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Sample records for acid phosphoric acid

  1. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  2. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-12-21

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  3. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-08-17

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  4. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 582.1073 Section 582.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 582.1073 Section 582.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 582.1073 Section 582.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 582.1073 Section 582.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 582.1073 Section 582.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  14. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  15. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Platinum sintering on phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes is discussed. The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst dispersed on a conductive carbon support to minimize both cathode polarization and fabrication costs. During operation, however, the active surface area of these electrodes decreases, which in turn leads to decreased cell performance. This loss of active surface area is a major factor in the degradation of fuel cell performance over time.

  16. 46 CFR 153.558 - Special requirements for phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for phosphoric acid. 153.558... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.558 Special requirements for phosphoric acid. A phosphoric acid... phosphoric acid tanks by the Commandant (CG-522); or (c) Made of a stainless steel that resists corrosion...

  17. 46 CFR 153.558 - Special requirements for phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special requirements for phosphoric acid. 153.558... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.558 Special requirements for phosphoric acid. A phosphoric acid... phosphoric acid tanks by the Commandant (CG-522); or (c) Made of a stainless steel that resists corrosion...

  18. 46 CFR 153.558 - Special requirements for phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special requirements for phosphoric acid. 153.558... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.558 Special requirements for phosphoric acid. A phosphoric acid... phosphoric acid tanks by the Commandant (CG-ENG); or (c) Made of a stainless steel that resists corrosion...

  19. 46 CFR 153.558 - Special requirements for phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special requirements for phosphoric acid. 153.558... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.558 Special requirements for phosphoric acid. A phosphoric acid... phosphoric acid tanks by the Commandant (CG-ENG); or (c) Made of a stainless steel that resists corrosion...

  20. 46 CFR 151.50-23 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Phosphoric acid. 151.50-23 Section 151.50-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-23 Phosphoric acid. (a) The term phosphoric acid as used in this subpart shall include, in addition to phosphoric acid, aqueous solutions...

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-23 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Phosphoric acid. 151.50-23 Section 151.50-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-23 Phosphoric acid. (a) The term phosphoric acid as used in this subpart shall include, in addition to phosphoric acid, aqueous solutions...

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-23 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Phosphoric acid. 151.50-23 Section 151.50-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-23 Phosphoric acid. (a) The term phosphoric acid as used in this subpart shall include, in addition to phosphoric acid, aqueous solutions...

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-23 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Phosphoric acid. 151.50-23 Section 151.50-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-23 Phosphoric acid. (a) The term phosphoric acid as used in this subpart shall include, in addition to phosphoric acid, aqueous solutions...

  4. 46 CFR 151.50-23 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Phosphoric acid. 151.50-23 Section 151.50-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-23 Phosphoric acid. (a) The term phosphoric acid as used in this subpart shall include, in addition to phosphoric acid, aqueous solutions...

  5. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1981-10-01

    A carbon substrate for use in fabricating phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes was modified by catalytic oxidation to stabilize the platinum catalyst by retarding the sintering of small platinum crystallites. Results of 100-hour operational tests confirmed that the rate of platinum surface area loss observed on catalytically oxidized supports was less than that observed with unmodified supports of the same starting material. Fuel cell electrodes fabricated from Vulcan XC-72R, which was modified by catalytic in a nitric oxide atmosphere, produced low platium sintering rates and high activity for the reduction of oxygen in the phosphoric acid environment.

  6. Corrosion free phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Maynard K.

    1990-01-01

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell with an electrolyte fuel system which supplies electrolyte via a wick disposed adjacent a cathode to an absorbent matrix which transports the electrolyte to portions of the cathode and an anode which overlaps the cathode on all sides to prevent corrosion within the cell.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10685 - Phosphoric acid, mixed esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, mixed esters (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10685 Phosphoric acid, mixed esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid, mixed esters (PMN P-13-170) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10431 - Phosphoric acid esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid esters (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10431 Phosphoric acid esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphoric acid esters (PMNs...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  11. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  12. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10431 - Phosphoric acid esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid esters (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10431 Phosphoric acid esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphoric acid esters (PMNs...

  15. Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.; Prokopius, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the current phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented both for multimegawatt systems for electric utility applications and for multikilowatt systems for on-site integrated energy system applications. Improving fuel cell performance, reducing cost, and increasing durability are the technology drivers at this time. Electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, and fuel selection are discussed.

  16. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, O.F.; Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.

    1981-03-24

    Improvement in the process for recovering uranium from wetprocess phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange liquidliquid solvent extraction circuits in which in the first circuit (A) the uranium is reduced to the uranous form; (B) the uranous uranium is recovered by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using a mixture of mono- and di-(Alkyl-phenyl) esters of orthophosphoric acid as the ion exchange agent; and (C) the uranium oxidatively stripped from the agent with phosphoric acid containing an oxidizing agent to convert uranous to uranyl ions, and in the second circuit (D) recovering the uranyl uranium from the strip solution by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using di(2ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as a synergist; (E) scrubbing the uranium loaded agent with water; (F) stripping the loaded agent with ammonium carbonate, and (G) calcining the formed ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium oxide, the improvement comprising: (1) removing the organics from the raffinate of step (B) before recycling the raffinate to the wet-process plant, and returning the recovered organics to the circuit to substantially maintain the required balance between the mono and disubstituted esters; (2) using hydogren peroxide as the oxidizing agent in step (C); (3) using an alkali metal carbonate as the stripping agent in step (F) following by acidification of the strip solution with sulfuric acid; (4) using some of the acidified strip solution as the scrubbing agent in step (E) to remove phosphorus and other impurities; and (5) regenerating the alkali metal loaded agent from step (F) before recycling it to the second circuit.

  17. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst supported on a carbon substrate. During operation, the small platinum crystallites sinter, causing loss in cell performance. A support was developed that stabilizes platinum in the high surface area condition by retarding or preventing the sintering process. The approach is to form etch pits in the carbon by oxidizing the carbon in the presence of a metal oxide catalyst, remove the metal oxide by an acid wash, and then deposit platinum in these pits. Results confirm the formation of etch pits in each of the three supports chosen for investigation: Vulcan XC-72R, Vulcan XC-72 that was graphized at 2500 C, and Shawinigan Acetylene Black.

  18. World wide IFC phosphoric acid fuel cell implementation

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    International Fuel Cells, a subsidary of United technologies Corporation, is engaged in research and development of all types of fuel cell technologies and currently manufactures alkaline fuel cell power plants for the U.S. manned space flight program and natural gas fueled stationary power plants using phosphoric acid fuel cells. This paper describes the phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants.

  19. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  20. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  1. 40 CFR 422.50 - Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory. 422.50 Section 422.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Defluorinated Phosphoric Acid Subcategory § 422.50 Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric... defluorination of phosphoric acid. Wet process phosphoric acid is dehydrated by application of heat and...

  2. 40 CFR 422.50 - Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory. 422.50 Section 422.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Defluorinated Phosphoric Acid Subcategory § 422.50 Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric... defluorination of phosphoric acid. Wet process phosphoric acid is dehydrated by application of heat and...

  3. 40 CFR 422.50 - Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory. 422.50 Section 422.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Defluorinated Phosphoric Acid Subcategory § 422.50 Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric... defluorination of phosphoric acid. Wet process phosphoric acid is dehydrated by application of heat and...

  4. 40 CFR 422.50 - Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory. 422.50 Section 422.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Defluorinated Phosphoric Acid Subcategory § 422.50 Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric... defluorination of phosphoric acid. Wet process phosphoric acid is dehydrated by application of heat and...

  5. Proton Conductivity in Phosphoric Acid: The Role of Quantum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heres, M.; Wang, Y.; Griffin, P. J.; Gainaru, C.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Phosphoric acid has one of the highest intrinsic proton conductivities of any known liquids, and the mechanism of this exceptional conductivity remains a puzzle. Our detailed experimental studies discovered a strong isotope effect in the conductivity of phosphoric acids caused by (i) a strong isotope shift of the glass transition temperature and (ii) a significant reduction of the energy barrier by zero-point quantum fluctuations. These results suggest that the high conductivity in phosphoric acids is caused by a very efficient proton transfer mechanism, which is strongly assisted by quantum effects.

  6. Proton Conductivity in Phosphoric Acid: The Role of Quantum Effects

    DOE PAGES

    Heres, M.; Wang, Y.; Griffin, P. J.; ...

    2016-10-07

    Phosphoric acid has one of the highest intrinsic proton conductivities of any known liquids, and the mechanism of this exceptional conductivity remains a puzzle. In our detailed experimental studies we discovered a strong isotope effect in the conductivity of phosphoric acids caused by (i) a strong isotope shift of the glass transition temperature and (ii) a significant reduction of the energy barrier by zero-point quantum fluctuations. Our results suggest that the high conductivity in phosphoric acids is caused by a very efficient proton transfer mechanism, which is strongly assisted by quantum effects.

  7. Synthesis of novel acid electrolytes for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, James L.

    1988-11-01

    A 40 millimole per hour scale aerosol direct fluorination reactor was constructed. F-Methyl F-4-methoxybutanoate and F-4-methoxybutanoyl fluoride were synthesized by aerosol direct fluorination of methyl 4-methoxybutanoate. Basic hydrolysis of the perfluorinated derivatives produce sodium F-4 methoxybutanoate which was pyrolyzed to F-3-methoxy-1-propene. Purification and shipment of 33 grams of F-3-methoxy-1-propene followed. Syntheses by analogous methods allowed production and shipment of 5 grams of F-3-ethoxy 1-propene, 18 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-propene, and 37 grams of F-3,3-dimethyl 1-butene. Eighteen grams of F-2,2-dimethyl 1-chloropropane was produced directly and shipped. As suggested by other contractors, 5 grams of F-3-methoxy 1-iodopropane, and 5 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-iodopropane were produced by converting the respective precursor acid sodium salts produced for olefin synthesis to the silver salts and pyrolyzing them with iodine. Each of these compounds was prepared for the first time by the aerosol fluorination process during the course of the contract. These samples were provided to other Gas Research Institute (GRI) contractors for synthesis of perfluorinated sulfur (VI) and phosphorous (V) acids.

  8. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  9. New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stickles, R.P.; Breuer, C.T.

    1983-11-01

    New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells were identified and evaluated. Candidates considered included all possibilities except grid connected electric utility applications, on-site total energy systems, industrial co-generation, opportunistic use of waste hydrogen, space and military applications, and applications smaller than 10 kW. Applications identified were screened, with the most promising subjected to technical and economic evaluation using a fuel cell and conventional power system data base developed in the study. The most promising applications appear to be the underground mine locomotive and the railroad locomotive. Also interesting is power for robotic submersibles and Arctic villages. The mine locomotive is particularly attractive since it is expected that the fuel cell could command a very high price and still be competitive with the conventionally used battery system. The railroad locomotive's attractiveness results from the (smaller) premium price which the fuel cell could command over the conventional diesel electric system based on its superior fuel efficiency, and on the large size of this market and the accompanying opportunities for manufacturing economy.

  10. New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickles, R. P.; Breuer, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells were identified and evaluated. Candidates considered included all possibilities except grid connected electric utility applications, on site total energy systems, industrial cogeneration, opportunistic use of waste hydrogen, space and military applications, and applications smaller than 10 kW. Applications identified were screened, with the most promising subjected to technical and economic evaluation using a fuel cell and conventional power system data base developed in the study. The most promising applications appear to be the underground mine locomotive and the railroad locomotive. Also interesting are power for robotic submersibles and Arctic villages. The mine locomotive is particularly attractive since it is expected that the fuel cell could command a very high price and still be competitive with the conventionally used battery system. The railroad locomotive's attractiveness results from the (smaller) premium price which the fuel cell could command over the conventional diesel electric system based on its superior fuel efficiency, and on the large size of this market and the accompanying opportunities for manufacturing economy.

  11. Solid-state actinide acid phosphites from phosphorous acid melts

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, George N.; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-07-01

    The reaction of UO{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} at 100 °C and subsequent reaction with dimethylformamide (DMF) produces crystals of the compound (NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2})[UO{sub 2}(HPO{sub 2}OH)(HPO{sub 3})]. This compound crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}/n and consists of layers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share equatorial vertices with phosphite units, separated by dimethylammonium. In contrast, the reaction of phosphorous acid and actinide oxides at 210 °C produces a viscous syrup. Subsequent dilution in solvents and use of standard solution-state methods results in the crystallization of two polymorphs of the actinide acid phosphites An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (An=U, Th) and of the mixed acid phosphite–phosphite U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)·2(H{sub 2}O). α- and β-An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} crystallize in space groups C2/c and P2{sub 1}/n, respectively, and comprise a three-dimensional network of An{sup 4+} cations in square antiprismatic coordination corner-sharing with protonated phosphite units, whereas U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}·(H{sub 2}O) crystallizes in a layered structure in space group Pbca that is composed of An{sup 4+} cations in square antiprismatic coordination corner-sharing with protonated phosphites and water ligands. We discuss our findings in using solid inorganic reagents to produce a solution-workable precursor from which solid-state compounds can be crystallized. - Graphical abstract: Reaction of UO{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} at 100 °C and subsequent reaction with DMF produces crystals of (NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2})[UO{sub 2}(HPO{sub 2}OH)(HPO{sub 3})] with a layered structure. Reaction of phosphorous acid and actinide oxides at 210 °C produces a viscous syrup and further solution-state reactions result in the crystallization of the actinide acid phosphites An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (An=U, Th), with a three-dimensional network structure, and the mixed acid phosphite

  12. Materials characterization of phosphoric acid fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Srinivasan

    1986-01-01

    The component materials used in the fabrication of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) must have mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical stability to withstand the moderately high temperature (200 C) and pressure (500 kPa) and highly oxidizing nature of phosphoric acid. This study discusses the chemical and structural stability, performance and corrosion data on certain catalysts, catalyst supports, and electrode support materials used in PAFC applications.

  13. Phosphoric acid impurities in phosphoric acid fuel cell electrolytes. 2: Effects on the oxygen reduction reaction at platinum electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sugishima, Noboru; Hinatsu, J.T.; Foulkes, F.R. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry)

    1994-12-01

    The effects of phosphorus acid additions on the oxygen reduction reaction at platinum electrodes in concentrated phosphoric acid were studied. The oxygen reduction currents decreased, and the Tafel slopes became more negative upon the addition of small concentrations of phosphorus acid. In addition,the phosphorus acid oxidation current tended to complete with the oxygen reduction current. These effects became more pronounced at higher phosphorus acid concentrations and at higher temperatures. Upon the addition of phosphorus acid the number of electrons involved in the oxygen reduction reaction decreased from a value close to four to a value approaching two, suggesting promotion of a two-electron reduction to peroxide. Therefore, in studies of the electrochemical reduction of oxygen in hot concentrated phosphoric acid or in fuel cell systems using hot concentrated phosphoric acid as electrolyte, it is recommended that precautions be taken against the inadvertent formation of the phosphorus acid. The removal of phosphorus acid from concentrated phosphoric acid by repeated potential cycling at 100 mV/s between + 0.5 and +1.50 V (vs. dynamic hydrogen electrode) was demonstrated.

  14. Energy recovery method and system for combined sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid manufacturing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, G. M.; Orlando, J. V.

    1985-01-22

    In conventional processes for manufacturing phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid is reacted with phosphate rock to produce weak phosphoric acid which is concentrated using steam from the associated sulphuric acid manufacturing operation. Low grade heat from the absorbers and drier of the sulphuric acid manufacturing plant has been wasted. According to the invention waste heat from the drier and one or more absorbers of the sulphuric acid manufacturing plant is used in all the evaporators of the phosphoric acid plant. The evaporators all operate at low pressures and their heaters are arranged in series, to enable the heat to be used at the relatively low temperatures available. The valuable steam is thus freed for other uses.

  15. Phosphoric Acid-Mediated Synthesis of Vinyl Sulfones through Decarboxylative Coupling Reactions of Sodium Sulfinates with Phenylpropiolic Acids.

    PubMed

    Rong, Guangwei; Mao, Jincheng; Yan, Hong; Zheng, Yang; Zhang, Guoqi

    2015-08-07

    A novel phosphoric acid -mediated synthesis of vinyl sulfones through decarboxylative coupling reactions of sodium sulfinates with phenylpropiolic acids is described. This transformation is efficient and environmentally friendly.

  16. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant (phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The status of technology for the manufacturing and testing of 1200 sq. cm cell materials, components, and stacks for on-site integrated energy systems is assessed. Topics covered include: (1) preparation of thin layers of silicon carbide; (2) definition and control schemes for volume changes in phosphoric acid fuel cells; (3) preparation of low resin content graphite phenolic resin composites; (4) chemical corrosion of graphite-phenolic resin composites in hot phosphoric acid; (5) analysis of electrical resistance of composite materials for fuel cells; and (6) fuel cell performance and testing.

  17. Recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.W.; Henrickson, A.V.

    1981-11-24

    Uranium values are recovered as uranyl peroxide from wet process phosphoric acid by a solvent extraction-precipitation process. The preferred form of this process comprises a first solvent extraction with depa-topo followed by reductive stripping of the extractant with fe++ - containing phosphoric acid. After reoxidation, the uranium-containing aqueous stripping solution is extracted again with depa-topo and the pregnant organic is then stripped with a dilute ammonium carbonate solution. The resulting ammonium uranyl tricarbonate solution is then acidified, with special kerosene treatment to prevent wax formation, and the acidified solution is reacted with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ to precipitate a uranyl peroxide compound.

  18. Phosphoric acid, nitric acid, and hydrogen peroxide digestion of soil and plant materials for selenium determination

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, A.; Rendig, V.V.; Burau, R.G.; Besga, G.S.

    1987-11-15

    A mixture of phosphoric acid, nitric acid, and hydrogen peroxide has been proposed as an alternative to the use of the nitric/perchloric acid mixture to digest biological fluids to determine their selenium (Se) content. The purpose of the studies reported here was to test the applicability of this digestion method for the determination of Se in soil and plant materials.

  19. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  20. A mechanistic study of copper electropolishing in phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansson, Andrew

    The microelectronics industry is using copper as the interconnect material for microchips. A study of copper electropolishing is important for the process development of a new, low downforce approach, which is being developed to replace chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of the copper overburden. A promising technology is a combination of electropolishing with conventional CMP. Electropolishing of copper in phosphoric acid has been studied for, more than 70 years. Previous work has shown that the polishing rate, as measured by current density is directly related to the viscosity of the electrolyte. Also, the limiting species is water. In this study, a multidimensional design of experiments was performed to develop an in-depth model of copper electropolishing. Phosphoric acid was mixed with alcohols of different molecular weight and related viscosity to investigate how the solvents' properties affected polishing. The alcohols used were methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, butanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol. The limiting current densities and electrochemical behavior of each solution was measured by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic experiments. Also, the kinematic viscosity and density were measured to determine the dynamic viscosity to investigate the relationship of current density and viscosity. Water, methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol solutions were also examined at 20°C to 60°C. Next, the relative percentage of dissociated phosphoric acid was measured by Raman spectroscopy for each polishing solution. Raman spectroscopy was also used to measure the relative dissociation of phosphoric acid inside the polishing film. Additionally, wafers were electropolished and electrochemical mechanically polished to investigate the effects of the different solvents, fluid flow, current, and potential. The results of these experiments have shown that the molecular mass and the ability of the solvent to dissociate phosphoric acid are the primary electrolyte properties that

  1. 40 CFR 721.6110 - Alkyldi(alkyloxyhydroxypropyl) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. 721.6110 Section 721.6110 Protection of Environment...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts (PMN P-91-818) is subject to reporting under this...

  2. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6110 - Alkyldi(alkyloxyhydroxypropyl) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. 721.6110 Section 721.6110 Protection of Environment...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts (PMN P-91-818) is subject to reporting under this...

  4. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.6110 - Alkyldi(alkyloxyhydroxypropyl) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. 721.6110 Section 721.6110 Protection of Environment...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts (PMN P-91-818) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this...

  7. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this...

  8. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section and applied on aluminum may be safely used as...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6110 - Alkyldi(alkyloxyhydroxypropyl) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. 721.6110 Section 721.6110 Protection of Environment...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts (PMN P-91-818) is subject to reporting under this...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6110 - Alkyldi(alkyloxyhydroxypropyl) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. 721.6110 Section 721.6110 Protection of Environment...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...) derivative, phosphoric acid esters, potassium salts (PMN P-91-818) is subject to reporting under this...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10220 - Phosphoric acid, polymer with cycloaliphatic diglycidyl ether, alkylethers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, polymer with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10220 Phosphoric acid, polymer with... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphoric acid, polymer...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10220 - Phosphoric acid, polymer with cycloaliphatic diglycidyl ether, alkylethers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, polymer with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10220 Phosphoric acid, polymer with... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphoric acid, polymer...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10220 - Phosphoric acid, polymer with cycloaliphatic diglycidyl ether, alkylethers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, polymer with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10220 Phosphoric acid, polymer with... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphoric acid, polymer...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10220 - Phosphoric acid, polymer with cycloaliphatic diglycidyl ether, alkylethers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, polymer with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10220 Phosphoric acid, polymer with... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphoric acid, polymer...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6200 - Fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphoric acid ester salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., phosphoric acid ester salts. 721.6200 Section 721.6200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ester salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphate ester salts (PMNs P-90-1984 and...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6200 - Fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphoric acid ester salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., phosphoric acid ester salts. 721.6200 Section 721.6200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ester salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphate ester salts (PMNs P-90-1984 and...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6200 - Fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphoric acid ester salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., phosphoric acid ester salts. 721.6200 Section 721.6200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ester salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphate ester salts (PMNs P-90-1984 and...

  18. 40 CFR 721.6200 - Fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphoric acid ester salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., phosphoric acid ester salts. 721.6200 Section 721.6200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ester salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphate ester salts (PMNs P-90-1984 and...

  19. 40 CFR 721.6200 - Fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphoric acid ester salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., phosphoric acid ester salts. 721.6200 Section 721.6200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ester salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphate ester salts (PMNs P-90-1984 and...

  20. Methodology for detecting residual phosphoric acid in polybenzoxazole fibers.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Su; Sieber, John; Guttman, Charles; Rice, Kirk; Flynn, Kathleen; Watson, Stephanie; Holmes, Gale

    2009-12-01

    Because of the premature failure of in-service soft-body armor containing the ballistic fiber poly[(benzo-[1,2-d:5,4-d']-benzoxazole-2,6-diyl)-1,4-phenylene] (PBO), the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a research program to investigate the reasons for this failure and to develop testing methodologies and protocols to ensure that these types of failures do not reoccur. In a report that focused on the stability of the benzoxazole ring that is characteristic of PBO fibers, Holmes, G. A.; Rice, K.; Snyder, C. R. J. Mater. Sci. 2006, 41, 4105-4116, showed that the benzoxazole ring was susceptible to hydrolytic degradation under acid conditions. Because of the processing conditions for the fibers, it is suspected by many researchers that residual phosphoric acid may cause degradation of the benzoxazole ring resulting in a reduction of ballistic performance. Prior to this work, no definitive data have indicated the presence of phosphoric acid since the residual phosphorus is not easily extracted and the processed fibers are known to incorporate phosphorus containing processing aids. Methods to efficiently extract phosphorus from PBO are described in this article. Further, characterization determined that the majority of the extractable phosphorus in PBO was attributed to the octyldecyl phosphate processing aid with some phosphoric acid being detected. Analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of model PBO oligomers indicates that the nonextractable phosphorus is attached to the PBO polymer chain as a monoaryl phosphate ester. The response of model aryl phosphates to NaOH exposure indicates that monoaryl phosphate ester is stable to NaOH washes used in the manufacturing process to neutralize the phosphoric acid reaction medium and to extract residual phosphorus impurities.

  1. Enzymatic saccharification coupling with polyester recovery from cotton-based waste textiles by phosphoric acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Xiao, Wenxiong; Lin, Lili; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Yanzong; Deng, Shihuai

    2013-02-01

    In order to recycle the cotton-based waste textiles, a novel process was designed for pretreating waste textiles with phosphoric acid to recover polyester and fermentable sugar. The effects of pretreatment conditions including, phosphoric acid concentration, pretreatment temperature, time, and ratio of textiles and phosphoric acid were thoroughly investigated. Results indicated the mentioned four factors had significant influences on sugar and polyester recovery. Almost complete polyester recovery was achieved by enhancing phosphoric acid concentration, temperature and pretreatment time or reducing the ratio of textiles and phosphoric acid. However, these behaviors decreased the sugar recovery seriously. 100% polyester recovery with a maximum sugar recovery of 79.2% was achieved at the optimized conditions (85% phosphoric acid, 50°C, 7h, and the ratio of 1:15). According to the technical and cost-benefit analysis, it was technically feasible and potentially profitable to recover polyester and sugar from waste textiles by phosphoric acid pretreatment.

  2. Status of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Prokopius, P. R.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are important. The barrier to the attainment of these goals has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants are their technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy.

  3. Integral edge seals for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granata, Jr., Samuel J. (Inventor); Woodle, Boyd M. (Inventor); Dunyak, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell having integral edge seals formed by an elastomer permeating an outer peripheral band contiguous with the outer peripheral edges of the cathode and anode assemblies and the matrix to form an integral edge seal which is reliable, easy to manufacture and has creep characteristics similar to the anode, cathode and matrix assemblies inboard of the seals to assure good electrical contact throughout the life of the fuel cell.

  4. Theoretical study on the acidities of chiral phosphoric acids in dimethyl sulfoxide: hints for organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Xue, Xiao-Song; Jin, Jia-Lu; Li, Xin; Cheng, Jin-Pei

    2013-07-19

    The pKa values of 41 chiral phosphoric acid-family catalysts in DMSO were predicted using the SMD/M06-2x/6-311++G(2df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d) method for the first time. The study showed that the calculated pKa's range from -4.23 to 6.16 for absolute pKa values and from -4.21 to 6.38 for relative pKa values. Excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental pKa's was achieved for the few available cases (to a precision of around 0.4 pKa unit), indicating that this strategy may be suitable for calculating highly accurate pKa's. A good linear correlation between the pKa's for 3 and 3' disubstituted phenyl BINOL phosphoric acids and the Hammett constants was obtained. The relationship between the acidities of phosphoric acid catalysts and their reaction activity and selectivity was also discussed. Knowledge of the pKa values of phosphoric acids should be of great value for the understanding of chiral Brønsted acid-catalyzed reactions and may aid in future catalyst design.

  5. Cathode catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Alkylation or carbon Vulcan XC-72, the support carbon, was shown to provide the most stable bond type for linking cobalt dehydrodibenzo tetraazannulene (CoTAA) to the surface of the carbon; this result is based on data obtained by cyclic voltammetry, pulse voltammetry and by release of 14C from bonded CoTAA. Half-cell tests at 100 C in 85% phosphoric acid showed that CoTAA bonded to the surface of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) via an alkylation procedure is a more active catalyst than is platinum based on a factor of two improvement in Tafel slope; dimeric CoTAA had catalytic activity equal to platinum. Half-cell tests also showed that bonded CoTAA catalysts do not suffer a loss in potential when air is used as a fuel rather than oxygen. Commercially available polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) was shown to be unstable in the fuel cell environment with degradation occurring in 2000 hours or less. The PTFE was stressed at 200 C in concentrated phosphoric acid as well as electrochemically stressed in 150 C concentrated phosphoric acid; the surface chemistry of PTFE was observed to change significantly. Radiolabeled PTFE was prepared and used to verify that such chemical changes also occur in the primary fuel cell environment.

  6. Full scale phosphoric acid fuel cell stack technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.; Faroque, M.

    1984-01-01

    The technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cells is summarized. The preparation, heat treatment, and characterization of carbon composites used as bipolar separator plates are described. Characterization included resistivity, porosity, and electrochemical corrosion. High density glassy carbon/graphite composites performed well in long-term fuel cell endurance tests. Platinum alloy cathode catalysts and low-loaded platinum electrodes were evaluated in 25 sq cm cells. Although the alloys displayed an initial improvement, some of this improvement diminished after a few thousand hours of testing. Low platinum loading (0.12 mg/sq cm anodes and 0.3 mg/sq cm cathodes) performed nearly as well as twice this loading. A selectively wetproofed anode backing paper was tested in a 5 by 15 inch three-cell stack. This material may provide for acid volume expansion, acid storage, and acid lateral distribution.

  7. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    Component development has resulted in routine molding of 12 in. by 17 in. bipolar plates with 80 percent acceptance. A 5 C per hour post-cure heating cycle for these plates was found to give blister free materials. Lowering the resin in a bipolar plate content from 32 percent to 22 percent decreases the resistivity more than 50 percent. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of Novolak and Resol resins at 185 C in phosphoric acid indicates a slow etch. aerosol modified phenolics, however, decompose rapidly. Estimates of acid loss by the use of analytical expressions known as Margule, van Laar, and Wilson equations were not satisfactory. Experimental evaluation of the P4O10 vapor concentration of 103 wt percent acid at 191 C provided a value of 2 ppm. This value is based on a single experiment.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  13. Nitric-phosphoric acid treatment of TRU wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Pierce, R.A.; Sturcken, E.F.

    1993-09-30

    A general process is being developed for the treatment of solid TRU and hazardous organic waste. Experimental data indicates that 100 lb/hr of aliphatic organic (plastics) and 1,000 lb/hr of non-aliphatic organic compounds can be quantitatively oxidized in a 1,000 gallon reaction vessel. The process uses dilute nitric acid in a concentrated phosphoric acid media as the main oxidant for the organic compounds. Phosphoric acid allows oxidation at temperatures up to 200{degrees}C and is relatively non-corrosive on 304-L stainless steel, especially at room temperature. Many organic materials have been completely oxidized to CO{sub 2}, CO, and inorganic acids in a 0.1M HNO{sub 3}/14.8M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution. Addition of 0.001M Pd{sup 2+} reduces the CO to near 1% of the released carbon gases. To accomplish complete oxidation the solution temperature must be maintained above 130--150{degrees}C. Organic materials quantitatively destroyed include neoprene, cellulose, EDTA, TBP, tartaric acid, and nitromethane. The oxidation is usually complete in a few hours for soluble organic materials. The oxidation rate for non-aliphatic organic solids is moderately fast and surface area dependent. Polyethylene is quantitatively oxidized in 1.0M HNO{sub 3}/13.8M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution while contained in pressure vessels heated with microwave energy. This is probably due to the high concentrations of NO{sub 2}{center_dot} obtained in the reaction environment.

  14. Catalyst and electrode research for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.; King, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the development status of phosphoric acid fuel cells' high performance catalyst and electrode materials. Binary alloys have been identified which outperform the baseline platinum catalyst; it has also become apparent that pressurized operation is required to reach the desired efficiencies, calling in turn for the use of graphitized carbon blacks in the role of catalyst supports. Efforts to improve cell performance and reduce catalyst costs have led to the investigation of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts represented by the tetraazaannulenes, and a mixed catalyst which is a mixture of carbons catalyzed with an organometallic and a noble metal.

  15. Technology Development for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Powerplant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1980-01-01

    The technology development for materials, cells, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems is described. The carbonization of 25 cu cm, 350 cu cm, and 1200 cu cm cell test hardware was accomplished and the performance of 25 cu cm fuel cells was improved. Electrochemical corrosion rates of graphite/phenolic resin composites in phosphoric acid were determined. Three cells (5 in by 15 in stacks) were operated for longer than 7000 hours. Specified endurance stacks completed a total of 4000 hours. An electrically heated reformer was tested and is to provide hydrogen for 23 cell fuel cell stack.

  16. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are the technology drivers at this time. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals, which manifests itself in a number of ways, has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants (United Technologies Corporation (UTC), Westinghouse Electric Corporation/Energy Research Corporation (ERC), and Engelhard Industries) and their unique technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy are discussed.

  17. Fact Sheet - Phosphate Fertilizer Production Plants and Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants NESHAP

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact sheet summarizing National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Phosphate Fertilizer Production Plants and Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants (40 CFR 63 Subparts AA and BB).

  18. Determination of polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters, perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids, perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, and perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids in lake trout from the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Reiner, Eric J; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Helm, Paul A; Mabury, Scott A; Braekevelt, Eric; Tittlemier, Sheryl A

    2012-11-01

    A comprehensive method to extract perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids, and polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters simultaneously from fish samples has been developed. The recoveries of target compounds ranged from 78 % to 121 %. The new method was used to analyze lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Great Lakes region. The results showed that the total perfluoroalkane sulfonate concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 145 ng/g (wet weight) with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) as the dominant contaminant. Concentrations in fish between lakes were in the order of Lakes Ontario ≈ Erie > Huron > Superior ≈ Nipigon. The total perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 18.2 ng/g wet weight. The aggregate mean perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentration in fish across all lakes was 0.045 ± 0.023 ng/g. Mean concentrations of PFOA were not significantly different (p > 0.1) among the five lakes. Perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids were detected in lake trout from Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, and Lake Huron with concentration ranging from non-detect (ND) to 0.032 ng/g. Polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters were detected only in lake trout from Lake Huron, at levels similar to perfluorooctanoic acid.

  19. Effects of ultrasonic fields in the phosphoric acid process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalska, E.; Mizera, J.; Jakobiec, H.

    1974-01-01

    A process of apatite decomposition with sulfuric acid was studied under the influence of ultrasound in the phosphoric acid production process. The studies were carried out with and without ultrasonic fields in the reaction mixture, which resembled the mixing ratio used in technical production processes. Ultrasound with a frequency of 20 kHz and an intensity of 1 W/sq cm was used in the studies. A very favorable ultrasonic effect upon the degree of apatite decomposition was observed. The ultrasonic field affects the shape of byproduct gypsum crystals. In the H3PO4 production process without ultrasound, the byproduct gypsum crystallizes as long, thin needles which cause problems in filtration. In the trials involving the application of wound, gypsum crystallized in the form of small platelets possessing a favorable ratio of length to width.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. Structural changes of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) after fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Isroi; Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Millati, Ria; Syamsiah, Siti; Cahyanto, Muhammad N; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2012-12-17

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) was pretreated using white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, phosphoric acid or their combination, and the results were evaluated based on the biomass components, and its structural and morphological changes. The carbohydrate losses after fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 7.89%, 35.65%, and 33.77%, respectively. The pretreatments changed the hydrogen bonds of cellulose and linkages between lignin and carbohydrate, which is associated with crystallinity of cellulose of OPEFB. Lateral Order Index (LOI) of OPEFB with no pretreatment, with fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 2.77, 1.42, 0.67, and 0.60, respectively. Phosphoric acid pretreatment showed morphological changes of OPEFB, indicated by the damage of fibre structure into smaller particle size. The fungal-, phosphoric acid-, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments have improved the digestibility of OPEFB's cellulose by 4, 6.3, and 7.4 folds, respectively.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. Evaluation of sodium bisulphate and phosphoric acid as urine acidifiers for cats.

    PubMed

    Spears, Julie K; Grieshop, Christine M; Fahey, G C

    2003-10-01

    Eighteen cats were used to compare the urine acidifying properties of sodium bisulphate to phosphoric acid. Acidifying agents were added at one of three concentrations (0.4, 0.6, or 0.8%, as-is basis). Cats were offered a commercial diet to determine basal urinary pH, and then again for a 1 week period between blocks 1 and 2. Cats were acclimated to the diets for 6 days, and urine samples were collected on day 7 at 0, 4, and 8 h postfeeding to obtain pre- and postprandial urinary pH. Intakes of diets containing sodium bisulphate tended (P < 0.07) to be lower than intakes of diets containing phosphoric acid. Cats consuming the 0.8% phosphoric acid diet had higher (P < 0.05) food intakes than cats consuming either the 0.4 or 0.6% phosphoric acid-containing diets. There was significant (P = 0.01) linear and quadratic response for food intake in cats consuming the sodium bisulphate-containing diet. Cats consuming the 0.4 and 0.8% phosphoric acid-containing diets tended (P = 0.07) to have higher water intakes than cats consuming the 0.6% phosphoric acid-containing diet. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in urine pH and specific gravity between cats fed the different acidifier types. Cats consuming the 0.6% phosphoric acid-containing diet tended (P = 0.07) to have a higher urine pH 8 h post-feeding than cats consuming the 0.4 and 0.8% phosphoric acid-containing diets. Urine pH was highest at 4 h post-feeding except for cats fed the 0.4% sodium bisulphate- and the 0.6% phosphoric acid-containing diets. No differences (P > 0.05) between acidifiers were found in faecal score or in faecal dry matter and organic matter concentrations. A quadratic response was detected in faecal score for cats consuming the phosphoric acid-containing diets. Cats consuming the 0.6% phosphoric acid diet tended (P = 0.06) to have a lower faecal score than cats consuming the 0.4 and 0.8% phosphoric acid diets. For faecal dry matter, a linear trend was detected in cats consuming the sodium

  7. Transmission electron microscopic examination of phosphoric acid fuel cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pebler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to physically characterize tested and untested phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) components. Those examined included carbon-supported platinum catalysts, carbon backing paper, and Teflon-bonded catalyst layers at various stages of fabrication and after testing in pressurized PAFC's. Applicability of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy for identifying the various phases was explored. The discussion focuses on the morphology and size distribution of platinum, the morphology and structural aspects of Teflon in catalyst layers, and the structural evidence of carbon corrosion. Reference is made to other physical characterization techniques where appropriate. A qualitative model of the catalyst layer that emerged from the TEM studies is presented.

  8. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of materials, cell components, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems is described. Progress includes: (1) heat-treatment of 25 sq cm, 350 sq cm and 1200 sq cm cell test hardware was accomplished. Performance of fuel cells is improved by using this material; (2) electrochemical and chemical corrosion rates of heat-treated and as-molded graphite/phenolic resin composites in phosphoric acid were determined; (3) three cell, 5 in. x 15 in. stacks operated for up to 10,000 hours and 12 in. x 17 in. five cell stacks were tested for 5,000 hours; (4) a three cell 5 in. x 15 in. stack with 0.12 mg Pt/sq cm anodes and 0.25 mg Pt/sq cm cathodes was operated for 4,500 hours; and (5) an ERC proprietary high bubble pressure matrix, MAT-1, was tested for up to 10,000 hours.

  9. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-01-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  10. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-03-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  11. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase II. Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, M.B.; Isbell, R.E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions. The first reaction forms glucose by hydrolyzing the cellulose polymer and a subsequent reaction decomposes the glucose. The maximum theoretical yield depends on the ratio of the rate constants for these two reactions. The rate constants of both reactions were measured in a series of experiments studying temperature and concentration effects. The results suggest that the glucose decomposition reaction is similar with the two acids but that the cellulose hydrolysis reaction mechanism with phosphoric acid may be different than with sulfuric acid. The studies show phosphoric acid is unpromising and much inferior to sulfuric acid as the catalytic agent. Under the conditions studied, 0.8 wt % sulfuric acid gives a greater yield of glucose than 8.0 wt % phosphoric acid.

  12. Arsenic removal from contaminated soil using phosphoric acid and phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Min; Liao, Bohan; Lei, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Qingru; Ouyang, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to study arsenic (As) removal from a naturally contaminated soil using phosphoric acid (H3PO4) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4). Both H3PO4 and KH2PO4 proved to reduce toxicity of the soil in terms of soil As content, attaining more than 20% As removal at a concentration of 200 mmol/L. At the same time, acidification of soil and dissolution of soil components (Ca, Mg, and Si) resulted from using these two extractants, especially H3PO4. The effectiveness of these two extractants could be attributed to the replacement of As by phosphate ions (PO4(3-)). The function of H3PO4 as an acid to dissolve soil components had little effects on As removal. KH2PO4 almost removed as much As as H3PO4, but it did not result in serious damage to soils, indicating that it was a more promising extractant. The results of a kinetic study showed that As removal reached equilibrium after incubation for 360 min, but dissolution of soil components, especially Mg and Ca, was very rapid. Therefore dissolution of soil components would be inevitable if As was further removed. Elovich model best described the kinetic data of As removal among the four models used in the kinetic study.

  13. Addition of Grape Seed Extract Renders Phosphoric Acid a Collagen-stabilizing Etchant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Dusevich, V; Wang, Y

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies found that grape seed extract (GSE), which is rich in proanthocyanidins, could protect demineralized dentin collagen from collagenolytic activities following clinically relevant treatment. Because of proanthocyanidin's adverse interference to resin polymerization, it was believed that GSE should be applied and then rinsed off in a separate step, which in effect increases the complexity of the bonding procedure. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of combining GSE treatment with phosphoric acid etching to address the issue. It is also the first attempt to formulate collagen-cross-linking dental etchants. Based on Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and digestion assay, it was established that in the presence of 20% to 5% phosphoric acid, 30 sec of GSE treatment rendered demineralized dentin collagen inert to bacterial collagenase digestion. Based on this positive result, the simultaneous dentin etching and collagen protecting of GSE-containing phosphoric acid was evaluated on the premise of a 30-second etching time. According to micro-Raman spectroscopy, the formulation containing 20% phosphoric acid was found to lead to overetching. Based on scanning and transmission electronic microscopy, this same formulation exhibited unsynchronized phosphoric acid and GSE penetration. Therefore, addition of GSE did render phosphoric acid a collagen-stabilizing etchant, but the preferable phosphoric acid concentration should be <20%.

  14. Method for separating mono- and di-octylphenyl phosphoric acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.

    1977-01-01

    A method for separating mono-octylphenyl phosphoric acid ester and di-octylphenyl phosphoric acid ester from a mixture thereof comprises reacting the ester mixture with a source of lithium or sodium ions to form a mixture of the phosphate salts; contacting the salt mixture with an organic solvent which causes the dioctylphenyl phosphate salt to be dissolved in the organic solvent phase and the mono-octylphenyl phosphate salt to exist in a solid phase; separating the phases; recovering the phosphate salts from their respective phases; and acidifying the recovered salts to form the original phosphoric acid esters.

  15. Radionuclide concentrations in raw and purified phosphoric acids from Brazil and their processing wastes: implications for radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Fabiano Tomazini; Antunes, Maria Lúcia Pereira; Durrant, Steven F

    2012-02-01

    Radionuclides from the U and Th natural series are present in alkaline rocks, which are used as feedstock in Brazil for the production of raw phosphoric acid, which can be considered as a NORM (naturally occurring radioactive material). As a result of the purification of raw phosphoric acid to food-grade phosphoric acid, two by-products are generated, i.e., solid and liquid wastes. Taking this into account, the main aim of this study was to evaluate the fluxes of natural radionuclide in the production of food-grade phosphoric acids in Brazil, to determine the radiological impact caused by ingestion of food-grade phosphoric acid, and to evaluate the solid waste environmental hazards caused by its application in crop soils. Radiological characterization of raw phosphoric acid, food-grade phosphoric acid, solid waste, and liquid waste was performed by alpha and gamma spectrometry. The (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra, and (232)Th activity concentrations varied depending on the source of raw phosphoric acid. Decreasing radionuclides activity concentrations in raw phosphoric acids used by the producer of the purified phosphoric acid were observed as follows: Tapira (raw phosphoric acid D) > Catalão (raw phosphoric acids B and C) > Cajati (raw phosphoric acid A). The industrial purification process produces a reduction in radionuclide activity concentrations in food-grade phosphoric acid in relation to raw phosphoric acid produced in plant D and single raw phosphoric acid used in recent years. The most common use of food-grade phosphoric acid is in cola soft drinks, with an average consumption in Brazil of 72 l per person per year. Each liter of cola soft drink contains 0.5 ml of food-grade phosphoric acid, which gives an annual average intake of 36 ml of food-grade phosphoric acid per person. Under these conditions, radionuclide intake through consumption of food-grade phosphoric acid per year per person via cola soft drinks is not hazardous to human health in Brazil

  16. Method of recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid with enhanced content of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.; Nakamura, R.

    1984-01-24

    In preparing wet process phosphoric acid by decomposing a phosphate rock containing uranium with sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid on condition that hemihydrate gypsum is formed in an acid solution either at the stage of decomposing the phosphate rock or subsequently, uranium contained in the phosphate rock can almost entirely be retained in the obtained phosphoric acid solution by forming the hemihydrate gypsum in the presence of an oxidizing agent, such as a soluble chlorate, hydrogen peroxide or oxygen gas, in the acid solution in a quantity sufficient to render the entire uranium dissolved in the acid solution hexavalent because hemihydrate gypsum adsorbs almost exclusively tetravalent ions of uranium. The uranium is then recovered.

  17. Evolution of the graphite surface in phosphoric acid: an AFM and Raman study

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Luigi; Bussetti, Gianlorenzo; Tommasini, Matteo; Li Bassi, Andrea; Casari, Carlo Spartaco; Passoni, Matteo; Ciccacci, Franco; Duò, Lamberto; Castiglioni, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoric acid is an inorganic acid used for producing graphene sheets by delaminating graphite in (electro-)chemical baths. The observed phenomenology during the electrochemical treatment in phosphoric acid solution is partially different from other acidic solutions, such as sulfuric and perchloric acid solutions, where the graphite surface mainly forms blisters. In fact, the graphite surface is covered by a thin layer of modified (oxidized) material that can be observed when an electrochemical potential is swept in the anodic current regime. We characterize this particular surface evolution by means of a combined electrochemical, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy investigation. PMID:28144537

  18. 40 CFR 422.50 - Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the defluorinated phosphoric acid subcategory. 422.50 Section 422.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... processing acids such as vacuum and air stripping. The acid is concentrated up to 70-73% P2 O5 in...

  19. Development of advanced kocite electrocatalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. S.; Leyerle, R. W.; Scarlata, D. S.; Vanek, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    These improved electrocatalysts should demonstrate a larger initial catalytic metal surface area, and a better catalytic metal surface area retention during fuel cell operation than present state-of-the-art phosphoric acid electrocatalysts. Kocite electrocatalysts impregnated with platinum and platinum-vanadium alloys were tested. The Kocite electrocatalysts were aged in electrodes potentiostated in H3PO4 half cells, and were then analyzed for catalytic metals surface area retention. Compared with the state-of-the-art platinum electrocatalysts, as represented by a standard Kocite electrocatalyst, the Kocite electrocatalysts impregnated by the techniques used in this study have a better initial platinum surface area. This initial surface area difference appeared to be maintained when the catalysts are aged at 700 mV, but was not maintained when the catalysts were aged at 800 mV. Variations of the alumina substrate and of the post-treatment of the leached Kocite catalyst support did not produce any catalysts with better platinum surface area retention than the standard catalyst. Alloying of vanadium with the platinum did produce Kocite electrocatalysts which maintained their alloy surface area better than the standard catalyst maintained its platinum surface area.

  20. Intelligent machine learning analysis for phosphoric acid fuel cell operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, W.; Foote, J.P.; Murphy, R.W.; Chen, F.C.

    1998-07-01

    Several fuel cell types are available and are in various stages of technology development. The complex nature of the balance of plant and fuel cell interface poses many technical challenges to achieve proper system control under commercial operating conditions. Real-time predictive diagnostic computer systems based on advanced intelligent machine learning technologies offer a means to facilitate the detection, understanding, and control of fuel cell subsystems to avoid system instabilities and failures that can result in costly plant shutdowns. The objectives reported herein are the development of physical and empirical computer models for application and testing of predictive control strategies based on intelligent machine learning techniques for fuel cells. A physical/empirical model was built and validated using available operating data from commercial fuel cells. Neural networks were then used to build an empirical model from the original physical/empirical model. Using the neural network model, a predictive, feedforward strategy was developed to control the fuel flow for a phosphoric acid fuel cell physical/empirical model. The predictive control strategy was compared to traditional proportional integral derivative control schemes.

  1. Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

  2. Dry compliant seal for phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Granata, Jr., Samuel J.; Woodle, Boyd M.

    1990-01-01

    A dry compliant overlapping seal for a phosphoric acid fuel cell preformed f non-compliant Teflon to make an anode seal frame that encircles an anode assembly, a cathode seal frame that encircles a cathode assembly and a compliant seal frame made of expanded Teflon, generally encircling a matrix assembly. Each frame has a thickness selected to accommodate various tolerances of the fuel cell elements and are either bonded to one of the other frames or to a bipolar or end plate. One of the non-compliant frames is wider than the other frames forming an overlap of the matrix over the wider seal frame, which cooperates with electrolyte permeating the matrix to form a wet seal within the fuel cell that prevents process gases from intermixing at the periphery of the fuel cell and a dry seal surrounding the cell to keep electrolyte from the periphery thereof. The frames may be made in one piece, in L-shaped portions or in strips and have an outer perimeter which registers with the outer perimeter of bipolar or end plates to form surfaces upon which flanges of pan shaped, gas manifolds can be sealed.

  3. Influence of phosphoric acid on the electrochemistry of lead electrodes in sulfuric acid electrolyte containing antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, S.

    The influence of phosphoric acid (0 to 40 g 1 -1) on the Pb/PbSO 4 reaction and the kinetics of hydrogen evolution on pure, smooth lead and lead alloy electrodes is studied via galvanostatic polarization in the linear and Tafel domains with and without antimony (0 to 10 mg 1 -1) addition to the H 2SO 4 (3 to 10 M) electrolyte. Phosphoric acid is found to offset significantly the adverse effect of antimony. H 3PO 4 is also found to increase the hydrogen overpotential without affecting the Pb/PbSO 4 reaction. This implies that the open-circuit corrosion of lead and the consequent hydrogen evolution rate on lead are reduced in the presence of H 3PO 4. The beneficial effects of H 3PO 4 additive are found to be optimum at around 20 g 1 -1. Suppression of hydrogen evolution on the negative electrode, a crucial criterion for sealed cell operation, can be achieved using a H 3PO 4 additive.

  4. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

  5. Chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azlactones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Sun, Wangsheng; Zhu, Gongming; Yang, Junxian; Zhang, Ming; Hong, Liang; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-25

    The first chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed highly diastereo- and enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azlactones and methyleneindolinones was disclosed. By using a BINOL-derived chiral phosphoric acid as the catalyst, azlactones were activated as chiral anti N-protonated 1,3-dipoles to react with methyleneindolinones to yield biologically important 3,3'-pyrrolidonyl spirooxindole scaffolds in high yields, with good-to-excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity.

  6. Phosphorous acid residues in apples after foliar fertilization: results of field trials.

    PubMed

    Malusà, E; Tosi, L

    2005-06-01

    The levels of phosphorous acid residues in apples after foliar fertilization with P fertilizers and after treatment with a phosphonate fungicide (Fosetyl-Al) were determined and compared. Two field trials and a glasshouse experiment, using different genotypes and plants of different age, were carried out and monitored over a three-year period. Phosphorous acid residues were found in apples after application of foliar P fertilizers. Concentrations of the residues ranged between 0.02 and 14 mg kg(-1) depending on the phosphorous acid content in the fertilizer used and the plant size and yield. The treatments induced an accumulation of the residue in the course of the experiments, which in some cases reached a level exceeding the maximum limit set by EU legislation. Residues were also detected in other plant organs, i.e., roots and buds. Plants treated with Fosetyl-Al contained phosphorous acid residues in their fruits and buds two years after the suspension of the treatment, suggesting a long-term persistence of the substance in plant storage organs. A second experiment, involving treatment of trees with seven foliar fertilizers of different composition, also induced accumulation of phosphorous acid residues in fruits. It is concluded that a wide array of foliar products containing phosphorous acid, even as a minor component, could mimic the residue effect of phosphonate fungicide treatments.

  7. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of phosphoric acid solution compared to other root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    PRADO, Maíra; da SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto; FERRAZ, Caio Cezar Randi; de ALMEIDA, José Flávio Affonso; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid has been suggested as an irrigant due to its effectiveness in removing the smear layer. Objectives : The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of a 37% phosphoric acid solution to other irrigants commonly used in endodontics. Material and Methods : The substances 37% phosphoric acid, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid, 2% chlorhexidine (solution and gel), and 5.25% NaOCl were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was tested against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces meyeri, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella nigrescens according to the agar diffusion method. The cytotoxicity of the irrigants was determined by using the MTT assay. Results : Phosphoric acid presented higher antimicrobial activity compared to the other tested irrigants. With regard to the cell viability, this solution showed results similar to those with 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution), whereas 17% EDTA and 10% citric acid showed higher cell viability compared to other irrigants. Conclusion : Phosphoric acid demonstrated higher antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution). PMID:26018307

  8. Diluted phosphoric acid pretreatment for production of fermentable sugars in a sugarcane-based biorefinery.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Solange Maria; Santos, Andrelina Maria Pinheiro; Rocha, George Jackson Moraes; Souto-Maior, Ana Maria

    2013-05-01

    The influence of time (8-24 min), temperature (144-186 °C) and phosphoric acid concentration (0.05-0.20%, w/v) on the pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse in a 20 L batch rotary reactor was investigated. The efficiency of the pretreatment was verified by chemical characterization of the solid fraction of the pretreated bagasse and the conversion of cellulose to glucose by enzymatic hydrolysis. Models representing the percentage of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, solubilized hemicellulose and the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose were predictive and significant. Phosphoric acid concentration of 0.20% at temperature of 186 °C, during 8 and 24 min, was shown to be very effective in solubilizing hemicellulose from sugarcane bagasse, reaching solubilization of 96% and 98%, respectively. Relatively low amounts of inhibitors were produced, and the phosphoric acid remaining in the hemicellulosic hydrolysate is at adequate levels for supplying phosphorous requirement during subsequent fermentation.

  9. Production of monosaccharides from napier grass by hydrothermal process with phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Takata, Eri; Tsutsumi, Ken; Tsutsumi, Yuji; Tabata, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The production of monosaccharides from napier grass was investigated in the presence of acid catalysts using the hydrothermal process. When the napier grass was treated with 3 wt.% phosphoric acid at 160°C for 15min, the xylose yield reached 10.3 wt.%, corresponding to 72.0% of the xylan in it, whereas glucose was hardly obtained. A combined process was then conducted using an 85 wt.% phosphoric acid treatment at 60 °C for 1h followed by a hydrothermal treatment with 3 wt.% phosphoric acid. In the initial treatment with concentrated phosphoric acid the most of xylan was hydrolyzed to xylose, and the crystalline cellulose was converted to its amorphous form. The hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose was significantly enhanced during the following hydrothermal process with 3 wt.% phosphoric acid at 200 °C for 8 min. Consequently, 77.2% yield of xylose and 50.0% yield of glucose were obtained from the combined process.

  10. Comparison between phosphoric acid and hydrochloric acid in microabrasion technique for the treatment of dental fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Bassir, Mahshid Mohammadi; Bagheri, Golnaz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of phosphoric acid (H3PO4)-pumice compound with conventional hydrochloric acid (HCl)-pumice compound in treating different severities of dental fluorosis with the microabrasion technique. Materials and Methods: Sixty-seven anterior teeth from seven patients with different severities of dental fluorosis were treated. In each patient, half of the teeth were treated with HCl-pumice compound and the other half with H3PO4-pumice compound (split-mouth design). Both treatment compounds were applied for 30-second periods and treatment continued up to 10 minutes. Before and after treatment, standardized photographs were taken. The photographs were compared by two experienced observers unaware of the modality of treatment. Two indices of aesthetics, improvement in appearance (IA) and degree of stain removal (DSR), were determined according to a visual analog scale. The inter- and intra-correlation coefficients were made; then, statistical analyses were calculated using Mann-Whitney and t-test. Results: There were no significant differences in interobserver evaluation. Improvements in aesthetic indices were observed in all fluorotic teeth by both compounds; however, the mean treatment time with HCl-pumice was significantly lower than H3PO4-pumice. Conclusion: The H3PO4-pumice compound improved aesthetic indices in fluorotic teeth similar to the HCl-pumice compound. PMID:23349575

  11. Chiral BINOL-derived phosphoric acids: privileged Brønsted acid organocatalysts for C-C bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Zamfir, Alexandru; Schenker, Sebastian; Freund, Matthias; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2010-12-07

    BINOL-derived phosphoric acids have emerged during the last five years as powerful chiral Brønsted acid catalysts in many enantioselective processes. The most successful transformations carried out with chiral BINOL phosphates include C-C bond formation reactions. The recent advances have been reviewed in this article with a focus being placed on hydrocyanations, aldol-type, Mannich, Friedel-Crafts, aza-ene-type, Diels-Alder, as well as cascade and multi-component reactions.

  12. On the reaction of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides with tannic and phosphoric acid and their mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, J. J.; Novegil, F. J.; García, K. E.; Barrero, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    The actions of tannic acid, phosphoric acid and their mixture on lepidocrocite, goethite, superparamagnetic goethite, akaganeite, magnetite, hematite and maghemite for 1 day and 1 month were explored. It was found that these acids form iron tannates and phosphates. Lepidocrocite and magnetite were the iron phases more easily transformed with the mixture of the acids after 1 month of reaction, whereas hematite was the most resistant phase. In the case of goethite, our results suggest that in order to understand properly the action of these acids, we have to take into account its stoichiometry, surface area and degree of crystallinity.

  13. Optimizing ethanol and methane production from steam-pretreated, phosphoric acid-impregnated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Bondesson, Pia-Maria; Dupuy, Aurélie; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Pretreatment is of vital importance in the production of ethanol and methane from agricultural residues. In this study, the effects of steam pretreatment with phosphoric acid on enzymatic hydrolysis (EH), simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), anaerobic digestion (AD) and the total energy output at three different temperatures were investigated. The effect of separating the solids for SSF and the liquid for AD was also studied and compared with using the whole slurry first in SSF and then in AD. Furthermore, the phosphoric acid was compared to previous studies using sulphuric acid or no catalyst. Using phosphoric acid resulted in higher yields than when no catalyst was used. However, compared with sulphuric acid, an improved yield was only seen with phosphoric acid in the case of EH. The higher pretreatment temperatures (200 and 210 °C) resulted in the highest yields after EH and SSF, while the highest methane yield was obtained with the lower pretreatment temperature (190 °C). The highest yield in terms of total energy recovery (78 %) was obtained after pretreatment at 190 °C, but a pretreatment temperature of 200 °C is, however, the best alternative since fewer steps are required (whole slurry in SSF and then in AD) and high product yields were obtained (76 %).

  14. Rare earth elements recycling from waste phosphor by dual hydrochloric acid dissolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hu; Zhang, Shengen; Pan, Dean; Tian, Jianjun; Yang, Min; Wu, Maolin; Volinsky, Alex A

    2014-05-15

    This paper is a comparative study of recycling rare earth elements from waste phosphor, which focuses on the leaching rate and the technical principle. The traditional and dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid (DHA) methods were compared. The method of dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid has been developed. The Red rare earth phosphor (Y0.95Eu0.05)2O3 in waste phosphor is dissolved during the first step of acid leaching, while the Green phosphor (Ce0.67Tb0.33MgAl11O19) and the Blue phosphor (Ba0.9Eu0.1MgAl10O17) mixed with caustic soda are obtained by alkali sintering. The excess caustic soda and NaAlO2 are removed by washing. The insoluble matter is leached by the hydrochloric acid, followed by solvent extraction and precipitation (the DHA method). In comparison, the total leaching rate of the rare earth elements was 94.6% by DHA, which is much higher than 42.08% achieved by the traditional method. The leaching rate of Y, Eu, Ce and Tb reached 94.6%, 99.05%, 71.45%, and 76.22%, respectively. DHA can decrease the consumption of chemicals and energy. The suggested DHA method is feasible for industrial applications.

  15. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase 2: Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, M. B.; Isbell, R. E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions.

  16. The Comparison of Hydrochloric Acid and Phosphoric Acid Treatments in the Preparation of Montmorillonite Catalysts for RNA Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aldersley, Michael Frank; Joshi, Prakash C; Huang, Yixing

    2017-02-16

    The treatment of clay minerals with a preliminary acid wash and titration to pH 7 has proven to generate catalysts for the most interesting of oligomerization reactions in which activated RNA-nucleotides generate oligomers up to 40-mers. Significantly, not all clay minerals become catalytic following this treatment and none are catalytic in the absence of such treatment. The washing procedure has been modified and explored further using phosphoric acid and the outcomes are compared to those obtained when clay samples are prepared following a hydrochloric acid wash.

  17. The Comparison of Hydrochloric Acid and Phosphoric Acid Treatments in the Preparation of Montmorillonite Catalysts for RNA Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldersley, Michael Frank; Joshi, Prakash C.; Huang, Yixing

    2017-02-01

    The treatment of clay minerals with a preliminary acid wash and titration to pH 7 has proven to generate catalysts for the most interesting of oligomerization reactions in which activated RNA-nucleotides generate oligomers up to 40-mers. Significantly, not all clay minerals become catalytic following this treatment and none are catalytic in the absence of such treatment. The washing procedure has been modified and explored further using phosphoric acid and the outcomes are compared to those obtained when clay samples are prepared following a hydrochloric acid wash.

  18. Moving single bubble sonoluminescence in phosphoric acid and sulphuric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Troia, A; Ripa, D Madonna; Spagnolo, R

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of sonoluminescence still presents some unsolved aspects. Recently [Y.T. Didenko, K. Suslick, Molecular Emission during Single Bubble Sonoluminescence, Nature 407 (2000) 877-879.], it was found that a single cavitating air bubble in polar aprotic liquids (including formamide and adiponitrile) can produce very strong sonoluminescence while undergoing macroscopic translation movements in the resonator, a condition known as moving single bubble sonoluminescing (MSBSL). Here we describe some experiments conducted in aqueous solutions of phosphoric and sulphuric acid. In these liquid media, it is possible to reproduce MSBSL and luminescence is emitted even if a trapped bubble is subjected to a strong shape instability, named in the literature "jittering phase". When a moving and luminescing bubble was present and the acoustic pressure gradually increased, we observed the generation of a discrete lattice of trapped bubbles. The bubbles in the lattice emit very intense light flashes and can change their position while maintaining the overall spatial distribution in time. Some preliminary results, obtained from Mie-scattering and measurements of relative light intensity, are reported.

  19. Phosphoric acid distribution and its impact on the performance of polybenzimidazole membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Florian; Heissler, Stefan; Laukenmann, Ruben; Zeis, Roswitha

    2014-12-01

    Phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) is the most common membrane material for high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFC). The PBI membrane is usually doped by immersion in hot phosphoric acid. Immersion time and acid temperature affect the doping level of the membrane. In this work we studied the influence of doping time and temperature on the ex-situ and in-situ proton conductivities of poly (2, 5-benzimidazole) (AB-PBI) membranes as well as the fuel cell performance. Confocal Raman microscopy was employed to spatially resolve the acid distribution within the AB-PBI membranes. Therefore the interactions between the basic nitrogen-sides of the AB-PBI polymer and the phosphoric acid protons were investigated. We found that membranes with a 6 h doping time had significantly higher proton conductivity than those doped for only 3 h. In terms of absolute acid up-take, however, the difference was rather small. This result shows that the doping level alone does not define the conductivity of the membrane. The conductivity is also influenced by the micro acid distribution within the membrane. Highest membrane conductivity and fuel cell performance with fumapem AM cross-linked membranes were achieved with a doping time of 6 h and a doping temperature of 120 °C.

  20. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for producing an acid inventory control member by spraying FEP onto a partially screened carbon paper backing is discussed. Theoretical analysis of the acid management indicates that the vapor composition of 103% H3PO4 is approximately 1.0 ppm P4O10. An SEM evaluation of corrosion resistance of phenolic resins and graphite/phenolic resin composites in H3PO4 at 185 C shows specific surface etching. Carbonization of graphite/phenolic bipolar plates is achieved without blistering.

  1. Why do proton conducting polybenzimidazole phosphoric acid membranes perform well in high-temperature PEM fuel cells?

    PubMed

    Melchior, Jan-Patrick; Majer, Günter; Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-12-21

    Transport properties and hydration behavior of phosphoric acid/(benz)imidazole mixtures are investigated by diverse NMR techniques, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and conductivity measurements. The monomeric systems can serve as models for phosphoric acid/poly-benzimidazole membranes which are known for their exceptional performance in high temperature PEM fuel cells. (1)H- and (31)P-NMR data show benzimidazole acting as a strong Brønsted base with respect to neat phosphoric acid. Since benzimidazole's nitrogens are fully protonated with a low rate for proton exchange with phosphate species, proton diffusion and conduction processes must take place within the hydrogen bond network of phosphoric acid only. The proton exchange dynamics between phosphate and benzimidazole species pass through the intermediate exchange regime (with respect to NMR line separations) with exchange times being close to typical diffusion times chosen in PFG-NMR diffusion measurements (ms regime). The resulting effects, as described by the Kärger equation, are included into the evaluation of PFG-NMR data for obtaining precise proton diffusion coefficients. The highly reduced proton diffusion coefficient within the phosphoric acid part of the model systems compared to neat phosphoric acid is suggested to be the immediate consequence of proton subtraction from phosphoric acid. This reduces hydrogen bond network frustration (imbalance of the number of proton donors and acceptors) and therefore also the rate of structural proton diffusion, phosphoric acid's acidity and hygroscopicity. Reduced water uptake, shown by TGA, goes along with reduced electroosmotic water drag which is suggested to be the reason for PBI-phosphoric acid membranes performing better in fuel cells than other phosphoric-acid-containing electrolytes with higher protonic conductivity.

  2. Suicide case due to phosphoric acid ingestion: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Isabella; Pepe, Francesca; Di Nunzio, Ciro; Ausania, Francesco; Serra, Arianna; Ricci, Pietrantonio

    2014-11-01

    Ingesting caustic substances represents a common event which may result in serious injuries of the gastrointestinal system. Severity of injury depends on the type of ingested substance: Caustic burns are more frequently associated with acid ingestion and their severity depends on type, concentration, time of exposure, and amount of the ingested substance. We report a case of phosphoric acid ingestion leading to death in a patient with depressive disorder. While reports ingestion of other acids and organophosphates can be found in the literature, there are no reports detailing a death due to phosphoric acid ingestion. We hope that presenting the findings in this case can aid death investigators in future cases that may involve ingestion of such a substance. After autopsy pH, phosphate and calcium ions concentration in the blood were analyzed. The cause of death was due to systemic effects: metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, hypocalcemia, and hyperkalemia.

  3. Extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from nitric acid solutions by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Teh-Hua

    2012-01-04

    The extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from a nitric acid solution using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an acidic extractant of organophosphorus compounds dissolved in kerosene was studied. By graphical and numerical analysis, the compositions of indium-D2EHPA complexes in organic phase and stoichiometry of the extraction reaction were examined. Nitric acid solutions with various indium concentrations at 25 °C were used to obtain the equilibrium constant of InR₃ in the organic phase. The experimental results showed that the extraction distribution ratios of indium(III) between the organic phase and the aqueous solution increased when either the pH value of the aqueous solution and/or the concentration of the organic phase extractant increased. Finally, the recovery efficiency of indium(III) in nitric acid was measured.

  4. Effect of phosphoric acid as a catalyst on the hydrothermal pretreatment and acidogenic fermentation of food waste.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Kun; Yin, Jun; Chen, Ting; Yu, Xiaoqin

    2016-05-01

    The hydrothermal method was applied to food waste (FW) pretreatment with phosphoric acid as a catalyst. The content of soluble substances such as protein and carbohydrate in the FW increased after the hydrothermal pretreatment with phosphoric acid addition (⩽5%). The SCOD approached approximately 29.0g/L in 5% phosphoric acid group, which is almost 65% more than the original FW. The hydrothermal condition was 160°C for 10min, which means that at least 40% of energy and 60% of reaction time were saved to achieve the expected pretreatment effect. Subsequent fermentation tests showed that the optimal dosage of phosphoric acid was 3% with a VFA yield of 0.763g/gVSremoval, but the increase in salinity caused by phosphoric acid could adversely affect the acidogenesis. With an increase in the quantity of phosphoric acid, among the VFAs, the percentage of propionic acid decreased and that of butyric acid increased. The PCR-DGGE analysis indicated that the microbial diversity could decrease with excessive phosphoric acid, which resulted in a low VFA yield.

  5. Enantioselective Aza Michael-Type Addition to Alkenyl Benzimidazoles Catalyzed by a Chiral Phosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Yi; Kanomata, Kyohei; Korenaga, Toshinobu; Terada, Masahiro

    2016-01-18

    Highly enantioselective Michael-type addition (MTA) reactions between N-protected alkenyl benzimidazoles and either pyrazoles or indazoles as nitrogen nucleophiles are accomplished for the first time using chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. Theoretical studies elucidated the reaction pathway and the origin of the stereochemical outcomes, where the catalyst substituent and the N-protecting group of benzimidazole contributed to the resulting high enantioselectivity.

  6. Current legal and institutional issues in the commercialization of phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimmons, J. T.; Sheehy, K. D.; Singer, J. R.; Gardner, T. C.

    1982-01-01

    Legal and institutional factors affecting the development and commercial diffusion of phosphoric acid fuel cells are assessed. Issues for future research and action are suggested. Perceived barriers and potential opportunities for fuel cells in central and dispersed utility operations and on-site applications are reviewed, as well as the general concept of commercialization as applied to emerging energy technologies.

  7. Tuning transport selectivity of ionic species by phosphoric acid gradient in positively charged nanochannel membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Fan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xizhen; Liu, Jianbo; Huang, Jin

    2015-02-03

    The transport of ionic species through a nanochannel plays important roles in fundamental research and practical applications of the nanofluidic device. Here, we demonstrated that ionic transport selectivity of a positively charged nanochannel membrane can be tuned under a phosphoric acid gradient. When phosphoric acid solution and analyte solution were connected by the positively charged nanochannel membrane, the faster-moving analyte through the positively charged nanochannel membrane was the positively charged dye (methylviologen, MV(2+)) instead of the negatively charged dye (1,5-naphthalene disulfonate, NDS(2-)). In other words, a reversed ion selectivity of the nanochannel membranes can be found. It can be explained as a result of the combination of diffusion, induced electroosmosis, and induced electrophoresis. In addition, the influencing factors of transport selectivity, including concentration of phosphoric acid, penetration time, and volume of feed solution, were also investigated. The results showed that the transport selectivity can further be tuned by adjusting these factors. As a method of tuning ionic transport selectivity by establishing phosphoric acid gradient, it will be conducive to improving the separation of ionic species.

  8. Survey on aging on electrodes and electrocatalysts in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.; Hochmuth, J.

    1981-01-01

    The processes which contribute to the decay in performance of electrodes used in phosphoric acid fuel cell systems are discussed. Loss of catalytic surface area, corrosion of the carbon support, electrode structure degradation, electrolyte degradation, and impurities in the reactant streams are identified as the major areas for concern.

  9. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant cost model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cost analysis of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant includes two parts: a method for estimation of system capital costs, and an economic analysis which determines the levelized annual cost of operating the system used in the capital cost estimation. A FORTRAN computer has been developed for this cost analysis.

  10. Phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system performance model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program was developed for analyzing the performance of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant systems. Energy mass and electrochemical analysis in the reformer, the shaft converters, the heat exchangers, and the fuel cell stack were combined to develop a mathematical model for the power plant for both atmospheric and pressurized conditions, and for several commercial fuels.

  11. Chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of 3-trifluoromethylthioquinolines.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Zhang, Qian-Fan; Zhao, Wei-Hao; Jiang, Guo-Fang

    2016-08-07

    A chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of 3-trifluoromethylthioquinolines has been successfully developed, providing direct and facile access to chiral 2,3-disubstituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline derivatives containing a stereogenic trifluoromethylthio group with up to 99% enantioselectivity.

  12. Impact of rolling and phosphorous acid on root rot of dry peas in the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rolling soil after planting is standard in dry pea production areas in the Pacific Northwest but can increase compaction resulting in increase of root rot by oomycetes and other pathogens. Phosphorous acid has been used to manage oomycete pathogens, therefore, the impact of not rolling soil after s...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance. 180.1210 Section 180.1210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  14. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance. 180.1210 Section 180.1210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  15. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance. 180.1210 Section 180.1210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  16. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance. 180.1210 Section 180.1210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  17. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance. 180.1210 Section 180.1210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  18. Cooperative catalysis by palladium and a chiral phosphoric acid: enantioselective amination of racemic allylic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debasis; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2014-11-24

    Cooperative catalysis by [Pd(dba)2] and the chiral phosphoric acid BA1 in combination with the phosphoramidite ligand L8 enabled the efficient enantioselective amination of racemic allylic alcohols with a variety of functionalized amines. This catalytic protocol is highly regio- and stereoselective (up to e.r. 96:4) and furnishes valuable chiral amines in almost quantitative yield.

  19. Modification of vital wheat gluten with phosphoric acid to produce high free-solution capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten reacts with phosphoric acid to produce natural superabsorbent gels. The gel properties are defined by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE), and uptake of water, salt solutions, and aqueous ethanol. Temperatures above 120'C and dry cond...

  20. Modification of vital wheat gluten with phosphoric acid to produce high free solution capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten reacts with phosphoric acid in the presence of urea to produce natural superabsorbent gels. Fourier Transform Infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) reveal chemical changes from the reaction. Temperatures above 120°C and dry conditions create the op...

  1. [Development of dental quick casting with zircon-phosphoric acid investments].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, R

    1990-03-01

    The application of zircon (ZrSiO4) that has high refractoriness, high thermal conductivity and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, to quick casting investment was studied. Various zircon powders and phosphoric acid solutions were tested with respect to the higher thermal shock resistance. The formulation and properties of zircon-phosphoric acid investment materials such as water/powder ratio, fluidity of slurry, setting time, setting expansion, thermal expansion, thermal analysis, green and fired compressive strength were measured. Formulation of zircon slurry for coating was zircon flower #600 30%, zircon flower #350 10%, and zircon sand CP 60%, and that for sanding was zircon flower #200. The mixing liquid was 15% phosphoric acid and liquid/powder ratio was 0.1. The slurry using phosphoric acid had good fluidity and good workability. The 24-hour green strength was 1 MPa, fired strength was 10 MPa, 24-hour setting expansion was -0.04% and the thermal expansion at 1000 degrees C was 0.31%. Immediately after coating with zircon slurry, the coating layer was dried, sintered and dewaxed by thermal shock. The thermal shock consisted of the following four-step manipulations. The first is hot air drying (50 degrees C, 5 minutes), the second is heat shock (900 degrees C, 3 seconds), the third is redrying (220 degrees C, 3 minutes) and the fourth is dewaxing (550 degrees C, 3 minutes). Small casting of pure titanium and K-metal could be done successfully by the quick casting method using the zircon-phosphoric acid investments. It was found that the total expansion of the secondary investments influenced the casting adapatability.

  2. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  3. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal, Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-01

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  4. Effects of phosphoric acid concentration on oxygen reduction kinetics at platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, K.L.; Chin, D.T.; Gonzalez, E.R.; Srinivasan, S.

    1984-04-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction was investigated at platinum electrodes in phosphoric acid in the concentration range 0.7M(6.6%) to 17.5M(95%) at 25/sup 0/C using the rotating ring-disk electrode technique. As a complement, cyclic voltammograms on platinum and potentials of zero charge of mercury were obtained as a function of phosphoric aci concentration. The mechanism of the oxygen electrode reaction is discussed in terms of the direct four-electron transfer reduction to water and the formation of hydrogen peroxide as an intermediate in a parallel two-electron transfer reaction The rate constants of the intermediate reaction steps were calculated from the ring-disk data for various potentials and electrolyte concentrations. The characteristics of the reaction were found to be markedly dependent on the concentration of phosphoric acid. These results are interpreted in terms of changes in oxygen solubility, proton activity, and double laye characteristics when passing over from a water to a phosphoric acid solvent structure.

  5. Lignin hydrolysis and phosphorylation mechanism during phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wu; Wu, Lingnan; Zheng, Zongming; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2014-12-18

    The study focused on the structural sensitivity of lignin during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process and the resulting hydrolysis and phosphorylation reaction mechanisms using density functional theory calculations. The chemical stabilities of the seven most common linkages (β-O-4, β-β, 4-O-5, β-1, 5-5, α-O-4, and β-5) of lignin in H3PO4, CH3COCH3, and H2O solutions were detected, which shows that α-O-4 linkage and β-O-4 linkage tend to break during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process. Then α-O-4 phosphorylation and β-O-4 phosphorylation follow a two-step reaction mechanism in the acid treatment step, respectively. However, since phosphorylation of α-O-4 is more energetically accessible than phosphorylation of β-O-4 in phosphoric acid, the phosphorylation of α-O-4 could be controllably realized under certain operational conditions, which could tune the electron and hole transfer on the right side of β-O-4 in the H2PO4- functionalized lignin. The results provide a fundamental understanding for process-controlled modification of lignin and the potential novel applications in lignin-based imprinted polymers, sensors, and molecular devices.

  6. Phosphoric acid esters cannot replace polyvinylphosphonic acid as phosphoprotein analogs in biomimetic remineralization of resin-bonded dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Sui; Kim, Young Kyung; Toledano, Manuel; Breschi, Lorenzo; Ling, Jun Qi; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), a biomimetic analog of phosphoproteins, is crucial for recruiting polyacrylic acid (PAA)-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors during biomimetic remineralization of dentin collagen matrices. This study tested the null hypothesis that phosphoric acid esters of methacrylates in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during bimimetic remineralization of resin-dentin interfaces. Human dentin specimens were bonded with: I) XP Bond, an etch-and-rinse adhesive using moist bonding; II) XP Bond using dry bonding; and III) Adper Prompt L-Pop, a self-etching adhesive. The control medium contained only set Portland cement and a simulated body fluid (SBF) without any biomimetic analog. Two experimental Portland cement/SBF remineralization media were evaluated: the first contained PAA as the sole biomimetic analog, the second contained PAA and PVPA as dual biomimetic analogs. No remineralization of the resin-dentin interfaces could be identified from specimens immersed in the control medium. After 2–4 months in the first experimental medium, specimens exhibited either no remineralization or large crystal formation within hybrid layers. Only specimens immersed in the second remineralization medium produced nanocrystals that accounted for intrafibrillar remineralization within hybrid layers. The null hypothesis could not be rejected; phosphoric acid esters in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during biomimetic remineralization of adhesive-bonded dentin. PMID:19481792

  7. Removal of heavy metals and lanthanides from industrial phosphoric acid process liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, C.; Witkamp, G.J.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.

    1999-11-01

    To diminish the discharge of heavy metals and lanthanides by the phosphoric acid industry, these impurities have to be removed from the mother liquor before their incorporation in the gypsum crystals. This can best be achieved by means of solvent extraction or ion exchange during the recrystallization of hemihydrate to dihydrate gypsum. Various commercial carriers and two ion-exchange resins were screened for their efficiency and selectivity. Light and heavy lanthanide ions are extracted from the recrystallization acid by didodecylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (Nacure 1052) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA), and the heavy-metal ions by bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex 301) and by bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)monothiophosphinic acid (Cyanex 302). Mercury is also extracted by the anion carriers tri(C{sub 8}-C{sub 10})amine (Alamine 336) and tri(C{sub 8}-C{sub 10}) monomethyl ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336). Both Dowex C-500 and Amberlite IR-120 extract lanthanide and heavy-metal ions. Unfortunately, D2EHPA, Nacure 1052, and the two ion-exchange resins also show affinity for ions present in much higher concentrations, like calcium or iron ions.

  8. Preparation and evaluation of advanced catalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.; Baris, J.; Hockmuth, J.; Pagliaro, P.

    1984-01-01

    The platinum electrocatalysts were characterized for their crystallite sizes and the degree of dispersion on the carbon supports. One application of these electrocatalysts was for anodic oxidation of hydrogen in hot phosphoric acid fuel cells, coupled with the influence of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the fuel gas stream. In a similar way, these platinum on carbon electrocatalysts were evaluated for oxygen reduction in hot phosphoric acid. Binary noble metal alloys were prepared for anodic oxidation of hydrogen and noble metal-refractory metal mixtures were prepared for oxygen reduction. An exemplar alloy of platinum and palladium (50/50 atom %) was discovered for anodic oxidation of hydrogen in the presence of carbon monoxide, and patent disclosures were submitted. For the cathode, platinum-vanadium alloys were prepared showing improved performance over pure platinum. Preliminary experiments on electrocatalyst utilization in electrode structures showed low utilization of the noble metal when the electrocatalyst loading exceeded one weight percent on the carbon.

  9. Recovery of Uranium from Wet Phosphoric Acid by Solvent Extraction Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrami, Denis; Cote, Gérard; Mokhtari, Hamid; Courtaud, Bruno; Moyer, Bruce A.; Chagnes, Alexandre

    2014-11-17

    Between 1951 and 1991, we developed about 17 processes to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA), but the viability of these processes was subject to the variation of the uranium price market. Nowadays, uranium from WPA appears to be attractive due to the increase of the global uranium demand resulting from the emergence of developing countries. Moreover, the increasing demand provides impetus for a new look at the applicable technology with a view to improvements as well as altogether new approaches. This paper gives an overview on extraction processes developed in the past to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA) as well as the physicochemistry involved in these processes. Recent advances concerning the development of new extraction systems are also reported and discussed.

  10. Study of the chemical mechanisms of the reaction of neutralization of calcium hydroxide by phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgadi, M.; Mejdoubi, E.; Elansari, L. L.; Essaddek, A.; Abouricha, S.; Lamhamdi, A.

    2005-03-01

    Calcium phosphates reported in this study, are prepared following an acido-basic reaction between phosphoric acid and calcium hydroxide. These phosphates are the brushite, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and oxygenated apatite. The follow-up of the reaction by infra-red spectroscopy of absorption showed that the alkaline pH of calcium hydroxide solution, favours the formation of carbonated apatite, at the start of the reaction. Following the addition of phosphoric acid, the pH becomes increasingly favourable to the formation of the desired phase. The insertion of molecular oxygen in the apatitic tunnel is carried out by the use of hydrogen peroxide. The molecular oxygen rate in the apatite is then determined by volumetric analysis.

  11. Assessment of the environmental aspects of the DOE phosphoric acid fuel cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.; Cavagrotti, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The likely facets of a nationwide phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant commercial system are described. The beneficial and adverse environmental impacts produced by the system are assessed. Eleven specific system activities are characterized and evaluated. Also included is a review of fuel cell technology and a description of DOE's National Fuel Cell Program. Based on current and reasonably foreseeable PAFC characteristics, no environmental or energy impact factor was identified that would significantly inhibit the commercialization of PAFC power plant technology.

  12. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell stack three-dimensional model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed distributed mathematical model of phosphoric acid fuel cell stack have been developed, with the FORTRAN computer program, for analyzing the temperature distribution in the stack and the associated current density distribution on the cell plates. Energy, mass, and electrochemical analyses in the stack were combined to develop the model. Several reasonable assumptions were made to solve this mathematical model by means of the finite differences numerical method.

  13. Potential of phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis for biosugar production from Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Min; Kim, Sung-Koo; Jeong, Gwi-Taek

    2016-07-01

    This study combined phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis to produce biosugars from Gracilaria verrucosa as a potential renewable resource for bioenergy applications. We optimized phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment conditions to 1:10 solid-to-liquid ratio, 1.5 % phosphoric acid, 140 °C, and 60 min reaction time, producing a 32.52 ± 0.06 % total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. By subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, a 68.61 ± 0.90 % TRS yield was achieved. These results demonstrate the potential of phosphoric acid to produce biosugars for biofuel and biochemical production applications.

  14. Effects of phosphoric acid on bovine enamel bleached with carbamide peroxide.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Carmen L S G; González-López, Santiago; Bolaños-Carmona, Maria V; Sanchez-Sanchez, Purificación; Bolaños-Carmona, Jorge

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the demineralization capacity of 37% phosphoric acid on bovine enamel at different time-points after bleaching with 30% carbamide peroxide. Five, 4 x 4-mm sections were obtained from the enamel of 10 bovine incisors. After applying 30% carbamide peroxide (Vivastyle) for 90 min, specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 0, 24, 72 h, or 7 d and then immersed in 37% phosphoric solution. At 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 s, 5-ml aliquots were extracted. A control group of specimens was not bleached. Ca(2+) concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A larger amount of Ca(2+) was extracted from enamel by phosphoric acid after the application of 30% carbamide peroxide. Twenty-four hours after bleaching, significantly more Ca(2+) was extracted from bleached than from control specimens at all time-points, and this greater susceptibility to the action of the acid persisted for at least 1 wk after bleaching.

  15. Estimates of the occupational exposure to tenorm in the phosphoric acid production plant in Iran.

    PubMed

    Fathabadi, N; Vasheghani Farahani, M; Moradi, M; Hadadi, B

    2012-09-01

    Phosphate rock is used world wide for manufacturing phosphoric acid and several chemical fertilisers. It is known that the phosphate rock contains various concentrations of uranium, thorium, radium and their daughters. The subject of this study is the evaluation of the radiation exposure to workers in the phosphoric acid production plant due to technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials that can result from the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials in phosphate ores used in the manufacturing of phosphoric acid. Radiation exposure due to direct gamma radiation, dust inhalation and radon gas has been investigated and external and internal doses of exposed workers have been calculated. Natural radioactivity due to (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th have been measured in phosphate rock, phosphogypsum, chemical fertilisers and other samples by gamma spectrometry system with a high-purity germanium. The average concentrations of (226)Ra and (40)K observed in the phosphate rock are 760 and 80 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Annual effective dose from external radiation had a mean value of ∼0.673 mSv y(-1). Dust sampling revealed greatest values in the storage area. The annual average effective dose from inhalation of long-lived airborne was 0.113 mSv y(-1). Radon gas concentrations in the processing plant and storage area were found to be of the same value as the background. In this study the estimated annual effective doses to workers were below 1 mSv y(-1).

  16. Energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence determination of thorium in phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirashi, N. N.; Dhara, Sangita; Kumar, S. Sanjay; Chaudhury, Satyajeet; Misra, N. L.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    2010-07-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence studies on determination of thorium (in the range of 7 to 137 mg/mL) in phosphoric acid solutions obtained by dissolution of thoria in autoclave were made. Fixed amounts of Y internal standard solutions, after dilution with equal amount of phosphoric acid, were added to the calibration as well as sample solutions. Solution aliquots of approximately 2-5 µL were deposited on thick absorbent sheets to absorb the solutions and the sheets were presented for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence measurements. A calibration plot was made between intensity ratios (Th Lα/Y Kα) against respective amounts of thorium in the calibration solutions. Thorium amounts in phosphoric acid samples were determined using their energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra and the above calibration plot. The energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence results, thus obtained, were compared with the corresponding gamma ray spectrometry results and were found to be within average deviation of 2.6% from the respective gamma ray spectrometry values. The average precision obtained in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence determinations was found to be 4% (1 σ). The energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method has an advantage over gamma ray spectrometry for thorium determination as the amount of sample required and measurement time is far less compared to that required in gamma ray spectrometry.

  17. Superlubricity behavior with phosphoric acid-water network induced by rubbing.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinjin; Zhang, Chenhui; Luo, Jianbin

    2011-08-02

    In present work, a superlubricity phenomenon of phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) was found under ambient conditions. An ultralow friction coefficient of about 0.004 between glass/Si(3)N(4) and sapphire/sapphire tribopairs was obtained under the lubrication of a phosphoric acid aqueous solution (pH 1.5) at high contact pressure (the maximum pressure can reach about 1.65 GPa) after a running-in period of about 600 s. The experimental results indicate that the superlow friction state was very stable for more than 3 h. In such a state, solidlike films formed on the two sliding surfaces, which are hydrates of phosphoric acid with a hydrogen-bonded network according to the Raman spectrum. The superlubricity mechanism is mainly attributed to the hydrogen bond effect that forms a hydrated water layer with low shearing strength, and the dipole-dipole effects that form an interfacial Coulomb repulsion force also make some contributions to low friction. This work may help us to introduce a new approach to superlubricity and may lead to the wide application of superlubricity in future technological and biomedical areas.

  18. Production of technical grade phosphoric acid from incinerator sewage sludge ash (ISSA).

    PubMed

    Donatello, S; Tong, D; Cheeseman, C R

    2010-01-01

    The recovery of phosphorus from sewage sludge ash samples obtained from 7 operating sludge incinerators in the UK using a sulfuric acid washing procedure to produce a technical grade phosphoric acid product has been investigated. The influences of reaction time, sulfuric acid concentration, liquid to solid ratio and source of ISSA on P recovery have been examined. The optimised conditions were the minimum stoichiometric acid requirement, a reaction time of 120 min and a liquid to solid ratio of 20. Under these conditions, average recoveries of between 72% and 91% of total phosphorus were obtained. Product filtrate was purified by passing through a cation exchange column, concentrated to 80% H(3)PO(4) and compared with technical grade H(3)PO(4) specifications. The economics of phosphate recovery by this method are briefly discussed.

  19. Effects of fluoride treatment on phosphoric acid-etching in primary teeth: an AFM observation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samjin; Rhee, Yeri; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Lee, Gi-Ja; Kim, Kyung-Sook; Park, Jae-Hong; Park, Young-Guk; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride application on 37% phosphoric acid-etching by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in primary tooth samples based on a clinical protocol used in a pediatric dental hospital. Enamel samples were prepared from 36 exfoliated and non-carious primary teeth. Primary tooth samples were randomly assigned to one of the four groups based on the timing of acid-etching with 37% phosphoric acid after an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) pre-treatment. Group 1 received no fluoride application, Group 2 was pre-treated with fluoride and then received acid-etching 2 weeks later. One week separated the fluoride treatment and the acid-etching in Group 3, while Group 4 received acid-etching immediately after the fluoride treatment. The vestibular enamel surfaces of each primary tooth sample were scanned in air at a resolution of 512 x 512 pixels and a scan speed of 0.8 line/s. On the enamel surfaces of the primary teeth after APF pre-treatment, debris were observed although the teeth were smoother than they were prior to APF. As a result, it was concluded that APF treatment is responsible for decreased primary tooth surface roughness. The enamel surfaces etched for 20s showed that acid-etching was effective not only in removing scratches and debris, but also for evaluating enamel rod characteristics. Primary tooth enamel surfaces after etching showed minute structures caused by the decreased hydroxyapatite nanoparticle space, compared to those before etching. Also, acid-etching showed significantly increased roughness effects (p<0.0001, n=9). Finally, as more time elapsed after APF pre-treatment, the roughness was decreased to a lesser degree (p=0.005, n=9). We suggest that primary teeth etching 2 weeks after APF pre-treatment used clinically in pediatric hospitals may be effective to obtain properly etched enamel surfaces.

  20. Wet Chemical Oxidation of Organic Waste Using Nitric-Phosphoric Acid Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.A.

    1998-10-06

    Experimental progress has been made in a wide range of areas which support the continued development of the nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation process for combustible, solid organic wastes. An improved understanding of the overall process operation has been obtained, acid recovery and recycle systems have been studied, safety issues have been addressed, two potential final waste forms have been tested, preliminary mass flow diagrams have been prepared, and process flowsheets have been developed. The flowsheet developed is essentially a closed-loop system which addresses all of the internally generated waste streams. The combined activities aim to provide the basis for building and testing a 250-400 liter pilot-scale unit. Variations of the process now must be evaluated in order to address the needs of the primary customer, SRS Solid Waste Management. The customer is interested in treating job control waste contaminated with Pu-238 for shipment to WIPP. As a result, variations for feed preparation, acid recycle, and final form manufacturing must be considered to provide for simpler processing to accommodate operations in high radiation and contamination environments. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate a nitric-phosphoric acid destruction technology which can treat a heterogeneous waste by oxidizing the solid and liquid organic compounds while decontaminating noncombustible items.

  1. The Partitioning of Acetic, Formic, and Phosphoric Acids Between Liquid Water and Steam

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Marshall, S.L.; Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.

    1999-06-22

    The chemical carryover of impurities and treatment chemicals from the boiler to the steam phase, and ultimately to the low-pressure turbine and condenser, can be quantified based on laboratory experiments preformed over ranges of temperature, pH, and composition. The two major assumptions are that thermodynamic equilibrium is maintained and no deposition, adsorption or decomposition occurs. The most recent results on acetic, formic and phosphoric acids are presented with consideration of the effects of hydrolysis and dimerization reactions. Complications arising from thermal decomposition of the organic acids are discussed. The partitioning constants for these acids and other solutes measured in this program have been incorporated into a simple thermodynamic computer code that calculates the effect of chemical and mechanical carryover on the composition of the condensate formed to varying extents in the water/steam cycle.

  2. Recovery of organic extractant from secondary emulsions formed in the extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Korchnak, J.D.; Fett, R.H.G.

    1984-01-03

    Uranium in wet-process phosphoric acid is extracted with an organic extractant. The pregnant extractant is then centrifuged to separate contaminants from the extractant. Secondary emulsions obtained by separating the contaminants following centrifugation are mixed with water or an acid leaching solution. After mixing, the mixture is centrifuged to separate and recover extractant which is recycled for stripping.

  3. How do crop plants tolerate acid soils? Mechanisms of aluminum tolerance and phosphorous efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kochian, Leon V; Hoekenga, Owen A; Pineros, Miguel A

    2004-01-01

    Acid soils significantly limit crop production worldwide because approximately 50% of the world's potentially arable soils are acidic. Because acid soils are such an important constraint to agriculture, understanding the mechanisms and genes conferring tolerance to acid soil stress has been a focus of intense research interest over the past decade. The primary limitations on acid soils are toxic levels of aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn), as well as suboptimal levels of phosphorous (P). This review examines our current understanding of the physiological, genetic, and molecular basis for crop Al tolerance, as well as reviews the emerging area of P efficiency, which involves the genetically based ability of some crop genotypes to tolerate P deficiency stress on acid soils. These are interesting times for this field because researchers are on the verge of identifying some of the genes that confer Al tolerance in crop plants; these discoveries will open up new avenues of molecular/physiological inquiry that should greatly advance our understanding of these tolerance mechanisms. Additionally, these breakthroughs will provide new molecular resources for improving crop Al tolerance via both molecular-assisted breeding and biotechnology.

  4. Cassava starch maltodextrinization/monomerization through thermopressurized aqueous phosphoric acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fontana, J D; Passos, M; Baron, M; Mendes, S V; Ramos, L P

    2001-01-01

    Kinetic conditions were established for the depolymerization of cassava starch for the production of maltodextrins and glucose syrups. Thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses corroborated that the proper H3PO4 strength and thermopressurization range (e.g., 142-170 degrees C; 2.8-6.8 atm) can be successfully explored for such hydrolytic purposes of native starch granules. Because phosphoric acid can be advantageously maintained in the hydrolysate and generates, after controlled neutralization with ammonia, the strategic nutrient triplet for industrial fermentations (C, P, N), this pretreatment strategy can be easily recognized as a recommended technology for hydrolysis and upgrading of starch and other plant polysaccharides. Compared to the classic catalysts, the mandatory desalting step (chloride removal by expensive anion-exchange resin or sulfate precipitation as the calcium-insoluble salt) can be avoided. Furthermore, properly diluted phosphoric acid is well known as an allowable additive in several popular soft drinks such as colas since its acidic feeling in the mouth is compatible and synergistic with both natural and artificial sweeteners. Glycosyrups from phosphorolyzed cassava starch have also been upgraded to high-value single-cell protein such as the pigmented yeast biomass of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma), whose astaxanthin (diketo-dihydroxy-beta-carotene) content may reach 0.5-1.0 mg/g of dry yeast cell. This can be used as an ideal complement for animal feeding as well as a natural staining for both fish farming (meat) and poultry (eggs).

  5. Origin of Kinetic Resolution of Hydroxy Esters through Catalytic Enantioselective Lactonization by Chiral Phosphoric Acids.

    PubMed

    Changotra, Avtar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-08-05

    Kinetic resolution is a widely used strategy for separation and enrichment of enantiomers. Using density functional theory computations, the origin of how a chiral BINOL-phosphoric acid catalyzes the selective lactonization of one of the enantiomers of α-methyl γ-hydroxy ester is identified. In a stepwise mechanism, the stereocontrolling transition state for the addition of the hydroxyl group to the si face of the ester carbonyl in the case of the S isomer exhibits a network of more effective noncovalent interactions between the substrate and the chiral catalyst.

  6. Reductive stripping process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Fred J.; Crouse, David J.

    1984-01-01

    A reductive stripping flow sheet for recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is described. Uranium is stripped from a uranium-loaded organic phase by a redox reaction converting the uranyl to uranous ion. The uranous ion is reoxidized to the uranyl oxidation state to form an aqueous feed solution highly concentrated in uranium. Processing of this feed through a second solvent extraction cycle requires far less stripping reagent as compared to a flow sheet which does not include the reductive stripping reaction.

  7. Non-noble catalysts and catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Tungsten carbide, which is known to be active for hydrogen oxidation and CO tolerant has a hexagonal structure. Titanium carbide is inactive and has a cubic structure. Four different samples of the cubic alloys Wx-1TixC were prepared and found to be active and CO tolerant. These alloys are of interest as possible phosphoric acid fuel cell catalysts. They also are of interest as opportunities to study the activity of W in a different crystalline environment and to correlate the activities of the surface sites with surface composition.

  8. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant optimization model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    An optimized cost and performance model for a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system was derived and developed into a modular FORTRAN computer code. Cost, energy, mass, and electrochemical analyses were combined to develop a mathematical model for optimizing the steam to methane ratio in the reformer, hydrogen utilization in the PAFC plates per stack. The nonlinear programming code, COMPUTE, was used to solve this model, in which the method of mixed penalty function combined with Hooke and Jeeves pattern search was chosen to evaluate this specific optimization problem.

  9. Status of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.

    1987-01-01

    A technology development and commercial feasibility evaluation is presented for phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) applicable to electric utility operations. The correction of identified design deficiencies in the control card and water treatment subsystems is projected to be able to substantially increase average powerplant availability from the 63 percent achieved in recent field tests of a PAFC system. Current development work is proceeding under NASA research contracts at the output levels of a multimegawatt facility for electric utility use, a multikilowatt on-site integrated energy generation facility, and advanced electrocatalysts applicable to PAFCs.

  10. Enantioselective Synthesis of β-Arylamines via Chiral Phosphoric Acid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Reductive Amination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Chun-Young; Cheon, Cheol-Hong

    2015-06-19

    A new method for the synthesis of chiral β-aryl amines via chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed enantioselective reductive amination of benzyl methyl ketone derivatives with Hantzsch ester was developed. Various chiral β-aryl amines were obtained in high yields and with good to high enantioselectivities. This transformation is applicable to gram-scale reactions, and the catalyst loading can be reduced to 1 mol % without sacrificing any catalytic efficacy. Furthermore, the resulting β-aryl amine was successfully converted into a tetrahydroisoquinoline compound without any loss of enantioselectivity.

  11. Non-noble catalysts and catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Four different samples of the cubic alloys W sub x-1 Ti sub x C sub 1-y were prepared and found to be active and CO tolerant. When the activities of these cubic alloys were weighted by the reciprocal of the square of the W exchange, they displayed magnitudes and dependence on bulk C deficiency comparable to those of highly active forms of WC. It is concluded that they may offer important insight into the nature of the active sites on, and means for improving the performance of, W-C anode catalysts for use in phosphoric acid fuel cells.

  12. Non-noble catalysts and catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Tungsten carbide, which is active for hydrogen oxidation, is CO tolerant and has a hexagonal structure is discussed. Titanium carbide is inactive and has a cubic structure. Four different samples of the cubic alloys W sub x-1Ti sub XC sub 1-y were found to be active and CO tolerant. When the activities of these cubic alloys are weighted by the reciprocal of the square to those of highly forms of WC. They offer important insight into the nature of the active sites on W-C anode catalysts for use in phosphoric acid fuel cells.

  13. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METALS FROM PHOSPHORIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.

    1958-11-01

    > A solvent extraction process is presented for recovering metal values including uranium, thorium, and other lanthanide and actinide elements from crude industrial phosphoric acid solutions. The process conslsts of contacting said solution with an immisclble organic solvent extractant containing a diluent and a material selected from the group consisting of mono and di alkyl phosphates, alkyl phosphonates and alkyl phosphites. The uranlum enters the extractant phase and is subsequently recovered by any of the methods known to the art. Recovery is improved if the phosphate solution is treated with a reducing agent such as iron or aluminum powder prior to the extraction step.

  14. Computer-based phosphoric acid fuel cell analytical tools Descriptions and usages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C.; Presler, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation models have been developed for the prediction of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) powerplant system performance under both transient and steady operation conditions, as well as for the design of component configurations and for optimal systems synthesis. These models, which are presently computer-implemented, are an engineering and a system model; the former being solved by the finite difference method to determine the balances and properties of different sections, and the latter using thermodynamic balances to set up algebraic equations that yield physical and chemical properties of the stream for one operating condition.

  15. Effect of fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment on ethanol production from oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB).

    PubMed

    Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Isroi; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-08-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB), a lignocellulosic residue of palm oil industries was examined for ethanol production. Milled OPEFB exposed to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted just in 14.5% ethanol yield compared to the theoretical yield. Therefore, chemical pretreatment with phosphoric acid, a biological pretreatment with white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, and their combination were carried out on OPEFB prior to the SSF. Pretreatment with phosphoric acid, combination of both methods and just fungal pretreatment improved the digestibility of OPEFB by 24.0, 16.5 and 4.5 times, respectively. During the SSF, phosphoric acid pretreatment, combination of fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment and just fungal pretreatment resulted in the highest 89.4%, 62.8% and 27.9% of the theoretical ethanol yield, respectively. However, the recovery of the OPEFB after the fungal pretreatment was 98.7%, which was higher than after phosphoric acid pretreatment (36.5%) and combined pretreatment (45.2%).

  16. Influence of pH-control in phosphoric acid treatment of titanium oxide and their powder properties

    SciTech Connect

    Onoda, Hiroaki Matsukura, Aki

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The photocatalytic activity was suppressed by phosphoric acid treatment. • The obtained pigment had small particles with sub-micrometer size. • By phosphoric acid treatment, the smoothness of samples improved. - Abstract: Titanium oxide that has the photocatalytic activity is used as a white pigment for cosmetics. A certain degree of sebum on the skin is decomposed by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, titanium oxide was shaken with phosphoric acid at various pH to synthesize a novel white pigment for cosmetics. Their chemical composition, powder properties, photocatalytic activity, color phase, and smoothness were studied. The obtained materials indicated XRD peaks of titanium oxide, however, these peak intensity became weak by phosphoric acid treatment. These samples without heating and heated at 100 °C included the small particles with sub-micrometer size. The photocatalytic activity of the obtained powders became weak by phosphoric acid treatment at pH 4 and 5 to protect the sebum on the skin.

  17. Evaluating EDTA as a substitute for phosphoric acid-etching of enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Imbery, Terence A; Kennedy, Matthew; Janus, Charles; Moon, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes released when dentin is acid-etched. The enzymes are capable of destroying unprotected collagen fibrils that are not encapsulated by the dentin adhesive. Chlorhexidine applied after etching inhibits the activation of released MMPs, whereas neutral ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) prevents the release of MMPs. The purpose of this study was to determine if conditioning enamel and dentin with EDTA can be a substitute for treating acid-etching enamel and dentin with chlorhexidine. A column of composite resin was bonded to enamel and dentin after conditioning. Shear bond strengths were evaluated after 48 hours and after accelerated aging for three hours in 12% sodium hypochlorite. Shear bond strengths ranged from 15.6 MP a for accelerated aged EDTA enamel specimens to 26.8 MPa for dentin conditioned with EDTA and tested after 48 hours. A three-way ANOVA and a Tukey HSD test found statistically significant differences among the eight groups and the three independent variables (P < 0.05). EDTA was successfully substituted for phosphoric acid-etched enamel and dentin treated with chlorhexidine. Interactions of conditioning agent and aging were significant for dentin but not for enamel. In an effort to reduce the detrimental effects of MMPs, conditioning enamel and dentin with EDTA is an alternative to treating acid-etched dentin and enamel with chlorhexidine.

  18. High surface area porous carbons prepared from hydrochars by phosphoric acid activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Guo, Yupeng; Zou, Bo; Rong, Chunguang; Ma, Xiaoyu; Qu, Yuning; Li, Ying; Wang, Zichen

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, a new route for preparation of high-performance porous carbons under mild conditions was reported. The high surface area (2700 m2/g) and large pore volume (1.98 cm3/g) porous carbons were prepared from hydrochars by conventional phosphoric acid activation method. The hydrochars described here can be obtained from sulfuric acid hydrolysis of rice husk via dehydration, polymerization and carbonization. A specific capacitance of 130 F g(-1) was achieved by using the porous carbon, indicating that the porous carbon prepared by this route has good electrochemical performance. Furthermore, the localized graphitic nature of the porous carbon was proved by X-ray diffraction pattern.

  19. Recovery of Uranium from Wet Phosphoric Acid by Solvent Extraction Processes

    DOE PAGES

    Beltrami, Denis; Cote, Gérard; Mokhtari, Hamid; ...

    2014-11-17

    Between 1951 and 1991, we developed about 17 processes to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA), but the viability of these processes was subject to the variation of the uranium price market. Nowadays, uranium from WPA appears to be attractive due to the increase of the global uranium demand resulting from the emergence of developing countries. Moreover, the increasing demand provides impetus for a new look at the applicable technology with a view to improvements as well as altogether new approaches. This paper gives an overview on extraction processes developed in the past to recover uranium from wet phosphoricmore » acid (WPA) as well as the physicochemistry involved in these processes. Recent advances concerning the development of new extraction systems are also reported and discussed.« less

  20. Recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid medium by polymeric composite beads encapsulating organophosphorus extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.K.; Yadav, K.K.; Varshney, L.; Singh, H.

    2013-07-01

    The present study deals with the preparation and evaluation of the poly-ethersulfone (PES) based composite beads encapsulating synergistic mixture of D2EHPA and Cyanex 923 (at 4:1 mole ratio) for the separation of uranium from phosphoric acid medium. SEM was used for the characterization of the composite materials. Addition of 1% PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) improved the internal morphology and porosity of the beads. Additionally, microscopic examination of the composite bead confirmed central coconut type cavity surrounded by porous polymer layer of the beads through which exchange of metal ions take place. Effect of various experimental variables including aqueous acidity, metal ion concentration in aqueous feed, concentration of organic extractant inside the beads, extractant to polymer ratio, liquid to solid (L/S) ratio and temperature on the extraction of uranium was studied. Increase in acidity (1-6 M), L/S ratio (1- 10), metal ion concentration (0.2-3 g/L U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and polymer to extractant ratio (1:4 -1:10) led to decrease in extraction of uranium. At 5.5 M (comparable to wet process phosphoric acid concentration) the extraction of uranium was about 85% at L/S ratio 5. Increase in extractant concentration inside the bead resulted in enhanced extraction of metal ion. Increase in temperature in the range of 30 to 50 Celsius degrees increased the extraction, whereas further increase to 70 C degrees led to the decrease in extraction of uranium. Amongst various reagents tested, stripping of uranium was quantitative by 12% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. Polymeric beads were found to be stable and reusable up-to 10 cycles of extraction/stripping. (authors)

  1. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases and production of phosphoric acid

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Liu, David K.

    1992-01-01

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorous preferably in a wet scrubber. The addition of yellow phosphorous in the system induces the production of O.sub.3 which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO.sub.2. The resulting NO.sub.2 dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO.sub.2 under appropriate conditions. In a 20 acfm system, yellow phosphorous is oxidized to yield P.sub.2 O.sub.5 which picks up water to form H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 mists and can be collected as a valuable product. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, better than 90% of SO.sub.2 and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained.

  2. Determination of bismuth in pharmaceutical products using phosphoric acid as molecular probe by resonance light scattering.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yanru; Cui, Fengling; Geng, Shaoguang; Jin, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the sensitive determination of bismuth(III) in pharmaceutical products using phosphoric acid as a molecular probe by resonance light scattering (RLS) is discussed. In 0.5 mol/L phosphoric acid (H3 PO4) medium, bismuth(III) reacted with PO4 (3-) to form an ion association compound, which resulted in the significant enhancement of RLS intensity and the appearance of the corresponding RLS spectral characteristics. The maximum scattering peak of the system existed at 364 nm. Under optimal conditions, there was linear relationship between the relative intensity of RLS and concentration of bismuth(III) in the range of 0.06-10.0 µg/mL for the system. A low detection limit for bismuth(III) of 3.22 ng/mL was achieved. The relative standard deviations (RSD) for the determination of 0.40 and 0.80 µg/mL bismuth(III) were 2.1% and 1.1%, respectively, for five determinations. Based on this fact, a simple, rapid, and sensitive method was developed for the determination of bismuth(III) at nanogram level by RLS technique with a common spectrofluorimeter. This analytical system was successfully applied to determine the trace amounts of bismuth(III) in pharmaceutical products, which was in good agreement with the results obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS).

  3. Optimizing the saccharification of sugar cane bagasse using dilute phosphoric acid followed by fungal cellulases.

    PubMed

    Geddes, C C; Peterson, J J; Roslander, C; Zacchi, G; Mullinnix, M T; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, L O

    2010-03-01

    A low level of phosphoric acid (1% w/w on dry bagasse basis, 160 degrees C and above, 10 min) was shown to effectively hydrolyze the hemicellulose in sugar cane bagasse into monomers with minimal side reactions and to serve as an effective pre-treatment for the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Up to 45% of the remaining water-insoluble solids (WIS) was digested to sugar monomers by a low concentration of Biocellulase W (0.5 filter paper unit/gWIS) supplemented with beta-glucosidase, although much higher levels of cellulase (100-fold) were required for complete hydrolysis. After neutralization and nutrient addition, phosphoric acid syrups of hemicellulose sugars were fermented by ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY160 without further purification. Fermentation of these syrups was preceded by a lag that increased with increased pre-treatment temperature. Further improvements in organisms and optimization of steam treatments may allow the co-fermentation of sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose, eliminating need for liquid-solid separation, sugar purification, and separate fermentations.

  4. Treatment of phosphoric acid plant wastewater using Fenton's reagent and coagulants.

    PubMed

    Nawghare, P; Rao, N N; Bejankiwar, R; Szyprkowicz, L; Kaul, S N

    2001-01-01

    The results of treatability studies viz., Fenton reaction and physico-chemical (coagulation) treatment using lime, alum, Fe salts and polyaluminium chloride (PAC) performed on wastewater generated from a unit manufacturing technical grade phosphoric acid are reported. Due to low biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) chemical oxygen demand (COD) ratio and very low pH, this wastewater is not amenable for biological treatment. The treatability studies indicated that it is possible to remove 75-80% COD using Fenton's reagent at optimum doses of 1.0 g/L FeSO4 and 2 ml of 30% H2O2. Simultaneously, significant quantities of suspended solids, phosphate and fluoride are also removed. Polyaluminium chloride is found to be more effective towards suspended solids (SS), COD, phosphate and fluoride removal, when compared to other coagulants used in the present study. Addition of an anionic polyelectrolyte (Magnafloc 156) to PAC improved the performance further. A treatment scheme that consists of neutralization (pH 4) + Fenton's reagent + neutralization (pH 7.5) + PAC/Magnafloc 156 is found to be effective in treating phosphoric acid plant wastewater to meet marine discharge standards.

  5. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela; Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-01

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO 4, by H 3PO 4 is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H 2PO 4)(PO 4)·2H 2O and Ti(H 2PO 4)(PO 4). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H 3PO 4 concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H 3PO 4 is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O-SiO 2 composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO 4·2H 2O fertilizer.

  6. Effect of etching with cysteamine assisted phosphoric acid on gallium nitride surface oxide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, S. J.; Paskova, T.; Ivanisevic, A.

    2013-08-01

    In-situ functionalization of polar GaN was performed by adding cysteamine to a phosphoric acid etchant in order to study its effect on photoluminescence and oxide formation on the surfaces. The functionalization was characterized by atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and water contact angle measurements. Two sets of polar GaN samples with different dislocation densities were evaluated, thin GaN layers residing on sapphire and thick free-standing GaN separated from sapphire substrate aiming to reveal the effect of material quality on in-situ functionalization. The addition of cysteamine to the phosphoric acid solution was found to result in: (i) decreased surface roughness, (ii) no change to hydrophobicity, (iii) decreased oxygen content especially at high-temperature treatments. The effect of the in-situ functionalization on the PL efficiency was more pronounced in the free-standing sample than in the film residing on the sapphire, which was attributed to a higher crystal quality free from strain.

  7. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of lignocellulosic residues pretreated with phosphoric acid-acetone for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kim, Nag-Jong; Jiang, Min; Kang, Jong Won; Chang, Ho Nam

    2009-07-01

    Bermudagrass, reed and rapeseed were pretreated with phosphoric acid-acetone and used for ethanol production by means of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with a batch and fed-batch mode. When the batch SSF experiments were conducted in a 3% low effective cellulose, about 16 g/L of ethanol were obtained after 96 h of fermentation. When batch SSF experiments were conducted with a higher cellulose content (10% effective cellulose for reed and bermudagrass and 5% for rapeseed), higher ethanol concentrations and yields (of more than 93%) were obtained. The fed-batch SSF strategy was adopted to increase the ethanol concentration further. When a higher water-insoluble solid (up to 36%) was applied, the ethanol concentration reached 56 g/L of an inhibitory concentration of the yeast strain used in this study at 38 degrees C. The results show that the pretreated materials can be used as good feedstocks for bioethanol production, and that the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment can effectively yield a higher ethanol concentration.

  8. Investigations on the mechanism of superlubricity achieved with phosphoric acid solution by direct observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinjin; Ma, Liran; Zhang, Shaohua; Zhang, Chenhui; Liu, Yuhong; Luo, Jianbin

    2013-09-01

    In this work, the contact region between a Si3N4 ball and a SiO2 plate with the lubrication of phosphoric acid solution is observed directly by an optical microscope combined with a Raman microscope to understand the superlubricity mechanism. It is found that the wear on the friction surfaces mainly occurs at the beginning of the test and nearly disappears after the friction coefficient reduces to 0.05. When the superlubricity appears (μ = 0.004), there is only a limited amount of solution available to the contact (forming starvation state), resulting in an "H" distribution surrounding the contact region. Moreover, it is observed that the hydrogen bond effect in the solution is enhanced with time going by, and finally a thin film with hydrogen bond network among H3PO4, H2PO4-, and H2O is formed on the friction surfaces, leading to the superlubricity. By employing this direct observation approach, the structure of the confined solution and the superlubricity mechanism of phosphoric acid solution are finally investigated and discussed.

  9. Arundo donax cane as a precursor for activated carbons preparation by phosphoric acid activation.

    PubMed

    Vernersson, T; Bonelli, P R; Cerrella, E G; Cukierman, A L

    2002-06-01

    Canes from Arundo donax, a herbaceous rapid-growing plant, were used as precursor for activated carbon preparation by phosphoric acid activation under a self-generated atmosphere. The influence of the carbonization temperature in the range 400-550 degrees C and of the weight ratio phosphoric acid to precursor (R = 1.5-2.5) on the developed porous structure of the resulting carbons was studied for 1 h of carbonization time. Surface properties of the activated carbons were dependent on a combined effect of the conditions employed. Carbons developed either with R = 1.5 over the range 400-500 degrees C, or with R = 2 at 500 degrees C exhibited surface areas of around 1100 m2/g, the latter conditions promoting a larger pore volume and enhanced mesoporous character. For both ratios, temperature above 500 degrees C led to reduction in porosity development. A similar effect was found for the highest ratio (R = 2.5) and 500 degrees C. The influence of carrying out the carbonization either for times shorter than 1 h or under flowing N2 was also examined at selected conditions (R = 2, 500 degrees C). Shorter times induced increase in the surface area (approximately 1300 m2/g), yielding carbons with smaller mean pore radius. Activated carbons obtained under flowing N2 possessed predominant microporous structures and larger ash contents than the samples derived in the self-generated atmosphere.

  10. Quantifying phosphoric acid in high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell components by X-ray tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, S H; Marone, F; Stampanoni, M; Büchi, F N; Schmidt, T J

    2014-11-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy is investigated for imaging the local distribution and concentration of phosphoric acid in high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Phosphoric acid fills the pores of the macro- and microporous fuel cell components. Its concentration in the fuel cell varies over a wide range (40-100 wt% H3PO4). This renders the quantification and concentration determination challenging. The problem is solved by using propagation-based phase contrast imaging and a referencing method. Fuel cell components with known acid concentrations were used to correlate greyscale values and acid concentrations. Thus calibration curves were established for the gas diffusion layer, catalyst layer and membrane in a non-operating fuel cell. The non-destructive imaging methodology was verified by comparing image-based values for acid content and concentration in the gas diffusion layer with those from chemical analysis.

  11. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    SciTech Connect

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-15

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO{sub 4}, by H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}).2H{sub 2}O and Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O fertilizer. - Graphical abstract: A new synthesis scheme for preparation of composite titanium phosphate (TiP) ion-exchangers upon one-stage decomposition process of natural sphene with phosphoric acid is presented. Syntheses of {alpha}-TiP-silica composites proceed via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases. The concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} determines the porosity of final products and their sorption affinities.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10505 - Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12-16-alkyl ethers. 721.10505 Section 721... Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12-16-alkyl... identified as phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10505 - Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12-16-alkyl ethers. 721.10505 Section 721... Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12-16-alkyl... identified as phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol...

  14. Influence of multi-step washing using Na2EDTA, oxalic acid and phosphoric acid on metal fractionation and spectroscopy characteristics from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meng; Chen, Jiajun

    2016-11-01

    A multi-step soil washing test using a typical chelating agent (Na2EDTA), organic acid (oxalic acid), and inorganic weak acid (phosphoric acid) was conducted to remediate soil contaminated with heavy metals near an arsenic mining area. The aim of the test was to improve the heavy metal removal efficiency and investigate its influence on metal fractionation and the spectroscopy characteristics of contaminated soil. The results indicated that the orders of the multi-step washing were critical for the removal efficiencies of the metal fractions, bioavailability, and potential mobility due to the different dissolution levels of mineral fractions and the inter-transformation of metal fractions by XRD and FT-IR spectral analyses. The optimal soil washing options were identified as the Na2EDTA-phosphoric-oxalic acid (EPO) and phosphoric-oxalic acid-Na2EDTA (POE) sequences because of their high removal efficiencies (approximately 45 % for arsenic and 88 % for cadmium) and the minimal harmful effects that were determined by the mobility and bioavailability of the remaining heavy metals based on the metal stability (I R ) and modified redistribution index ([Formula: see text]).

  15. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) from a former phosphoric acid processing plant.

    PubMed

    Beddow, H; Black, S; Read, D

    2006-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the radiological impact of non-nuclear industries that extract and/or process ores and minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). These industrial activities may result in significant radioactive contamination of (by-) products, wastes and plant installations. In this study, scale samples were collected from a decommissioned phosphoric acid processing plant. To determine the nature and concentration of NORM retained in pipe-work and associated process plant, four main areas of the site were investigated: (1) the 'Green Acid Plant', where crude acid was concentrated; (2) the green acid storage tanks; (3) the Purified White Acid (PWA) plant, where inorganic impurities were removed; and (4) the solid waste, disposed of on-site as landfill. The scale samples predominantly comprise the following: fluorides (e.g. ralstonite); calcium sulphate (e.g. gypsum); and an assemblage of mixed fluorides and phosphates (e.g. iron fluoride hydrate, calcium phosphate), respectively. The radioactive inventory is dominated by 238U and its decay chain products, and significant fractionation along the series occurs. Compared to the feedstock ore, elevated concentrations (< or =8.8 Bq/g) of 238U were found to be retained in installations where the process stream was rich in fluorides and phosphates. In addition, enriched levels (< or =11 Bq/g) of 226Ra were found in association with precipitates of calcium sulphate. Water extraction tests indicate that many of the scales and waste contain significantly soluble materials and readily release radioactivity into solution.

  16. A Comparative Study of Phosphoric Acid-doped m-PBI Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Kelly A; More, Karren Leslie; Payzant, E Andrew; Meisner, Roberta A; Sumpter, Bobby G; Benicewicz, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoric acid (PA)-doped m-polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes used in high temperature fuel cells and hydrogen pumps were prepared by a conventional imbibing process and a sol-gel fabrication process. A comparative study was conducted to investigate the critical properties of PA doping levels, ionic conductivities, mechanical properties, and molecular ordering. This systematic study found that sol-gel PA-doped m-PBI membranes were able to absorb higher acid doping levels and to achieve higher ionic conductivities than conventionally imbibed membranes when treated in an equivalent manner. Even at similar acid loadings, the sol-gel membranes exhibited higher ionic conductivities. Heat treatment of conventionally imbibed membranes with 29wt% solids caused a significant reduction in mechanical properties; conversely, sol-gel membranes exhibited an enhancement in mechanical properties. From X-ray structural studies and atomistic simulations, both conventionally imbibed and sol-gel membranes exhibited d-spacings of 3.5 and 4.6 , which were tentatively attributed to parallel ring stacking and staggered side-to-side packing, respectively, of the imidazole rings in these aromatic hetercyclic polymers. An anisotropic staggered side-to-side chain packing present in the conventional membranes may be root to the reduction in mechanical properties.

  17. Enhanced proton conductivity of Nafion composite membrane by incorporating phosphoric acid-loaded covalent organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongheng; Li, Zhen; Yang, Xin; Cao, Li; Wang, Chongbin; Zhang, Bei; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-11-01

    Design and fabrication of efficient proton transport channels within solid electrolytes is crucial and challenging to new energy-relevant devices such as proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this study, the phosphoric acid (H3PO4) molecules are impregnated into SNW-1-type covalent organic frameworks (COFs) via vacuum assisted method. High loading of H3PO4 in SNW-1 and low guest leaching rate are achieved due to the similar diameter between H3PO4 and micropores in SNW-1. Then the COF-based composite membranes are fabricated for the first time with impregnated COFs (H3PO4@SNW-1) and Nafion matrix. For the composite membranes, the acid-base pairs formed between H3PO4@SNW-1 networks and Nafion optimize the interfacial interactions and hydrophilic domains. The acidic -PO3H2 groups in pores of H3PO4@SNW-1 provide abundant proton transfer sites. As a result, the continuous proton transfer channels with low energy barrier are created. At the filler content of 15 wt%, the composite membrane exhibits a superior proton conductivity of 0.0604 S cm-1 at 51% relative humidity and 80 °C. At the same time, the maximum power density of single fuel cell is 60.3% higher than that of the recast Nafion membrane.

  18. Physicochemical properties of carbons prepared from pecan shell by phosphoric acid activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanping; Rockstraw, David A

    2007-05-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from pecan shell by phosphoric acid activation. The pore structure and acidic surface groups of these carbons were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, Boehm titration and transmittance Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The characterization results demonstrated that the development of pore structure was apparent at temperatures 250 degrees C, and reached 1130m(2)/g and 0.34cm(3)/g, respectively, at 500 degrees C. Impregnation ratio and soaking time at activation temperature also affected the pore development and pore size distribution of final carbon products. At an impregnation ratio of 1.5, activated carbon with BET surface area and micropore volume as high as 861m(2)/g and 0.289cm(3)/g was obtained at 400 degrees C. Microporous activated carbons were obtained in this study. Low impregnation ratio (less than 1.5) and activation temperature (less than 300 degrees C) are favorable to the formation of acidic surface functional groups, which consist of temperature-sensitive (unstable at high temperature) and temperature-insensitive (stable at high temperature) two parts. The disappearance of temperature-sensitive groups was significant at temperature 300 degrees C; while the temperature-insensitive groups are stable even at 500 degrees C. FTIR results showed that the temperature-insensitive part was mostly phosphorus-containing groups as well as some carbonyl-containing groups, while carbonyl-containing groups were the main contributor of temperature-sensitive part.

  19. Effect of EDTA and Phosphoric Acid Pretreatment on the Bonding Effectiveness of Self-Etch Adhesives to Ground Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ihab M.; Elkassas, Dina W.; Yousry, Mai M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study determined the effect of enamel pretreatment with phosphoric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bond strength of strong, intermediary strong, and mild self-etching adhesive systems. Methods: Ninety sound human premolars were used. Resin composite cylinders were bonded to flat ground enamel surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=0.9–1.0), intermediary strong AdheSE (pH=1.6–1.7), and mild Frog (pH=2). Adhesive systems were applied either according to manufacturer instructions (control) or after pretreatment with either phosphoric acid or EDTA (n=10). After 24 hours, shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Ultra-morphological characterization of the surface topography and resin/enamel interfaces as well as representative fractured enamel specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Neither surface pretreatment statistically increased the mean shear bond strength values of either the strong or the intermediary strong self-etching adhesive systems. However, phosphoric acid pretreatment significantly increased the mean shear bond strength values of the mild self-etching adhesive system. SEM examination of enamel surface topography showed that phosphoric acid pretreatment deepened the same etching pattern of the strong and intermediary strong adhesive systems but converted the irregular etching pattern of the mild self-etching adhesive system to a regular etching pattern. SEM examination of the resin/enamel interface revealed that deepening of the etching pattern was consistent with increase in the length of resin tags. EDTA pretreatment had a negligible effect on ultra-morphological features. Conclusions: Use of phosphoric acid pretreatment can be beneficial with mild self-etching adhesive systems for bonding to enamel. PMID:20922162

  20. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, Gustav K. H. E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk

    2015-02-15

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperature, i.e., very close to the actual conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). The cell consists of a stainless steel flow field and a PEEK plastic cell body comprising the electrochemical cell, which exhibits a three electrode configuration. The cell body and flow field are braced using a KF-25 vacuum flange clamp, which allows an easy assembly of the setup. As demonstrated, the setup can be used to investigate temperature dependent electrochemical processes on high surface area type electrocatalysts, but it also enables quick screening tests of HT-PEMFC catalysts under realistic conditions.

  1. Phosphoric acid pretreatment of Achyranthes aspera and Sida acuta weed biomass to improve enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Siripong, Premjet; Duangporn, Premjet; Takata, Eri; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Achyranthes aspera and Sida acuta, two types of weed biomass are abundant and waste in Thailand. We focus on them as novel feedstock for bio-ethanol production because they contain high-cellulose content (45.9% and 46.9%, respectively) and unutilized material. Phosphoric acid (70%, 75%, and 80%) was employed for the pretreatment to improve by enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment process removed most of the xylan and a part of the lignin from the weeds, while most of the glucan remained. The cellulose conversion to glucose was greater for pretreated A. aspera (86.2 ± 0.3%) than that of the pretreated S. acuta (82.2 ± 1.1%). Thus, the removal of hemicellulose significantly affected the efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis. The scanning electron microscopy images showed the exposed fibrous cellulose on the cell wall surface, and this substantial change of the surface structure contributed to improving the enzyme accessibility.

  2. Evaluation of gas cooling for pressurized phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooque, M.; Skok, A. J.; Maru, H. C.; Kothmann, R. E.; Harry, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas cooling has already been demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. This paper presents theoretical and experimental investigation of gas cooling for pressurized PAFC. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  3. Assessment and comparison of 100-MW coal gasification phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi

    1988-01-01

    One of the advantages of fuel cell (FC) power plants is fuel versatility. With changes only in the fuel processor, the power plant will be able to accept a variety of fuels. This study was performed to design process diagrams, evaluate performance, and to estimate cost of 100 MW coal gasifier (CG)/phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant systems utilizing coal, which is the largest single potential source of alternate hydrocarbon liquids and gases in the United States, as the fuel. Results of this study will identify the most promising integrated CG/PAFC design and its near-optimal operating conditions. The comparison is based on the performance and cost of electricity which is calculated under consistent financial assumptions.

  4. Inertisation of galvanic sludge with calcium oxide, activated carbon, and phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Oreščanin, Višnja; Lovrenčić Mikelić, Ivanka; Kollar, Robert; Mikulić, Nenad; Medunić, Gordana

    2012-09-01

    In this study we compared three methods for the treatment of electroplating sludge highly loaded with zinc and iron: (1) calcium oxide-based solidification/stabilisation; (2) conversion into inert material by adsorption of organic and inorganic pollutants onto activated carbon; and (3) conversion of mobile waste components into insoluble phosphates. All three methods proved highly efficient in the conversion of hazardous waste into inert material. Under optimum treatment conditions zinc concentration in the leachate of solidified waste was reduced by 99.7 % compared to untreated sludge. Zinc retention efficiency in the waste treated with activated carbon and phosphoric acid was 99.9 % and 98.7 %, respectively. The advantages of electroplating sludge treatment with activated carbon over the other two methods are high sorption capacity, insignificant pH and volume changes of the sludge, and simple use.

  5. Evaluation of Gas-Cooled Pressurized Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells for Electric Utility Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faroque, M.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas-cooling was already demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. Theoretical and experimental investigations of gas-cooling for pressurized PAFC are presented. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas-Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas-Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of advanced electrocatalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.; Baris, J.; Pagliaro, P.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen oxidation poisoned by carbon monoxide at levels between 0 and 30%. Due to the high activities that are now being observed for our platinum based electrocatalysts, the hydrogen concentrations were reduced to 10% levels in the gas supplies. Perturbation techniques were used to determine that a mechanism for the efficient operation of our porous gas diffusion electrodes is diffusion of the carbon monoxide out of the electrode structure through the electrolyte film on the electro-catalyst. A survey of the literature on platinum group materials (PGM) was carried out so that an identification of successful electrocatalysts could be made. Two PGM electrocatalysts were prepared and performance data for hydrogen oxidation in hot phosphoric acid in the presence of high carbon monoxide concentrations showed that they matched the best platinum on carbon electrocatalysts but with an electrocatalyst cost that was half of the platinum catalyst cost.

  7. Porous texture of activated carbons prepared by phosphoric acid activation of woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Díez, M. A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.; Fernández González, C.; Cuerda-Correa, E. M.; Macías-García, A.

    2004-11-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared using chestnut, cedar and walnut wood shavings from furniture industries located in the Comunidad Autónoma de Extremadura (SW Spain). Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) at different concentrations (i.e. 36 and 85 wt.%) has been used as activating agent. ACs have been characterized from the results obtained by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Moreover, the fractal dimension (D) has been calculated in order to determine the AC surface roughness degree. Optimal textural properties of ACs have been obtained by chemical activation with H3PO4 36 wt.%. This is corroborated by the slightly lower values of D for samples treated with H3PO4 85 wt.%.

  8. Trial operation of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PC25) for CHP applications in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, M.; Droste, W.; Wolf, D.

    1996-12-31

    In Europe, ten 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) produced by ONSI (PC25) are currently in operation. Their operators collaborate closely in the European Fuel Cell Users Group (EFCUG). The experience gained from trial operation by the four German operators - HEAG, HGW/HEW, Thyssengas and Ruhrgas - coincides with that of the other European operators. This experience can generally be regarded as favourable. With a view to using fuel cells in combined heat and power generation (CHP), the project described in this report, which was carried out in cooperation with the municipal utility of Bochum and Gasunie of the Netherlands, aimed at gaining experience with the PC 25 in field operation under the specific operating conditions prevailing in Europe. The work packages included heat-controlled operation, examination of plant behavior with varying gas properties and measurement of emissions under dynamic load conditions. The project received EU funding under the JOULE programme.

  9. Fabrication of Alumina Nanowires from Porous Alumina Membranes by Etching in Phosphoric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuehua; Li, Chengyong; Ma, Lianjiao; Cao, Hong; Zhang, Baohua

    Alumina nanowires (ANWs) with high aspect ratios were synthesized by the chemical etching of porous alumina membranes (PAMs) in phosphoric acid solution. The morphology and structure of ANWs were analyzed by SEM and XRD, respectively. The results showed that the typical features of ANWs are around 35 nm in diameter and around 20 μm in length, the crystalline structure of the ANWs was amorphous, which was in accordance with that of the PAMs. Furthermore, the morphology of the PAMs was characterized by AFM and SEM in detail. On the basis of AFM and SEM observations, a possible formation mechanism of ANWs was discussed, and the inhomogeneous of the dissolution between the triple points and the side walls was considered to be the essential factor deciding the formation of ANWs.

  10. Method for the purification of bis (2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1974-02-19

    Foreign products including the neutral organophosphorous compounds and the iron salts normally present in commercial bis(2ethyl-hexyl) phosphoric acid(HDEHP), and the radiolytic degradation products of HDEHP on exposure of HDEHP to beta and gamma irradiation are removed from HDEHP containing one or more of such products by contacting the said foreign product containing HDEHP with a macroreticular anion exchange resin in base form whereby the DEHP- ion of HDEHP exchanges with the anion of the resin and is thus adsorbed on the resin and the said foreign products are not adsorbed and will pass through a bed of particles of the resin. The adsorbed DEHP- ion is then eluted from the resin and acidified to form and recover the purified HDEHP. (auth)

  11. Utilization of date stones for production of activated carbon using phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Haimour, N.M. . E-mail: nomanhaimour@hotmail.com; Emeish, S. . E-mail: s_emiesh@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    Date stone wastes have been utilized for production of activated carbon by chemical activation with phosphoric acid using a fluidized-bed reactor. The effects of the activation time, activation temperature, impregnation ratio, and particle size on the yield and the adsorptive capacity towards iodine were studied. The yield and the quality of the activated carbon prepared by using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were compared with that prepared from date stones using the same equipment, and under similar conditions by using ZnCl{sub 2} as an oxidizing agent. The maximum value of the iodine number of the activated carbon produced using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in this work was about 495 under the following conditions: impregnation ratio 0.4, activation time 60 min, activation temperature 800 deg. C, particle size 0.60 mm. The iodine number for the produced activated carbon was higher when phosphoric acid was used, compared to that when zinc chloride was used as impregnation reagent; however, the yield obtained when H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was used was lower than the yield when ZnCl{sub 2} was used. The iodine number increases significantly with increasing the activation temperature. By increasing the impregnation ratio at the same temperature, the iodine number decreased sharply and an oscillation is noticed for all the cases but it was clearer at 800 deg. C. The average variation of the iodine number for the whole range of particle size used in this work is {+-}10%.

  12. Effect of phosphoric acid pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juanhua; Zhang, Beixiao; Zhang, Jingqiang; Lin, Lu; Liu, Shijie; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2010-01-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was pretreated with phosphoric acid at 323K for 10h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) analyses revealed that the fiber surface morphology of pretreated MCC (P-MCC) were uneven and rough with the crystalline diffraction peaks of P-MCC decreased to a distinct range. The X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the uneven and rough surface of P-MCC could enhance the adsorption of cellulose to the molecular surface of cellulose, which is one of the key factors affecting enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. A reversible first order kinetics was employed to describe the adsorption kinetics of cellulase to MCC and P-MCC, and the adsorption rate constants of MCC and P-MCC were found to be 0.016, 0.024, 0.041, and 0.095, 0.149, 0.218min(-1), respectively at 278K, 293K and 308K. The activation energies of MCC and P-MCC hydrolysis reactions were found to be 22.257 and 19.721kJ mol(-1). The major hydrolysis products of MCC and P-MCC were cellobiose and glucose. Hydrolysis of MCC for 120h resulted in yields of glucose (7.21%), cellobiose (13.16%) and total sugars (20.37%). However, after the pretreatment with phosphoric acid, the corresponding sugar yields resulted from enzymatic hydrolysis of P-MCC were increased to 24.10%, 41.42%, and 65.52%; respectively, which were 3.34, 3.15, and 3.22 times of the sugars yields from enzymatic hydrolysis of MCC.

  13. Deciphering the origin of cooperative catalysis by dirhodium acetate and chiral spiro phosphoric acid in an asymmetric amination reaction.

    PubMed

    Kisan, Hemanta K; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-12-04

    The mechanism of asymmetric amination of diazo-acetate by tert-butyl carbamate catalyzed by dirhodium tetra(trifluoro)acetate and chiral SPINOL-phosphoric acid is examined using DFT (M06 and B3LYP) computations. A cooperative participation of both catalysts is noticed in the stereo-controlling transition state of the reaction.

  14. Determination of real oxidation potentials of the Bk /SUP IV/ -Bk /SUP III/ pair in phosphoric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Kulyako, Y.M.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-03-01

    The authors measure the oxidation potential of the Bk(IV)-Bk(III) pair in H3PO4 solutions by a direct spectroelectrchemical method. When the phosphoric acid concentration is increased from 3 to 10 M, its value decreases from 1.123 to 1.065 V (with respect to a normal hydrogen electrode).

  15. Palladium-Catalyzed Enantioselective C-H Activation of Aliphatic Amines Using Chiral Anionic BINOL-Phosphoric Acid Ligands.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Adam P; Cuthbertson, James D; Gaunt, Matthew J

    2017-02-01

    The design of an enantioselective Pd(II)-catalyzed C-H amination reaction is described. The use of a chiral BINOL phosphoric acid ligand enables the conversion of readily available amines into synthetically valuable aziridines in high enantiomeric ratios. The aziridines can be derivatized to afford a range of chiral amine building blocks incorporating motifs readily encountered in pharmaceutically relevant molecules.

  16. IN-VITRO FORMATION OF PYROMORPHITE VIA REACTION OF PB SOURCES WITH SOFT-DRINK PHOSPHORIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk of Pb adsorption into the body may be greatly diminished when accompanied by a phosphate sink. One of the most labile, albeit not healthiest, forms of phosphate consumed in the human diet is derived from cola soft drinks that use phosphoric acid as a preservative and als...

  17. Highly enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reaction of 1-azadienes with enecarbamates catalyzed by chiral phosphoric acids.

    PubMed

    He, Long; Laurent, Gregory; Retailleau, Pascal; Folléas, Benoît; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Masson, Géraldine

    2013-10-11

    On demand: A highly enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of 6-amino- trisubstituted tetrahydropyridine compounds has been developed through the inverse-electron-demand aza-Diels-Alder reaction of N-aryl α,β-unsaturated ketimines with enecarbamates (E)-1. Chiral phosphoric acid catalysts achieve simultaneous activation of both the 1-azadiene and dienophile partners.

  18. Efficacy of fungicide combinations, phosphoric acid, and plant extract from stinging nettle on potato late blight management and tuber yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans is a major constraint to potato production. Inadequate management of the disease has often resulted in heavy losses in various production regions. We assessed the efficacy of fungicides, phosphoric acid, and stinging nettle plant extract combinations for...

  19. Immobilization of Zn, Cu, and Pb in contaminated soils using phosphate rock and phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinde; Wahbi, Ammar; Ma, Lena; Li, Bing; Yang, Yongliang

    2009-05-30

    Considerable research has been done on P-induced Pb immobilization in Pb-contaminated soils. However, application of P to soils contaminated with multiple heavy metals is limited. The present study examined effectiveness of phosphoric acid (PA) and/or phosphate rock (PR) in immobilizing Pb, Cu, and Zn in two contaminated soils. The effectiveness was evaluated using water extraction, plant uptake, and a simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET) mimicking metal uptake in the acidic environment of human stomach. The possible mechanisms for metal immobilization were elucidated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and chemical speciation program Visual MINTEQ. Compared to the control, all P amendments significantly reduced Pb water solubility, phytoavailability, and bioaccessibility by 72-100%, 15-86%, and 28-92%, respectively. The Pb immobilization was probably attributed to the formation of insoluble Pb phosphate minerals. Phosphorus significantly reduced Cu and Zn water solubility by 31-80% and 40-69%, respectively, presumably due to their sorption on minerals (e.g., calcite and phosphate phases) following CaO addition. However, P had little effect on the Cu and Zn phytoavailability; while the acid extractability of Cu and Zn induced by SBET (pH 2) were even elevated by up to 48% and 40%, respectively, in the H(3)PO(4) treatments (PA and PR+PA). Our results indicate that phosphate was effective in reducing Pb availability in terms of water solubility, bioaccessibility, and phytoavailability. Caution should be exercised when H(3)PO(4) was amended to the soil co-contaminated with Cu and Zn since the acidic condition of SBET increased Cu and Zn bioaccessibility though their water solubility was reduced.

  20. Effect of Phosphoric Acid on the Degradation of Human Dentin Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A.; Mutluay, M.; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R.; Agee, K.A.; Key, W.O.; Scheffel, D.L.S.; Breschi, L.; Mazzoni, A.; Tjäderhane, L.; Nishitani, Y.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    This study determined if dentin proteases are denatured by phosphoric acid (PA) used in etch-and-rinse dentin adhesives. Dentin beams were completely demineralized with EDTA for 30 days. We “acid-etched” experimental groups by exposing the demineralized dentin beams to 1, 10, or 37 mass% PA for 15 sec or 15 min. Control beams were not exposed to PA but were incubated in simulated body fluid for 3 days to assay their total endogenous telopeptidase activity, by their ability to solubilize C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides ICTP and CTX from insoluble dentin collagen. Control beams released 6.1 ± 0.8 ng ICTP and 0.6 ± 0.1 ng CTX/mg dry-wt/3 days. Positive control beams pre-incubated in p-aminophenylmercuric acetate, a compound known to activate proMMPs, released about the same amount of ICTP peptides, but released significantly less CTX. Beams immersed in 1, 10, or 37 mass% PA for 15 sec or 15 min released amounts of ICTP and CTX similar to that released by the controls (p > 0.05). Beams incubated in galardin, an MMP inhibitor, or E-64, a cathepsin inhibitor, blocked most of the release of ICTP and CTX, respectively. It is concluded that PA does not denature endogenous MMP and cathepsin activities of dentin matrices. PMID:23103634

  1. Thermal properties of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes in water and methanol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nores-Pondal, Federico J.; Buera, M. Pilar; Corti, Horacio R.

    The thermal properties of phosphoric acid-doped poly[2-2‧-(m-phenylene)-5-5‧ bi-benzimidazole] (PBI) and poly[2,5-benzimidazole] (ABPBI) membranes, ionomeric materials with promising properties to be used as electrolytes in direct methanol and in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique in the temperature range from -145 °C to 200 °C. The DSC scans of samples equilibrated in water at different relative humidities (RH) and in liquid water-methanol mixtures were analyzed in relation to glass transition, water crystallization/melting and solvent desorption in different temperature regions. The thermal relaxation observed in the very low temperature region could be ascribed to the glass transition of the H 3PO 4-H 2O mixture confined in the polymeric matrix. After cooling the samples up to -145 °C, frozen water was detected in PBI and ABPBI at different RH, although at 100% RH less amount of water had crystallized than that observed in Nafion membranes under the same conditions. Even more important is the fact that the freezing degree of water is much lower in ABPBI membranes equilibrated in liquid water-methanol mixtures than that observed for PBI and, in a previous study, for Nafion. Thus, apart from other well known properties, acid-doped ABPBI emerges as an excellent ionomer for applications in direct methanol fuel cells working in cold environments.

  2. An investigation of Pt alloy oxygen reduction catalysts in phosphoric acid doped PBI fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamlouk, M.; Scott, K.

    A study of a phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane fuel cell using commercial carbon supported, Pt alloy oxygen reduction catalysts is reported. The cathodes were made from PTFE bonded carbon supported Pt alloys without PBI but with phopshoric acid added to the electrode for ionic conductivity. Polarisation data for fuel cells with cathodes made with alloys of Pt with Ni, Co, Ru and Fe are compared with those with Pt alone as cathode at temperatures between 120 and 175 °C. With the same loading of Pt enhancement in cell performance was achieved with all alloys except Pt-Ru, in the low current density activation kinetics region of operation. The extent of enhancement depended upon the operating temperature and also the catalyst loading. In particular a Pt-Co alloy produced performance significantly better than Pt alone, e.g. a peak power, with low pressure air, of 0.25 W cm -2 with 0.2 mg Pt cm -2 of a 20 wt% Pt-Co catalyst.

  3. The effects of excess phosphoric acid in a Polybenzimidazole-based high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Saif; Higier, Andrew; Liu, Hongtan

    A series of experiments are conducted in order to investigate the performance of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell using a commercially available polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based high temperature membrane. During the study a drastic degradation in performance is observed over time and a significant amount of solid material built-up is found in the flow field plate and the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA). The built-up material is examined by the use of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Further elemental analysis using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) finds that the built-up material contains large amount of phosphorus, thus relating it with the excess phosphoric acid found in the MEA. Additional experimental studies show that the built-up material is caused by the excess acid solution in the MEA, and when the excess phosphoric acid is removed from the MEA the fuel cell performance improves significantly and becomes very stable.

  4. Edge-Functionalization of Pyrene as a Miniature Graphene via Friedel-Crafts Acylation Reaction in Poly(Phosphoric Acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, In-Yup; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Bae, Seo-Yoon; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2010-10-01

    The feasibility of edge-functionalization of graphite was tested via the model reaction between pyrene and 4-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyloxy)benzamide (TMPBA) in poly(phosphoric acid) (PPA)/phosphorous pentoxide (P2O5) medium. The functionalization was confirmed by various characterization techniques. On the basis of the model study, the reaction condition could be extended to the edge-functionalization of graphite with TMPBA. Preliminary results showed that the resultant TMPBA-grafted graphite (graphite-g-TMPBA) was found to be readily dispersible in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and can be used as a precursor for edge-functionalized graphene (EFG).

  5. The results of HLW processing using zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Yury; Zilberman, Boris; Shmidt, Olga; Saprikin, Vladimir; Ryasantsev, Valery

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Zirconium salt of dibutyl-phosphoric acid (ZS HDBP) dissolved in a diluent, is a promising solvent for liquid HLW processing. The investigations carried out earlier showed that ZS HDBP can recover a series of radionuclides (TPE, RE, U, Pu, Np, Sr) and some other elements (Mo, Ca, Fe) from aqueous solutions. The possibility of TPE and RE effective recovery and separation into appropriate fractions with high purification from each other was demonstrated as well. The results of extraction tests in the mixer-settlers in the course of liquid HLW treatment in hot cells, using ZS HDBP (0.4 M HDBP and 0.044 M Zr) dissolved in 30% TBP are presented. 30 liters of the feed solution containing TPE, RE, Sr and Cs with the total specific activity of 520 MBq/L and acidity of 2 M HNO{sub 3} were processed using the two-cycle flowsheet. TPE and RE recovery with subsequent stripping was realized in the first cycle, while Sr was recovered and concentrated in the second cycle. Raffinate of the latter contained almost all Cs. The degree of TPE and RE recovery was 104, and that of Sr was {approx}10. Decontamination factor of TPE and RE from Cs and Sr was 104, and that of Sr from TPE and Cs was 103. So, ZS HDBP can be used for separation of long-lived radionuclides from HLW with respect to radio-toxic category of the process products. (authors)

  6. Enantiodivergent Atroposelective Synthesis of Chiral Biaryls by Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation: Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Mori, Keiji; Itakura, Tsubasa; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2016-09-12

    Reported herein is an enantiodivergent synthesis of chiral biaryls by a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reaction. Upon treatment of biaryl lactols with aromatic amines and a Hantzsch ester in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) involving a reductive amination reaction proceeded smoothly to furnish both R and S isomers of chiral biaryls with excellent enantioselectivities by proper choice of hydroxyaniline derivative. This trend was observed in wide variety of substrates, and various chiral biphenyl and phenyl naphthyl adducts were synthesized with satisfactory enantioselectivities in enantiodivergent fashion. The enantiodivergent synthesis of synthetically challenging, chiral o-tetrasubstituted biaryls were also accomplished, and suggests high synthetic potential of the present method.

  7. V-shaped crystalline structures of di-n-alkyl esters of phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Thünemann, Andreas F; Kurth, Dirk G; Beinhoff, Matthias; Bienert, Ralf; Schulz, Burkhard

    2006-06-20

    We prepared crystals of di-n-alkyl esters of phosphoric acid with chain lengths of n = 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18. These were characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that the alkyl chains are in an extended all-trans conformation and aligned close to perpendicular, forming V-shaped molecules. This is in strong contrast to the typical arrangement of the alkyl chains of phospholipids where the two alkyl chains are arranged parallel in the same direction (e.g., tuning fork configuration in bilayers). Additionally, it was found that the arrangement of the V-shaped molecules of the di-n-alkyl esters in neighboring stacks of the lamellar crystals is antiparallel for short chain lengths (n = 10 and 12) and parallel for the longer (n = 14 and 16). DSC reveals that the melting of the crystals increases systematically with increasing chain lengths from 48 to 82 degrees C. The contribution of each methylene group to the melting enthalpy (70-133 kJ/mol) is independent of the chain length (3.9 kJ per mol CH2).

  8. Absorption of sulfur dioxide from simulated flue gas by polyethyleneimine-phosphoric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Bo, Wen; Li, Hongxia; Zhang, Junjie; Song, Xiangjia; Hu, Jinshan; Liu, Ce

    2016-12-01

    Clean fuel technologies have been widely developed in current society because fuel combustion can directly bring about the emission of hazardous gasses such as SO2. Flue gas desulfurization by polyethyleneimine (PEI)-phosphoric acid solution is an efficient desulfurization method. In this research, the PEI and the additive H3PO4 were used as absorption solution. SO2 was absorbed by the system and desorbed from the loaded solution. The cycle operation was also analyzed. Some technology conditions such as the concentration of PEI, the temperature, the gas flow rate, the concentration of SO2 and the pH value were experimentally researched. With the optimized process, the absorption efficiency of this system could reach 98% and the desorption efficiency was over 60%, showing good absorption/desorption capability. With this efficient approach, the present study may open a new window for developing high-performance absorbents which can make SO2 be well desorbed from the loaded solution and better reused in the flue gas desulfurization.

  9. Development of ternary alloy cathode catalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cells: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, V.; Kosek, J.; Giner, J.; Taylor, E. J.; Anderson, E.; Bianchi, V.; Brooks, C.; Cahill, K.; Cropley, C.; Desai, M.; Frost, D.; Morriseau, B.; Paul, B.; Poirier, J.; Rousseau, M.; Swette, L.; Waterhouse, R.

    1988-11-01

    The overall objective of the program was the identification development and incorporation of high activity platinum ternary alloys on corrosion resistant supports, for use in advanced phosphoric acid fuel cells. Two high activity ternary alloys, Pr-Cr-Ce and Pt-Ni-Co, both supported on Vulcan XC-72, were identified during the course of the program. The Pr-Ni-Co system was selected for optimization, including preparation and evaluation on corrosion resistant supports such as 2700/degree/C heat-treated Vulcan XC-72 and 2700/degree/ heat-treated Black Pearls 2000. A series of tests identified optimum metal ratios, heat-treatment temperatures and heat-treatment atmospheres for the Pr-Ni-Co system. During characterization testing, it was discovered that approximately 50% of the nickel and cobalt present in the starting material could be removed, subsequent to alloy formation, without degrading performance. Extremely stable full cell performance was observed for the Pt-Ni-Co system during a 10,000 hour atmosphere pressure life test. Several theories are proposed to explain the enhancement in activity due to alloy formation. Recommendations are made for future research in this area. 62 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. Experimental oxygen isotope fractionation between siderite-water and phosphoric acid liberated CO2-siderite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carothers, W.W.; Adami, L.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium fractionation of O isotopes between synthetic siderite and water has been measured at temperatures ranging from 33?? to 197??C. The fractionation between siderite and water over this temperature range can be represented by the equation: 103 ln ?? = 3.13 ?? 106T-2 - 3.50. Comparison between the experimental and theoretical fractionations is favorable only at approximately 200??C; at lower temperatures, they generally differ by up to 2 permil. Siderite was prepared by the slow addition of ferrous chloride solutions to sodium bicarbonate solutions at the experimental temperatures. It was also used to determine the O isotope fractionation factors between phosphoric acid liberated CO2 and siderite. The fractionation factors for this pair at 25?? and 50??C are 1.01175 and 1.01075, respectively. Preliminary results of the measured C isotope fractionation between siderite and Co2 also indicate C isotopic equilibrium during precipitation of siderite. The measured distribution of 13C between siderite and CO2 coincides with the theoretical values only at about 120??C. Experimental and theoretical C fractionations differ up to 3 permil at higher and lower temperatures. ?? 1988.

  11. Preparation and structural characterization of poly-mannose synthesized by phosphoric acid catalyzation under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haisong; Cheng, Xiangrong; Shi, Yonghui; Le, Guowei

    2015-05-05

    Poly-mannose with molecular weight of 2.457 kDa was synthesized using d-mannose as substrate and phosphoric acid as catalyst under the condition of microwave irradiation for the first time. The optimum reaction conditions were microwave output power of 900 W, temperature 115°C, proton concentration 2.5 mol/L, and microwave irradiation time 5 min. The actual maximum yield was 91.46%. After purified by Sepherdex G-25 column chromatography, the structural features of poly-mannose were investigated by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), high-performance gel-permeation chromatography (HPGPC), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, methylation analysis and NMR spectroscopy analysis ((1)H, (13)C, COSY, TOCSY, HMQC, and HMBC). HPAEC analysis showed that the composition of synthetic polysaccharides was d-mannose, its purity was demonstrated by HPGPC as a single symmetrical sharp peak, and additionally IR spectra demonstrated the polymerization of d-mannose. Methylation analysis and NMR spectroscopy revealed that the backbone of poly-mannose consisting of (1→3)-linked β-d-Manp, (1→3)-linked α-d-Manp, and (1→6)-linked α-d-Manp residues, and the main chain were branched at the O-2, O-3, O-4, O-6 position.

  12. Fluoride removal from groundwater by limestone treatment in presence of phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Sweety; Nath, Suresh K; Bordoloi, Shreemoyee; Dutta, Robin K

    2015-04-01

    Fluoride removal from groundwater has been studied by addition of dilute phosphoric acid (PA) to the influent water before limestone treatment through laboratory plug-flow column experiments and bench-scale plug-flow pilot tests. In this PA-enhanced limestone defluoridation (PAELD) technique, fluoride is removed from 0.526 mM to 0.50-52.60 μM in 3 h with near neutral final pH. The presence of PA increases the fluoride removal capacity of limestone to 1.10 mg/g compared to 0.39 mg/g reported in its absence. The changes in fluoride removal with variation in initial PA concentration, initial fluoride concentration and the final pH have been found to be statistically significant with p < 0.05. The estimated recurring cost is US$ ≈0.58/m(3) water. Simple scrubbing and rinsing is a preferable method for regeneration of limestone as it is almost equally effective with lime or NaOH. Sorption of fluoride by calcium phosphates produced in situ in the reactor is the dominant mechanism of fluoride removal in the PAELD. Precipitation of CaF2 and sorption of fluoride by the limestone also contribute to the fluoride removal. High efficiency, capacity, safety, environment-friendliness, low cost and simplicity of operation make the PAELD a potential technique for rural application.

  13. Conversion of spent solid phosphoric Acid catalyst to environmentally friendly fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Merwe, Werner van der

    2010-03-01

    Solid phosphoric acid (SPA) catalysts are widely used in the petroleum industry. Despite a high phosphorus content the spent catalyst is generally not reused. Moreover, due to the limited life spans that are achieved industrially, large quantities of spent catalyst requires disposal, often by landfill. SPA can be readily converted to fertilizer, but the presence of carbonaceous deposits on the catalyst presents a potential environmental hazard. This work demonstrates that these deposits are mostly polyaromatic (amorphous carbon) with smaller amounts of oxygenates and aliphatics. Neither the chemical makeup nor the physical structure of the catalyst or the presence of coke precludes it from use as fertilizer. Subsequently, the spent catalyst was milled, neutralized with lime and ammonium hydroxide, and then calcined to yield a phosphate-rich fertilizer. Toxicity characteristic leaching tests of the spent catalyst fertilizer showed low levels of metals and organics, establishing that no harmful compounds are likely to be absorbed into plant life or groundwater. A plant growth study of the spent catalyst fertilizer indicated that it is approximately as effective as superphosphate fertilizer when used in alkaline soil. The spent catalyst fertilizer is environmentally benign and economically efficient.

  14. Uranium control in phosphogypsum. [In wet-process phosphoric acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, F.J.; Arnold, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    In wet-process phosphoric acid plants, both previous and recent test results show that uranium dissolution from phosphate rock is significantly higher when the rock is acidulated under oxidizing conditions than under reducing conditions. Excess sulfate and excess fluoride further enhance the distribution of uranium to the cake. Apparently the U(IV) present in the crystal lattice of the apatite plus that formed by reduction of U(IV) by FE(II) during acidulation is trapped or carried into the crystal lattice of the calcium sulfate crystals as they form and grow. The amount of uranium that distributes to hemihydrate filter cake is up to seven times higher than the amount that distributes to the dihydrate cake. About 60% of the uranium in hemihydrate cakes can be readily leached after hydration of the cake, but the residual uranium (20 to 30%) is very difficult to remove economically. Much additional research is needed to develop methods for minimizing uranium losses to calcium filter cakes.

  15. Effect of aluminum anodizing in phosphoric acid electrolyte on adhesion strength and thermal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sulki; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Yonghwan; Jung, Uoochang; Chung, Wonsub

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the adhesive bond strength and thermal performance of the anodized aluminum 6061 in phosphoric acid electrolyte to improve the adhesive bond strength and thermal performance for use in metal core printed circuit boards (MCPCB). The electrolyte temperature and applied voltage were altered to generate varied pore structures. The thickness, porosity and pore diameter of the anodized layer were measured. The pore morphologies were affected most by temperature, which was the driving force for ion transportation. The mechanism of adhesive bond was penetration of the epoxy into the pores. The optimal anodization conditions for maximum adhesive bond strength, 27 MPa, were 293 K and 100V. The maximum thermal conductivity of the epoxy-treated anodized layer was 1.6 W/m·K at 273 K. Compared with the epoxy-treated Al layer used for conventional MCPCBs, the epoxy-treated anodized layer showed advanced thermal performance due to a low difference of thermal resistance and high heat dissipation.

  16. Chiral Phosphoric Acid-Catalyzed Enantioselective Reductive Amination of 2-Pyridyl Ketones: Construction of Structurally Chiral Pyridine-Based Ligands.

    PubMed

    Abudu Rexit, Abulikemu; Luo, Shiwei; Mailikezati, Maihemuti

    2016-11-18

    A chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed one-pot enantioselective reductive amination of 2-pyridyl ketones was realized to provide chiral pyridine-based ligands in excellent yields with high enantioselectivities (up to 98% yield, 94% ee). Computational studies on the key intermediate imine and transition state of the hydride transfer process revealed that the nitrogen atom of the pyridyl ring might be an important factor to significantly promote both the reaction activity and enantioselectivity.

  17. Extraction of cellulose nano-crystals from old corrugated container fiber using phosphoric acid and enzymatic hydrolysis followed by sonication.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanjun; Shen, Xiaochuang; Zhang, Junhua; Guo, Daliang; Kong, Fangong; Zhang, Nan

    2015-07-10

    Due to its amazing physicochemical properties and high environmental compatibility, cellulose nano-crystals (CNC) hold great promise for serving as a strategic platform for sustainable development. Now, there has been growing interest in the development of processes using waste or residual biomass as CNC source for addressing economic and environmental concerns. In the present work, a combined process involving phosphoric acid hydrolysis, enzymatic hydrolysis and sonication was proposed aiming to efficiently exact CNC from low-cost old corrugated container (OCC) pulp fiber. The effect of enzymatic hydrolysis on the yield and microstructure of resulting CNC was highlighted. Results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis was effective in enhancing CNC yield after phosphoric acid hydrolysis. CNC was obtained with a yield of 23.98 wt% via the combined process with phosphoric acid concentration of 60 wt%, cellulase dosage of 2 mL (84 EGU) per 2g fiber and sonication intensity of 200 W. Moreover, the presence of enzymatic hydrolysis imparted the obtained CNC with improved dispersion, increased crystallinity and thermal stability.

  18. Modulated optical properties of nonpolar gallium nitride via surface in-situ functionalization with cysteamine assisted phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stewart J.; Paskova, Tania; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-03-01

    In-situ functionalization of nonpolar a-plane gallium nitride (GaN) surface was achieved by adding cysteamine to phosphoric acid, aiming to modulate its optical properties. The emission properties and oxide formation were explored through surface characterization with atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence (PL), and water contact angle. Nonpolar a-plane bulk GaN sample sliced from a GaN boule and nonpolar a-plane GaN thin layer heteroepitaxially grown on r-plane sapphire were used to elucidate the effects of in-situ functionalization of identical surface orientation of GaN crystals with different defect ensembles. The addition of cysteamine to the phosphoric acid solution was found to result in: (i) increased surface roughness, (ii) no change to hydrophobicity, (iii) decreased oxygen content at high solution temperatures and increased gallium and nitrogen content versus phosphoric acid solutions at similar temperatures without cysteamine. The in-situ functionalization resulted in enhanced PL intensity from the nonpolar bulk GaN, while the PL intensity from the nonpolar heteroepitaxially grown GaN layer on sapphire was significantly reduced. The opposite PL modulation was explained by the effects of different defects present in the two samples on the nonradiative recombination.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of new biopolymeric microcapsules containing DEHPA-TOPO extractants for separation of uranium from phosphoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Outokesh, Mohammad; Tayyebi, Ahmad; Khanchi, Alireza; Grayeli, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Ghodrat

    2011-01-01

    A novel microcapsule adsorbent for separation of uranium from phosphoric acid solutions was developed by immobilizing the di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid-trioctyl phosphine oxide extractants in the polymeric matrix of calcium alginate. Physical characterization of the microcapsules was accomplished by scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric techniques. Equilibrium experiments revealed that both ion exchange and solvent extraction mechanisms were involved in the adsorption of [Formula: see text] ions, but the latter prevailed in a wider range of acid concentration. According to the results of kinetics study, at low acidity level, the rate controlling step was slow chemical reaction of [Formula: see text] ions with the microdroplets of extractant, whereas it changed to intraparticle diffusion at higher acid concentration. The study also attempted identification of the diffusion paths of the ions within the microcapsules, and the mechanism of change of mass transfer rate during the uptake process. The prepared microcapsules preserved their entire capacity after three cycles of adsorption, and their breakthrough behaviour was well fitted by a new formula derived from shrinking core model.

  20. Transient responses of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and computerized study of the steady state and transient response of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system was completed. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of the PAFC system's operation were accomplished. Four non-linear dynamic models of the fuel cell stack, reformer, shift converters, and heat exchangers were developed based on nonhomogeneous non-linear partial differential equations, which include the material, component, energy balance, and electrochemical kinetic features. Due to a lack of experimental data for the dynamic response of the components only the steady state results were compared with data from other sources, indicating reasonably good agreement. A steady state simulation of the entire system was developed using, nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The finite difference method and trial-and-error procedures were used to obtain a solution. Using the model, a PAFC system, that was developed under NASA Grant, NCC3-17, was improved through the optimization of the heat exchanger network. Three types of cooling configurations for cell plates were evaluated to obtain the best current density and temperature distributions. The steady state solutions were used as the initial conditions in the dynamic model. The transient response of a simplified PAFC system, which included all of the major components, subjected to a load change was obtained. Due to the length of the computation time for the transient response calculations, analysis on a real-time computer was not possible. A simulation of the real-time calculations was developed on a batch type computer. The transient response characteristics are needed for the optimization of the design and control of the whole PAFC system. All of the models, procedures and simulations were programmed in Fortran and run on IBM 370 computers at Cleveland State University and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  1. Effect of Phosphoric Acid Concentration on the Characteristics of Sugarcane Bagasse Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, M. R. M.; Suraya, W. M. S. W.; Rafidah, H.; Amirza, A. R. M.; Attahirah, M. H. M. N.; Hani, M. S. N. Q.; Adnan, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation method is one of the crucial steps involved in producing activated carbon using chemical activation process. Chemicals employed in this step is effective at decomposing the structure of material and forming micropores that helps in adsorption of contaminants. This paper explains thorough procedures that have been involved in producing sugarcane bagasse activated carbon (SBAC) by using 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) during the impregnation step. Concentration of H3PO4 used in the process of producing SBAC was optimized through several tests including bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter and the charactesristic of optimum SBAC produced has been compared with commercial activated carbon (CAC). Batch study has been carried out by using the SBAC produced from optimum condition to investigate the performance of SBAC in removal of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand (COD) from textile wastewater. From characteristic study, SBAC with 30% H3PO4 has shown the optimum value of bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter of 0.3023 g cm-3, 4.35%, 974.96 mg/g and 0.21-0.41 µm, respectively. These values are comparable to the characteristics of CAC. Experimental result from the batch study has been concluded that the SBAC has a promising potential in removing turbidity and COD of 75.5% and 66.3%, respectively which was a slightly lower than CAC which were able to remove 82.8% of turbidity and 70% of COD. As a conclusion, the SBAC is comparable with CAC in terms of their characteristics and the capability of removing contaminants from textile wastewater. Therefore, it has a commercial value to be used as an alternative of low-cost material in producing CAC.

  2. Highly efficient heat recovery system for phosphoric acid fuel cells used for cooling telecommunication equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, Maki; Okada, Shigeru; Yamashita, Takashi

    To protect the global environment by using energy more efficiently, NTT is developing a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) energy system for telecommunication cogeneration systems. Fuel cells are used to provide electrical power to telecommunication equipment and the heat energy is used by absorption refrigerators to cool the telecommunication rooms throughout the year. We have recently developed a highly efficient system for recovering heat and water from the exhaust gases of a 200-kW (rated power) fuel cell. It is composed of a shell-and-tube type heat exchanger to recover high-temperature heat and a direct-contact cooler to recover the water efficiently and simply. The reformer and cathode exhaust gases from the fuel cell are first supplied to the heat exchanger and then to the cooler. The high-temperature (85-60°C) heat can be recovered, and the total efficiency including the heat recovered from the fuel-cell stack coolant can be improved by supplying the recovered heat to the dual-heat-input absorption refrigerator. The water needed for operating the fuel cell is also recovered from the exhaust gases. We are currently applying this heat and water recovery system to the PC25C-type fuel cell. Maximum total efficiency including electrical power efficiency is estimated to be 78% at the rated power of 200 kW: composed of 17% heat recovery for the fuel-cell stack coolant, 21% from the exhaust gas by improving the heat exchanger, and 40% from electrical conversion. Next, we plan to evaluate the usefulness of this heat recovery system for cooling telecommunication equipment.

  3. Dimensionally-stable phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazoles for high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaobai; Ma, Hongwei; Shen, Yanchao; Hu, Wei; Jiang, Zhenhua; Liu, Baijun; Guiver, Michael D.

    2016-12-01

    Phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PA-m-PBI) membranes are widely investigated for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells because of their low cost and high performance. For this system, a major challenge is in achieving a good compromise between the phosphoric acid doping level and the membrane dimensional-mechanical stability. Different from the established PA-m-PBI system, the present work investigates two types of PA-PBI membranes incorporating flexible ether linkages and asymmetric bulky pendants (phenyl and methylphenyl), which exhibit much better dimensional-mechanical stability after immersing in PA solution, even at high temperature for an extended period. This superior stability allowed higher acid doping levels (20.6 and 24.6) to be achieved, thus increasing proton conductivity (165 and 217 mS cm-1 at 200 °C under anhydrous conditions) as well as significantly improving fuel cell performance. The peak power densities in hydrogen/air fuel cell were 279 and 320 mW cm-2 at 160 °C, without humidification. Molecular simulation, density and fractional free volume, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction were used to investigate their structure-property relationships.

  4. Injection of air into the headspace improves fermentation of phosphoric acid pretreated sugarcane bagasse by Escherichia coli MM170.

    PubMed

    Nieves, I U; Geddes, C C; Mullinnix, M T; Hoffman, R W; Tong, Z; Castro, E; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, L O

    2011-07-01

    Microaeration (injecting air into the headspace) improved the fermentation of hemicellulose hydrolysates obtained from the phosphoric acid pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse at 170°C for 10 min. In addition, with 10% slurries of phosphoric acid pretreated bagasse (180°C, 10 min), air injection into the headspace promoted xylose utilization and increased ethanol yields from 0.16 to 0.20 g ethanol/g bagasse dry weight using a liquefaction plus simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation process (L+SScF). This process was scaled up to 80 L using slurries of acid pretreated bagasse (96 h incubation; 0.6L of air/min into the headspace) with ethanol yields of 312-347 L (82-92 gal) per tone (dry matter), corresponding to 0.25 and 0.27 g/g bagasse (dry weight). Injection of small amounts of air into the headspace may provide a convenient alternative to subsurface sparging that avoids problems of foaming, sparger hygiene, flotation of particulates, and phase separation.

  5. Crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate under simulated conditions of phosphoric acid production in the presence of aluminum and magnesium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, M. M.; Mahmoud, M. H. H.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Abdel-Aal, E. A.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of Al 3+ and Mg 2+ ions, as additives, on the crystallization of gypsum was studied under simulated conditions of the phosphoric acid production. Calcium hydrogen phosphate and sulfuric acid were mixed with dilute phosphoric acid at 80°C, and the turbidity of the reaction mixture was measured at different time periods to calculate the induction time of gypsum crystals formation. Addition of Al 3+ ions up to 2% decreased the induction time and increased the growth efficiency while addition of Mg 2+ increased the induction time and decreased the growth efficiency compared with in absence of additives. Interestingly, the crystals mean and median diameters were found to increase in the presence of Al 3+ and decrease in the presence of Mg 2+. The surface energy increased with Al 3+ and decreased with Mg 2+ compared to the baseline (without additives). Gypsum morphology changed from needle-like type in absence of additives to thick-rhombic in the presence of Al 3+ ions.

  6. Characterization of phosphogypsum wastes associated with phosphoric acid and fertilizers production.

    PubMed

    El Afifi, E M; Hilal, M A; Attallah, M F; El-Reefy, S A

    2009-05-01

    The present work is directed to characterize the phosphogypsum (PG) wastes associated with phosphoric acid produced by the wet process in industrial facility for the production of fertilizers and chemicals in Egypt. The PG waste samples were characterized in terms of spectroscopic analysis (X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, IR spectra) and radiometric analysis (gamma- and alpha-measurements). The gamma-ray measurements showed that the average activity concentrations are 140+/-12.6, 459+/-36.7, 323+/-28.4, 8.3+/-0.76 and 64.3+/-4.1 Bq/kg for U-238, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-232 and K-40, respectively. The alpha-particle measurements of uranium isotopes showed that the average activity concentrations of U-238, U-235 and U-234 were 153+/-9.8, 7+/-0.38, 152+/-10.4 Bq/kg, respectively. The average radiochemical recovery (%) of the destructive alpha-particle measurements is approximately 70% with a resolution (FWHM) of approximately 30 keV. Activity ratios of U-238/Ra-226 and U-238/Pb-210 were less than unity (i.e., <1) and equal to 0.31+/-0.02 and 0.47+/-0.16, respectively. The isotopic ratios of U-238/U-235 and U-238/U-234 (in PG and PR samples) were close to the normal values of approximately 21.7 and approximately 1, respectively and are not affected by the wet processing of phosphate rock (PR). The obtained results of PG waste samples were compared with phosphate rock (PR) samples. The radiation hazard indices are namely, radium activity index (Ra-Eq>370 Bq/kg), total absorbed gamma dose rate (D(gamma r)>5 nGy/h) and radon emanation fraction (Rn-EF>20%). Uncertainty of the sample counting was 95% confidence level of sigma. The results indicated the necessity to find suitable routes to decrease and/or redistribute the radionuclide of environmental interest (i.e., Ra-226) in PG wastes, consequently to reduce its radiation impacts in the surrounding environment.

  7. δ18O anchoring to VPDB: calcite digestion with 18O-adjusted ortho-phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Wendeberg, Magnus; Richter, Jürgen M; Rothe, Michael; Brand, Willi A

    2011-04-15

    For anchoring CO(2) isotopic measurements on the δ(18)O(VPD-CO2) scale, the primary reference material (NBS 19 calcite) needs to be digested using concentrated ortho-phosphoric acid. During this procedure, great care must be taken to ensure that the isotopic composition of the liberated gas is accurate. Apart from controlling the reaction temperature to ±0.1 °C, the potential for oxygen isotope exchange between the produced CO(2) and water must be kept to a minimum. The water is usually assumed to reside on the walls in the headspace of the reaction vessel. We demonstrate here that a large fraction of the exchange may also occur with water inside the acid. Our results indicate that both exchange reactions have a significant impact on the results and may have largely been responsible for scale inconsistencies between laboratories in the past. The extent of CO(2)/H(2)O oxygen exchange depends on the concentration (amount of free water) in the acid. For acids with a nominal H(3)PO(4) mass fraction of less than 102%, oxygen isotope exchange can create a substantial isotopic bias during high-precision measurements with the degree of the alteration being proportional to the effective isotopic contrast between the acid and the CO(2) released from the calcite. Water evaporating from the acid at 25 °C has a δ(18)O value of -34.5‰ relative to the isotopic composition of the whole acid. This large fractionation is likely to occur in two steps; by exchange with phosphate, water inside the acid is decreased in oxygen-18 relative to the bulk acid by ∼ -22‰. This water is then fractionated further during evaporation. Oxygen exchange with both water inside the acid and water condensate in the headspace can contribute to the measured isotopic signature depending on the experimental parameters. The system employed for this study has been specifically designed to minimize oxygen exchange with water. However, the amount of altered CO(2) for a 95% H(3)PO(4) at 25 °C still

  8. Enantioselective Cycloaddition Reactions Catalyzed by BINOL-Derived Phosphoric Acids and N-Triflyl Phosphoramides: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Held, Felix E; Grau, Dominik; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2015-09-03

    Over the last several years there has been a huge increase in the development and applications of new efficient organocatalysts for enantioselective pericyclic reactions, which represent one of the most powerful types of organic transformations. Among these processes are cycloaddition reactions (e.g., [3+2]; formal [3+3]; [4+2]; vinylogous [4+2] and 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions), which belong to the most utilized reactions in organic synthesis of complex nitrogen- and oxygen-containing heterocyclic molecules. This review presents the breakthrough realized in this field using chiral BINOL-derived phosphoric acids and N-triflyl phosphoramide organocatalysts.

  9. Modeling of facilitated transport of phenylalanine by emulsion liquid membranes with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as a carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Liu, D.

    1998-12-01

    A mathematical model is developed in this paper to simulate the facilitated transport of phenylalanine (Phe) in emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as a carrier. The model takes into account the mass transfer in both the external aqueous phase and the organic membrane phase interfacial reaction as well as membrane breakage during agitation. The model is tested by comparing theoretical predications with experimental results using Phe extraction by ELM processes. It is found that the model is valid for simulating the facilitated transport of Phe with ELM under various experimental conditions.

  10. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  11. Measurements of the effects of thermal contact resistance on steady state heat transfer in phosphoric-acid fuel cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Alkasab, Kalil A.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of the thermal contact resistance on the heat transfer between the electrode plates, and the cooling system plate in a phosphoric-acid fuel-cell stack was experimentally investigated. The investigation was conducted using a set-up that simulates the operating conditions prevailing in a phosphoric acid fuel-cell stack. The fuel-cell cooling system utilized three types of coolants, water, engine oil, and air, to remove excess heat generated in the cell electrode and to maintain a reasonably uniform temperature distribution in the electrode plate. The thermal contact resistance was measured as a function of pressure at the interface between the electrode plate and the cooling system plate. The interface pressure range was from 0 kPa to 3448 kPa, while the Reynolds number for the cooling limits varied from 15 to 79 for oil, 1165 to 6165 for water, and 700 to 6864 for air. Results showed that increasing the interface pressure resulted in a higher heat transfer coefficient.

  12. Optimization of preparation of activated carbon from cotton stalk by microwave assisted phosphoric acid-chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hui; Zhang, Genlin; Xu, Xiaolin; Tao, Guanghui; Dai, Jiulei

    2010-10-15

    The preparation of activated carbon (AC) from cotton stalk was investigated in this paper. Orthogonal array experimental design method was used to optimize the preparation of AC using microwave assisted phosphoric acid. Optimized parameters were radiation power of 400 W, radiation time of 8 min, concentration of phosphoric acid of 50% by volume and impregnation time of 20 h, respectively. The surface characteristics of the AC prepared under optimized condition were examined by pore structure analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Pore structure analysis shows that mecropores constitute more of the porosity of the prepared AC. Compared to cotton stalk, different functionalities and morphology on the carbon surfaces were formed in the prepared process. The adsorption capacity of the AC was also investigated by removing methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution. The equilibrium data of the adsorption was well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity of MB on the prepared AC is 245.70 mg/g. The adsorption process follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  13. Studies of the Mechanism and Origins of Enantioselectivity for the Chiral Phosphoric Acid-Catalyzed Stereoselective Spiroketalization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Khomutnyk, Yaroslav Ya; Argüelles, Alonso J; Winschel, Grace A; Sun, Zhankui; Zimmerman, Paul M; Nagorny, Pavel

    2016-01-13

    Mechanistic and computational studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanism and the origins of enantiocontrol for asymmetric chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed spiroketalization reactions. These studies were designed to differentiate between the S(N)1-like, S(N)2-like, and covalent phosphate intermediate-based mechanisms. The chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed spiroketalization of deuterium-labeled cyclic enol ethers revealed a highly diastereoselective syn-selective protonation/nucleophile addition, thus ruling out long-lived oxocarbenium intermediates. Hammett analysis of the reaction kinetics revealed positive charge accumulation in the transition state (ρ = -2.9). A new computational reaction exploration method along with dynamics simulations supported an asynchronous concerted mechanism with a relatively short-lived polar transition state (average lifetime = 519 ± 240 fs), which is consistent with the observed inverse secondary kinetic isotope effect of 0.85. On the basis of these studies, a transition state model explaining the observed stereochemical outcome has been proposed. This model predicts the enantioselective formation of the observed enantiomer of the product with 92% ee, which matches the experimentally observed value.

  14. Improved detection of multi-phosphorylated peptides in the presence of phosphoric acid in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-02-18

    In contrast to lower phosphorylation states (e.g., the tryptic monophosphopeptide FQpSEEQQQTEDELQDK from bovine -casein), the specific detection of multi-phosphorylated peptides (e.g. the tetraphosphopeptide RELEELNVPGEIVEpSLpSpSpSEESITR from tryptic digestion of bovine -casein) has often been problematic for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis due to their high affinity for adsorption to exposed surfaces. We observed an enhancement in the overall detection of phosphopeptides upon addition of phosphoric acid (0.1% to 1.0%) to the sample solution; a 10-fold increase in sensitivity was measured for the detection of two tryptic phosphopeptides as well as a significant improvement in the detection of the tetraphosphopeptide. Using capillary LC with an ion trap tandem mass spectrometer for detection and identification, the achievable detection limits were 50 fmol and 50 pmol for the monophosphopeptide and the tetraphosphopeptide, respectively. Phosphoric acid is believed to act as a blocking agent to available silanol groups on both the silica capillary surface and the C-18-bonded silica surface.

  15. Preparation and physical properties of (PVA)0.7(NaBr)0.3(H3PO4)xM solid acid membrane for phosphoric acid – Fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, F.; Sheha, E.

    2012-01-01

    A solid acid membranes based on poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA), sodium bromide (NaBr) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) were prepared by a solution casting method. The morphological, IR, electrical and optical properties of the (PVA)0.7(NaBr)0.3(H3PO4)xM solid acid membranes where x = 0.00, 0.85, 1.7, 3.4, 5.1 M were investigated. The variation of film morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. FTIR spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structure of polymer and confirms the complexation of phosphoric acid with host polymeric matrix. The temperature dependent nature of ionic conductivity and the impedance of the polymer electrolytes were determined along with the associated activation energy. The ionic conductivity at room temperature was found to be strongly depends on the H3PO4 concentration which it has been achieved to be of the order 4.3 × 10−3 S/cm at ambient temperature. Optical measurements showed a decrease in optical band gap and an increase in band tail width with the increase of phosphoric acid. The data shows that the (PVA)0.7(NaBr)0.3(H3PO4)xM solid acid membrane is promising for intermediate temperature phosphoric acid fuel cell applications. PMID:25685413

  16. Evaluation of the effect of surface preparation using phosphoric acid and luting cement on the flexural strength of porcelain laminate veneering material

    PubMed Central

    Guruprasada; Rivankar, N.; Dhiman, R.K.; Viswambaran, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventionally HF acid has been used for etching ceramic veneer restorations before their cementation. Studies are lacking regarding the effectiveness of phosphoric acid as a substitute for HF acid for etching the ceramic veneers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of surface preparation of porcelain laminate veneers using phosphoric acid, as compared to HF acid etching in providing the necessary surface roughness conducive to development of an effective bond between the ceramic laminate and the resin luting cement. Methods 210 porcelain discs of 15 mm diameter and 0.9 mm thickness were prepared. These study samples were divided into seven groups of thirty samples each. Surfaces of the first (control) and the second group of samples were not prepared. The surfaces of other five groups were prepared with different surface treatments. Further all the groups of specimens were coated with a layer of resin luting cement. Flexural strength of each specimen was determined using universal testing machine and the results were compared. Results The combination surface treatment using alumina surface abrasion followed by etching with phosphoric acid provided the highest flexural strength with the mean flexural strength of 101.11 MPa, followed by alumina surface abrasion (95.41 MPa), and phosphoric acid surface etching (81.68 MPa). Conclusion Laminate veneers surface treated using 50 μm alumina abrasion followed by etching with phosphoric acid showed the highest flexural strengths after resin coating compared to other groups. PMID:26843743

  17. Fuel ethanol production from corn stover under optimized dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol is a renewable oxygenated fuel. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Generation of fermentable sugars from corn stover involves pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Pretreatment is crucial as nat...

  18. Enantioselective Synthesis of α-Mercapto-β-amino Esters via Rh(II)/Chiral Phosphoric Acid-Cocatalyzed Three-Component Reaction of Diazo Compounds, Thiols, and Imines.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guolan; Ma, Chaoqun; Xing, Dong; Hu, Wenhao

    2016-12-02

    An enantioselective method for the synthesis of α-mercapto-β-amino esters has been developed via a rhodium(II)/chiral phosphoric acid-cocatalyzed three-component reaction of diazo compounds, thiols, and imines. This transformation is proposed to proceed through enantioselective trapping of the sulfonium ylide intermediate generated in situ from the diazo compound and thiol by the phosphoric acid-activated imine. With this method, a series of α-mercapto-β-amino esters were obtained in good yields with moderate to good stereoselectivities.

  19. Brønsted Acid Catalysis-Structural Preferences and Mobility in Imine/Phosphoric Acid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Greindl, Julian; Hioe, Johnny; Sorgenfrei, Nils; Morana, Fabio; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2016-12-14

    Despite the huge success of enantioselective Brønsted acid catalysis, experimental data about structures and activation modes of substrate/catalyst complexes in solution are very rare. Here, for the first time, detailed insights into the structures of imine/Brønsted acid catalyst complexes are presented on the basis of NMR data and underpinned by theoretical calculations. The chiral Brønsted acid catalyst R-TRIP (3,3'-bis(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diyl hydrogen phosphate) was investigated together with six aromatic imines. For each investigated system, an E-imine/R-TRIP complex and a Z-imine/R-TRIP complex were observed. Each of these complexes consists of two structures, which are in fast exchange on the NMR time scale; i.e., overall four structures were found. Both identified E-imine/R-TRIP structures feature a strong hydrogen bond but differ in the orientation of the imine relative to the catalyst. The exchange occurs by tilting the imine inside the complex and thereby switching the oxygen that constitutes the hydrogen bond. A similar situation is observed for all investigated Z-imine/R-TRIP complexes. Here, an additional exchange pathway is opened via rotation of the imine. For all investigated imine/R-TRIP complexes, the four core structures are highly preserved. Thus, these core structures are independent of electron density and substituent modulations of the aromatic imines. Overall, this study reveals that the absolute structural space of binary imine/TRIP complexes is large and the variations of the four core structures are small. The high mobility is supposed to promote reactivity, while the preservation of the core structures in conjunction with extensive π-π and CH-π interactions leads to high enantioselectivities and tolerance of different substrates.

  20. Brønsted Acid Catalysis—Structural Preferences and Mobility in Imine/Phosphoric Acid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge success of enantioselective Brønsted acid catalysis, experimental data about structures and activation modes of substrate/catalyst complexes in solution are very rare. Here, for the first time, detailed insights into the structures of imine/Brønsted acid catalyst complexes are presented on the basis of NMR data and underpinned by theoretical calculations. The chiral Brønsted acid catalyst R-TRIP (3,3′-bis(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)-1,1′-binaphthyl-2,2′-diyl hydrogen phosphate) was investigated together with six aromatic imines. For each investigated system, an E-imine/R-TRIP complex and a Z-imine/R-TRIP complex were observed. Each of these complexes consists of two structures, which are in fast exchange on the NMR time scale; i.e., overall four structures were found. Both identified E-imine/R-TRIP structures feature a strong hydrogen bond but differ in the orientation of the imine relative to the catalyst. The exchange occurs by tilting the imine inside the complex and thereby switching the oxygen that constitutes the hydrogen bond. A similar situation is observed for all investigated Z-imine/R-TRIP complexes. Here, an additional exchange pathway is opened via rotation of the imine. For all investigated imine/R-TRIP complexes, the four core structures are highly preserved. Thus, these core structures are independent of electron density and substituent modulations of the aromatic imines. Overall, this study reveals that the absolute structural space of binary imine/TRIP complexes is large and the variations of the four core structures are small. The high mobility is supposed to promote reactivity, while the preservation of the core structures in conjunction with extensive π–π and CH−π interactions leads to high enantioselectivities and tolerance of different substrates. PMID:27960345

  1. Analytical applications of condensed phosphoric acid-III Iodometric determination of sulphur after reduction of sulphate with sodium hypophosphite and either tin metal or potassium iodide in condensed phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, T; Iwahori, H; Ishii, H

    1980-06-01

    Novel methods for the reduction of sulphate to hydrogen sulphide with hypophosphite-tin metal or hypophosphite-iodide in condensed phosphoric acid (CPA) are proposed. The reduction of sulphate with hypophosphite alone does not proceed quantitatively. Sulphate, however, is quantitatively decomposed with hypophosphite when tin metal or potassium iodide is used together with it. The determination of sulphur by the hypophosphite-tin metal-CPA and tin(II)-CPA methods is interfered with by copper on account of the stabilization of copper(I) sulphide, but this interference can be eliminated by adding iodide, e.g. potassium and lead salts. Alum and barytes are quantitatively decomposed within 15 min at 140 and 280 degrees , respectively. The hydrogen sulphide evolved is absorbed in zinc acetate solution at pH 4.5 and then determined by iodometry.

  2. High temperature dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment of corn stover for furfural and ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural was produced from corn stover by one stage pretreatment process using dilute H3PO4 and solid residues following furfural production were used for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL- Y2034. A series of experiments were conducted at varied temperatures (140-200 oC) and acid ...

  3. The influence of tributyl phosphate on molybdenum extraction with solutions of dibutyl phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goletskiy, N. D.; Zilberman, B. Ya.; Fedorov, Yu. S.; Khonina, I. V.; Kukharev, D. N.

    2006-01-01

    Comparative investigations were carried out to study the influence of TBP on Mo extraction by HDBP solutions in xylene and TBP in xylene. The dependences of DMo on HNO3 concentration for both HDBP and D2EHPA have minima at about 3 mol/L HNO3. This shows similar extraction properties of HDBP and D2EHPA. The presence of TBP in the solvent results in the reduction of Mo extraction and in an increase in the formal slopes of the falling and rising parts of the logDMo — log[HNO3] curve from -0.5 and +2 up to -2 and +4. Solvent loading curves with Mo show that in the absence of TBP a molybdenum solvate with two molecules of HDBP is formed at low acidity. Anomalous increase in the maximum solvent loading in the presence of TBP is caused by the ability of TBP to extract Mo from oversaturated low acidity solutions following the acidic mechanism. A molybdenum solvate with two HDBP molecules and one HNO3 molecule is possibly formed at high acidity. A flowsheet for Mo recovery from HLW with HDBP-TBP solvent was tested in centrifugal contactors.

  4. Role of keto-enol tautomerization in a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric thiocarboxylysis of meso-epoxide: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Ajitha, Manjaly J; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2015-12-07

    The mechanism of a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed thiocarboxylysis of meso-epoxide was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations (M06-2X). The nucleophilic ring opening of epoxide by thiobenzoic acid was found to proceed via a concerted termolecular transition state with a simultaneous dual proton transfer to yield the β-hydroxy thioester product. Electrostatic interactions together with the steric environment inside the chiral catalyst play an important role in determining the enantioselectivity of the reaction.

  5. Laser Fired Local Back Contact C-Si Solar Cells Using Phosphoric Acid for Back Surface Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Nagarajan; Park, Cheolmin; Ju, Minkyu; Lee, Seunghwan; Kim, Jungmo; Chung, Sungyoun; Raja, Jayapal; Yi, Junsin

    2015-04-01

    We report on a laser doping process for the formation of a local back surface field (BSF) using phosphoric acid (H3PO4) for n-type passivated emitter rear totally diffused silicon solar cells. The sheet resistance of the BSF layer was varied by changing the H3PO4 concentration. The BSF layer was passivated using SiN x . With the passivated BSF, the LBC solar cell shows an improved open circuit voltage. A laser power of 44 mW with 10 kHz resulted in a 45-Ω/sq BSF layer with effective lifetime of 290 μs and a higher V oc of 623 mV. With the optimized laser parameters, devices with the best electrical results yielded a short circuit current density of 36 mA/cm2 and an efficiency of 18.26%.

  6. Luminescence properties of compounds of europium(III) with quinaldic acid and phosphor-containing neutral ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovskaya, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    Luminescent complex mixed-ligand compounds of europium(III) with quinaldic acid and phosphor- containing neutral ligands have been obtained. Their composition and structure have been determined. The thermal and spectral-luminescent properties of the obtained complex mixed-ligand compounds of europium( III) have been studied. It is shown that, during thermolysis, a water molecule and neutral ligand are detached in two stages with endothermic effects. It is established that quinaldinate ion is coordinated to europium(III) ion in a bidentate fashion. The Stark structure of the 5 D 0-7 F j ( j = 0, 1, 2) transitions in low-temperature luminescence spectra of complex compounds of europium(III) has been analyzed.

  7. Determination of Activity Coefficients of di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phosphoric Acid Dimer in Select Organic Solvents Using Vapor Phase Osmometry

    SciTech Connect

    Michael F. Gray; Peter Zalupski; Mikael Nilsson

    2013-08-01

    Effective models for solvent extraction require accurate characterization of the nonideality effects for each component, including the extractants. In this study, the nonideal behavior of the industrial extractant di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid has been investigated using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO). From the osmometry data, activity coefficients for the HDEHP dimer were obtained based on a formulation of the regular solution theory of Scatchard and Hildebrand, and the Margules two- and three-suffix equations. The results show similarity with a slope-analysis based relation from previous literature, although important differences are highlighted. The work points towards VPO as a useful technique for this type of study, but care must be taken with the choice of standard and method of analysis.

  8. Morphology of the diastereomeric salt of the alkaloid ephedrine and a chlorine substituted cyclic phosphoric acid (CLINAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, C. S.; Leusen, F. J. J.; Geertman, R. M.; Ariaans, G. J. A.

    1997-01-01

    The morphology of the diastereomeric salt of the alkaloid ephedrine and a chlorine substituted cyclic phosphoric acid is studied theoretically by means of a first-principles application of Hartman's PBC theory. A rigorous graph-theoretic derivation of the F slices of CLINAM and 2,4-DICLINAM has yielded all possible growth layers and their orientations. The Coulomb and Van der Waals contributions to the energy quantities characterizing CLINAM are calculated, using the Ewald formulation adjusted to lamina shapes, exactly and free from adjustable parameters. Several schemes of computing partial charges, in combination with energy minimization techniques are used for computing the atomic point charges. The structural morphology follows from the total attachment energies. The theoretical growth habit depends sensitively on the choice of the employed atomic charge scheme. The theoretical morphology of CLINAM crystals is discussed in the light of experimental results.

  9. Effect of sol aging time on the anti-reflective properties of silica coatings templated with phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wen; Li, Haibin; Chen, Xiaojing; Chang, Chengkang

    Silica anti-reflective coatings have been prepared by a sol-gel dip-coating process using the sol containing phosphoric acid as a pore-forming template. The effect of the aging time of the sol on the anti-reflective properties has been investigated. The surface topography of the silica AR coatings has been characterized. With increasing sol aging time, more over-sized pores larger than 100 nm are formed in the silica coatings. These could act as scattering centers, scattering visible light and thereby lowering transmittance. The optimal aging time was identified as 1 day, and the corresponding silica coatings showed a maximum transmittance of 99.2%, representing an 8% increase compared to the bare glass substrate.

  10. Self-Controlled Synthesis of Hyperbranched Poly(etherketone)s from A2 + B3 Approach in Poly(phosphoric acid)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    polymerization condition was indeed strong enough to effi- ciently facilitate polycondensation via ‘‘direct’’ Friedel - Crafts reaction without gelation...Keywords: Friedel - Crafts acylation; high performance polymer; hyperbranched polymer; poly(ether-ketone)s; poly(phosphoric acid) INTRODUCTION Dendritic...Hence, the applied polymerization condition was indeed strong enough to efficiently facilitate polycondensation via ??direct?? Friedel - Crafts reaction

  11. Inositol hexa phosphoric acid (phytic acid), a nutraceuticals, attenuates iron-induced oxidative stress and alleviates liver injury in iron overloaded mice.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Anwesha; Ojha, Durbadal; Goswami, Debayan; Das, Rashmi; Chandra, Nidhi S; Chatterjee, Tapan K; Chakravarty, Amit; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad

    2017-03-01

    Inositol hexa phosphoric acid (IP6) or Phytic acid, a natural antioxidant of some leguminous plants, known to act as a protective agent for seed storage in plants by suppressing iron catalyzed oxidative process. Following the same mechanism, we have tested the effect of IP6 on iron overloaded in vitro oxidative stress, and studied it's in vivo hepatoprotective ability in iron-dextran (injection)-induced iron overloaded liver injury in mice (intraperitoneal). Our results showed that IP6 had in vitro iron chelation (IC50 38.4μg/ml) activity, with the inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation (IC50 552μg/ml), and deoxyribose sugar degrading hydroxyl radicals (IC50 448.6μg/ml). Oral administration of IP6 (0-200mg/kg) revealed significant decrease in biochemical markers such as serum iron, total iron binding, serum ferritin and serum enzymes. Histopathology of liver stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Prussian blue showed reduced hepatocellular necrosis, ballooning and inflammation, indicating the restoration of normal cellular integrity. Interestingly, the IP6 was found to down-regulate the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, Interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in iron overloaded liver tissues. Thus, we provide an insight that IP6, a natural food component, can serve as an iron chelator against iron overload diseases like Thalassemia, and also as a dietary hepatoprotective supplement.

  12. Phosphoric acid loaded azo (-N═N-) based covalent organic framework for proton conduction.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suman; Kundu, Tanay; Kandambeth, Sharath; Babarao, Ravichandar; Marathe, Yogesh; Kunjir, Shrikant M; Banerjee, Rahul

    2014-05-07

    Two new chemically stable functional crystalline covalent organic frameworkds (COFs) (Tp-Azo and Tp-Stb) were synthesized using the Schiff base reaction between triformylphloroglucinol (Tp) and 4,4'-azodianiline (Azo) or 4,4'-diaminostilbene (Stb), respectively. Both COFs show the expected keto-enamine form, and high stability toward boiling water, strong acidic, and basic media. H3PO4 doping in Tp-Azo leads to immobilization of the acid within the porous framework, which facilitates proton conduction in both the hydrous (σ = 9.9 × 10(-4) S cm(-1)) and anhydrous state (σ = 6.7 × 10(-5) S cm(-1)). This report constitutes the first emergence of COFs as proton conducting materials.

  13. Radiological, chemical and morphological characterizations of phosphate rock and phosphogypsum from phosphoric acid factories in SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Vioque, Ignacio; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo

    2010-09-15

    In this work, radiological, chemical, and also morphological characterization was performed in phosphate rock and phosphogypsum samples, in order to understand the behavior of toxic elements. Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gamma spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX). Our results show that the phosphate rock was mainly composed of fluorapatite, calcite, perovskite, quartz, magnetite, pyrite and kaolinite, whereas phosphogypsum only exhibited dihydrated calcium sulfate. The activity concentration of U-series radioisotopes in phosphate rock was around 1640 Bq/kg. (226)Ra and (210)Pb tend to be distributed into phosphogypsum by up to 80%, whereas the fraction of U-isotopes is 10%. The most abundant trace elements in phosphate rock were Sr, Cr, V, Zn, Y, Ni and Ba. Some elements, such as Ba, Cd, Cu, La, Pb, Se, Sr, Th and Y, were enriched in the phosphogypsum. This enrichment may be attributed to an additional input associated to the sulfuric acid used for the phosphoric acid production. Furthermore, results from SEM-EDX demonstrated that toxic elements are not distributed homogeneously into phosphogypsum. Most of these elements are concentrated in particles <20 microm of high porosity, and could be easily mobilized by leaching and/or erosion.

  14. Optimizing available phosphorus in calcareous soils fertilized with diammonium phosphate and phosphoric acid using Freundlich adsorption isotherm.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Asif; Akhtar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Waqar

    2013-01-01

    In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P) retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA) required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were spiked with 0, 10, and 20 % CaCO3 for 15 days. Freundlich adsorption isotherms (P = aC(b/a)) were constructed, and theoretical doses of PA and DAP to develop a desired soil solution P level (i.e., 0.20 mg L(-1)) were calculated. It was observed that P adsorption in soil increased with CaCO3. Moreover, at all the levels of CaCO3, P adsorption from PA was lower compared to that from DAP in both the soils. Consequently, lesser quantity of PA was required to produce desired solution P, 0.2 mg L(-1), compared to DAP. However, extrapolating the developed relationship between soil CaCO3 contents and quantity of fertilizer to other similar textured soils needs confirmation.

  15. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide with a long-range order and tunable cell sizes by phosphoric acid anodization on pre-patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Surawathanawises, Krissada; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-20

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been explored for various applications due to its regular cell arrangement and relatively easy fabrication processes. However, conventional two-step anodization based on self-organization only allows the fabrication of a few discrete cell sizes and formation of small domains of hexagonally packed pores. Recent efforts to pre-pattern aluminum followed with anodization significantly improve the regularity and available pore geometries in AAO, while systematic study of the anodization condition, especially the impact of acid composition on pore formation guided by nanoindentation is still lacking. In this work, we pre-patterned aluminium thin films using ordered monolayers of silica beads and formed porous AAO in a single-step anodization in phosphoric acid. Controllable cell sizes ranging from 280 nm to 760 nm were obtained, matching the diameters of the silica nanobead molds used. This range of cell size is significantly greater than what has been reported for AAO formed in phosphoric acid in the literature. In addition, the relationships between the acid concentration, cell size, pore size, anodization voltage and film growth rate were studied quantitatively. The results are consistent with the theory of oxide formation through an electrochemical reaction. Not only does this study provide useful operational conditions of nanoindentation induced anodization in phosphoric acid, it also generates significant information for fundamental understanding of AAO formation.

  16. Preparation of intercalation compounds of carbon fibers through electrolysis using phosphoric acid electrolyte and their exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Masahiro; Yoshinaga, Aya; Amao, Yutaka; Takagi, Hideyuki; Soneda, Yasushi; Inagaki, Michio

    2006-05-01

    Preparation of intercalation compounds using H3PO4 electrolyte solution in mesophase-pitch-based carbon fibers successfully carried out by electrolysis in less than 10 mol/dm3 of its electrolyte solution. Structural changes with preparation of intercalation compounds of carbon fibers were confirmed by a peak appeared around 2θ=8° observed after electrolysis, which corresponds to an interlayer spacing of about 0.9 nm through XRD pattern (anticathode: Cu Kα). This new peak was reasonably supposed to be due to the intercalation into interspacing of carbon layers. Suitable synthesis condition of the intercalation compounds was determined to be the concentration of electrolyte of 5 mol/dm3 at the electrolysis. It was also confirmed by morphology changes through SEM, that is carbon fibers, which treated low electrolyte concentration synthesized the intercalation compounds easily, and then it revealed markedly morphology changes such as fibrils. It could become exfoliation as well as them treated by other acid treatment through rapid heat-treatment. The formation of graphite oxide was suggested when the kind of intercalate was analyzed with elementary and TPD analysis.

  17. 1,2-Dichlorobenzene Pretreatment via Phosphoric Acid-Mediated Fenton Reagent.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Mark D

    2015-07-01

    A large industrial water resource recovery facility needed to significantly reduce the amount of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (ODCB) entering its biological treatment units. Numerous Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were considered based on literature and industry reports. Many AOPs appear to be incompatible with some of the native species present in groundwater or wastewater matrices. Iron, in particular, is often viewed as a nuisance increasing the complexity of the overall treatment scheme. The approach used in the current study was to incorporate the new AOP into the existing groundwater matrix and facilities as much as possible. To that end, native iron was exploited as the reaction catalyst, an acid was selected to fit with current macro nutrient needs of the biotreatment units, and the reactor was designed to require minimum modification of the existing facilities. The "green chemical" (Noyori, 2003) treatment process selected was demonstrated at full-scale, achieving good agreement with the results of prior laboratory studies. Up to eighty percent destruction of ODCB was demonstrated in a new pretreatment unit whose effluent fit seamlessly with the existing bioreactors.

  18. Extraction and isolation of TPE from other elements on ion exchangers in aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-07-01

    The behavior of Am-Es and other actinides on anion and cation exchange resins in aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of phosphoric acid has been studied in a wide range of concentration of various components of the solution. The sorptivity of transplutonium elements (TPE) on anion exchangers from dilute H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ with a concentration less than or equal to 1 M in presence of organic solvents (alcohols, ketones, etc.) and on cation exchangers from concentrated H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ has been found to be significant. The possibility of use of phosphoric acid solutions for isolation of TPE from Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, and Zr and separation of TPE in different oxidation states in presence of a high-purity oxidant has been shown.

  19. Research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated in a test-bed bus. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-30

    This project, the research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated into test-bed buses, began as a multi-phase U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project in 1989. Phase I had a goal of developing two competing half-scale (25 kW) brassboard phosphoric acid fuel cell systems. An air-cooled and a liquid-cooled fuel cell system were developed and tested to verify the concept of using a fuel cell and a battery in a hybrid configuration wherein the fuel cell supplies the average power required for operating the vehicle and a battery supplies the `surge` or excess power required for acceleration and hill-climbing. Work done in Phase I determined that the liquid-cooled system offered higher efficiency.

  20. Recovery of valuable metals from waste cathode materials of spent lithium-ion batteries using mild phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Ma, Hongrui; Luo, Chuanbao; Zhou, Tao

    2017-03-15

    Sustainable recycling of valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) may be necessary to alleviate the depletion of strategic metal resources and potential risk of environmental pollution. Herein a hydrometallurgical process was proposed to explore the possibility for the recovery of valuable metals from the cathode materials (LiCoO2) of spent LIBs using phosphoric acid as both leaching and precipitating agent under mild leaching conditions. According to the leaching results, over 99% Co can be separated and recovered as Co3(PO4)2 in a short-cut process involved merely with leaching and filtrating, under the optimized leaching conditions of 40°C (T), 60min (t), 4 vol.% H2O2, 20mLg(-1) (L/S) and 0.7mol/L H3PO4. Then leaching kinetics was investigated based on the logarithmic rate kinetics model and the obtained results indicate that the leaching of Co and Li fits well with this model and the activation energies (Ea) for Co and Li are 7.3 and 10.2kJ/mol, respectively. Finally, it can be discovered from characterization results that the obtained product is 97.1% pure cobalt phosphate (Co3(PO4)2).

  1. On the Analysis of the Mössbauer Spectra of the Rust Converted by Tannic and Phosphoric Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrero, C. A.; Ríos, J. F.; Morales, A. L.; Bohórquez, A.; Pérez-Alcazar, G.

    2003-06-01

    In previous work, we reported results on the action of rust converters based on a mixture of tannic and phosphoric acids, upon the rust formed on mild steel coupons. There, the rust before and after the application of converters were characterized by room-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, among other techniques. The present work is an extension of this one, and additional MS at 77 K, 130 K and 300 K for some samples are presented. Special emphasis is given to the methodology of analysis. Our results confirm previous findings that an important portion of the magnetite remains without conversion. New information was also derived: (i) the converters seem to affect more the magnetite octahedral (B) than the tetrahedral (A) sites; (ii) among the magnetite B sites, the Fe2+ is the most affected; (iii) at least 31% of magnetic goethite at 77 K is transformed by the converter; and (iv) the presence of an additional phase identified as ferrous phosphate, could be resolved un-ambiguously only at these lower temperatures.

  2. Optimizing Phosphoric Acid plus Hydrogen Peroxide (PHP) Pretreatment on Wheat Straw by Response Surface Method for Enzymatic Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jingwen; Wang, Qing; Shen, Fei; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Yanzong; Deng, Shihuai; Zhang, Jing; Zeng, Yongmei; Song, Chun

    2017-03-01

    Wheat straw was pretreated by phosphoric acid plus hydrogen peroxide (PHP), in which temperature, time, and H3PO4 proportion for pretreatment were investigated by using response surface method. Results indicated that hemicellulose and lignin removal positively responded to the increase of pretreatment temperature, H3PO4 proportion, and time. H3PO4 proportion was the most important variable to control cellulose recovery, followed by pretreatment temperature and time. Moreover, these three variables all negatively related to cellulose recovery. Increasing H3PO4 proportion can improve enzymatic hydrolysis; however, reduction on cellulose recovery results in decrease of glucose yield. Extra high temperature or long time for pretreatment was not beneficial to enzymatic hydrolysis and glucose yield. Based on the criterion for minimizing H3PO4 usage and maximizing glucose yield, the optimized pretreatment conditions was 40 °C, 2.0 h, and H3PO4 proportion of 70.2 % (H2O2 proportion of 5.2 %), by which glucose yielded 299 mg/g wheat straw (946.2 mg/g cellulose) after 72-h enzymatic hydrolysis.

  3. Extraction of transplutionium and rare-earth elements, molybdenum and iron with zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, B. Ya.; Fedorov, Yu. S.; Shmidt, O. V.; Goletsky, N. D.; Sukhareva, S. Yu.; Puzikov, E. A.; Suglobov, D. N.; Mashirov, L. G.; Choppin, G. R.

    2003-01-01

    Zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid (ZS-HDBP) dissolved in dilute tributyl phosphate (TBP) is proposed as a solvent for separation of transplutonium and rare-earth elements (TPE, RE), including yttrium, from high-level waste in the presence of molybdenum and iron. The optimum HDBP:Zr ratio is 9 for RE and TPE extraction and is 12.5 for Mo. IR spectra indicate formation of Zr(DBP)4(HDBP)4 complex as a base of solvation. HNO3 depresses RE and TPE extraction, while Mo extraction is characterised by a minimum at 2.5 mol/L HNO3. Presence of TBP in the solvent, independently of the used diluent, leads to reduction of the distribution coefficients, but ZS-HDBP extraction capacity for the above elements is increased, as well as solubility of their solvates. Two types of complexes M(DBP)3 and MNO3(DBP)2 are formed at RE and TPE extraction by ZS-HDBP in dilute TBP. Molybdenum extraction is based both on cation exchange and on Mo solvation with HDBP as a neutral ligand. Iron extraction is formally similar to that of Mo, being influenced by the latter if both metals are present in the solution.

  4. Anodic luminescence, structural, photoluminescent, and photocatalytic properties of anodic oxide films grown on niobium in phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojadinović, Stevan; Tadić, Nenad; Radić, Nenad; Stefanov, Plamen; Grbić, Boško; Vasilić, Rastko

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on properties of oxide films obtained by anodization of niobium in phosphoric acid before and after the dielectric breakdown. Weak anodic luminescence of barrier oxide films formed during the anodization of niobium is correlated to the existence of morphological defects in the oxide layer. Small sized sparks generated by dielectric breakdown of formed oxide film cause rapid increase of luminescence intensity. The luminescence spectrum of obtained films on niobium under spark discharging is composed of continuum radiation and spectral lines caused by electronic spark discharging transitions in oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Oxide films formed before the breakdown are amorphous, while after the breakdown oxide films are partly crystalline and mainly composed of Nb2O5 hexagonal phase. The photocatalytic activity of obtained oxide films after the breakdown was investigated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange. Increase of the photocatalytic activity with time is related to an increase of oxygen vacancy defects in oxide films formed during the process. Also, higher concentration of oxygen vacancy defects in oxide films results in higher photoluminescence intensity.

  5. Development of a novel computational tool for optimizing the operation of fuel cells systems: Application for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, P. L.; Tatsis, A.; Sarimveis, H.; Markatos, N. C. G.

    Fuel cells offer a significant and promising clean technology for portable, automotive and stationary applications and, thus, optimization of their performance is of particular interest. In this study, a novel optimization tool is developed that realistically describes and optimizes the performance of fuel cell systems. First, a 3D steady-state detailed model is produced based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Simulated results obtained from the CFD model are used in a second step, to generate a database that contains the fuel and oxidant volumetric rates and utilizations and the corresponding cell voltages. In the third step mathematical relationships are developed between the input and output variables, using the database that has been generated in the previous step. In particular, the linear regression methodology and the radial basis function (RBF) neural network architecture are utilized for producing the input-output "meta-models". Several statistical tests are used to validate the proposed models. Finally, a multi-objective hierarchical Non-Linear Programming (NLP) problem is formulated that takes into account the constraints and limitations of the system. The multi-objective hierarchical approach is built upon two steps: first, the fuel volumetric rate is minimized, recognizing the fact that our first concern is to reduce consumption of the expensive fuel. In the second step, optimization is performed with respect to the oxidant volumetric rate. The proposed method is illustrated through its application for phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) systems.

  6. Ultra-sensitive detection of zinc oxide nanowires using a quartz crystal microbalance and phosphoric acid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kuewhan; You, Juneseok; Park, Chanhoo; Park, Hyunjun; Choi, Jaeyeong; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Park, Jinsung; Lee, Howon; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-09-01

    Recent advancements of nanomaterials have inspired numerous scientific and industrial applications. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) is one of the most important nanomaterials due to their extraordinary properties. However, studies performed over the past decade have reported toxicity of ZnO NWs. Therefore, there has been increasing demand for effective detection of ZnO NWs. In this study, we propose a method for the detection of ZnO NW using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and DNA probes. The detection method is based on the covalent interaction between ZnO NWs and the phosphoric acid group of single-stranded DNA (i.e., linker DNA), and DNA hybridization between the linker DNA and the probe DNA strand on the QCM electrode. Rapid, high sensitivity, in situ detection of ZnO NWs was demonstrated for the first time. The limit of detection was 10-4 μg ml-1 in deionized water, which represents a sensitivity that is 100000 times higher than the toxic ZnO NW concentration level. Moreover, the selectivity of the ZnO NW detection method was demonstrated by comparison with other types of nanowires and the method was able to detect ZnO NWs in tap water sensitively even after stored for 14 d in a refrigerator. The performance of our proposed method was sufficient to achieve detection of ZnO NW in the ‘real-world’ environment.

  7. Field assessment of treatment efficacy by three methods of phosphoric acid application in lead-contaminated urban soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, John; Mosby, David

    2006-07-31

    In situ soil treatment using phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) may be an effective remedial technology for immobilizing soil Pb and reducing Pb risk to human health and ecosystem. The treatment efficacy of three H(3)PO(4) application methods was assessed in a smelter-contaminated urban soil located in the Jasper County Superfund Site, Missouri. Soil, with an average of 3529 mg Pb kg(-1) and in the 2- by 4-m plot size, was treated with H(3)PO(4) at a rate of 10 g P kg(-1) in four replicates by each of three methods: rototilling; surface application; pressure injection. Three soil cores, 2.5-cm diameter and 30-cm long, were taken from each plot before and 90 days after treatment and analyzed for soluble P, bioaccessible Pb and solid-Pb speciation. Applications of H(3)PO(4) induced the heterogeneity of soluble P in soil, with the highest concentrations in the surface. Three application methods mixed the H(3)PO(4) more effectively in the horizontals than the verticals of treated soil zone. The H(3)PO(4) applications significantly reduced Pb bioaccessibility in the soil, which was influenced by the concentrations of soil soluble P and solid-Pb species. The risk reductions of soil Pb were achieved by formation of pyromorphites or pyromorphite-like minerals. The rototilling appears to be the most effective treatment method in context of the homogeneity of soluble P and the reduction of Pb bioaccessibility in treated soil.

  8. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical, thermal and dielectric characterization of phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 18 mm × 12 mm × 8 mm have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colorless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples has been found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the crystals. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of grown crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) has been made. The mechanical strength of the crystal was estimated by Vickers hardness test. The grown crystals were subjected to thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). The dielectric behavior of the sample was also studied.

  9. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical, thermal and dielectric characterization of phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Rose, A S J Lucia; Selvarajan, P; Perumal, S

    2011-10-15

    Phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 18 mm×12 mm×8 mm have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colorless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples has been found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the crystals. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of grown crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) has been made. The mechanical strength of the crystal was estimated by Vickers hardness test. The grown crystals were subjected to thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). The dielectric behavior of the sample was also studied.

  10. Valoniopsis pachynema Extract as a Green Inhibitor for Corrosion of Brass in 0.1 N Phosphoric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva Kumar, R.; Chandrasekaran, V.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of marine alga Valoniopsis pachynema extract on corrosion inhibition of brass in phosphoric acid was investigated by weight-loss method, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies. The inhibition efficiency is found to increase with increasing concentration of extract and decreases with rise in temperature. The activation energy, thermodynamic parameters (free energy, enthalpy, and entropy change) and kinetic parameters (rate constant and half-life) for inhibition process were calculated. These thermodynamic and kinetic parameters indicate a strong interaction between the inhibitor and the brass surface. The inhibition is assumed to occur via adsorption of inhibitor molecules on brass surface, which obeys Temkin adsorption isotherm. The adsorption of inhibitor on the brass surface is exothermic, physical, and spontaneous, and follows first-order kinetics. The polarization measurements showed that the inhibitor behaves as a mixed type inhibitor and the higher inhibition surface coverage on the brass was predicted. Inhibition efficiency values were found to show good trend with weight-loss method, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies. Surface study techniques (FT-IR and SEM) were carried out to ascertain the inhibitive nature of the algal extract on the brass surface.

  11. Low thermal budget n-type doping into Ge(001) surface using ultraviolet laser irradiation in phosphoric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kouta E-mail: kurosawa@alice.xtal.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Wakana; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Kurosawa, Masashi E-mail: kurosawa@alice.xtal.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated phosphorus (P) doping into Ge(001) surfaces by using ultraviolet laser irradiation in phosphoric acid solution at room temperature. We demonstrated that the diffusion depth of P in Ge and the concentration of electrically activated P can be controlled by the number of laser shots. Indeed, a high concentration of electrically activated P of 2.4 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} was realized by 1000-times laser shots at a laser energy of 1.0 J/cm{sup 2}, which is comparable or better than the counterparts of conventional n-type doping using a high thermal budget over 600 °C. The generation current is dominant in the reverse bias condition for the laser-doped pn-junction diodes independent on the number of laser shots, thus indicating low-damage during the pn-junction formation. These results open up the possibility for applicable low thermal budget doping process for Ge-based devices fabricated on flexible substrates as well as Si electronics.

  12. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  17. Influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on bond durability of universal adhesives and surface free-energy characteristics of enamel.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel. Three universal adhesives and extracted human molars were used. Two no-pre-etching groups were prepared: ground enamel; and enamel after ultrasonic cleaning with distilled water for 30 s to remove the smear layer. Four pre-etching groups were prepared: enamel pre-etched with phosphoric acid for 3, 5, 10, and 15 s. Shear bond strength (SBS) values of universal adhesive after no thermal cycling and after 30,000 or 60,000 thermal cycles, and surface free-energy values of enamel surfaces, calculated from contact angle measurements, were determined. The specimens that had been pre-etched showed significantly higher SBS and surface free-energy values than the specimens that had not been pre-etched, regardless of the aging condition and adhesive type. The SBS and surface free-energy values did not increase for pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. There were no significant differences in SBS values and surface free-energy characteristics between the specimens with and without a smear layer. The results of this study suggest that phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel improves the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel, but these bonding properties do not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times of longer than 3 s.

  18. Chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed highly enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction of C3-substituted indoles to β,γ-unsaturated α-ketimino esters.

    PubMed

    Bi, Bo; Lou, Qin-Xin; Ding, Yu-Yang; Chen, Sheng-Wei; Zhang, Sha-Sha; Hu, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Jun-Ling

    2015-02-06

    A highly enantioselective C2 Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction of 3-substituted indoles to β,γ-unsaturated α-ketimino esters has been developed. This reaction was efficiently catalyzed by a chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. The corresponding C2-substituted indole derivatives, bearing an α-ketimino ester motif, were obtained in moderate to high yields (up to 93%) and with high enantioselectivities (up to >99% ee).

  19. Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Nitroso-Diels-Alder Reaction of 1,3-Diene-1-carbamates Catalyzed by Chiral Phosphoric Acids.

    PubMed

    Pous, Jonathan; Courant, Thibaut; Bernadat, Guillaume; Iorga, Bogdan I; Blanchard, Florent; Masson, Géraldine

    2015-09-23

    Chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric nitroso-Diels-Alder reaction of nitrosoarenes with carbamate-dienes afforded cis-3,6-disubstituted dihydro-1,2-oxazines in high yields with excellent regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivities. Interestingly, we observed that the catalyst is able not only to control the enantioselectivity but also to reverse the regioselectivity of the noncatalyzed nitroso-Diels-Alder reaction. The regiochemistry reversal and asynchronous concerted mechanism were confirmed by DFT calculations.

  20. Usage of Dibutyl Phosphoric Acid and Its Zirconium Salt for Extraction of Transplutonium Elements and Rare Earths with Their Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Zilberman, B.Ya.; Fedorov, Yu.S.; Shmidt, O.V.; Goletskiy, N.D.; Shishkin, D.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Rodionov, S.A.; Egorova, O.N.; Palenik, Yu.V.

    2007-07-01

    Dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP) formed by tributyl phosphate (TBP) destruction is soluble both in aqueous alkaline solutions and in organic solvents in acidic media. So, the solvent based on HDBP and its zirconium salt (ZS-HDBP) dissolved in polar diluent, e.g. in diluted TBP, is interesting for radwaste treatment, minimizing the amount of secondary organic wastes. Addition of Zr to 0.2 mol/L HDBP dissolved in 30% TBP results in successful extraction of lanthanides and actinides at the optimum ratio Zr:HDBP=1:(8-9) from 1.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, followed by their back-washing with 5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. Partitioning of yttrium and cerium RE subgroups (the latter together with TPE) with the separation factor from 5 to 50 is also possible with purification from molybdenum. Strontium is extracted by 0.4 mol/L ZS HDBP from 0.3 mol/L HNO{sub 3} and stripped with 1.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. ZS-HDBP solution in 30% TBP is also capable of extraction of residual Np, Pu and corrosion-born iron. Stripping of these elements requires salt-free complexants. Solvents containing ZS-HDBP have high capacity, while TBP presence doubles it because of synergetic effect. The maximum solvent loading of 0.2 mol/L ZSHDBP in xylene was found as 8.0 g/L Eu and {approx}6 g/L Mo. The mixture of DTPA and formic acid is suitable for TPE/RE partitioning using ZS-HDBP as a solvent with separation factors for Ce/Am and Eu/Am of 67 and 9, respectively. Two variants of two-cycle flowsheet for TPE and RE partitioning after their joint recovery have been proposed, which differs by order of the cycles with acidic and buffer media at the partitioning. Both variants were successfully tested using simulate solutions on the centrifugal contactor rig with TPE/RE separation factor being {approx}60, the major impurity being Nd. Correction of the solvent composition because of HDBP loss due to its solubility in aqueous phase, especially at acidity less than 0.2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, was also taken into consideration. Further

  1. Removal of arsenic and cadmium with sequential soil washing techniques using Na2EDTA, oxalic and phosphoric acid: Optimization conditions, removal effectiveness and ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meng; Chen, Jiajun; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-08-01

    Testing of sequential soil washing in triplicate using typical chelating agent (Na2EDTA), organic acid (oxalic acid) and inorganic weak acid (phosphoric acid) was conducted to remediate soil contaminated by heavy metals close to a mining area. The aim of the testing was to improve removal efficiency and reduce mobility of heavy metals. The sequential extraction procedure and further speciation analysis of heavy metals demonstrated that the primary components of arsenic and cadmium in the soil were residual As (O-As) and exchangeable fraction, which accounted for 60% and 70% of total arsenic and cadmium, respectively. It was determined that soil washing agents and their washing order were critical to removal efficiencies of metal fractions, metal bioavailability and potential mobility due to different levels of dissolution of residual fractions and inter-transformation of metal fractions. The optimal soil washing option for arsenic and cadmium was identified as phosphoric-oxalic acid-Na2EDTA sequence (POE) based on the high removal efficiency (41.9% for arsenic and 89.6% for cadmium) and the minimal harmful effects of the mobility and bioavailability of the remaining heavy metals.

  2. Effects of phosphoric acid sprayed into an incinerator furnace on the flue gas pressure drop at fabric filters.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Hwang, In-Hee; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Fabric filters are widely used to remove dust from flue gas generated by waste incineration. However, a pressure drop occurs at the filters, caused by growth of a dust layer on the filter fabric despite regular cleaning by pulsed-jet air. The pressure drop at the fabric filters leads to energy consumption at induced draft fan to keep the incinerator on negative pressure, so that its proper control is important to operate incineration facility efficiently. The pressure drop at fabric filters decreased whenever phosphoric acid wastewater (PAW) was sprayed into an incinerator for treating industrial waste. Operational data obtained from the incineration facility were analyzed to determine the short- and long-term effects of PAW spraying on the pressure drop. For the short-term effect, it was confirmed that the pressure drop at the fabric filters always decreased to 0.3-1.2kPa within about 5h after spraying PAW. This effect was expected to be obtained by about one third of present PAW spraying amount. However, from the long-term perspective, the pressure drop showed an increase in the periods of PAW spraying compared with periods for which PAW spraying was not performed. The pressure drop increase was particularly noticeable after the initial PAW spraying, regardless of the age and type of fabric filters used. These results suggest that present PAW spraying causes a temporary pressure drop reduction, leading to short-term energy consumption savings; however, it also causes an increase of the pressure drop over the long-term, degrading the overall operating conditions. Thus, appropriate PAW spraying conditions are needed to make effective use of PAW to reduce the pressure drop at fabric filters from a short- and long-term point of view.

  3. Effect of the application time of phosphoric acid and self-etch adhesive systems to sclerotic dentin

    PubMed Central

    MENA-SERRANO, Alexandra Patricia; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; PEREZ, Miguel Muñoz; MARTINS, Gislaine Cristine; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; REIS, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of application time on the resin-dentin bond strength (µTBS) and etching pattern of adhesive systems applied on sclerotic dentine. Material and Methods: A total of forty-two bovine incisors had their roots removed. The 1-step self-etch GO (SDI), the 2-step self-etch Adper SE Bond (3MESPE) and the 35% phosphoric acid (3MESPE) from the 2-step etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 (3MESPE) were applied on the bovine incisal surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions or duplicating the recommended conditioning time. After adhesive application, thirty teeth were restored with composite resin, stored for 24 h in distilled water at 37º C, and sectioned into resin-dentin bonded sticks (0.8 mm2) and tested according to the µTBS at 0.5 mm/min. The etching pattern of the remaining twelve teeth (n=4 for each material) was examined under scanning electron microscopy. Each tooth was divided into a buccal-to-lingual direction into three thirds, and each third randomly assigned to the groups: control (no treatment), according to the manufacturers' instructions and duplicating the recommended application time. The µTBS and the relative percentage of the tubule area opening were evaluated by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Results: The duplication of the conditioning time favored only the GO adhesive (p<0.05). Both application methods significantly increased the tubule area opening (p<0.05) compared to the controls. Conclusions: The efficacy of duplicating the conditioning time was only effective for the 1-step self-etch adhesive system tested. PMID:23739856

  4. Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, S

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  5. Grafting of 4-(2,4,6-Trimethylphenoxy)benzoyl onto Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Poly(phosphoric acid) via Amide Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sang-Wook; Oh, Se-Jin; Tan, Loon-Seng; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2009-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), which were commercial grade containing 60-70 wt% impurity, were treated in a mild poly(phosphoric acid) (PPA). The purity of PPA treated SWCNTs was greatly improved with or without little damage to SWCNTs framework and stable crystalline carbon particles. An amide model compound, 4-(2,4,6-trimethylphenoxy)benzamide (TMPBA), was reacted with SWCNTs in PPA with additional phosphorous pentoxide as “direct” Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction to afford TMPBA functionalized SWCNTs. All evidences obtained from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microcopy, and transmission electron microscopy strongly supported that the functionalization of SWCNTs with benzamide was indeed feasible.

  6. Mechanistic investigation of the influence of phosphoric and boric acids in the formation of homogeneous Ni-P/ZnO@SiO2 coatings.

    PubMed

    Sharifalhoseini, Zahra; Entezari, Mohammad H; Shahidi, Mohsen

    2016-02-15

    High agglomeration of the nanoparticles and low volume fraction of nanosized inert particles within the nanocomposite thin films are found as the practical problems. In our previous work, silica coated ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO@SiO2 NPs) were synthesized to prevent dissolution of the ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in the electrolytic Ni bath. The high agglomeration of these core-shell particles led to an unequal particle distribution in the deposit matrix. In this work, we aimed to prepare a highly homogeneous nanocomposite coating by stabilizing the nanoparticles in the medium. Adding the buffering agents, including phosphoric and boric acids to the medium, disclosed their new aspect of these inorganic acids in the prevention of particle agglomeration. The corrosion study of the resulting well-dispersed Ni-P/Zn@SiO2 nanocomposite coating confirmed a significant increase in anticorrosion performance. This increase was about 2.3 times compared to the previously prepared coating. Moreover, the probable mechanisms of phosphoric and boric acids in particle stability through the steric or/and electrostatic repulsion at the interfaces between the colloidal nanoparticles (ZnO@SiO2 NPs) and the electrolyte solution were investigated in detail.

  7. Determination of Water Vapor Pressure Over Corrosive Chemicals Versus Temperature Using Raman Spectroscopy as Exemplified with 85.5% Phosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Marion; Li, Qingfeng; Berg, Rolf Willestofte; Bjerrum, Niels Janniksen

    2016-07-01

    A method to determine the water vapor pressure over a corrosive substance was developed and tested with 85.5 ± 0.4% phosphoric acid. The water vapor pressure was obtained at a range of temperatures from ∼25 ℃ to ∼200 ℃ using Raman spectrometry. The acid was placed in an ampoule and sealed with a reference gas (either hydrogen or methane) at a known pressure (typically ∼0.5 bar). By comparing the Raman signals from the water vapor and the references, the water pressure was determined as a function of temperature. A considerable amount of data on the vapor pressure of phosphoric acid are available in the literature, to which our results could successfully be compared. A record value of the vapor pressure, 3.40 bar, was determined at 210 ℃. The method required a determination of the precise Raman scattering ratios between the substance, water, and the used reference gas, hydrogen or methane. In our case the scattering ratios between water and reference ν1 Q-branches were found to be 1.20 ± 0.03 and 0.40 ± 0.02 for H2 and CH4, respectively.

  8. Changes in mobility of toxic elements during the production of phosphoric acid in the fertilizer industry of Huelva (SW Spain) and environmental impact of phosphogypsum wastes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Alvarez-Valero, Antonio M; Nieto, José Miguel

    2007-09-30

    Presently, about 3 million tonnes of phosphogypsum are being generated annually in Spain as by-product from phosphoric acid in a fertilizer factory located in Huelva (southwestern Iberian Peninsula). Phosphate rock from Morocco is used as raw material in this process. Phosphogypsum wastes are stored in a stack containing 100Mt (approximately 1200ha of surface) over salt marshes of an estuary formed by the confluence of the Tinto and Odiel rivers, less than 1km away from the city centre. A very low proportion of this waste is used to improve fertility of agricultural soils in the area of the Guadalquivir river valley (Seville, SW Spain). The chemical speciation of potentially toxic elements (Ba, Cd, Cu, Ni, Sr, U and Zn) in phosphogypsum and phosphate rock was performed using the modified BCR-sequential extraction procedure, as described by the European Community Bureau of Reference (1999). This study has been done with the main of: (1) evaluate changes in the mobility of metals during the production of phosphoric acid; (2) estimate the amount of mobile metals that can affect the environmental surrounding; and (3) verify the environmentally safe use of phosphogypsum as an amendment to agricultural soils. The main environmental concern associated to phosphoric acid production is that Uranium, a radiotoxic element, is transferred from the non-mobile fraction in the phosphate rock to the bioavailable fraction in phosphogypsum in a rate of 23%. Around 21% of Ba, 6% of Cu and Sr, 5% of Cd and Ni, and 2% of Zn are also contained in the water-soluble phase of the final waste. Considering the total mass of phosphogypsum, the amount of metals easily soluble in water is approximately 6178, 3089, 1931, 579, 232, 193 and 77t for Sr, U, Ba, Zn, Ni, Cu and Cd, respectively. This gives an idea of the pollution potential of this waste.

  9. Effect of self-etching primer vs phosphoric acid etchant on bonding to bur-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, M; Harada, N; Yamaguchi, S; Nakajima, M; Tagami, J

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin conditioner on tensile bond strength to dentin prepared with different types of burs. A self-etching primer system, Mac-Bond II (MB, Tokuyama Dental) and a phosphoric acid etching system, Single Bond (SB, 3M) were used for conditioning. Twenty-four extracted intact human molars were ground flat to expose occlusal dentin. After the dentin surfaces were polished with #600 SiC paper, the teeth were randomly divided into a control group and three experimental groups according to the bur grits used: #600 SiC paper only as the control, fine cut steel bur (SB600), crosscut steel bur (SB703) and regular grit diamond bur (DB) mounted in a dental handpiece utilizing water cooling. The dentin surfaces were treated with one of two adhesive systems, then composite buildups were done with Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical). After soaking the bond specimens for 24 hours in 37 degrees C water, multiple vertical serial sections (0.7 mm thick, 7-8 slices per one tooth) were made, trimmed to form an hour-glass shape with a 1.0 mm2 cross-section and tensile bond strengths were determined at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Statistical analysis was made using one and two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test (p<0.05). Six additional molars were used for SEM observations of the dentin surfaces of each group before and after treatment with the self-etching primer of MB, and another four teeth were used to observe the resin-dentin interface of each group of SB. Using MB, the DB group produced the lowest tensile bond strength (TBS) among the groups that received bur preparation, and there were no statistical differences among SB600, SB703 and the control. For SB, the TBS of SB703 was the highest, and there were no statistical differences among the other groups and the control. The influence of the method used to prepare dentin for micro-tensile bond strength testing was dependent on the adhesive system used.

  10. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  11. Measurement and modeling of density and viscosity of n-octanol-kerosene-phosphoric acid solutions in a temperature range 293.15-333.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Changwen; Pei, Xiangjun; Liu, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Densities and viscosities have been measured for the n-octanol + aviation kerosene (AK) + phosphoric acid (H3PO4) system with the mass fraction of H3PO4 in the range from w = 0 to 0.26 and in the temperature of 293.15-333.15 K. According to the experimental data, the measured viscosities were found well correlated with the temperature and mass fraction of H3PO4, which were fitted to regression equations. The result shows that the dilution effect of AK is obvious under the same temperature and mass fraction of H3PO4.

  12. A new oxidimetric reagent: potassium dichromate in a strong phosphoric acid medium--VII. Photometric titration of vanadium(IV) and of cerium(III) alone and in mixtures with iroN(II).

    PubMed

    Rao, G G; Rao, P K

    1967-01-01

    Vanadium(IV) can be accurately titrated with potassium dichromate in media containing phosphoric acid of 3-12M concentration: the change in absorption of vanadium(IV) is followed in the region 660 mmicro using a red filter. It is more convenient to carry out the titration in 3M phosphoric acid because at higher concentrations chloride, nitrate, cerium(III) and manganese(II) may interfere. Photoelcetric titration is more convenient than potentiometric because the former can be made in a 3M phosphoric acid medium, whereas the latter is possible only in 12M phosphoric acid. The simultaneous differential photometric titration of iron(II) and vanadium(IV) is also possible. Conditions have been found for the photometric titration of cerium(III) and of cerium(III) plus iron(II). The titration is carried out (at 450 mmicro or with a blue filter) in about 10.5M phosphoric acid. Application of the method to a cerium mineral is considered.

  13. Oxidations of organic matter present in the phosphoric acid 54% by the ozone: characterization of groups carbonyls upstream and downstream of the ozonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linda, D.; Louati, A.; Chtara, C.; Kabadou, A.

    2012-02-01

    This study was focused on the oxidation of organic matter in phosphoric acid 54% by ozone. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in this process, the identification of this matter upstream and downstream of the ozonation was necessary. For the identification, after an extraction by a mixture (dichloro-methanol), the organic phase was divided into two parts: the residue and the extract:-The residue was studied by infrared spectroscopy Fourier Transform (IR-TF). It contains Kérogène which is a mixture of saturated hydrocarbons with high molecular weights. The absorption bands of the FT-IR showed that the residue contains also quantities of amino that correspond to the remains of dinoflagellate cysts, which are abundant in sediments.-The extract has been the subject of a detailed study by, chromatography on silica column, IR-TF spectroscopy and CG-SM. The passage of this extract on a silica column yielded two fractions (saturated fraction and polar fraction). Both of these fractions were analyzed by CG-SM. The yield of the reduction of the organic matter content in the phosphoric acid 54% could not exceed 29%. Therefore, we can conclude that the reduction in the rate of organic matter remains limited by the fact that some compounds are inert towards ozone.

  14. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of H-bonding and proton transfer in the phosphoric acid-N,N-Dimethylformamide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, Irina V.; Krestyaninov, Michael A.; Safonova, Lyubov P.

    2016-09-01

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations of phosphoric acid (H3PO4)-N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) mixtures over the whole composition range have been carried out. It has been found that the neutral molecules are the dominant species in this system. The concentration dependences of the average number of H-bonds per proton acceptor atom in P=O and C=O groups as well as per proton donor atom in DMFH+ ions towards phosphate species have been discussed. The H-bonding between components in all investigated mixtures of H3PO4 and DMF is possible. A significant fraction of the protonated DMF forms appears at phosphoric acid mole fraction higher than 0.37, indicating a high probability of proton transfer from phosphate species to oxygen atoms in C=O groups. The intermolecular proton transfer between phosphate species themselves is mainly observed when xH3PO4 > 0.19. Satisfactory agreement with available experimental data for structural characteristics of the investigated system was obtained.

  15. Impact of the substrate loading regime and phosphoric acid supplementation on performance of biogas reactors and microbial community dynamics during anaerobic digestion of chicken wastes.

    PubMed

    Belostotskiy, Dmitry E; Ziganshina, Elvira E; Siniagina, Maria; Boulygina, Eugenia A; Miluykov, Vasili A; Ziganshin, Ayrat M

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the effects of increasing organic loading rate (OLR) and decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) as well as phosphoric acid addition on mesophilic reactors' performance and biogas production from chicken wastes. Furthermore, microbial community composition in reactors was characterized by a 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing analysis. Each step of increasing OLR impacted on the activity of microorganisms what caused a temporary decrease in biogas production. The addition of phosphoric acid resulted in the increased biogas production with values between 361 and 447 mL g(VS)(-1) from day 61 to day 74 compared to control reactor (309-350 mL g(VS)(-1)). With reactors' operation, Bacteroidetes phylotypes were noticeably replaced with Firmicutes representatives, and significant increase of Clostridium sp. was identified. Within Euryarchaeota, Methanosarcina sp. dominated in all analyzed samples, in which high ammonium levels were detected (3.4-4.9 NH4(+)-N g L(-1)). These results can help in better understanding the anaerobic digestion process of simultaneously ammonium/phosphate-rich substrates.

  16. [Validation study on a multi-residue analysis of pesticides in agricultural products by using phosphoric acid treatment and GC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Makabe, Yuhki; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Tomoko; Aikawa, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method for multi-residue determination of pesticides in agricultural products was validated. The sample was cut into pieces and placed into a mixer cup containing half weight amount of 10% phosphoric acid in order to suppress degradation of easily degraded pesticides, represented by captan, and then homogenized. Pesticides in the phosphoric acid-treated sample were extracted with acetonitrile using a homogenizer, followed by salting out with anhydrous magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride. The extract was cleaned up on a C18 and graphite carbon black/PSA mini-cartridge column. Some pesticides gave tailing peaks, but these peaks became sharp and symmetrical when polyethylene glycol (PEG) 300 was added to the test solution. Recovery tests were performed on nine kinds of agricultural products (brown rice, soybean, spinach, cabbage, potato, orange, apple, strawberry, and Japanese pear) fortified with 170 pesticides at 0.01 and 0.1 μg/g. Each concentration of pesticide residue was extracted from 2 samples on 5 separate days. The trueness of the method for 147-164 pesticides in each sample was 70-120% with satisfactory repeatability and within-run reproducibility. This method is expected to useful for multi-residue analysis of pesticides in agricultural products.

  17. Effect of cavity preparation method on microtensile bond strength of a self-etching primer vs phosphoric acid etchant to enamel.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine; Delfino, Carina Sinclér; Ciccone-Nogueira, Juliane Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2007-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cavity preparation using air abrasion or carbide bur on bond strength to enamel treated with a self-etching primer (Tyrian SPE) or a phosphoric acid etchant. Twenty-four molars were divided into three groups: high-speed; standard handpiece (ST air abrasion) or supersonic handpiece (SP air abrasion) of the same air-abrasive system. The enamel surfaces were treated with one of the two etchants and the same adhesive agent One Step Plus, and then composite buildups were done with Filtek Z250. After 24 h at 37 degrees C, beams (0.8 mm2) were obtained and subjected to tensile stress in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). For the conditioning agents, it was observed that the specimens conditioned with phosphoric acid presented superior results than the specimens that used Tyrian SPE. For the preparation techniques, it was verified that the SP air abrasion groups showed the highest bond strengths and carbide-bur groups presented the lowest bond strengths when the specimens were conditioned with Tyrian SPE. It can be concluded that the influence of the cavity preparation method was dependent on the conditioning system used, only when using carbide-bur preparation technique.

  18. Mechanistic investigation of chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric Baeyer-Villiger reaction of 3-substituted cyclobutanones with H2O2 as the oxidant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Senmiao; Wang, Zheng; Li, Yuxue; Zhang, Xumu; Wang, Haiming; Ding, Kuiling

    2010-03-08

    The mechanism of the chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger (B-V) reaction of cyclobutanones with hydrogen peroxide was investigated by using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Of the two pathways that have been proposed for the present reaction, the pathway involving a peroxyphosphate intermediate is not viable. The reaction progress kinetic analysis indicates that the reaction is partially inhibited by the gamma-lactone product. Initial rate measurements suggest that the reaction follows Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics consistent with a bifunctional mechanism in which the catalyst is actively involved in both carbonyl addition and the subsequent rearrangement steps through hydrogen-bonding interactions with the reactants or the intermediate. High-level quantum chemical calculations strongly support a two-step concerted mechanism in which the phosphoric acid activates the reactants or the intermediate in a synergistic manner through partial proton transfer. The catalyst simultaneously acts as a general acid, by increasing the electrophilicity of the carbonyl carbon, increases the nucleophilicity of hydrogen peroxide as a Lewis base in the addition step, and facilitates the dissociation of the OH group from the Criegee intermediate in the rearrangement step. The overall reaction is highly exothermic, and the rearrangement of the Criegee intermediate is the rate-determining step. The observed reactivity of this catalytic B-V reaction also results, in part, from the ring strain in cyclobutanones. The sense of chiral induction is rationalized by the analysis of the relative energies of the competing diastereomeric transition states, in which the steric repulsion between the 3-substituent of the cyclobutanone and the 3- and 3'-substituents of the catalyst, as well as the entropy and solvent effects, are found to be critically important.

  19. Improved wet bonding of methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butylborane resin to dentin etched with ten percent phosphoric acid in the presence of ferric ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Toida, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of dissolved dentinal substances in demineralized dentin on the hybridization of resin for bonding to dentin. It was hypothesized that these substances, including polyelectrolytes, significantly change the substrates, which could then be assessed by the addition of Na(+), Ca(2+), or Fe(3+) in 10% phosphoric acid. Bovine dentin specimens were etched for 10 s with a solution of 10% phosphoric acid (control) or of 22.0 mM dissolved sodium chloride (10P-Na), calcium chloride (10P-Ca), or ferric chloride (10P-Fe). The specimens were then rinsed, blot-dried, and primed three times with 5% 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride in acetone for 60 s. Methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butylborane resin was then applied. The tensile bond strength of each of the dumbbell-shaped specimens was then measured. The fractured surfaces and modified cross-sections were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The cross-sections were soaked in 6N HCl for 10 s and then in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min to determine the resin content in the hybridized specimens. Shrinkage of the demineralized dentins upon drying was assessed by atomic force microscopy. The tensile bond strengths were 10.8 +/- 4.5 (control), 15.0 +/- 7.0 (10P-Na), 19.3 +/- 5.5 (10P-Ca), and 27.8 +/- 8.1 (10P-Fe) MPa. The atomic force microscopy studies showed that Fe(3+) minimized the shrinkage by drying for 10 s but Ca(2+) and Na(+) did not decrease the shrinkage the same as the control. The results support the hypothesis that the monomer permeability of wet demineralized dentin is effectively improved by dissolving ferric ions in the phosphoric acid, resulting in a greater bond strength and higher resin content in the hybridized dentin. The dissolved dentinal substances, including the polyelectrolytes, had a significant influence on the characteristics of the demineralized dentin, changing the degree of hybridization and bonding.

  20. Synergistic extraction equilibrium of gallium(III) with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid and 8-quinolinol derivatives into supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akira; Kawashima, Natsumi; Sato, Kazuaki; Kim, Haeng-Boo

    2013-01-01

    The synergistic effect of five 8-quinolinol derivatives (HQs) on the extraction of gallium(III) with di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA or HA) from weak nitric acid into supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) was investigated. 8-Quinolinol (Hq), 5-ethoxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(2)q), 5-hexyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(6)q), 5-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxymethyl)-8-quinolinol (HFO(2)q), and 5-chloro-8-quinolinol (5-Cl-Hq) were used as synergists. Synergism was observed for all of the HQs. The synergistic effect increased in the following order: Hq < HO(2)q < HFO(2)q < 5-Cl-Hq ≍ HO(6)q. The extent of synergism can be related to both the distribution constant and the acid dissociation constant of the HQ. The synergistic extraction equilibrium of gallium(III) with D2EHPA and 5-Cl-Hq into SC-CO(2) was investigated; the results suggest that the composition of the extracted complex is as GaA(2)Q·HA. The synergistic extraction mechanism was the same for both SC-CO(2) and n-heptane. The synergistic extraction equilibrium constants in both cases were calculated based on the experimental results.

  1. Combining octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid extractants for recovering transuranic elements from irradiated nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Gelis, Artem V.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2009-10-14

    Advanced concepts for closing the nuclear fuel cycle include separating Am and Cm from other fuel components. Separating these elements from the lanthanide elements at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge. We describe here a chemical system in which a neutral extractant--octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO)--is combined with an acidic extractant--bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP)--to form a single process solvent (with dodecane as the diluent) for separating Am and Cm from the other components of irradiated nuclear fuel. Continuous variation experiments in which the relative CMPO and HDEHP concentrations are varied indicate a synergistic relationship between the two extractants in the extraction of Am from buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solutions. A solvent mixture consisting or 0.1 M CMPO + 1 M HDEHP in dodecane offers acceptable extraction efficiency for the trivalent lanthanides and actinides from 1 M HNO3 while maintaining good lanthanide/actinide separation factors in the stripping regime (buffered DTPA solutions with pH 3.5 to 4). Using citrate buffer instead of lactate buffer results in improved lanthanide/actinide separation factors.

  2. Response surface optimization of corn stover pretreatment using dilute phosphoric acid for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ayse; Saha, Badal C; Dien, Bruce S; Kennedy, Gregory J; Cotta, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    Dilute H(3)PO(4) (0.0-2.0%, v/v) was used to pretreat corn stover (10%, w/w) for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment conditions were optimized for temperature, acid loading, and time using central composite design. Optimal pretreatment conditions were chosen to promote sugar yields following enzymatic digestion while minimizing formation of furans, which are potent inhibitors of fermentation. The maximum glucose yield (85%) was obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover pretreated with 0.5% (v/v) acid at 180°C for 15min while highest yield for xylose (91.4%) was observed from corn stover pretreated with 1% (v/v) acid at 160°C for 10min. About 26.4±0.1g ethanol was produced per L by recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5 from 55.1±1.0g sugars generated from enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover (10%, w/w) pretreated under a balanced optimized condition (161.81°C, 0.78% acid, 9.78min) where only 0.4±0.0g furfural and 0.1±0.0 hydroxylmethyl furfural were produced.

  3. ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING A PHOSPHORIC ACID FUEL CELL ON A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL GAS STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phorsphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Th...

  4. Response surface optimization of corn stover pretreatment using dilute phosphoric acid for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dilute H3PO4 (0.0 - 2.0%, v/v) was used to pretreat corn stover (10%, w/w) for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment conditions were optimized for temperature, acid loading, and time using a central composite design. Optimal pretreatment conditions were chosen to promote sugar yields following enzym...

  5. The effect of ethoxyquin on the quality of ground poultry mortality carcasses preserved by lactic acid fermentation and phosphoric acid stabilization.

    PubMed

    Middleton, T F; Ferket, P R; Boyd, L C

    2001-08-01

    Fermentation and acidification have been shown to preserve the protein quality of ground poultry coproducts, but the effects of these processes on their lipid stability are unknown, especially in the presence of an antioxidant. To evaluate the effects of these treatments on lipid quality, ground poultry mortality carcasses, with and without an addition of 500 ppm ethoxyquin, were stabilized for 14 and 45 d by lactic acid fermentation or acidification with 2.76, 5.07, 7.35, or 9.65% feed-grade H3PO4. Ethoxyquin treatment significantly (P < 0.001) improved the oxidative stability of lipids from all storage treatments. However, the addition of ethoxyquin increased (P < 0.001) the levels of volatile N (VN) from 2.51 to 3.18% in products stored for 45 d and resulted in an increase (P < 0.001) in free fatty acids in all ensiled products. Ethoxyquin addition had no effect (P > 0.120) on the fatty acid profile of products stored for 14 d but significantly increased (P < 0.001) the levels of stearic (C18:0) and arachidonic acids (C20:4) in products stored for 45 d. In this experiment, the addition of ethoxyquin to preservation systems for the short-term storage of poultry mortality carcasses improved the lipid quality of the ground material without compromising the protein quality or affecting proximate analysis parameters. However, the increased oxidative stability of mortality silage materials that contain ethoxyquin may contribute to enhanced microbial or enzymatic activities that result in proteolytic or lypolytic breakdown products following longer periods of storage.

  6. Ethanol production from glucose and xylose obtained from steam exploded water-extracted olive tree pruning using phosphoric acid as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Negro, M J; Alvarez, C; Ballesteros, I; Romero, I; Ballesteros, M; Castro, E; Manzanares, P; Moya, M; Oliva, J M

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the effect of phosphoric acid (1% w/w) in steam explosion pretreatment of water extracted olive tree pruning at 175°C and 195°C was evaluated. The objective is to produce ethanol from all sugars (mainly glucose and xylose) contained in the pretreated material. The water insoluble fraction obtained after pretreatment was used as substrate in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process by a commercial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The liquid fraction, containing mainly xylose, was detoxified by alkali and ion-exchange resin and then fermented by the xylose fermenting yeast Scheffersomyces stipitis. Ethanol yields reached in a SSF process were close to 80% when using 15% (w/w) substrate consistency and about 70% of theoretical when using prehydrolysates detoxified by ion-exchange resins. Considering sugars recovery and ethanol yields about 160g of ethanol from kg of water extracted olive tree pruning could be obtained.

  7. Solid phase extraction of zinc(II) using a PVC-based polymer inclusion membrane with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as the carrier.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Spas D; Baba, Yoshinari; Cattrall, Robert W; Tasaki, Tsutomu; Pereira, Natalie; Perera, Jilska M; Stevens, Geoffrey W

    2009-05-15

    A polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) is reported consisting of 45% (m/m) di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) immobilized in poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) for use as a solid phase absorbent for selectively extracting Zn(II) from aqueous solutions in the presence of Cd(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Fe(II). Interference from Fe(III) in the sample is eliminated by precipitation with orthophosphate prior to the extraction of Zn(II). Studies using a dual compartment transport cell have shown that the Zn(II) flux (2.58 x 10(-6)mol m(-2)s(-1)) is comparable to that observed for supported liquid membranes. The stoichiometry of the extracted complex is shown to be ZnR(2).HR, where R is the D2EHPA anion.

  8. Isolation and structural characterization of sugarcane bagasse lignin after dilute phosphoric acid plus steam explosion pretreatment and its effect on cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jijiao; Tong, Zhaohui; Wang, Letian; Zhu, J Y; Ingram, Lonnie

    2014-02-01

    The structure of lignin after dilute phosphoric acid plus steam explosion pretreatment process of sugarcane bagasse in a pilot scale and the effect of the lignin extracted by ethanol on subsequent cellulose hydrolysis were investigated. The lignin structural changes caused by pretreatment were identified using advanced nondestructive techniques such as gel permeation chromatography (GPC), quantitative (13)C, and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The structural analysis revealed that ethanol extractable lignin preserved basic lignin structure, but had relatively lower amount of β-O-4 linkages, syringyl/guaiacyl units ratio (S/G), p-coumarate/ferulate ratio, and other ending structures. The results also indicated that approximately 8% of mass weight was extracted by pure ethanol. The bagasse after ethanol extraction had an approximate 22% higher glucose yield after enzyme hydrolysis compared to pretreated bagasse without extraction.

  9. Growth of thin, c-axis oriented Sr-doped LaP3O9 electrolyte membranes in condensed phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatada, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Kota; Adachi, Yoshinobu; Uda, Tetsuya

    2016-08-01

    Proton-conducting Sr-doped LaP3O9 has potential application as electrolytes in intermediate temperature fuel cells, but reduction of the electrical resistance of the electrolyte membranes is necessary for practical applications. In this study, we focused on reducing the resistance by reducing the electrolyte thickness, while maintaining a preferable microstructure for proton conduction (c-axis orientation and absence of the small-crystal layer). Thin, c-axis oriented Sr-doped LaP3O9 membranes were successfully obtained in condensed phosphoric acid solutions by a novel "two-step precipitation method". In this method, Sr-doped LaP3O9 powder was artificially deposited on the surface of the carbon paper supports as seeds, and then columnar crystals were grown "downward" in the solutions. We expect that this method will be utilized to produce LaP3O9 electrolyte membranes with lower electrical resistance.

  10. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES, MECHANICAL TESTING, AND GEL MORPHOLOGY STUDY OF PHOSPHORIC ACID-DOPED META-POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES VIA CONVENTIONALLY IMBIBING AND THE SOL-GEL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Kelly A; More, Karren Leslie; Benicewicz, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) research has been directed at phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes since the 1990s. PEM fuel cells based on PA-doped PBI membranes produced via a sol-gel transition process have achieved lifetimes >10,000hrs with low degradation rates. It has been suggested that the gel morphology of the PA-doped PBI membranes is responsible for their excellent electrochemical performance. Thus, a study has been underway to characterize the microstructure of PA-doped PBI membranes, and to correlate structure with performance. However, PA-doped PBI membranes present special challenges for microscopy analysis, as these membranes are extremely sensitive to the electron beam and high vacuum conditions. This paper will discuss and compare the mechanical, electrochemical, and cryo-SEM analyses of PA-doped meta-PBI membranes produced via conventional imbibing and the sol-gel process.

  11. Remarkable Differences in Reactivity between Benzothiazoline and Hantzsch Ester as a Hydrogen Donor in Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Asymmetric Reductive Amination of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Akiyama, Takahiko; Cheon, Cheol-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are differences in behavior between a Hantzsch ester and a benzothiazoline as hydrogen donors in the chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric reductive amination of ketones with p-anisidine. The asymmetric reductive amination of ketones with a Hantzsch ester as a hydrogen donor provided the corresponding chiral amines exclusively, regardless of the structures of the ketones, whereas a similar transformation with a benzothiazoline provided chiral amines and p-methoxyphenyl-protected primary amines in variable yields, depending on the structures of both the ketones and benzothiazolines. Because a benzothiazoline has an N,S-acetal moiety that is vulnerable to p-anisidine, the primary amine can be formed through transimination of the benzothiazoline with p-anisidine followed by reduction of the resulting aldimine with remaining benzothiazoline.

  12. Sources, solubility, and acid processing of aerosol iron and phosphorous over the South China Sea: East Asian dust and pollution outflows vs. Southeast Asian biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S.-C.; Gong, G.-C.; Shiah, F.-K.; Hung, C.-C.; Kao, S.-J.; Zhang, R.; Chen, W.-N.; Chen, C.-C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Lin, F.-J.; Lin, S.-H.

    2014-08-01

    Iron and phosphorous are essential to marine microorganisms in vast regions in oceans worldwide. Atmospheric inputs are important allochthonous sources of Fe and P. The variability in airborne Fe deposition is hypothesized to serve an important function in previous glacial-interglacial cycles, contributing to the variability in atmospheric CO2 and ultimately the climate. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the mobilization of airborne Fe and P from insoluble to soluble forms is critical to evaluate the biogeochemical effects of these elements. In this study, we present a robust power-law correlation between fractional Fe solubility and non-sea-salt-sulfate / Total-Fe (nss-sulfate / FeT) molar ratio independent of distinct sources of airborne Fe of natural and/or anthropogenic origins over the South China Sea. This area receives Asian dust and pollution outflows and Southeast Asian biomass burning. This correlation is also valid for nitrate and total acids, demonstrating the significance of acid processing in enhancing Fe mobilization. Such correlations are also found for P, yet source dependent. These relationships serve as straightforward parameters that can be directly incorporated into available atmosphere-ocean coupling models that facilitate the assessment of Fe and P fertilization effects. Although biomass burning activity may supply Fe to the bioavailable Fe pool, pyrogenic soils are possibly the main contributors, not the burned plants. This finding warrants a multidisciplinary investigation that integrates atmospheric observations with the resulting biogeochemistry in the South China Sea, which is influenced by atmospheric forcings and nutrient dynamics with monsoons.

  13. Solid-phase extraction of phosphorous-containing amino acid herbicides from biological specimens with a zirconia-coated silica cartridge.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Ohta, Hikoto; Yamamuro, Tadashi

    2014-10-15

    We report a rapid solid-phase extraction method for glyphosate (Glyp), glufosinate (Gluf), and bialaphos (Bial) using a zirconia-coated silica cartridge, which interacts specifically with phosphorous-containing amino acid herbicides (PAAHs). We extracted PAAHs from serum and urine samples. The PAAHs were derivatized with trimethyl orthoacetate-acetic acid and analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The intra-day and inter-day accuracy was within ±13% RE, the intra-day and inter-day precision was less than 12% RSD, and the total recovery was more than 60% for Glyp and more than 80% for Gluf and Bial. The linearity ranges of the calibration curves of the serum samples were 0.2-10,000μg/mL for Glyp, 0.1-1000μg/L for Gluf, and 0.5-1000μg/L for Bial; and those of the urine samples were 0.4-20,000μg/L for Glyp, 0.2-2000μg/L for Gluf, and 0.1-2000μg/L for Bial. This range covers almost all the reported poisoning cases involving these compounds, from very mild to fatal cases. The present paper offers a universal cleanup method for PAAHs in serum and urine samples for clinical and forensic analysis.

  14. Synergistic Rhodium/Phosphoric Acid Catalysis for the Enantioselective Addition of Oxonium Ylides to ortho-Quinone Methides.

    PubMed

    Alamsetti, Santosh Kumar; Spanka, Matthias; Schneider, Christoph

    2016-02-12

    We report herein a powerful and highly stereoselective protocol for the domino-type reaction of diazoesters with ortho-quinone methides generated in situ to furnish densely functionalized chromans with three contiguous stereogenic centers. A transition-metal and a Brønsted acid catalyst were shown to act synergistically to produce a transient oxonium ylide and ortho-quinone methide, respectively, in two distinct cycles. These intermediates underwent subsequent coupling in a conjugate-addition-hemiacetalization event in generally good yield with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity.

  15. Separation of berkelium (IV) from trivalent transplutonium elements on ion-exchangers in solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependences of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf and Es behavior on anion- and cation-exchangers in solutions of 0.1-8.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ on acid concentration and oxidant content in solution (KBrO/sub 3/) or in resin (PbO/sub 2/) have been studied. Significant differences in distribution coefficients of Bk and other transplutonium elements (TPE) have been found that can be explained by Bk oxidation to the tetravalent state. A simple and effective method of Bk (IV) separation from trivalent TPE has been developed. The method was applied to the isolation of isotopes Bk-249 and Bk-250; the purification factor of Bk (IV) from other TPE is 10/sup 4/-10/sub 6/ per cycle. The possibility of Bk separation from bromate and phosphate ions by its sorption on a cation-exchanger from diluted H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ solutions with subsequent desorption by the mineral acid has been shown. 20 references, 8 figures.

  16. DISTRIBUTION OF LANTHANIDE AND ACTINIDE ELEMENTS BETWEEN BIS-(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHOSPHORIC ACID AND BUFFERED LACTATE SOLUTIONS CONTAINING SELECTED COMPLEXANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, Tracy S.; Diprete, David P.; Thompson, Major C.

    2013-04-15

    With the renewed interest in the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, the TALSPEAK process is being considered for the separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanide fission products in a next generation reprocessing plant. However, an efficient separation requires tight control of the pH which likely will be difficult to achieve on a large scale. To address this issue, we measured the distribution of lanthanide and actinide elements between aqueous and organic phases in the presence of complexants which were potentially less sensitive to pH control than the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (DTPA) used in the process. To perform the extractions, a rapid and accurate method was developed for measuring distribution coefficients based on the preparation of lanthanide tracers in the Savannah River National Laboratory neutron activation analysis facility. The complexants tested included aceto-, benzo-, and salicylhydroxamic acids, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), and ammonium thiocyanate (NH{sub 4}SCN). The hydroxamic acids were the least effective of the complexants tested. The separation factors for TPEN and NH{sub 4}SCN were higher, especially for the heaviest lanthanides in the series; however, no conditions were identified which resulted in separations factors which consistently approached those measured for the use of DTPA.

  17. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  18. Microscopic and mesoscopic structural features of an activated carbon sample, prepared from sorghum via activation by phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Temleitner, László; Pusztai, László; Rubio-Arroyo, Manuel F.; Aguilar-López, Sergio; Pizio, Orest

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation of a new activated carbon sample from sorghum. ► Characterization by adsorption/desorption methods. ► Determination of the structure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. ► The sample is amorphous and contains distorted graphene fragments. ► A characteristic nanoscale distance is established from the radial distribution function. -- Abstract: An acidic chemical activation procedure has been used for preparing activated carbon with a surface area exceeding 1000 m{sup 2}/g from sorghum. In order to reveal structural features, synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed. The structure of the material has been characterized by the total scattering structure factor and the radial distribution function describing short-range arrangement of atoms at distances of the order of a few atomic diameters as well as correlations at a longer scale, of the order of nanometers. The atomic arrangement has been found to be consistent with that of amorphous graphite-like carbon. As far as the mesoscopic structure is concerned, the presence of a characteristic distance is suggested on the basis of the clear nanometer scale oscillations of the radial distribution function, which distance may be assigned as the mesopore size in the material. It is suggested that the approach devized here may later be applied routinely for other activated carbon samples, too, for characterizing atomic and nanoscale order simultaneously.

  19. A new facile route for synthesizing of graphene oxide using mixture of sulfuric-nitric-phosphoric acids as intercalating agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Vinay; Chattree, Ananya; Pal, Kaushik

    2015-09-01

    In this work, graphene oxide (GO) has been prepared through three different processes namely, eco-friendly Hummers method, modification in improved Hummers method and a new approach. This new approach has been designed by changing some processing parameters and intercalating agent for significant reduction in processing time and to improve the quantity of GO in comparison to the other two methods. This has been achieved through better oxidization of graphite using nitric-sulfuric acid (HNO3-H2SO4) as intercalating agent. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-visible spectroscopy, and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) are used to characterize the GO prepared through different processes. These characterizations have confirmed an improved exfoliation of graphite, using addition of HNO3 in intercalating agent, in a short processing time and bring on higher yield of GO via this new process.

  20. Surface modification of CoCr alloy using varying concentrations of phosphoric and phosphonoacetic acids: albumin and fibrinogen adsorption, platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation studies.

    PubMed

    Thiruppathi, Eagappanath; Larson, Mark K; Mani, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    CoCr alloy is commonly used in various cardiovascular medical devices for its excellent physical and mechanical properties. However, the formation of blood clots on the alloy surfaces is a serious concern. This research is focused on the surface modification of CoCr alloy using varying concentrations (1, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mM) of phosphoric acid (PA) and phosphonoacetic acid (PAA) to generate various surfaces with different wettability, chemistry, and roughness. Then, the adsorption of blood plasma proteins such as albumin and fibrinogen and the adhesion, activation, and aggregation of platelets with the various surfaces generated were investigated. Contact angle analysis showed PA and PAA coatings on CoCr provided a gradient of hydrophilic surfaces. FTIR showed PA and PAA were covalently bound to CoCr surface and formed different bonding configurations depending on the concentrations of coating solutions used. AFM showed the formation of homogeneous PA and PAA coatings on CoCr. The single and dual protein adsorption studies showed that the amount of albumin and fibrinogen adsorbed on the alloy surfaces strongly depend on the type of PA and PAA coatings prepared by different concentrations of coating solutions. All PA coated CoCr showed reduced platelet adhesion and activation when compared to control CoCr. Also, 75 and 100 mM PA-CoCr showed reduced platelet aggregation. For PAA coated CoCr, no significant difference in platelet adhesion and activation was observed between PAA coated CoCr and control CoCr. Thus, this study demonstrated that CoCr can be surface modified using PA for potentially reducing the formation of blood clots and improving the blood compatibility of the alloy.

  1. Electric power generation using a phosphoric acid cell on a municipal solid waste landfill gas stream. Technology verification report, November 1997--July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Masemore, S.; Piccot, S.

    1998-08-01

    The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phosphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Performance data were collected at two sites determined to be representative of the U.S. landfill market. The Penrose facility, in Los Angeles, CA, was the first test site. The landfill gas at this site represented waste gas recovery from four nearby landfills, consisting primarily of industrial waste material. It produced approximately 3000 scf of gas/minute, and had a higher heating value of 446 Btu/scf at about 44% methane concentration. The second test site, in Groton, CT, was a relatively small landfill, but with greater heat content gas (methane levels were about 57% and the average heating value was 585 Btu/scf). The verification test addressed contaminant removal efficiency, flare destruction efficiency, and the operational capability of the cleanup system, and the power production capability of the fuel cell system.

  2. Hyrdothermally prepared biochars from potato peels. Activation of biochars with phosphoric acid for use as sorbents for cobalt removal from wastewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakkovikiotis, Evangelos; Kyzas, George; Deliyanni, Eleni; Matis, Kostas

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, activated carbons (ACs) were hydrothermally prepared with an environmental friendly preparation route from biomass (specifically from potato peels). The prepared biochars were activated with phosphoric acid (chemical activation). The porous texture and the surface chemistry of the biochars and the relative activated carbons prepared were investigated and were compared to the activated carbon prepared and activated by pyrolysis, in one step procedure. Biochars and activated carbon materials were also characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The prepared activated carbons were used as adsorbents for the removal of cobalt from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effect of physico-chemical parameters, such as pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial metal concentration and temperature. The kinetics of adsorption were studied by applying the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. Equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The thermodynamic parameters such as the change of enthalpy (ΔH0), entropy (ΔS0) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG0) of adsorption systems were also determined and evaluated.

  3. Extraction Equilibrium of Mn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ from Chloride Solutions by Di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric Acid Dissolved in Kerosene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanfu; Cao, Wenxin; Zhan, Jing; Ding, Fenghua; Hwang, Jiann-Yang

    2015-05-01

    The presence of calcium and magnesium affects the purity of the final product MnCl2 in hydrometallurgical treatment processes. The solvent extraction method can be used to separate Ca2+ and Mg2+ from Mn2+ solutions containing impurity ions such as Ca2+ and Mg2+. This article aims to investigate the single-stage extraction equilibrium of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ in chloride medium using di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in kerosene (O:A = 1:1). The results show that the pH0.5 values are 1.11, 1.56, and 2.18 for Ca2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+, respectively. The mechanism of extraction and stoichiometries of metal-containing extracted species were illustrated based on a slope analysis. The composition of the extracted species in the organic phase is proposed to be MnR2·R2H2, CaR2·R2H2, and MgR2·(R2H2)2, respectively.

  4. Effect of a self-etching primer and phosphoric acid etching on the bond strength of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Saiki, Osamu; Hiraba, Haruto; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel. A self-etching primer that contained 4-META (Teeth Primer, TP) and 35-45% or 60-65% concentrations of phosphoric acid (K-Etchant Gel, KE, and Super Bond C&B Red Activator, RA) were used as the surface treatment agents. A methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based self-polymerizing resin (Super-Bond C&B) was used as a luting agent. The shear bond strength was determined both pre and post thermocycling. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The post-thermocycling shear bond strength of the TP group was significantly higher than that of other groups, and that of the KE group was significantly higher compared with the RA group. These results demonstrated that 4-META was effective. Furthermore, when the degree of tooth demineralization was compared, surface treatment with less demineralization using TP was the most effective treatment.

  5. Central metal ion exchange in a coordination polymer based on lanthanide ions and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid: exchange rate and tunable affinity.

    PubMed

    Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Abe, Yukie; Ooi, Kenta; Tanaka, Mikiya; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the exchange of lanthanide(III) ions (Ln(3+)) between a solution and a coordination polymer (CP) of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (Hdehp), [Ln(dehp)3], is studied. Kinetic and selectivity studies suggest that a polymeric network of [Ln(dehp)3] has different characteristics than the corresponding monomeric complex. The reaction rate is remarkably slow and requires over 600 h to reach in nearly equilibrium, and this can be explained by the polymeric crystalline structure and high valency of Ln(3+). The affinity of the exchange reaction reaches a maximum with the Ln(3+) possessing an ionic radius 7% smaller than that of the central Ln(3+), therefore, the affinity of the [Ln(dehp)3] is tunable based on the choice of the central metal ion. Such unique affinity, which differs from the monomeric complex, can be explained by two factors: the coordination preference and steric strain caused by the polymeric structure. The latter likely becomes predominant for Ln(3+) exchange when the ionic radius of the ion in solution is smaller than the original Ln(3+) by more than 7%. Structural studies suggest that the incoming Ln(3+) forms a new phase though an exchange reaction, and this could plausibly cause the structural strain.

  6. Effect of H2S and COS in the fuel gas on the performance of ambient pressure phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P. N., Jr.

    1985-04-01

    The objective of this project was to determine in laboratory cells the tolerance of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) to hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulphide impurities in the anode feed gas. The study was conducted in three phases: the first was testing in a small (1 sq cm) free electrolyte cell to examine the effect of electrode structure on cell tolerance and to determine the order of magnitude of sulfur causing failure in cells at zero utilization; the second was testing in standard 2' x 2' PAFC laboratory hardware at ambient pressure to examine the effect of hydrogen utilization on tolerance and the possible effect of fuel impurities on cathode performance; the final phase was testing with a 2' x 2' cell in a pressure vessel to determine the effect of pressurized operation on cell tolerance. The poisoning effect of hydrogen sulfide was characteristically different from the effects of carbon monoxide, in that it was not manifested by a marginal (e.g., 0 to 50 mV) increase in anode potential but either had no effect or caused catastrophic polarization. Critical levels were derived for hydrogen sulfide as related to cell operating conditions.

  7. Features of the Thermodynamics of Trivalent Lanthanide/Actinide Distribution Reactions by Tri-n-Octylphosphine Oxide and Bis(2-EthylHexyl) Phosphoric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Travis S. Grimes; Peter R. Zalupski

    2014-11-01

    A new methodology has been developed to study the thermochemical features of the biphasic transfer reactions of trisnitrato complexes of lanthanides and americium by a mono-functional solvating ligand (tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide - TOPO). Stability constants for successive nitrato complexes (M(NO3)x3-x (aq) where M is Eu3+, Am3+ or Cm3+) were determined to assist in the calculation of the extraction constant, Kex, for the metal ions under study. Enthalpies of extraction (?Hextr) for the lanthanide series (excluding Pm3+) and Am3+ by TOPO have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The observed ?Hextr were found to be constant at ~29 kJ mol-1across the series from La3+-Er3+, with a slight decrease observed from Tm3+-Lu3+. These heats were found to be consistent with enthalpies determined using van ’t Hoff analysis of temperature dependent extraction studies. A complete set of thermodynamic parameters (?G, ?H, ?S) was calculated for Eu(NO3)3, Am(NO3)3 and Cm(NO3)3 extraction by TOPO and Am3+ and Cm3+ extraction by bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP). A discussion comparing the energetics of these systems is offered. The measured biphasic extraction heats for the transplutonium elements, ?Hextr, presented in these studies are the first ever direct measurements offered using two-phase calorimetric techniques.

  8. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  9. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  10. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  11. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  12. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid-coconut oil supported liquid membrane for the separation of copper ions from copper plating wastewater.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, P; Navaneetha Gopalakrishnan, A; Palanivelu, K

    2007-01-01

    Permeation of Cu(II) from its aqueous solution through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) containing di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) carrier dissolved in coconut oil has been studied. The effects of Cu(II), pH (in feed), H2SO4 (stripping) and D2EHPA (in membrane) concentrations have been investigated. The stability of the D2EHPA-coconut oil has also been evaluated. High Cu(II) concentration in the feed leads to an increase in flux from 4.1 x 10(-9) to 8.9 x 10(-9) mol/(m2 x s) within the Cu(II) concentration range 7.8 x 10(-4)-78.6 x 10(-4) mol/L at pH of 4.0 in the feed and 12.4 x 10-4 mol/L D2EHPA in the membrane phase. Increase in H2SO4 concentration in strip solution leads to an increase in copper ions flux up to 0.25 mol/L H2SO4, providing a maximum flux of 7.4 x 10(-9) mol/(m2 x s). The optimum conditions for Cu(II) transport are, pH of feed 4.0, 0.25 mol/L H2SO4 in strip phase and 12.4 x 10(-4) mol/L D2EHPA (membrane) in 0.5 microm pore size polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. It has been observed that Cu(II) flux across the membrane tends to increase with the concentration of copper ions. Application of the method developed to copper plating bath rinse solutions has been found to be successful in the recovery of Cu(II).

  13. Phosphorus-containing fluorinated organics: polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters (diPAPs), perfluorophosphonates (PFPAs), and perfluorophosphinates (PFPIAs) in residential indoor dust.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Amila O; Allard, Cody N; Spencer, Christine; Webster, Glenys M; Shoeib, Mahiba

    2012-11-20

    Indoor dust is thought to be a source of human exposure to perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) and perfluorosulfonates (PFSAs), but exposures to emerging organofluorine compounds, including precursors to PFCAs and PFSAs via indoor dust, remain unknown. We report an analytical method for measuring several groups of emerging phosphorus-containing fluorinated compounds, including polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters (diPAP), perfluorophosphonates (PFPA), and perfluorophosphinates (PFPIA), as well as perfluoroethylcyclohexane sulfonate (PFECHS) in indoor dust. This method was used to analyze diPAP, PFPA, and PFPIA levels in 102 residential dust samples collected in 2007-2008 from Vancouver, Canada. The results indicated a predominant and ubiquitous presence of diPAPs (frequency of detection 100%, mean and median ΣdiPAPs 7637 and 2215 ng/g). Previously measured median concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) in the same samples were 14-74 times lower than ΣdiPAP levels, i.e. 71 ng/g PFOS, 30 ng/g PFOA, and 152 ng/g ΣFTOHs. PFPAs and PFPIAs were detected in 62% and 85% of samples, respectively, at concentrations nearly 3 orders of magnitude lower than diPAPs (median 2.3 ng/g ΣPFPAs and 2.3 ng/g ΣPFPIAs). PFECHS was detected in only 8% of dust samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of these compounds in indoor dust. In this study, diPAP concentrations represented 98% ± 7% of the total measured analytes in the dust samples. Detection of diPAPs at such high concentrations in indoor dust may represent an important and as-yet unrecognized indirect source of PFCA exposure in humans, given the identified biotransformation pathways. Identifying the sources of diPAPs to the indoor environment is a priority for future research to improve air quality in households.

  14. Characterization and application of expanded graphite modified with phosphoric acid and glucose for the removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hai; Guo, Zizhang; Kang, Yan; Li, Yiran; Xu, Jingtao

    2015-12-01

    Three kinds of modified expanded graphite (EG), impregnated with phosphoric acid (H3PO4) (P-EG), impregnated with glucose (G-EG), and impregnated with H3PO4 and glucose (G-P-EG), were prepared under a low temperature (150 °C). The adsorption capacity of G-P-EG (Qm = 7.016 mg/g) is much higher than original expanded graphite (EG Qm = 0.423 mg/g) and other two kinds of modified expanded graphite (P-EG Qm = 0.770 mg/g; G-EG Qm = 0.507 mg/g). The physicochemical properties of EG and G-P-EG were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, Boehm's titration and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). EG exhibited higher values of BET surface area (11.357 m2/g) and total pore volume (0.0303 cm3/g) than that of G-P-EG (4.808 m3/g and 0.0109 cm3/g). However, the results of Bohm's titration and XPS showed that G-P-EG contained more surface oxygen-containing functional groups. The Ni(II) adsorption equilibrium data agreed well with the Langmuir model. And the experimental data of EG and G-P-EG fitted better by pseudo-second order model. Based on the results of batch adsorption experiments and XPS analysis, there were several possible mechanisms for Ni(II) adsorption on the G-P-EG, including chemical adsorption, cation exchange, electrostatic attraction and surface complication.

  15. Lanthanide ion exchange properties of a coordination polymer consisting of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and trivalent metal ions (Ce3+, Fe3+, or Al3+).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kenta; Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Abe, Yukie; Wakisaka, Akihiko

    2014-03-28

    Three kinds of coordination polymers ([M(dehp)3], M = Ce, Fe, or Al) were prepared by mixing the sodium form (Na(dehp)) of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and MCl3 in an ethanol-water binary mixture. They have monoclinic crystalline structure with similar lattice parameters. The lanthanide ion (Ln(3+) = La(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+), or Yb(3+)) exchange properties were studied in a 20 : 80 vol% ethanol-water binary mixture containing 2 mM Ln(NO3)3 at room temperature. The rate of Ln(3+) adsorption is relatively slow; it requires over 3 weeks to reach equilibrium. [M(dehp)3] has different Ln(3+) affinities depending on the kind of central metal ions: the affinity order at 3 week adsorption is Yb(3+) < La(3+) < Dy(3+) < Sm(3+) for [Ce(dehp)3], La(3+) < Sm(3+) < Dy(3+) < Yb(3+) for [Fe(dehp)3], and La(3+) < Sm(3+), Dy(3+), Yb(3+) for [Al(dehp)3]. The difference in affinity order can be explained by two factors: the coordination preference and steric strain caused by the polymeric structure. The chemical and structural analyses suggested that the Ln(3+) adsorption progresses first by the central M(3+)/Ln(3+) exchange, followed by a morphological change to a rod-like or fibrous form by a solid phase reaction. In the case of [Fe(dehp)3], the eluted Fe(3+) may be hydrolyzed and precipitated as amorphous iron hydroxide.

  16. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  17. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  18. Obeticholic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  19. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  20. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  1. Aristolochic Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences NIH-HHS www.niehs.nih.gov Aristolochic Acids Key Points Report on Carcinogens Status Known to be human carcinogens Aristolochia Clematitis Aristolochic Acids n Known human carcinogens n Found in certain ...

  2. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  3. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  4. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  5. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  6. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  7. Recovery of uranium from acid media by macroporous bifunctional phosphinic acid resin

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwal, K.N.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Rao, P.R.V.; Nandy, K.K.

    1996-11-01

    The extraction of uranium from various acid media such as nitric acid, sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid and perchloric acid by a macroporous bifunctional phosphinic acid resin (MPBPA) has been studied. The distribution coefficients for the extraction of uranium by the MPBPA resin are compared with the corresponding values reported in literature for the conventional sulphonic acid resin. The results clearly indicate the suitability of the MPBPA resin to recover uranium from different types of acid solutions of widely ranging acidities. 17 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  9. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications.

  10. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  11. Effect of level of acidification by phosphoric acid, storage temperature, and length of storage on the chemical and biological stability of ground poultry mortality carcasses.

    PubMed

    Middleton, T F; Ferket, P R

    2001-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the addition of feed-grade H3PO4 in comparison to lactic acid fermentation as a means of preserving ground poultry mortality carcasses. Mortality silage quality in both experiments was evaluated by measuring the rise in pH after initial acidification (deltapH) and the content of nonprotein N (NPN), volatile nitrogen (VN), NH3-N, and fecal coliform bacteria in the silage treatments. Preliminary work in Experiment 1 evaluated the preservative effects of six initial levels of acidification with H3PO4 (pH 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 4.0, or 5.0) at two storage temperatures (21 and 45 C). Experiment 2 compared silages preserved with different levels of feed-grade 74.5% H3PO4 (4.13, 5.52, 6.90, and 8.28% wt/wt, concentrated acid basis) to silages made by lactic acid fermentation. Based on the evaluations in Experiment 1, acidification with H3PO4 to pH < or = 3.0, when incubated at 45 C, or pH < or = 2.0, when incubated at ambient temperatures, produced the most biologically favorable poultry mortality silage for subsequent use as a feed ingredient. In Experiment 2, mortality silages containing 8.28% H3PO4 (wt/wt, concentrated acid basis) contained significantly (P < 0.05) lower levels of the protein degradation by-products VN and NH3-N than silages prepared by lactic acid fermentation. Therefore, feedstuffs manufactured from mortality silages prepared using 8.28% H3PO4 would be expected to result in improved animal performance vs. feedstuffs manufactured using silages prepared by lactic acid fermentation.

  12. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  13. Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Waste Disposal Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    46 2 4 H2 3 4 4 2 Phosphate Sulfuric Water Phosphoric Hydro- Phosphogypsum Rock Acid Acid fluoric Acid For our purposes the process could be viewed as...one where sulfuric acid is neutralized using phosphate rock rather than lime. Although the resulting calcium sulfate (referred to as phosphogypsum ...spearhead research in this country on uses for waste gypsum or phosphogypsum . They have published a recent review of historic and current work on

  14. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  15. Acid Rain

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA Is Doing Acid Rain Program Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Progress Reports Educational Resources Kid's Site for ... Monitoring National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Exit Interstate Air Pollution Transport Contact Us to ask a question, provide ...

  16. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid can hide signs that you lack vitamin B12, which can cause nerve damage. 10 Do I ... Rosenberg, I.H., et al. (2007). Folate and vitamin B12 status in relation to anemia, macrocytosis and cognitive ...

  17. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  18. Review of HxPyOz-Catalyzed H + OH Recombination in Scramjet Nozzle Expansions; and Possible Phosphoric Acid Enhancement of Scramjet Flameholding, from Extinction of H3PO4 + H2 - Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Recent detailed articles by Twarowski indicate that small quantities of phosphorus oxides and acids in the fuel-rich combustion products of H2 + phosphine (PH3) + air should significantly catalyze H, OH and O recombination kinetics during high-speed nozzle expansions -- to reform H2O, release heat, and approach equilibrium more rapidly and closely than uncatalyzed kinetics. This paper is an initial feasibility study to determine (a) if addition of phosphoric acid vapor (H3PO4) to a H2 fuel jet -- which is much safer than using PH3 -- will allow combustion in a high-speed scramjet engine test without adverse effects on localized flameholding, and (b) if phosphorus-containing exhaust emissions are environmentally acceptable. A well-characterized axisymmetric straight-tube opposed jet burner (OJB) tool is used to evaluate H3PO4 addition effects on the air velocity extinction limit (flame strength) of a H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flame. Addition of nitric oxide (NO), also believed to promote catalytic H-atom recombination, was evaluated for comparison. Two to five mass percent H3PO4 in the H2 jet increased flame strength 4.2%, whereas airside addition decreased it 1%. Adding 5% NO to the H2 caused a 2% decrease. Products of H-atom attack on H3PO4 produced an intense green chemiluminescence near the stagnation point. The resultant exothermic production of phosphorus oxides and acids, with accelerated H-atom recombination, released sufficient heat near the stagnation point to increase flame strength. In conclusion, the addition of H3PO4 vapor (or more reactive P sources) to hydrogen in scramjet engine tests may positively affect flameholding stability in the combustor and thrust production during supersonic expansion -- a possible dual benefit with system design / performance implications. Finally, a preliminary assessment of possible environmental effects indicates that scramjet exhaust emissions should consist of phosphoric acid aerosol, with gradual

  19. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  20. Catalytic enantioselective amination of alcohols by the use of borrowing hydrogen methodology: cooperative catalysis by iridium and a chiral phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Lim, Ching-Si; Sim, Derek Sui Boon; Pan, Hui-Jie; Zhao, Yu

    2014-01-27

    The catalytic asymmetric reduction of ketimines has been explored extensively for the synthesis of chiral amines, with reductants ranging from Hantzsch esters, silanes, and formic acid to H2 gas. Alternatively, the amination of alcohols by the use of borrowing hydrogen methodology has proven a highly atom economical and green method for the production of amines without an external reductant, as the alcohol substrate serves as the H2 donor. A catalytic enantioselective variant of this process for the synthesis of chiral amines, however, was not known. We have examined various transition-metal complexes supported by chiral ligands known for asymmetric hydrogenation reactions, in combination with chiral Brønsted acids, which proved essential for the formation of the imine intermediate and the transfer-hydrogenation step. Our studies led to an asymmetric amination of alcohols to provide access to a wide range of chiral amines with good to excellent enantioselectivity.

  1. Activation of carboxylic acids in asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Poladura, Belén; Diaz de Los Bernardos, Miriam; Leutzsch, Markus; Goddard, Richard; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Organocatalysis, catalysis using small organic molecules, has recently evolved into a general approach for asymmetric synthesis, complementing both metal catalysis and biocatalysis. Its success relies to a large extent upon the introduction of novel and generic activation modes. Remarkably though, while carboxylic acids have been used as catalyst directing groups in supramolecular transition-metal catalysis, a general and well-defined activation mode for this useful and abundant substance class is still lacking. Herein we propose the heterodimeric association of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acid catalysts as a new activation principle for organocatalysis. This self-assembly increases both the acidity of the phosphoric acid catalyst and the reactivity of the carboxylic acid. To illustrate this principle, we apply our concept in a general and highly enantioselective catalytic aziridine-opening reaction with carboxylic acids as nucleophiles.

  2. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1993-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  3. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  4. Acid-functionalized polyolefin materials and their use in acid-promoted chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Tian, Chengcheng; Bauer, John Christopher; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-07

    An acid-functionalized polyolefin material that can be used as an acid catalyst in a wide range of acid-promoted chemical reactions, wherein the acid-functionalized polyolefin material includes a polyolefin backbone on which acid groups are appended. Also described is a method for the preparation of the acid catalyst in which a precursor polyolefin is subjected to ionizing radiation (e.g., electron beam irradiation) of sufficient power and the irradiated precursor polyolefin reacted with at least one vinyl monomer having an acid group thereon. Further described is a method for conducting an acid-promoted chemical reaction, wherein an acid-reactive organic precursor is contacted in liquid form with a solid heterogeneous acid catalyst comprising a polyolefin backbone of at least 1 micron in one dimension and having carboxylic acid groups and either sulfonic acid or phosphoric acid groups appended thereto.

  5. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  6. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  7. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / R - 03 / 007 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 79 - 43 - 6 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) August 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revi

  8. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 09 / 003F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 76 - 03 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2011 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document has

  9. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  10. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  11. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  12. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  13. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  14. Azelaic acid.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro-Porro, M

    1987-12-01

    This review is an update on the literature accumulated over the past 10 years following the original observation that azelaic acid, a naturally occurring and nontoxic C9 dicarboxylic acid, possesses significant biologic properties and a potential as a therapeutic agent. These studies have shown that azelaic acid is a reversible inhibitor of tyrosinase and other oxidoreductases in vitro and that it inhibits mitochondrial respiration. It can also inhibit anaerobic glycolysis. Both in vitro and in vivo it has an antimicrobial effect on both aerobic and anaerobic (Propionibacterium acnes) microorganisms. In tissue culture it exerts a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect on malignant melanocytes, associated with mitochondrial damage and inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis. Tumoral cell lines not containing tyrosinase are equally affected. Normal cells in culture exposed to the same concentrations of the diacid that are toxic for tumoral cells are in general not damaged. Radioactive azelaic acid has been shown to penetrate tumoral cells at a higher level than normal cells of the corresponding line. Topically applied (a 20% cream), it has been shown to be of therapeutic value in skin disorders of different etiologies. Its beneficial effect on various forms of acne (comedogenic, papulopustular, nodulocystic) has been clearly demonstrated. Particularly important is its action on abnormal melanocytes, which has led to the possibility of obtaining good results on melasma and highly durable therapeutic responses on lentigo maligna. It is also capable of causing regression of cutaneous malignant melanoma, but its role in melanoma therapy remains to be investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  16. Rapid method of separating Am(VI) from transplutonium and rare-earth elements on a cation exchanger in phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, G.S.; Guseva, L.I.

    1988-07-01

    Measurements have been made on cation-exchanger sorption of americium, other actinoids, and certain rare-earth elements from 0.1-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ when the elements have been oxidized with ammonium persulfate alone or mixed with silver phosphate. There are considerable differences in behavior between the americium and the other elements on account of its being oxidized to a higher valency state. Measurements have been made on the effects of acid and oxidant concentrations and of the oxidation and elution conditions on the americium yield when the exchanger is treated with H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Optimum oxidation conditions have been chosen, and a rapid method has been devised for separating americium(VI) from other transplutonium elements and REE on Dowex 50 /times/ 8, where the eluent is 0.1-1.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ plus 0.05 M (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/.

  17. Determination of ultra-micro amounts of sulfur in igneous rocks by spectrofluorimetry using 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl) benzoxazole derivatization and tin(II)-strong phosphoric acid-assisted reduction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y D; Namgung, S W; Yoshida, M; Malik, A

    2000-02-07

    A new and very sensitive method was developed for the determination of ultra-micro amounts of sulfur in igneous rock samples. The sulfur compounds in an igneous rock sample are reduced and released in the form of hydrogen sulfide by heating with a tin(II)-strong phosphoric acid (SPA) reagent. The liberated hydrogen sulfide is carried by a flow of nitrogen into a copper(II) absorbing solution to obtain a precipitate of copper(II) sulfide. The remaining copper(II) ion forms a chelate with 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HPB) and quenches the fluorescence of HPB. The amount of sulfide is determined by measuring the HPB fluorescence intensity. The optimum reaction conditions were stoichiometrically investigated. By the present method using 0.1-0.2 g of rock sample, ultramicro amounts of sulfur (0.1-12.8 mug) could be quantitatively separated, collected, and determined with a relative standard deviation of 1.37% for a sample containing 5.7 mug of sulfur (95% confidence level).

  18. Acidic domains around nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, G; Pack, G R

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen ion concentration in the vicinity of DNA was mapped out within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Experimental conditions were modeled by assuming Na-DNA to be solvated in a buffer solution containing 45 mM Tris and 3 mM Mg cations at pH 7.5. Three regions of high H+ concentration (greater than 10 microM) are predicted: one throughout the minor groove of DNA and two localized in the major groove near N7 of guanine and C5 of cytosine for a G.C base pair. These acidic domains correlate well with the observed covalent binding sites of benzo[a]pyrene epoxide (N2 of guanine) and of aflatoxin B1 epoxide (N7 of guanine), chemical carcinogens that presumably undergo acid catalysis to form highly reactive carbocations that ultimately bind to DNA. It is suggested that these regions of high H+ concentration may also be of concern in understanding interactions involving proteins and noncarcinogenic molecules with or near nucleic acids. PMID:2123348

  19. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  20. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  1. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  2. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  3. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.H.; Boyle, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acid rain, says Boyle is a chemical leprosy eating into the face of North America and Europe, perhaps the major ecological problem of our time. Boyle describes the causes and scope of the phenomenon; the effects on man, wildlife, water, and our cultural heritage. He probes the delays of politicians and the frequent self-serving arguments advanced by industry in the face of what scientists have proved. The solutions he offers are to strengthen the Clean Air Act and require emission reductions that can be accomplished by establishing emission standards on a regional or bubble basis, burn low-sulfur coal, install scrubbers at critical plants, and invest in alternative energy sources. 73 references, 1 figure.

  4. Effect of mixed additives on lead-acid battery electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Arup; Basumallick, Indra Narayan

    This paper describes the corrosion behaviour of the positive and negative electrodes of a lead-acid battery in 5 M H 2SO 4 with binary additives such as mixtures of phosphoric acid and boric acid, phosphoric acid and tin sulphate, and phosphoric acid and picric acid. The effect of these additives is examined from the Tafel polarisation curves, double layer capacitance and percentage of inhibition efficiency. A lead salt battery has been fabricated replacing the binary mixture with an alternative electrolyte and the above electrochemical parameters have been evaluated for this lead salt battery. The results are explained in terms of H + ion transport and the morphological change of the PbSO 4 layer.

  5. Incorporation and distribution of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1986-02-01

    Human keratinocytes in culture were labelled with /sup 14/C-dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid or /sup 14/C-eicosapentaenoic acid. All three eicosanoid precursor fatty acids were effectively incorporated into the cells. In phospholipids most of the radioactivity was recovered, in neutral lipids a substantial amount, and as free unesterified fatty acids only a minor amount. Most of the radioactivity was found in phosphatidylethanolamine which was also the major phospholipid as measured by phosphorous assay. The incorporation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid into lipid subfractions was essentially similar. Eicosapentaenoic acid was, however, much less effectively incorporated into phosphatidylinositol + phosphatidylserine and, correspondingly, more effectively into triacylglycerols as compared to the two other precursor fatty acids. Once incorporated, the distribution of all three precursor fatty acids was relatively stable, and only minor amounts of fatty acids were released into the culture medium during short term culture (two days). Our study demonstrates that eicosanoid precursor fatty acids are avidly taken up by human keratinocytes and esterified into membrane lipids. The clinical implication of this finding is that dietary manipulations might be employed to cause changes in the fatty acid composition of keratinocytes.

  6. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  7. Organic acids tunably catalyze carbonic acid decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-07-10

    Density functional theory calculations predict that the gas-phase decomposition of carbonic acid, a high-energy, 1,3-hydrogen atom transfer reaction, can be catalyzed by a monocarboxylic acid or a dicarboxylic acid, including carbonic acid itself. Carboxylic acids are found to be more effective catalysts than water. Among the carboxylic acids, the monocarboxylic acids outperform the dicarboxylic ones wherein the presence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond hampers the hydrogen transfer. Further, the calculations reveal a direct correlation between the catalytic activity of a monocarboxylic acid and its pKa, in contrast to prior assumptions about carboxylic-acid-catalyzed hydrogen-transfer reactions. The catalytic efficacy of a dicarboxylic acid, on the other hand, is significantly affected by the strength of an intramolecular hydrogen bond. Transition-state theory estimates indicate that effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed decomposition are four orders-of-magnitude larger than those for the water-catalyzed reaction. These results offer new insights into the determinants of general acid catalysis with potentially broad implications.

  8. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  9. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  10. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  11. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  12. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid ...

  13. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  14. Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... other health conditions > Fatty acid oxidation disorders Fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... these disorders, go to genetests.org . What fatty acid oxidation disorders are tested for in newborn screening? ...

  15. Reactivity of aminophosphonic acids. Oxidative dephosphonylation of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids by aqueous halogens.

    PubMed

    Drabowicz, Józef; Jordan, Frank; Kudzin, Marcin H; Kudzin, Zbigniew H; Stevens, Christian V; Urbaniak, Paweł

    2016-02-07

    The reactions of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids with bromine-water, chlorine-water and iodine-water were investigated. The formation of phosphoric(v) acid, as a result of a halogen-promoted cleavage of the Cα-P bond, accompanied by nitrogen release, was observed. The dephosphonylation of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids was found to occur quantitatively. In the reactions of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids with other halogen-water reagents investigated by (31)P NMR, scission of the Cα-P bond was also observed, the reaction rates being comparable for bromine and chlorine, but much slower for iodine.

  16. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO[sub 2], highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO[sub 4]/2.5M H[sub 3]PO[sub 4] solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO[sub 2] (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.

  17. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO{sub 2}, highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO{sub 4}/2.5M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO{sub 2} (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.

  18. An Effective Acid Combination for Enhanced Properties and Corrosion Control of Acidizing Sandstone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham

    2016-03-01

    To fulfill the demand of the world energy, more technologies to enhance the recovery of oil production are being developed. Sandstone acidizing has been introduced and it acts as one of the important means to increase oil and gas production. Sandstone acidizing operation generally uses acids, which create or enlarge the flow channels of formation around the wellbore. In sandstone matrix acidizing, acids are injected into the formation at a pressure below the formation fracturing pressure, in which the injected acids react with mineral particles that may restrict the flow of hydrocarbons. Most common combination is Hydrofluoric Acid - Hydrochloric with concentration (3% HF - 12% HCl) known as mud acid. But there are some problems associated with the use of mud acid i.e., corrosion, precipitation. In this paper several new combinations of acids were experimentally screened to identify the most effective combination. The combinations used consist of fluoboric, phosphoric, formic and hydrofluoric acids. Cores were allowed to react with these combinations and results are compared with the mud acid. The parameters, which are analyzed, are Improved Permeability Ratio, strength and mineralogy. The analysis showed that the new acid combination has the potential to be used in sandstone acidizing.

  19. 46 CFR 153.1052 - Carriage of other cargoes in acid tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., hydrochloric acid, or phosphoric acid with out specific authorization from the Commandant (CG-ENG). ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carriage of other cargoes in acid tanks. 153.1052... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1052 Carriage of other cargoes in acid tanks. No person shall load or...

  20. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  1. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  2. The cytochemistry of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Janckila, A J; Li, C Y; Lam, K W; Yam, L T

    1978-07-01

    Cytochemical demonstration of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity is essential for the diagnosis of leukemic reticuloendotheliosis. In order to perform this test correctly and to interpret the results propertly, it is necessary to understand the technical details of the cytochemical methods thoroughly. The method using naphthol--ASBI phosphoric acid--fast garnet GBC is recommended for this purpose, and factors crucial to the cytochemical study, such as fixation, substrate, coupler, pH and temperature of incubation buffer, counterstains, and mounting media are examined and discussed. Conventional methods for acid phosphatase in the presence and absence of L(+) tartaric acid are also critically examined. The naphthol--ASBI phosphoric acid--fast garnet GBC method is sensitive, technically simple and easily reproducible. Its reaction product is highly chromogenic and is most suitable for cytochemical demonstration of acid phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in cytologic preparations. The naphthol--ASBI phosphoric acid--pararosaniline method is highly specific and is best for histochemical demonstration of acid phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase in tissue sections.

  3. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  4. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  5. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  6. Method for the isolation of citric acid and malic acid in Japanese apricot liqueur for carbon stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Oe, Takaaki; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-02-15

    A method for detecting the undeclared addition of acidic ingredients is required to control the authenticity of Japanese apricot liqueur. We developed an analytical procedure that minimizes carbon isotope discrimination for measurement of the δ(13)C values of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Our results demonstrated that freeze-drying is preferable to nitrogen spray-drying, because it does not significantly affect the δ(13)C values of citric acid and results in smaller isotope discrimination for malic acid. Both 0.1% formic acid and 0.2% phosphoric acid are acceptable HPLC mobile phases for the isolation of citric and malic acid, although the δ(13)C values of malic acid exhibited relatively large variation compared with citric acid following isolation using either mobile phase. The developed procedure allows precise δ(13)C measurements of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur.

  7. Preparation of fodder dicalcium phosphate from phosphorous-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Teplov, Y.A.; Dmitrevskii, B.A.; Maksimenko, N.F.; Olifson, A.L.; Yarosh, E.B.

    1985-02-01

    Fodder dicalcium phosphate is produced in chemical plants by neutralization of electrothermal phosphoric acid with chalk, or by high-temperature defluorination of a mixture of phosphate raw material with phosphoric acid. The deficiencies of the first technology include the scarcity and high cost of phosphoric acid, and the disadvantages of the second include the high expenditure of energy and low concentration of useful substance in the product. This paper reports on studies which demonstrate the possibility of preparing fodder dicalcium phosphate from different types of phosphate raw material which is not inferior in quality to the product produced from expensive and scarce electrothermal phosphoric acid.

  8. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine evidence for the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE PubMed was searched for articles on the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. Level I and II evidence indicates that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial in improving cardiovascular outcomes. MAIN MESSAGE Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids has declined by 80% during the last 100 years, while intake of omega-6 fatty acids has greatly increased. Omega-3 fatty acids are cardioprotective mainly due to beneficial effects on arrhythmias, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and thrombosis. There is also evidence that they improve endothelial function, lower blood pressure, and significantly lower triglycerides. CONCLUSION There is good evidence in the literature that increasing intake of omega-3 fatty acids improves cardiac outcomes. Physicians need to integrate dietary recommendations for consumption of omega-3 fatty acids into their usual cardiovascular care. PMID:16812965

  10. Sulfuric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sulfuric acid is a very strong chemical that is corrosive. Corrosive means it can cause severe burns and ... or mucous membranes. This article discusses poisoning from sulfuric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  11. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Lactate test ... test. Exercise can cause a temporary increase in lactic acid levels. ... not getting enough oxygen. Conditions that can increase lactic acid levels include: Heart failure Liver disease Lung disease ...

  12. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Folic Acid Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... button beside the question. Good Luck! 1. Folic acid is: A a B vitamin B a form ...

  13. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  14. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  15. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  16. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Home Cosmetics Products & Ingredients Ingredients Alpha Hydroxy Acids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... for Industry: Labeling for Cosmetics Containing Alpha Hydroxy Acids The following information is intended to answer questions ...

  17. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  18. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  19. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid and Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 July 2015 In every ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  20. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  1. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  2. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  3. Electrochemical characteristics of acid electrolytes for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasio, D.; Razaq, M.; Razaq, A.; Adzic, R.; Kanamura, K.; Yeager, E. B.

    1992-01-01

    The electrochemical evaluation of new perfluorinated fuel cell electrolytes provided by GRI contractors at Clemson and Iowa shows the kinetics for O2 reduction on Pt improves with these acids compared to with phosphoric acid. The improvement is mainly due to the lesser tendency of these acids to absorb on Pt. Kinetics do not have a strong dependence on pH or O2 solubility when mass transport is not involved. Concentrated sulfonyl acids were usually found to wet Teflon resulting in the flooding of Teflon-bonded gas fed electrodes and poor performance at high current densities. These perfluorinated electrolytes were, however, found to be useful as performance enhancing additives to concentrated phosphoric acid in some cases. The alpha, omega-bis-phosphonic acid with a perfluoroethylene bridge gave superior performance compared to phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures (up to 200 C) for 500 hours. Bis-phosphonic acids with higher CF2 to PO3H2 ratios dehydrated more readily at elevated temperatures, resulting in resistive voltage losses. New perfluorinated phosphonic acid containing olefins were found to be polymerizable. This suggests that with a reasonable synthetic effort, new kinds of ionomer membrames are attainable, and these may be superior to Nafion for fuel cell applications.

  4. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  5. Refining Lurgi tar acids

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, N.P.

    1984-04-17

    There is disclosed a process for removing tar bases and neutral oils from the Lurgi tar acids by treating the tar acids with aqueous sodium bisulfate to change the tar bases to salts and to hydrolyze the neutral oils to hydrolysis products and distilling the tar acids to obtain refined tar acid as the distillate while the tar base salts and neutral oil hydrolysis products remain as residue.

  6. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  7. 78 FR 20029 - Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic Acid; Tolerance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic..., polymer with adipic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid and ricinoleic acid (CAS Reg. No. 1357486-09- 9) when used as an inert ingredient in a pesticide formulation. Advance Polymer Technology submitted a...

  8. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  9. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  10. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  11. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  12. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Acid Lipase Disease Information Page What research is being ... research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency. Additional research studies hope to identify ...

  13. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  14. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  15. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  16. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  17. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  18. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  19. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  1. [Biosynthesis of adipic acid].

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Chen, Wujiu; Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-10-01

    Adipic acid is a six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, mainly for the production of polymers such as nylon, chemical fiber and engineering plastics. Its annual demand is close to 3 million tons worldwide. Currently, the industrial production of adipic acid is based on the oxidation of aromatics from non-renewable petroleum resources by chemo-catalytic processes. It is heavily polluted and unsustainable, and the possible alternative method for adipic acid production should be developed. In the past years, with the development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, green and clean biotechnological methods for adipic acid production attracted more attention. In this study, the research advances of adipic acid and its precursor production are reviewed, followed by addressing the perspective of the possible new pathways for adipic acid production.

  2. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  3. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  4. Biotransformation of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid by plant cell cultures of Eucalyptus perriniana.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hisashi; Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Hamada, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformations of phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid were investigated with plant-cultured cells of Eucalyptus perriniana. The plant-cultured cells of E. perriniana converted cinnamic acid into cinnamic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, p-coumaric acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid. p-Coumaric acid was converted into 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid, p-coumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, a new compound, caffeic acid, and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid. On the other hand, incubation of caffeic acid with cultured E. perriniana cells gave 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 3-O-(6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, a new compound, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, ferulic acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid. 4-O-β-D-Glucopyranosylferulic acid, ferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester were isolated from E. perriniana cells treated with ferulic acid.

  5. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  6. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  7. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  8. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  9. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W [Menlo Park, CA; Eggeman, Timothy J [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  10. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  11. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  12. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  13. Diterpenoid acids from Grindelia nana.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A A; Ahmed, A A; Tanaka, T; Iinuma, M

    2000-03-01

    Two new norditerpenoid acids of the labdane-type (norgrindelic acids), 4,5-dehydro-6-oxo-18-norgrindelic acid (1) and 4beta-hydroxy-6-oxo-19-norgrindelic acid (2), as well as a new grindelic acid derivative, 18-hydroxy-6-oxogrindelic acid (3), were isolated from the aerial parts of Grindelia nana. In addition, the known compounds, 6-oxogrindelic acid, grindelic acid, methyl grindeloate, 7alpha,8alpha-epoxygrindelic acid, and 4alpha-carboxygrindelic acid were also isolated. The structures of the new compounds were characterized on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  14. Structure of Acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Araujo, César L; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are enzymes that have been studied extensively due to the fact that their dysregulation is associated with pathophysiological conditions. This characteristic has been exploited for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. As an example, prostatic acid phosphatase was the first marker for metastatic prostate cancer diagnosis and the dysregulation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase is associated with abnormal bone resorption linked to osteoporosis. The pioneering crystallization studies on prostatic acid phosphatase and mammalian tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase conformed significant milestones towards the elucidation of the mechanisms followed by these enzymes (Schneider et al., EMBO J 12:2609-2615, 1993). Acid phosphatases are also found in nonmammalian species such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and plants, and most of them share structural similarities with mammalian acid phosphatase enzymes. Acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters following the general equation. Phosphate monoester + H2O -->/<-- alcohol + phosphate. The general classification "acid phosphatase" relies only on the optimum acidic pH for the enzymatic activity in assay conditions using non-physiological substrates. These enzymes accept a wide range of substrates in vitro, ranging from small organic molecules to phosphoproteins, constituting a heterogeneous group of enzymes from the structural point of view. These structural differences account for the divergence in cofactor dependences and behavior against substrates, inhibitors, and activators. In this group only the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase is a metallo-enzyme whereas the other members do not require metal-ion binding for their catalytic activity. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and erythrocytic acid phosphatase are not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate ion while the prostatic acid phosphatase is tartrate-sensitive. This is an important

  15. Acid activated montmorillonite as catalysts in methyl esterification reactions of lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Zatta, Leandro; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Wypych, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of acid activated montmorillonite in the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) is reported. Standard Montmorillonite (MMT) type STx-1 provided by the Clay Mineral Society repository was activated using phosphoric, nitric and sulphuric acids under different conditions and the resulting materials were characterized and evaluated as catalysts in the methyl esterification of lauric acid. Blank reactions carried out in the absence of any added catalyst presented conversions of 32.64, 69.79 and 79.23%, for alcohol:lauric acid molar ratios of 60:1, 12:1 and 6:1, respectively. In the presence of the untreated clay and using molar ratios of 12:1 and 6:1 with 12% of catalyst, conversions of 70.92 and 82.30% were obtained, respectively. For the acid activated clays, conversions up to 93.08% of lauric acid to methyl laurate were obtained, much higher than those observed for the thermal conversion or using untreated montmorillonite. Relative good correlations were observed between the catalytic activity and the development of acid sites and textural properties of the resulting materials. Therefore, a simple acid activation was able to improve the catalytic activity and produce clay catalysts that are environmental friendly, cost effective, noncorrosive and reusable.

  16. Use of super acids to digest chrysotile and amosite asbestos in simple mixtures or matrices found in building materials compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Petrakis, L.; Webster, R.P.

    1999-12-21

    A composition for converting asbestos-containing material to environmentally benign components is provided. The composition comprises a fluoro acid decomposing agent which can be applied to either amosite-containing thermal insulation or chrysotile-containing fire-proof material or to any asbestos-containing material which includes of chrysotile and amosite asbestos. The fluoro acid decomposing agent includes FP{sub 0}(OH){sub 2}, hexafluorophosphoric acid, a mixture of hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid and a mixture of hexafluorophosphoric acid and phosphoric acid. A method for converting asbestos-containing material to environmentally benign components is also provided.

  17. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid ... > For Parents > Folic Acid and Pregnancy A A A What's ...

  18. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  19. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  20. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Propa pH® Peel-Off Acne Mask ... pimples and skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat ... medications called keratolytic agents. Topical salicylic acid treats acne by reducing swelling and redness and unplugging blocked ...