was that targeting polA at ca. 12 μM. In contrast, in B. suis-infected macrophages, the most effective PNAs were those targeting asd and dnaG at 30 μM; both of these PNAs had little inhibitory effect on Brucella in broth culture. The polA PNA that inhibits wild-type B. suis also inhibits the growth of wild-type Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308 in culture. This study reveals the potential usefulness of antisense PNA constructs as novel therapeutic agents against intracellular Brucella. PMID:23305655

  14. cDNA sequence and expression analysis of an antimicrobial peptide, theromacin, in the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiaoqing; Wang, Gailing; Yuan, Hanwen; Chai, Yi; Xiao, Zhili

    2010-09-01

    Bivalve molluscs rely on the interaction between cellular and humoral factors for protection against potential pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proven to be one of the most important humoral components that afford resistance to pathogen infection. The AMP gene to be identified was that encoding theromacin in the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii (Hc theromacin); this gene was identified from a suppression subtractive hybridization library, and subsequently cloned by 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). The full-length theromacin cDNA contains 547 bp, with a 294-bp open reading frame that encodes a 97-amino acid peptide, and the deduced peptide sequence contains a 61-amino acid putative mature peptide. The sequence also contains 10 cysteine residues. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis showed that Hc theromacin transcripts were constitutively expressed in the liver, foot, gill, adductor muscle, heart, mantle, intestine, and hemocytes, with the highest level in hemocytes. Theromacin mRNA levels were found to increase after challenge with gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. After injection of the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, Hc theromacin expression showed the highest fold-change at 48 and 36 h after infection, respectively, and its levels decreased gradually thereafter. PMID:20639135

  15. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  16. Application of Peptide Nucleic Acid-based Assays Toward Detection of Somatic Mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Hong, Christopher S; Yang, Chunzhang; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2016-04-26

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with many applications. Compared with DNA, PNAs bind their complementary DNA strand with higher specificity and strength, an attribute that can make it an effective polymerase chain reaction clamp. A growing body of work has demonstrated the utility of PNAs in detecting low levels of mutant DNA, particularly in the detection of circulating mutated tumor cells in the peripheral blood. The PNA-based assay has greater sensitivity than direct sequencing and is significantly more affordable and rapid than next-generation deep sequencing. We have previously demonstrated that PNAs can successfully detect somatic mosaicism in patients with suspected disease phenotypes. In this report, we detail our methodology behind PNA design and application. We describe our protocol for optimizing the PNA for sequencing use and for determining the sensitivity of the PNA-based assay. Lastly, we discuss the potential applications of our assay for future laboratory and clinical purposes and highlight the role of PNAs in the detection of somatic mosaicism.

  17. Application of Peptide Nucleic Acid-based Assays Toward Detection of Somatic Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Christopher S; Yang, Chunzhang; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with many applications. Compared with DNA, PNAs bind their complementary DNA strand with higher specificity and strength, an attribute that can make it an effective polymerase chain reaction clamp. A growing body of work has demonstrated the utility of PNAs in detecting low levels of mutant DNA, particularly in the detection of circulating mutated tumor cells in the peripheral blood. The PNA-based assay has greater sensitivity than direct sequencing and is significantly more affordable and rapid than next-generation deep sequencing. We have previously demonstrated that PNAs can successfully detect somatic mosaicism in patients with suspected disease phenotypes. In this report, we detail our methodology behind PNA design and application. We describe our protocol for optimizing the PNA for sequencing use and for determining the sensitivity of the PNA-based assay. Lastly, we discuss the potential applications of our assay for future laboratory and clinical purposes and highlight the role of PNAs in the detection of somatic mosaicism. PMID:27115839

  18. Purification and N-terminal partial sequence of anti-epilepsy peptide from venom of the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X H; Yang, D; Zhang, J H; Liu, C M; Lei, K J

    1989-01-01

    An anti-epilepsy peptide (AEP) was isolated and purified from venom of the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. The purification procedure included CM-Sephadex C-50 chromatography, gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and DEAE-Sephadex A-50 chromatography. Its homogeneity was demonstrated by pH 4.3 polyacrylamide-disc-gel electrophoresis, focusing electrophoresis and SDS/polyacrylamide-disc-gel electrophoresis. The Mr of this peptide, calculated from measurements in SDS/15%-polyacrylamide-disc-gel and SDS/20%-polyacrylamide-disc-gel electrophoresis, is 8300. The isoelectric point is 8.52 by pH 8-9.5-range isoelectric focusing. No haemorrhagic or toxic activities were found. No toxicity was found even after the dose reached 28 mg/kg. The pharmacological tests showed that the AEP had no effect on heart rate, blood pressure or electrocardiogram, but strongly inhibited epilepsy induced by coriaria lactone and cephaloridine. The fluorescence spectrum showed that the peptide has a strong emission peak at 337 nm. Amino acid analysis suggested that the AEP is composed of 66 residues from 18 amino acids and has an Mr of 8290. The sequence of the first 50 N-terminal residues is as follows: Asp-Gly-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Gly-Ser-Asp-Asn-Cys-Lys-Val-Ser-Cys-Leu-Leu-Gly-Asn- Glu-Gly - Cys-Asn-Lys-Glu-Cys-Arg-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Ala-Ser-Tyr-Gly-Tyr-Cys-Trp-Thr-Val- Lys-Leu - Ala-Gln-Asp-Cys-Glu-Gly-Leu-Pro-Asp-Thr-. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2930463

  19. Partial amino acid sequences around sulfhydryl groups of soybean beta-amylase.

    PubMed

    Nomura, K; Mikami, B; Morita, Y

    1987-08-01

    Sulfhydryl (SH) groups of soybean beta-amylase were modified with 5-(iodoaceto-amidoethyl)aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (IAEDANS) and the SH-containing peptides exhibiting fluorescence were purified after chymotryptic digestion of the modified enzyme. The sequence analysis of the peptides derived from the modification of all SH groups in the denatured enzyme revealed the existence of six SH groups, in contrast to five reported previously. One of them was found to have extremely low reactivity toward SH-reagents without reduction. In the native state, IAEDANS reacted with 2 mol of SH groups per mol of the enzyme (SH1 and SH2) accompanied with inactivation of the enzyme owing to the modification of SH2 located near the active site of this enzyme. The selective modification of SH2 with IAEDANS was attained after the blocking of SH1 with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). The amino acid sequences of the peptides containing SH1 and SH2 were determined to be Cys-Ala-Asn-Pro-Gln and His-Gln-Cys-Gly-Gly-Asn-Val-Gly-Asp-Ile-Val-Asn-Ile-Pro-Ile-Pro-Gln-Trp, respectively.

  20. Anti-biofilm activity of ultrashort cinnamic acid peptide derivatives against medical device-related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Garry; McCloskey, Alice P; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-10-01

    The threat of antimicrobial resistance has placed increasing emphasis on the development of innovative approaches to eradicate multidrug-resistant pathogens. Biofilm-forming microorganisms, for example, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, are responsible for increased incidence of biomaterial infection, extended hospital stays and patient morbidity and mortality. This paper highlights the potential of ultrashort tetra-peptide conjugated to hydrophobic cinnamic acid derivatives. These peptidomimetic molecules demonstrate selective and highly potent activity against resistant biofilm forms of Gram-positive medical device-related pathogens. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)propionic)-Orn-Orn-Trp-Trp-NH2 displays particular promise with minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 125 µg/ml against methicillin sensitive (ATCC 29213) and resistant (ATCC 43300) S. aureus and activity shown against biofilm forms of Escherichia coli (MBEC: 1000 µg/ml). Kill kinetics confirms complete eradication of established 24-h biofilms at MBEC with 6-h exposure. Reduced cell cytotoxicity, relative to Gram-positive pathogens, was proven via tissue culture (HaCaT) and haemolysis assays (equine erythrocytes). Existing in nature as part of the immune response, antimicrobial peptides display great promise for exploitation by the pharmaceutical industry in order to increase the library of available therapeutic molecules. Ultrashort variants are particularly promising for translation as clinical therapeutics as they are more cost-effective, easier to synthesise and can be tailored to specific functional requirements based on the primary sequence allowing factors such as spectrum of activity to be varied.

  1. Anti-biofilm activity of ultrashort cinnamic acid peptide derivatives against medical device-related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Garry; McCloskey, Alice P; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-10-01

    The threat of antimicrobial resistance has placed increasing emphasis on the development of innovative approaches to eradicate multidrug-resistant pathogens. Biofilm-forming microorganisms, for example, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, are responsible for increased incidence of biomaterial infection, extended hospital stays and patient morbidity and mortality. This paper highlights the potential of ultrashort tetra-peptide conjugated to hydrophobic cinnamic acid derivatives. These peptidomimetic molecules demonstrate selective and highly potent activity against resistant biofilm forms of Gram-positive medical device-related pathogens. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)propionic)-Orn-Orn-Trp-Trp-NH2 displays particular promise with minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 125 µg/ml against methicillin sensitive (ATCC 29213) and resistant (ATCC 43300) S. aureus and activity shown against biofilm forms of Escherichia coli (MBEC: 1000 µg/ml). Kill kinetics confirms complete eradication of established 24-h biofilms at MBEC with 6-h exposure. Reduced cell cytotoxicity, relative to Gram-positive pathogens, was proven via tissue culture (HaCaT) and haemolysis assays (equine erythrocytes). Existing in nature as part of the immune response, antimicrobial peptides display great promise for exploitation by the pharmaceutical industry in order to increase the library of available therapeutic molecules. Ultrashort variants are particularly promising for translation as clinical therapeutics as they are more cost-effective, easier to synthesise and can be tailored to specific functional requirements based on the primary sequence allowing factors such as spectrum of activity to be varied. PMID:26310860

  2. Cloning of a crustin-like, single whey-acidic-domain, antibacterial peptide from the haemocytes of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, and its response to infection with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hauton, C; Brockton, V; Smith, V J

    2006-03-01

    Degenerate PCR was used to isolate a 221-base pair nucleotide sequence of a new crustin-like antibacterial peptide from the haemocytes of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to extend the sequence to determine the complete open reading frame and un-translated regions. The inferred amino acid sequence of this peptide was found to be similar to crustin-like peptides isolated for several species of shrimp as well as the shore crab, Carcinus maenas. The sequence also contains a single-whey-acidic protein (WAP) domain, similar to novel antibacterial single-whey-acidic domain (SWD) peptides that have been recently described in the tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, and the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Real-time PCR was used to analyse the expression of the gene coding for this peptide. The gene is up regulated after inoculation with the Gram-positive lobster pathogen Aerococcus viridans var. homari but down regulated after inoculation with the Gram-negative bacteria Listonella anguillarum. Phylogenetic analysis of this new peptide shows that it is most related to other antimicrobial crustin peptides and that the crustins are only distantly related to the antibacterial SWD peptides recently described. PMID:16144710

  3. Identification of Distant Agouti-Like Sequences and Re-Evaluation of the Evolutionary History of the Agouti-Related Peptide (AgRP)

    PubMed Central

    Västermark, Åke; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Houle, Michael E.; Fredriksson, Robert; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2012-01-01

    The Agouti-like peptides including AgRP, ASIP and the teleost-specific A2 (ASIP2 and AgRP2) peptides have potent and diverse functional roles in feeding, pigmentation and background adaptation mechanisms. There are contradictory theories about the evolution of the Agouti-like peptide family as well the nomenclature. Here we performed comprehensive mining and annotation of vertebrate Agouti-like sequences. We identified A2 sequences from salmon, trout, seabass, cod, cichlid, tilapia, gilt-headed sea bream, Antarctic toothfish, rainbow smelt, common carp, channel catfish and interestingly also in lobe-finned fish. Moreover, we surprisingly found eight novel homologues from the kingdom of arthropods and three from fungi, some sharing the characteristic C-x(6)-C-C motif which are present in the Agouti-like sequences, as well as approximate sequence length (130 amino acids), positioning of the motif sequence and sharing of exon-intron structures that are similar to the other Agouti-like peptides providing further support for the common origin of these sequences. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the AgRP sequences cluster basally in the tree, suggesting that these sequences split from a cluster containing both the ASIP and the A2 sequences. We also used a novel approach to determine the statistical evidence for synteny, a sinusoidal Hough transform pattern recognition technique. Our analysis shows that the teleost AgRP2 resides in a chromosomal region that has synteny with Hsa 8, but we found no convincing synteny between the regions that A2, AgRP and ASIP reside in, which would support that the Agouti-like peptides were formed by whole genome tetraplodization events. Here we suggest that the Agouti-like peptide genes were formed through classical subsequent gene duplications where the AgRP is the most distantly related to the three other members of that group, first splitting from a common ancestor to ASIP and A2, and then later the A2 split from ASIP followed by a

  4. PHASTpep: Analysis Software for Discovery of Cell-Selective Peptides via Phage Display and Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Siva Sai Krishna; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enhanced the phage display process, allowing for the quantification of millions of sequences resulting from the biopanning process. In response, many valuable analysis programs focused on specificity and finding targeted motifs or consensus sequences were developed. For targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging, it is also necessary to find peptides that are selective—targeting only the cell type or tissue of interest. We present a new analysis strategy and accompanying software, PHage Analysis for Selective Targeted PEPtides (PHASTpep), which identifies highly specific and selective peptides. Using this process, we discovered and validated, both in vitro and in vivo in mice, two sequences (HTTIPKV and APPIMSV) targeted to pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts that escaped identification using previously existing software. Our selectivity analysis makes it possible to discover peptides that target a specific cell type and avoid other cell types, enhancing clinical translatability by circumventing complications with systemic use. PMID:27186887

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of the myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani.

    PubMed

    Jones, B N; Wang, C C; Dwulet, F E; Lehman, L D; Meuth, J L; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1979-04-25

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani, was determined by the automated Edman degradation of several large peptides obtained by specific cleavage of the protein. The acetimidated apomyoglobin was selectively cleaved at its two methionyl residues with cyanogen bromide and at its three arginyl residues by trypsin. By subjecting four of these peptides and the apomyoglobin to automated Edman degradation, over 80% of the primary structure of the protein was obtained. The remainder of the covalent structure was determined by the sequence analysis of peptides that resulted from further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide fragment. This fragment was cleaved at its glutamyl residues with staphylococcal protease and its lysyl residues with trypsin. The action of trypsin was restricted to the lysyl residues by chemical modification of the single arginyl residue of the fragment with 1,2-cyclohexanedione. The primary structure of this myoglobin proved to be identical with that from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin and Pacific common dolphin but differs from the myoglobins of the killer whale and pilot whale at two positions. The above sequence identities and differences reflect the close taxonomic relationship of these five species of Cetacea. PMID:454657

  6. Sequence Motifs in Transit Peptides Act as Independent Functional Units and Can Be Transferred to New Sequence Contexts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Woo, Seungjin; Geem, Kyoung Rok; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-09-01

    A large number of nuclear-encoded proteins are imported into chloroplasts after they are translated in the cytosol. Import is mediated by transit peptides (TPs) at the N termini of these proteins. TPs contain many small motifs, each of which is critical for a specific step in the process of chloroplast protein import; however, it remains unknown how these motifs are organized to give rise to TPs with diverse sequences. In this study, we generated various hybrid TPs by swapping domains between Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) and chlorophyll a/b-binding protein, which have highly divergent sequences, and examined the abilities of the resultant TPs to deliver proteins into chloroplasts. Subsequently, we compared the functionality of sequence motifs in the hybrid TPs with those of wild-type TPs. The sequence motifs in the hybrid TPs exhibited three different modes of functionality, depending on their domain composition, as follows: active in both wild-type and hybrid TPs, active in wild-type TPs but inactive in hybrid TPs, and inactive in wild-type TPs but active in hybrid TPs. Moreover, synthetic TPs, in which only three critical motifs from RbcS or chlorophyll a/b-binding protein TPs were incorporated into an unrelated sequence, were able to deliver clients to chloroplasts with a comparable efficiency to RbcS TP. Based on these results, we propose that diverse sequence motifs in TPs are independent functional units that interact with specific translocon components at various steps during protein import and can be transferred to new sequence contexts. PMID:26149569

  7. From Artificial Amino Acids to Sequence-Defined Targeted Oligoaminoamides.

    PubMed

    Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Lächelt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Artificial oligoamino acids with appropriate protecting groups can be used for the sequential assembly of oligoaminoamides on solid-phase. With the help of these oligoamino acids multifunctional nucleic acid (NA) carriers can be designed and produced in highly defined topologies. Here we describe the synthesis of the artificial oligoamino acid Fmoc-Stp(Boc3)-OH, the subsequent assembly into sequence-defined oligomers and the formulation of tumor-targeted plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes. PMID:27436323

  8. CycloPs: generating virtual libraries of cyclized and constrained peptides including nonnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; Verniere, Mélanie; Devocelle, Marc; Bernard, Elise; Shields, Denis C; Chubb, Anthony J

    2011-04-25

    We introduce CycloPs, software for the generation of virtual libraries of constrained peptides including natural and nonnatural commercially available amino acids. The software is written in the cross-platform Python programming language, and features include generating virtual libraries in one-dimensional SMILES and three-dimensional SDF formats, suitable for virtual screening. The stand-alone software is capable of filtering the virtual libraries using empirical measurements, including peptide synthesizability by standard peptide synthesis techniques, stability, and the druglike properties of the peptide. The software and accompanying Web interface is designed to enable the rapid generation of large, structurally diverse, synthesizable virtual libraries of constrained peptides quickly and conveniently, for use in virtual screening experiments. The stand-alone software, and the Web interface for evaluating these empirical properties of a single peptide, are available at http://bioware.ucd.ie .

  9. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature’s most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  10. Rapid complexing of oxoacylglycerols with amino acids, peptides and aminophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kurvinen, J P; Kuksis, A; Ravandi, A; Sjövall, O; Kallio, H

    1999-03-01

    We prepared model Schiff bases from 2-[9-oxo]nonanoyl glycerol (2-MAG-ALD) and various amino compounds. 2-MAG-ALD was obtained by pancreatic lipase hydrolysis of trioleoyl glycerol and reductive ozonolysis of the resulting 2-monooleoyl glycerol. The reaction products were purified by thin-layer chromatography. Schiff bases were synthesized in greater than 50% yield by reacting 2-MAG-ALD with twofold molar excess of valine, Nalpha-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester and the tripeptides glycyl-glycyl-glycine, glycyl-glycyl-histidine, and glycyl-histidyl-lysine in aqueous methanol and with 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl glycerophosphoethanolamine (PE) in chloroform/methanol for 16 h at room temperature. Prior to analysis the bases were reduced with sodium cyanoborohydride in methanol for 30 min at 4 degrees C. Reaction products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI/MS). Reduced Schiff bases of 2-MAG-ALD with PE and amino acids were analyzed by normal-phase HPLC/ESI/MS and those with peptides by reversed-phase HPLC/ESI/MS. Single adducts were obtained in all cases and both the alpha-amino group of valine and the epsilon-amino group of Nalpha-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester were reactive. Molecular ions of reaction products were the only detected ions in the negative ionization mode, whereas in the positive ion mode sodiated molecular ions were also detected. The present study suggests that 2-MAG-ALD may form Schiff base adducts with amino compounds in other aqueous media, such as the intestinal lumen and in the hydrophobic environment of cell membranes. PMID:10230725

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the goose-beaked whale, Ziphius cavirostris.

    PubMed

    Lehman, L D; Jones, B N; Dwulet, F E; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1980-10-21

    The complete primary structure of the major component myoglobin from the goose-beaked whale, Ziphius cavirostris, was determined by specific cleavage of the protein to obtain large peptides which are readily degraded by the automatic sequencer. Over 80% of the amino acid sequence was established from the three peptides resulting from the cleavage of the apomyoglobin at its two methionine residues with cyanogen bromide along with the four peptides resulting from the cleavage with trypsin of the citraconylated apomyoglobin at its three arginine residues. Further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide peptide with S. aureus strain V8 protease and the 1,2-cyclohexanedione-treated central cyanogen bromide peptide with trypsin enabled the determination of the remainder of the covalent structure. This myoglobin differs from the cetacean myoglobins determined to date at 12 to 17 positions. These large sequence differences reflect the distant taxonomic relationships between the goose-beaked whale and the other species of Cetacea the myoglobin sequences of which have previously been determined.

  12. Predicting most probable conformations of a given peptide sequence in the random coil state.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Cigdem Sevim; Erman, Burak

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we present a computational scheme for finding high probability conformations of peptides. The scheme calculates the probability of a given conformation of the given peptide sequence using the probability distribution of torsion states. Dependence of the states of a residue on the states of its first neighbors along the chain is considered. Prior probabilities of torsion states are obtained from a coil library. Posterior probabilities are calculated by the matrix multiplication Rotational Isomeric States Model of polymer theory. The conformation of a peptide with highest probability is determined by using a hidden Markov model Viterbi algorithm. First, the probability distribution of the torsion states of the residues is obtained. Using the highest probability torsion state, one can generate, step by step, states with lower probabilities. To validate the method, the highest probability state of residues in a given sequence is calculated and compared with probabilities obtained from the Coil Databank. Predictions based on the method are 32% better than predictions based on the most probable states of residues. The ensemble of "n" high probability conformations of a given protein is also determined using the Viterbi algorithm with multistep backtracking. PMID:22955874

  13. Proteolytically stable peptides by incorporation of alpha-Tfm amino acids.

    PubMed

    Koksch, B; Sewald, N; Hofmann, H J; Burger, K; Jakubke, H D

    1997-01-01

    A series of model peptides containing alpha-trifluoromethyl-substituted amino acids in five different positions relative to the predominant cleavage site of the serine protease alpha-chymotrypsin was synthesized by solution methods to investigate the influence of alpha-Tfm substitution on the proteolytic stability of peptides. Proteolysis studies demonstrated absolute stability of peptides substituted to the P1 position and still considerable proteolytic stability for peptides substituted at the P2 and P'2 positions compared with the corresponding unsubstituted model peptide. Comparison with peptides containing the fluorine-free disubstituted amino acid alpha-aminoisobutyric acid allowed to separate electronic from steric effects. Furthermore, the absolute configuration of the alpha-Tfm-substituted amino acid was found to exert considerable effects on the proteolytic stability, especially in P'1 substituted peptides. Investigations of this phenomenon using empirical force field calculations revealed that in the (S,R,S)-diasteromer the steric constraints exhibited by the alpha-Tfm group can be outweighed by an advantageous interaction of the flourine atoms with the serine side chain of the enzyme. In contrast, a favourable interaction between substrate and enzyme is impossible for the (S,S,S)-diastereomer. PMID:9230481

  14. Discriminating D-amino acid-containing peptide epimers by radical-directed dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yuanqi; Quebbemann, Neil R; Julian, Ryan R

    2012-08-01

    The presence of a single D-amino acid in a peptide is very difficult to detect. Mass spectrometry-based approaches rely on differences in fragmentation between all L-amino acid-containing peptides and single D-amino acid-containing peptides (which are epimers) for identification. The success of this approach is dependent on the structural sensitivity of the fragmentation method. Recently, experiments have demonstrated that fragmentation initiated by radical chemistry, or radical-directed dissociation (RDD), is particularly sensitive to the structure of the ion being fragmented. Herein, RDD is used to identify the presence of D-serine, D-alanine, or D-aspartic acid in eight biologically relevant peptides. It is demonstrated that chiral disambiguation by RDD is dependent on both the initial radical site and subsequent radical migration. Fortuitously, RDD can be initiated by a variety of different radical precursors which can be associated with the peptide via covalent or noncovalent means, and RDD can be examined in all observable charge states (both positive and negative). This diversity enables numerous initial radical sites and migration pathways to be explored. For all but one of the peptides that were examined, RDD provides significantly better chiral discrimination than CID. Quantitation of peptide epimers by RDD is also described.

  15. Effect of N-terminal glutamic acid and glutamine on fragmentation of peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Godugu, Bhaskar; Neta, Pedatsur; Simón-Manso, Yamil; Stein, Stephen E

    2010-07-01

    A prominent dissociation path for electrospray generated tryptic peptide ions is the dissociation of the peptide bond linking the second and third residues from the amino-terminus. The formation of the resulting b(2) and y(n-2) fragments has been rationalized by specific facile mechanisms. An examination of spectral libraries shows that this path predominates in diprotonated peptides composed of 12 or fewer residues, with the notable exception of peptides containing glutamine or glutamic acid at the N-terminus. To elucidate the mechanism by which these amino acids affect peptide fragmentation, we synthesized peptides of varying size and composition and examined their MS/MS spectra as a function of collision voltage in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Loss of water from N-terminal glutamic acid and glutamine is observed at a lower voltage than any other fragmentation, leading to cyclization of the terminal residue. This cyclization results in the conversion of the terminal amine group to an imide, which has a lower proton affinity. As a result, the second proton is not localized at the N-terminus but is readily transferred to other sites, leading to fragmentation near the center of the peptide. Further confirmation was obtained by examining peptides with N-terminal pyroglutamic acid and N-acetyl peptides. Peptides with N-terminal proline maintain the trend of forming b(2) and y(n-2) because their ring contains an imine rather than imide and has sufficient proton affinity to retain the proton at the N-terminus.

  16. Identification of a novel Plasmopara halstedii elicitor protein combining de novo peptide sequencing algorithms and RACE-PCR

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Often high-quality MS/MS spectra of tryptic peptides do not match to any database entry because of only partially sequenced genomes and therefore, protein identification requires de novo peptide sequencing. To achieve protein identification of the economically important but still unsequenced plant pathogenic oomycete Plasmopara halstedii, we first evaluated the performance of three different de novo peptide sequencing algorithms applied to a protein digests of standard proteins using a quadrupole TOF (QStar Pulsar i). Results The performance order of the algorithms was PEAKS online > PepNovo > CompNovo. In summary, PEAKS online correctly predicted 45% of measured peptides for a protein test data set. All three de novo peptide sequencing algorithms were used to identify MS/MS spectra of tryptic peptides of an unknown 57 kDa protein of P. halstedii. We found ten de novo sequenced peptides that showed homology to a Phytophthora infestans protein, a closely related organism of P. halstedii. Employing a second complementary approach, verification of peptide prediction and protein identification was performed by creation of degenerate primers for RACE-PCR and led to an ORF of 1,589 bp for a hypothetical phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that identification of proteins within minute amounts of sample material improved significantly by combining sensitive LC-MS methods with different de novo peptide sequencing algorithms. In addition, this is the first study that verified protein prediction from MS data by also employing a second complementary approach, in which RACE-PCR led to identification of a novel elicitor protein in P. halstedii. PMID:20459704

  17. Interrelationships among biological activity, disulfide bonds, secondary structure, and metal ion binding for a chemically synthesized 34-amino-acid peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    MacColl, R; Eisele, L E; Stack, R F; Hauer, C; Vakharia, D D; Benno, A; Kelly, W C; Mizejewski, G J

    2001-10-01

    A 34-amino-acid peptide has been chemically synthesized based on a sequence from human alpha-fetoprotein. The purified peptide is active in anti-growth assays when freshly prepared in pH 7.4 buffer at 0.20 g/l, but this peptide slowly becomes inactive. This functional change is proven by mass spectrometry to be triggered by the formation of an intrapeptide disulfide bond between the two cysteine residues on the peptide. Interpeptide cross-linking does not occur. The active and inactive forms of the peptide have almost identical secondary structures as shown by circular dichroism (CD). Zinc ions bind to the active peptide and completely prevents formation of the inactive form. Cobalt(II) ions also bind to the peptide, and the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the cobalt-peptide complex shows that: (1) a near-UV sulfur-to-metal-ion charge-transfer band had a molar extinction coefficient consistent with two thiolate bonds to Co(II); (2) the lowest-energy visible d-d transition maximum at 659 nm, also, demonstrated that the two cysteine residues are ligands for the metal ion; (3) the d-d molar extinction coefficient showed that the metal ion-ligand complex was in a distorted tetrahedral symmetry. The peptide has two cysteines, and it is speculated that the other two metal ion ligands might be the two histidines. The Zn(II)- and Co(II)-peptide complexes had similar peptide conformations as indicated by their ultraviolet CD spectra, which differed very slightly from that of the free peptide. Surprisingly, the cobalt ions acted in the reverse of the zinc ions in that, instead of stabilizing anti-growth form of the peptide, they catalyzed its loss. Metal ion control of peptide function is a saliently interesting concept. Calcium ions, in the conditions studied, apparently do not bind to the peptide. Trifluoroethanol and temperature (60 degrees C) affected the secondary structure of the peptide, and the peptide was found capable of assuming various conformations in solution

  18. CAMPR3: a database on sequences, structures and signatures of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Waghu, Faiza Hanif; Barai, Ram Shankar; Gurung, Pratima; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are known to have family-specific sequence composition, which can be mined for discovery and design of AMPs. Here, we present CAMPR3; an update to the existing CAMP database available online at www.camp3.bicnirrh.res.in. It is a database of sequences, structures and family-specific signatures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic AMPs. Family-specific sequence signatures comprising of patterns and Hidden Markov Models were generated for 45 AMP families by analysing 1386 experimentally studied AMPs. These were further used to retrieve AMPs from online sequence databases. More than 4000 AMPs could be identified using these signatures. AMP family signatures provided in CAMPR3 can thus be used to accelerate and expand the discovery of AMPs. CAMPR3 presently holds 10247 sequences, 757 structures and 114 family-specific signatures of AMPs. Users can avail the sequence optimization algorithm for rational design of AMPs. The database integrated with tools for AMP sequence and structure analysis will be a valuable resource for family-based studies on AMPs. PMID:26467475

  19. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  20. Between peptides and bile acids: self-assembly of phenylalanine substituted cholic acids.

    PubMed

    Travaglini, Leana; D'Annibale, Andrea; di Gregorio, Maria Chiara; Schillén, Karin; Olsson, Ulf; Sennato, Simona; Pavel, Nicolae V; Galantini, Luciano

    2013-08-01

    Biocompatible molecules that undergo self-assembly are of high importance in biological and medical applications of nanoscience. Peptides and bile acids are among the most investigated due to their ability to self-organize into many different, often stimuli-sensitive, supramolecular structures. With the aim of preparing molecules mixing the aggregation properties of bile acid and amino acid-based molecules, we report on the synthesis and self-association behavior of two diastereomers obtained by substituting a hydroxyl group of cholic acid with a l-phenylalanine residue. The obtained molecules are amphoteric, and we demonstrate that they show a pH-dependent self-assembly. Both molecules aggregate in globular micelles at high pH, whereas they form tubular superstructures under acid conditions. Unusual narrow nanotubes with outer and inner cross-section diameters of about 6 and 3 nm are formed by the derivatives. The diasteroisomer with α orientation of the substituent forms in addition a wider tubule (17 nm cross-section diameter). The ability to pack in supramolecular tubules is explained in terms of a wedge-shaped bola-form structure of the derivatives. Parallel or antiparallel face-to-face dimers are hypothesized as fundamental building blocks for the formation of the narrow and wide nanotubes, respectively.

  1. Molecular mechanics and dynamics studies on the interaction of gallic acid with collagen-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Ramasami, T.

    2001-10-01

    Molecular modelling approaches have been used to understand the interaction of collagen-like peptides with gallic acid, which mimic vegetable tanning processes involved in protein stabilization. Several interaction sites have been identified and the binding energies of the complexes have been calculated. The calculated binding energies for various geometries are in the range 6-13 kcal/mol. It is found that some complexes exhibit hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interaction plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the peptide by gallic acid. The π-OH type of interaction is also observed in the peptide stabilization. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for 600 ps revealed the possibility of hydrogen bonding between the collagen-like peptide and gallic acid.

  2. Butelase-Mediated Macrocyclization of d-Amino-Acid-Containing Peptides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Hemu, Xinya; Quek, Jun-Ping; Tam, James P

    2016-10-01

    Macrocyclic compounds have received increasing attention in recent years. With their large surface area, they hold promise for inhibiting protein-protein interactions, a chemical space that was thought to be undruggable. Although many chemical methods have been developed for peptide macrocyclization, enzymatic methods have emerged as a promising new economical approach. Thus far, most enzymes have been shown to act on l-peptides; their ability to cyclize d-amino-acid-containing peptides has rarely been documented. Herein we show that macrocycles consisting of d-amino acids, except for the Asn residue at the ligating site, were efficiently synthesized by butelase 1, an Asn/Asp-specific ligase. Furthermore, by using a peptide-library approach, we show that butelase 1 tolerates most of the d-amino acid residues at the P1'' and P2'' positions. PMID:27624217

  3. Amino acids, peptides, and proteins as chemically bonded stationary phases--A review.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Szymon; Skoczylas, Magdalena; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of chromatographic separation depends mostly on the stationary phase and mobile phase composition. Despite being a material with bonded simple organic molecule, a wide group of stationary phases contain immobilized compound that possesses biological activity. Stationary phases that contain amino acids and peptides as well as enzymes and proteins are alternative materials that may be used for liquid chromatographic separations and are reviewed in this work. In the case of peptide-bonded stationary phases, most of these types of materials were elaborated in the 1970s and 1980s; however, over the last few years a growing interest has been observed which is connected with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. The most important application of amino acid and peptide-bonded stationary phases is connected with separation of amino acids, their derivatives, and peptides. The main advantage of such materials is the ability for chiral separations.

  4. {{text{C}}_{α }} - {text{C}} Bond Cleavage of the Peptide Backbone in MALDI In-Source Decay Using Salicylic Acid Derivative Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as novel matrices for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described. The use of 5-FSA and 5-NSA generated a- and x-series ions accompanied by oxidized peptides [M - 2 H + H]+. The preferential formation of a- and x-series ions was found to be dependent on the hydrogen-accepting ability of matrix. The hydrogen-accepting ability estimated from the ratio of signal intensity of oxidized product [M - 2 H + H]+ to that of non-oxidized protonated molecule [M + H]+ of peptide was of the order 5-NSA > 5-FSA > 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) ≒ 2,5-dihydroxyl benzoic acid (2,5-DHB) ≒ 0. The results suggest that the hydrogen transfer reaction from peptide to 5-FSA and 5-NSA occurs during the MALDI-ISD processes. The hydrogen abstraction from peptides results in the formation of oxidized peptides containing a radical site on the amide nitrogen with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the {{{C}}_{α }} - {{C}} bond, leading to the formation of a- and x-series ions. The most significant feature of MALDI-ISD with 5-FSA and 5-NSA is the specific cleavage of the {{{C}}_{α }} - {{C}} bond of the peptide backbone without degradation of side-chain and post-translational modifications (PTM). The matrix provides a useful complementary method to conventional MALDI-ISD for amino acid sequencing and site localization of PTMs in peptides.

  5. Relationship between cadmium, zinc, Cd-peptide, and organic acid in tobacco suspension cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krotz, R.M.; Evangelou, B.P.; Wagner, G.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Responses of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) suspension cells to Cd and Zn were studied in the presence and absence of ligand of Cd-peptide in order to understand the role of this peptide versus other mechanisms in Cd and Zn accumulation and accommodation in plants. With 45 micromolar Cd and 300 micromolar Zn (non-growth-inhibiting levels), metals appeared rapidly within cells, and intracellular Cd and Zn reached medium concentrations after 6 to 10 hours. Cd-peptide was observed in response to Cd after 2 hours, but this form only accounted for {approximately}30% of soluble Cd after 24 hours. Peptide was not observed in cells exposed to 300 micromolar Zn for up to 7 days. Organic acid-to-metal stoichiometry indicated that endogenous organic acid content of cells was more than sufficient to complex absorbed metals and no evidence was found for stimulation of organic acid biosynthesis by Cd or Zn. Metal-complexing potential of organic acids for Cd and Zn versus endogenous cations is discussed as is vacuolar-extravacuolar distribution of metals. The absence of Cd-peptide does not limit Cd-accumulation in the system studied. Results suggest that tobacco suspension cells accommodte the presence of non-growth-inhibiting and growth-inhibiting levels of Cd and Zn by sequestration in the vacuole as complexes with endogenous organic acids and that this may be a principal means for accommodation of Cd as well as Zn in the presence and absence of Cd-peptide.

  6. Synthesis and biological properties of amino acids and peptides containing a tetrazolyl moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Trifonov, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    Literature data published mainly in the last 15 years on the synthesis and biological properties of amino acid analogues and derivatives containing tetrazolyl moieties are analyzed. Tetrazolyl analogues and derivatives of amino acids and peptides are shown to be promising for medicinal chemistry. Being polynitrogen heterocyclic systems comprising four endocyclic nitrogen atoms, tetrazoles can behave as acids and bases and form strong hydrogen bonds with proton donors (more rarely, with acceptors). They have high metabolic stability and are able to penetrate biological membranes. The review also considers the synthesis and properties of linear and cyclic peptides based on modified amino acids incorporating a tetrazolyl moiety. A special issue is the discussion of the biological properties of tetrazole-containing amino acids and peptides, which exhibit high biological activity and can be used to design new drugs. The bibliography includes 200 references.

  7. Sequence motifs of human her-2 protooncogene important for Peptide binding to hla-A2.

    PubMed

    Fisk, B; Chesak, B; Ioannides, M; Wharton, J; Ioannides, C

    1994-07-01

    Tumor progression and metastasis are often associated with overexpression of specific cellular proteins. In 1991, we introduced a hypothesis that epitopes of nonmutated overexpressed proteins can be targets of a specific cellular immune response against tumor mediated by T cells (Mol Carcinogen 6: 77-81, 1992) and that, when T cell epitopes are present, distinction between tumor immunity/autoimmunity and unresponsiveness can be predicated on the protein concentration as a limiting factor of epitope supply. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrated that CTL from patients with ovarian tumors which overexpress HER-2 proto-oncogene can recognize both autologous tumor and synthetic analogs of a specific epitope from HER-2, which was identified based on the convergence of all criteria for selection of HLA-A2 associated epitopes recognized by T cells. In this study, we identified all epitopes in HER-2 containing nonapeptides with HLA-A2 anchors. Of these, analysis of potential amphiphilic sites identified both sequences and specific mutations that positively affected the reactivity of conformationally dependent HLA-A2 specific mAb which served as an indication of HER-2 peptide binding. We also report the in vitro induction of cellular responses to these peptides by PBMC from healthy HLA-A2+ volunteers as an indication of their ability to stimulate/ restimulate pre-existing T cell responses to HER-2. The peptides induced proliferative responses in one of four donors tested and CTL responses (one of three peptides tested in two of three donors). This strategy may allow selection of immunogenic HER-2 peptides and elucidation of mechanisms operating in induction of tolerance to defined epitopes on self-proteins. PMID:21559557

  8. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J.; Wilkinson, Trevor C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these “undesirable” residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  9. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  10. Amino acid sequence of a protease inhibitor isolated from Sarcophaga bullata determined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papayannopoulos, I A; Biemann, K

    1992-02-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protease inhibitor isolated from the hemolymph of Sarcophaga bullata larvae was determined by tandem mass spectrometry. Homology considerations with respect to other protease inhibitors with known primary structures assisted in the choice of the procedure followed in the sequence determination and in the alignment of the various peptides obtained from specific chemical cleavage at cysteines and enzyme digests of the S. bullata protease inhibitor. The resulting sequence of 57 residues is as follows: Val Asp Lys Ser Ala Cys Leu Gln Pro Lys Glu Val Gly Pro Cys Arg Lys Ser Asp Phe Val Phe Phe Tyr Asn Ala Asp Thr Lys Ala Cys Glu Glu Phe Leu Tyr Gly Gly Cys Arg Gly Asn Asp Asn Arg Phe Asn Thr Lys Glu Glu Cys Glu Lys Leu Cys Leu.

  11. Purification to homogeneity and amino acid sequence analysis of two anionic species of human interleukin 1

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Two anionic species of human IL-1 have been purified to homogeneity. These molecules were characterized as having pI of 5.4 and 5.2 and molecular weights identical to IL-1/6.8 (17,500). The specific activities of IL-1/5.4 and IL-1/5.2, as measured in the mouse thymocyte co-mitogenic assay, were identical to that of IL-1/6.8, namely 1.2 X 10(7) U/mg, with half-maximal stimulation observed at 2 X 10(-11) M. IL- 1/5.4 and IL-1/5.2 were found to be antigenically distinct from IL- 1/6.8 in an ELISA. IL-1/5.4 was structurally distinct from IL-1/6.8 based on reverse-phase HPLC or CNBr peptides. Intact IL-1/5.2 and three intact CNBr peptides of IL-1/5.4 were sequenced, with the identification of 74 amino acid residues. These sequences were found to correspond exactly with the amino acid sequence deduced from the IL-1- alpha cDNA reported by March et al. PMID:3487613

  12. Biophysical and morphological studies on the dual interaction of non-octarepeat prion protein peptides with copper and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Juliana A P; Sanchez-López, Carolina; Gomes, Mariana P B; Sisnande, Tháyna; Macedo, Bruno; de Oliveira, Vanessa End; Braga, Carolina A C; Rangel, Luciana P; Silva, Jerson L; Quintanar, Liliana; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2014-08-01

    Conversion of prion protein (PrP) to an altered conformer, the scrapie PrP (PrP(Sc)), is a critical step in the development of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Both Cu(II) and nucleic acid molecules have been implicated in this conversion. Full-length PrP can bind up to six copper ions; four Cu(II) binding sites are located in the octarepeat domain (residues 60-91), and His-96 and His-111 coordinate two additional copper ions. Experimental evidence shows that PrP binds different molecules, resulting in diverse cellular signaling events. However, there is little information about the interaction of macromolecular ligands with Cu(II)-bound PrP. Both RNA and DNA sequences can bind PrP, and this interaction results in reciprocal conformational changes. Here, we investigated the interaction of Cu(II) and nucleic acids with amyloidogenic non-octarepeat PrP peptide models (comprising human PrP residues 106-126 and hamster PrP residues 109-149) that retain His-111 as the copper-anchoring residue. The effect of Cu(II) and DNA or RNA sequences in the aggregation, conformation, and toxicity of PrP domains was investigated at low and neutral pH. Circular dichroism and EPR spectroscopy data indicate that interaction of the PrP peptides with Cu(II) and DNA occurs at pH 7. This dual interaction induces conformational changes in the peptides, modulating their aggregation, and affecting the morphology of the aggregated species, resulting in different cytotoxic effects. These results provide new insights into the role of Cu(II) and nucleic acid sequences in the structural conversion and aggregation of PrP, which are both critical events related to prion pathogenesis.

  13. Pyruvate decarboxylase from Pisum sativum. Properties, nucleotide and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Mücke, U; Wohlfarth, T; Fiedler, U; Bäumlein, H; Rücknagel, K P; König, S

    1996-04-15

    To study the molecular structure and function of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) from plants the protein was isolated from pea seeds and partially characterised. The active enzyme which occurs in the form of higher oligomers consists of two different subunits appearing in SDS/PAGE and mass spectroscopy experiments. For further experiments, like X-ray crystallography, it was necessary to elucidate the protein sequence. Partial cDNA clones encoding pyruvate decarboxylase from seeds of Pisum sativum cv. Miko have been obtained by means of polymerase chain reaction techniques. The first sequences were found using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designated according to conserved amino acid sequences of known pyruvate decarboxylases. The missing parts of one cDNA were amplified applying the 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends systems. The amino acid sequence deduced from the entire cDNA sequence displays strong similarity to pyruvate decarboxylases from other organisms, especially from plants. A molecular mass of 64 kDa was calculated for this protein correlating with estimations for the smaller subunit of the oligomeric enzyme. The PCR experiments led to at least three different clones representing the middle part of the PDC cDNA indicating the existence of three isozymes. Two of these isoforms could be confirmed on the protein level by sequencing tryptic peptides. Only anaerobically treated roots showed a positive signal for PDC mRNA in Northern analysis although the cDNA from imbibed seeds was successfully used for PCR.

  14. DNA sequence and mutational analysis of genes involved in the production and resistance of the antibiotic peptide trifolitoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Breil, B T; Ludden, P W; Triplett, E W

    1993-01-01

    The 7.1-kb fragment of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii T24 DNA which confers trifolitoxin production and resistance to nonproducing, sensitive Rhizobium strains (E. W. Triplett, M. J. Schink, and K. L. Noeldner, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 2:202-208, 1989) was subcloned, sequenced, and mutagenized with a transcriptional fusion cassette. The sequence of this fragment revealed seven complete open reading frames, tfxABCDEFG, all transcribed in the same direction. TfxA has an 11-amino-acid carboxy terminus identical to the known amino acid sequence of the trifolitoxin backbone, DIGGSRXGCVA, where X is an UV-absorbing chromophore. This is evidence that trifolitoxin is synthesized ribosomally as a prepeptide that is posttranslationally modified to yield the active peptide. TfxB shows 27.6% identity with McbC, a protein required for the production of the ribosomally synthesized antibiotic microcin B17. Tn3GUS transcriptional fusion insertions in tfxA, tfxB, tfxD, or tfxF caused a nonproducing, trifolitoxin-resistant phenotype and confirmed the direction of transcription of these frames. No insertion mutations were found in tfxE or tfxG. Sequence analysis along with insertion and deletion mutation analysis suggest that (i) trifolitoxin is synthesized ribosomally from tfxA; (ii) tfxA, tfxE, and tfxG have their own promoters; (iii) TfxG is required for immunity; (iv) TfxB, TfxD, and TfxF are required for trifolitoxin production; and (v) the UV-absorbing chromophore is derived from glutamine. PMID:8509324

  15. Sequence-defined shuttles for targeted nucleic acid and protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Röder, Ruth; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Molecular medicine opens into a space of novel specific therapeutic agents: intracellularly active drugs such as peptides, proteins or nucleic acids, which are not able to cross cell membranes and enter the intracellular space on their own. Through the development of cell-targeted shuttles for specific delivery, this restriction in delivery has the potential to be converted into an advantage. On the one hand, due to the multiple extra- and intracellular barriers, such carrier systems need to be multifunctional. On the other hand, they must be precise and reproducibly manufactured due to pharmaceutical reasons. Here we review the design of precise sequence-defined delivery carriers, including solid-phase synthesized peptides and nonpeptidic oligomers, or nucleotide-based carriers such as aptamers and origami nanoboxes.

  16. Enzyme-free translation of DNA into sequence-defined synthetic polymers structurally unrelated to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jia; Hili, Ryan; Liu, David R.

    2013-04-01

    The translation of DNA sequences into corresponding biopolymers enables the production, function and evolution of the macromolecules of life. In contrast, methods to generate sequence-defined synthetic polymers with similar levels of control have remained elusive. Here, we report the development of a DNA-templated translation system that enables the enzyme-free translation of DNA templates into sequence-defined synthetic polymers that have no necessary structural relationship with nucleic acids. We demonstrate the efficiency, sequence-specificity and generality of this translation system by oligomerizing building blocks including polyethylene glycol, α-(D)-peptides, and β-peptides in a DNA-programmed manner. Sequence-defined synthetic polymers with molecular weights of 26 kDa containing 16 consecutively coupled building blocks and 90 densely functionalized β-amino acid residues were translated from DNA templates using this strategy. We integrated the DNA-templated translation system developed here into a complete cycle of translation, coding sequence replication, template regeneration and re-translation suitable for the iterated in vitro selection of functional sequence-defined synthetic polymers unrelated in structure to nucleic acids.

  17. Structural and membrane modifying properties of suzukacillin, a peptide antibiotic related to alamethicin. Part A. Sequence and conformation.

    PubMed

    Jung, G; König, W A; Leibfritz, D; Ooka, T; Janko, K; Boheim, G

    1976-04-16

    The primary structure and conformation of the polypeptide antibiotic suzukacillin A are investigated. Suzukacillin A is isolated from the Trichoderma viride strain 1037 and exhibits membrane modifying and lysing properties similar to those of alamethicin. A combined gas chromatographic mass spectrometric analysis of the trifluoroacetylated peptide methyl esters of partial hydrolysates revealed a tentative sequence of 23 residues including 10 2-methylalanines and one phenylalaninol, which shows many fragments known from alamethicin: Ac-Aib-Pro-Val-Aib-Val-Ala-Aib-Ala-Aib-Aib-Gln-Aib-Leu-Aib-Gly-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-Aib-Aib-Glu(Pheol)-Gln-OH. All chiral amino acids and phenylalainol have L-configuration. Ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism in various solvents and in particular 13C nuclear magnetic resonance have been used for a comparative study of suzukacillin with alamethicin. Suzukacillin has a partially alpha-helical structure and the helix content increases largely from polar to lipophilic solvents. Suzukacillin aggregates more strongly than alamethicin in aqueous medis due to a longer alpha-helical part and higher number of aliphatic residues. A part of the alpha-helix is exceptionally stabilized due to 2-methylalanine residues shielding the peptide bonds from interactions with polar solvents. In lipophilic solvents and lecithin vesicles particularly large temperature induced reductions of the high alpha-helix content are found for alamethicin. Suzukacillin shows similar temperature coefficients in lipophilic media, however, in contrast to alamethicin a more linear change in intensity of the Cotton effects is observed. PMID:1260057

  18. Influence of Amino Acid Compositions and Peptide Profiles on Antioxidant Capacities of Two Protein Hydrolysates from Skipjack Tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) Dark Muscle.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chang-Feng; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Wang, Bin; Li, Zhong-Rui; Luo, Hong-Yu

    2015-04-27

    Influence of amino acid compositions and peptide profiles on antioxidant capacities of two protein hydrolysates from skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) dark muscle was investigated. Dark muscles from skipjack tuna were hydrolyzed using five separate proteases, including pepsin, trypsin, Neutrase, papain and Alcalase. Two hydrolysates, ATH and NTH, prepared using Alcalase and Neutrase, respectively, showed the strongest antioxidant capacities and were further fractionated using ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography. Two fractions, Fr.A3 and Fr.B2, isolated from ATH and NTH, respectively, showed strong radical scavenging activities toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (EC50 1.08% ± 0.08% and 0.98% ± 0.07%), hydroxyl radicals (EC50 0.22% ± 0.03% and 0.48% ± 0.05%), and superoxide anion radicals (EC50 1.31% ± 0.11% and 1.56% ± 1.03%) and effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation. Eighteen peptides from Fr.A3 and 13 peptides from Fr.B2 were isolated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, and their amino acid sequences were determined. The elevated antioxidant activity of Fr.A3 might be due to its high content of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues (181.1 and 469.9 residues/1000 residues, respectively), small molecular sizes (3-6 peptides), low molecular weights (524.78 kDa), and amino acid sequences (antioxidant score 6.11). This study confirmed that a smaller molecular size, the presence of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues, and the amino acid sequences were the key factors that determined the antioxidant activities of the proteins, hydrolysates and peptides. The results also demonstrated that the derived hydrolysates and fractions from skipjack tuna (K. pelamis) dark muscles could prevent oxidative reactions and might be useful for food preservation and medicinal purposes.

  19. Influence of Amino Acid Compositions and Peptide Profiles on Antioxidant Capacities of Two Protein Hydrolysates from Skipjack Tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) Dark Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chang-Feng; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Wang, Bin; Li, Zhong-Rui; Luo, Hong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Influence of amino acid compositions and peptide profiles on antioxidant capacities of two protein hydrolysates from skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) dark muscle was investigated. Dark muscles from skipjack tuna were hydrolyzed using five separate proteases, including pepsin, trypsin, Neutrase, papain and Alcalase. Two hydrolysates, ATH and NTH, prepared using Alcalase and Neutrase, respectively, showed the strongest antioxidant capacities and were further fractionated using ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography. Two fractions, Fr.A3 and Fr.B2, isolated from ATH and NTH, respectively, showed strong radical scavenging activities toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (EC50 1.08% ± 0.08% and 0.98% ± 0.07%), hydroxyl radicals (EC50 0.22% ± 0.03% and 0.48% ± 0.05%), and superoxide anion radicals (EC50 1.31% ± 0.11% and 1.56% ± 1.03%) and effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation. Eighteen peptides from Fr.A3 and 13 peptides from Fr.B2 were isolated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, and their amino acid sequences were determined. The elevated antioxidant activity of Fr.A3 might be due to its high content of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues (181.1 and 469.9 residues/1000 residues, respectively), small molecular sizes (3–6 peptides), low molecular weights (524.78 kDa), and amino acid sequences (antioxidant score 6.11). This study confirmed that a smaller molecular size, the presence of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues, and the amino acid sequences were the key factors that determined the antioxidant activities of the proteins, hydrolysates and peptides. The results also demonstrated that the derived hydrolysates and fractions from skipjack tuna (K. pelamis) dark muscles could prevent oxidative reactions and might be useful for food preservation and medicinal purposes. PMID:25923316

  20. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  1. Sequence-defined bioactive macrocycles via an acid-catalysed cascade reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porel, Mintu; Thornlow, Dana N.; Phan, Ngoc N.; Alabi, Christopher A.

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic macrocycles derived from sequence-defined oligomers are a unique structural class whose ring size, sequence and structure can be tuned via precise organization of the primary sequence. Similar to peptides and other peptidomimetics, these well-defined synthetic macromolecules become pharmacologically relevant when bioactive side chains are incorporated into their primary sequence. In this article, we report the synthesis of oligothioetheramide (oligoTEA) macrocycles via a one-pot acid-catalysed cascade reaction. The versatility of the cyclization chemistry and modularity of the assembly process was demonstrated via the synthesis of >20 diverse oligoTEA macrocycles. Structural characterization via NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of conformational isomers, which enabled the determination of local chain dynamics within the macromolecular structure. Finally, we demonstrate the biological activity of oligoTEA macrocycles designed to mimic facially amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. The preliminary results indicate that macrocyclic oligoTEAs with just two-to-three cationic charge centres can elicit potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. A Peptide Mimetic of 5-Acetylneuraminic Acid-Galactose Binds with High Avidity to Siglecs and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L.; Spyroulias, Georgios A.; Jones, Norman G.; Hanson, Carl V.; Hoober, J. Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified several peptide sequences that mimicked the terminal sugars of complex glycans. Using plant lectins as analogs of lectin-type cell-surface receptors, a tetravalent form of a peptide with the sequence NPSHPLSG, designated svH1C, bound with high avidity to lectins specific for glycans with terminal 5-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-galactose (Gal)/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) sequences. In this report, we show by circular dichroism and NMR spectra that svH1C lacks an ordered structure and thus interacts with binding sites from a flexible conformation. The peptide binds with high avidity to several recombinant human siglec receptors that bind preferentially to Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal, Neu5Ac(α2,6)GalNAc or Neu5Ac(α2,8)Neu5Ac ligands. In addition, the peptide bound the receptor NKG2D, which contains a lectin-like domain that binds Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal. The peptide bound to these receptors with a KD in the range of 0.6 to 1 μM. Binding to these receptors was inhibited by the glycoprotein fetuin, which contains multiple glycans that terminate in Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal or Neu5Ac(α2,6)Gal, and by sialyllactose. Binding of svH1C was not detected with CLEC9a, CLEC10a or DC-SIGN, which are lectin-type receptors specific for other sugars. Incubation of neuraminidase-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with svH1C resulted in binding of the peptide to a subset of the CD14+ monocyte population. Tyrosine phosphorylation of siglecs decreased dramatically when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 100 nM svH1C. Subcutaneous, alternate-day injections of svH1C into mice induced several-fold increases in populations of several types of immune cells in the peritoneal cavity. These results support the conclusion that svH1C mimics Neu5Ac-containing sequences and interacts with cell-surface receptors with avidities sufficient to induce biological responses at low concentrations. The attenuation of inhibitory receptors suggests that svH1C has

  3. Circulating T cells of patients with active psoriasis respond to streptococcal M-peptides sharing sequences with human epidermal keratins.

    PubMed

    Sigmundsdottir, H; Sigurgeirsson, B; Troye-Blomberg, M; Good, M F; Valdimarsson, H; Jonsdottir, I

    1997-06-01

    Psoriasis is a T-cell mediated inflammatory skin disease which has been associated with group A, beta-haemolytic streptococcal infections. Four 20 a.a. long M6-peptides sharing 5-6 a.a. sequences with human epidermal keratins were identified. To investigate the role of potentially cross-reactive T cells in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) responses of circulating T cells to these peptides were analysed by ELISPOT and RT-PCR in 14 psoriatic patients, 12 healthy individuals and six patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Untreated psoriatic patients' responses were significantly higher to these peptides than healthy and AD controls, while responses to a control M6-peptide, not sharing sequences with keratin, were negligible in all groups. No difference was found in response to streptokinase/streptodornase (SK/SD). M6-protein and peptides exclusively elicited IFN-gamma production, with little IL-4 production, even in AD patients. Interferon-gamma responses to all the M6-peptides were abolished after successful treatment of psoriatic patients, but responses to SK/SD were unaffected. The results indicate that active psoriasis is associated with Th1-like cells responding to streptococcal M6-peptides sharing sequences with human epidermal keratin. This is consistent with the hypothesis that psoriasis may be induced and exacerbated in susceptible individuals by M-protein specific Th1-like cells that cross-react with human epidermal keratin.

  4. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  5. A method for the 32P labeling of peptides or peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A novel approach to the radioactive labeling of peptides and PNA oligomers is described. It is based on the conjugation of a deoxynucleoside 3'-phosphate with the terminal amine of the substrate, followed by phosphorylation of the 5'-hydroxyl group of the nucleotide using T4 polynucleotide kinase and [gamma-32P]ATP.

  6. Elucidation of peptide sequence effects that control the activity, size, and function of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppage, Ryan

    Bio-inspired nanoparticle catalysis offers the opportunity to improve on current catalytic standards with respect to turnover efficiency, organic solvent use, and thermal activation. Unfortunately, projected energy demands will soon outweigh our fuel supplies. The task of creating multifunctional catalysts that both lower thermal activation and possess a number of functions in aqueous conditions is daunting. Similar to these needs, nature has evolved to create a wide range of highly specialized catalytic processes, which incorporate inorganic materials, take place in ambient temperatures, and in an aqueous environment. These specialized biological systems provide inspiration, but are not applicable to current needs. Exploitation of these biotic-abiotic systems could allow for green, multifunctional catalysts. In the resulting works, a peptide sequence has been isolated via phage display with affinity for Pd surfaces, that forms stable, peptide-capped nanoparticles. Substitution of residues results in the tuning of both nanocatalyst activity and nanoparticle size, such that a peptide surface-controlling effect can be noted. These characteristics can be exploited to ultimately understand the binding interactions among bio-inorganic interfaces, such that a rational design of biomolecules can be realized for the synthesis of highly active, green, multifunctional nanomaterials.

  7. Species identification of archaeological skin objects from Danish bogs: comparison between mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing and microscopy-based methods.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth; Mannering, Ulla; Sarret, Mathilde; Kelstrup, Christian D; Olsen, Jesper V; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has an extraordinarily large and well-preserved collection of archaeological skin garments found in peat bogs, dated to approximately 920 BC - AD 775. These objects provide not only the possibility to study prehistoric skin costume and technologies, but also to investigate the animal species used for the production of skin garments. Until recently, species identification of archaeological skin was primarily performed by light and scanning electron microscopy or the analysis of ancient DNA. However, the efficacy of these methods can be limited due to the harsh, mostly acidic environment of peat bogs leading to morphological and molecular degradation within the samples. We compared species assignment results of twelve archaeological skin samples from Danish bogs using Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing, against results obtained using light and scanning electron microscopy. While it was difficult to obtain reliable results using microscopy, MS enabled the identification of several species-diagnostic peptides, mostly from collagen and keratins, allowing confident species discrimination even among taxonomically close organisms, such as sheep and goat. Unlike previous MS-based methods, mostly relying on peptide fingerprinting, the shotgun sequencing approach we describe aims to identify the complete extracted ancient proteome, without preselected specific targets. As an example, we report the identification, in one of the samples, of two peptides uniquely assigned to bovine foetal haemoglobin, indicating the production of skin from a calf slaughtered within the first months of its life. We conclude that MS-based peptide sequencing is a reliable method for species identification of samples from bogs. The mass spectrometry proteomics data were deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD001029.

  8. Species Identification of Archaeological Skin Objects from Danish Bogs: Comparison between Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptide Sequencing and Microscopy-Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth; Mannering, Ulla; Sarret, Mathilde; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has an extraordinarily large and well-preserved collection of archaeological skin garments found in peat bogs, dated to approximately 920 BC – AD 775. These objects provide not only the possibility to study prehistoric skin costume and technologies, but also to investigate the animal species used for the production of skin garments. Until recently, species identification of archaeological skin was primarily performed by light and scanning electron microscopy or the analysis of ancient DNA. However, the efficacy of these methods can be limited due to the harsh, mostly acidic environment of peat bogs leading to morphological and molecular degradation within the samples. We compared species assignment results of twelve archaeological skin samples from Danish bogs using Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing, against results obtained using light and scanning electron microscopy. While it was difficult to obtain reliable results using microscopy, MS enabled the identification of several species-diagnostic peptides, mostly from collagen and keratins, allowing confident species discrimination even among taxonomically close organisms, such as sheep and goat. Unlike previous MS-based methods, mostly relying on peptide fingerprinting, the shotgun sequencing approach we describe aims to identify the complete extracted ancient proteome, without preselected specific targets. As an example, we report the identification, in one of the samples, of two peptides uniquely assigned to bovine foetal haemoglobin, indicating the production of skin from a calf slaughtered within the first months of its life. We conclude that MS-based peptide sequencing is a reliable method for species identification of samples from bogs. The mass spectrometry proteomics data were deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD001029. PMID:25260035

  9. Proteogenomic strategies for identification of aberrant cancer peptides using large-scale Next Generation Sequencing data

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sunghee; Cha, Seong Won; Na, Seungjin; Guest, Clark; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Bafna, Vineet

    2014-11-17

    Cancer is driven by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions. Distinguishing the early driver mutations from subsequent passenger mutations is key to molecular sub-typing of cancers, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. The availability of genomics technologies (mainly wholegenome and exome sequencing, and transcript sampling via RNA-seq, collectively referred to as NGS) have fueled recent studies on somatic mutation discovery. However, the vision is challenged by the complexity, redundancy, and errors in genomic data, and the difficulty of investigating the proteome using only genomic approaches. Recently, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies are increasingly employed. However, the complexity and redundancy of NGS data remains a challenge for proteogenomics, and various trade-offs must be made to allow for the searches to take place. This paperprovides a discussion of two such trade-offs, relating to large database search, and FDR calculations, and their implication to cancer proteogenomics. Moreover, it extends and develops the idea of a unified genomic variant database that can be searched by any mass spectrometry sample. A total of 879 BAM files downloaded from TCGA repository were used to create a 4.34 GB unified FASTA database which contained 2,787,062 novel splice junctions, 38,464 deletions, 1105 insertions, and 182,302 substitutions. Proteomic data from a single ovarian carcinoma sample (439,858 spectra) was searched against the database. By applying the most conservative FDR measure, we have identified 524 novel peptides and 65,578 known peptides at 1% FDR threshold. The novel peptides include interesting examples of doubly mutated peptides, frame-shifts, and non-sample-recruited mutations, which emphasize the strength of our approach.

  10. Proteogenomic strategies for identification of aberrant cancer peptides using large-scale Next Generation Sequencing data

    DOE PAGES

    Woo, Sunghee; Cha, Seong Won; Na, Seungjin; Guest, Clark; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Bafna, Vineet

    2014-11-17

    Cancer is driven by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions. Distinguishing the early driver mutations from subsequent passenger mutations is key to molecular sub-typing of cancers, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. The availability of genomics technologies (mainly wholegenome and exome sequencing, and transcript sampling via RNA-seq, collectively referred to as NGS) have fueled recent studies on somatic mutation discovery. However, the vision is challenged by the complexity, redundancy, and errors in genomic data, and the difficulty of investigating the proteome using only genomic approaches. Recently, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies are increasingly employed. However, the complexity and redundancymore » of NGS data remains a challenge for proteogenomics, and various trade-offs must be made to allow for the searches to take place. This paperprovides a discussion of two such trade-offs, relating to large database search, and FDR calculations, and their implication to cancer proteogenomics. Moreover, it extends and develops the idea of a unified genomic variant database that can be searched by any mass spectrometry sample. A total of 879 BAM files downloaded from TCGA repository were used to create a 4.34 GB unified FASTA database which contained 2,787,062 novel splice junctions, 38,464 deletions, 1105 insertions, and 182,302 substitutions. Proteomic data from a single ovarian carcinoma sample (439,858 spectra) was searched against the database. By applying the most conservative FDR measure, we have identified 524 novel peptides and 65,578 known peptides at 1% FDR threshold. The novel peptides include interesting examples of doubly mutated peptides, frame-shifts, and non-sample-recruited mutations, which emphasize the strength of our approach.« less

  11. Amino acid sequences of lower vertebrate parvalbumins and their evolution: parvalbumins of boa, turtle, and salamander.

    PubMed

    Maeda, N; Zhu, D X; Fitch, W M

    1984-11-01

    One major parvalbumin each was isolated from the skeletal muscle of two reptiles, a boa snake, Boa constrictor, and a map turtle, Graptemys geographica, while two parvalbumins were isolated from an amphibian, the salamander Amphiuma means. The amino acid sequences of all four parvalbumins were determined from the sequences of their tryptic peptides, which were ordered partially by homology to other parvalbumins. Phylogenetic study of these and 16 other parvalbumin sequences revealed that the turtle parvalbumin belongs to beta lineage, while the salamander sequences belong, one each, to the alpha and beta lineages defined by Goodman and Pechère (1977). Boa parvalbumin, however, while belonging to the beta lineage, clusters within the fish in all reasonably parsimonious trees. The most parsimonious trees show many parallel or back mutations in the evolution of many parvalbumin residues, although the residues responsible for Ca2+ binding are very well conserved. These most parsimonious trees show an actinopterygian rather than a crossoptyrigian origin of the tetrapods in both the alpha and beta groups. One of two electric eel parvalbumins is evolving more than 10 times faster than its paralogous partner, suggesting it may be on its way to becoming a pseudogene. It is concluded that varying rates of amino acid replacement, much homoplasy, considerable gene duplication, plus complicated lineages make the set of parvalbumin sequences unsuitable for systematic study of the origin of the tetrapods and other higher-taxa divergence, although it may be suitable within a genus or family.

  12. Synthesis and application of acid labile anchor groups for the synthesis of peptide amides by Fmoc-solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Breipohl, G; Knolle, J; Stüber, W

    1989-10-01

    The preparation and application of a new linker for the synthesis of peptide amides using a modified Fmoc-method is described. The new anchor group was developed based on our experience with 4,4'-dimethoxybenzhydryl (Mbh)-protecting group for amides. Lability towards acid treatment was increased dramatically and results in an easy cleavage procedure for the preparation of peptide amides. The synthesis of N-9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl- ([5-carboxylatoethyl-2.4-dimethoxyphenyl)- 4'-methoxyphenyl]-methylamin is reported in detail. This linker was coupled to a commercially available aminomethyl polystyrene resin. Peptide synthesis proceeded smoothly using HOOBt esters of Fmoc-amino acids. Release of the peptide amide and final cleavage of the side chain protecting groups was accomplished by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid-dichloromethane mixtures in the presence of scavengers. The synthesis of peptide amides such as LHRH and C-terminal hexapeptide of secretin are given as examples.

  13. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  14. Predicting three-dimensional conformations of peptides constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  15. Cargo sequences are important for Som1p-dependent signal peptide cleavage in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Liang, Haobo; Luo, Wentian; Green, Neil; Fang, Hong

    2004-09-17

    The inner membrane protease (IMP) has two catalytic subunits, Imp1p and Imp2p, that exhibit nonoverlapping substrate specificity in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The IMP also has at least one noncatalytic subunit, Som1p, which is required to cleave signal peptides from a subset of Imp1p substrates. To understand how Som1p mediates Imp1p substrate specificity, we addressed the possibility that Som1p functions as a molecular chaperone, which binds to specific substrates and directs them to the catalytic site. Our results show that cargo sequences attached to the signal peptide are important for Som1p-dependent presequence cleavage; however, no specific cargo sequence is required. Indeed, we show that a substrate normally destined for Imp2p is cleaved in a Som1p-dependent manner when the substrate is directed to Imp1p. These results argue against the notion that Som1p is a molecular chaperone. Instead, we propose that the cargo of some Imp1p substrates can assume a conformation incompatible with presequence cleavage. Som1p could thus act through Imp1p to improve cleavage efficiency early during substrate maturation. PMID:15254042

  16. Antilope--a Lagrangian relaxation approach to the de novo peptide sequencing problem.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Sandro; Klau, Gunnar W; Reinert, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Peptide sequencing from mass spectrometry data is a key step in proteome research. Especially de novo sequencing, the identification of a peptide from its spectrum alone, is still a challenge even for state-of-the-art algorithmic approaches. In this paper, we present ANTILOPE, a new fast and flexible approach based on mathematical programming. It builds on the spectrum graph model and works with a variety of scoring schemes. ANTILOPE combines Lagrangian relaxation for solving an integer linear programming formulation with an adaptation of Yen’s k shortest paths algorithm. It shows a significant improvement in running time compared to mixed integer optimization and performs at the same speed like other state-of-the-art tools. We also implemented a generic probabilistic scoring scheme that can be trained automatically for a data set of annotated spectra and is independent of the mass spectrometer type. Evaluations on benchmark data show that ANTILOPE is competitive to the popular state-of-the-art programs PepNovo and NovoHMM both in terms of runtime and accuracy. Furthermore, it offers increased flexibility in the number of considered ion types. ANTILOPE will be freely available as part of the open source proteomics library OpenMS.

  17. iACP: a sequence-based tool for identifying anticancer peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui; Feng, Pengmian; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Cancer remains a major killer worldwide. Traditional methods of cancer treatment are expensive and have some deleterious side effects on normal cells. Fortunately, the discovery of anticancer peptides (ACPs) has paved a new way for cancer treatment. With the explosive growth of peptide sequences generated in the post genomic age, it is highly desired to develop computational methods for rapidly and effectively identifying ACPs, so as to speed up their application in treating cancer. Here we report a sequence-based predictor called iACP developed by the approach of optimizing the g-gap dipeptide components. It was demonstrated by rigorous cross-validations that the new predictor remarkably outperformed the existing predictors for the same purpose in both overall accuracy and stability. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a publicly accessible web-server for iACP has been established at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iACP, by which users can easily obtain their desired results. PMID:26942877

  18. HPLC monitoring of spontaneous non-linear peptidization dynamics of selected amino acids in solution.

    PubMed

    Godziek, Agnieszka; Maciejowska, Anna; Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Kowalska, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    This is our new study in a series of publications devoted to exploration of applicability of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to providing answers to difficult questions from the area of the reaction kinetics and mechanisms with non-linear reactions. Although an excellent analytical performance of HPLC is an indisputable fact, so far its performance as a tool in the kinetic and mechanistic studies has been tested to a lesser extent. In our earlier studies, spontaneous peptidization dynamics of amino acids in solution was demonstrated by means of HPLC upon a few amino acid examples, and on that basis a theoretical model has been developed, anticipating an interdependence of dynamics on chemical structures of amino acids involved. In order to expand the spectrum of experimentally investigated amino acid cases, in this study we present the results valid for three novel amino acids of significant life sciences importance, which differ in terms of peptidization dynamics. Experimental evidence originates from the achiral HPLC with the evaporative light scattering detection and MS detection. A conclusion is drawn that different spontaneous peptidization dynamics of amino acids may significantly influence chemical composition of proteins encountered in living organisms. Hence, a need emerges for systematic physicochemical studies on spontaneous non-linear peptidization dynamics of proteinogenic amino acids in liquid abiotic (but also in the biotic) systems.

  19. Remote Enantioselection Transmitted by an Achiral Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, Igor A.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2000-01-01

    short homochiral segment of DNA into a PNA helix could have guaranteed that the next short segment of DNA to be incorporated would have the same handedness as the first. Once two segments of the same handedness were present, the probability that a third segment would have the same handedness would increase, and so on. Evolution could then slowly dilute out the PNA part. This scenario would ultimately allow the formation of a chiral oligonucleotide by processes that are largely resistant to enantiomeric crossinhibition. It is important to note that the ligation of homochiral dinucleotides on a nucleic acid template would probably be at least as enantiospecific as the reaction that we have studied. The disadvantage of using chiral monomers as components of a replicating system arises from the difficulty of generating a first long homochiral template from a racemic mixture of monomers, although results of experiments designed to overcome this difficulty by employing homochiral tetramers have been reported.l l The probability of obtaining a homochiral n-mer from achiral substrates is approximately 1P-I if the nontemplate-directed extension of the primer is not enantioselective. Hence, it would be very hard to get started with a homochiral 40-mer, for example. No such difficulty exists in a scenario that originates with an achiral genetic material and in which the incorporation of very few chiral monomers in this achiral background gradually progresses towards homochirality. It seems possible that some PNA sequences could act as catalysts, analogous to ribozymes, even though PNA lacks clear metal binding sites. Although such catalysts could not be enantioselective, the incorporation of as few as two chiral nucleotides could then impose chiral specificity on the system. Furthermore, such patch chimeras could help to bridge the gap in catalytic potential between PNA and RNA, while guaranteeing enantioselectivity.

  20. Characteristic of HIV-1 in V3 loop region based on seroreactivity and amino acid sequences in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Kruavon; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Sutthent, Ruengpung; Hoisanka, Narin; Boonsarthorn, Naphasawan; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Warachit, Paijit; Yamazaki, Shudo; Honda, Mitsuo

    2002-06-01

    The third variable (V3) domain of the envelop (env) protein has been used for determining genetic subtype and phenotypic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. Based on the seroreactivity of the HIV-1 subtype by V3 peptide binding enzyme immunoassay (EIA) of 351 samples obtained in 1998 from HIV-1 infected individuals and AIDS patients, we found that 283 (80.6%) were subtype E, 20 (5.7%) were subtype B, 28 (8.0%) were cross-reactive between both types and 20 (5.7%) were non-typeable. The degree of seroreactivity of HIV-1 subtype E decreased significantly when the amino acid at the crown of the V3 loop was substituted from a GPGQ motif to GPGR motif. Interestingly, AIDS patients who had V3 sequences of subtype E as GPGR motif had a stronger immunoreactivity to GPGQ motif peptides than to GPGR motif peptides, in contradiction for their proviral sequences. The results suggested that mutations in the V3 loop may lead to a changed immunoreactivity that makes HIV-1 mutants unrecognizable or allow escape from the primary immune response by means of neutralizing sensitivity. In connection with vaccine development, it should be pointed out that the combination of V3 sequencing and peptide EIA could provide a novel approach to obtain a primarily infected virus sequence as a target for a preventive AIDS vaccine.

  1. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins-MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  2. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins—MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  3. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Blumberg, B.S.; Putnam, F.W.

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  4. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Takahashi, Y; Blumberg, B S; Putnam, F W

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO4/PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  5. The amino acid sequences of the cytochromes c553 from Porphyridium cruentum and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    PubMed

    Sprinkle, J R; Hermodson, M; Krogmann, D W

    1986-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of cytochrome c553 from the eukaryotic red alga Porphyridium cruentum and from the prokaryotic cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae have been determined from the tryptic and cyanogen bromide peptides. The results indicate that a charged region of these proteins has evolved with special rapidity to accomodate a rapid evolution of a binding site in the P700 electron acceptor complex.

  6. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  7. Relative Stability of Peptide Sequence Ions Generated by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2012-04-01

    We report the use of unimolecular dissociation by infrared radiation for gaseous multiphoton energy transfer to determine relative activation energy (Ea,laser) for dissociation of peptide sequence ions. The sequence ions of interest are mass-isolated; the entire ion cloud is then irradiated with a continuous wave CO2 laser, and the first order rate constant, kd, is determined for each of a series of laser powers. Provided these conditions are met, a plot of the natural logarithm of kd versus the natural logarithm of laser power yields a straight line, whose slope provides a measure of Ea,laser. This method reproduces the Ea values from blackbody radiative dissociation (BIRD) for the comparatively large, singly and doubly protonated bradykinin ions (nominally y 9 and y 9 2+ ). The comparatively small sequence ion systems produce Ea,laser values that are systematic underestimates of theoretical barriers calculated with density functional theory (DFT). However, the relative Ea,laser values are in qualitative agreement with the mobile proton model and available theory. Additionally, novel protonated cyclic-dipeptide (diketopiperazine) fragmentation reactions are analyzed with DFT. FT-ICR MS provides access to sequence ions generated by electron capture dissociation, infrared multiphoton dissociation, and collisional activation methods (i.e., b n , y m , c n , z m • ions).

  8. Peptide modules for overcoming barriers of nucleic acids transport to cells.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Anna A; Kiselev, Anton V

    2016-01-01

    Absence of safe and efficient methods of nucleic acids delivery is one of the major issues which limits the development of human gene therapy. Highly efficient viral vectors raise questions due to safety reasons. Among non-viral vectors peptide-based carriers can be considered as good candidates for the development of "artificial viruses"--multifunctional polyplexes that mimic viruses. Suggested strategy to obtain multifunctionality is to combine several peptide modules into one modular carrier. Different kinds of peptide modules are needed for successful overcoming barriers of nucleic acids transport into the cells. Design of such modules and establishment of structure-function relationships are issues of importance to researchers working in the field of nucleic acids delivery.

  9. Targeting pre-miRNA by Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Avitabile, Concetta; Saviano, Michele; D'Andrea, Luca; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Brognara, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    PNAs conjugated to carrier peptides have been employed for the targeting of miRNA precursor, with the aim to develop molecules able to interfere in the pre-miRNA processing. The capability of the molecules to bind pre-miRNA has been tested in vitro by fluorescence assayes on Thiazole Orange labeled molecules and in vivo, in K562 cells, evaluating the amount of miRNA produced after treatment of cells with two amounts of PNAs. PMID:22699795

  10. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J H; Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1990-01-01

    It was reported two decades ago that insulin was not detectable in the glucose-stimulated state in Saimiri sciurea, the New World squirrel monkey, by a radioimmunoassay system developed with guinea pig anti-pork insulin antibody and labeled pork insulin. With the same system, reasonable levels were observed in rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees. This suggested that New World monkeys, like the New World hystricomorph rodents such as the guinea pig and the coypu, might have insulins whose sequences differ markedly from those of Old World mammals. In this report we describe the purification and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey insulin and glucagon. We demonstrate that the substitutions at B29, B27, A2, A4, and A17 of squirrel monkey insulin are identical with those previously found in another New World primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). The immunologic cross-reactivity of this insulin in our immunoassay system is only a few percent of that of human insulin. Squirrel monkey glucagon is identical with the usual glucagon found in Old World mammals, which predicts that the glucagons of other New World monkeys would not differ from the usual Old World mammalian glucagon. It appears that the peptides of the New World monkeys have diverged less from those of the Old World mammals than have those of the New World hystricomorph rodents. The striking improvements in peptide purification and sequencing have the potential for adding new information concerning the evolutionary divergence of species. PMID:2263627

  11. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jinghua ); Eng, J.; Yalow, R.S. City Univ. of New York, NY )

    1990-12-01

    It was reported two decades ago that insulin was not detectable in the glucose-stimulated state in Saimiri sciurea, the New World squirrel monkey, by a radioimmunoassay system developed with guinea pig anti-pork insulin antibody and labeled park insulin. With the same system, reasonable levels were observed in rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees. This suggested that New World monkeys, like the New World hystricomorph rodents such as the guinea pig and the coypu, might have insulins whose sequences differ markedly from those of Old World mammals. In this report the authors describe the purification and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey insulin and glucagon. They demonstrate that the substitutions at B29, B27, A2, A4, and A17 of squirrel monkey insulin are identical with those previously found in another New World primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). The immunologic cross-reactivity of this insulin in their immunoassay system is only a few percent of that of human insulin. It appears that the peptides of the New World monkeys have diverged less from those of the Old World mammals than have those of the New World hystricomorph rodents. The striking improvements in peptide purification and sequencing have the potential for adding new information concerning the evolutionary divergence of species.

  12. Intercalation of amino acids and peptides into Mg-Al layered double hydroxide by reconstruction method.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hirokazu; Wada, Natsuko; Tsuhako, Mitsutomo

    2004-01-28

    The intercalation of amino acids and some peptides into Mg-Al layered double hydroxide known as hydrotalcite was examined. Although the intercalation by ion-exchange method was unsuccessful, all the amino acids except for Lys and Arg, and peptides examined could be intercalated into the layered double hydroxide by reconstruction method using Mg-Al oxide precursor. The uptake amounts of amino acids and peptides were 0.9-2.7 mmol per 1 g of LDH. Intercalation compounds were examined by using XRD and solid-state NMR. For Gly, Ala, Ser, Thr, Pro, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu, and aspartame the intercalation accompanied the expansion of interlayer distance of the solid products, whereas the other amino acids and oligoglycine showed no expansion. The intercalation mechanism and release profile in K(2)CO(3) aqueous solution were also investigated. And the cointercalation of amino acids and peptides into Mg-Al LDH and easy release of amino acids from the LDH layer were found.

  13. Sequence requirement for peptide recognition by rat brain p21ras protein farnesyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Y; Stradley, S J; Gierasch, L M; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1991-01-01

    We tested 42 tetrapeptides for their ability to bind to the rat brain p21ras protein farnesyltransferase as estimated by their ability to compete with p21Ha-ras in a farnesyltransfer assay. Peptides with the highest affinity had the structure Cys-A1-A2-X, where positions A1 and A2 are occupied by aliphatic amino acids and position X is occupied by a COOH-terminal methionine, serine, or phenylalanine. Charged residues reduced affinity slightly at the A1 position and much more drastically at the A2 and X positions. Effective inhibitors included tetrapeptides corresponding to the COOH termini of all animal cell proteins known to be farnesylated. In contrast, the tetrapeptide Cys-Ala-Ile-Leu (CAIL), which corresponds to the COOH termini of several neural guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein gamma subunits, did not compete in the farnesyl-transfer assay. Inasmuch as several of these proteins are geranylgeranylated, the data suggest that the two isoprenes (farnesyl and geranylgeranyl) are transferred by different enzymes. A biotinylated heptapeptide corresponding to the COOH terminus of p21Ki-rasB was farnesylated, suggesting that at least some of the peptides serve as substrates for the transferase. The data are consistent with a model in which a hydrophobic pocket in the protein farnesyltransferase recognizes tetrapeptides through interactions with the cysteine and the last two amino acids. PMID:1992464

  14. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures.

  15. [Amino acid composition and peptide maps of udder and serum albumins in lactating and nonlactating cows].

    PubMed

    Lagodiuk, P Z; Klos, Iu S; Charkin, V A; Kisil', I O

    1983-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides of albumin hydrolyzates from the mammary gland and blood serum were studied for lactating and nonlactating (dry, pregnant 1-4.5 and 4.5-9 months) black-and-white cows. Most pronounced difference between the content of certain amino acids of the mammary gland and blood serum albumins are established for lactating cows and least pronounced for nonlactating dry cows. Dactylography detected 55-57 fragments of products resulted from trypsin hydrolysis of the mammary gland and blood serum albumins of the animals under study. Differences are found in the content and mobility of certain peptides. PMID:6829076

  16. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Identifying proteins from two-dimensional gels by molecular mass searching of peptide fragments in protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Henzel, W J; Billeci, T M; Stults, J T; Wong, S C; Grimley, C; Watanabe, C

    1993-06-01

    A rapid method for the identification of known proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is described in which molecular masses of peptide fragments are used to search a protein sequence database. The peptides are generated by in situ reduction, alkylation, and tryptic digestion of proteins electroblotted from two-dimensional gels. Masses are determined at the subpicomole level by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of the unfractionated digest. A computer program has been developed that searches the protein sequence database for multiple peptides of individual proteins that match the measured masses. To ensure that the most recent database updates are included, a theoretical digest of the entire database is generated each time the program is executed. This method facilitates simultaneous processing of a large number of two-dimensional gel spots. The method was applied to a two-dimensional gel of a crude Escherichia coli extract that was electroblotted onto poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane. Ten randomly chosen spots were analyzed. With as few as three peptide masses, each protein was uniquely identified from over 91,000 protein sequences. All identifications were verified by concurrent N-terminal sequencing of identical spots from a second blot. One of the spots contained an N-terminally blocked protein that required enzymatic cleavage, peptide separation, and Edman degradation for confirmation of its identity.

  18. Triose phosphate isomerase from the coelacanth. An approach to the rapid determination of an amino acid sequence with small amounts of material.

    PubMed

    Kolb, E; Harris, J I; Bridgen, J

    1974-02-01

    The preparation and purification of cyanogen bromide fragments from [(14)C]carboxymethylated coelacanth triose phosphate isomerase is presented. The automated sequencing of these fragments, the lysine-blocked tryptic peptides derived from them, and also of the intact protein, is described. Combination with results from manual sequence analysis has given the 247-residue amino acid sequence of coelacanth triose phosphate isomerase in 4 months, by using 100mg of enzyme. (Two small adjacent peptides were placed by homology with the rabbit enzyme.) Comparison of this sequence with that of the rabbit muscle enzyme shows that 207 (84%) of the residues are identical. This slow rate of evolutionary change (corresponding to two amino acid substitutions per 100 residues per 100 million years) is similar to that found for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The reliability of sequence information obtained by automated methods is discussed.

  19. Photomodulation of conformational states. II. Mono- and bicyclic peptides with (4-aminomethyl)phenylazobenzoic acid as backbone constituent.

    PubMed

    Renner, C; Cramer, J; Behrendt, R; Moroder, L

    2000-12-01

    It has been reported that backbone cyclization of octapeptides with the photoresponsive (4-aminomethyl)phenylazobenzoic acid imparts sufficient restraints to induce and stabilize ordered conformations of the peptide backbone in both the cis- and trans-azo-isomers (L. Ulysse, J. Cubillos, and J. Chmielewski, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 1995, Vol. 117, pp. 8466-8467). Correspondingly, the active-site octapeptide fragment H-Ala-Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys-Asp-Gly-Phe-OH [134-141] of thioredoxin reductase, with its high preference for a 3(10)-helix turn conformation centered on the Thr-Cys sequence, was backbone cyclized with this azobenzene moiety in the attempt to design a photoresponsive system where the conformational states of the peptide backbone are dictated by the configuration of the azobenzene and can be further modulated by the disulfide bridge. Nuclear magnetic resonance conformational analysis of the monocyclic compound clearly revealed the presence of two conformational families in both the cis- and trans-azo configuration. Of the higher populated conformational families, the structure of the trans-isomer seems like a pretzel-like folding, while the cis-isomer relaxes into a significantly less defined conformational state that does not exhibit any regular structural elements. Further restrictions imparted by disulfide bridging of the peptide moiety leads to an even better defined conformation for the trans-azo-isomer, whereas the cis-isomer can be described as a frustrated system without pronounced energy minima and thus with little conformational preferences. Our findings would suggest that this photoresponsive peptide template may not be of general usefulness for light-induced conformational transitions between two well-defined conformational states at least under the experimental conditions employed, even in the bicyclic form. However, trans --> cis isomerization of the bicyclic peptide is accompanied by a switch from a well-defined conformation to

  20. Determination of residue-specific acid dissociation constants for peptides by band-selective homonuclear-decoupled (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Rabenstein, Dallas L

    2007-09-01

    Acid dissociation constants of side-chain acidic groups of amino acid residues in peptides can be determined by 1H NMR, provided resonances can be resolved for carbon-bonded reporter protons located near the acidic group. We report here that the increased resolution of the band-selective homonuclear-decoupled (BASHD) TOCSY experiment greatly extends the range of application of the NMR method for determination of residue-specific, side-chain acid dissociation constants of peptides that contain multiple residues of the same amino acid. Chemical shift-pH titration curves are obtained from cross-peaks for reporter protons in BASHD-TOCSY spectra measured as a function of pH. The method is based on using sequence-dependent differences in the chemical shifts of resonances for the backbone CalphaH protons and the increased resolution in BASHD-TOCSY spectra from collapse of CalphaH multiplets to singlets in the F1 dimension to resolve resonances for the side-chain reporter protons. Application of the method is demonstrated by determination of residue-specific pKA values for each of the side-chain ammonium groups of the six lysine residues in the hexadecapeptide Ac-SRGKAKVKAKVKDQTK-NH2. Chemical shift-pH titration curves were obtained for the lysine side-chain CepsilonH2 reporter protons from their resolved CalphaH-CepsilonH2 TOCSY cross-peaks in BASHD-TOCSY spectra. Relative acidities of the six ammonium groups were also determined from the residue specific chemical shift-pH titration data by a pH-independent method, and calculation of fractional concentrations of protonation microspecies using the residue-specific pKAs is also described.

  1. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  2. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Sainz, I.J.; Largo, E.; Gladue, D.P.; Fletcher, P.; O’Donnell, V.; Holinka, L.G.; Carey, L.B.; Lu, X.; Nieva, J.L.; Borca, M.V.

    2014-05-15

    E2, along with E{sup rns} and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions: cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. Here we evaluate the role of a specific E2 region, {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828}, containing a putative fusion peptide (FP) sequence. Reverse genetics utilizing a full-length infectious clone of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) was used to evaluate how individual amino acid substitutions within this region of E2 may affect replication of BICv. A synthetic peptide representing the complete E2 FP amino acid sequence adopted a β-type extended conformation in membrane mimetics, penetrated into model membranes, and perturbed lipid bilayer integrity in vitro. Similar peptides harboring amino acid substitutions adopted comparable conformations but exhibited different membrane activities. Therefore, a preliminary characterization of the putative FP {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828} indicates a membrane fusion activity and a critical role in virus replication. - Highlights: • A putative fusion peptide (FP) region in CSFV E2 protein was shown to be critical for virus growth. • Synthetic FPs were shown to efficiently penetrate into lipid membranes using an in vitro model. • Individual residues in the FP affecting virus replication were identified by reverse genetics. • The same FP residues are also responsible for mediating membrane fusion.

  3. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  4. Design of a shear-thinning recoverable peptide hydrogel from native sequences and application for influenza H1N1 vaccine adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hongzhou; Shi, Jishu; Laskin, Julia; Liu, Ziyan; McVey, David S.; Sun, Xiuzhi S.

    2011-10-07

    Peptide hydrogels are considered injectable materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Most published hydrogel-forming sequences contain either alternating-charged and noncharged residues or amphiphilic blocks. Here, we report a self-assembling peptide, h9e (FLIVIGSIIGPGGDGPGGD), designed by rationally combining two native sequences from an elastic segment of spider silk and a trans-membrane segment of human muscle L-type calcium channel. The turning segment GSII of h9e promoted hydrogel formation in both Ca2+ solution and acidic pH conditions at water content greater than 99.5%. Although h9e Ca2+ hydrogel and h9e acidic hydrogel have the same sequence, they have distinct physical properties. The shear-thinning, rapid-strengthrecovering h9e Ca2+ hydrogel was used as an H1N1 influenza vaccine adjuvant. The h9e adjuvant was biologically safe and improved immune response by 70% compared with an oil-based commercial adjuvant.

  5. Mass spectrometric detection of the amino acid sequence polymorphism of the hepatitis C virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Kaysheva, A L; Ivanov, Yu D; Frantsuzov, P A; Krohin, N V; Pavlova, T I; Uchaikin, V F; Konev, V А; Kovalev, O B; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-03-01

    A method for detection and identification of the hepatitis C virus antigen (HCVcoreAg) in human serum with consideration for possible amino acid substitutions is proposed. The method is based on a combination of biospecific capturing and concentrating of the target protein on the surface of the chip for atomic force microscope (AFM chip) with subsequent protein identification by tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. Biospecific AFM-capturing of viral particles containing HCVcoreAg from serum samples was performed by use of AFM chips with monoclonal antibodies (anti-HCVcore) covalently immobilized on the surface. Biospecific complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS/MS analysis allowed to reliably identify the HCVcoreAg in the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. Analysis of MS/MS spectra, with the account taken of the possible polymorphisms in the amino acid sequence of the HCVcoreAg, enabled us to increase the number of identified peptides.

  6. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-09-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C-H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C-H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four ‘chiral pool’ amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C-H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C-H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  7. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-09-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C–H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C–H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four ‘chiral pool’ amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C–H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C–H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  8. Self-assembly of a peptide with a tandem repeat of the Aβ16-22 sequence linked by a β turn-promoting dipeptide sequence.

    PubMed

    Sivakama Sundari, Chandrasekaran; Bikshapathy, Erugurala; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid deposits have been found to be abundant in patients with Alzheimer's disease due to fibril formation by the Aβ peptides. Peptide Aβ16-22, comprising of the seven-residue segment KLVFFAE, spanning residues 16-22 of the full length Aβ42 peptide, aggregates to form fibrils or other nanostructures in isolation, depending on the conditions of dissolution and incubation. In this study, we have examined the self-assembly of PAβ, a tandem repeat peptide of the Aβ16-22 sequence, joined by a β-turn-inducing sequence Asn-Gly. To study the effect of various solvents on the self-association, hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP), trifluoroethanol (TFE) and methanol were used. The peptide was also incubated in fibril-promoting conditions of 20% fluorinated alcohol-water mixtures which form dynamical solvent clusters, as well as in 20% MeOH-water mixture which does not form solvent clusters. Secondary structural studies suggest the presence of β-structures. Electron microscopic images indicate that fibril formation occurs in a time-dependent manner, under different conditions of solvent composition. Thioflavin-T fluorescence studies confirm the presence of amyloid fibrils in the aggregates. Although the insertion of the Asn-Gly sequence has not facilitated the formation of an ideal Type I' rigid turn, the intramolecular interactions aid the formation of a flexible β-turn conformation, with twisted β-sheets. Interactions between the intermolecular β-sheets result in the formation of amyloid fibrils. Organic solvents appear to play an important role in modulating self-assembly of peptide PAβ during fibril formation. Studies on β-hairpin engineered amyloidogenic peptides could lead to knowledge about suitable conditions for generating a diverse range of polymorphic structures. PMID:26473431

  9. Self-assembly of a peptide with a tandem repeat of the Aβ16-22 sequence linked by a β turn-promoting dipeptide sequence.

    PubMed

    Sivakama Sundari, Chandrasekaran; Bikshapathy, Erugurala; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid deposits have been found to be abundant in patients with Alzheimer's disease due to fibril formation by the Aβ peptides. Peptide Aβ16-22, comprising of the seven-residue segment KLVFFAE, spanning residues 16-22 of the full length Aβ42 peptide, aggregates to form fibrils or other nanostructures in isolation, depending on the conditions of dissolution and incubation. In this study, we have examined the self-assembly of PAβ, a tandem repeat peptide of the Aβ16-22 sequence, joined by a β-turn-inducing sequence Asn-Gly. To study the effect of various solvents on the self-association, hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP), trifluoroethanol (TFE) and methanol were used. The peptide was also incubated in fibril-promoting conditions of 20% fluorinated alcohol-water mixtures which form dynamical solvent clusters, as well as in 20% MeOH-water mixture which does not form solvent clusters. Secondary structural studies suggest the presence of β-structures. Electron microscopic images indicate that fibril formation occurs in a time-dependent manner, under different conditions of solvent composition. Thioflavin-T fluorescence studies confirm the presence of amyloid fibrils in the aggregates. Although the insertion of the Asn-Gly sequence has not facilitated the formation of an ideal Type I' rigid turn, the intramolecular interactions aid the formation of a flexible β-turn conformation, with twisted β-sheets. Interactions between the intermolecular β-sheets result in the formation of amyloid fibrils. Organic solvents appear to play an important role in modulating self-assembly of peptide PAβ during fibril formation. Studies on β-hairpin engineered amyloidogenic peptides could lead to knowledge about suitable conditions for generating a diverse range of polymorphic structures.

  10. Identification of potent 11mer glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist peptides with novel C-terminal amino acids: Homohomophenylalanine analogs.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasir S; Lee, Ving G; Riexinger, Douglas; Lei, Ming; Malmstrom, Sarah; Xin, Li; Han, Songping; Mapelli, Claudio; Cooper, Christopher B; Zhang, Ge; Ewing, William R; Krupinski, John

    2010-05-01

    We report the identification of potent agonists of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R). These compounds are short, 11 amino acid peptides containing several unnatural amino acids, including (in particular) analogs of homohomophenylalanine (hhPhe) at the C-terminal position. Typically the functional activity of the more potent peptides in this class is in the low picomolar range in an in vitro cAMP assay, with one example demonstrating excellent in vivo activity in an ob/ob mouse model of diabetes.

  11. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications. PMID:24789252

  12. A Sensitive Peptide Nucleic Acid Probe Assay for Detection of BRAF V600 Mutations in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Long; Chang, John Wen-Cheng; Hsieh, Jia-Juan; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Chiou, Chiuan-Chian

    Mutated v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) is an important biomarker for the prediction of therapeutic efficacy of several anticancer drugs. The detection of BRAF mutation faces two challenges: Firstly, there are multiple types of mutations, and secondly, tumor samples usually contain various amounts of wild-type, normal tissues. Here, we describe a newly established method for sensitive detection of multiple types of BRAF V600 mutations in excess wild-type background. The method introduced a fluorophore-tagged peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to serve as both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamp and sensor probe, which inhibited the amplification of wild-type templates during PCR and revealed multiple types of mutant signals during melting analysis. We demonstrated the design and optimization process of the method, and applied it in the detection of BRAF mutations in 49 melanoma samples. This PNA probe assay method detected three types of mutations in 17 samples, and was much more sensitive than conventional PCR plus Sanger sequencing. PMID:27566656

  13. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels via peptide nucleic acid (PNA)/DNA complexation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Te-Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-12-28

    This work presents a new concept in hybrid hydrogel design. Synthetic water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) polymers grafted with multiple peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are crosslinked upon addition of the linker DNA. The self-assembly is mediated by the PNA-DNA complexation, which results in the formation of hydrophilic polymer networks. We show that the hydrogels can be produced through two different types of complexations. Type I hydrogel is formed via the PNA/DNA double-helix hybridization. Type II hydrogel utilizes a unique "P-form" oligonucleotide triple-helix that comprises two PNA sequences and one DNA. Microrheology studies confirm the respective gelation processes and disclose a higher critical gelation concentration for the type I gel when compared to the type II design. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the interconnected microporous structure of both types of hydrogels. Type I double-helix hydrogel exhibits larger pore sizes than type II triple-helix gel. The latter apparently contains denser structure and displays greater elasticity as well. The designed hybrid hydrogels have potential as novel biomaterials for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

  14. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications.

  15. The nucleotide sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 reveals a new amino acid substitution in exon 4 which is also present in HLA-B{sup *}2706

    SciTech Connect

    Rudwaleit, M.; Bowness, P.; Wordsworth, P.

    1996-12-31

    The HLA-B27 subtype HLA-B{sup *}2704 is virtually absent in Caucasians but common in Orientals, where it is associated with ankylosing spondylitis. The amino acid sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 has been established by peptide mapping and was shown to differ by two amino acids from HLA-B{sup *}2705, HLA-B{sup *}2704 is characterized by a serine for aspartic acid substitution at position 77 and glutamic acid for valine at position 152. To date, however, no nucleotide sequence confirming these changes at the DNA level has been published. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  17. Fetal rat septal cells adhere to and extend processes on basement membrane, laminin, and a synthetic peptide from the laminin A chain sequence.

    PubMed

    Jucker, M; Kleinman, H K; Ingram, D K

    1991-04-01

    Responses of rat embryonic septal cells to reconstituted basement membrane, laminin, and laminin A chain-derived synthetic peptides were studied in culture. Dissociated fetal E16/17 septal cells were grown for three days on differently coated plastic substrata. Reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel), laminin, and a 19-amino acid synthetic peptide CSRARKQAASIKVAVSADR-NH2 (PA22-2) from the laminin A chain sequence mediated cell-substratum adhesion and promoted neurite outgrowth. In contrast, cells did not attach to or form processes on uncoated plastic or on plastic substrata coated with synthetic, laminin-derived control peptides. Polyethylenimine (PEI) supported the adhesion and survival of fetal septal cells; however, when laminin was added to the medium during cell plating or 18 hr afterward, a dose-dependent increase was observed in neurite outgrowth of cells attached to this substratum. Cells grown for 6 days on PEI in the presence of laminin showed a determined increase in the number of cholinergic neurons as marked by acetylcholinesterase staining. These data suggest that the subpopulation of cholinergic septal neurons present in the septal cells studied here were also responding to laminin. The results of this in vitro study suggest potential uses for basement membrane, laminin, or synthetic peptides, such as PA22-2, in fetal septal grafts to enhance regeneration in the damaged septo-hippocampal system.

  18. Mutations in the Spacer Peptide and Adjoining Sequences in Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Lead to Tubular Budding ▿

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Paul W.; Johnson, Marc C.; Vogt, Volker M.

    2008-01-01

    All orthoretroviruses encode a single structural protein, Gag, which is necessary and sufficient for the assembly and budding of enveloped virus-like particles from the cell. The Gag proteins of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contain a short spacer peptide (SP or SP1, respectively) separating the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains. SP or SP1 and the residues immediately upstream are known to be critical for proper assembly. Using mutagenesis and electron microscopy analysis of insect cells or chicken cells overexpressing RSV Gag, we defined the SP assembly domain to include the last 8 residues of CA, all 12 residues of SP, and the first 4 residues of NC. Five- or two-amino acid glycine-rich insertions or substitutions in this critical region uniformly resulted in the budding of abnormal, long tubular particles. The equivalent SP1-containing HIV-1 Gag sequence was unable to functionally replace the RSV sequence in supporting normal RSV spherical assembly. According to secondary structure predictions, RSV and HIV-1 SP/SP1 and adjoining residues may form an alpha helix, and what is likely the functionally equivalent sequence in murine leukemia virus Gag has been inferred by mutational analysis to form an amphipathic alpha helix. However, our alanine insertion mutagenesis did not provide evidence for an amphipathic helix in RSV Gag. Taken together, these results define a short assembly domain between the folded portions of CA and NC, which is essential for formation of the immature Gag shell. PMID:18448521

  19. Synthesis of peptides from amino acids and ATP with lysine-rich proteinoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the synthesis of peptides from aminoacids and ATP with a lysine-rich protenoid. The latter in aqueous solution catalyzes the formation of peptides from free amino acids and ATP; this catalytic activity is not found in acidic protenoids, even though the latter contain a basic aminoacid. The pH optimum for the synthesis is about 11, but it is appreciable below 8 and above 13. Temperature data indicate an optimum at 20 C or above, with little increase in rate up to 60 C. Pyrophosphate can be used instead of ATP, but the yields are lower. The ATP-aided syntheses of peptides in aqueous solution occur with several types of proteinous aminoacids.

  20. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  1. Peptide Aptamers: Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Peptide aptamers are small combinatorial proteins that are selected to bind to specific sites on their target molecules. Peptide aptamers consist of short, 5-20 amino acid residues long sequences, typically embedded as a loop within a stable protein scaffold. Various peptide aptamer scaffolds and in vitro and in vivo selection techniques are reviewed with emphasis on specific biomedical, bioimaging, and bioanalytical applications. PMID:25866267

  2. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated induction of human gamma-globin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Xu, X; Pace, B; Dean, D A; Glazer, P M; Chan, P; Goodman, S R; Shokolenko, I

    1999-07-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can bind to homopurine/homopyrimidine sequences of double-stranded DNA targets in a sequence-specific manner and form [PNA]2/DNA triplexes with single-stranded DNA D-loop structures at the PNA binding sites. These D-loop structures have been found to have a capacity to initiate transcription in vitro. If this strategy can be used to induce transcription of endogenous genes, it may provide a novel approach for gene therapy of many human diseases. Human [beta] globin disorders such as sickle cell anemia and beta-thalassemia are very common genetic diseases that are caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. When gamma-globin genes are highly expressed in sickle cell patients, the presence of high levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF, alpha2gamma2) can compensate for the defective beta-globin gene product and such patients have much improved symptoms or are free of disease. However, the gamma-globin genes are developmentally regulated and normally expressed at very low levels (>1%) in adult blood cells. We have investigated the possibility of inducing gamma-globin gene expression with PNAs. Using PNAs designed to bind to the 5' flanking region of the gamma-globin gene, induction of expression of a reporter gene construct was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, PNA-mediated induction of endogenous gamma-globin gene expression was also demonstrated in K562 human erythroleukemia cells. This result suggests that induction of gamma-globin gene expression with PNAs might provide a new approach for the treatment of sickle cell disease. PNA-induced gene expression strategy also may have implications in gene therapy of other diseases such as genetic diseases, cancer and infectious diseases.

  3. Nanoparticle Formation from Hybrid, Multiblock Copolymers of Poly(Acrylic Acid) and VPGVG Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Grieshaber, Sarah E.; Paik, Bradford A.; Bai, Shi; Kiick, Kristi L.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-01-01

    Elastin-mimetic hybrid copolymers with an alternating molecular architecture were synthesized via the step growth polymerization of azide-functionalized, telechelic poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PtBA) and an alkyne-terminated, valine and glycine-rich peptide with a sequence of (VPGVG)2 (VG2). The resultant hybrid copolymer, [PtBA-VG2]n, contains up to six constituent building blocks and has a polydispersity index (PDI) of ~1.9. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) treatment of [PtBA-VG2]n gave rise to an alternating copolymer of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and VG2 ([PAA-VG2]n). The modular design permits facile adjustment of the copolymer composition by varying the molecular weight of PAA (22 and 63 repeat units). Characterization by dynamic light scattering indicated that the multiblock copolymers formed discrete nanoparticles at room temperature in aqueous solution at pH 3.8, with an average diameter of 250-270 nm and a particle size distribution of 0.34 for multiblock copolymers containing PAA22 and 0.17 for those containing PAA63. Upon increasing the pH to 7.4, both types of particles were able to swell without being disintegrated, reaching an average diameter of 285-300 nm for [PAA22-VG2]n and 330-350 nm for [PAA63-VG2]n, respectively. The nanoparticles were not dissociated upon the addition of urea, further confirming their unusual stability. The nanoparticles were capable of sequestering a hydrophobic fluorescent dye (pyrene), and the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) was determined to be 1.09 × 10-2 or 1.05 × 10-2 mg/mL for [PAA22-VG2]n and [PAA63-VG2]n, respectively. We suggest that the multiblock copolymers form through collective H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions between the PAA and VG2 peptide units, and that the unusual stability of the multiblock nanoparticles is conferred by the multiblock architecture. These hybrid multiblock copolymers are potentially useful as pH-responsive drug delivery vehicles, with the possibility of drug loading through

  4. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  5. Binding of small basic peptides to membranes containing acidic lipids: theoretical models and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tal, N; Honig, B; Peitzsch, R M; Denisov, G; McLaughlin, S

    1996-01-01

    We measured directly the binding of Lys3, Lys5, and Lys7 to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. When the vesicles contain 33% acidic lipids and the aqueous solution contains 100 mM monovalent salt, the standard Gibbs free energy for the binding of these peptides is 3, 5, and 7 kcal/mol, respectively. The binding energies decrease as the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane decreases and/or as the salt concentration increases. Several lines of evidence suggest that these hydrophilic peptides do not penetrate the polar headgroup region of the membrane and that the binding is mainly due to electrostatic interactions. To calculate the binding energies from classical electrostatics, we applied the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation to atomic models of the phospholipid bilayers and the basic peptides in aqueous solution. The electrostatic free energy of interaction, which arises from both a long-range coulombic attraction between the positively charged peptide and the negatively charged lipid bilayer, and a short-range Born or image charge repulsion, is a minimum when approximately 2.5 A (i.e., one layer of water) exists between the van der Waals surfaces of the peptide and the lipid bilayer. The calculated molar association constants, K, agree well with the measured values: K is typically about 10-fold smaller than the experimental value (i.e., a difference of about 1.5 kcal/mol in the free energy of binding). The predicted dependence of K (or the binding free energies) on the ionic strength of the solution, the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane, and the number of basic residues in the peptide agree very well with the experimental measurements. These calculations are relevant to the membrane binding of a number of important proteins that contain clusters of basic residues. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8842196

  6. Correlations Between Amino Acids at Different Sites in Local Sequences of Protein Fragments with Given Structural Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen; Liu, Hai-yan

    2007-02-01

    Ample evidence suggests that the local structures of peptide fragments in native proteins are to some extent encoded by their local sequences. Detecting such local correlations is important but it is still an open question what would be the most appropriate method. This is partly because conventional sequence analyses treat amino acid preferences at each site of a protein sequence independently, while it is often the inter-site interactions that bring about local sequence-structure correlations. Here a new scheme is introduced to capture the correlation between amino acid preferences at different sites for different local structure types. A library of nine-residue fragments is constructed, and the fragments are divided into clusters based on their local structures. For each local structure cluster or type, chi-square tests are used to identify correlated preferences of amino acid combinations at pairs of sites. A score function is constructed including both the single site amino acid preferences and the dual-site amino acid combination preferences, which can be used to identify whether a sequence fragment would have a strong tendency to form a particular local structure in native proteins. The results show that, given a local structure pattern, dual-site amino acid combinations contain different information from single site amino acid preferences. Representative examples show that many of the statistically identified correlations agree with previously-proposed heuristic rules about local sequence-structure correlations, or are consistent with physical-chemical interactions required to stabilize particular local structures. Results also show that such dual-site correlations in the score function significantly improves the Z-score matching a sequence fragment to its native local structure relative to non-native local structures, and certain local structure types are highly predictable from the local sequence alone if inter-site correlations are considered.

  7. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  8. One-pot nanoparticulation of potentially bioactive peptides and gallic acid encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2016-11-01

    Whey protein isolate was hydrolyzed to an in vitro antioxidative hydrolysate, followed by transglutaminase-induced cross-linking and microemulsification in an oil phase. The obtained microemulsion was then dispersed in a gallic acid-rich model wastewater which caused gallic acid transportation into internal nanodroplets. Whey peptides were consequently gelled, yielding nanoparticles. Electrophoresis showed that β-lactoglobulin and low molecular weight peptides were cross-linked by transglutaminase. Protein hydrolysis and subsequent enzymatic cross-linking increased the ζ-potential value. Microscopic investigation indicated that most particles were non-spherical. Non-cross-linked and cross-linked peptides underwent a form of heat-triggered self-assembly in the dry state, while nanoparticles did not show such behavior. Peptide crystallites size was increased by cross-linking and acid-induced particle formation. The latter also caused a reduction in intensity of C-H stretching and C-N bending peaks in infra-red spectrum. Gallic acid release from particles to simulated gastrointestinal fluids was through diffusion from swollen particles, and reached almost 70% release. PMID:27211653

  9. One-pot nanoparticulation of potentially bioactive peptides and gallic acid encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2016-11-01

    Whey protein isolate was hydrolyzed to an in vitro antioxidative hydrolysate, followed by transglutaminase-induced cross-linking and microemulsification in an oil phase. The obtained microemulsion was then dispersed in a gallic acid-rich model wastewater which caused gallic acid transportation into internal nanodroplets. Whey peptides were consequently gelled, yielding nanoparticles. Electrophoresis showed that β-lactoglobulin and low molecular weight peptides were cross-linked by transglutaminase. Protein hydrolysis and subsequent enzymatic cross-linking increased the ζ-potential value. Microscopic investigation indicated that most particles were non-spherical. Non-cross-linked and cross-linked peptides underwent a form of heat-triggered self-assembly in the dry state, while nanoparticles did not show such behavior. Peptide crystallites size was increased by cross-linking and acid-induced particle formation. The latter also caused a reduction in intensity of C-H stretching and C-N bending peaks in infra-red spectrum. Gallic acid release from particles to simulated gastrointestinal fluids was through diffusion from swollen particles, and reached almost 70% release.

  10. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  11. Alkylating potency of nitrosated amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Shephard, S E; Meier, I; Lutz, W K

    1991-01-01

    The alkylating potency of unstable N-nitrosamino acids and N-nitrosopeptides was investigated in vitro using 4-(para-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) as nucleophile. Of the amino acids, Met and those with an aromatic side chain were the most potent. The relative overall alkylating potency was 23:10:5:4:2:1: for Trp, Met, His, Tyr, Phe and Gly, respectively. The homo-dipeptides were much more potent than the amino acids, with relative potencies of 400:110:100:8:3:1, for Trp-Trp, Tyr-Tyr, Met-Met, Asp-Asp, Phe-Phe and Gly, respectively. In the one-phase reaction system (in which NBP is already present during the nitrosation reaction at acidic pH), all amino acids tested showed a second-order reaction for nitrite. In the two-phase system (in which NBP is added only after bringing the nitrosation reaction mixture to neutrality), all amino acids tested except one again showed a second-order reaction for nitrite (Phe, His, Asp and the dipeptide artificial sweetener aspartame); only Met under these conditions had a reaction order of one for nitrite. This could mean that nitrosation of the side chain of Met produces a second N-nitroso product which is relatively stable in acid but reacts with NBP under neutral conditions. In the human stomach, this side-chain nitrosation might become more important than the reactions at the primary amino group, firstly because of the greater stability of the product(s) in acid and secondly because of the first-order reaction rate for nitrite.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Sequence Effect of Self-Assembling Peptides on the Complexation and In Vitro Delivery of the Hydrophobic Anticancer Drug Ellipticine

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Shan Yu; Yang, Hong; Chen, P.

    2008-01-01

    A special class of self-assembling peptides has been found to be capable of stabilizing the hydrophobic anticancer agent ellipticine in aqueous solution. Here we study the effect of peptide sequence on the complex formation and its anticancer activity in vitro. Three peptides, EAK16-II, EAK16-IV and EFK16-II, were selected to have either a different charge distribution (EAK16-II vs. EAK16-IV) or a varying hydrophobicity (EAK16-II vs. EFK16-II). Results on their complexation with ellipticine revealed that EAK16-II and EAK16-IV were able to stabilize protonated ellipticine or ellipticine microcrystals depending on the peptide concentration; EFK16-II could stabilize neutral ellipticine molecules and ellipticine microcrystals. These different molecular states of ellipticine were expected to affect ellipticine delivery. The anticancer activity of these complexes was tested against two cancer cell lines: A549 and MCF-7, and related to the cell viability. The viability results showed that the complexes with protonated ellipticine were effective in eradicating both cancer cells (viability <0.05), but their dilutions in water were not stable, leading to a fast decrease in their toxicity. In contrast, the complexes formulated with EFK16-II were relatively stable upon dilution, but their original toxicity was relatively low compared to that with protonated ellipticine. Overall, the charge distribution of the peptides seemed not to affect the complex formation and its therapeutic efficacy in vitro; however, the increase in hydrophobicity of the peptides significantly altered the state of stabilized ellipticine and increased the stability of the complexes. This work provides essential information for peptide sequence design in the development of self-assembling peptide-based delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs. PMID:18398476

  13. Sequence-Dependent Structure/Function Relationships of Catalytic Peptide-Enabled Gold Nanoparticles Generated under Ambient Synthetic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Hughes, Zak E; Tang, Zhenghua; Li, Yue; Briggs, Beverly D; Ren, Yang; Swihart, Mark T; Petkov, Valeri G; Naik, Rajesh R; Knecht, Marc R; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2016-01-20

    Peptide-enabled nanoparticle (NP) synthesis routes can create and/or assemble functional nanomaterials under environmentally friendly conditions, with properties dictated by complex interactions at the biotic/abiotic interface. Manipulation of this interface through sequence modification can provide the capability for material properties to be tailored to create enhanced materials for energy, catalysis, and sensing applications. Fully realizing the potential of these materials requires a comprehensive understanding of sequence-dependent structure/function relationships that is presently lacking. In this work, the atomic-scale structures of a series of peptide-capped Au NPs are determined using a combination of atomic pair distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data and advanced molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The Au NPs produced with different peptide sequences exhibit varying degrees of catalytic activity for the exemplar reaction 4-nitrophenol reduction. The experimentally derived atomic-scale NP configurations reveal sequence-dependent differences in structural order at the NP surface. Replica exchange with solute-tempering MD simulations are then used to predict the morphology of the peptide overlayer on these Au NPs and identify factors determining the structure/catalytic properties relationship. We show that the amount of exposed Au surface, the underlying surface structural disorder, and the interaction strength of the peptide with the Au surface all influence catalytic performance. A simplified computational prediction of catalytic performance is developed that can potentially serve as a screening tool for future studies. Our approach provides a platform for broadening the analysis of catalytic peptide-enabled metallic NP systems, potentially allowing for the development of rational design rules for property enhancement.

  14. Sequence-Dependent Structure/Function Relationships of Catalytic Peptide-Enabled Gold Nanoparticles Generated under Ambient Synthetic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Hughes, Zak E; Tang, Zhenghua; Li, Yue; Briggs, Beverly D; Ren, Yang; Swihart, Mark T; Petkov, Valeri G; Naik, Rajesh R; Knecht, Marc R; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2016-01-20

    Peptide-enabled nanoparticle (NP) synthesis routes can create and/or assemble functional nanomaterials under environmentally friendly conditions, with properties dictated by complex interactions at the biotic/abiotic interface. Manipulation of this interface through sequence modification can provide the capability for material properties to be tailored to create enhanced materials for energy, catalysis, and sensing applications. Fully realizing the potential of these materials requires a comprehensive understanding of sequence-dependent structure/function relationships that is presently lacking. In this work, the atomic-scale structures of a series of peptide-capped Au NPs are determined using a combination of atomic pair distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data and advanced molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The Au NPs produced with different peptide sequences exhibit varying degrees of catalytic activity for the exemplar reaction 4-nitrophenol reduction. The experimentally derived atomic-scale NP configurations reveal sequence-dependent differences in structural order at the NP surface. Replica exchange with solute-tempering MD simulations are then used to predict the morphology of the peptide overlayer on these Au NPs and identify factors determining the structure/catalytic properties relationship. We show that the amount of exposed Au surface, the underlying surface structural disorder, and the interaction strength of the peptide with the Au surface all influence catalytic performance. A simplified computational prediction of catalytic performance is developed that can potentially serve as a screening tool for future studies. Our approach provides a platform for broadening the analysis of catalytic peptide-enabled metallic NP systems, potentially allowing for the development of rational design rules for property enhancement. PMID:26679562

  15. Investigating the microstructure of keratin extracted from wool: peptide sequence (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and protein conformation (FTIR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin was extracted from wool by reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol. It was isolated as intact keratin and characterized by its similar molecular weight, protein composition, and secondary structure to native keratin. Gel electrophoresis patterns and MALDI-TOF/TOF peptide sequences provided the ide...

  16. Peptide sequencing using a patchwork approach and surface-induced dissociation in sector-TOF and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Facundo M; Smith, Lori L; Kuppannan, Krishnamoorthy; Yang, Xi; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2003-12-01

    Surface-induced ion activation in combination with a database search strategy based on the Patchwork concept is applied to the determination of peptide sequences. Surface-induced dissociation (SID) is performed in a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer and in a hybrid sector/time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to evaluate the importance of accurate mass analysis of the SID fragment ions for peptide identification. The modified Patchwork approach is based on piecing together the peptide blocks in a bidirectional way, simultaneously using low-mass fragments originating from the C-terminus and N-terminus of the molecule, and relying on the measurement of the peptide's molecular weight with moderate mass accuracy. The results from this analysis are used as search filters in MASCOT's (http://www.matrixscience.com) Sequence Query search engine, with the simultaneous addition of the full MS/MS peak list. SID is performed with collision targets coated with pure and mixed composition self-assembled monolayers produced by fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon alkanethiolate solutions of varying chemical composition. The resulting MS/MS spectra produced on pure and mixed hydrocarbon SAMs are submitted to the modified version of Patchwork sequencing. It is found that hydrocarbon surfaces improve the relative abundance of larger fragments. Under the moderate mass accuracy conditions (+/-0.3 u) offered by our linear-TOF-SID instrument, it is found that increasing the abundance of larger fragments dramatically improves the sequencing scores.

  17. Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1, an Antibacterial Peptide-Producing Bacterium from Hot Springs in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Alkhalili, Rawana N; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Canbäck, Björn

    2015-07-23

    This paper reports the draft genome sequence of the firmicute Geobacillus sp. strain ZGt-1, an antibacterial peptide producer isolated from the Zara hot spring in Jordan. This study is the first report on genomic data from a thermophilic bacterial strain isolated in Jordan.

  18. Gamma Peptide Nucleic Acids: As Orthogonal Nucleic Acid Recognition Codes for Organizing Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sacui, Iulia; Hsieh, Wei-Che; Manna, Arunava; Sahu, Bichismita; Ly, Danith H

    2015-07-01

    Nucleic acids are an attractive platform for organizing molecular self-assembly because of their specific nucleobase interactions and defined length scale. Routinely employed in the organization and assembly of materials in vitro, however, they have rarely been exploited in vivo, due to the concerns for enzymatic degradation and cross-hybridization with the host's genetic materials. Herein we report the development of a tight-binding, orthogonal, synthetically versatile, and informationally interfaced nucleic acid platform for programming molecular interactions, with implications for in vivo molecular assembly and computing. The system consists of three molecular entities: the right-handed and left-handed conformers and a nonhelical domain. The first two are orthogonal to each other in recognition, while the third is capable of binding to both, providing a means for interfacing the two conformers as well as the natural nucleic acid biopolymers (i.e., DNA and RNA). The three molecular entities are prepared from the same monomeric chemical scaffold, with the exception of the stereochemistry or lack thereof at the γ-backbone that determines if the corresponding oligo adopts a right-handed or left-handed helix, or a nonhelical motif. These conformers hybridize to each other with exquisite affinity, sequence selectivity, and level of orthogonality. Recognition modules as short as five nucleotides in length are capable of organizing molecular assembly.

  19. The genome of RNA tumor viruses contains polyadenylic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Cartas, M

    1972-04-01

    The 70S genome of two RNA tumor viruses, murine sarcoma virus and avian myeloblastosis virus, binds to Millipore filters in buffer with high salt concentration and to glass fiber filters containing poly(U). These observations suggest that 70S RNA contains adenylic acid-rich sequences. When digested by pancreatic RNase, 70S RNA of murine sarcoma virus yielded poly(A) sequences that contain 91% adenylic acid. These poly(A) sequences sedimented as a relatively homogenous peak in sucrose gradients with a sedimentation coefficient of 4-5 S, but had a mobility during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis that corresponds to molecules that sediment at 6-7 S. If we estimate a molecular weight for each sequence of 30,000-60,000 (100-200 nucleotides) and a molecular weight for viral 70S RNA of 3-12 million, each viral genome could contain 1-8 poly(A) sequences. Possible functions of poly(A) in the infecting viral RNA may include a role in the initiation of viral DNA or RNA synthesis, in protein maturation, or in the assembly of the viral genome.

  20. Isolation and a partial amino acid sequence of insulin from the islet tissue of cod (Gadus callarias)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P. T.; Reid, K. B. M.

    1968-01-01

    1. Insulin has been isolated by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography from extracts of the discrete islet tissue of cod. The final preparation yielded a single band on electrophoresis at two pH values. The biological potency was 11·5 international units/mg. in mouse-convulsion and other assay procedures. 2. Glycine and methionine were shown to be the N-terminal amino acids of the A and B chains respectively. An estimate of the molecular weight together with amino acid analyses indicated that cod insulin, like the bovine hormone, consists of 51 amino acid residues. In contrast, the amino acid composition differs markedly from bovine insulin. 3. Oxidation of insulin with performic acid yielded the A and B peptide chains, which were separated by ion-exchange chromatography. Sequence studies on smaller peptides isolated from enzymic digests or from dilute acetic acid hydrolysates of the two chains have established the sequential order of 14 of the 21 amino acid residues of the A chain and 25 of the 30 amino acid residues of the B chain. PMID:4866431

  1. Impact of sequence on the molecular assembly of short amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Victoria A; Cheon, Mookyung; Chang, Iksoo; Hall, Carol K

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this work is to understand how the sequence of a protein affects the likelihood that it will form an amyloid fibril and the kinetics along the fibrillization pathway. The focus is on very short fragments of amyloid proteins since these play a role in the fibrillization of the parent protein and can form fibrils themselves. Discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations using the PRIME20 force field were performed of the aggregation of 48-peptide systems containing SNQNNF (PrP (170-175)), SSTSAA (RNaseA(15-20)), MVGGVV (Aβ(35-40)), GGVVIA (Aβ(37-42)), and MVGGVVIA (Aβ(35-42)). In our simulations SNQQNF, SSTTSAA, and MVGGVV form large numbers of fibrillar structures spontaneously (as in experiment). GGVVIA forms β-sheets that do not stack into fibrils (unlike experiment). The combination sequence MVGGVVIA forms less fibrils than MVGGVV, hindered by the presence of the hydrophobic residues at the C-terminal. Analysis of the simulation kinetics and energetics reveals why MVGGVV forms fibrils and GGVVIA does not, and why adding I and A to MVGGVVIA reduces fibrillization and enhances amorphous aggregation into oligomeric structures. The latter helps explain why Aβ(1-42) assembles into more complex oligomers than Aβ(1-40), a consequence of which is that it is more strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-01

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  3. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-02-22

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)(n) amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher-order structure and function. This study defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing from the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA(1)-Gly-X1-X2, designated G1G interruptions. Residues found within G1G interruptions are predominantly hydrophobic (70%), followed by a significant amount of charged residues (16%), and the Gly-X1-X2 triplets flanking the interruption are atypical. Studies on peptide models indicate the degree of destabilization is much greater when Pro is in the interruption, GP, than when hydrophobic residues (GF, GY) are present, and a rigid Gly-Pro-Hyp tripeptide adjacent to the interruption leads to greater destabilization than a flexible Gly-Ala-Ala sequence. Modeling based on NMR data indicates the Phe residue within a GF interruption is located on the outside of the triple helix. The G1G interruptions resemble a previously studied collagen interruption GPOGAAVMGPO, designated G4G-type, in that both are destabilizing, but allow continuation of rod-like triple helices and maintenance of the single residue stagger throughout the imperfection, with a loss of axial register of the superhelix on both sides. Both kinds of interruptions result in a highly localized perturbation in hydrogen bonding and dihedral angles, but the hydrophobic residue of a G4G interruption packs near the central axis of the superhelix, while the hydrophobic residue of a G1G interruption is located on the triple-helix surface. The different structural consequences of G1G and G4G interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence pattern suggest a physical basis for their differential susceptibility to matrix metalloproteinases in type X collagen.

  4. Nucleic acid sequence design via efficient ensemble defect optimization.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Joseph N; Wolfe, Brian R; Pierce, Niles A

    2011-02-01

    We describe an algorithm for designing the sequence of one or more interacting nucleic acid strands intended to adopt a target secondary structure at equilibrium. Sequence design is formulated as an optimization problem with the goal of reducing the ensemble defect below a user-specified stop condition. For a candidate sequence and a given target secondary structure, the ensemble defect is the average number of incorrectly paired nucleotides at equilibrium evaluated over the ensemble of unpseudoknotted secondary structures. To reduce the computational cost of accepting or rejecting mutations to a random initial sequence, candidate mutations are evaluated on the leaf nodes of a tree-decomposition of the target structure. During leaf optimization, defect-weighted mutation sampling is used to select each candidate mutation position with probability proportional to its contribution to the ensemble defect of the leaf. As subsequences are merged moving up the tree, emergent structural defects resulting from crosstalk between sibling sequences are eliminated via reoptimization within the defective subtree starting from new random subsequences. Using a Θ(N(3) ) dynamic program to evaluate the ensemble defect of a target structure with N nucleotides, this hierarchical approach implies an asymptotic optimality bound on design time: for sufficiently large N, the cost of sequence design is bounded below by 4/3 the cost of a single evaluation of the ensemble defect for the full sequence. Hence, the design algorithm has time complexity Ω(N(3) ). For target structures containing N ∈{100,200,400,800,1600,3200} nucleotides and duplex stems ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, RNA sequence designs at 37°C typically succeed in satisfying a stop condition with ensemble defect less than N/100. Empirically, the sequence design algorithm exhibits asymptotic optimality and the exponent in the time complexity bound is sharp.

  5. Amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta chains of adult hemoglobin of the slender loris, Loris tardigradus.

    PubMed

    Maita, T; Goodman, M; Matsuda, G

    1978-08-01

    alpha and beta chains from adult hemoglobin of the slender loris (Loris tardigradus) were isolated by Amberlite CG-50 column chromatography. After S-aminoethylation, both chains were digested with trypsin and the amino acid sequences of the tryptic peptides obtained were analyzed. Further, the order of these tryptic peptides in each chain was deduced from their homology with the primary structures of alpha and beta chains of human adult hemoglobin. Comparing the primary structures of the alpha and beta chains of adult hemoglobin of the slender loris thus obtained with those of adult hemoglobin of the slow loris, 4 amino acid substitutions in the alpha chains and 2 in the beta chains were recognized.

  6. Applications of hydrophilic interaction chromatography to amino acids, peptides, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Periat, Aurélie; Krull, Ira S; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-02-01

    This review summarizes the recent advances in the analysis of amino acids, peptides, and proteins using hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Various reports demonstrate the successful analysis of amino acids under such conditions. However, a baseline resolution of the 20 natural amino acids has not yet been published and for this reason, there is often a need to use mass spectrometry for detection to further improve selectivity. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography is also recognized as a powerful technique for peptide analysis, and there are a lot of papers showing its applicability for proteomic applications (peptide mapping). It is expected that its use for peptide mapping will continue to grow in the future, particularly because this analytical strategy can be combined with reversed-phase liquid chromatography, in a two-dimensional setup, to reach very high resolving power. Finally, the interest in hydrophilic interaction chromatography for intact proteins analysis is less evident due to possible solubility issues and a lack of suitable hydrophilic interaction chromatography stationary phases. To date, it has been successfully employed only for the characterization of membrane proteins, histones, and the separation of glycosylated isoforms of an intact glycoprotein. From our point of view, the number of hydrophilic interaction chromatography columns compatible with intact proteins (higher upper temperature limit, large pore size, etc.) is still too limited.

  7. Acidity-Mediated, Electrostatic Tuning of Asymmetrically Charged Peptides Interactions with Protein Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Asandei, Alina; Chinappi, Mauro; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Mereuta, Loredana; Park, Yoonkyung; Luchian, Tudor

    2015-08-01

    Despite success in probing chemical reactions and dynamics of macromolecules on submillisecond time and nanometer length scales, a major impasse faced by nanopore technology is the need to cheaply and controllably modulate macromolecule capture and trafficking across the nanopore. We demonstrate herein that tunable charge separation engineered at the both ends of a macromolecule very efficiently modulates the dynamics of macromolecules capture and traffic through a nanometer-size pore. In the proof-of-principle approach, we employed a 36 amino acids long peptide containing at the N- and C-termini uniform patches of glutamic acids and arginines, flanking a central segment of asparagines, and we studied its capture by the α-hemolysin (α-HL) and the mean residence time inside the pore in the presence of a pH gradient across the protein. We propose a solution to effectively control the dynamics of peptide interaction with the nanopore, with both association and dissociation reaction rates of peptide-α-HL interactions spanning orders of magnitude depending upon solution acidity on the peptide addition side and the transmembrane electric potential, while preserving the amplitude of the blockade current signature. PMID:26144534

  8. On combining protein sequences and nucleic acid sequences in phylogenetic analysis: the homeobox protein case.

    PubMed

    Agosti, D; Jacobs, D; DeSalle, R

    1996-01-01

    Amino acid encoding genes contain character state information that may be useful for phylogenetic analysis on at least two levels. The nucleotide sequence and the translated amino acid sequences have both been employed separately as character states for cladistic studies of various taxa, including studies of the genealogy of genes in multigene families. In essence, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences are two different ways of character coding the information in a gene. Silent positions in the nucleotide sequence (first or third positions in codons that can accrue change without changing the identity of the amino acid that the triplet codes for) may accrue change relatively rapidly and become saturated, losing the pattern of historical divergence. On the other hand, non-silent nucleotide alterations and their accompanying amino acid changes may evolve too slowly to reveal relationships among closely related taxa. In general, the dynamics of sequence change in silent and non-silent positions in protein coding genes result in homoplasy and lack of resolution, respectively. We suggest that the combination of nucleic acid and the translated amino acid coded character states into the same data matrix for phylogenetic analysis addresses some of the problems caused by the rapid change of silent nucleotide positions and overall slow rate of change of non-silent nucleotide positions and slowly changing amino acid positions. One major theoretical problem with this approach is the apparent non-independence of the two sources of characters. However, there are at least three possible outcomes when comparing protein coding nucleic acid sequences with their translated amino acids in a phylogenetic context on a codon by codon basis. First, the two character sets for a codon may be entirely congruent with respect to the information they convey about the relationships of a certain set of taxa. Second, one character set may display no information concerning a phylogenetic

  9. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  10. Electroporation-based delivery of cell-penetrating peptide conjugates of peptide nucleic acids for antisense inhibition of intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sai; Schroeder, Betsy; Sun, Chen; Loufakis, Despina Nelie; Cao, Zhenning; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lu, Chang

    2014-10-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been used for a myriad of cellular delivery applications and were recently explored for delivery of antisense agents such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) for bacterial inhibition. Although these molecular systems (i.e. CPP-PNAs) have shown ability to inhibit growth of bacterial cultures in vitro, they show limited effectiveness in killing encapsulated intracellular bacteria in mammalian cells such as macrophages, presumably due to difficulty involved in the endosomal escape of the reagents. In this report, we show that electroporation delivery dramatically increases the bioavailability of CPP-PNAs to kill Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 inside macrophages. Electroporation delivers the molecules without involving endocytosis and greatly increases the antisense effect. The decrease in the average number of Salmonella per macrophage under a 1200 V cm(-1) and 5 ms pulse was a factor of 9 higher than that without electroporation (in an experiment with a multiplicity of infection of 2 : 1). Our results suggest that electroporation is an effective approach for a wide range of applications involving CPP-based delivery. The microfluidic format will allow convenient functional screening and testing of PNA-based reagents for antisense applications.

  11. Insights on peptide backbone N-H acidity: Structure of anions, hydration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Antoni; Henry, Bernard; Ruiz-López, Manuel F.

    2013-03-01

    Despite the key role played by deamidation reactions in biochemical phenomena such as aging processes, knowledge of factors determining peptide backbone N-H acidities is scarce. We report a theoretical study on this topic by means of quantum-chemical calculations. Gas-phase acidities and pKa's in water have been estimated. The results agree reasonably well with available experimental data. Further analysis suggests that the secondary peptide structure, in addition to hydration effects, is the main factor determining pKa. In particular, we predict N-H protons to be more acidic in β-turns than in α-helices, a finding that may have broad biological implications.

  12. Exploiting anthracene photodimerization within peptides: light induced sequence-selective DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Gemma A; Tucker, James H R; Peacock, Anna F A

    2015-05-11

    The unprecedented use of anthracene photodimerization within a protein or peptide system is explored through its incorporation into a DNA-binding peptide, derived from the GCN4 transcription factor. This study demonstrates an effective and dynamic interplay between a photoreaction and a peptide-DNA assembly, with each process able to exert control over the other.

  13. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  14. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  15. Inspiration from the mirror: D-amino acid containing peptides in biomedical approaches.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Xu, Bing

    2016-06-01

    D-amino acids, the enantiomers of naturally abundant L-amino acids, bear unique stereochemistry properties that lead to the resistance towards most of the endogenous enzymes. Previous works have demonstrated applications of D-amino acids in therapeutic development with the aid of mirror-image phage display and retro-inverso peptide synthesis. In this review, we highlight the recent progress and challenges in the exploration of D-amino acids at the interface of chemistry and life science. First, we will introduce some progress made in traditional application of D-amino acids to enhance biostability of peptide therapeutics. Then, we discuss some works that explore the relatively underexplored interactions between the enzyme and D-amino acids and enzymatic reactions of D-amino acids. To highlight the enzymatic reactions of D-amino acids, we will describe several emerging works on the enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA) and their potential application in selective anti-inflammatory or anticancer therapies. At the end, we briefly mention the challenges and possible future directions. PMID:27159920

  16. [3H]Azidodantrolene photoaffinity labeling, synthetic domain peptides and monoclonal antibody reactivity identify the dantrolene binding sequence on RyR1

    SciTech Connect

    Paul-Pletzer, Kalanethee; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Bhat, Manju B.; Ma, Jianjie; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Jimenez, Leslie S.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Parness, Jerome

    2002-06-14

    Dantrolene is a drug that suppresses intracellular Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in normal skeletal muscle and is used as a therapeutic agent in individuals susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. Though its precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated, we have identified the N-terminal region (amino acids 1-1400) of the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the primary Ca2+ release channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum, as a molecular target for dantrolene using the photoaffinity analog [3H]azidodantrolene(1). Here, we demonstrate that heterologously expressed RyR1 retains its capacity to be specifically labeled with [3H]azidodantrolene,indicating that muscle specific factors are not required for this ligand-receptor interaction. Synthetic domain peptides of RyR1, previously shown to affect RyR1 function in vitro and in vivo, were exploited as potential drug binding site mimics and used in photoaffinity labeling experiments. Only DP1 and DP1-2, peptide s containing the amino acid sequence corresponding to RyR1 residues 590-609, were specifically labeled by [3H]azidodantrolene. A monoclonal anti-RyR1 antibody which recognizes RyR1 and its 1400 amino acid N-terminal fragment, recognizes DP1 and DP1-2 in both Western blots and immunoprecipitation assays, and specifically inhibits [3H]azidodantrolene photolabeling of RyR1 and its N-terminal fragment in sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that synthetic domain peptides can mimic a native, ligand binding conformation in vitro, and that the dantrolene binding site and the epitope for the monoclonal antibody on RyR1 are equivalent and composed of amino-acids 590-609.

  17. Synthesis of peptide nucleic acids containing a crosslinking agent and evaluation of their reactivities.

    PubMed

    Akisawa, Takuya; Ishizawa, Yuki; Nagatsugi, Fumi

    2015-03-13

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are structural mimics of nucleic acids that form stable hybrids with DNA and RNA. In addition, PNAs can invade double-stranded DNA. Due to these characteristics, PNAs are widely used as biochemical tools, for example, in antisense/antigene therapy. Interstrand crosslink formation in nucleic acids is one of the strategies for preparing a stable duplex by covalent bond formation. In this study, we have synthesized PNAs incorporating 4-amino-6-oxo-2-vinylpyrimidine (AOVP) as a crosslinking agent and evaluated their reactivities for targeting DNA and RNA.

  18. A novel phytase with sequence similarity to purple acid phosphatases is expressed in cotyledons of germinating soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, C E; Grabau, E A

    2001-08-01

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate) is the major storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds. During germination, stored reserves are used as a source of nutrients by the plant seedling. Phytic acid is degraded by the activity of phytases to yield inositol and free phosphate. Due to the lack of phytases in the non-ruminant digestive tract, monogastric animals cannot utilize dietary phytic acid and it is excreted into manure. High phytic acid content in manure results in elevated phosphorus levels in soil and water and accompanying environmental concerns. The use of phytases to degrade seed phytic acid has potential for reducing the negative environmental impact of livestock production. A phytase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from cotyledons of germinated soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.). Peptide sequence data generated from the purified enzyme facilitated the cloning of the phytase sequence (GmPhy) employing a polymerase chain reaction strategy. The introduction of GmPhy into soybean tissue culture resulted in increased phytase activity in transformed cells, which confirmed the identity of the phytase gene. It is surprising that the soybean phytase was unrelated to previously characterized microbial or maize (Zea mays) phytases, which were classified as histidine acid phosphatases. The soybean phytase sequence exhibited a high degree of similarity to purple acid phosphatases, a class of metallophosphoesterases.

  19. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development. PMID:27336588

  20. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development.

  1. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, C.T.; Hua, R.L.; Souers, P.C.; Coronado, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21 K and 9 K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenyl-alanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritium are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Coronado, P.R.; Peng, C.T.; Hua, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21/degree/K and 9/degree/K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenylalanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritiums are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins.

  3. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, C.T.; Hua, R.L.; Souers, P.C.; Coronado, P.R.

    1988-09-01

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21 K and 9 K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenyl-alanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when sued as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. The authors study shows that both liquid and solid tritium are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins.

  4. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed. PMID:26189442

  5. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed.

  6. Molecular Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the cDNAs Encoding Toxin-Like Peptides from the Venom Glands of Tarantula Grammostola rosea

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tadashi; Ono, Seigo; Kubo, Tai

    2012-01-01

    Tarantula venom glands produce a large variety of bioactive peptides. Here we present the identification of venom components obtained by sequencing clones isolated from a cDNA library prepared from the venom glands of the Chilean common tarantula, Grammostola rosea. The cDNA sequences of about 1500 clones out of 4000 clones were analyzed after selection using several criteria. Forty-eight novel toxin-like peptides (GTx1 to GTx7, and GTx-TCTP and GTx-CRISP) were predicted from the nucleotide sequences. Among these peptides, twenty-four toxins are ICK motif peptides, eleven peptides are MIT1-like peptides, and seven are ESTX-like peptides. Peptides similar to JZTX-64, aptotoxin, CRISP, or TCTP are also obtained. GTx3 series possess a cysteine framework that is conserved among vertebrate MIT1, Bv8, prokineticins, and invertebrate astakines. GTx-CRISP is the first CRISP-like protein identified from the arthropod venom. Real-time PCR revealed that the transcripts for TCTP-like peptide are expressed in both the pereopodal muscle and the venom gland. Furthermore, a unique peptide GTx7-1, whose signal and prepro sequences are essentially identical to those of HaTx1, was obtained. PMID:22500178

  7. /sup 113/Cd NMR studies of a 1:1 Cd adduct with an 18-residue finger peptide from HIV-1 nucleic acid binding protein, p7

    SciTech Connect

    South, T.L.; Kim, B.; Summers, M.F.

    1989-01-04

    The Zn/sup 2+/ and Cd/sup 2+/ adducts with the 18-residue peptide comprising the amino acid sequence of the first finger (residues 13 through 30) of retroviral nucleic acid binding proteins p7 from HIV-1 (the causative agent of AIDS) have been prepared. /sup 1/H NMR data indicate that the metal adducts are 1:1 compounds that are stable in aqueous solutions for at least a month. The /sup 113/Cd NMR spectral results for the adduct are presented and analyzed. 26 references, 3 figures.

  8. High efficacy of a 20 amino acid peptide of the acidic ribosomal protein P0 against the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mallon, Alina; Encinosa, Pedro E; Méndez-Pérez, Lídice; Bello, Yamil; Rodríguez Fernández, Rafmary; Garay, Hilda; Cabrales, Ania; Méndez, Luis; Borroto, Carlos; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Current strategies to control cattle ticks use integrated control programs (ICP) that include vaccination. Reduction in the use of chemicals and in the cost of tick control, the delay or elimination of acaricide resistance and the decreasing of environmental pollution are the advantages of using these programs. This integrated program is potentially applicable to all genotypes of chemical resistant ticks. However, the problem here is to improve the efficacy of anti-tick vaccines. The P0 protein is a structural component of the ribosome of all organisms. We have identified an immunogenic region of ribosomal protein P0 from Rhipicephalus spp. ticks that is not very conserved compared to the orthologous protein in their hosts. A synthetic 20 amino acid peptide from this sequence was effective as a vaccine against Rhipicephalus sanguineus infestations in an immunization and challenge experiment using rabbits. In this paper, the same peptide used as vaccine against the cattle tick Rhipicephalus Boophilus microplus shows a significant diminution in the number of engorged females recovered, in the weight of females and the weight of egg masses. The number of eggs hatched was also significantly reduced for the vaccinated group, with an overall effectivity for the antigen pP0 of 96%. These results, together with the conserved sequence of the P0 peptide among ticks, suggest that this antigen could be a good broad spectrum vaccine candidate. It would be expected to be active against many species of ticks and thus has promise in an ICP for effective control of ticks and thereby to improve the efficiency and productivity of the livestock industry. PMID:25958782

  9. GAWK, a novel human pituitary polypeptide: isolation, immunocytochemical localization and complete amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Benjannet, S; Leduc, R; Lazure, C; Seidah, N G; Marcinkiewicz, M; Chrétien, M

    1985-01-16

    During the course of reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) purification of a postulated big ACTH (1) from human pituitary gland extracts, a highly purified peptide bearing no resemblance to any known polypeptide was isolated. The complete sequence of this 74 amino acid polypeptide, called GAWK, has been determined. Search on a computer data bank on the possible homology to any known protein or fragment, using a mutation data matrix, failed to reveal any homology greater than 30%. An antibody produced against a synthetic fragment allowed us to detect several immunoreactive forms. The antisera also enabled us to localize the polypeptide, by immunocytochemistry, in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.

  10. Purification, properties and complete amino acid sequence of the ferredoxin from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, J M; Jacquot, J P; de Lamotte-Guéry, F; Beauvallet, C; Dutka, S; Gadal, P; Decottignies, P

    1988-03-01

    The ferredoxin was purified from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protein showed typical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin. When compared with spinach ferredoxin, the C. reinhardtii protein was less effective in the catalysis of NADP+ photoreduction, but its activity was higher in the light activation of C. reinhardtii malate dehydrogenase (NADP). The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and of peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestions and by CNBr cleavage. The protein consists of 94 residues, with Tyr at both NH2 and COOH termini. The positions of the four cysteines binding the two iron atoms are similar to those found in other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The primary structure of C. reinhardtii ferredoxin showed a great homology (about 80%) with ferredoxins from two other green algae.

  11. Fluorine containing amino acids: synthesis and peptide coupling of amino acids containing the all-cis tetrafluorocyclohexyl motif.

    PubMed

    Ayoup, Mohammed Salah; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; O'Hagan, David

    2015-05-28

    A synthesis of two (S)-phenylalanine derivatives is described which have the all-cis, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorocyclohexyl motif attached to the aromatic ring at the meta and para positions; the para substituted isomer is elaborated into illustrative dipeptides via the free amine and carboxylate respectively demonstrating its utility as a novel amino acid for peptide synthesis and offering a vehicle for incorporation of this unique and facially polarized ring system into bioactive compounds.

  12. Antibacterial and anticancer activity of a series of novel peptides incorporating cyclic tetra-substituted C(α) amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rickey P

    2016-09-15

    Eleven antimicrobial peptides (AMP) based on the incorporation of cyclic tetra substituted C(α) amino acids, as well as other unnatural amino acids were designed, synthesized and screened for in vitro activity against 18 strains of bacteria as well as 12 cancer cell lines. The AMPs discussed herein are derived from the following peptide sequence: Ac-GF(X)G(X)B(X)G(X)F(X)G(X)GB(X)BBBB-amide, X=any one of the following residues, A5c, A6c, Tic or Oic and B=any one of the following residues, Arg, Lys, Orn, Dpr or Dab. A diversity of in vitro inhibitory activity was observed for these AMPs. Several analogs exhibited single digit μM activity against drug resistant bacteria including; multiple drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, extremely drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and MRSA. The physicochemical properties of the basic amino acid residues incorporated into these AMPs seem to play a major role in defining antibacterial activity. Overall hydrophobicity seems to play a limited role in defining antibacterial activity. The ESKAPE pathogens were used to compare the activity of these AMPs to another family of synthetic AMPs incorporating the unnatural amino acids Tic and Oic. In most cases similarly substituted members of both families exhibited similar inhibitory activity against the ESKAPE pathogens. In specific cases differences in activity as high as 15 fold were observed between analogs. In addition four of these AMPs exhibited promising IC50 (<7.5μM) values against 12 different and diverse cancer cell lines. Five other AMPs exhibited promising IC50 (<7.5μM) values against selected cancer cell lines. PMID:27387357

  13. Antibacterial and anticancer activity of a series of novel peptides incorporating cyclic tetra-substituted C(α) amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rickey P

    2016-09-15

    Eleven antimicrobial peptides (AMP) based on the incorporation of cyclic tetra substituted C(α) amino acids, as well as other unnatural amino acids were designed, synthesized and screened for in vitro activity against 18 strains of bacteria as well as 12 cancer cell lines. The AMPs discussed herein are derived from the following peptide sequence: Ac-GF(X)G(X)B(X)G(X)F(X)G(X)GB(X)BBBB-amide, X=any one of the following residues, A5c, A6c, Tic or Oic and B=any one of the following residues, Arg, Lys, Orn, Dpr or Dab. A diversity of in vitro inhibitory activity was observed for these AMPs. Several analogs exhibited single digit μM activity against drug resistant bacteria including; multiple drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, extremely drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and MRSA. The physicochemical properties of the basic amino acid residues incorporated into these AMPs seem to play a major role in defining antibacterial activity. Overall hydrophobicity seems to play a limited role in defining antibacterial activity. The ESKAPE pathogens were used to compare the activity of these AMPs to another family of synthetic AMPs incorporating the unnatural amino acids Tic and Oic. In most cases similarly substituted members of both families exhibited similar inhibitory activity against the ESKAPE pathogens. In specific cases differences in activity as high as 15 fold were observed between analogs. In addition four of these AMPs exhibited promising IC50 (<7.5μM) values against 12 different and diverse cancer cell lines. Five other AMPs exhibited promising IC50 (<7.5μM) values against selected cancer cell lines.

  14. Biological Activity of Aminophosphonic Acids and Their Short Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejczak, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel

    The biological activity and natural occurrence of the aminophosphonic acids were described half a century ago. Since then the chemistry and biology of this class of compounds have developed into the separate field of phosphorus chemistry. Today it is well acknowledged that these compounds possess a wide variety of promising, and in some cases commercially useful, physiological activities. Thus, they have found applications ranging from agrochemical (with the herbicides glyphosate and bialaphos being the most prominent examples) to medicinal (with the potent antihypertensive fosinopril and antiosteoporetic bisphosphonates being examples).

  15. Transporters for ammonium, amino acids and peptides are expressed in pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, W; Frommer, W B; Ward, J M

    1999-03-01

    Insect capture and digestion contribute substantially to the nitrogen budget of carnivorous plants. In Nepenthes, insect-derived nitrogenous compounds are imported from the pitcher fluid and transported throughout the plant via the vascular tissue to support growth. Import and distribution of nutrients may require transmembrane nitrogen transporters. Representatives of three classes of genes encoding transporters for the nitrogenous compounds ammonium, amino acids and peptides were identified in Nepenthes pitchers. The expression at the cellular level of an ammonium transporter gene, three amino acid transporter genes, and one peptide transporter gene were investigated in the insect trapping organs of Nepenthes. Expression of the ammonium transporter gene NaAMT1 was detected in the head cells of digestive glands in the lower part of the pitcher where NaAMT1 may function in ammonium uptake from the pitcher fluid. One amino acid transporter gene, NaAAP1, was expressed in bundle sheath cells surrounding the vascular tissue. To understand the locations where transmembrane transport could be required within the pitcher, symplasmic and apoplasmic continuity was probed using fluorescent dyes. Symplasmic connections were not found between cortical cells and vascular bundles. Therefore, the amino acid transporter encoded by NaAAP1 may be involved in transport of amino acids into the vascular tissue. In contrast, expression of the peptide transporter gene NaNTR1 was detected in phloem cells of the vascular tissue within pitchers. NaNTR1 may function in the export of nitrogen from the pitcher by loading peptides into the phloem. PMID:10230062

  16. Amino acid sequence and domain structure of entactin. Homology with epidermal growth factor precursor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Entactin (nidogen), a 150-kD sulfated glycoprotein, is a major component of basement membranes and forms a highly stable noncovalent complex with laminin. The complete amino acid sequence of mouse entactin has been derived from sequencing of cDNA clones. The 5.9-kb cDNA contains a 3,735-bp open reading frame followed by a 3'- untranslated region of 2.2 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 1,245- residue polypeptide with an unglycosylated Mr of 136,500, a 28-residue signal peptide, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and two potential Ca2+-binding sites. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence predicts that the molecule consists of two globular domains of 70 and 36 kD separated by a cysteine-rich domain of 28 kD. The COOH-terminal globular domain shows homology to the EGF precursor and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Entactin contains six EGF-type cysteine-rich repeat units and one copy of a cysteine-repeat motif found in thyroglobulin. The Arg-Gly-Asp cell recognition sequence is present in one of the EGF-type repeats, and a synthetic peptide from the putative cell-binding site of entactin was found to promote the attachment of mouse mammary tumor cells. PMID:3264556

  17. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of <10 fmol (<1 ng) of DNA. With the high specificity of the pyrrolidinyl PNA probe used, excellent discrimination between complementary and various single-mismatched DNA targets was obtained. An application of this new platform for a sensitive and specific detection of isothermally-amplified shrimp's white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated. PMID:26695270

  18. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of <10 fmol (<1 ng) of DNA. With the high specificity of the pyrrolidinyl PNA probe used, excellent discrimination between complementary and various single-mismatched DNA targets was obtained. An application of this new platform for a sensitive and specific detection of isothermally-amplified shrimp's white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated.

  19. Evidence for a near-resonant charge transfer mechanism for double-stranded peptide nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Ravindra; Davis, Kathryn L; Wierzbinski, Emil; Bezer, Silvia; Balaeff, Alexander; Keinan, Shahar; Paul, Amit; Kocsis, Laura; Beratan, David N; Achim, Catalina; Waldeck, David H

    2011-01-12

    We present evidence for a near-resonant mechanism of charge transfer in short peptide nucleic acid (PNA) duplexes obtained through electrochemical, STM break junction (STM-BJ), and computational studies. A seven base pair (7-bp) PNA duplex with the sequence (TA)(3)-(XY)-(TA)(3) was studied, in which XY is a complementary nucleobase pair. The experiments showed that the heterogeneous charge transfer rate constant (k(0)) and the single-molecule conductance (σ) correlate with the oxidation potential of the purine base in the XY base pair. The electrochemical measurements showed that the enhancement of k(0) is independent, within experimental error, of which of the two PNA strands contains the purine base of the XY base pair. 7-bp PNA duplexes with one or two GC base pairs had similar measured k(0) and conductance values. While a simple superexchange model, previously used to rationalize charge transfer in single stranded PNA (Paul et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 6498-6507), describes some of the experimental observations, the model does not explain the absence of an enhancement in the experimental k(0) and σ upon increasing the G content in the duplexes from one to two. Moreover, the superexchange model is not consistent with other studies (Paul et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 14140), that showed a hopping charge transport mechanism is likely important for PNA duplexes longer than seven base pairs. A quantitative computational analysis shows that a near-resonant charge transfer regime, wherein a mix of superexchange and hopping mechanisms are expected to coexist, can rationalize all of the experimental results. PMID:21141966

  20. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  1. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  2. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels with IKVAV peptides for tissue repair and axonal regeneration in an injured rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. T.; Tian, W. M.; Yu, X.; Cui, F. Z.; Hou, S. P.; Xu, Q. Y.; Lee, In-Seop

    2007-09-01

    A biocompatible hydrogel of hyaluronic acid with the neurite-promoting peptide sequence of IKVAV was synthesized. The characterization of the hydrogel shows an open porous structure and a large surface area available for cell interaction. Its ability to promote tissue repair and axonal regeneration in the lesioned rat cerebrum is also evaluated. After implantation, the polymer hydrogel repaired the tissue defect and formed a permissive interface with the host tissue. Axonal growth occurred within the microstructure of the network. Within 6 weeks the polymer implant was invaded by host-derived tissue, glial cells, blood vessels and axons. Such a hydrogel matrix showed the properties of neuron conduction. It has the potential to repair tissue defects in the central nervous system by promoting the formation of a tissue matrix and axonal growth by replacing the lost tissue.

  3. Interspecies conservation of structure of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein. Similarities and differences as adjudged by peptide mapping and N-terminal sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, T M; Wiggert, B; Robey, F A; Chader, G J

    1986-01-01

    Structural properties of the retinal extracellular-matrix glycolipoprotein interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) from human, monkey and bovine retinas have been compared. SDS/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoretic analysis of limited tryptic and Staphylococcus aureus-V8-proteinase digests show virtually identical patterns for the monkey and human proteins, whereas both sets differ considerably from the bovine protein pattern. Time-course digestion shows monkey IRBP to be more readily cleaved than bovine IRBP and also cleaved to smaller fragments. Also, reversed-phase h.p.l.c. of complete tryptic digests of the IRBPs indicate that, although they have in common a similar preponderance of hydrophobic peptides, all three proteins differ extensively in their fine structure. The N-terminal sequences of monkey and bovine IRBPs have been extended beyond those presented in our previous report [Redmond, Wiggert, Robey, Nguyen, Lewis, Lee & Chader (1985) Biochemistry 24, 787-793] to over 30 residues each. The sequences yet show extensive homology, differing at only two positions, although the major monkey sequence has an additional five amino acid residues at its N-terminus ('n + 5' sequence) not observed with bovine IRBP ('n' sequence). The newly determined N-terminal sequence of human IRBP demonstrates the presence of equal amounts of the 'n' and 'n+5' sequences that are qualitatively identical with those of the monkey. The presence of the five-amino-acid-residue extension in primate, but not bovine, IRBP may indicate variation in post-translational processing. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3827838

  4. [Molecular cloning of the DNA sequence of activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides from panda and related species and its application in the research of phylogeny and taxonomy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Xi-Zhong; He, Guang-Xin; Chen, Hong-Wei; Fei, Li-Song

    2002-09-01

    Activin, which is included in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) superfamily of proteins and receptors, is known to have broad-ranging effects in the creatures. The mature peptide of beta A subunit of this gene, one of the most highly conserved sequence, can elevate the basal secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary and FSH is pivotal to organism's reproduction. Reproduction block is one of the main reasons which cause giant panda to extinct. The sequence of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides has been successfully amplified from giant panda, red panda and malayan sun bear's genomic DNA by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The PCR products were cloned into the vector pBlueScript+ of Esherichia coli. Sequence analysis of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides shows that the length of this gene segment is the same (359 bp) and there is no intron in all three species. The sequence encodes a peptide of 119 amino acid residues. The homology comparison demonstrates 93.9% DNA homology and 99% homology in amino acid among these three species. Both GenBank blast search result and restriction enzyme map reveal that the sequences of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during the evolution process. Phylogeny analysis is performed with PHYLIP software package. A consistent phylogeny tree has been drawn with three different methods. The software analysis outcome accords with the academic view that giant panda has a closer relationship to the malayan sun bear than the red panda. Giant panda should be grouped into the bear family (Uersidae) with the malayan sun bear. As to the red panda, it would be better that this animal be grouped into the unique family (red panda family) because of great difference between the red panda and the bears (Uersidae).

  5. A sequence-based computational approach to predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Nakariyakul, Songyot; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Luonan

    2014-01-01

    The PDZ domain is one of the most ubiquitous protein domains that is involved in coordinating signaling complex formation and protein networking by reversibly interacting with multiple binding partners. It has been linked to many devastating diseases such as avian influenza, Fraser syndrome, Usher syndrome and Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. Understanding the selectivity of PDZ domains can help elucidate how defects in PDZ proteins and their binding partners lead to human diseases. Since experimental methods to determine the interaction specificity of the PDZ domains are expensive and labor intensive, an accurate computational method is thus needed. Our developed support vector machine-based predictor using dipeptide composition is shown to qualitatively predict PDZ domain-peptide interaction with a high accuracy rate. Furthermore, since most of the dipeptide compositions are redundant and irrelevant, we propose a new hybrid feature selection technique to select only a subset of these compositions for interaction prediction. The experimental results show that only approximately 25% of dipeptide features are needed and that our method improves the prediction results significantly. The selected dipeptide features are also analyzed and shown to play important roles in specificity patterns of PDZ domains. Our method is based only on primary sequence information, and it can be used for the research of drug target and drug design in identifying PDZ domain-ligand interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics, Systems Biology & Clinical Implications. Guest Editor: Yudong Cai. PMID:23608946

  6. Shaping quaternary assemblies of water-soluble non-peptide helical foldamers by sequence manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collie, Gavin W.; Pulka-Ziach, Karolina; Lombardo, Caterina M.; Fremaux, Juliette; Rosu, Frédéric; Decossas, Marion; Mauran, Laura; Lambert, Olivier; Gabelica, Valérie; Mackereth, Cameron D.; Guichard, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    The design and construction of biomimetic self-assembling systems is a challenging yet potentially highly rewarding endeavour that contributes to the development of new biomaterials, catalysts, drug-delivery systems and tools for the manipulation of biological processes. Significant progress has been achieved by engineering self-assembling DNA-, protein- and peptide-based building units. However, the design of entirely new, completely non-natural folded architectures that resemble biopolymers (‘foldamers’) and have the ability to self-assemble into atomically precise nanostructures in aqueous conditions has proved exceptionally challenging. Here we report the modular design, formation and structural elucidation at the atomic level of a series of diverse quaternary arrangements formed by the self-assembly of short amphiphilic α-helicomimetic foldamers that bear proteinaceous side chains. We show that the final quaternary assembly can be controlled at the sequence level, which permits the programmed formation of either discrete helical bundles that contain isolated cavities or pH-responsive water-filled channels with controllable pore diameters.

  7. The cytoplasmic domain close to the transmembrane region of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-07-01

    In order to gain better insight into the molecular events involved in the signal transduction generated through glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors, we tested the effect of deletions and point mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor with a view to establishing relationships between signal transduction desensitisation and receptor internalisation. Wild-type and truncated (deletion of the last 27 amino acids (GLPR 435R) and deletion of 44 amino acids (GLPR 418R)) GLP-1 receptors bound the agonist with similar affinity. Deletion of the last 27 amino acids decreased the internalisation rate by 78%, while deletion of 44 amino acids containing all the phosphorylation sites hitherto described in this receptor decreased the internalisation rate by only 47%. Binding of the ligand to both receptors stimulated adenylyl cyclase. In contrast, deletion of the region containing amino acids 419 to 435 (GLPR 419delta435) increased the internalisation rate by 268%, and the replacement of EVQ(408-410) by alanine (GLPR A(408-410)) increased this process to 296%. In both receptors, the efficacy in stimulating adenylate cyclase was decreased. All the receptors studied were internalised by coated pits, except for the receptor with a deletion of the last 44 amino acids, which also had a faster resensitisation rate. Our findings indicate that the neighbouring trans-membrane domain of the carboxyl-terminal tail of the GLP-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation and transmembrane signalling.

  8. Effects of salt concentration on the reaction rate of Glc with amino acids, peptides, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keiko; Noumi, Yuri; Nakajima, Katsumi; Nagatsuka, Chiharu; Aizawa, Haruko; Nakawaki, Rie; Mizude, Eri; Otsuka, Yuzuru; Homma, Takeshi; Chuyen, Nguyen Van

    2009-11-01

    The reaction between the amino group and the carbonyl group is important in food quality control. Furthermore, advanced glycation end products from foods are considered to relate to aging and diabetes. Thus, it is important to control this reaction. In this study, we investigated the effects of salt concentration on the rates of browning reaction of amino acid, peptides, and proteins. A high concentration of sodium chloride retarded the reaction rate of Glc with amino acids as measured with the absorbance at 470 nm, but did not change the browning rate of Glc with peptides. On the other hand, sodium chloride retarded the browning reaction rate of proteins as measured with polymerization degree or by the loss of Lys. It is hoped that the results of this study will be applied in the control of amino-carbonyl reaction rates in the food industry. PMID:19897911

  9. Kinetics of interaction of vanillin with amino acids and peptides in model systems.

    PubMed

    Chobpattana, W; Jeon, I J; Smith, J S

    2000-09-01

    Model systems were used to study the reaction kinetics of vanillin and pentalysine, lysine, glutathione, cysteine, aspartame, or phenylalanine (molar ratio 1:1) in phosphate buffer. The buffer pH was adjusted to the pK(a)(2) of the available alpha-amino group of each amino acid or peptide. Reductions of vanillin followed first-order kinetics at 55, 65, and 75 degrees C in the presence of each of the amino acids or peptides used. The reaction rates were accelerated as the temperature increased. The rate constants were highest for pentalysine followed by lysine, phenylalanine, glutathione/cysteine, and aspartame. The reduction of phenylalanine followed first-order kinetics, whereas the formation of its reaction product followed zero-order kinetics. The activation energy (E(a)) for the reaction ranged from 5.6 to 14.5 kcal/mol.

  10. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  11. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  12. A molecular peptide beacon for the ratiometric sensing of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junchen; Zou, Ying; Li, Chunyan; Sicking, Wilhelm; Piantanida, Ivo; Yi, Tao; Schmuck, Carsten

    2012-02-01

    A pyrene-functionalized cationic oligopeptide 1 efficiently binds to double-stranded DNA, as shown by different spectrophotochemical studies. Upon binding, the conformation of 1 changes from a folded to an extended form, which leads to a distinct change in the fluorescence properties. Thus, 1 functions as a molecular peptide beacon, and as it is easily taken up by cells, 1 can also be used for imaging of nucleic acids within cells.

  13. The sequence of rat leukosialin (W3/13 antigen) reveals a molecule with O-linked glycosylation of one third of its extracellular amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Barclay, A N; Willis, A C; Williams, A F

    1987-01-01

    Leukosialin is one of the major glycoproteins of thymocytes and T lymphocytes and is notable for a very high content of O-linked carbohydrate structures. The full protein sequence for rat leukosialin as translated from cDNA clones is now reported. The molecule contains 371 amino acids with 224 residues outside the cell, one transmembrane sequence and 124 cytoplasmic residues. Data from the peptide sequence and carbohydrate composition suggest that one in three of the extracellular amino acids may be O-glycosylated with no N-linked glycosylation sites. The cDNA sequence contained a CpG rich region in the 3' coding sequence and a large 3' non-coding region which included tandem repeats of the sequence GGAT. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2965006

  14. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  15. Sequence-specific interaction of Tat protein and Tat peptides with the transactivation-responsive sequence element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cordingley, M G; LaFemina, R L; Callahan, P L; Condra, J H; Sardana, V V; Graham, D J; Nguyen, T M; LeGrow, K; Gotlib, L; Schlabach, A J

    1990-01-01

    Bacterially expressed Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 binds selectively to short RNA transcripts containing the viral transactivation-responsive element (TAR). Sequences sufficient for Tat interaction map to the distal portion of the TAR stem-loop. We show that critical sequences for Tat binding are located in the single-stranded "bulge," but no requirement for specific "loop" sequences could be demonstrated. TAR RNA competed for complex formation, and TAR mutants exhibited up to 10-fold reduced affinity for Tat. Synthetic peptides containing the basic region of Tat bound selectively to TAR RNA and exhibited the same sequence requirements and similar relative affinities for mutant TAR RNA as the intact protein. These results suggest that Tat contains a small RNA-binding domain capable of recognizing TAR and implicate functional relevance for direct Tat-TAR interaction in transactivation. Images PMID:2247474

  16. Binding of acylated peptides and fatty acids to phospholipid vesicles: pertinence to myristoylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Peitzsch, R M; McLaughlin, S

    1993-10-01

    We studied the binding of fatty acids and acylated peptides to phospholipid vesicles by making electrophoretic mobility and equilibrium dialysis measurements. The binding energies of the anionic form of the fatty acids and the corresponding acylated glycines were identical; the energies increased by 0.8 kcal/mol per number of carbons in the acyl chain (Ncarbon = 10, 12, 14, 16), a value identical to that for the classical entropy-driven hydrophobic effect discussed by Tanford [The Hydrophobic Effect (1980) Wiley, New York]. The unitary Gibbs free binding energy, delta Gou, of myristoylated glycine, 8 kcal/mol, is independent of the nature of the electrically neutral lipids used to form the vesicles. Similar binding energies were obtained with other myristoylated peptides (e.g., Gly-Ala, Gly-Ala-Ala). The 8 kcal/mol, which corresponds to an effective dissociation constant of 10(-4) M for myristoylated peptides with lipids, provides barely enough energy to attach a myristoylated protein in the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. Thus, other factors that reduce (e.g., hydrophobic interaction of myristate with the covalently attached protein) or enhance (e.g., electrostatic interactions of basic residues with acidic lipids; protein-protein interactions with intrinsic receptor proteins) the interaction of myristoylated proteins with membranes are likely to be important and may cause reversible translocation of these proteins to the membrane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Acid-base titration of melanocortin peptides: evidence of Trp rotational conformers interconversion.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Roberto M; Vieira, Renata F F; Nakaie, Clóvis R; Lamy, M Teresa; Ito, Amando S

    2005-01-01

    Tryptophantime-resolved fluorescence was used to monitor acid-base titration properties of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and the biologically more potent analog [Nle4, D-Phe7]alpha -MSH (NDP-MSH), labeled or not with the paramagnetic amino acid probe 2,2,6,6-tetramthylpiperidine-N-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (Toac). Global analysis of fluorescence decay profiles measured in the pH range between 2.0 and 11.0 showed that, for each peptide, the data could be well fitted to three lifetimes whose values remained constant. The less populated short lifetime component changed little with pH and was ascribed to Trp g+ chi1 rotamer, in which electron transfer deactivation predominates over fluorescence. The long and intermediate lifetime preexponential factors interconverted along that pH interval and the result was interpreted as due to interconversion between Trp g- and trans chi1 rotamers, driven by conformational changes promoted by modifications in the ionization state of side-chain residues. The differences in the extent of interconversion in alpha-MSH and NDP-MSH are indicative of structural differences between the peptides, while titration curves suggest structural similarities between each peptide and its Toac-labeled species, in aqueous solution. Though less sensitive than fluorescence, the Toac electron spin resonance (ESR) isotropic hyperfine splitting parameter can also monitor the titration of side-chain residues located relatively far from the probe.

  18. Reaction of chlorine dioxide with amino acids and peptides: kinetics and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, H K; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1987-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is currently being considered as an alternate to chlorine as a disinfectant for water treatment. Many organic compounds present in water and food treated with ClO2 are subject to oxidation. 21 amino acids and 3 peptides (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame), L-glycyl-L-tryptophan and L-tryptophylglycine) were studied for their reactivity with ClO2. Chlorine dioxide reacted only with 6 amino acids in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.0. The reaction with cysteine, tryptophan and tyrosine was too rapid to be monitored either iodometrically or spectrophotometrically. The reaction with histidine, hydroxyproline and proline was found to be pseudo-first order. ClO2 readily reacted with L-glycyl-L-tryptophan and L-tryptophylglycine but not with aspartame. Mutagenicity studies with the Salmonella microsome assay of the reaction mixtures of ClO2 with those 6 reactive amino acids and the 3 peptides indicated that the reaction products of the 3 peptides, hydroxyproline, and tyrosine exerted mutagenic activity toward both tester strains of TA98 and TA100 in the presence and absence of rat-liver S9 mix.

  19. Integrating the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-coded α-amino acids modified at the peptide bond into the NCAD database

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-López, Guillem; Rodríguez-Ropero, Francisco; Curcó, David; Torras, Juan; Calaza, M. Isabel; Zanuy, David; Jiménez, Ana I.; Cativiela, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth; Alemán, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we reported a database (NCAD, Non-Coded Amino acids Database; http://recerca.upc.edu/imem/index.htm) that was built to compile information about the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-proteinogenic residues determined by quantum mechanical calculations, as well as bibliographic information about their synthesis, physical and spectroscopic characterization, the experimentally-established conformational propensities, and applications (J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 7413). The database initially contained the information available for α-tetrasubstituted α-amino acids. In this work, we extend NCAD to three families of compounds, which can be used to engineer peptides and proteins incorporating modifications at the –NHCO– peptide bond. Such families are: N-substituted α-amino acids, thio-α-amino acids, and diamines and diacids used to build retropeptides. The conformational preferences of these compounds have been analyzed and described based on the information captured in the database. In addition, we provide an example of the utility of the database and of the compounds it compiles in protein and peptide engineering. Specifically, the symmetry of a sequence engineered to stabilize the 310-helix with respect to the α-helix has been broken without perturbing significantly the secondary structure through targeted replacements using the information contained in the database. PMID:21491493

  20. The effect of an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide and hyaluronate synthetic matrix on epithelialization of meshed skin graft interstices.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M L; Hansbrough, J F; Polarek, J W

    1996-01-01

    Keratinocytes and fibroblasts interact with proteins of the extracellular matrix such as fibronectin and vitronectin through RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) cell-attachment sequences. This study evaluated the ability of a provisional synthetic matrix composed of an RGD peptide and hyaluronic acid to accelerate the epithelialization of the interstices of meshed, human, split-thickness skin when placed on full-thickness wounds of athymic mice. Full-thickness skin defects, sparing the panniculus carnosus, were created on athymic mice and 3:1 meshed, human skin was placed on them. The grafts had four central, isolated interstices, which epithelialized by migration of human keratinocytes. Conditions were either the addition to the wound of the synthetic matrix or a matrix of hyaluronic acid alone. The time to closure of the graft interstices was decreased (p < 0.02) in the wounds treated with the RGD peptide-hyaluronic acid provisional matrix. The resultant epithelium of the closed interstices was significantly thicker 8 days after surgery for the RGD-treated wounds. Basement membrane proteins (laminin and type IV collagen) were also found to be present at the dermoepidermal junction earlier in the RGD-treated wounds. These results imply that use of the RGD peptide conjugate to effect cell-matrix interactions may have clinical significance in the field of wound healing.

  1. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zu T.; Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  2. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zu T; Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  3. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with (/sup 3/H)-NaBH/sub 4/, and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P.

  4. Application of hydrophilic interaction chromatography retention coefficients for predicting peptide elution with TFA and methanesulfonic acid ion-pairing reagents.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, Chad E; Tweed, Joseph; Kadar, Eugene P

    2010-03-01

    Hydrophilic retention coefficients for 17 peptides were calculated based on retention coefficients previously published for TSKgel silica-60 and were compared with the experimental elution profile on a Waters Atlantis HILIC silica column using TFA and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as ion-pairing reagents. Relative peptide retention could be accurately determined with both counter-ions. Peptide retention and chromatographic behavior were influenced by the percent acid modifier used with increases in both retention and peak symmetry observed at increasing modifier concentrations. The enhancement of net peptide polarity through MSA pairing shifted retention out by nearly five-fold for the earliest eluting peptide, compared with TFA. Despite improvements in retention and efficiency (N(eff)) for MSA over TFA, a consistent reduction in calculated selectivity (alpha) was observed. This result is believed to be attributed to the stronger polar contribution of MSA masking and diminishing the underlying influence of the amino acid residues of each associated peptide. Finally, post-column infusion of propionic acid and acetic acid was evaluated for their potential to recover signal intensity for TFA and MSA counter-ions for LC-ESI-MS applications. Acetic acid generally yielded more substantial signal improvements over propionic acid on the TFA system while minimal benefits and some further reductions were noted with MSA.

  5. Formation pathways and opioid activity data for 3-hydroxypyridinium compounds derived from glucuronic acid and opioid peptides by Maillard processes.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Stefica; Roscić, Maja; Lemieux, Carole; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Schiller, Peter W

    2007-07-01

    The kinetics of formation and identity of the reaction products of the glucuronic acid with three representative opioid peptides were investigated in vitro. Peptides were conjugated with glucuronic acid either in solution or under dry-heating conditions. From the incubations performed in solution N-(1-deoxy-D-fructofuranos-1-yluronic acid)-peptide derivatives (Amadori compounds) were isolated, whereas from the dry-heated reactions products containing the 3-hydroxypyridinium moiety at the N-terminal of the peptide chain were obtained. Experiments performed under mild dry-heating conditions (40 degrees C) in model systems based on Leu-enkephalin and glucuronic acid, and in environment of either 40% or 75% relative humidity, revealed that the higher level of humidity promoted a process that enhanced 3-hydroxypyridinium compound generation. The mechanism of 3-hydroxypyridinium formation is discussed. In comparison with their respective parent peptides, the N-(1-deoxy-D-fructofuranosyl-uronic acid) derivatives of the opioid peptides showed three- to 11-fold lower mu- and delta-receptor-binding affinities and agonist potencies in the functional assays, likely as a consequence of the steric bulk introduced at the N-terminal amino group. The further decrease in opioid activity observed with the 3-hydroxypyridinium-containing peptides may be due to the lower pK(a) of the 3-hydroxypyridinium moiety and to delocalization of the positive charge in the pyridinium ring system. PMID:17630992

  6. Statistical physics inspired methods to assign statistical significance in bioinformatics and proteomics: From sequence comparison to mass spectrometry based peptide sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio

    After the sequencing of many complete genomes, we are in a post-genomic era in which the most important task has changed from gathering genetic information to organizing the mass of data as well as under standing how components interact with each other. The former is usually undertaking using bioinformatics methods, while the latter task is generally termed proteomics. Success in both parts demands correct statistical significance assignments for results found. In my dissertation. I study two concrete examples: global sequence alignment statistics and peptide sequencing/identification using mass spectrometry. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (HPLC/MS/MS), enabling peptide identifications and thus protein identifications, has become the tool of choice in large-scale proteomics experiments. Peptide identification is usually done by database searches methods. The lack of robust statistical significance assignment among current methods motivated the development of a novel de novo algorithm, RAId, whose score statistics then provide statistical significance for high scoring peptides found in our custom, enzyme-digested peptide library. The ease of incorporating post-translation modifications is another important feature of RAId. To organize the massive protein/DNA data accumulated, biologists often cluster proteins according to their similarity via tools such as sequence alignment. Homologous proteins share similar domains. To assess the similarity of two domains usually requires alignment from head to toe, ie. a global alignment. A good alignment score statistics with an appropriate null model enable us to distinguish the biologically meaningful similarity from chance similarity. There has been much progress in local alignment statistics, which characterize score statistics when alignments tend to appear as a short segment of the whole sequence. For global alignment, which is useful in domain alignment, there is still much room for

  7. β-Turn sequences promote stability of peptide substrates for kinases within the cytosolic environment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Proctor, Angela; Cline, Lauren L; Houston, Kaiulani M; Waters, Marcey L; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2013-08-01

    A strategy was developed to extend the lifetime of an peptide-based substrate for Abl kinase in the cytosolic environment. Small β-turn structures were added to the peptide's N-terminus to block entry into peptidase catalytic sites. The influence of the size of the β-turn and two covalent cross-linking strategies on the rate of hydrolysis was assessed. The most peptidase-resistant substrate was degraded at a rate of 0.6 pmol mg(-1) s(-1) and possessed a half-life of 20.3 ± 1.7 min in a Baf/BCR-ABL cytosolic lysate, representing 16- and 40-fold improvements, respectively, over that of a control peptide lacking the β-turn structure. Furthermore, the kcat/KM value of this peptide was 432 μM(-1) min(-1), a 1.25× increase over the unmodified control, verifying that the added β-turn did not hinder the substrate properties of the peptide. This improved peptide was microinjected into single Baf/BCR-ABL cells and substrate phosphorylation measured. Zero to forty percent of the peptide was phosphorylated in the single cells. In contrast, when the control peptide without a β-turn was loaded into cells, the peptide was too rapidly degraded to detect phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that small β-turn structures can render peptides more resistant to hydrolysis while retaining substrate efficacy and shows that these stabilized peptides have the potential to be of high utility in single-cell enzyme assays.

  8. New approaches for computer analysis of nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Ghandour, G; Ost, F; Tavare, S; Korn, L J

    1983-09-01

    A new high-speed computer algorithm is outlined that ascertains within and between nucleic acid and protein sequences all direct repeats, dyad symmetries, and other structural relationships. Large repeats, repeats of high frequency, dyad symmetries of specified stem length and loop distance, and their distributions are determined. Significance of homologies is assessed by a hierarchy of permutation procedures. Applications are made to papovaviruses, the human papillomavirus HPV, lambda phage, the human and mouse mitochondrial genomes, and the human and mouse immunoglobulin kappa-chain genes. PMID:6577449

  9. Effect of Diaminopropionic acid (Dap) on the Biophysical Properties of a Modified Synthetic Channel-Forming Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Bukovnik, Urska; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Francis, Simonne; Frazier, Shawnalea J.; Schultz, Bruce D.; Nichols, Colin G.; Tomich, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Channel replacement therapy, based on synthetic channel-forming peptides (CFPs) with the ability to supersede defective endogenous ion channels, is a novel treatment modality that may augment existing interventions against multiple diseases. Previously, we derived CFPs from the second transmembrane segment of the α-subunit of the glycine receptor, M2GlyR, which forms chloride-selective channels in its native form. The best candidate, NK4-M2GlyR T19R, S22W (p22-T19R, S22W), was water-soluble, incorporated into cell membranes and was non-immunogenic, but lacked the structural properties for high conductance and anion selectivity when assembled into a pore. Further studies suggested that the threonine residues at positions 13, 17 and 20 line the pore of assembled p22-T19R, S22W, and here we used 2, 3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) substitutions to introduce positive charges to the pore-lining interface of the predicted p22-T19R, S22W channel. Dap-substituted p22-T19R, S22W peptides retained the α-helical secondary structure characteristic of their parent peptide, and induced short-circuit transepithelial currents when exposed to the apical membrane of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells; the sequences containing multiple Dap-substituted residues induced larger currents than the peptides with single or no Dap-substitutions. To gain further insights into the effects of Dap residues on the properties of the putative pore, we performed two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology on Xenopus oocytes exposed to p22-T19R, S22W or its Dap-modified analogs. We observed that Dap-substituted peptides also induced significantly larger voltage-dependent currents than the parent compound, but there was no apparent change in reversal potential upon replacement of external Na+, Cl− or K+, indicating that these currents remained non-selective. These results suggest that the introduction of positively charged side chains in predicted pore-lining residues does not improve anion

  10. Insertion of multiple alpha-amino gamma-lactam (Agl) residues into a peptide sequence by solid-phase synthesis on synphase lanterns.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Luisa; Jamieson, Andrew G; Beauregard, Kim; Quiniou, Christiane; Chemtob, Sylvain; Lubell, William D

    2010-01-01

    The insertion of lactams into peptide analogs can enhance potency and improve receptor selectivity. The synthesis of lactam-bridged peptide sequences has been accomplished by a solid-phase approach on SynPhase lanterns using cyclic (R)- and (S)-oxathiazinane ester (2) to annulate the amino lactam residue onto the peptide chain. Parallel synthesis of alpha-amino gamma-lactam analogs of the allosteric modulator of IL-1 receptor 101.10 (D-Arg-D-Tyr-D-Thr-D-Val-D-Glu-D-Leu-D-Ala: rytvela) was performed by split-mix chemistry on the lanterns. In particular, the double insertion of alpha-amino gamma-lactams in the same peptide sequence has been accomplished by this effective method for the solid-supported combinatorial synthesis of lactam-bridged peptides. Peptides bearing an Agl residue exhibited curve shapes indicative of turn conformations in their circular dichroism spectra. PMID:20225301

  11. Osmotic Pressure Simulations of Amino Acids and Peptides Highlight Potential Routes to Protein Force Field Parameterization.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark S; Lay, Wesley K; Elcock, Adrian H

    2016-08-25

    Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins have suggested that common force fields overestimate the strength of amino acid interactions in aqueous solution. In an attempt to determine the causes of these effects, we have measured the osmotic coefficients of a number of amino acids using the AMBER ff99SB-ILDN force field with two popular water models, and compared the results with available experimental data. With TIP4P-Ew water, interactions between aliphatic residues agree well with experiment, but interactions of the polar residues serine and threonine are found to be excessively attractive. For all tested amino acids, the osmotic coefficients are lower when the TIP3P water model is used. Additional simulations performed on charged amino acids indicate that the osmotic coefficients are strongly dependent on the parameters assigned to the salt ions, with a reparameterization of the sodium/carboxylate interaction reported by the Aksimentiev group significantly improving description of the osmotic coefficient for glutamate. For five neutral amino acids, we also demonstrate a decrease in solute-solute attractions using the recently reported TIP4P-D water model and using the KBFF force field. Finally, we show that for four two-residue peptides improved agreement with experiment can be achieved by rederiving the partial charges for each peptide. PMID:27052117

  12. Amino acid sequence of rabbit kidney neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) deduced from a complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Lazure, C; Nault, C; Le Moual, H; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Kahn, P; Powell, J; Mallet, J; Beaumont, A

    1987-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) is a major constituent of kidney brush border membranes. It is also present in the brain where it has been shown to be involved in the inactivation of opioid peptides, methionine- and leucine-enkephalins. For this reason this enzyme is often called 'enkephalinase'. In order to characterize the primary structure of the enzyme, oligonucleotide probes were designed from partial amino acid sequences and used to isolate clones from kidney cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA inserts revealed the complete primary structure of the enzyme. Neutral endopeptidase consists of 750 amino acids. It contains a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (27 amino acids), a single membrane-spanning segment (23 amino acids) and an extracellular domain that comprises most of the protein mass. The comparison of the primary structure of neutral endopeptidase with that of thermolysin, a bacterial Zn-metallopeptidase, indicates that most of the amino acid residues involved in Zn coordination and catalytic activity in thermolysin are found within highly honmologous sequences in neutral endopeptidase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440677

  13. Prediction of Antimicrobial Peptides Based on Sequence Alignment and Support Vector Machine-Pairwise Algorithm Utilizing LZ-Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Shahrudin, Shahriza

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns an attempt to establish a new method for predicting antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are important to the immune system. Recently, researchers are interested in designing alternative drugs based on AMPs because they have found that a large number of bacterial strains have become resistant to available antibiotics. However, researchers have encountered obstacles in the AMPs designing process as experiments to extract AMPs from protein sequences are costly and require a long set-up time. Therefore, a computational tool for AMPs prediction is needed to resolve this problem. In this study, an integrated algorithm is newly introduced to predict AMPs by integrating sequence alignment and support vector machine- (SVM-) LZ complexity pairwise algorithm. It was observed that, when all sequences in the training set are used, the sensitivity of the proposed algorithm is 95.28% in jackknife test and 87.59% in independent test, while the sensitivity obtained for jackknife test and independent test is 88.74% and 78.70%, respectively, when only the sequences that has less than 70% similarity are used. Applying the proposed algorithm may allow researchers to effectively predict AMPs from unknown protein peptide sequences with higher sensitivity. PMID:25802839

  14. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences of polypeptides from early region 1A of human adenovirus 5.

    PubMed Central

    Downey, J F; Evelegh, C M; Branton, P E; Bayley, S T

    1984-01-01

    Experiments exploring the reasons for a multiplicity of products from early region 1A of adenovirus 5 are described. Labeled early region 1A products from wild-type virus were synthesized in infected cells and in a cell-free system programmed with mRNA from infected cells, immunoprecipitated specifically with an antipeptide serum, E1A-C1, directed against the C-terminal sequence of E1A products, and separated by gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional maps of [35S]methionine-labeled peptides were consistent with antigens of 52,000 daltons (52K) and 48.5K being from the 13S mRNA and antigens of 50K, 45K, and 35K from the 12S mRNA. Partial N-terminal sequences of 52K, 50K, 48.5K, and 45K synthesized in vitro showed that each of these antigens was initiated at the predicted ATG at nucleotide 560 in the DNA sequence. These results eliminate multiple initiation sites and proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminal end as sources of antigen diversity.