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Sample records for acid pna probes

  1. Identification of PCR-amplified genetically modified organisms (GMOs) DNA by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in anion-exchange chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Stefano; Lesignoli, Francesca; Germini, Andrea; Faccini, Andrea; Sforza, Stefano; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2007-04-04

    PCR products obtained by selective amplification of transgenic DNA derived from food samples containing Roundup Ready soybean or Bt-176 maize have been analyzed by anion-exchange HPLC. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), oligonucleotide analogues known to bind to complementary single-stranded DNA with high affinity and specificity, have been used as specific probes in order to assess the identity of the peaks observed. Two different protocols were adopted in order to obtain single-stranded DNA: amplification with an excess of one primer or digestion of one DNA strand. The single-stranded DNA was mixed with the PNA probe, and the presence of a specific sequence was revealed through detection of the corresponding PNA:DNA peak with significantly different retention time. Advantages and limits of this approach are discussed. The method was tested with reference materials and subsequently applied to commercial samples.

  2. Peptide nucleic acid probes with charged photocleavable mass markers

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rachel J; Green, Philip S; Gale, Nittaya; Langley, G John

    2010-01-01

    Halogen-labelled peptide organic acid (HPOA) monomers have been synthesised and incorporated into sequence-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. Three different types of probe have been prepared; the unmodified PNA probe, the PNA probe with a mass marker, and the PNA probe with photocleavable mass marker. All three types of probe have been used in model studies to develop a mass spectrometry-based hybridisation assay for detection of point mutations in DNA. PMID:21687524

  3. Increased stability and specificity through combined hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and locked nucleic acid (LNA) to supercoiled plasmids for PNA-anchored "Bioplex" formation.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Karin E; Hasan, Maroof; Moreno, Pedro M; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Oprea, Iulian; Svahn, Mathias G; Simonson, E Oscar; Smith, C I Edvard

    2005-12-01

    Low cellular uptake and poor nuclear transfer hamper the use of non-viral vectors in gene therapy. Addition of functional entities to plasmids using the Bioplex technology has the potential to improve the efficiency of transfer considerably. We have investigated the possibility of stabilizing sequence-specific binding of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) anchored functional peptides to plasmid DNA by hybridizing PNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligomers as "openers" to partially overlapping sites on the opposite DNA strand. The PNA "opener" stabilized the binding of "linear" PNA anchors to mixed-base supercoiled DNA in saline. For higher stability under physiological conditions, bisPNA anchors were used. To reduce nonspecific interactions when hybridizing highly cationic constructs and to accommodate the need for increased amounts of bisPNA when the molecules are uncharged, or negatively charged, we used both PNA and LNA oligomers as "openers" to increase binding kinetics. To our knowledge, this is the first time that LNA has been used together with PNA to facilitate strand invasion. This procedure allows hybridization at reduced PNA-to-plasmid ratios, allowing greater than 80% hybridization even at ratios as low as 2:1. Using significantly lower amounts of PNA-peptides combined with shorter incubation times reduces unspecific binding and facilitates purification.

  4. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA): a model structure for the primordial genetic material?

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P E

    1993-12-01

    It is proposed that the primordial genetic material could have been peptide nucleic acids, i.e., DNA analogues having a peptide backbone. PNA monomers based on the amino acid, alpha, gamma-diaminobutyric acid or ornithine are suggested as compounds that could have been formed in the prebiotic soup. Finally, the possibility of a PNA/RNA world is presented, in which PNA constitutes the stable genetic material, while RNA which may be polymerized using the PNA as template accounts for enzymatic activities including PNA replication.

  5. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA): A model structure for the primordial genetic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Peter Egil

    1993-12-01

    It is proposed that the primordial genetic material could have been peptide nucleic aicds,i.e., DNA analogues having a peptide backbone. PNA momomers based on the amino acid, α, γ-diaminobutyric acid or ornithine are suggested as compounds that could have been formed in the prebiotic soup. Finally, the possibility of a PNA/RNA world is presented, in which PNA constitutes the stable genetic material, while RNA which may be polymerized using the PNA as template accounts for enzymatic activities including PNA replication.

  6. High affinity γPNA sandwich hybridization assay for rapid detection of short nucleic acid targets with single mismatch discrimination.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Johnathan M; Zhang, Li Ang; Manna, Arunava; Armitage, Bruce A; Ly, Danith H; Schneider, James W

    2013-07-08

    Hybridization analysis of short DNA and RNA targets presents many challenges for detection. The commonly employed sandwich hybridization approach cannot be implemented for these short targets due to insufficient probe-target binding strengths for unmodified DNA probes. Here, we present a method capable of rapid and stable sandwich hybridization detection for 22 nucleotide DNA and RNA targets. Stable hybridization is achieved using an n-alkylated, polyethylene glycol γ-carbon modified peptide nucleic acidPNA) amphiphile. The γPNA's exceptionally high affinity enables stable hybridization of a second DNA-based probe to the remaining bases of the short target. Upon hybridization of both probes, an electrophoretic mobility shift is measured via interaction of the n-alkane modification on the γPNA with capillary electrophoresis running buffer containing nonionic surfactant micelles. We find that sandwich hybridization of both probes is stable under multiple binding configurations and demonstrate single base mismatch discrimination. The binding strength of both probes is also stabilized via coaxial stacking on adjacent hybridization to targets. We conclude with a discussion on the implementation of the proposed sandwich hybridization assay as a high-throughput microRNA detection method.

  7. Fluorescence imaging of single-copy DNA sequences within the human genome using PNA-directed padlock probe assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yaroslavsky, Anastasia I.; Smolina, Irina V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a novel approach for fluorescent in situ detection of short, single-copy sequences within genomic DNA in human cells. The single copy sensitivity and single base specificity of our method is achieved due to the combination of three components. First, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe locally opens a chosen target site, which allows a padlock DNA probe to access the site and become ligated. Second, rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates thousands of single-stranded copies of the target sequence. Finally, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to visualize the amplified DNA. We validate this new technique by successfully detecting six unique target sites on human mitochondrial and autosomal DNA. We also demonstrate the high specificity of this method by detecting X- and Y- specific sequences on human sex chromosomes and by simultaneously detecting three unique target sites. Finally, we discriminate two target sites that differ by two nucleotides. The PNA-RCA-FISH approach is a unique in situ hybridization method capable of multi-target visualization within human chromosomes and nuclei that does not require DNA denaturation and is extremely sequence specific. PMID:23521801

  8. Yeasts identification in microfluidic devices using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, André M; Cruz-Moreira, Daniela; Cerqueira, Laura; Miranda, João M; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2017-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) is a highly specific molecular method widely used for microbial identification. Nonetheless, and due to the detection limit of this technique, a time-consuming pre-enrichment step is typically required before identification. In here we have developed a lab-on-a-chip device to concentrate cell suspensions and speed up the identification process in yeasts. The PNA-FISH protocol was optimized to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common yeast that is very relevant for several types of food industries. Then, several coin-sized microfluidic devices with different geometries were developed. Using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we modeled the hydrodynamics inside the microchannels and selected the most promising options. SU-8 structures were fabricated based on the selected designs and used to produce polydimethylsiloxane-based microchips by soft lithography. As a result, an integrated approach combining microfluidics and PNA-FISH for the rapid identification of S. cerevisiae was achieved. To improve fluid flow inside microchannels and the PNA-FISH labeling, oxygen plasma treatment was applied to the microfluidic devices and a new methodology to introduce the cell suspension and solutions into the microchannels was devised. A strong PNA-FISH signal was observed in cells trapped inside the microchannels, proving that the proposed methodology works as intended. The microfluidic designs and PNA-FISH procedure described in here should be easily adaptable for detection of other microorganisms of similar size.

  9. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is capable of enhancing hammerhead ribozyme activity with long but not with short RNA substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, E; Strunk, G; Schwenzer, B

    1997-01-01

    Long RNA substrates are inefficiently cleaved by hammerhead ribozymes in trans. Oligonucleotide facilitators capable of affecting the ribozyme activity by interacting with the substrates at the termini of the ribozyme provide a possibility to improve ribozyme mediated cleavage of long RNA substrates. We have examined the effect of PNA as facilitator in vitro in order to test if even artificial compounds have facilitating potential. Effects of 12mer PNA- (peptide nucleic acid), RNA- and DNA-facilitators of identical sequence were measured with three substrates containing either 942, 452 or 39 nucleotides. The PNA facilitator enhances the ribozyme activity with both, the 942mer and the 452mer substrate to a slightly smaller extent than RNA and DNA facilitators. This effect was observed up to PNA facilitator:substrate ratios of 200:1. The enhancement becomes smaller as the PNA facilitator:substrate ratio exceeds 200:1. With the 39mer substrate, the PNA facilitator decreases the ribozyme activity by more than 100-fold, even at PNA facilitator:substrate ratios of 1:1. Although with long substrates the effect of the PNA facilitator is slightly smaller than the effect of identical RNA or DNA facilitators, PNA may be a more practical choice for potential applications in vivo because PNA is much more resistant to degradation by cellular enzymes. PMID:9207013

  10. Sequence dependent N-terminal rearrangement and degradation of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, M.; Christensen, L.; Schmidt, J.; Haaima, G.; Orgel, L.; Nielsen, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of the PNA (peptide nucleic acid) thymine monomer inverted question markN-[2-(thymin-1-ylacetyl)]-N-(2-aminoaminoethyl)glycine inverted question mark and those of various PNA oligomers (5-8-mers) have been measured at room temperature (20 degrees C) as a function of pH. The thymine monomer undergoes N-acyl transfer rearrangement with a half-life of 34 days at pH 11 as analyzed by 1H NMR; and two reactions, the N-acyl transfer and a sequential degradation, are found by HPLC analysis to occur at measurable rates for the oligomers at pH 9 or above. Dependent on the amino-terminal sequence, half-lives of 350 h to 163 days were found at pH 9. At pH 12 the half-lives ranged from 1.5 h to 21 days. The results are discussed in terms of PNA as a gene therapeutic drug as well as a possible prebiotic genetic material.

  11. Optimization of a peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method for the detection of bacteria and disclosure of a formamide effect.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rita S; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2014-10-10

    Despite the fact that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a well-established technique to identify microorganisms, there is a lack of understanding concerning the interaction of the different factors affecting the obtained fluorescence. In here, we used flow cytometry to study the influence of three essential factors in hybridization - temperature, time and formamide concentration - in an effort to optimize the performance of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probe targeting bacteria (EUB338). The PNA-FISH optimization was performed with bacteria representing different families employing response surface methodology. Surprisingly, the optimum concentration of formamide varied according to the bacterium tested. While hybridization on the bacteria possessing the thickest peptidoglycan was more successful at nearly 50% (v/v) formamide, hybridization on all other microorganisms appeared to improve with much lower formamide concentrations. Gram staining and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to confirm that the overall effect of formamide concentration on the fluorescence intensity is a balance between a harmful effect on the bacterial cell envelope, affecting cellular integrity, and the beneficial denaturant effect in the hybridization process. We also conclude that microorganisms belonging to different families will require different hybridization parameters for the same FISH probe, meaning that an optimum universal PNA-FISH procedure is non-existent for these situations.

  12. Triage biodosimetry using centromeric/telomeric PNA probes and Giemsa staining to score dicentrics or excess fragments in non-stimulated lymphocyte prematurely condensed chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Karachristou, Ioanna; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Dimitriou, Panagiotis; Pantelias, Gabriel; Terzoudi, Georgia I

    2015-11-01

    The frequency of dicentric chromosomes in human peripheral blood lymphocytes at metaphase is considered as the "gold-standard" method for biological dosimetry and, presently, it is the most widely used for dose assessment. Yet, it needs lymphocyte stimulation and a 2-day culture, failing the requirement of rapid dose estimation, which is a high priority in radiation emergency medicine and triage biodosimetry. In the present work, we assess the applicability of cell fusion mediated premature chromosome condensation (PCC) methodology, which enables the analysis of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations directly in non-stimulated G0-lymphocytes, without the 2-day culture delay. Despite its advantages, quantification of an exposure by means of the PCC-method is not currently widely used, mainly because Giemsa-staining of interphase G0-lymphocyte chromosomes facilitates the analysis of fragments and rings, but not of dicentrics. To overcome this shortcoming, the PCC-method is combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using simultaneously centromeric/telomeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-probes. This new approach enables an accurate analysis of dicentric and centric ring chromosomes, which are formed within 8h post irradiation and will, therefore, be present in the blood sample by the time it arrives for dose estimation. For triage biodosimetry, a dose response curve for up to 10Gy was constructed and compared to that obtained using conventional metaphase analysis with Giemsa or centromeric/telomeric PNA-probes in metaphase. Since FISH is labor intensive, a simple PCC-method scoring Giemsa-stained fragments in excess of 46 was also assessed as an even more rapid approach for triage biodosimetry. First, we studied the rejoining kinetics of fragments and constructed a dose-response curve for 24h repair time. Then, its applicability was assessed for four different doses and compared with the PCC-method using centromeric/telomeric PNA-probes, through the

  13. Differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Kenneth; Haase, Gerhard; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens Jo/rgen; Stender, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The recent discovery of Candida dubliniensis as a separate species that traditionally has been identified as Candida albicans has led to the development of a variety of biochemical and molecular methods for the differentiation of these two pathogenic yeasts. rRNA sequences are well-established phylogenetic markers, and probes targeting species-specific rRNA sequences have been used in diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of microorganisms. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic with improved hybridization characteristics, and the neutral backbone of PNA probes offers significant advantages in whole-cell in situ hybridization assays. In this study, we developed PNA probes targeting the rRNAs of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and applied them to a fluorescence in situ hybridization method (PNA FISH) for differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. Liquid cultures were smeared onto microscope slides, heat fixed, and then hybridized for 30 min. Unhybridized PNA probe was removed by washing, and smears were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Evaluation of the PNA FISH method using smears of 79 C. dubliniensis and 70 C. albicans strains showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for both PNA probes. We concluded that PNA FISH is a powerful tool for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11682542

  14. Identification of Dekkera bruxellensis (Brettanomyces) from Wine by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Henrik; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Sørensen, Ditte; Broomer, Adam; Oliveira, Kenneth; Perry-O'Keefe, Heather; Sage, Andrew; Young, Barbara; Coull, James

    2001-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Brettanomyces is described. The test is based on fluorescein-labeled PNA probes targeting a species-specific sequence of the rRNA of Dekkera bruxellensis. The PNA probes were applied to smears of colonies, and results were interpreted by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained from testing 127 different yeast strains, including 78 Brettanomyces isolates from wine, show that the spoilage organism Brettanomyces belongs to the species D. bruxellensis and that the new method is able to identify Brettanomyces (D. bruxellensis) with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PMID:11157265

  15. Targeting peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers to mitochondria within cells by conjugation to lipophilic cations: implications for mitochondrial DNA replication, expression and disease

    PubMed Central

    Muratovska, Aleksandra; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Martin, Stephen W.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    The selective manipulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and expression within mammalian cells has proven difficult. One promising approach is to use peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers, nucleic acid analogues that bind selectively to complementary DNA or RNA sequences inhibiting replication and translation. However, the potential of PNAs is restricted by the difficulties of delivering them to mitochondria within cells. To overcome this problem we conjugated a PNA 11mer to a lipophilic phosphonium cation. Such cations are taken up by mitochondria through the lipid bilayer driven by the membrane potential across the inner membrane. As anticipated, phosphonium–PNA (ph–PNA) conjugates of 3.4–4 kDa were imported into both isolated mitochondria and mitochondria within human cells in culture. This was confirmed by using an ion-selective electrode to measure uptake of the ph–PNA conjugates; by cell fractionation in conjunction with immunoblotting; by confocal microscopy; by immunogold-electron microscopy; and by crosslinking ph–PNA conjugates to mitochondrial matrix proteins. In all cases dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential with an uncoupler prevented ph–PNA uptake. The ph–PNA conjugate selectively inhibited the in vitro replication of DNA containing the A8344G point mutation that causes the human mtDNA disease ‘myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibres’ (MERRF) but not the wild-type sequence that differs at a single nucleotide position. Therefore these modified PNA oligomers retain their selective binding to DNA and the lipophilic cation delivers them to mitochondria within cells. When MERRF cells were incubated with the ph–PNA conjugate the ratio of MERRF to wild-type mtDNA was unaffected, even though the ph–PNA content of the mitochondria was sufficient to inhibit MERRF mtDNA replication in a cell-free system. This unexpected finding suggests that nucleic acid derivatives cannot bind their complementary sequences during mt

  16. An amphipathic trans-acting phosphorothioate DNA element delivers uncharged PNA and PMO nucleic acid sequences in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Harsh V.; Beaucage, Serge L.

    2016-01-01

    An innovative approach to the delivery of uncharged peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) oligomers in mammalian cells is described and consists of extending the sequence of those oligomers with a short PNA-polyA or PMO-polyA tail. Recognition of the polyA-tailed PNA or PMO oligomers by an amphipathic trans-acting polythymidylic thiophosphate triester element (dTtaPS) results in efficient internalization of those oligomers in several cell lines. Our findings indicate that cellular uptake of the oligomers occurs through an energy-dependent mechanism and macropinocytosis appears to be the predo-minant endocytic pathway used for internalization. The functionality of the internalized oligomers is demonstrated by alternate splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding luciferase in HeLa pLuc 705 cells. Amphipathic phosphorothioate DNA elements may represent a unique class of cellular transporters for robust delivery of uncharged nucleic acid sequences in live mammalian cells. PMID:27516815

  17. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons.

  18. Application of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-PCR clamping technique to investigate the community structures of rhizobacteria associated with plant roots.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Masao; Ikenaga, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    The contamination of plant organelle (mitochondria and plastid) genes in the DNA extraction step becomes a major drawback in investigating the community structures of bacteria associated with plant samples. This is because organelle small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes are easily amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a set of universal primers for bacteria. To suppress the PCR amplification of the organelle SSU rRNA genes, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-PCR clamping technique was applied for selective amplification of bacterial SSU rRNA genes. The PNA oligomers, which had sequences that were complementary to mitochondria and plastid SSU rRNA genes, were designed to overlap the region in the 1492r primer-binding site. PCR with the PNA oligomers significantly suppressed the amplification of the organelle SSU rRNA genes from spinach and cucumber roots. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis showed that the conventional amplification without PNA oligomers generated the predominant T-RFLP fragments derived from mitochondria and plastids, whereas there was little detection of the rhizobacterial fragments. In contrast, several other T-RFLP fragments derived from rhizobacteria were detected in the products amplified with PNA oligomers, thereby enabling us to differentiate the community structures in spinach and cucumber roots. Thus, application of PNA-PCR clamping was considered to be effective and is a useful technique to amplify the rhizobacterial SSU rRNA genes from selectively extracted DNA containing plant mitochondria and plastid genes.

  19. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Topham, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like base pair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNADNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs.

  20. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH.

  1. In Vitro Assessment of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) - Peptide Conjugate Labeled With an Auger-Emitting Radionuclide for Prostate Cell Killing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    synthesis of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) that has an Auger-emitter (1-125) incorporated. By design the PNA will bind with mRNA and DNA associated with...bind with cell surface gastrin -releasing peptide receptors and be internalized (3). Binding with mRNA and nuclear DNA specific to the insulin-like...route proposed to prepare 10 is shown in Figure 1 (compounds 1-10). This synthesis began with the preparation of the base-reactive intermediate 5

  2. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is added to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and hybridized for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference strains representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084

  3. Role of SbmA in the uptake of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptide conjugates in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Vitali, Ally; Stach, James E M; Nielsen, Peter E

    2013-02-15

    Antisense PNA oligomers targeting essential genes (acpP or ftsZ) and conjugated to the delivery peptide L((KFF)(3)K) show complete growth inhibition of wild type E. coli strain (MG1655) with submicromolar MIC. In this study we show that resistant mutants generated against such PNA-peptide conjugates had disruptions in the region of sbmA, a gene encoding an inner membrane peptide transporter. The wild type sensitivity to the PNA conjugates was re-established in the resistance mutants by complementation with sbmA. Furthermore, deletion of sbmA in E. coli AS19, a strain that is sensitive to unmodified PNA, resulted in resistance to PNA. Finally, PNA conjugated with the corresponding non-biological H-D((KFF)(3)K) peptide retained antibacterial activity in sbmA deletion strains, whereas the same conjugate with a protease-sensitive linker did not. These results clearly identify SbmA as a carrier of naked PNA over the inner bacterial membrane and thereby infer that the peptide is transporting the PNA conjugates over the outer membrane. Strains lacking SbmA were used to screen novel peptide-PNA carriers that were SbmA-independent. Four such PNA-peptide conjugates, H-D((KFF)(3)K), H-(RFR)(4)-Ahx-βAla, H-(R-Ahx-R)(4)-Ahx-βAla, and H-(R-Ahx)(6)-βAla, were identified that utilize an alternative uptake mechanism but retain their antimicrobial potency. In addition SbmA is the first protein identified to recognize PNA.

  4. PNA microarrays for hybridisation of unlabelled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Ole; Feldner, Julia; Stephan, Achim; Schröder, Markus; Schnölzer, Martina; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Jacob, Anette

    2003-01-01

    Several strategies have been developed for the production of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) microarrays by parallel probe synthesis and selective coupling of full-length molecules. Such microarrays were used for direct detection of the hybridisation of unlabelled DNA by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. PNAs were synthesised by an automated process on filter-bottom microtitre plates. The resulting molecules were released from the solid support and attached without any purification to microarray surfaces via the terminal amino group itself or via modifications, which had been chemically introduced during synthesis. Thus, only full-length PNA oligomers were attached whereas truncated molecules, produced during synthesis because of incomplete condensation reactions, did not bind. Different surface chemistries and fitting modifications of the PNA terminus were tested. For an examination of coupling selectivity, bound PNAs were cleaved off microarray surfaces and analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Additionally, hybridisation experiments were performed to compare the attachment chemistries, with fully acetylated PNAs spotted as controls. Upon hybridisation of unlabelled DNA to such microarrays, binding events could be detected by visualisation of phosphates, which are an integral part of nucleic acids but missing entirely in PNA probes. Overall best results in terms of selectivity and sensitivity were obtained with thiol-modified PNAs on maleimide surfaces. PMID:14500847

  5. Development of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of the HER2 Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young K.; Evangelista, Jennifer; Aschenbach, Konrad; Johansson, Peter; Wen, Xinyu; Chen, Qingrong; Lee, Albert; Hempel, Heidi; Gheeya, Jinesh S.; Getty, Stephanie; Gomez, Romel; Khan, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have gained much interest as molecular recognition tools in biology, medicine and chemistry. This is due to high hybridization efficiency to complimentary oligonucleotides and stability of the duplexes with RNA or DNA. We have synthesized 15/16-mer PNA probes to detect the HER2 mRNA. The performance of these probes to detect the HER2 target was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence bead assays. The PNA probes have sufficiently discriminated between the wild type HER2 target and the mutant target with single base mismatches. Furthermore, the probes exhibited excellent linear concentration dependence between 0.4 to 400 fmol for the target gene. The results demonstrate potential application of PNAs as diagnostic probes with high specificity for quantitative measurements of amplifications or over-expressions of oncogenes. PMID:23593123

  6. Quaternized chitosan particles as ion exchange supports for label-free DNA detection using PNA probe and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meebungpraw, Jittima; Wiarachai, Oraphan; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Kiatkamjornwong, Suda; Hoven, Voravee P

    2015-10-20

    Quaternized chitosan particles are introduced as anion-exchanged captures to be used with a conformationally constrained pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for DNA sequence analysis. Methylated chitosan (MC) and methylated N-benzyl chitosan (MBzC) particles were obtained by heterogeneous chemical modification of ionically cross-linked chitosan particles via direct methylation and reductive benzylation/methylation, respectively. N,N,N-trimethylchitosan (TMC) and N-[(2-hydroxyl-3-trimethylammonium)propyl]chitosan chloride (HTACC) particles were prepared by ionic cross-linking of quaternized chitosan derivatives, homogeneously modified from chitosan, namely TMC and HTACC, respectively. The particles formed had a size in a sub-micrometer range and possessed positive charge. Investigation by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry suggested that some quaternized particles in combination with acpcPNA were capable of detecting a single mismatched base out of 9-14 base DNA sequences. Potential application of this technique for the detection of wild-type and mutant K-ras DNA, a gene that mutation is associated with certain cancers, has also been demonstrated.

  7. PNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Zambaldo, Claudio; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-encoded chemical libraries along with DNA-encoded libraries have provided a powerful new paradigm for library synthesis and ligand discovery. PNA-encoding stands out for its compatibility with standard solid phase synthesis and the technology has been used to prepare libraries of peptides, heterocycles and glycoconjugates. Different screening formats have now been reported including selection-based and microarray-based methods that have yielded specific ligands against diverse target classes including membrane receptors, lectins and challenging targets such as Hsp70.

  8. Thermal decomposition of HO2NO2 (peroxynitric acid, PNA): rate coefficient and determination of the enthalpy of formation.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Tomasz; Jiménez, Elena; Riffault, Veronique; Burkholder, James B; Ravishankara, A R

    2005-02-03

    Rate coefficients for the gas-phase thermal decomposition of HO(2)NO(2) (peroxynitric acid, PNA) are reported at temperatures between 331 and 350 K at total pressures of 25 and 50 Torr of N(2). Rate coefficients were determined by measuring the steady-state OH concentration in a mixture of known concentrations of HO(2)NO(2) and NO. The measured thermal decomposition rate coefficients k(-)(1)(T,P) are used in combination with previously published rate coefficient data for the HO(2)NO(2) formation reaction to yield a standard enthalpy for reaction 1 of Delta(r)H degrees (298K) = -24.0 +/- 0.5 kcal mol(-1) (uncertainties are 2sigma values and include estimated systematic errors). A HO(2)NO(2) standard heat of formation, Delta(f)H degrees (298K)(HO(2)NO(2)), of -12.6 +/- 1.0 kcal mol(-1) was calculated from this value. Some of the previously reported data on the thermal decomposition of HO(2)NO(2) have been reanalyzed and shown to be in good agreement with our reported value.

  9. Novel Methodology for Rapid Detection of KRAS Mutation Using PNA-LNA Mediated Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Itonaga, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Ibu; Warigaya, Kenji; Tamura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuki; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Murata, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting point mutation of human cancer cells quickly and accurately is gaining in importance for pathological diagnosis and choice of therapeutic approach. In the present study, we present novel methodology, peptide nucleic acid-locked nucleic acid mediated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (PNA-LNA mediated LAMP), for rapid detection of KRAS mutation using advantages of both artificial DNA and LAMP. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP reactions occurred under isothermal temperature conditions of with 4 primary primers set for the target regions on the KRAS gene, clamping PNA probe that was complimentary to the wild type sequence and LNA primers complementary to the mutated sequences. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was applied for cDNA from 4 kinds of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines with or without KRAS point mutation. The amplified DNA products were verified by naked-eye as well as a real-time PCR equipment. By PNA-LNA mediated LAMP, amplification of wild type KRAS DNA was blocked by clamping PNA probe, whereas, mutant type KRAS DNA was significantly amplified within 50 min. Mutant alleles could be detected in samples which diluted until 0.1% of mutant-to-wild type ratio. On the other hand, mutant alleles could be reproducibly with a mutant-to-wild type ratio of 30% by direct sequencing and of 1% by PNA-clamping PCR. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was much lower than the other conventional methods. Competition of LNA clamping primers complementary to two different subtypes (G12D and G12V) of mutant KRAS gene indicated different amplification time depend on subtypes of mutant cDNA. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP is a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive methodology for the detection of KRAS mutation.

  10. Novel Methodology for Rapid Detection of KRAS Mutation Using PNA-LNA Mediated Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Warigaya, Kenji; Tamura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuki; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Murata, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting point mutation of human cancer cells quickly and accurately is gaining in importance for pathological diagnosis and choice of therapeutic approach. In the present study, we present novel methodology, peptide nucleic acid—locked nucleic acid mediated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (PNA-LNA mediated LAMP), for rapid detection of KRAS mutation using advantages of both artificial DNA and LAMP. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP reactions occurred under isothermal temperature conditions of with 4 primary primers set for the target regions on the KRAS gene, clamping PNA probe that was complimentary to the wild type sequence and LNA primers complementary to the mutated sequences. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was applied for cDNA from 4 kinds of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines with or without KRAS point mutation. The amplified DNA products were verified by naked-eye as well as a real-time PCR equipment. By PNA-LNA mediated LAMP, amplification of wild type KRAS DNA was blocked by clamping PNA probe, whereas, mutant type KRAS DNA was significantly amplified within 50 min. Mutant alleles could be detected in samples which diluted until 0.1% of mutant-to-wild type ratio. On the other hand, mutant alleles could be reproducibly with a mutant-to-wild type ratio of 30% by direct sequencing and of 1% by PNA-clamping PCR. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was much lower than the other conventional methods. Competition of LNA clamping primers complementary to two different subtypes (G12D and G12V) of mutant KRAS gene indicated different amplification time depend on subtypes of mutant cDNA. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP is a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive methodology for the detection of KRAS mutation. PMID:26999437

  11. Rapid detection of urinary tract infections caused by Proteus spp. using PNA-FISH.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C; Azevedo, N F; Bento, J C; Cerca, N; Ramos, H; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2013-06-01

    We developed a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for the rapid detection of Proteus spp. in urine, using a novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Testing on 137 urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections has shown specificity and sensitivity values of 98 % (95 % CI, 93.2-99.7) and 100 % (95 % CI, 80,8-100), respectively, when compared with CHROMagar Orientation medium. Results indicate that PNA-FISH is a reliable alternative to traditional culture methods and can reduce the diagnosis time to approximately 2 h.

  12. Synthesis of DNA mimics representing HypNA-pPNA hetero-oligomers.

    PubMed

    Efimov, Vladimir A; Chakhmakhcheva, Oksana G

    2005-01-01

    The methods for the synthesis and purification of negatively charged peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-relative deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mimics containing alternating residues of phosphono peptide nucleic acid (pPNA) monomers and PNA-like monomers on the base of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline are described. Examples of the chimeric oligomers hybridization with complementary DNA and ribonucleic acid fragments are demonstrated.

  13. Discriminating typical and atypical cystic fibrosis-related bacteria by multiplex PNA-FISH.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Susana P; Carvalho, Daniel T; Pereira, Maria O; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to report the development of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to specifically detect the cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated traditional and atypical species Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Inquilinus limosus, respectively. PNA probes were designed in silico, developed and tested in smears prepared in phosphate-buffer saline (PBS), and in artificial sputum medium (ASM). A multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) approach using the designed probes was further validated in artificially contaminated clinical sputum samples and also applied in polymicrobial 24 h-old biofilms involving P. aeruginosa, I. limosus, and other CF-related bacteria. Both probes showed high predictive and experimental specificities and sensitivities. The multiplex PNA-FISH assay, associated with non-specific staining, was successfully adapted in the clinical samples and in biofilms of CF-related bacteria, allowing differentiating the community members and inferring about microbial-microbial interactions within the consortia. This study revealed the great potential of PNA-FISH as a diagnostic tool to discriminate between classical and less common CF-associated bacteria, being suitable to further describe species-dependent prevention strategies and deliver more effective target control therapeutics. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 355-367. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Thermodynamic studies on PNA and PNA/DNA dendrimer formation.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Maria; Musumeci, Domenica; Valente, Margherita; Roviello, Giovanni N; Sapio, Roberto; Pedone, Carlo; Bucci, Enrico M

    2007-01-01

    In this work we report a kinetic and thermodynamic study relative to the formation of gel systems based on PNA and PNA/DNA dendrimers, useful for drug delivery or diagnostic applications. We realized two kinds of systems: a PNA-based monomolecular system formed by an autoassembling PNA tridendron (A) and a PNA/DNA bimolecular system based on a PNA tridendron with a mixed sequence and a DNA crosslinker (B). Both systems have the ability to form a three-dimensional network by means of specific W-C base pairing.

  15. [Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method in the identifi cation of Candida species isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Gonca; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa Altay

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, increased number of patients who are hospitalized in intensive care units, received immunosuppressive therapy and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics that can lead an increase in the incidence of systemic candidiasis. In these patients, the most common clinical manifestation is candidemia. Since the identification of Candida species isolated from blood cultures is time consuming by conventional (morphological and biochemical) methods, rapid, reliable and accurate methods are needed. For this purpose novel systems have been developed to identify the agent directly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method for the identification of Candida species by comparing with the conventional methods. A total of 50 patients who were admitted to Erciyes University Medical Faculty Hospital clinics and followed with prediagnosis of systemic fungal infections whose blood cultures were positive for the yeasts between July 2011 and July 2012 were included in the study. The conventional identification of Candida isolates was performed by considering macroscopic and microscopic morphology, germ tube test, cycloheximide sensitivity, urease activity and carbohydrate assimilation patterns with API 20C AUX (bioMerieux, France) test. PNA FISH method was conducted by the use of a commercial kit namely Yeast Traffic Light(®) PNA FISH (AdvanDx, USA). According to morphological and biochemical characteristics (conventional methods), 19 (38%) out of 50 Candida isolates were identified as C.albicans, 12 (24%) as C.glabrata, five (10%) as C.parapsilosis, five (10%) as C.kefyr, four (8%) as C.krusei, two (4%) as C.guilliermondii, two (4%) as C.tropicalis and one (2%) as C.lusitaniae. On the other hand, 24 (48%) of the isolates were identified as C.albicans/C.parapsilosis (with green fluorescence), 16 (32%) as C.glabrata/C.krusei (with red fluorescence) and one (%2) as C.tropicalis (with yellow

  16. DNA display of PNA-tagged ligands: a versatile strategy to screen libraries and control geometry of multidentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Winssinger, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade, several technologies have emerged to access nucleic acid-tagged libraries and select the fittest compound within such libraries. This perspective focuses on recent development with PNA-tagged small molecules displayed on DNA templates for screening purposes and to probe the optimal geometry in multivalent interactions.

  17. Positively charged polymer brush-functionalized filter paper for DNA sequence determination following Dot blot hybridization employing a pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Laopa, Praethong S; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Hoven, Voravee P

    2013-01-07

    As inspired by the Dot blot analysis, a well known technique in molecular biology and genetics for detecting biomolecules, a new paper-based platform for colorimetric detection of specific DNA sequences employing peptide nucleic acid (PNA) as a probe has been developed. In this particular study, a pyrrolidinyl PNA bearing a conformationally rigid d-prolyl-2-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid backbone (acpcPNA) was used as a probe. The filter paper was modified to be positively charged with grafted polymer brushes of quaternized poly(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (QPDMAEMA) prepared by surface-initiated polymerization of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate from the filter paper via ARGET ATRP followed by quaternization with methyl iodide. Following the Dot blot format, a DNA target was first immobilized via electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of the QPDMAEMA brushes and negative charges of the phosphate backbone of DNA. Upon hybridization with the biotinylated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (b-PNA) probe, the immobilized DNA can be detected by naked eye observation of the yellow product generated by the enzymatic reaction employing HRP-labeled streptavidin. It has been demonstrated that this newly developed assay was capable of discriminating between complementary and single base mismatch targets at a detection limit of at least 10 fmol. In addition, the QPDMAEMA-grafted filter paper exhibited a superior performance to the commercial membranes, namely Nylon 66 and nitrocellulose.

  18. PNA-based fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of bacteria in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Fazli, Mustafa; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with PNA probes (PNA-FISH) that target specific bacterial ribosomal RNA sequences is a powerful and rapid tool for identification of bacteria in clinical samples. PNA can diffuse readily through the bacterial cell wall due to its uncharged backbone, and PNA-FISH can be performed with high specificity due to the extraordinary thermal stability of RNA-PNA hybrid complexes. We describe a PNA-FISH procedure and provide examples of the application of PNA-FISH for the identification of bacteria in chronic wounds, cystic fibrosis lungs, and soft tissue fillers. In all these cases, bacteria can be identified in biofilm aggregates, which may explain their recalcitrance to antibiotic treatment.

  19. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  20. Base pair opening kinetics study of the aegPNA:DNA hydrid duplex containing a site-specific GNA-like chiral PNA monomer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lim, Jisoo; Lee, Eun-Hae; Ok, Taedong; Yoon, Juyoung; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2011-09-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are one of the most widely used synthetic DNA mimics where the four bases are attached to a N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (aeg) backbone instead of the negative-charged phosphate backbone in DNA. We have developed a chimeric PNA (chiPNA), in which a chiral GNA-like γ(3)T monomer is incorporated into aegPNA backbone. The base pair opening kinetics of the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrid duplexes were studied by NMR hydrogen exchange experiments. This study revealed that the aegPNA:DNA hybrid is much more stable duplex and is less dynamic compared to DNA duplex, meaning that base pairs are opened and reclosed much more slowly. The site-specific incorporation of γ(3)T monomer in the aegPNA:DNA hybrid can destabilize a specific base pair and its neighbors, maintaining the thermal stabilities and dynamic properties of other base pairs. Our hydrogen exchange study firstly revealed the unique kinetic features of base pairs in the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrids, which will provide an insight into the development of methodology for specific DNA recognition using PNA fragments.

  1. Human leukocyte antigen haplotype phasing by allele-specific enrichment with peptide nucleic acid probes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Nicholas M; Pouton, Colin W; Irving, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    Targeted capture of large fragments of genomic DNA that enrich for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system haplotypes has utility in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current methods of HLA matching are based on inference or familial studies of inheritance; and each approach has its own inherent limitations. We have designed and tested a probe–target-extraction method for capturing specific HLA haplotypes by hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to alleles of the HLA-DRB1 gene. Short target fragments contained in plasmids were initially used to optimize the method followed by testing samples of genomic DNA from human subjects with preselected HLA haplotypes and obtained approximately 10% enrichment for the specific haplotype. When performed with high-molecular-weight genomic DNA, 99.0% versus 84.0% alignment match was obtained for the specific haplotype probed. The allele-specific target enrichment that we obtained can facilitate the elucidation of haplotypes between the 65 kb separating the HLA-DRB1 and the HLA-DQA1 genes, potentially spanning a total distance of at least 130 kb. Allele-specific target enrichment with PNA probes is a straightforward technique that has the capability to improve the resolution of DNA and whole genome sequencing technologies by allowing haplotyping of enriched DNA and crucially, retaining the DNA methylation profile. PMID:24936514

  2. Disruption of Higher Order DNA Structures in Friedreich’s Ataxia (GAA)n Repeats by PNA or LNA Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Bergquist, Helen; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Álvarez-Asencio, Rubén; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Rutland, Mark. W.; Smith, C. I. Edvard; Good, Liam; Nielsen, Peter E.; Zain, Rula

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated with epigenetic modifications. With the aim of interfering with higher order H-DNA (like) DNA structures within pathological (GAA)n expansions, we examined sequence-specific interaction of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with (GAA)n repeats of different lengths (short: n=9, medium: n=75 or long: n=115) by chemical probing of triple helical and single stranded regions. We found that a triplex structure (H-DNA) forms at GAA repeats of different lengths; however, single stranded regions were not detected within the medium size pathological repeat, suggesting the presence of a more complex structure. Furthermore, (GAA)4-PNA binding of the repeat abolished all detectable triplex DNA structures, whereas (CTT)5-PNA did not. We present evidence that (GAA)4-PNA can invade the DNA at the repeat region by binding the DNA CTT strand, thereby preventing non-canonical-DNA formation, and that triplex invasion complexes by (CTT)5-PNA form at the GAA repeats. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotides also inhibited triplex formation at GAA repeat expansions, and atomic force microscopy analysis showed significant relaxation of plasmid morphology in the presence of GAA-LNA. Thus, by inhibiting disease related higher order DNA structures in the Frataxin gene, such PNA and LNA oligomers may have potential for discovery of drugs aiming at recovering Frataxin expression. PMID:27846236

  3. Feasibility of Affibody Molecule-Based PNA-Mediated Radionuclide Pretargeting of Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Honarvar, Hadis; Westerlund, Kristina; Altai, Mohamed; Sandström, Mattias; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2016-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa), non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a potential as targeting agents for radionuclide imaging of cancer. However, high renal re-absorption of Affibody molecules prevents their use for radionuclide therapy with residualizing radiometals. We hypothesized that the use of Affibody-based peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated pretargeting would enable higher accumulation of radiometals in tumors than in kidneys. To test this hypothesis, we designed an Affibody-PNA chimera ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 containing a 15-mer HP1 PNA recognition tag and a complementary HP2 hybridization probe permitting labeling with both 125I and 111In. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 bound specifically to HER2-expressing BT474 and SKOV-3 cancer cells in vitro, with a KD of 6±2 pM for binding to SKOV-3 cells. Specific high affinity binding of the radiolabeled complementary PNA probe 111In-/125I-HP2 to ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-treated cells was demonstrated. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 demonstrated specific accumulation in SKOV-3 xenografts in BALB/C nu/nu mice and rapid clearance from blood. Pre-saturation of SKOV-3 with non-labeled anti-HER2 Affibody or the use of HER2-negative Ramos xenografts resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake of 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1. The complementary PNA probe 111In/125I-HP2 accumulated in SKOV-3 xenografts when ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 was injected 4 h earlier. The tumor accumulation of 111In/125I-HP2 was negligible without ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-injection. The uptake of 111In-HP2 in SKOV-3 xenografts was 19±2 %ID/g at 1 h after injection. The uptake in blood and kidneys was approximately 50- and 2-fold lower, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that the use of Affibody-based PNA-mediated pretargeting enables specific delivery of radiometals to tumors and provides higher radiometal concentration in tumors than in kidneys. PMID:26722376

  4. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  5. Homologous PNA Hybridization to Noncanonical DNA G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Kormuth, Karen A; Woolford, John L; Armitage, Bruce A

    2016-03-29

    Potential guanine (G) quadruplex-forming sequences (QFSs) found throughout the genomes and transcriptomes of organisms have emerged as biologically relevant structures. These G-quadruplexes represent novel opportunities for gene regulation at the DNA and RNA levels. Recently, the definition of functional QFSs has been expanding to include a variety of unconventional motifs, including relatively long loop sequences (i.e., >7 nucleotides) separating adjacent G-tracts. We have identified a QFS within the 25S rDNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisae that features a long loop separating the two 3'-most G-tracts. An oligonucleotide based on this sequence, QFS3, folds into a stable G-quadruplex in vitro. We have studied the interaction between QFS3 and several loop mutants with a small, homologous (G-rich) peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer that is designed to form a DNA/PNA heteroquadruplex. The PNA successfully invades the DNA quadruplex target to form a stable heteroquadruplex, but with surprisingly high PNA:DNA ratios based on surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometric results. A model for high stoichiometry PNA-DNA heteroquadruplexes is proposed, and the implications for quadruplex targeting by G-rich PNA are discussed.

  6. A peptide nucleic acid-functionalized carbon nitride nanosheet as a probe for in situ monitoring of intracellular microRNA.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xianjiu; Wang, Quanbo; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-06-21

    A novel probe for recognition of both cancer cells and intracellular microRNA (miRNA) is designed by functionalizing a carbon nitride nanosheet (f-CNNS) with a Cy5-labeled peptide nucleic acid (Cy5-PNA) and folate. The interaction between Cy5-PNA and CNNS quenches the fluorescence of Cy5, and the presence of folate endows the probe with good specificity to folate acceptor overexpressed cells. The probe can be specifically taken up by cancer cells with an incubation step. Upon the recognition of the PNA to complementary miRNA, the hybridization product is released from the CNNS surface, which leads to the fluorescence recovery and provides a specific method for sensing of miRNA. Thus, this probe can be used for cell-specific intracellular miRNA sensing with a confocal microscope. Using miRNA-18a as a target model, the dynamic changes of its expression level inside living cells can be monitored with the proposed method. This method possesses promising applications in the study of miRNA related bioprocesses and biomedicine.

  7. The role of reactivity in DNA templated native chemical PNA ligation during PCR.

    PubMed

    Roloff, Alexander; Seitz, Oliver

    2013-06-15

    DNA templated fluorogenic reactions have been used as a diagnostic tool for the sequence specific detection of nucleic acids; and it has been shown that the native chemical ligation between thioester- and 1,2-aminothiol-modified PNA probes is amongst the most selective DNA detection methods reported. We explored whether a DNA templated reaction can be interfaced with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This endeavor posed a significant challenge. The reactive groups involved must be sufficiently stable to tolerate the high temperature applied in the PCR process. Nevertheless, the ligation reaction must proceed very rapidly and sequence specifically within the short time available in the annealing and primer extension steps before denaturation is used after approx. 1 min to commence the next PCR cycle. This required a careful optimization of the ternary complex architecture as well as adjustments of probe length and probe reactivities. Our results point to the prime importance of the ligation architecture. We show that once suitable annealing sites have been identified less reactive probe sets may be preferable if sequence specificity is of major concern. The reactivity tuning enabled the development of an in-PCR ligation, which was used for the single nucleotide specific typing of the V600E (T1799A) point mutation in the human BRaf gene. Showcasing the efficiency and sequence specificity of native chemical PNA ligation, attomolar template proofed sufficient to trigger signal while a 1000-fold higher load of single mismatched template failed to induce appreciable signal.

  8. Focused upon hybridization: rapid and high sensitivity detection of DNA using isotachophoresis and peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Ostromohov, Nadya; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel assay for rapid and high sensitivity detection of nucleic acids without amplification. Utilizing the neutral backbone of peptide nucleic acids (PNA), our method is based on the design of low electrophoretic mobility PNA probes, which do not focus under isotachophoresis (ITP) unless bound to their target sequence. Thus, background noise associated with free probes is entirely eliminated, significantly improving the signal-to-noise ratio while maintaining a simple single-step assay requiring no amplification steps. We provide a detailed analytical model and experimentally demonstrate the ability to detect targets as short as 17 nucleotides (nt) and a limit of detection of 100 fM with a dynamic range of 5 decades. We also demonstrate that the assay can be successfully implemented for detection of DNA in human serum without loss of signal. The assay requires 15 min to complete, and it could potentially be used in applications where rapid and highly sensitive amplification-free detection of nucleic acids is desired.

  9. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  10. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  11. Potent and sustained cellular inhibition of miR-122 by lysine-derivatized peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and phosphorothioate locked nucleic acid (LNA)/2'-O-methyl (OMe) mixmer anti-miRs in the absence of transfection agents

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Adrian G.; Threlfall, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient cell delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) is a key issue for their potential therapeutic use. It has been shown recently that some ONs can be delivered into cells without the use of transfection agents (gymnosis), but this generally requires cell incubation over several days and high amounts of ONs (micromolar concentrations). Here we have targeted microRNA 122 (miR-122), a small non-coding RNA involved in regulation of lipid metabolism and in the replication of hepatitis C virus, with ONs of different chemistries (anti-miRs) by gymnotic delivery in cell culture. Using a sensitive dual-luciferase reporter assay, anti-miRs were screened for their ability to enter liver cells gymnotically and inhibit miR-122 activity. Efficient miR-122 inhibition was obtained with cationic PNAs and 2'-O-methyl (OMe) and Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA)/OMe mixmers containing either phosphodiester (PO) or phosphorothioate (PS) linkages at sub-micromolar concentrations when incubated with cells for just 4 hours. Furthermore, PNA and PS-containing anti-miRs were able to sustain miR-122 inhibitory effects for at least 4 days. LNA/OMe PS anti-miRs were the most potent anti-miR chemistry tested in this study, an ON chemistry that has been little exploited so far as anti-miR agents towards therapeutics. PMID:22567190

  12. DNA biosensors implemented on PNA-functionalized microstructured optical fibers Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candiani, A.; Giannetti, S.; Cucinotta, A.; Bertucci, A.; Manicardi, A.; Konstantaki, M.; Margulis, W.; Pissadakis, S.; Corradini, R.; Selleri, S.

    2013-05-01

    A novel DNA sensing platform based on a Peptide Nucleic Acid - functionalized Microstructured Optical Fibers gratings has been demonstrated. The inner surface of different MOFs has been functionalized using PNA probes, OligoNucleotides mimic that are well suited for specific DNA target sequences detection. The hybrid sensing systems were tested for optical DNA detection of targets of relevance in biomedical application, using the cystic fibrosis gene mutation, and food-analysis, using the genomic DNA from genetic modified organism soy flour. After the solutions of DNA molecules has been infiltrated inside the fibers capillaries and hybridization has occurred, oligonucleotidefunctionalized gold nanoparticles were infiltrated and used to form a sandwich-like system to achieve signal amplification. Spectral measurements of the reflected signal reveal a clear wavelength shift of the reflected modes when the infiltrated complementary DNA matches with the PNA probes placed on the inner fiber surface. Measurements have also been made using the mismatched DNA solution for the c, containing a single nucleotide polymorphism, showing no significant changes in the reflected spectrum. Several experiments have been carried out demonstrating the reproducibility of the results and the high selectivity of the sensors, showing the simplicity and the potential of this approach.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Study of Small PNA Molecules in Lipid-Water System

    PubMed Central

    Weroński, Paweł; Jiang, Yi; Rasmussen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of small peptide nucleic acid (PNA) molecules, synthetic analogs of DNA, at a lipid bilayer in water. At neutral pH, without any salt, and in the NPnγT ensemble, two similar PNA molecules (6-mers) with the same nucleic base sequence and different terminal groups are investigated at the interface between water and a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer. The results of our simulations suggest that at low ionic strength of the solution, both PNA molecules adsorb at the lipid-water interface. In the case where the PNA molecule has charged terminal groups, the main driving force of adsorption is the electrostatic attraction between the charged groups of PNA and the lipid heads. The main driving force of adsorption of the PNA molecule with neutral terminal groups is the hydrophobic interaction of the nonpolar groups. Our simulations suggest that the system free energy change associated with PNA adsorption at the lipid-water interface is on the order of several tens of kT per PNA molecule in both cases. PMID:17307825

  14. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis.

  15. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  16. γ Sulphate PNA (PNA S): highly selective DNA binding molecule showing promising antigene activity.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; Moggio, Loredana; Malgieri, Gaetano; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Saviano, Michele; Pedone, Carlo; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs), nucleic acid analogues showing high stability to enzyme degradation and strong affinity and specificity of binding toward DNA and RNA are widely investigated as tools to interfere in gene expression. Several studies have been focused on PNA analogues with modifications on the backbone and bases in the attempt to overcome solubility, uptake and aggregation issues. γ PNAs, PNA derivatives having a substituent in the γ position of the backbone show interesting properties in terms of secondary structure and affinity of binding toward complementary nucleic acids. In this paper we illustrate our results obtained on new analogues, bearing a sulphate in the γ position of the backbone, developed to be more DNA-like in terms of polarity and charge. The synthesis of monomers and oligomers is described. NMR studies on the conformational properties of monomers and studies on the secondary structure of single strands and triplexes are reported. Furthermore the hybrid stability and the effect of mismatches on the stability have also been investigated. Finally, the ability of the new analogue to work as antigene, interfering with the transcription of the ErbB2 gene on a human cell line overexpressing ErbB2 (SKBR3), assessed by FACS and qPCR, is described.

  17. Continuously tunable nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lucia R; Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Fang, John Z; Evans, Emily R; Pinto, Alessandro; Pekker, Irena; Boykin, Richard; Ngouenet, Celine; Webster, Philippa J; Beechem, Joseph; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-12-01

    In silico-designed nucleic acid probes and primers often do not achieve favorable specificity and sensitivity tradeoffs on the first try, and iterative empirical sequence-based optimization is needed, particularly in multiplexed assays. We present a novel, on-the-fly method of tuning probe affinity and selectivity by adjusting the stoichiometry of auxiliary species, which allows for independent and decoupled adjustment of the hybridization yield for different probes in multiplexed assays. Using this method, we achieved near-continuous tuning of probe effective free energy. To demonstrate our approach, we enforced uniform capture efficiency of 31 DNA molecules (GC content, 0-100%), maximized the signal difference for 11 pairs of single-nucleotide variants and performed tunable hybrid capture of mRNA from total RNA. Using the Nanostring nCounter platform, we applied stoichiometric tuning to simultaneously adjust yields for a 24-plex assay, and we show multiplexed quantitation of RNA sequences and variants from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples.

  18. Quantitative rRNA-targeted solution-based hybridization assay using peptide nucleic acid molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-12-01

    The potential of a solution-based hybridization assay using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) molecular beacon (MB) probes to quantify 16S rRNA of specific populations in RNA extracts of environmental samples was evaluated by designing PNA MB probes for the genera Dechloromonas and Dechlorosoma. In a kinetic study with 16S rRNA from pure cultures, the hybridization of PNA MB to target 16S rRNA exhibited a higher final hybridization signal and a lower apparent rate constant than the hybridizations to nontarget 16S rRNAs. A concentration of 10 mM NaCl in the hybridization buffer was found to be optimal for maximizing the difference between final hybridization signals from target and nontarget 16S rRNAs. Hybridization temperatures and formamide concentrations in hybridization buffers were optimized to minimize signals from hybridizations of PNA MB to nontarget 16S rRNAs. The detection limit of the PNA MB hybridization assay was determined to be 1.6 nM of 16S rRNA. To establish proof for the application of PNA MB hybridization assays in complex systems, target 16S rRNA from Dechlorosoma suillum was spiked at different levels to RNA isolated from an environmental (bioreactor) sample, and the PNA MB assay enabled effective quantification of the D. suillum RNA in this complex mixture. For another environmental sample, the quantitative results from the PNA MB hybridization assay were compared with those from clone libraries.

  19. Synthesis, characterisation and bioimaging of a fluorescent rhenium-containing PNA bioconjugate.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Gilles; Pinto, Antonio; Neumann, Sebastian; Sosniak, Anna M; Seitz, Michael; Merz, Klaus; Heumann, Rolf; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2012-02-28

    A new rhenium tricarbonyl complex of a bis(quinoline)-derived ligand (2-azido-N,N-bis((quinolin-2-yl)methyl)ethanamine, L-N(3)), namely [Re(CO)(3)(L-N(3))]Br was synthesized and characterized in-depth, including by X-ray crystallography. [Re(CO)(3)(L-N(3))]Br exhibits a strong UV absorbance in the range 300-400 nm with a maximum at 322 nm, and upon photoexcitation, shows two distinct emission bands at about 430 and 560 nm in various solvents (water, ethylene glycol). [Re(CO)(3)(L-N(3))]Br could be conjugated, on a solid phase, to a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer using the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction (Cu-AAC, "click" chemistry) and an alkyne-containing PNA building block to give Re-PNA. It was demonstrated that upon hybridisation with a complementary DNA strand (DNA), the position of the maxima and emission intensity for the hybrid Re-PNA·DNA remained mainly unchanged compared to those of the single strand Re-PNA. The rhenium-containing PNA oligomer Re-PNA could be then mediated in living cells where they have been shown to be non-toxic contrary to the general notion that organometallic compounds are usually unstable under physiological conditions and/or cytotoxic. Furthermore, Re-PNA could be detected in living cells using fluorescent microscopy.

  20. Anionic magnetite nanoparticle conjugated with pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid for DNA base discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadsai, Sudarat; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Nakkuntod, Maliwan; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2016-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were surface modified with anionic poly( N-acryloyl glycine) (PNAG) and streptavidin for specific interaction with biotin-conjugated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Hydrodynamic size ( D h) of PNAG-grafted MNPs varied from 334 to 496 nm depending on the loading ratio of the MNP to NAG in the reaction. UV-visible and fluorescence spectrophotometries were used to confirm the successful immobilization of streptavidin and PNA on the MNPs. About 291 pmol of the PNA/mg MNP was immobilized on the particle surface. The PNA-functionalized MNPs were effectively used as solid supports to differentiate between fully complementary and non-complementary/single-base mismatch DNA using the PNA probe. These novel anionic MNPs can be efficiently applicable for use as a magnetically guidable support for DNA base discrimination.

  1. Differential expression and regulation of PNA and UEA-1 bindings in rabbit uterus during preimplantation period.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Duan, Cui-Cui; Wang, Qu-Yuan; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2013-04-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) were used as probes to study the distribution of β-gal (1→3) ga1Nac and α-L-Fucose in rabbit uterus during early pregnancy. PNA binding was mainly localized on the surface of uterine glandular and luminal epithelium. There were no positive signals on day 1 of pregnancy. PNA binding gradually increased from day 2 and reached its highest level on days 3 and 4. The distribution of PNA binding gradually declined from day 5 and reached a low level on day 7. However, UEA-1 binding was only localized on the luminal epithelial during early pregnancy. A high level of UEA-1 binding had been found on the luminal epithelium on day 1 of pregnancy and low level of positive signals had been found in the uterus on days 2 and 3. UEA-1 binding increased gradually and reached its highest level on day 4. Then the distribution of UEA-1 binding sharply declined and no positive signals were found on days 5-7. The distribution of PNA and UEA-1 bindings in pseudopregnant uterus was similar to that in normal pregnant uterus. During estrus cycle, there was no detectable PNA binding signal in uterus. But, a high level of UEA-1 binding was found in the luminal epithelium of estrus uterus. In ovariectomized rabbit uterus, progesterone significantly induced the expression of PNA binding, while estrogen stimulated UEA-1 binding expression. These results suggested that the distribution of PNA and UEA-1 bindings in rabbit uterus may be related to rabbit implantation.

  2. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  3. Electrochemiluminescent monomers for solid support syntheses of Ru(II)-PNA bioconjugates: multimodal biosensing tools with enhanced duplex stability.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Barbante, Gregory J; Francis, Paul S; Hogan, Conor F; Bond, Alan M; Gasser, Gilles; Spiccia, Leone

    2012-03-05

    The feasibility of devising a solid support mediated approach to multimodal Ru(II)-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers is explored. Three Ru(II)-PNA-like monomers, [Ru(bpy)(2)(Cpp-L-PNA-OH)](2+) (M1), [Ru(phen)(2)(Cpp-L-PNA-OH)](2+) (M2), and [Ru(dppz)(2)(Cpp-L-PNA-OH)](2+) (M3) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, Cpp-L-PNA-OH = [2-(N-9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)aminoethyl]-N-[6-(2-(pyridin-2yl)pyrimidine-4-carboxamido)hexanoyl]-glycine), have been synthesized as building blocks for Ru(II)-PNA oligomers and characterized by IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electrochemistry and elemental analysis. As a proof of principle, M1 was incorporated on the solid phase within the PNA sequences H-g-c-a-a-t-a-a-a-a-Lys-NH(2) (PNA1) and H-P-K-K-K-R-K-V-g-c-a-a-t-a-a-a-a-lys-NH(2) (PNA4) to give PNA2 (H-g-c-a-a-t-a-a-a-a-M1-lys-NH(2)) and PNA3 (H-P-K-K-K-R-K-V-g-c-a-a-t-a-a-a-a-M1-lys-NH(2)), respectively. The two Ru(II)-PNA oligomers, PNA2 and PNA3, displayed a metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition band centered around 445 nm and an emission maximum at about 680 nm following 450 nm excitation in aqueous solutions (10 mM PBS, pH 7.4). The absorption and emission response of the duplexes formed with the cDNA strand (DNA: 5'-T-T-T-T-T-T-T-A-T-T-G-C-T-T-T-3') showed no major variations, suggesting that the electronic properties of the Ru(II) complexes are largely unaffected by hybridization. The thermal stability of the PNA·DNA duplexes, as evaluated from UV melting experiments, is enhanced compared to the corresponding nonmetalated duplexes. The melting temperature (T(m)) was almost 8 °C higher for PNA2·DNA duplex, and 4 °C for PNA3·DNA duplex, with the stabilization attributed to the electrostatic interaction between the cationic residues (Ru(II) unit and positively charged lysine/arginine) and the polyanionic DNA backbone. In presence of tripropylamine (TPA) as co-reactant, PNA2, PNA3, PNA2

  4. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in-situ hybridization for identification of Vibrio spp. in aquatic products and environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Li, Ke; Wu, Shan; Shuai, Jiangbing; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-08-03

    A peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method was developed for specific detection of the Vibrio genus. In silico analysis by BLAST and ProbeCheck showed that the designed PNA probe targeting the 16S rRNAs was suitable for specific identification of Vibrio. Specificity and sensitivity of the probe Vib-16S-1 were experimentally verified by its reactivity against 18 strains of 9 Vibrio species and 14 non-Vibrio strains of 14 representative species. The PNA-FISH assay was able to identify 47 Vibrio positive samples from selectively enriched cultures of 510 samples of aquatic products and environments, comparable with the results obtained by biochemical identification and real-time PCR. We conclude that PNA-FISH can be an alternative method for rapid identification of Vibrio species in a broad spectrum of seafood or related samples.

  5. Highly selective single nucleotide polymorphism recognition by a chiral (5S) PNA beacon.

    PubMed

    Totsingan, Filbert; Tedeschi, Tullia; Sforza, Stefano; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2009-01-01

    A chiral peptide nucleic acid (PNA) beacon containing a C-5 modified monomer based on L-lysine was synthesized. The terminal amino group of the lysine side chain was linked to a spacer for future applications on surfaces. The PNA beacon bears a carboxyfluorescein fluorophore and a dabcyl quencher at opposite ends. The DNA binding properties were compared with those of a homologous PNA beacon containing only achiral monomers. Both beacons underwent a fluorescence increase in the presence of complementary DNA, with higher efficiency and higher selectivity (evaluated using single mismatched DNA sequences) observed for the chiral monomer containing PNA. Ion exchange (IE) HPLC with fluorimetric detection was used in combination with the beacon for the selective detection of complementary DNA. A fluorescent peak corresponding to the PNA beacon:DNA duplex was observed at a very low detection limit (1 nM). The discriminating capacity of the chiral PNA beacon for a single mismatch was found to be superior to those observed with the unmodified one, thus confirming the potency of chirality for increasing the affinity and specificity of DNA recognition.

  6. Effect of chirality in gamma-PNA: PNA interaction, another piece in the picture

    PubMed Central

    Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Modification of the PNA backbone can be used to broaden their utility by introducing new functional groups. In particular, gamma-modified PNA have been found to be quite effective in a number of applications, and exhibit particularly high DNA binding affinity. The introduction of one side chain imply that the achiral backbone of PNA becomes chiral, and binding properties depend on the stereochemistry. A new paper on gamma-modified PNA by Ly and co-workers complete the existing knowledge by displaying that in binding to complementary PNA stereochemical orthogonality can be demonstrated. This opens the way to the exploitation of stereochemical features in diagnostic assays and in nanofabrication. PMID:26744081

  7. PNA-peptide assembly in a 3D DNA nanocage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Flory, Justin D; Shinde, Sandip; Lin, Su; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Fromme, Petra

    2013-05-08

    Proteins and peptides fold into dynamic structures that access a broad functional landscape; however, designing artificial polypeptide systems is still a great challenge. Conversely, DNA engineering is now routinely used to build a wide variety of 2D and 3D nanostructures from hybridization based rules, and their functional diversity can be significantly expanded through site specific incorporation of the appropriate guest molecules. Here we demonstrate a new approach to rationally design 3D nucleic acid-amino acid complexes using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to assemble peptides inside a 3D DNA nanocage. The PNA-peptides were found to bind to the preassembled DNA nanocage in 5-10 min at room temperature, and assembly could be performed in a stepwise fashion. Biophysical characterization of the DNA-PNA-peptide complex was performed using gel electrophoresis as well as steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Based on these results we have developed a model for the arrangement of the PNA-peptides inside the DNA nanocage. This work demonstrates a flexible new approach to leverage rationally designed nucleic acid (DNA-PNA) nanoscaffolds to guide polypeptide engineering.

  8. Probing Lewis Acid-Base Interactions with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics: The Electronic Absorption Spectrum of p-Nitroaniline in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Benedito J Costa; Rivelino, Roberto; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-07-02

    The structure and dynamics of p-nitroaniline (PNA) in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at T = 315 K and ρ = 0.81 g cm(-3) are investigated by carrying out Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, and the electronic absorption spectrum in scCO2 is determined by time dependent density functional theory. The structure of the PNA-scCO2 solution illustrates the role played by Lewis acid-base (LA-LB) interactions. In comparison with isolated PNA, the ν(N-O) symmetric and asymmetric stretching modes of PNA in scCO2 are red-shifted by -17 and -29 cm(-1), respectively. The maximum of the charge transfer (CT) absorption band of PNA in scSCO2 is at 3.9 eV, and the predicted red-shift of the π → π* electronic transition relative to the isolated gas-phase PNA molecule reproduces the experimental value of -0.35 eV. An analysis of the relationship between geometry distortions and excitation energies of PNA in scCO2 shows that the π → π* CT transition is very sensitive to changes of the N-O bond distance, strongly indicating a correlation between vibrational and electronic solvatochromism driven by LA-LB interactions. Despite the importance of LA-LB interactions to explain the solvation of PNA in scCO2, the red-shift of the CT band is mainly determined by electrostatic interactions.

  9. Phospholipid conjugate for intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gang; Fang, Huafeng; Song, Yinyin; Bielska, Agata A.; Wang, Zhenghui; Taylor, John-Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have a number of attractive features that have made them an ideal choice for antisense and antigene-based tools, probes and drugs, but their poor membrane permeability has limited their application as therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Herein we report a general method for the synthesis of phospholipid-PNAs (LP-PNAs), and compare the effect of non-cleavable lipids and bioreductively cleavable lipids (L and LSS) and phospholipid (LP) on the splice-correcting bioactivity of a PNA bearing the cell penetrating Arg9 group (PNA-R9). While the three constructs show similar and increasing bioactivity at 1–3 μM, the activity of LP-PNA-R9 continues to increase from 4–6 μM while the activity of L-PNA-R9 remains constant and LSS-PNA-R9 decreases rapidly in parallel with their relative cytotoxicity. The activity of both LP-PNA-R9 and L-PNA-R9 were found to dramatically increase with chloroquine, as expected for an endocytotic entry mechanism. Both constructs were also found to have CMC values of 1.0 and 4.5 μM in 150 mM NaCl, pH 7 water, suggesting that micelle formation may play a hitherto unrecognized role in modulating toxicity and/or facilitating endocytosis. PMID:19678628

  10. Zip nucleic acids are potent hydrolysis probes for quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Clément; Moreau, Valérie; Deglane, Gaëlle; Voirin, Emilie; Erbacher, Patrick; Lenne-Samuel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Zip nucleic acids (ZNAs) are oligonucleotides conjugated with cationic spermine units that increase affinity for their target. ZNAs were recently shown to enable specific and sensitive reactions when used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription. Here, we report their use as quantitative PCR hydrolysis probes. Ultraviolet duplex melting data demonstrate that attachment of cationic residues to the 3′ end of an oligonucleotide does not alter its ability to discriminate nucleotides nor the destabilization pattern relative to mismatch location in the oligonucleotide sequence. The stability increase provided by the cationic charges allows the use of short dual-labeled probes that significantly improve single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Longer ZNA probes were shown to display reduced background fluorescence, therefore, generating greater sensitivity and signal level as compared to standard probes. ZNA probes thus provide broad flexibility in assay design and also represent an effective alternative to minor groove binder- and locked nucleic-acid-containing probes. PMID:20071749

  11. Antimicrobial Peptide-PNA Conjugates Selectively Targeting Bacterial Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-22

    RXR)4XB and (KFF)3K, were previously reported as a potent permeabilizer against E. coli and MRSA cells (Mellbye, 2009). (RW)4D, a small dendrimeric ...lethal concentration (Liu, 2007). Scheme 1. Synthesis of PNA- dendrimer conjugate. (a) (RW)4D-cysteine (b)Free PNA (C) PNA-(RW)4D conjugates

  12. Diagnosis of HNF-1alpha mutations on a PNA zip-code microarray by single base extension.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae Yang; Park, Hyun Gyu; Jung, Sung-Ouk; Park, JaeChan

    2005-02-01

    In the present study, we exploited the superior features of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to develop an efficient PNA zip-code microarray for the detection of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) mutations that cause type 3 maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). A multi-epoxy linker compound was synthesized and used to achieve an efficient covalent linking of amine-modified PNA to an aminated glass surface. PCR was performed to amplify the genomic regions containing the mutation sites. The PCR products were then employed as templates in a subsequent multiplex single base extension reaction using chimeric primers with 3' complementarity to the specific mutation site and 5' complementarity to the respective PNA zip-code sequence on the microarray. The primers were extended by a single base at each corresponding mutation site in the presence of biotin-labeled ddNTPs, and the products were hybridized to the PNA microarray. Compared to the corresponding DNA, the PNA zip-code sequence showed a much higher duplex specificity for the complementary DNA sequence. The PNA zip-code microarray was finally stained with streptavidin-R-phycoerythrin to generate a fluorescent signal. Using this strategy, we were able to correctly diagnose several mutation sites in exon 2 of HNF-1alpha with a wild-type and mutant samples including a MODY3 patient. This work represents one of the few successful applications of PNA in DNA chip technology.

  13. Signal enhancement for gene detection based on a redox reaction of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) mediated by ferrocene at the terminal of a peptide nucleic acid as a probe with hybridization-amenable conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiroshi; Tao, Hiroaki

    2008-07-01

    Electrochemically enhanced DNA detection was demonstrated by utilizing the couple of a synthesized ferrocene-terminated peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with a cysteine anchor and a sacrificial electron donor [Fe(CN)(6)](4-). DNA detection sensors were prepared by modifying a gold electrode surface with a mixed monolayer of the probe PNA and 11-hydroxy-1-undecanethiol (11-HUT), protecting [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) from any unexpected redox reaction. Before hybridization, the terminal ferrocene moiety of the probe was subject to a redox reaction due to the flexible probe structure and, in the presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-), the observed current was amplified based on regeneration of the ferrocene moiety. Hybridization decreased the redox current of the ferrocene. This occurred because hybridization rigidified the probe structure: the ferrocene moiety was then removed from the electrode surface, and the redox reaction of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) was again prevented. The change in the anodic current before and after hybridization was enhanced 1.75-fold by using the electron donor [Fe(CN)(6)](4-). Sequence-specific detection of the complementary target DNA was also demonstrated.

  14. Focus on PNA Flexibility and RNA Binding using Molecular Dynamics and Metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verona, Massimiliano Donato; Verdolino, Vincenzo; Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Corradini, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) can efficiently target DNA or RNA acting as chemical tools for gene regulation. Their backbone modification and functionalization is often used to increase the affinity for a particular sequence improving selectivity. The understanding of the trading forces that lead the single strand PNA to bind the DNA or RNA sequence is preparatory for any further rational design, but a clear and unique description of this process is still not complete. In this paper we report further insights into this subject, by a computational investigation aiming at the characterization of the conformations of a single strand PNA and how these can be correlated to its capability in binding DNA/RNA. Employing Metadynamics we were able to better define conformational pre-organizations of the single strand PNA and γ-modified PNA otherwise unrevealed through classical molecular dynamics. Our simulations driven on backbone modified PNAs lead to the conclusion that this γ-functionalization affects the single strand preorganization and targeting properties to the DNA/RNA, in agreement with circular dichroism (CD) spectra obtained for this class of compounds. MD simulations on PNA:RNA dissociation and association mechanisms allowed to reveal the critical role of central bases and preorganization in the binding process.

  15. Focus on PNA Flexibility and RNA Binding using Molecular Dynamics and Metadynamics

    PubMed Central

    Verona, Massimiliano Donato; Verdolino, Vincenzo; Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Corradini, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) can efficiently target DNA or RNA acting as chemical tools for gene regulation. Their backbone modification and functionalization is often used to increase the affinity for a particular sequence improving selectivity. The understanding of the trading forces that lead the single strand PNA to bind the DNA or RNA sequence is preparatory for any further rational design, but a clear and unique description of this process is still not complete. In this paper we report further insights into this subject, by a computational investigation aiming at the characterization of the conformations of a single strand PNA and how these can be correlated to its capability in binding DNA/RNA. Employing Metadynamics we were able to better define conformational pre-organizations of the single strand PNA and γ-modified PNA otherwise unrevealed through classical molecular dynamics. Our simulations driven on backbone modified PNAs lead to the conclusion that this γ-functionalization affects the single strand preorganization and targeting properties to the DNA/RNA, in agreement with circular dichroism (CD) spectra obtained for this class of compounds. MD simulations on PNA:RNA dissociation and association mechanisms allowed to reveal the critical role of central bases and preorganization in the binding process. PMID:28211525

  16. Detection of unamplified genomic DNA by a PNA-based microstructured optical fiber (MOF) Bragg-grating optofluidic system.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Manicardi, Alex; Candiani, Alessandro; Giannetti, Sara; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Spoto, Giuseppe; Konstantaki, Maria; Pissadakis, Stavros; Selleri, Stefano; Corradini, Roberto

    2015-01-15

    Microstructured optical fibers containing microchannels and Bragg grating inscribed were internally functionalized with a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe specific for a gene tract of the genetically modified Roundup Ready soy. These fibers were used as an optofluidic device for the detection of DNA by measuring the shift in the wavelength of the reflected IR light. Enhancement of optical read-out was obtained using streptavidin coated gold-nanoparticles interacting with the genomic DNA captured in the fiber channels (0%, 0.1%, 1% and 10% RR-Soy), enabling to achieve statistically significant, label-free, and amplification-free detection of target DNA in low concentrations, low percentages, and very low sample volumes. Computer simulations of the fiber optics based on the finite element method (FEM) were consistent with the formation of a layer of organic material with an average thickness of 39 nm for the highest percentage (10% RR soy) analysed.

  17. A Template-Mediated Click-Click Reaction: PNA-DNA, PNA-PNA (or Peptide) Ligation, and Single Nucleotide Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaohua; Li, Hong; Seidman, Michael

    2010-08-01

    A highly efficient chemical ligation was developed for quantitative conjugation of PNA with DNA (PNA or peptide) using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. While PNAs with an alkyne at the C-terminus and an azide at the N-terminus have been used, an efficient click-click reaction occurs. The PNA click ligation is sequence-specific and capable of single nucleotide discrimination.

  18. A new method for ABO genotyping using fluorescence melting curve analysis based on peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungmyung; Park, Hyun-Chul; An, Sanghyun; Ahn, Eu-Ree; Lee, Yang-Han; Kim, Mi-Jung; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Jae Sin; Jung, Jin Wook; Lim, Sikeun

    2015-09-01

    ABO genotyping has been routinely used to identify suspects or unknown remains in crime investigations. Probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) is a powerful tool for mutation detection and is based on melting temperature shifts due to thermal denaturation. In the present study, we developed a new method for ABO genotyping using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe-based FMCA. This method allowed for the simultaneous detection of three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in the ABO gene (nucleotide positions 261, 526, and 803) and the determination of 14 ABO genotypes (A/A, A/O01 or A/O02, A/O03, B/B, B/O01 or B/O02, B/O03, O01/O01 or O01/O02 or O02/O02, O01/O03 or O02/O03, O03/O03, A/B, cis-AB01/A, cis-AB01/B, cis-AB01/O01 or cis-AB01/O02, and cis-AB01/cis-AB01). Using this method, we analyzed 80 samples and successfully identified ABO genotypes (A/A [n=5], A/O01 or A/O02 [n=23], B/B [n=3], B/O01 or B/O02 [n=18], A/B [n=9], O01/O01 or O01/O02 or O02/O02 [n=20], cis-AB01/A [n=1], and cis-AB01/O01 or cis-AB01/O02 [n=1]). In addition, all steps in the method, including polymerase chain reaction, PNA probe hybridization, and FMCA, could be performed in one single closed tube in less than 3h. Since no processing or separation steps were required during analysis, this method was more convenient and rapid than traditional methods and reduced the risk of contamination. Thus, this method may be an effective and helpful tool in forensic investigations.

  19. Pseudo-complementary PNA actuators as reversible switches in dynamic DNA nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Damian; Famulok, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The structural reorganization of nanoscale DNA architectures is a fundamental aspect in dynamic DNA nanotechnology. Commonly, DNA nanoarchitectures are reorganized by means of toehold-expanded DNA sequences in a strand exchange process. Here we describe an unprecedented, toehold-free switching process that relies on pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acid (pcPNA) by using a mechanism that involves double-strand invasion. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated by application of these peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) as switches in a DNA rotaxane architecture. The monomers required for generating the pcPNA were obtained by an improved synthesis strategy and were incorporated into a PNA actuator sequence as well as into a short DNA strand that subsequently was integrated into the rotaxane architecture. Alternate addition of a DNA and PNA actuator sequence allowed the multiple reversible switching between a mobile rotaxane macrocycle and a stationary pseudorotaxane state. The switching occurs in an isothermal process at room temperature and is nearly quantitative in each switching step. pcPNAs can potentially be combined with light- and toehold-based switches, thus broadening the toolbox of orthogonal switching approaches for DNA architectures that open up new avenues in dynamic DNA nanotechnology. PMID:23444144

  20. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Shan; Li, Ke; Shuai, Jiangbing; Dong, Qiang; Fang, Weihuan

    2012-07-02

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method in conjunction with fluorescin-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes (PNA-FISH) for detection of Listeria species was developed. In silico analysis showed that three PNA probes Lis-16S-1, Lm-16S-2 and Liv-16S-5 were suitable for specific identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii, respectively. These probes were experimentally verified by their reactivity against 19 strains of six Listeria species (excluding newly described species Listeria marthii and Listeria rocourtiae) and eight other bacterial species. The PNA-FISH method was optimized as 30 min of hybridization with 0.2% Triton X-100 in the solution and used to identify 85 Listeria strains from individual putative Listeria colonies on PALCAM agar plates streaked from selectively enriched cultures of 780 food or food-related samples. Of the 85 Listeria strains, thirty-seven were identified as L. monocytogenes with the probe Lm-16S-2 and two as L. ivanovii with the probe Liv-16S-5 which was in agreement with the results obtained by the API LISTERIA method. Thus, the PNA-FISH protocol has the potential for identification of pathogenic Listeria spp. from food or food-related samples.

  1. Expanding the scope of PNA-encoded synthesis (PES): Mtt-protected PNA fully orthogonal to fmoc chemistry and a broad array of robust diversity-generating reactions.

    PubMed

    Chouikhi, Dalila; Ciobanu, Mihai; Zambaldo, Claudio; Duplan, Vincent; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2012-10-01

    Nucleic acid-encoded libraries are emerging as an attractive and highly miniaturized format for the rapid identification of protein ligands. An important criterion in the synthesis of nucleic acid encoded libraries is the scope of reactions that can be used to introduce molecular diversity and devise divergent pathways for diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS). To date, the protecting group strategies that have been used in peptide nucleic acid (PNA) encoded synthesis (PES) have limited the choice of reactions used in the library synthesis to just a few prototypes. Herein, we describe the preparation of PNA monomers with a protecting group combination (Mtt/Boc) that is orthogonal to Fmoc-based synthesis and compatible with a large palette of reactions that have been productively used in DOS (palladium cross-couplings, metathesis, reductive amination, amidation, heterocycle formation, nucleophilic addition, conjugate additions, Pictet-Spengler cyclization). We incorporate γ-modifications in the PNA backbone that are known to enhance hybridization and solubility. We demonstrate the robustness of this strategy with a library synthesis that is characterized by MALDI MS analysis at every step.

  2. PNA-DNA hybridization study using labeled streptavidin by voltammetry and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyun; Tiefenauer, Louis; Tian, Shengjun; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2006-01-15

    Using ferrocene-streptavidin conjugates as amplifiers, we recently have demonstrated the simultaneous detection of DNA hybridization to peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-modified gold surfaces at the femtomole level by electrochemical and surface plasmon resonance techniques (Liu, J.; Tian, S.; Tiefenauer, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Knoll, W. Anal. Chem. 2005, 77, 2756-2761). In this paper, a detailed study of the binding behavior of PNA-DNA is presented by square wave voltammetry and surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The different binding constants for fully matched and single-mismatched DNA were obtained. The effect of the buffer concentration on the PNA-DNA hybrids was investigated using labeled streptavidin by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and SPFS. At high ionic strength, both the CV and SPFS signals were restrained dramatically, which is most probably due to a conformational change of the short-strand PNA-DNA helices on the surface. We conclude that the combination of electrochemical techniques with SPFS is very useful for the study of short DNA structure transformation.

  3. Low temperature assembly of functional 3D DNA-PNA-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Flory, Justin D; Simmons, Chad R; Lin, Su; Johnson, Trey; Andreoni, Alessio; Zook, James; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Fromme, Petra

    2014-06-11

    Proteins have evolved to carry out nearly all the work required of living organisms within complex inter- and intracellular environments. However, systematically investigating the range of interactions experienced by a protein that influence its function remains challenging. DNA nanostructures are emerging as a convenient method to arrange a broad range of guest molecules. However, flexible methods are needed for arranging proteins in more biologically relevant 3D geometries under mild conditions that preserve protein function. Here we demonstrate how peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control the assembly of cytochrome c (12.5 kDa, pI 10.5) and azurin (13.9 kDa, pI 5.7) proteins into separate 3D DNA nanocages, in a process that maintains protein function. Toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement is introduced as a method to purify PNA-protein conjugates. The PNA-proteins were assembled within 2 min at room temperature and within 4 min at 11 °C, and hybridize with even greater efficiency than PNA conjugated to a short peptide. Gel electrophoresis and steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy were used to investigate the effect of protein surface charge on its interaction with the negatively charged DNA nanocage. These data were used to generate a model of the DNA-PNA-protein complexes that show the negatively charged azurin protein repelled away from the DNA nanocage while the positively charged cytochrome c protein remains within and closely interacts with the DNA nanocage. When conjugated to PNA and incorporated into the DNA nanocage, the cytochrome c secondary structure and catalytic activity were maintained, and its redox potential was reduced modestly by 20 mV possibly due to neutralization of some positive surface charges. This work demonstrates a flexible new approach for using 3D nucleic acid (PNA-DNA) nanostructures to control the assembly of functional proteins, and facilitates further investigation of protein interactions as well

  4. Designer nucleic acids to probe and program the cell.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Yamuna; Bathe, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in nucleic acid sequencing, structural, and computational technologies have resulted in dramatic progress in our understanding of nucleic acid structure and function in the cell. This knowledge, together with the predictable base-pairing of nucleic acids and powerful synthesis and expression capabilities now offers the unique ability to program nucleic acids to form precise 3D architectures with diverse applications in synthetic and cell biology. The unique modularity of structural motifs that include aptamers, DNAzymes, and ribozymes, together with their well-defined construction rules, enables the synthesis of functional higher-order nucleic acid complexes from these subcomponents. As we illustrate here, these highly programmable, smart complexes are increasingly enabling researchers to probe and program the cell in a sophisticated manner that moves well beyond the use of nucleic acids for conventional genetic manipulation alone.

  5. Noninvasive molecular imaging of MYC mRNA expression in human breast cancer xenografts with a [99mTc]peptide-peptide nucleic acid-peptide chimera.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaobing; Aruva, Mohan R; Qin, Wenyi; Zhu, Weizhu; Sauter, Edward R; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells typically display elevated levels of Myc protein due to overexpression of MYC mRNA, and elevated insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) due to overexpression of IGF1R mRNA. We hypothesized that scintigraphic detection of MYC peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes with an IGF1 peptide loop on the C-terminus, and a [99mTc]chelator peptide on the N-terminus, could measure levels of MYC mRNA noninvasively in human IGF1R-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer xenografts in nude mice. We prepared the chelator-MYC PNA-IGF1 peptide, as well as a 4-nt mismatch PNA control, by solid-phase synthesis. We imaged MCF7 xenografts scintigraphically and measured the distribution of [99mTc]probes by scintillation counting of dissected tissues. MCF7 xenografts in nude mice were visualized at 4 and 24 h after tail vein administration of the [99mTc]PNA probe specific for MYC mRNA, but not with the mismatch control. The [99mTc]probes distributed normally to the kidneys, livers, tumors, and other tissues. Molecular imaging of oncogene mRNAs in solid tumors with radiolabel-PNA-peptide chimeras might provide additional genetic characterization of preinvasive and invasive breast cancers.

  6. Is it possible to study the kinetic parameters of interaction between PNA and parallel and antiparallel DNA by stopped-flow fluorescence?

    PubMed

    Barbero, N; Cauteruccio, S; Thakare, P; Licandro, E; Viscardi, G; Visentin, S

    2016-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are among the most interesting and versatile artificial structural mimics of nucleic acids and exhibit peculiar and important properties (i.e. high chemical stability, and a high resistance to cellular enzymes and nucleases). Despite their unnatural structure, they are able to recognize and bind DNA and RNA in a very high, specific and selective manner. One of the most popular, easy and reliable method to measure the stability of PNA-DNA hybrid systems is the melting temperature but the thermodynamic data are obtained using a big quantity of materials failing to provide information on the kinetics of the interaction. In the present work, the PNA decamer 6, with the TCACTAGATG sequence of nucleobases, and the corresponding fluorescent PNA-FITU (fluorescein isothiourea) decamer 8 were synthesized with standard manual Boc-based chemistry. The interaction of the PNA-FITU with parallel and antiparallel DNA has been studied by stopped-flow fluorescence, which is proposed as an alternative technique to obtain the kinetic parameters of the binding. The great advantage of using the stopped-flow technique is the possibility of studying the kinetics of the PNA-DNA duplex formation in a physiological environment. In particular, fluorescence stopped-flow technique has been exploited to compare the affinity of two PNA-DNA duplexes since it can discriminate between parallel and antiparallel DNA binding.

  7. A new system for the amplification of biological signals: RecA and complimentary single strand DNA probes on a leaky surface acoustic wave biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Chen, Ming; Luo, Yang; Deng, Kun; Chen, Dong; Fu, Weiling

    2014-10-15

    This research describes a new amplification signals system of the leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) bis-peptide nucleic acid (bis-PNA) biosensor for the simple, sensitive and rapid detection of the target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The system consists of a RecA protein-coated complementary single-stranded DNA (cssDNA) probe complex that amplifies the biological signal to improve the sensitivity of the biosensor. The bis-PNA probe for detecting HPV was first immobilized on a gold surface membrane of the detection channel. After the probe was completely hybridized with the corresponding target DNA, different concentrations of the "RecA protein-complementary single strand DNA probe" were added to react with the bis-PNA/dsDNA complex. The phase shift of the LSAW biosensors, which was measured and found to be most significant when the RecA protein was 45 μg/mL and the ATPγS was 2.5 mmol/L. Compared with other concentrations (P<0.01) of RecA and ATPγS, the value of the phase shift was (11.74 ± 1.03) degrees and the ratio of the phase shift and hybridization time clearly outperformed that of the other concentrations. Compared to the direct hybridization of the bis-PNA probe and the target DNA sequence, the sensitivity was effectively improved and the detection time was significantly shortened. PNA binding adjacent to the area of the target sequence homologous to the probe significantly increased the yield of the hybridization reaction between the PNA/dsDNA complex and the RecA protein-coated cssDNA probe. In this condition, the phase shift was significantly obvious and the detection time was significantly shortened. In conclusion, the combination of the RecA protein-coated cssDNA probe and the LSAW bis-PNA biosensor provides sensitivity and simple and rapid detection of clinical trace pathogenic microorganisms.

  8. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    PubMed Central

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  9. THE APPLICATION OF PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID PROBES FOR RAPID DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF EUBACTERIA, STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN RECREATIONAL BEACHES OF S. FLORIDA. (R828830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, S...

  10. Computer selection of oligonucleotide probes from amino acid sequences for use in gene library screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Ye, J H; Wallace, D C

    1984-01-11

    We present a computer program, FINPROBE, which utilizes known amino acid sequence data to deduce minimum redundancy oligonucleotide probes for use in screening cDNA or genomic libraries or in primer extension. The user enters the amino acid sequence of interest, the desired probe length, the number of probes sought, and the constraints on oligonucleotide synthesis. The computer generates a table of possible probes listed in increasing order of redundancy and provides the location of each probe in the protein and mRNA coding sequence. Activation of a next function provides the amino acid and mRNA sequences of each probe of interest as well as the complementary sequence and the minimum dissociation temperature of the probe. A final routine prints out the amino acid sequence of the protein in parallel with the mRNA sequence listing all possible codons for each amino acid.

  11. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label.

    PubMed

    Yotapan, Nattawut; Charoenpakdee, Chayan; Wathanathavorn, Pawinee; Ditmangklo, Boonsong; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2014-01-01

    DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA-DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes.

  12. Use of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Definitive, Rapid Identification of Five Common Candida Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Mallonee, Amanda B.; Kwiatkowski, Nicole P.; Merz, William G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated a 2.5-h peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay with five Candida species-specific probes to identify Candida colonies and compared it to standard 2-h to 5-day phenotypic identification methods. Suspensions were made and slides were prepared and read for fluorescence per the manufacturer's instructions. Sensitivity was 99% (109/110), and specificity was 99% (129/130). PNA-FISH can rapidly identify those Candida species isolated most frequently. PMID:17804657

  13. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  14. Electrochemical genosensor based on peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR and asymmetric PCR techniques: Electrostatic interactions with a metal cation.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Kagan; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji; Nagatani, Naoki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2006-04-01

    The unique structure of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), linking the N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine units that create a neutral backbone, and prevent it from acting as a primer for DNA polymerase, has been utilized in an electrochemical biosensor scheme for simple and sensitive detection of hybridization. When the PNA is targeted against a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or wild-type site on the gene, PNA-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamping method effectively blocks the formation of a PCR product. In our report, PNA probe for PCR clamping was targeted against the wild-type site of alcohol dehydrogenase. The electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged DNA and neutral PNA molecules with redox-active metal cation cobalt(III)hexamine ([Co(NH3)6]3+) were monitored using differential pulse voltammetry. The electrostatic binding of [Co(NH3)6]3+ to DNA provided the basis for the discrimination against PNA/PNA, PNA/DNA, and DNA/DNA hybrid molecules. We have optimized the experimental conditions, such as probe concentration, [Co(NH3)6]3+ concentration, accumulation time for [Co(NH3)6]3+, and target concentration. A new pretreatment method has also been employed to allow fast and simple detection of hybridization reaction between the PCR amplicon and the probe on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. This method was based on the application of a high-temperature treatment (95 degrees C, 5 min), followed by a 1-min incubation in the presence of DNA primers. The excess concentration of DNA primers prevented the rehybridization of the denatured strands, while enabling the target gene sequence to bind with the immobilized probe. Additionally, asymmetric PCR was employed to detect the presence of genetically modified organism in standard Roundup Ready soybean samples. The amplicons of asymmetric PCR, which were predominantly single-stranded DNA as a result of unequal primer concentration, hybridized with the DNA probe on the sensor surface efficiently. The

  15. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  16. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  17. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  18. Unique base-pair breathing dynamics in PNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Leijon, M; Sehlstedt, U; Nielsen, P E; Gräslund, A

    1997-08-22

    Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, derived from 1H-NMR measurements of the imino proton exchange rates upon titration with the exchange catalyst ammonia, are reported for two mixed-sequence peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA hybrids and their counterpart DNA duplex. The exchange times of the imino protons in the PNA strands extrapolate to very short base-pair lifetimes in the limit of infinite exchange catalyst concentration. This is not due to generally less stable base-pairs in PNA-DNA hybrids, since the lifetimes, apparent dissociation constants and thermodynamic stability (DeltaG degrees ) of the innermost DNA guanine imino protons are similar in the hybrid duplexes and in the DNA duplex. In addition, the apparent dissociation constants determined for PNA bases of the hybrids are of the same order as those of the corresponding bases in the DNA duplex. An exchange process from the closed state was found to be inconsistent with the experimental data. From these results, we conclude that opening and closing rates of the PNA guanine and thymine bases are at least two orders of magnitude higher than those of the corresponding bases in the DNA duplex. Unusual kinetics in the hybrids is also evident from the destabilization of the complementary DNA strand thymine bases, which exhibit base-pair dissociation constants increased by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to what is observed in the DNA duplex, while the DNA strand guanine bases are largely unaffected. The general pattern of the base-pair dynamics in the hybrids obtained when using trimethylamine as an exchange catalyst is the same as when using ammonia. However, the long base-pair lifetimes i. e. those of the DNA duplex and the guanine bases of the DNA strands in the hybrids, are approximately three to five times longer than when using ammonia. Thus, all opening events sensed by ammonia are not accessible to trimethylamine. These observations are discussed in regard to the mechanism of base

  19. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Przetakiewicz, M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, T.

    1998-08-18

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5{prime}- and/or 3{prime}-overhangs. 16 figs.

  20. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Przetakiewicz, Marek; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  1. Sensitive determination of nucleic acids using organic nanoparticle fluorescence probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunyou; Bian, Guirong; Wang, Leyu; Dong, Ling; Wang, Lun; Kan, Jian

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the preparation of organic nanoparticles by reprecipitation method under sonication and vigorous stirring. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize the size and size distribution of the luminescent nanoparticles. Their average diameter was about 25 nm with a size variation of ±18%. The fluorescence decay lifetime of the nanoparticles also was determined on a self-equipped fluorospectrometer with laser light source. The lifetime (˜0.09 μs) of nanoparticles is about three times long as that of the monomer. The nanoparticles were in abundant of hydrophilic groups, which increased their miscibility in aqueous solution. These organic nanoparticles have high photochemical stability, excellent resistance to chemical degradation and photodegradation, and a good fluorescence quantum yield (25%). The fluorescence can be efficiently quenched by nucleic acids. Based on the fluorescence quenching of nanoparticles, a fluorescence quenching method was developed for determination of microamounts of nucleic acids by using the nanoparticles as a new fluorescent probe. Under optimal conditions, maximum fluorescence quenching is produced, with maximum excitation and emission wavelengths of 345 and 402 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range 0.4-19.0 μg ml -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.3-19.0 μg ml -1 for fish sperm DNA (fs-DNA). The corresponding detection limits are 0.25 μg ml -1 for ct-DNA and 0.17 μg ml -1 for fs-DNA. The relative standard deviation of six replicate measurements is 1.3-2.1%. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive with wide linear range. The recovery and relative standard deviation are very satisfactory.

  2. Mechanism of sodium uptake in PNA negative MR cells from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss as revealed by silver and copper inhibition.

    PubMed

    Goss, Greg; Gilmour, Kathleen; Hawkings, Guy; Brumbach, Jonathan H; Huynh, Maily; Galvez, Fernando

    2011-07-01

    The rate of acid-stimulated and phenamil-sensitive sodium (Na(+)) uptake was measured in three different cell lineages: pavement cells (PVC), total mitochondrion-rich (MR) cell populations, and peanut lectin agglutinin-negative mitochondrion-rich cells (PNA(-) MR) isolated from the rainbow trout gill epithelium. Despite the presence of basal levels of Na(+) uptake in PVC, this transport was not enhanced by acidification, nor was it inhibited by independent treatment with bafilomycin (i.e., a V-type H(+)-ATPase inhibitor), phenamil (i.e., a specific inhibitor of ENaC), or Ag (a specific inhibitor of active Na(+) transport in fish). In contrast, Na(+) uptake in PNA(-) MR cells was increased by ~220% above basal levels following acidification of near 0.4 pH units in the presence of 1.0 mM external Na(+). Acid-stimulated Na(+) transport was entirely inhibited by both phenamil and bafilomycin. Silver (Ag) and copper (Cu), which are known to interfere with active Na(+) transport in fish, were also responsible for inhibiting acid stimulated Na(+) uptake in PNA(-) MR cells, but by themselves had no effect on basal Na(+) transport. Thus, we demonstrate that Ag specifically prevented acid-stimulated Na(+) uptake in PNA(-) MR cells in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrate rapid (<1 min) and significant inhibition of carbonic anhydrase (CA) by Ag in PNA(-) MR cells, but not in PVC. These data lend further support to the idea of a PNA(-) MR cell type as the primary site for Na(+) uptake in the freshwater (FW) gill phenotype of rainbow trout. Moreover, these findings provide support for the importance of intracellular protons in regulating the movement of Na(+) across the apical surface of the fish gill.

  3. A Nucleic Acid Probe and Method for the Detection of Shigella and Enteroinvasive E. coli Bacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This invention relates to nucleic acid probes and a method for the rapid detection of Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, the causative agents of bacterial dysentery, by use of a nucleic acid hybridization probe, equivalent to a plasmid DNA region encoding one of 4 specific invasion-associated, peptides of all strains of Shigella and enterinvasive E . coli , in a nucleic acid hybridization reaction with a clinical specimen containing dysentery bacteria.

  4. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Junager, Nina P. L.; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  5. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  6. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  7. Fluorescence probe for the convenient and sensitive detection of ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yuta; Yamato, Mayumi; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is an important antioxidant that plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of numerous bioactive substances. The detection of ascorbic acid has traditionally been achieved using high-performance liquid chromatography and absorption spectrophotometry assays. However, the development of fluorescence probes for this purpose is highly desired because they provide a much more convenient and highly sensitive technique for the detection of this material. OFF-ON-type fluorescent probes have been developed for the detection of non-fluorescent compounds. Photo-induced electron transfer and fluorescence resonance energy transfer are the two main fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the detection of ascorbic acid, and several fluorescence probes have been reported based on redox-responsive metals and quantum dots. Profluorescent nitroxide compounds have also been developed as non-metal organic fluorescence probes for ascorbic acid. These nitroxide systems have a stable unpaired electron and can therefore react with ascorbic acid and a strong fluorescence quencher. Furthermore, recent synthetic advances have allowed for the synthesis of α-substituted nitroxides with varying levels of reactivity towards ascorbic acid. In this review, we have discussed the design strategies used for the preparation of fluorescent probes for ascorbic acid, with particular emphasis on profluorescent nitroxides, which are unique radical-based redox-active fluorescent probes. PMID:26798193

  8. Interactive fluorophore and quencher pairs for labeling fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E

    2008-03-01

    The use of fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes that generate a fluorescence signal only when they bind to their target enables real-time monitoring of nucleic acid amplification assays. Real-time nucleic acid amplification assays markedly improves the ability to obtain qualitative and quantitative results. Furthermore, these assays can be carried out in sealed tubes, eliminating carryover contamination. Fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes are available in a wide range of different fluorophore and quencher pairs. Multiple hybridization probes, each designed for the detection of a different nucleic acid sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, can be added to the same nucleic acid amplification reaction, enabling the development of high-throughput multiplex assays. In order to develop robust, highly sensitive and specific real-time nucleic acid amplification assays it is important to carefully select the fluorophore and quencher labels of hybridization probes. Selection criteria are based on the type of hybridization probe used in the assay, the number of targets to be detected, and the type of apparatus available to perform the assay. This article provides an overview of different aspects of choosing appropriate labels for the different types of fluorescent hybridization probes used with different types of spectrofluorometric thermal cyclers currently available.

  9. Correlation between east Asian dust storm frequency and PNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Dao-Yi; Mao, Rui; Shi, Pei-Jun; Fan, Yi-Da

    2007-07-01

    Large-scale climate teleconnections play evident roles in spring dust storm variability over east Asia through influencing regional weather and climates. In the present study authors found that dust storm frequency in northern China is significantly correlated to the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of +0.60 on interannual time scale during the period 1962-2002. The atmospheric circulation changes (including weather disturbances at 850hPa, monthly mean wind and height at 500 hPa and 200 hPa levels) in association with dust storm and PNA bear remarkable similarity, confirming the robustness of their connections. East Asian jet stream is, at least partly, responsible for generating the evident co-variations between dust storm frequency and PNA. This teleconnection and the corresponding circulation changes exist in non-El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), likely independent of ENSO phases. The results are helpful for better understanding how East Asian dust storm responds to the global change.

  10. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications.

  11. Probe kit for identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  12. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  13. Fluorescent macrocyclic probes with pendant functional groups as markers of acidic organelles within live cells.

    PubMed

    Wadhavane, Prashant D; Izquierdo, M Ángeles; Lutters, Dennis; Burguete, M Isabel; Marín, María J; Russell, David A; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V

    2014-02-07

    A new family of acidity sensitive fluorescent macrocycles has been synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including emission quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime have been determined. The acid-base properties of the new molecules can be tuned by the incorporation of pendant functional groups. The nature of such functional groups (carboxylic acid or ester) influences dramatically the pKa of the probes, two compounds of which exhibit low values. Preliminary intracellular studies using confocal microscopy together with emission spectra of the probes from the cellular environment have shown that the synthesized fluorescent macrocycles mark the acidic organelles of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells.

  14. An alternative strategy to synthesize PNA and DNA magnetic conjugates forming nanoparticle assembly based on PNA/DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Milano, Giovanna; Musumeci, Domenica; Gaglione, Maria; Messere, Anna

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we report an alternative approach to synthesize PNA and DNA magnetic nanoconjugates. Chemical modifications were introduced on the 130 nm dextran-magnetite particles to obtain poly-functionalized particles containing reversible bonds sensitive to the cellular environment and suitable for the direct introduction of unmodified oligomers. Due to the polyvalent nature of the nanoparticles, when the complementary PNA and DNA nanoconjugates were mixed together, the resulting duplex structures bring to a nanoparticle assembly driven by W-C base pairs. The formation of the nanoparticle assembly was investigated by optical spectroscopy (UV, FTIR), scanning and transmission electron microscopies and by the analysis of the macroscopic behaviour of the nanoparticle-conjugates in aqueous solution with and without magnetic field application. Furthermore, serum stability assays revealed an increased enzymatic resistance in FCS of the PNA/DNA nanoconjugate duplex with respect to the unconjugated duplex. The described nanosystem could be extended to other duplex structures, possibly involving aptameric sequences of biomedical relevance, and could be very useful in order to obtain high local concentration at the target site of both the duplex and the magnetic nanoparticles in biotechnological applications.

  15. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA modifications have on the probe that is targeting microorganisms is unknown. In this study, the melting and hybridization efficiency properties of 18 different probes in regards to their use in FISH for the detection of the 16S rRNA of Helicobacter pylori were compared. For the same sequence and target, probe length and the type of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2'-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall, these results have significant implications for the design and applications of LNA probes for the detection of microorganisms.

  16. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  17. Time-resolved detection probe for homogeneous nucleic acid analyses in one-step format.

    PubMed

    Laitala, Ville; Ylikoski, Alice; Raussi, Hanna-Mari; Ollikka, Pia; Hemmilä, Ilkka

    2007-02-01

    We report here an extension of homogeneous assays based on fluorescence intensity and lifetime measuring on DNA hybridization. A novel decay probe that allows simple one-step nucleic acid detection with subnanomolar sensitivity, and is suitable for closed-tube applications, is introduced. The decay probe uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a europium chelate donor and an organic fluorophore acceptor. The substantial change in the acceptor emission decay time on hybridization with the target sequence allows the direct separation of the hybridized and unhybridized probe populations in a time-resolved measurement. No additional sample manipulation or self-hybridization of the probes is required. The wavelength and decay time of a decay probe can be adjusted according to the selection of probe length and acceptor fluorophore, thereby making the probes applicable to multiplexed assays. Here we demonstrate the decay probe principle and decay probe-based, one-step, dual DNA assay using celiac disease-related target oligonucleotides (single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) as model analytes. Decay probes showed specific response for their complementary DNA target and allowed good signal deconvolution based on simultaneous optical and temporal filtering. This technique potentially could be used to further increase the number of simultaneously detected DNA targets in a simple one-step homogeneous assay.

  18. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label

    PubMed Central

    Yotapan, Nattawut; Charoenpakdee, Chayan; Wathanathavorn, Pawinee; Ditmangklo, Boonsong

    2014-01-01

    Summary DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA–DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes. PMID:25246975

  19. Electrochemical paper-based peptide nucleic acid biosensor for detecting human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Teengam, Prinjaporn; Siangproh, Weena; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Henry, Charles S; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2017-02-01

    A novel paper-based electrochemical biosensor was developed using an anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) probe (AQ-PNA) and graphene-polyaniline (G-PANI) modified electrode to detect human papillomavirus (HPV). An inkjet printing technique was employed to prepare the paper-based G-PANI-modified working electrode. The AQ-PNA probe baring a negatively charged amino acid at the N-terminus was immobilized onto the electrode surface through electrostatic attraction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to verify the AQ-PNA immobilization. The paper-based electrochemical DNA biosensor was used to detect a synthetic 14-base oligonucleotide target with a sequence corresponding to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA by measuring the electrochemical signal response of the AQ label using square-wave voltammetry before and after hybridization. It was determined that the current signal significantly decreased after the addition of target DNA. This phenomenon is explained by the rigidity of PNA-DNA duplexes, which obstructs the accessibility of electron transfer from the AQ label to the electrode surface. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit of HPV type 16 DNA was found to be 2.3 nM with a linear range of 10-200 nM. The performance of this biosensor on real DNA samples was tested with the detection of PCR-amplified DNA samples from the SiHa cell line. The new method employs an inexpensive and disposable device, which easily incinerated after use and is promising for the screening and monitoring of the amount of HPV-DNA type 16 to identify the primary stages of cervical cancer.

  20. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2013-07-05

    Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb(3+)). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb(3+) emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb(3+)/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36±1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  1. A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe based on a benzothiazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiujuan; Li, Xian; Feng, Suxiang; Liang, Beibei; Zhou, Tiqiang; Xu, Min; Ma, Zhuoyi

    2017-04-15

    A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe 1 based on a benzothiazole derivative has been designed, synthesized and developed. The linear response range covers the acidic pH range from 3.44 to 6.46, which is valuable for pH researches in acidic environment. The evaluated pKa value of the probe 1 is 4.23. The fluorescence enhancement of the studied probe 1 with an increase in hydrogen ions concentration is based on the hindering of enhanced photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Moreover, the pH sensor possesses a highly selective response to H(+) in the presence of metal ions, anions and other bioactive small molecules which would be interfere with its fluorescent pH response. Furthermore, the probe 1 responds to acidic pH with short response time that was less than 1min. The probe 1 has been successfully applied to confocal fluorescence imaging in live HeLa cells and can selectively stain lysosomes. All of such good properties prove it can be used to monitoring pH fluctuations in acidic environment with high sensitivity, pH dependence and short response time.

  2. A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe based on a benzothiazole derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiujuan; Li, Xian; Feng, Suxiang; Liang, Beibei; Zhou, Tiqiang; Xu, Min; Ma, Zhuoyi

    2017-04-01

    A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe 1 based on a benzothiazole derivative has been designed, synthesized and developed. The linear response range covers the acidic pH range from 3.44 to 6.46, which is valuable for pH researches in acidic environment. The evaluated pKa value of the probe 1 is 4.23. The fluorescence enhancement of the studied probe 1 with an increase in hydrogen ions concentration is based on the hindering of enhanced photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Moreover, the pH sensor possesses a highly selective response to H+ in the presence of metal ions, anions and other bioactive small molecules which would be interfere with its fluorescent pH response. Furthermore, the probe 1 responds to acidic pH with short response time that was less than 1 min. The probe 1 has been successfully applied to confocal fluorescence imaging in live HeLa cells and can selectively stain lysosomes. All of such good properties prove it can be used to monitoring pH fluctuations in acidic environment with high sensitivity, pH dependence and short response time.

  3. Probing linker design in citric acid-ciprofloxacin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Milner, Stephen J; Snelling, Anna M; Kerr, Kevin G; Abd-El-Aziz, Ahmad; Thomas, Gavin H; Hubbard, Roderick E; Routledge, Anne; Duhme-Klair, Anne-Kathrin

    2014-08-15

    A series of structurally related citric acid-ciprofloxacin conjugates was synthesised to investigate the influence of the linker between citric acid and ciprofloxacin on antibacterial activities. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined against a panel of reference strains and clinical isolates of bacteria associated with infection in humans and correlated with the DNA gyrase inhibitory activity. The observed trend was rationalised by computational modelling.

  4. Nucleobase-Modified PNA Suppresses Translation by Forming a Triple Helix with a Hairpin Structure in mRNA In Vitro and in Cells.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Tamaki; Hnedzko, Dziyana; Rozners, Eriks; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-01-18

    Compounds that bind specifically to double-stranded regions of RNA have potential as regulators of structure-based RNA function; however, sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA is challenging. The modification of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with unnatural nucleobases enables the formation of PNA-RNA triplexes. Herein, we demonstrate that a 9-mer PNA forms a sequence-specific PNA-RNA triplex with a dissociation constant of less than 1 nm at physiological pH. The triplex formed within the 5' untranslated region of an mRNA reduces the protein expression levels both in vitro and in cells. A single triplet mismatch destabilizes the complex, and in this case, no translation suppression is observed. The triplex-forming PNAs are unique and potent compounds that hold promise as inhibitors of cellular functions that are controlled by double-stranded RNAs, such as RNA interference, RNA editing, and RNA localization mediated by protein-RNA interactions.

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Gene Fusion: Detection in Malignant Pleural Effusion by RNA or PNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Lin; Lee, Chung-Ta; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Yang, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wan-Li; Lee, Yang-Cheng; Yang, Chung-Hsien; Peng, Shu-Ling; Su, Wu-Chou; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing EGFR mutations and detecting ALK gene fusion are indispensable when planning to treat pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a devastating complication of lung cancer and sometimes the only source for mutation analysis. The percentage of tumor cells in the pleural effusion may be low; therefore, mutant enrichment is required for a successful analysis. The EGFR mutation status in MPE was determined using three methods: (1) PCR sequencing of genomic DNA (direct sequencing), (2) mutant-enriched PCR sequencing of genomic DNA using peptide nucleic acid (PNA-sequencing), and (3) PCR sequencing of cDNA after reverse transcription for cellular RNA (RNA-sequencing). RT-PCR was also used to test cases for ALK gene fusion. PNA-sequencing and RNA-sequencing had similar analytical sensitivities (< 1%), which indicates similar enrichment capabilities. The clinical sensitivity in 133 cases when detecting the common EGFR exon 19 and exon 21 mutations was 56.4% (75/133) for direct sequencing, 63.2% (84/133) for PNA-sequencing, and 65.4% (87/133) for RNA-sequencing. RT-PCR and sequencing showed 5 cases (3.8%) with ALK gene fusion. All had wild-type EGFR. For EGFR analysis of MPE, RNA-sequencing is at least as sensitive as PNA-sequencing but not limited to specific mutations. Detecting ALK fusion can be incorporated in the same RNA workflow. Therefore, RNA is a better source for comprehensive molecular diagnoses in MPE. PMID:27352172

  6. Permeabilization of mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes for in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, S J; O'Donnell, A G; Embley, T M

    1994-10-01

    The application of whole-cell hybridization using labelled oligonucleotide probes in microbial systematics and ecology is limited by difficulties in permeabilizing many Gram-positive organisms. In this investigation paraformaldehyde treatment, acid methanolysis and acid hydrolysis were evaluated as a means of permeabilizing mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes prior to hybridization with a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probe designed to bind to a conserved sequence of bacterial 16S rRNA. Methods were evaluated on stationary-phase cultures of Gordona bronchialis, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Nocardia asteroides, N. brasiliensis, Rhodococcus equi, R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous and Tsukamurella paurometabola, none of which could be probed following 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde fixation. For comparison and to test the general applicability of mild acid pretreatments, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida were also studied. The data showed that most of the mycolic-acid-containing organisms were successfully permeabilized by mild acid hydrolysis in 1 M HCl at 37 degrees C. Cells were treated for different lengths of time. In general, the mycolic-acid-containing organisms required between 30 and 50 min hydrolysis, whereas B. subtilis, E. coli and P. putida were rendered permeable in only 10 min. Interestingly, L. plantarum could not be permeabilized using acid hydrolysis even after 60 min exposure to 1 M HCl.

  7. Acidity characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by solid-state NMR spectroscopy using probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the surface acidic properties of solid acid catalysts is a key issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Important acid features of solid acids, such as their type (Brønsted vs. Lewis acid), distribution and accessibility (internal vs. external sites), concentration (amount), and strength of acid sites are crucial factors dictating their reactivity and selectivity. This short review provides information on different solid-state NMR techniques used for acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts. In particular, different approaches using probe molecules containing a specific nucleus of interest, such as pyridine-d5, 2-(13)C-acetone, trimethylphosphine, and trimethylphosphine oxide, are compared. Incorporation of valuable information (such as the adsorption structure, deprotonation energy, and NMR parameters) from density functional theory (DFT) calculations can yield explicit correlations between the chemical shift of adsorbed probe molecules and the intrinsic acid strength of solid acids. Methods that combine experimental NMR data with DFT calculations can therefore provide both qualitative and quantitative information on acid sites.

  8. Advanced Molecular Probes for Sequence-Specific DNA Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto

    DNA detection can be achieved using the Watson-Crick base pairing with oligonucleotides or oligonucleotide analogs, followed by generation of a physical or chemical signal coupled with a transducer device. The nature of the probe is an essential feature which determines the performances of the sensing device. Many synthetic processes are presently available for "molecular engineering" of DNA probes, enabling label-free and PCR-free detection to be performed. Furthermore, many DNA analogs with improved performances are available and are under development; locked nucleic acids (LNA), peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and their analogs, morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) and other modified probes have shown improved properties of affinity and selectivity in target recognition compared to those of simple DNA probes. The performances of these probes in sensing devices, and the requirements for detection of unamplified DNA will be discussed in this chapter. Chemistry and architectures for conjugation of probes to reporter units, surfaces and nanostructures will also be discussed. Examples of probes used in ultrasensitive detection of unamplified DNA are listed.

  9. Tethered phytic acid as a probe for measuring phytase activity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Duane F; Berry, David A

    2005-06-15

    A novel approach for measuring phytase activity is presented. We have developed a new chromophoric substrate analog of phytic acid, 5-O-[6-(benzoylamino)hexyl]-d-myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,6-pentakisphosphate that permits direct measurement of the phosphate ester bond-cleavage reaction using HPLC. This compound, along with its dephosphorylated T-phosphatidylinositol intermediates, are quantified using reversed phase chromatography with UV detection.

  10. Probing lipid peroxidation by using linoleic acid and benzophenone.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Inmaculada; Neshchadin, Dmytro; Rico, Enrique; Griesser, Markus; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Morera, Isabel M; Gescheidt, Georg; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-08-29

    A thorough mechanistic study has been performed on the reaction between benzophenone (BZP) and a series of 1,4-dienes, including 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD), 1,4-dihydro-2-methylbenzoic acid (MBA), 1,4-dihydro-1,2-dimethylbenzoic acid (DMBA) and linoleic acid (LA). A combination of steady-state photolysis, laser flash photolysis (LFP), and photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) have been used. Irradiation of BZP and CHD led to a cross-coupled sensitizer-diene product, together with 6, 7, and 8. With MBA and DMBA as hydrogen donors, photoproducts arising from cross-coupling of sensitizer and diene radicals were found; compound 7 was also obtained, but 6 and o-toluic acid were only isolated in the irradiation of BZP with MBA. Triplet lifetimes were determined in the absence and in the presence of several diene concentrations. All three model compounds showed similar reactivity (k(q) ≈10(8)  M(-1)  s(-1)) towards triplet excited BZP. Partly reversible hydrogen abstraction of the allylic hydrogen atoms of CHD, MBA, and DMBA was also detected by photo-CIDNP on different timescales. Polarizations of the diamagnetic products were in full agreement with the results derived from LFP. Finally, LA also underwent partly reversible hydrogen abstraction during photoreaction with BZP. Subsequent hydrogen transfer between primary radicals led to conjugated derivatives of LA. The unpaired electron spin population in linoleyl radical (LA(.)) was predominantly found on H(1-5) protons. To date, LA-related radicals were only reported upon hydrogen transfer from highly substituted model compounds by steady-state EPR spectroscopy. Herein, we have experimentally established the formation of LA(.) and shown that it converts into two dominating conjugated isomers on the millisecond timescale. Such processes are at the basis of alterations of membrane structures caused by oxidative stress.

  11. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  12. Intra-albumin migration of bound fatty acid probed by spin label ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Gurachevsky, Andrey . E-mail: a.gurachevsky@medinnovation.de; Shimanovitch, Ekaterina; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Muravsky, Vladimir

    2007-09-07

    Conventional ESR spectra of 16-doxyl-stearic acid bound to bovine and human serum albumin were recorded at different temperatures in order to investigate the status of spin-labeled fatty acid in the interior of the protein globule. A computer spectrum simulation of measured spectra, performed by non-linear least-squares fits, clearly showed two components corresponding to strongly and weakly immobilized fatty acid molecules. The two-component model was verified on spectra measured at different pH. Thermodynamic parameters of the spin probe exchange between two spin probe states were analyzed. It was concluded that at physiological conditions, fatty acid molecules permanently migrate in the globule interior between the specific binding sites and a space among albumin domains.

  13. Bioavailability of xenobiotics in unsaturated soils – implications for nucleic acid based stable isotope probing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stable isotopes to label phylogenetically informative biomolecules (phospholipid fatty acids, DNA, or RNA), typically referred to as stable isotope probing (SIP) has the potential of providing definitive evidence that a detected population is active in a specific process, if that process ...

  14. Reductive alkylation and sequential reductive alkylation-click chemistry for on-solid-support modification of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Ditmangklo, Boonsong; Boonlua, Chalothorn; Suparpprom, Chaturong; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2013-04-17

    A methodology for the site-specific attachment of fluorophores to the backbone of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) with an α/β-backbone derived from D-prolyl-(1S,2S)-2-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid (acpcPNA) has been developed. The strategy involves a postsynthetic reductive alkylation of the aldehyde-containing labels onto the acpcPNA that was previously modified with (3R,4S)-3-aminopyrrolidine-4-carboxylic acid on the solid support. The reductive alkylation reaction is remarkably efficient and compatible with a range of reactive functional groups including Fmoc-protected amino, azide, and alkynes. This allows further attachment of readily accessible carboxyl-, alkyne-, or azide-containing labels via amide bond formation or Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC, also known as click chemistry). The label attached in this way does not negatively affect the affinity and specificity of the pairing of the acpcPNA to its DNA target. Applications of this methodology in creating self-reporting pyrene- and thiazole orange-labeled acpcPNA probes that can yield a change in fluorescence in response to the presence of the correct DNA target have also been explored. A strong fluorescence enhancement was observed with thiazole orange-labeled acpcPNA in the presence of DNA. The specificity could be further improved by enzymatic digestion with S1 nuclease, providing a 9- to 60-fold fluorescence enhancement with fully complementary DNA and a less than 3.5-fold enhancement with mismatched DNA targets.

  15. Trimethylamine as a probe molecule to differentiate acid sites in Y-FAU zeolite: FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Francisca Romero; Blasin-Aubé, Vanessa; Saussey, Jacques; Marie, Olivier; Daturi, Marco

    2006-07-06

    In heterogeneous catalysis acidity has a very important influence on activity and selectivity: correct determination of acidic properties is a base to improve industrial processes. The aim of this work was to study trimethylamine (TMA) as a probe molecule able to distinguish between the different Brønsted acid sites in zeolitic frameworks. Our work mainly focused on faujasite-type zeolites because the HY zeolite is one of the most used acidic catalysts in industrial processes. In this paper, typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species (formed in supercages) are detected in the HY zeolite. TMA interacting by hydrogen bonding with the acid sites located in the sodalite units is also observed. The wavenumbers of some typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species appear to depend on the acidic strength, and a complementary study with ZSM-5 and X-FAU samples confirms this proposition.

  16. Measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a sequence-independent nitroxide probe

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peter Z; Haworth, Ian S; Cai, Qi; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Grant, Gian Paola G; Price, Eric A; Sowa, Glenna Z; Popova, Anna; Herreros, Bruno; He, Honghang

    2008-01-01

    This protocol describes the procedures for measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a nitroxide probe that can be attached to any nucleotide within a given sequence. Two nitroxides are attached to phosphorothioates that are chemically substituted at specific sites of DNA or RNA. Inter-nitroxide distances are measured using a four-pulse double electron–electron resonance technique, and the measured distances are correlated to the parent structures using a Web-accessible computer program. Four to five days are needed for sample labeling, purification and distance measurement. The procedures described herein provide a method for probing global structures and studying conformational changes of nucleic acids and protein/nucleic acid complexes. PMID:17947978

  17. Modeling aqueous ozone/UV process using oxalic acid as probe chemical.

    PubMed

    Garoma, Temesgen; Gurol, Mirat D

    2005-10-15

    A kinetic model that describes the removal of organic pollutants by an ozone/UV process is described. Oxalic acid, which reacts with a very low rate constant with ozone and relatively high rate constant with hydroxyl radical (OH*), was used as the probe chemical to model the process. The model was verified by experimental data on concentrations of oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H202) under various experimental conditions, i.e., ozone gas dosage, UV light intensity, and varying oxalic acid concentrations.

  18. Development of specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for in situ identification of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Lucía; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2003-08-08

    A rapid method for the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from wine has been developed. This method is based on fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), using fluorescent oligonucleotide probes, homologous to 16S rDNA of those species of LAB commonly found in wines. The protocol for the specific detection of these bacteria was established through the hybridisation of 36 reference strains. The specificity of the probes was evaluated by using pure cultures. Probes were used to identify species in different wines, making it evident that direct identification and quantification from natural samples without culturing is also possible. The results show that FISH is a promising technique for the rapid identification of LAB, allowing positive identification in a few hours (4-16 h).

  19. Electron spin echo modulation studies of doxylstearic acid spin probes in frozen vesicles: Interaction of the spin probe with D sub 2 O and effects of cholesterol addition

    SciTech Connect

    Hiff, T.; Kevan, L. )

    1989-02-23

    Electron spin echo studies have been carried out for a series of x-doxylstearic acid (x = 5, 7, 10, 12 and 16) spin probes in frozen deuteriated aqueous solutions of phospholipid vesicles and cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) vesicles. Modulation effects due to interactions of the nitroxide group of the spin probes with D{sub 2}O give information about the conformations of the probes and the degree of hydration of the surfactant headgroups as well as about the degree of packing of the alkyl chain. We show that DODAC headgroups are more hydrated than choline headgroups and that the doxylstearic acid probes show a larger tendency for bending in DODAC vesicles than in phospholipid vesicles. Upon addition of cholesterol into phospholipid vesicles, the headgroups are separated and their degree of hydration increases.

  20. Docosahexaenoic acid conjugated near infrared flourescence probe for in vivo early tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siwen; Cao, Jie; Qin, Jingyi; Zhang, Xin; Achilefu, Samuel; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid(DHA) is an omega-3 C22 natural fatty acid with six cis double bonds and as a constituent of membranes used as a precursor for metabolic and biochemical path ways. In this manuscript,we describe the synthesis of near-infrared(NIR) flourescence ICG-Der-01 labeled DHA for in vitro and vivo tumor targeting.The structure of the probe was intensively characterized by UV and MS. The in vitro and vivo tumor targeting abilities of the DHA-based NIR probes were investigeted in MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 xenograft mice model differently by confocal microscopy and CCD camera. The cell cytotoxicity were tested in tumor cells MCF-7 .The results shows that the DHA-based NIR probes have high affinity with the tumor both in vitro and vivo.In addition ,we also found that the DHA-based NIR probes have the apparent cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells .which demonstrated that DHA was conjugated with other antitumor drug could increase the abilities of antirumor efficacy .So DHA-ICG-Der-01 is a promising optical agent for diagnosis of tumors especially in their early stage.

  1. Use of PNA FISH for blood cultures growing Gram-positive cocci in chains without a concomitant antibiotic stewardship intervention does not improve time to appropriate antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Sara E; Li, David X; Tamma, Pranita D; Avdic, Edina; Hadhazy, Eric; Wakefield, Teresa; Gherna, Michael; Carroll, Karen C

    2016-09-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) is a rapid diagnostic assay that can identify certain organisms growing in blood cultures 30-90 min from the time of positive Gram-stain. Existing studies have demonstrated a clinical utility with this assay when antibiotic stewardship programs assist clinicians with interpreting the results. However, the benefit of these rapid assays in the absence of concomitant antibiotic stewardship involvement is unclear. In this randomized study of 220 patients with enterococcal or streptococcal bacteremia, we found that PNA FISH, in the absence of concomitant input from an antibiotic stewardship program, had no impact on time to effective or optimal therapy, length of hospital stay, or in-hospital mortality. Our results suggest that in the absence of guidance from an antibiotic stewardship program, the clinical benefits of rapid diagnostic microbiological tools may be reduced.

  2. Sequence fidelity of a template-directed PNA-ligation reaction.

    PubMed

    Mattes, A; Seitz, O

    2001-10-21

    The ligation method and an appended duplex-stabilizing dye affect both yield and sequence selectivity of a template-controlled PNA-ligation. The highest selectivity was obtained with a peptide condensation that formed an abasic site.

  3. Silver ions-mediated conformational switch: facile design of structure-controllable nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Wang, Hao; Jin, Jianyu; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2010-08-01

    Conformationally constraint nucleic acid probes were usually designed by forming an intramolecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. The disadvantages of these approaches are the inflexibility and instability in complex environment of the Watson-Crick-based duplex. We report that this hydrogen bonding pattern can be replaced by metal-ligation between specific metal ions and the natural bases. To demonstrate the feasibility of this principle, two linear oligonucleotides and silver ions were examined as models for DNA hybridization assay and adenosine triphosphate detection. The both nucleic acids contain target binding sequences in the middle and cytosine (C)-rich sequences at the lateral portions. The strong interaction between Ag(+) ions and cytosines forms stable C-Ag(+)-C structures, which promises the oligonucleotides to form conformationally constraint formations. In the presence of its target, interaction between the loop sequences and the target unfolds the C-Ag(+)-C structures, and the corresponding probes unfolding can be detected by a change in their fluorescence emission. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic opportunities that are provided by using Ag(+) ion complexes instead of traditional Watson-Crick-based duplex. In particular, the intrinsic feature of the metal-ligation motif facilitates the design of functional nucleic acids probes by independently varying the concentration of Ag(+) ions in the medium.

  4. NAO and PNA influences on winter temperature and precipitation over the eastern United States in CMIP5 GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Liang; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2016-02-01

    The historical and future relationships between two major patterns of large-scale climate variability, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Pacific/North America pattern (PNA), and the regional winter temperature and precipitation over the eastern United States were systemically evaluated by using 17 general circulation models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. Empirical orthogonal function analysis was used to define the NAO and PNA. The observed spatial patterns of NAO and PNA can be reproduced by all the GCMs with slight differences in locations of the centers of action and their average magnitudes. For the correlations with regional winter temperature and precipitation over the eastern US, GCMs perform best in capturing the relationships between the NAO and winter temperature, and between the PNA and winter temperature and precipitation. The differences between the observed and simulated relationships are mainly due to displacements of the simulated NAO and PNA centers of action and differences in their magnitudes. In simulations of the future, both NAO and PNA magnitudes increase, with uncertainties related to the model response and emission scenarios. When assessing the influences of future NAO/PNA changes on regional winter temperature, it is found that the main factors are related to changes in the magnitude of the NAO Azores center and total NAO magnitude, and the longitude of the PNA center over northwestern North America, total PNA magnitude, and the magnitude of the PNA center over the southeastern US.

  5. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  6. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  7. Efficacy of Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of Poliovirus in Water Disinfected by Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, Ozone, and UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Norman J.; Margolin, Aaron B.

    1994-01-01

    MilliQ water was inoculated with poliovirus type 1 strain LSc-1 and was treated with disinfectants, including chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and UV light. No relationship between probes and plaque assays were seen, demonstrating that viral nucleic acids were not destroyed. These findings suggest that nucleic acid probes cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses and cannot be used in the evaluation of treated waters. PMID:16349448

  8. Comparative analysis of Gram's stain, PNA-FISH and Sepsityper with MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of yeast direct from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Gorton, Rebecca L; Ramnarain, P; Barker, K; Stone, N; Rattenbury, S; McHugh, T D; Kibbler, C C

    2014-10-01

    Fungaemia diagnosis could be improved by reducing the time to identification of yeast from blood cultures. This study aimed to evaluate three rapid methods for the identification of yeast direct from blood cultures; Gram's stain analysis, the AdvanDX Peptide Nucleic Acid in Situ Hybridisation Yeast Traffic Light system (PNA-FISH YTL) and Bruker Sepsityper alongside matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Fifty blood cultures spiked with a known single yeast strain were analysed by blinded operators experienced in each method. Identifications were compared with MALDI-TOF MS CHROMagar Candida culture and ITS rRNA sequence-based identifications. On first attempt, success rates of 96% (48/50) and 76% (36/50) were achieved using PNA-FISH YTL and Gram's stain respectively. MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated a success rate of 56% (28/50) when applying manufacturer's species log score thresholds and 76% (38/50) using in-house parameters, including lowering the species log score threshold to >1.5. In conclusion, PNA-FISH YTL demonstrated a high success rate successfully identifying yeast commonly encountered in fungaemia. Sepsityper(™) with MALDI-TOF MS was accurate but increased sensitivity is required. Due to the misidentification of commonly encountered yeast Gram's stain analysis demonstrated limited utility in this setting.

  9. Multiplex paper-based colorimetric DNA sensor using pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid-induced AgNPs aggregation for detecting MERS-CoV, MTB and HPV oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tee-Ngam, Prinjaporn; Siangproh, Weena; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Chailapakul, Orawon; Henry, Charles S

    2017-04-10

    The development of simple fluorescent and colorimetric assays that enable point-of-care DNA and RNA detection has been a topic of significant research because of the utility of such assays in resource limited settings. The most common motifs utilize hybridization to a complementary detection strand coupled with a sensitive reporter molecule. Here, apaper-based colorimetric assay for DNA detection based on pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA)-induced nanoparticle aggregationis reported as an alternative to traditional colorimetric approaches. PNA probes are an attractive alternative to DNA and RNA probes because they are chemically and biologically stable, easily synthesized, and hybridize efficiently with the complementary DNA strands. The acpcPNA probe contains a single positive charge from the lysine at C-terminus and causes aggregation of citrate anion-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the absence of complementary DNA. In the presence of target DNA, formation of the anionic DNA-acpcPNA duplex results in dispersion of the AgNPs as a result of electrostatic repulsion, giving rise to a detectable color change. Factors affecting the sensitivity and selectivity of this assay were investigated, including ionic strength, AgNP concentration, PNA concentration, and DNA strand mismatches. The method was used for screening of synthetic Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and human papillomavirus (HPV)DNA based on a colorimetric paper-based analytical device developed using the aforementioned principle. The oligonucleotide targets were detected by measuring the color change of AgNPs, giving detection limits of 1.53 nM (MERS-CoV), 1.27 nM (MTB) and 1.03 nM (HPV).The acpcPNA probe exhibited high selectivity for the complementary oligonucleotides over single-base-mismatch, two-base-mismatch and non-complementary DNA targets. The proposed paper-based colorimetric DNA sensor has potential to be an alternative

  10. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  11. Label-free impedimetric sensor for a ribonucleic acid oligomer specific to hepatitis C virus at a self-assembled monolayer-covered electrode.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Yoon-suk; Chang, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Byeang Hyean; Jeon, Sangmin; Park, Su-Moon

    2010-10-01

    A ribonucleic acid (RNA) sensor based on hybridization of its peptide nucleic acid (PNA) molecule with a target RNA oligomer of the internal ribosome entry site sequence specific to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the electrochemical impedance detection is described. This RNA is one of the most conservative molecules of the whole HCV RNA genome. The ammonium ion terminated PNA molecule was immobilized via its host-guest interactions with the diaza crown ring of 3-thiophene-acetamide-diaza-18-crown-6 synthesized by a simple two-step method, which forms a well-defined self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold. Hybridization events of the probe PNA with the target RNA were monitored by measuring charge-transfer resistances for the Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) redox probe using Fourier transform electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The ratio of the resistances of the SAM-covered electrode measured before and after hybridization increased linearly with log[RNA] in the rat liver lysate with a detection limit of about 23 pM.

  12. Formation of oligonucleotide-PNA-chimeras by template-directed ligation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppitz, M.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    DNA sequences have previously been reported to act as templates for the synthesis of PNA, and vice versa. A continuous evolutionary transition from an informational replicating system based on one polymer to a system based on the other would be facilitated if it were possible to form chimeras, that is molecules that contain monomers of both types. Here we show that ligation to form chimeras proceeds efficiently both on PNA and on DNA templates. The efficiency of ligation is primarily determined by the number of backbone bonds at the ligation site and the relative orientation of template and substrate strands. The most efficient reactions result in the formation of chimeras with ligation junctions resembling the structures of the backbones of PNA and DNA and with antiparallel alignment of both components of the chimera with the template, that is, ligations involving formation of 3'-phosphoramidate and 5'-ester bonds. However, double helices involving PNA are stable both with antiparallel and parallel orientation of the two strands. Ligation on PNA but not on DNA templates is, therefore, sometimes possible on templates with reversed orientation. The relevance of these findings to discussions of possible transitions between genetic systems is discussed.

  13. Oncogene mRNA Imaging with Radionuclide-PNA-Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wickstrom, Eric

    2008-03-19

    New cancer gene hybridization probes to carry radionuclides were made. Noninvasive technetium-99m gamma imaging of CCND1 cancer gene activity in human breast cancer tumors in mice was demonstrated, followed by noninvasive technetium-99m imaging of MYC cancer gene activity. Noninvasive imaging of CCND1 cancer gene activity in human breast cancer tumors in mice was demonstrated with a positron-emitting copper-64 probe, followed by noninvasive positron imaging of IRS1 cancer gene activity.

  14. Probing the interactions between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chenchen; Li, Hengye; Wang, Heye; Liu, Zhen

    2013-02-19

    The affinity of boronic acids to cis-diol-containing biomolecules has found wide applications in many fields, such as sensing, separation, drug delivery, and functional materials. A sound understanding of the binding interactions will greatly facilitate exquisite applications of this chemistry. Although a few analytical tools have been available for the characterization of the interactions, these techniques are associated with some apparent drawbacks, so they are only applicable to a limited range of boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. Therefore, a widely applicable method is still greatly needed. In this work, an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method was established and validated to probe the interactions between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. The method was proven to be applicable to almost all types of cis-diol-containing biomolecules and boronic acids. Based on this method, a quantitative, comparative study on the interactions between 14 boronic acids that have important potentials for application with 5 typical monosaccharides of biological importance was carried out. The findings provided new insights into boronate affinity interactions, particularly the relationship between the binding strength with the molecular structures of the binding species. Besides, effects of pH and temperature on the binding strength were also investigated. This method exhibited several significant advantages, including (1) possibility of simultaneous study of multiple interactions, (2) low requirement on the purity of the binding species, (3) wide applicability, and (4) high accuracy and precision.

  15. Folic acid-conjugated europium complexes as luminescent probes for selective targeting of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quici, Silvio; Casoni, Alessandro; Foschi, Francesca; Armelao, Lidia; Bottaro, Gregorio; Seraglia, Roberta; Bolzati, Cristina; Salvarese, Nicola; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio

    2015-02-26

    We report the synthesis of three optical probes (Eu(3+)⊂1, Eu(3+)⊂2, and Eu(3+)⊂3) having a luminescent Eu complex (signaling unit) bonded in different positions to folic acid (FA), the folate receptor (FR) targeting unit. The structures of the two regioisomers Eu(3+)⊂1 and Eu(3+)⊂2 were assigned by mass spectrometric experiments. The optical properties and stability of these probes were assessed in phosphate-buffered saline, cell culture medium, rat serum, and cellular lysate, and results indicated that they are chemically and photophysically stable. Cytotoxicity was studied with ovarian cancer cells having high (SKOV-3), intermediate (OVCAR-3), low (IGROV-1), or null (A2780) expression of FRs. The internalized probe, evaluated in SKOV-3, IGROV-1, and A2780 cells, was in the order Eu(3+)⊂2 > Eu(3+)⊂1 > Eu(3+)⊂3. No internalization was observed for A2780 cells. Such results, together with those obtained in competition experiments of FA versus Eu(3+)⊂2 and FA or Eu(3+)⊂2 versus (3)H-FA, indicate that internalization is receptor-mediated and that Eu(3+)⊂2 shows high selectivity and specificity for FR.

  16. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  17. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  18. Fluorescence energy transfer as a probe for nucleic acid structures and sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mergny, J L; Boutorine, A S; Garestier, T; Belloc, F; Rougée, M; Bulychev, N V; Koshkin, A A; Bourson, J; Lebedev, A V; Valeur, B

    1994-01-01

    The primary or secondary structure of single-stranded nucleic acids has been investigated with fluorescent oligonucleotides, i.e., oligonucleotides covalently linked to a fluorescent dye. Five different chromophores were used: 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-amino-acridine, coumarin 500, fluorescein, rhodamine and ethidium. The chemical synthesis of derivatized oligonucleotides is described. Hybridization of two fluorescent oligonucleotides to adjacent nucleic acid sequences led to fluorescence excitation energy transfer between the donor and the acceptor dyes. This phenomenon was used to probe primary and secondary structures of DNA fragments and the orientation of oligodeoxynucleotides synthesized with the alpha-anomers of nucleoside units. Fluorescence energy transfer can be used to reveal the formation of hairpin structures and the translocation of genes between two chromosomes. PMID:8152922

  19. Sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA and enhanced cellular uptake of cationic nucleobase and backbone-modified peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Karamitas, Yannis A; Rozners, Eriks

    2017-01-01

    Sequence-selective recognition of complex RNAs in live cells could find broad applications in biology, biomedical research, and biotechnology. However, specific recognition of structured RNA is challenging, and generally applicable and effective methods are lacking. Recently, we found that peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) were unusually well-suited ligands for recognition of double-stranded RNAs. Herein, we report that 2-aminopyridine (M) modified PNAs and their conjugates with lysine and arginine tripeptides form strong (Ka = 9.4 to 17 × 10(7) M(-1)) and sequence-selective triple helices with RNA hairpins at physiological pH and salt concentration. The affinity of PNA-peptide conjugates for the matched RNA hairpins was unusually high compared to the much lower affinity for DNA hairpins of the same sequence (Ka = 0.05 to 1.1 × 10(7) M(-1)). The binding of double-stranded RNA by M-modified PNA-peptide conjugates was a relatively fast process (kon = 2.9 × 10(4) M(-1) sec(-1)) compared to the notoriously slow triple helix formation by oligodeoxynucleotides (kon ∼ 10(3) M(-1) sec(-1)). M-modified PNA-peptide conjugates were not cytotoxic and were efficiently delivered in the cytosol of HEK293 cells at 10 µM. Surprisingly, M-modified PNAs without peptide conjugation were also taken up by HEK293 cells, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first example of heterocyclic base modification that enhances the cellular uptake of PNA. Our results suggest that M-modified PNA-peptide conjugates are promising probes for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA in live cells and other biological systems.

  20. Translational and rotational diffusion of flexible PEG and rigid dendrimer probes in sodium caseinate dispersions and acid gels.

    PubMed

    Salami, Souad; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Barhoum, Myriam; van Duynhoven, John; Mariette, François

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of rigid dendrimer and flexible PEG probes in sodium caseinate dispersions and acid gels, including both translational diffusion and rotational diffusion, were studied by NMR. Above the onset of the close-packing limit (C ∼ 10 g/100 g H2 O), translational diffusion of the probe depended on its flexibility and on the fluctuations of the matrix chains. The PEG probe diffused more rapidly than the spherical dendrimer probe of corresponding hydrodynamic radius. The greater conformational flexibility of PEG facilitated its motion through the crowded casein matrix. Rotational diffusion was, however, substantially less hindered than the translational diffusion and depended on the local protein-probe friction which became high when the casein concentration increased. The coagulation of the matrix led to the formation of large voids, which resulted in an increase in the translational diffusion of the probes, whereas the rotational diffusion of the probes was retarded in the gel, which could be attributed to the immobilized environment surrounding the probe. Quantitative information from PFG-NMR and SEM micrographs have been combined for characterizing microstructural details in SC acid gels.

  1. Boronic Acid: A Bio-Inspired Strategy To Increase the Sensitivity and Selectivity of Fluorescent NADH Probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jingye; Kim, Beomsue; Peng, Juanjuan; Berry, Stuart N; Ni, Yong; Su, Dongdong; Lee, Jungyeol; Yuan, Lin; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-08-24

    Fluorescent probes have emerged as an essential tool in the molecular recognition events in biological systems; however, due to the complex structures of certain biomolecules, it remains a challenge to design small-molecule fluorescent probes with high sensitivity and selectivity. Inspired by the enzyme-catalyzed reaction between biomolecule and probe, we present a novel combination-reaction two-step sensing strategy to improve sensitivity and selectivity. Based on this strategy, we successfully prepared a turn-on fluorescent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) probe, in which boronic acid was introduced to bind with NADH and subsequently accelerate the sensing process. This probe shows remarkably improved sensitivity (detection limit: 0.084 μM) and selectivity to NADH in the absence of any enzymes. In order to improve the practicality, the boronic acid was further modified to change the measurement conditions from alkalescent (pH 9.5) to physiological environment (pH 7.4). Utilizing these probes, we not only accurately quantified the NADH weight in a health care product but also evaluated intracellular NADH levels in live cell imaging. Thus, these bio-inspired fluorescent probes offer excellent tools for elucidating the roles of NADH in biological systems as well as a practical strategy to develop future sensitive and selective probes for complicated biomolecules.

  2. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  3. Exploring 12'-apo-beta-carotenoic-12'-acid as an ultrafast polarity probe for ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Peter W; Bürsing, Reinhard; Lenzer, Thomas; Oum, Kawon

    2008-03-13

    The ultrafast excited-state dynamics of the carbonyl-containing carotenoid 12'-apo-beta-carotenoic-12'-acid (12'CA) have been used for probing the microscopic environment in various ionic liquids (ILs). The following IL cations were investigated: 1,3-di-n-alkyl-imidazolium featuring different n-alkyl chain lengths and also additional methylation at the C2 position, triethylsulfonium, as well as two tetraalkylammonium ions. These were combined with different anions: [BF4]-, [PF6]-, ethyl sulfate ([EtOSO3]-), and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([Tf2N]-). The probe molecule was excited via the S0 --> S2 transition at 425 or 430 nm, and the characteristic stimulated emission decay of the low-lying excited electronic S1/ICT (intramolecular charge transfer) state of 12'CA was monitored in the near IR (850 or 860 nm). Its lifetime tau1 is sensitive to the micropolarity-induced stabilization of S1/ICT relative to S0. The lifetime tau1 of the S1/ICT state varies only moderately in all ionic liquids studied here ( approximately 40-110 ps), which lies in the range between ethanol (109 ps) and methanol (49 ps). While organic solvents show an excellent correlation of tau1 with the solvent polarity function Deltaf = (epsilon - 1)/(epsilon + 2) - (n2 - 1)/(n2 + 2), where epsilon and n are the static dielectric constant and the refractive index of the solvent, respectively, this is not the case for ILs. This is due to dominant local electrostatic probe-cation interactions which cannot be easily quantified by macroscopic quantities. Methylation at the C2 position of 1,3-di-n-alkyl-imidazolium reduces the accessibility of the cation and therefore the electrostatic stabilization of the probe, resulting in an increase of tau1. A similar increase is observed upon extension of one of the n-alkyl chains from ethyl to n-decyl. Tetraalkylammonium ILs show an increased tau1 probably due to their more delocalized positive charge which cannot interact so favorably with the probe, in

  4. Preparation of surfactant-stabilized gold nanoparticle-peptide nucleic acid conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy, Janice; Connell, Laurie B.; Eck, Wolfgang; Collins, Scott D.; Smith, Rosemary L.

    2010-09-01

    A simple, two-step method of producing stable and functional peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-conjugated gold nanoparticles using a surfactant stabilization step is presented. PNA are DNA analogs with superior chemical stability and target discrimination, but their use in metallic nanoparticle systems has been limited by the difficulty of producing stable colloids of nanoparticle-PNA conjugates. In this work, the nonionic surfactant Tween 20 (polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate) was used to sterically shield gold surfaces prior to the addition of thiolated PNA, producing conjugates which remain dispersed in solution and retain the ability to hybridize to complementary nucleic acid sequences. The conjugates were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy. PNA attachment to gold nanoparticles was confirmed with an enzyme-linked immunoassay, while the ability of nanoparticle-bound PNA to hybridize to its complement was demonstrated using labeled DNA.

  5. Complexation of malic acid with cadmium(II) probed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Jakl, Michal; Schröder, Detlef

    2012-02-15

    Electrospray ionization was used as a technique for the characterization of the interactions between cadmium(II) ions and malic acid (1) in aqueous solution. Particular attention was paid to the nature of the species formed, which generally correspond to complexes of CdX(+) cations with neutral malic acid, where X either is the counterion of the metal salt used as a precursor (i.e. X=Cl, I) or corresponds to singly deprotonated malic acid. In pure water solutions, also highly coordinated complexes [Cd(1-H)(1)(2)](+) and [CdCl(1)(2)](+) were detected, whereas the most abundant complexes detected in a sample of soil solution were: [Cd(1-H)(1)](+) and [CdCl(1)](+). With respect to possible application in environmental analysis, the effects of (i) metal salts present in solution, (ii) modest mineralization, and (iii) the matrices of real soil solutions were probed. While the presence of other metals leads to additional complexes, the characteristic species containing both cadmium(II) and malic acid can still be detected with good sensitivity.

  6. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of oral microbiology, as many of

  7. Exploring the Hybridization Thermodynamics of Spherical Nucleic Acids to Tailor Probes for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Pratik Shailesh

    Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), three-dimensional nanoparticle conjugates composed of densely packed and highly oriented oligonucleotides around organic or inorganic nanoparticles, are an emergent class of nanostructures that show promise as single-entity agents for intracellular messenger RNA (mRNA) detection and gene regulation. SNAs exhibit superior biocompatibility and biological properties compared to linear oligonucleotides, enabling them to overcome many of the limitations of linear oligonucleotides for use in biomedical applications. However, the origins of these biologically attractive properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, the chemistry underlying one such property is studied in detail, and the findings are applied towards the rational design of more effective SNAs for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Chapter 1 introduces the synthesis of SNAs, the unique properties that make them superior to linear nucleic acids for biomedicine, and previously studied applications of these structures. Chapter 2 focuses on quantitatively studying the impact of the chemical structure of the SNA on its ability to hybridize multiple complementary nucleic acids. This chapter lays the groundwork for understanding the factors that govern SNA hybridization thermodynamics and how to tailor SNAs to increase their binding affinity to target mRNA strands. Chapters 3 and 4 capitalize on this knowledge to engineer probes for intracellular mRNA detection and gene regulation applications. Chapter 3 reports the development of an SNA-based probe that can simultaneously report the expression level of two different mRNA transcripts in live cells and differentiate diseased cells from non-diseased cells. Chapter 4 investigates the use of topically-applied SNAs to down-regulate a critical mediator of impaired wound healing in diabetic mice to accelerate wound closure. This study represents the first topical therapeutic application of SNA nanotechnology to treat open

  8. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Hettich, Robert L.; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, proteomic stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) was used to characterize population-specific assimilation of dissolved free amino acids (DFAAs), a major source of dissolved organic carbon for bacterial secondary production in aquatic environments. Microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, Oregon, and Monterey Bay, California, were incubated with 1 µM 13C-labeled amino acids for 15 and 32 h. The taxonomic compositions of microcosm metaproteomes were highly similar to those of the sampled natural communities, with Rhodobacteriales, SAR11, and Flavobacteriales representing the dominant taxa. Analysis of 13C incorporation into protein biomass allowed for quantification of the isotopic enrichment of identified proteins and subsequent determination of differential amino acid assimilation patterns between specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales tended to have a significantly high frequency of 13C-enriched peptides, opposite the trend for Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of 13C-enriched spectra at time point 2. Alteromonadales proteins also had a significantly high frequency of 13C-enriched peptides, particularly within ribosomal proteins, demonstrating their rapid growth during incubations. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of DFAA assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities

  9. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Hettich, Robert L; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan S

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, proteomic stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) was used to characterize population-specific assimilation of dissolved free amino acids (DFAAs), a major source of dissolved organic carbon for bacterial secondary production in aquatic environments. Microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, Oregon, and Monterey Bay, California, were incubated with 1 µM (13)C-labeled amino acids for 15 and 32 h. The taxonomic compositions of microcosm metaproteomes were highly similar to those of the sampled natural communities, with Rhodobacteriales, SAR11, and Flavobacteriales representing the dominant taxa. Analysis of (13)C incorporation into protein biomass allowed for quantification of the isotopic enrichment of identified proteins and subsequent determination of differential amino acid assimilation patterns between specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales tended to have a significantly high frequency of (13)C-enriched peptides, opposite the trend for Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of (13)C-enriched spectra at time point 2. Alteromonadales proteins also had a significantly high frequency of (13)C-enriched peptides, particularly within ribosomal proteins, demonstrating their rapid growth during incubations. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of DFAA assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities

  10. Probing titanate nanowire surface acidity through methylene blue adsorption in colloidal suspension and on thin films.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Endre; Szilágyi, István; Forró, László; Magrez, Arnaud

    2014-02-15

    The interaction of the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) with titanate nanowires (TiONWs) was investigated in different pH environments using visible spectroscopy and electrophoresis on thin films as well as in aqueous suspension. The surface charge of the TiONWs depends on the pH and ionic strength leading to positive charge under acidic and negative under alkaline conditions. The TiONWs have the same adsorption capacity on films and in suspensions at neutral pH while under alkaline conditions they are able to adsorb significantly more MB in suspension due to their higher surface area. Detailed adsorption studies in water revealed that dye cations form monomers, dimers and larger aggregates of H-type (face-to-face) on the TiONW films. The results indicate that below pH = 4.0 the TiONWs' external surface consists of Brøntsted acid sites capable of protonating MB. It was suggested that reversible indicator role of MB molecule dimers probes the TiONW surface acidity (Brøntsted sites).

  11. Location and binding mechanism of an ESIPT probe 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid in unsaturated fatty acid bound serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Shyamal Kr; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Dasgupta, Swagata; Ghosh, Sanjib

    2014-02-05

    The binding site and the binding mechanism of 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (3HNA) in oleic acid (OA) bound serum albumins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA)) have been determined using steady state and time resolved emission of tryptophan residues (Trp) in proteins and the ESIPT emission of 3HNA. Time resolved anisotropy of the probe 3HNA and low temperature phosphorescence of Trp residues of BSA in OA bound BSA at 77K reveals a drastic change of the binding site of 3HNA in the ternary system compared to that in the free protein. 3HNA binds near Trp213 in the ternary system whereas 3HNA binds near Trp134 in the free protein. The structure of OA bound BSA generated using docking methodology exhibits U-bend configuration of all bound OA. The docked pose of 3HNA in the free protein and in OA bound albumins (ternary systems) and the concomitant perturbation of the structure of proteins around the binding region of 3HNA corroborate the enhanced ESIPT emission of 3HNA and the energy transfer efficiency from the donor Trp213 of BSA to 3HNA acceptor in 3HNA-OA-BSA system.

  12. Neutrophil chemotaxis and arachidonic acid metabolism are not linked: evidence from metal ion probe studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.R.; Turner, R.A.; Smith, D.M.; Johnson, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-met-leu-phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid release. In contrast to previous reports, no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis was demonstrated, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  13. PNA lectin for purifying mouse acinar cells from the inflamed pancreas.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Zimmerman, Ray; Song, Zewen; Nebres, Philip; Ricks, David Matthew; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Husain, Sohail Z; Gittes, George K

    2016-02-17

    Better methods for purifying human or mouse acinar cells without the need for genetic modification are needed. Such techniques would be advantageous for the specific study of certain mechanisms, such as acinar-to-beta-cell reprogramming and pancreatitis. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin has been used to label and isolate acinar cells from the pancreas. However, the purity of the UEA-I-positive cell fraction has not been fully evaluated. Here, we screened 20 widely used lectins for their binding specificity for major pancreatic cell types, and found that UEA-I and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) have a specific affinity for acinar cells in the mouse pancreas, with minimal affinity for other major pancreatic cell types including endocrine cells, duct cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, PNA-purified acinar cells were less contaminated with mesenchymal and inflammatory cells, compared to UEA-I purified acinar cells. Thus, UEA-I and PNA appear to be excellent lectins for pancreatic acinar cell purification. PNA may be a better choice in situations where mesenchymal cells or inflammatory cells are significantly increased in the pancreas, such as type 1 diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  14. PNA lectin for purifying mouse acinar cells from the inflamed pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Zimmerman, Ray; Song, Zewen; Nebres, Philip; Ricks, David Matthew; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Husain, Sohail Z.; Gittes, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Better methods for purifying human or mouse acinar cells without the need for genetic modification are needed. Such techniques would be advantageous for the specific study of certain mechanisms, such as acinar-to-beta-cell reprogramming and pancreatitis. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin has been used to label and isolate acinar cells from the pancreas. However, the purity of the UEA-I-positive cell fraction has not been fully evaluated. Here, we screened 20 widely used lectins for their binding specificity for major pancreatic cell types, and found that UEA-I and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) have a specific affinity for acinar cells in the mouse pancreas, with minimal affinity for other major pancreatic cell types including endocrine cells, duct cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, PNA-purified acinar cells were less contaminated with mesenchymal and inflammatory cells, compared to UEA-I purified acinar cells. Thus, UEA-I and PNA appear to be excellent lectins for pancreatic acinar cell purification. PNA may be a better choice in situations where mesenchymal cells or inflammatory cells are significantly increased in the pancreas, such as type 1 diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26884345

  15. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  16. An Activity-Based Probe for N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase

    PubMed Central

    Armirotti, Andrea; Summa, Maria; Bertozzi, Fabio; Garau, Gianpiero; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA) is a lysosomal cysteine hydrolase involved in the degradation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), a family of endogenous lipid signaling molecules that includes oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Among the reported NAAA inhibitors, α–amino–β–lactone (3–aminooxetan–2–one) derivatives have been shown to prevent FAE hydrolysis in innate-immune and neural cells and to reduce reactions to inflammatory stimuli. Recently, we disclosed two potent and selective NAAA inhibitors, the compounds ARN077 (5-phenylpentyl N-[(2S,3R)-2-methyl-4-oxo-oxetan-3-yl]carbamate) and ARN726 (4-cyclohexylbutyl-N-[(S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl]carbamate). The former is active in vivo by topical administration in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia, while the latter exerts systemic anti-inflammatory effects in mouse models of lung inflammation. In the present study, we designed and validated a derivative of ARN726 as the first activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe for the in vivo detection of NAAA. The newly synthesized molecule 1 is an effective in vitro and in vivo click-chemistry activity based probe (ABP), which is able to capture the catalytically active form of NAAA in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cells overexpressing human NAAA as well as in rat lung tissue. Competitive ABPP with 1 confirmed that ARN726 and ARN077 inhibit NAAA in vitro and in vivo. Compound 1 is a useful new tool to identify activated NAAA both in vitro and in vivo, and to investigate the physiological and pathological roles of this enzyme. PMID:26102511

  17. Adsorption of peptide nucleic acid and DNA decamers at electrically charged surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Fojta, M; Vetterl, V; Tomschik, M; Jelen, F; Nielsen, P; Wang, J; Palecek, E

    1997-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and DNA decamers (GTAGATCACT and the complementary sequence) on a mercury surface was studied by means of AC impedance measurements at a hanging mercury drop electrode. The nucleic acid was first attached to the electrode by adsorption from a 5-microliter drop of PNA (or DNA) solution, and the electrode with the adsorbed nucleic acid layer was then washed and immersed in the blank background electrolyte where the differential capacity C of the electrode double layer was measured as a function of the applied potential E. It was found that the adsorption behavior of the PNA with an electrically neutral backbone differs greatly from that of the DNA (with a negatively charged backbone), whereas the DNA-PNA hybrid shows intermediate behavior. At higher surface coverage PNA molecules associate at the surface, and the minimum value of C is shifted to negative potentials because of intermolecular interactions of PNA at the surface. Prolonged exposure of PNA to highly negative potentials does not result in PNA desorption, whereas almost all of the DNA is removed from the surface at these potentials. Adsorption of PNA decreases with increasing NaCl concentration in the range from 0 to 50 mM NaCl, in contrast to DNA, the adsorption of which increases under the same conditions. PMID:9129832

  18. Amperometric microsensor for direct probing of ascorbic acid in human gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Emily A; Pauliukaitė, Rasa; Hocevar, Samo B; Ogorevc, Božidar; Smyth, Malcolm R

    2010-09-30

    This article reports on a novel microsensor for amperometric measurement of ascorbic acid (AA) under acidic conditions (pH 2) based on a carbon fiber microelectrode (CFME) modified with nickel oxide and ruthenium hexacyanoferrate (NiO-RuHCF). This sensing layer was deposited electrochemically in a two-step procedure involving an initial galvanostatic NiO deposition followed by a potentiodynamic RuHCF deposition from solutions containing the precursor salts. Several important parameters were examined to characterize and optimize the NiO-RuHCF sensing layer with respect to its current response to AA by using cyclic voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods. With the NiO-RuHCF coated CFME, the AA oxidation potential under acidic conditions was shifted to a less positive value for about 0.2 V (E(p) of ca. 0.23 V vs. Ag/AgCl) as compared to a bare CFME, which greatly improves the electrochemical selectivity. Using the hydrodynamic amperometry mode, the current vs. AA concentration in 0.01 M HCl, at a selected operating potential of 0.30 V, was found to be linear over a wide range of 10-1610 μM (n=22, r=0.999) with a calculated limit of detection of 1.0 μM. The measurement repeatability was satisfactory with a relative standard deviation (r.s.d.) ranging from 4% to 5% (n=6), depending on the AA concentration, and with a sensor-to-sensor reproducibility (r.s.d.) of 6.9% at 100 μM AA. The long-term reproducibility, using the same microsensor for 112 consecutive measurements of 20 μM AA over 11 h of periodic probing sets over 4 days, was 16.1% r.s.d., thus showing very good stability at low AA levels and suitability for use over a prolonged period of time. Moreover, using the proposed microsensor, additionally coated with a protective cellulose acetate membrane, the calibration plot obtained in the extremely complex matrix of real undiluted gastric juice was linear from 10 to 520 μM (n=14, r=0.998). These results

  19. New fluorescent octadecapentaenoic acids as probes of lipid membranes and protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, C R; Souto, A A; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and spectroscopic properties of the new fluorescent acids all(E)-8, 10, 12, 14, 16-octadecapentaenoic acid (t-COPA) and its (8Z)-isomer (c-COPA) have been characterized in solvents of different polarity, synthetic lipid bilayers, and lipid/protein systems. These compounds are reasonably photostable in solution, present an intense UV absorption band (epsilon(350 nm) approximately 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1)) strongly overlapped by tryptophan fluorescence and their emission, centered at 470 nm, is strongly polarized (r(O) = 0.385 +/- 0.005) and decays with a major component (85%) of lifetime 23 ns and a faster minor one of lifetime 2 ns (D,L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), 15 degrees C). Both COPA isomers incorporate readily into vesicles and membranes (K(p) approximately 10(6)) and align parallel to the lipids. t-COPA distributes homogeneously between gel and fluid lipid domains and the changes in polarization accurately reflect the lipid T(m) values. From the decay of the fluorescence anisotropy in spherical bilayers of DMPC and POPC it is shown that t-COPA also correctly reflects the lipid order parameters, determined by 2H NMR techniques. Resonance energy transfer from tryptophan to the bound pentaenoic acid in serum albumin in solution, and from the tryptophan residues of gramicidin in lipid bilayers also containing the pentaenoic acid, show that this probe is a useful acceptor of protein tryptophan excitation, with R(O) values of 30-34 A. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:8889194

  20. A triterpene oleanolic acid conjugate with 3-hydroxyflavone derivative as a new membrane probe with two-color ratiometric response.

    PubMed

    Turkmen, Zeynep; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Oncul, Sule; Duportail, Guy; Topcu, Gulacti; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2005-07-29

    We report on the synthesis by coupling of a triterpenoid oleanolic acid with 4'-diethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (FE) to produce an environment-sensitive biomembrane probe with two-band ratiometric response in fluorescence emission. The synthesized compound (probe FOT) was tested in a series of model solvents and demonstrated the response to solvent polarity and intermolecular hydrogen bonding very similar to that of parent probe FE. Meantime when incorporated into lipid bilayer membranes, it showed new features differing in response between lipids of different surface charges as well as between glycerophospholipids and sphingomyelin. We observed that in the conditions of coexistence of rafts and non-raft structures the probe is excluded from the rafts.

  1. Determination of bismuth in pharmaceutical products using phosphoric acid as molecular probe by resonance light scattering.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yanru; Cui, Fengling; Geng, Shaoguang; Jin, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the sensitive determination of bismuth(III) in pharmaceutical products using phosphoric acid as a molecular probe by resonance light scattering (RLS) is discussed. In 0.5 mol/L phosphoric acid (H3 PO4) medium, bismuth(III) reacted with PO4 (3-) to form an ion association compound, which resulted in the significant enhancement of RLS intensity and the appearance of the corresponding RLS spectral characteristics. The maximum scattering peak of the system existed at 364 nm. Under optimal conditions, there was linear relationship between the relative intensity of RLS and concentration of bismuth(III) in the range of 0.06-10.0 µg/mL for the system. A low detection limit for bismuth(III) of 3.22 ng/mL was achieved. The relative standard deviations (RSD) for the determination of 0.40 and 0.80 µg/mL bismuth(III) were 2.1% and 1.1%, respectively, for five determinations. Based on this fact, a simple, rapid, and sensitive method was developed for the determination of bismuth(III) at nanogram level by RLS technique with a common spectrofluorimeter. This analytical system was successfully applied to determine the trace amounts of bismuth(III) in pharmaceutical products, which was in good agreement with the results obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS).

  2. Alginic acid-based macromolecular chemiluminescent probe for universal protein assay on a solid-phase membrane.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Tomasz; Kondo, Midori; Azam, Md Golam; Zhang, Huan; Shibata, Takayuki; Kai, Masaaki

    2010-11-01

    A novel chemiluminescent (CL) technique for the rapid determination of proteins on a membrane is described. The method utilizes an interaction between luminol-labeled alginic acid macromolecule and proteins. The synthesis of the macromolecular probe consists of the oxidation of alginic acid with NaIO(4), the introduction of luminol through imine formation as a CL tag, and the reduction of the conjugate with NaBH(4) to obtain the stable probe. The analytical protocol consists of adsorbing proteins on a poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) membrane, incubating the membrane for 30 min with the probe solution in the presence of boric acid and a surfactant, two short washing steps in order to remove an excess of the probe, and detection of CL intensity with hemin, tetra-n-propylammonium hydroxide and H(2)O(2). This proposed CL assay for proteins can be finished within 1 h, and indicates the detection limit of 15-250 ng of proteins on the membrane. The CL signals in the calibration curves for some proteins such as albumin show proportional intensities against the amounts of the proteins less than ca. 125 ng, though there is a logarithmic relationship between the CL signals and the protein amounts larger than ca. 125 ng. However, some other proteins indicate the proportional CL intensities against the increasing amounts in wider range up to 500 ng of the proteins. The synthesised alginic acid-based probe indicates specific selectivity towards proteins, and should be used as a CL probe for the universal detection of various proteins on a solid-phase membrane even in the presence of DNA and RNA.

  3. In situ synthesis of peptide nucleic acids in porous silicon for drug delivery and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Mares, Jeremy W; Swartz, Caleb M; Zhao, Yiliang; Weiss, Sharon M; Duvall, Craig L

    2014-07-16

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are a unique class of synthetic molecules that have a peptide backbone and can hybridize with nucleic acids. Here, a versatile method has been developed for the automated, in situ synthesis of PNA from a porous silicon (PSi) substrate for applications in gene therapy and biosensing. Nondestructive optical measurements were performed to monitor single base additions of PNA initiated from (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane attached to the surface of PSi films, and mass spectrometry was conducted to verify synthesis of the desired sequence. Comparison of in situ synthesis to postsynthesis surface conjugation of the full PNA molecules showed that surface mediated, in situ PNA synthesis increased loading 8-fold. For therapeutic proof-of-concept, controlled PNA release from PSi films was characterized in phosphate buffered saline, and PSi nanoparticles fabricated from PSi films containing in situ grown PNA complementary to micro-RNA (miR) 122 generated significant anti-miR activity in a Huh7 psiCHECK-miR122 cell line. The applicability of this platform for biosensing was also demonstrated using optical measurements that indicated selective hybridization of complementary DNA target molecules to PNA synthesized in situ on PSi films. These collective data confirm that we have established a novel PNA-PSi platform with broad utility in drug delivery and biosensing.

  4. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application: an ex vivo study in human skin.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N; Sorensen, J A; Brosen, K; Nielsen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin - dermal microdialysis (DMD) - is a unique technique for sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling of dermatological drug concentrations in the dermis. Debate has concerned the existence of a correlation between the depth of the sampling device - the probe - in the dermis and the amount of drug sampled following topical drug administration. This study evaluates the relation between probe depth and drug sampling using dermal DMD sampling ex vivo in human skin. We used superficial (<1 mm), intermediate (1-2 mm) and deep (>2 mm) positioning of the linear MD probe in the dermis of human abdominal skin, followed by topical application of 4 mg/ml of benzoic acid (BA) in skin chambers overlying the probes. Dialysate was sampled every hour for 12 h and analysed for BA content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial probes: 3,335 ± 1,094 μg·h/ml (mean ± SD); intermediate probes: 2,178 ± 1,068 μg·h/ml, and deep probes: 1,159 ± 306 μg·h/ml. AUC(0-12) sampled by the superficial probes was significantly higher than that of samples from the intermediate and deeply positioned probes (p value <0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between probe depth and AUC(0-12) sampled by the same probe (p value <0.001, r(2) value = 0.5). The mean extrapolated lag-times (±SD) for the superficial probes were 0.8 ± 0.1 h, for the intermediate probes 1.7 ± 0.5 h, and for the deep probes 2.7 ± 0.5 h, which were all significantly different from each other (p value <0.05). In conclusion, this paper demonstrates that there is an inverse relationship between the depth of the probe in the dermis

  5. Novel molecular beacon DNA probes for protein-nucleic acid interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei J.; Perlette, John; Fang, Xiaohong; Kelley, Shannon; Tan, Weihong

    2000-03-01

    We report a novel approach to study protein-nucleic acid interactions by using molecular beacons (MBs). Molecular beacons are hairpin-shaped DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher, and can report the presence of target DNA/RNA sequences. MBs can also report the existence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) through non-sequence specific binding. The interaction between SSB and MB has resulted in significant fluorescence restoration of the MB. The fluorescence enhancement brought by SSB and by complementary DNA is very comparable. The molar ratio of the binding between SSB and the molecular beacon is 1:1 with a binding constant of 2 X 107 M-1. Using the MB-SSB binding, we are able to determine SSB at 2 X 10-10 M with a conventional spectrometer. We have also applied MB DNA probes for the analysis of an enzyme lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and for the investigation of its binding properties with ssDNA. The biding process between MB and different isoenzymes of LDH has been studied. We also show that there are significant differences in MB binding affinity to different proteins, which will enable selective binding studies of a variety of proteins. This new approach is potentially useful for protein-DNA/RNA interaction studies that require high sensitivity, speed and convenience. The results also open the possibility of using easily obtainable, custom designed, modified DNA molecules for studies of drug interactions and targeting. Our results demonstrate that MB can be effectively used for sensitive protein quantitation and for efficient protein-DNA interaction studies. MB has the signal transduction mechanism built within the molecule, and can thus be used for quick protein assay development and for real-time measurements.

  6. Molecular self-assembly using peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Berger, Or; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are extensively studied for the control of genetic expression since their design in the 1990s. However, the application of PNAs in nanotechnology is much more recent. PNAs share the specific base-pair recognition characteristic of DNA together with material-like properties of polyamides, both proteins and synthetic polymers, such as Kevlar and Nylon. The first application of PNA was in the form of PNA-amphiphiles, resulting in the formation of either lipid integrated structures, hydrogels or fibrillary assemblies. Heteroduplex DNA-PNA assemblies allow the formation of hybrid structures with higher stability as compared with pure DNA. A systematic screen for minimal PNA building blocks resulted in the identification of guanine-containing di-PNA assemblies and protected guanine-PNA monomer spheres showing unique optical properties. Finally, the co-assembly of PNA with thymine-like three-faced cyanuric acid allowed the assembly of poly-adenine PNA into fibers. In summary, we believe that PNAs represent a new and important family of building blocks which converges the advantages of both DNA- and peptide-nanotechnologies.

  7. Climatic Data Integration and Analysis - Regional Approaches to Climate Change for Pacific Northwest Agriculture (REACCH PNA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamon, E.; Gessler, P. E.; Flathers, E.; Sheneman, L.; Gollberg, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Regional Approaches to Climate Change for Pacific Northwest Agriculture (REACCH PNA) is a five-year USDA/NIFA-funded coordinated agriculture project to examine the sustainability of cereal crop production systems in the Pacific Northwest, in relationship to ongoing climate change. As part of this effort, an extensive data management system has been developed to enable researchers, students, and the public, to upload, manage, and analyze various data. The REACCH PNA data management team has developed three core systems to encompass cyberinfrastructure and data management needs: 1) the reacchpna.org portal (https://www.reacchpna.org) is the entry point for all public and secure information, with secure access by REACCH PNA members for data analysis, uploading, and informational review; 2) the REACCH PNA Data Repository is a replicated, redundant database server environment that allows for file and database storage and access to all core data; and 3) the REACCH PNA Libraries which are functional groupings of data for REACCH PNA members and the public, based on their access level. These libraries are accessible thru our https://www.reacchpna.org portal. The developed system is structured in a virtual server environment (data, applications, web) that includes a geospatial database/geospatial web server for web mapping services (ArcGIS Server), use of ESRI's Geoportal Server for data discovery and metadata management (under the ISO 19115-2 standard), Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS) for data cataloging, and Interactive Python notebook server (IPython) technology for data analysis. REACCH systems are housed and maintained by the Northwest Knowledge Network project (www.northwestknowledge.net), which provides data management services to support research. Initial project data harvesting and meta-tagging efforts have resulted in the interrogation and loading of over 10 terabytes of climate model output, regional entomological data

  8. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. I. Covalent immobilization of oligonucleotide probes onto the nylon].

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, E V; Pyshnaia, I A; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2010-01-01

    The features of UV-induced immobilization of oligonucleotides on a nylon membranes and the effectiveness of enzymatic labeling of immobilized probes at heterophase detection of nucleic acids are studied. Short terminal oligothymidilate (up to 10 nt) sequences are suggested to attach to the probe via a flexible ethylene glycol based linker. The presence of such fragment enhances the intensity of immobilization and reduces UV-dependent degradation of the targeted (sequence-specific) part of the probe by reducing the dose needed for the immobilization of DNA. The optimum dose of UV-irradiation is determined to be ~0.4 J/cm(2) at the wavelength 254 nm. This dose provides high level of hybridization signal for immobilized probes with various nucleotide composition of the sequence specific moiety. The amide groups of the polyamide are shown to play the key role in the photoinduced immobilization of nucleic acids, whereas the primary amino groups in the structure of PA is not the center responsible for the covalent binding of DNA by UV-irradiation, as previously believed. Various additives in the soaking solution during the membrane of UV-dependent immobilization of probes are shown to influence its effectiveness. The use of alternative to UV-irradiation system of radical generation are shown to provide the immobilization of oligonucleotides onto the nylon membrane.

  9. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ohrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-11-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes.

  10. Sucrose esters of carboxylic acids in glandular trichomes ofSolanum berthaultii deter settling and probing by green peach aphid.

    PubMed

    Neal, J J; Tingey, W M; Steffens, J C

    1990-02-01

    Removal of type B trichome exudate fromSolanum berthaultii leaflets leads to a decrease in tarsal gumming and mortality and an increase in feeding by the green peach aphid,Myzus persicae. Type B trichome exudate of theS. berthaultii accession PI 473331 is composed of a complex of 3',3,4,6-tetra-O-acyl sucroses containing primarily short-chain branched carboxylic acids. The acyl constituents are primarily derived from 2-methylpropanoic, 2-methylbutyric, and 8-methylnonanoic acids but constituents derived fromn-decanoic and dodecanoic acids are also present. Sucrose esters inhibit settling and probing by aphids in glass feeding cages.

  11. Quantification of Syntrophic Fatty Acid-β-Oxidizing Bacteria in a Mesophilic Biogas Reactor by Oligonucleotide Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kaare H.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S. wolfei LYB was closely related to S. wolfei subsp. wolfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, of which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas. PMID:10543784

  12. Assessment of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by antisense mazE-PNA.

    PubMed

    Valadbeigi, Hassan; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Salehi, Majid Baseri

    2017-03-01

    The hallmark patogenicity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is biofilm formation that is not easy to eradicate, because it has variety mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. In addition, toxin-antitoxin (TA) system may play role in biofilm formation. The current study aimed to evaluate the role of TA loci in biofilm formation. Therefore, 18 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were collected and evaluated for specific biofilm and TA genes. The analysis by RT-qPCR demonstrated that expression of mazE antitoxin in biofilm formation was increase. On the other hand, mazE antitoxin TA system was used as target for antisense PNA. mazE-PNA was able to influence in biofilm formation and was inhibit at 5,10 and 15 μM concentrations biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it could be highlighted target for anti-biofilm target to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilm producer.

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pNA6 reveals the high plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Xu, Yan; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-10-10

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem in health care and is of widespread public concern. Conjugative plasmids are the most important vectors in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we determined the complete sequence of plasmid pNA6, a plasmid which was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to ampicillin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole. The complete sequence of plasmid pNA6 was 52,210bp in length with an average G+C content of 52.70%. Plasmid pNA6 belongs to the IncU group by sequence queries against the GenBank database. This plasmid has a typical IncU backbone and shows the highest similarities with plasmid RA3 and plasmid pFBAOT6. Plasmid pNA6 carries a class 1 integron consisting of aacA4, ereA and dfrA1 genes. Moreover, plasmid pNA6 also harbors a blaTEM-1-containing complex structure which inserted into the replication region and maintenance region. This insertion site has never been found on other IncU plasmids. The sequencing of plasmid pNA6 will add new sequence information to IncU family plasmids and enhance our understanding of the plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

  14. Glycoclusters on oligonucleotide and PNA scaffolds: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Nicolas; Defrancq, Eric; Morvan, François

    2013-06-07

    Conjugation of oligonucleotides (ONs) to a variety of reporter groups has been the subject of intensive research during the last decade. Conjugation is indeed of great interest because it can be used not only to improve the existing ONs properties but also to impart new ones. In this context tremendous efforts have been made to conjugate carbohydrate moieties to ONs. Indeed carbohydrates play an important role in biological processes such as signal transduction and cell adhesion through the recognition with sugar-binding proteins (i.e. lectins) located on the surface of cells. For this reason, carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates (COCs) have been first developed for improving the poor cellular uptake or tissue specific delivery of ONs through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Besides the targeted ONs delivery, carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates (COCs) are also evaluated in the context of carbohydrate biochips in which surface coating with carbohydrates is achieved by using the DNA-directed immobilization strategy (DDI). Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have also been extensively investigated as a surrogate of DNA for diverse applications. Therefore attachment of carbohydrate moieties to this class of molecules has been studied. The aforementioned applications of COCs require mimicking of the natural processes, in which the weak individual protein-carbohydrate binding is overcome by using multivalent interactions. This tutorial review focuses on the recent advances in carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates and describes the major synthetic approaches available. In addition, an overview of applications that have been developed using various scaffolds allowing multivalent interactions is provided. Finally recent results on the use of peptide nucleic acids as oligonucleotides surrogate are described.

  15. Intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering probe based on gold nanorods functionalized with mercaptohexadecanoic acid with reduced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zong, Shenfei; Zhang, Ruohu; Yang, Jing; Cui, Yiping

    2012-01-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe for intracellular detection was demonstrated by utilizing gold nanorods (GNRs) coated with p-aminothiophenol as the Raman reporters. In this probe, to reduce the cytotoxicity of GNRs, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) molecules adsorbed on the surfaces of GNRs as ligands were replaced by mercaptohexadecanoic acid via a "round-trip" phase change method. Such a ligand exchange can reduce the toxicity of the probe compared to the original CTAB-stabilized GNRs, which were confirmed by both 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and bright field view of HeLa cells. Meanwhile, the transmission electron microscopy images indicated that there is no significant morphologic change of GNRs before and after the ligand exchange. Moreover, its SERS performance was adequately retained after the incorporation of the probe into living HeLa cells. This new type of SERS probe is expected to have great potential in intracellular imaging or sensing applications.

  16. Detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms using very short, locked nucleic acid TaqMan probes.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Sergio; D'Orso, Fabio; Morelli, Giorgio

    2008-06-25

    Many countries have introduced mandatory labeling requirements on foods derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based upon the TaqMan probe chemistry has become the method mostly used to support these regulations; moreover, event-specific PCR is the preferred method in GMO detection because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence of the exogenous integrant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of very short (eight-nucleotide long), locked nucleic acid (LNA) TaqMan probes in 5'-nuclease PCR assays for the detection and quantification of GMOs. Classic TaqMan and LNA TaqMan probes were compared for the analysis of the maize MON810 transgene. The performance of the two types of probes was tested on the maize endogenous reference gene hmga, the CaMV 35S promoter, and the hsp70/cryIA(b) construct as well as for the event-specific 5'-integration junction of MON810, using plasmids as standard reference molecules. The results of our study demonstrate that the LNA 5'-nuclease PCR assays represent a valid and reliable analytical system for the detection and quantification of transgenes. Application of very short LNA TaqMan probes to GMO quantification can simplify the design of 5'-nuclease assays.

  17. A versatile method for the preparation of conjugates of peptides with DNA/PNA/analog by employing chemo-selective click reaction in water

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Khirud; Mane, Meenakshi V.; Kunte, Sunita S.; Kumar, Vaijayanti A.

    2007-01-01

    The specific 1,3 dipolar Hüisgen cycloaddition reaction known as ‘click-reaction’ between azide and alkyne groups is employed for the synthesis of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates. The peptide nucleic acids (PNA)/DNA and peptides may be appended either by azide or alkyne groups. The cycloaddition reaction between the azide and alkyne appended substrates allows the synthesis of the desired conjugates in high purity and yields irrespective of the sequence and functional groups on either of the two substrates. The versatile approach could also be employed to generate the conjugates of peptides with thioacetamido nucleic acid (TANA) analog. The click reaction is catalyzed by Cu (I) in either water or in organic medium. In water, ∼3-fold excess of the peptide-alkyne/azide drives the reaction to completion in 2 h with no side products. PMID:17981837

  18. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (Cdbnd C) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210 nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140 nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50 s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution.

  19. A carbon dot-based "off-on" fluorescent probe for highly selective and sensitive detection of phytic acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhao; Wang, Libing; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2015-08-15

    We herein report a facile, one-step pyrolysis synthesis of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) using citric acid as the carbon source and lysine as the surface passivation reagent. The as-prepared CDs show narrow size distribution, excellent blue fluorescence and good photo-stability and water dispersivity. The fluorescence of the CDs was found to be effectively quenched by ferric (Fe(III)) ions with high selectivity via a photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Upon addition of phytic acid (PA) to the CDs/Fe(III) complex dispersion, the fluorescence of the CDs was significantly recovered, arising from the release of Fe(III) ions from the CDs/Fe(III) complex because PA has a higher affinity for Fe(III) ions compared to CDs. Furthermore, we developed an "off-on" fluorescence assay method for the detection of phytic acid using CDs/Fe(III) as a fluorescent probe. This probe enables the selective detection of PA with a linear range of 0.68-18.69 μM and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio is 3) of 0.36 μM. The assay method demonstrates high selectivity, repeatability, stability and recovery ratio in the detection of the standard and real PA samples. We believe that the facile operation, low-cost, high sensitivity and selectivity render this CD-based "off-on" fluorescent probe an ideal sensing platform for the detection of PA.

  20. Theoretical study of the NLO responses of some natural and unnatural amino acids used as probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Derrar, S N; Sekkal-Rahal, M; Derreumaux, P; Springborg, M

    2014-08-01

    The first hyperpolarizabilities β of the natural aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine have been investigated using several methods and basis sets. Some of the theoretical results obtained were compared to the only experimental hyper-Rayleigh scattering data available. The sensitivity of tryptophan to its local environment was analyzed by constructing two-dimensional potential energy plots around the dipeptide tryptophan-lysine. Static hyperpolarizabilities β(0) of the found minima were calculated by a second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) method in combination with the 6-31+G(d) basis set. Moreover, the efficiency of tryptophan and those of a series of unnatural amino acids as endogenous probe molecules were tested by calculating the nonlinear responses of some peptides. Impressive results were obtained for the amino acid ALADAN, which shows significantly improved nonlinear performance compared to other amino acids with weak nonlinear responses.

  1. Mismatch discrimination in fluorescent in situ hybridization using different types of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Silvia; Silvia, Fontenete; Barros, Joana; Joana, Barros; Madureira, Pedro; Pedro, Madureira; Figueiredo, Céu; Céu, Figueiredo; Wengel, Jesper; Jesper, Wengel; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Filipe, Azevedo Nuno

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years, several researchers have focused their attention on nucleic acid mimics due to the increasing necessity of developing a more robust recognition of DNA or RNA sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an example of a method where the use of these novel nucleic acid monomers might be crucial to the success of the analysis. To achieve the expected accuracy in detection, FISH probes should have high binding affinity towards their complementary strands and discriminate effectively the noncomplementary strands. In this study, we investigate the effect of different chemical modifications in fluorescent probes on their ability to successfully detect the complementary target and discriminate the mismatched base pairs by FISH. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first study where this analysis is performed with different types of FISH probes directly in biological targets, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter acinonychis. This is also the first study where unlocked nucleic acids (UNA) were used as chemistry modification in oligonucleotides for FISH methodologies. The effectiveness in detecting the specific target and in mismatch discrimination appears to be improved using locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-O-methyl RNA (2'OMe) or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in comparison to LNA/DNA, LNA/UNA, or DNA probes. Further, the use of LNA modifications together with 2'OMe monomers allowed the use of shorter fluorescent probes and increased the range of hybridization temperatures at which FISH would work.

  2. Information transfer from peptide nucleic acids to RNA by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are uncharged analogs of DNA and RNA in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is substituted by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. A PNA C10 oligomer has been shown to act as template for efficient formation of oligoguanylates from activated guanosine ribonucleotides. In a previous paper we used heterosequences of DNA as templates in sequence-dependent polymerization of PNA dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from PNA to RNA. We describe the reactions of activated mononucleotides on heterosequences of PNA. Adenylic, cytidylic and guanylic acids were incorporated into the products opposite their complement on PNA, although less efficiently than on DNA templates.

  3. Detection of chromosomal inversions using non-repetitive nucleic acid probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for the identification of chromosomal inversions is described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  4. Detection of Chromosomal Inversions Using Non-Repetitive Nucleic Acid Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and a kit for the identification of chromosomal inversions are described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  5. Detection of Sialic Acid-Utilising Bacteria in a Caecal Community Batch Culture Using RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Young, Wayne; Egert, Markus; Bassett, Shalome A.; Bibiloni, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids are monosaccharides typically found on cell surfaces and attached to soluble proteins, or as essential components of ganglioside structures that play a critical role in brain development and neural transmission. Human milk also contains sialic acid conjugated to oligosaccharides, glycolipids, and glycoproteins. These nutrients can reach the large bowel where they may be metabolised by the microbiota. However, little is known about the members of the microbiota involved in this function. To identify intestinal bacteria that utilise sialic acid within a complex intestinal community, we cultured the caecal microbiota from piglets in the presence of 13C-labelled sialic acid. Using RNA-based stable isotope probing, we identified bacteria that consumed 13C-sialic acid by fractionating total RNA in isopycnic buoyant density gradients followed by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Addition of sialic acid caused significant microbial community changes. A relative rise in Prevotella and Lactobacillus species was accompanied by a corresponding reduction in the genera Escherichia/Shigella, Ruminococcus and Eubacterium. Inspection of isotopically labelled RNA sequences suggests that the labelled sialic acid was consumed by a wide range of bacteria. However, species affiliated with the genus Prevotella were clearly identified as the most prolific users, as solely their RNA showed significantly higher relative shares among the most labelled RNA species. Given the relevance of sialic acid in nutrition, this study contributes to a better understanding of their microbial transformation in the intestinal tract with potential implications for human health. PMID:25816158

  6. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HO2NO2 on Liquid Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of HO2NO2 (peroxynitric acid, PNA) vapor with liquid sulfuric acid surfaces was investigated for the acid contents ranging from 50 to 70 wt % and over a temperature range from 205 to 230 K, using a fast flow-reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. PNA was observed to be physically taken up by liquid sulfuric acid, without undergoing irreversible aqueous phase reactions.

  7. Hybridization probe for femtomolar quantification of selected nucleic acid sequences on a disposable electrode.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Daniel M; Chami, Bilal; Kreuzer, Matthias; Presting, Gernot; Alvarez, Anne M; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2006-04-01

    Mixed monolayers of electroactive hybridization probes on gold surfaces of a disposable electrode were investigated as a technology for simple, sensitive, selective, and rapid gene identification. Hybridization to the ferrocene-labeled hairpin probes reproducibly diminished cyclic redox currents, presumably due to a displacement of the label from the electrode. Observed peak current densities were roughly 1000x greater than those observed in previous studies, such that results could easily be interpreted without the use of algorithms to correct for background polarization currents. Probes were sensitive to hybridization with a number of oligonucleotide sequences with varying homology, but target oligonucleotides could be distinguished from competing nontarget sequences based on unique "melting" profiles from the probe. Detection limits were demonstrated down to nearly 100 fM, which may be low enough to identify certain genetic conditions or infections without amplification. This technology has rich potential for use in field devices for gene identification as well as in gene microarrays.

  8. Human papillomavirus 35 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 35 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 35 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 35 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  9. Human papillomavirus 43 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 43 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 43 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 43 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  10. Human papillomavirus 56 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorinez, A.T.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes an HPV 56 hybridization probe. It comprises: a member selected from the group consisting of HPV 56 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and HPV 56 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  11. Human papillomavirus 44 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 44 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (1) HPV 44 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 44 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  12. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  13. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1998-11-24

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  14. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  15. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  16. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1999-03-30

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  17. NanoCluster Beacon - A New Molecular Probe for Homogeneous Detection of Nucleic Acid Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    requires only a single preparation step (i.e. nanocluster formation on NC probes), but because there is no need to remove excess silver ions or...Oligonucleotide-templated nanoclusters consisting of a few atoms of silver (DNA/Ag NCs) have been made into a new molecular probe that “lights up...upon target DNA binding, termed a NanoCluster Beacon (NCB). We discovered that interactions between silver nanoclusters and a proximal, guanine- rich

  18. A universal strategy for visual chiral recognition of α-amino acids with L-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoxin; Zhou, Fulin; Xu, Chunli; Li, Baoxin

    2016-02-21

    The ability to recognize and quantify the chirality of alpha-amino acids constitutes the basis of many critical areas for specific targeting in drug development and metabolite probing. It is still challenging to conveniently distinguish the enantiomer of amino acids largely due to the lack of a universal and simple strategy. In this work, we report a strategy for the visual recognition of α-amino acids. It is based on the chirality of L-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles (L-TA-capped AuNPs, ca. 13 nm in diameter). All of 19 right-handed α-amino acids can induce a red-to-blue color change of L-TA-capped AuNP solution, whereas all of the left-handed amino acids (except cysteine) cannot. The chiral recognition can be achieved by the naked eye and a simple spectrophotometer. This method does not require complicated chiral modification, and excels through its low-cost, good availability of materials and its simplicity. Another notable feature of this method is its high generality, and this method can discriminate almost all native α-amino acid enantiomers. This versatile method could be potentially used for high-throughput chiral recognition of amino acids.

  19. Probing the Substrate Specificity and Protein-Protein Interactions of the E. coli Fatty Acid Dehydratase, FabA

    PubMed Central

    Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Chi; Jackson, David R.; Gupta, Aarushi; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Microbial fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes are important targets for areas as diverse as antibiotic development to biofuel production. Elucidating the molecular basis of chain length control during fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for the understanding of regulatory processes of this fundamental metabolic pathway. In Escherichia coli, the acyl carrier protein (AcpP) plays a central role by sequestering and shuttling the growing acyl chain between fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. FabA, a β-hydroxylacyl-AcpP dehydratase, is an important enzyme in controlling fatty acid chain length and saturation levels. FabA-AcpP interactions are transient in nature and thus difficult to visualize. In this study, four mechanistic crosslinking probes mimicking varying acyl chain lengths were synthesized to systematically probe for modified chain length specificity of fourteen FabA mutants. These studies provide evidence for the AcpP interacting “positive patch,” FabA mutations that altered substrate specificity, and the roles that the FabA “gating residues” play in chain-length selection. PMID:26526101

  20. Fluorescent amino acid undergoing excited state intramolecular proton transfer for site-specific probing and imaging of peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Sholokh, Marianna; Zamotaiev, Oleksandr M; Das, Ranjan; Postupalenko, Viktoriia Y; Richert, Ludovic; Dujardin, Denis; Zaporozhets, Olga A; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2015-02-12

    Fluorescent amino acids bearing environment-sensitive fluorophores are highly valuable tools for site-selective probing of peptide/ligand interactions. Herein, we synthesized a fluorescent l-amino acid bearing the 4'-methoxy-3-hydroxyflavone fluorophore (M3HFaa) that shows dual emission, as a result of an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The dual emission of M3HFaa was found to be substantially more sensitive to hydration as compared to previous analogues. By replacing the Ala30 and Trp37 residues of a HIV-1 nucleocapsid peptide, M3HFaa was observed to preserve the peptide structure and functions. Interaction of the labeled peptides with nucleic acids and lipid vesicles produced a strong switch in their dual emission, favoring the emission of the ESIPT product. This switch was associated with the appearance of long-lived fluorescence lifetimes for the ESIPT product, as a consequence of the rigid environment in the complexes that restricted the relative motions of the M3HFaa aromatic moieties. The strongest restriction and thus the longest fluorescence lifetimes were observed at position 37 in complexes with nucleic acids, where the probe likely stacks with the nucleobases. Based on the dependence of the lifetime values on the nature of the ligand and the labeled position, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to identify the binding partners of the labeled peptides microinjected into living cells. Thus, M3HFaa appears as a sensitive tool for monitoring site selectively peptide interactions in solution and living cells.

  1. Real-time, in-situ analysis of silver ions using nucleic acid probes modified silica microfiber interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Huang, Yunyun; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Tuan; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-04-01

    A sensitive Ag(+) sensor based on nucleic acid probes modified silica microfiber interferometry is designed and developed. The probes on microfiber surface plays the part on catching Ag(+) as tentacles, while their conformation change from random coils to hairpins. It induces the fiber surface refractive index change, which is captured by the optical fiber and translated into a significant wavelength shift in the interferometric fringe. Such a combination enables an improved concentration sensitivity of 0.22nm/log M and limit of detection of 1.36 × 10(-9)M, taking the advantage of real-time and in-situ analysis. It shows good selectivity in the present of many other metal ions and offers potential to analysis in real matrix, especially in the environmental samples must be analyzed in a short time. This may provide insights into the preparation of sensing platforms for optical quantification of other small molecular, supplementing the existing tools.

  2. Real-Time PCR Genotyping using Taqman Probes to Detect High Oleic Acid Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid, a monounsaturated, omega-9 fatty acid is an important agronomic trait in peanut cultivars because it provides increased shelf life, improved flavor, enhanced fatty acid composition, and a beneficial effect on human health. Currently, most high oleic peanuts confer limited resistance to ...

  3. Probing the acidity of carboxylic acids in protic ionic liquids, water, and their binary mixtures: activation energy of proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shashi Kant; Kumar, Anil

    2013-02-28

    Acidity functions were used to express the ability of a solvent/solution to donate/accept a proton to a solute. The present work accounts for the acidity determination of HCOOH, CH3COOH, and CH3CH2COOH in the alkylimidazolium-based protic ionic liquids (PILs), incorporated with carboxylate anion, water, and in a binary mixture of PIL and water using the Hammett acidity function, H0. A reversal in the acidity trend was observed, when organic acids were transferred from water to PIL. It was emphasized that an increased stabilization offered by PIL cation toward the more basic conjugate anion of organic acid was responsible for this anomalous change in acidity order in PILs, which was absent in water. The greater stabilization of a basic organic anion by PIL cation is discussed in terms of the stable hard–soft acid base (HSAB) pairing. A change in the H0 values of these acids was observed with a change in temperature, and a linear correlation between the ln H0 and 1/T was noted. This relationship points toward the activation energy of proton transfer (E(a,H+)), a barrier provided by the medium during the proton transfer from Brønsted acid to indicator. The H0 function in binary mixtures points to the involvement of pseudosolvent, the behavior of which changes with the nature and concentration of acid. The presence of the maxima/minima in the H0 function is discussed in terms of the synergetic behavior of the pseudosolvent composed of the mixtures of aqueous PILs.

  4. Photodissociation of pernitric acid (HO2NO2) at 248 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, Helene; Smith, Gregory P.; Golden, David M.

    1989-01-01

    The photodissociation of pernitric acid (PNA) was studied at 248 nm. The quantum yield for production of OH radicals is 34 + or - 16 percent. The yield of OH from PNA was measured relative to that of H2O2. The translational and rotational energy content of the OH photofragment from PNA was characterized. A fluorescent emission was also observed and characterized. It is attributed to electronically excited NO2 produced in the PNA photodissociation. A maximum yield of 30 percent for NO2 production was determined. The intensity of this emission, and a mass spectrometric peak at m/e = 33, were found to be useful means of characterizing the purity of the PNA sample.

  5. Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Identification of Clinically Relevant Mycobacteria in Clinical Specimens and Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Lefmann, Michael; Schweickert, Birgitta; Buchholz, Petra; Göbel, Ulf B.; Ulrichs, Timo; Seiler, Peter; Theegarten, Dirk; Moter, Annette

    2006-01-01

    With fluorescently labeled PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes targeting 16S rRNA, we established a 3-h fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for specific visualization of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. leprae, M. avium, and M. kansasii. Probe specificity was tested against a panel of 25 Mycobacterium spp. and 10 gram-positive organisms. After validation, probes were used to identify 52 mycobacterial culture isolates. Results were compared to conventional genotypic identification with amplification-based methods. All isolates (M. tuberculosis complex, n = 24; M. avium, n = 7; M. kansasii, n = 1) were correctly identified by FISH. In addition, the technique was used successfully for visualization of mycobacteria in biopsies from infected humans or animals. In conclusion, PNA-FISH is a fast and accurate tool for species-specific identification of culture-grown mycobacteria and for direct visualization of these organisms in tissue sections. It may be used successfully for both research and clinical microbiology. PMID:17021106

  6. Proteomic-based stable isotope probing reveals taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton

    DOE PAGES

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; ...

    2016-04-26

    Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual global primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure these microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, we utilized proteomics-based stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) to characterize the assimilation of amino acids by coastal marine bacterioplankton populations. We incubated microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, OR and Monterey Bay, CA with 1 M 13C-amino acids for 15 and 32 hours. Subsequent analysis of 13C incorporation into protein biomass quantified the frequency and extent of isotope enrichment for identifiedmore » proteins. Using these metrics we tested whether amino acid assimilation patterns were different for specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales and Alteromonadales tended to have a significantly high number of tandem mass spectra from 13C-enriched peptides, while Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins generally had significantly low numbers of 13C-enriched spectra. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of 13C-enriched spectra at time-point 2, while Alteromonadales ribosomal proteins were 13C- enriched across time-points. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of dissolved free amino acids assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population-level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities.« less

  7. Hybridization-based detection of Helicobacter pylori at human body temperature using advanced locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Filipe Azevedo, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the human microbiome and its influence upon human life has long been a subject of study. Hence, methods that allow the direct detection and visualization of microorganisms and microbial consortia (e.g. biofilms) within the human body would be invaluable. In here, we assessed the possibility of developing a variant of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), named fluorescence in vivo hybridization (FIVH), for the detection of Helicobacter pylori. Using oligonucleotide variations comprising locked nucleic acids (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl RNAs (2'OMe) with two types of backbone linkages (phosphate or phosphorothioate), we were able to successfully identify two probes that hybridize at 37 °C with high specificity and sensitivity for H. pylori, both in pure cultures and in gastric biopsies. Furthermore, the use of this type of probes implied that toxic compounds typically used in FISH were either found to be unnecessary or could be replaced by a non-toxic substitute. We show here for the first time that the use of advanced LNA probes in FIVH conditions provides an accurate, simple and fast method for H. pylori detection and location, which could be used in the future for potential in vivo applications either for this microorganism or for others.

  8. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues.

  9. Di-heterometalation of thiol-functionalized peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Patra, Malay; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As a proof-of-principle, two hetero-bimetallic PNA oligomers containing a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl and a cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex have been prepared by serial combination of solid-phase peptide coupling and in-solution thiol chemistry. Solid-phase N-terminus attachment of Ru(II)-polypyridyl carboxylic acid derivative, C1, onto the thiol-functionalized PNA backbone (H-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) has been performed by standard peptide coupling method. As two parallel approaches, the strong affinity of thiols for maleimide and haloacetyl group has been exploited for subsequent post-SPPS addition of cymantrene-based organometallic cores, C2 and C3. Michael-like addition and thioether ligation of thiol functionalized PNA1 (H-gly-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) and PNA2 (C1-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) to cymantrene maleimide and chloroacetyl derivatives, C2 and C3, respectively, has been performed. The synthesized ruthenium(II)-cymantrenyl PNA oligomers have been characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and IR spectroscopy. The distinct Mn-CO vibrational IR stretches, between 1,924–2,074 cm−1, have been used as markers to confirm the presence of cymantrenyl units in the PNA sequences and the purity of the HPLC-purified PNA thioethers assessed using LC-MS. PMID:23422249

  10. Mercaptopropionic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots as fluorescence probe for the determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Bunkoed, Opas; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2015-11-01

    Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dot (QDs) fluorescent probes were synthesized in aqueous solution and used for the determination of salicylic acid. The interaction between the MPA-capped CdTe QDs and salicylic acid was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy and some parameters that could modify the fluorescence were investigated to optimize the measurements. Under optimum conditions, the quenched fluorescence intensity of MPA-capped CdTe QDs was linearly proportional to the concentration of salicylic acid in the range of 0.5-40 µg mL(-1) with a coefficient of determination of 0.998, and the limit of detection was 0.15 µg mL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical products, and satisfactory results were obtained that were in agreement with both the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and the claimed values. The recovery of the method was in the range 99 ± 3% to 105 ± 9%. The proposed method is simple, rapid, cost effective, highly sensitivity and eminently suitable for the quality control of pharmaceutical preparation. The possible mechanisms for the observed quenching reaction was also discussed.

  11. A confocal study on the visualization of chromaffin cell secretory vesicles with fluorescent targeted probes and acidic dyes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alfredo; SantoDomingo, Jaime; Fonteriz, Rosalba I; Lobatón, Carmen D; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2010-12-01

    Secretory vesicles have low pH and have been classically identified as those labelled by a series of acidic fluorescent dyes such as acridine orange or neutral red, which accumulate into the vesicles according to the pH gradient. More recently, several fusion proteins containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and targeted to the secretory vesicles have been engineered. Both targeted fluorescent proteins and acidic dyes have been used, separately or combined, to monitor the dynamics of secretory vesicle movements and their fusion with the plasma membrane. We have now investigated in detail the degree of colocalization of both types of probes using several fusion proteins targeted to the vesicles (synaptobrevin2-EGFP, Cromogranin A-EGFP and neuropeptide Y-EGFP) and several acidic dyes (acridine orange, neutral red and lysotracker red) in chromaffin cells, PC12 cells and GH(3) cells. We find that all the acidic dyes labelled the same population of vesicles. However, that population was largely different from the one labelled by the targeted proteins, with very little colocalization among them, in all the cell types studied. Our data show that the vesicles containing the proteins more characteristic of the secretory vesicles are not labelled by the acidic dyes, and vice versa. Peptide glycyl-L-phenylalanine 2-naphthylamide (GPN) produced a rapid and selective disruption of the vesicles labelled by acidic dyes, suggesting that they could be mainly lysosomes. Therefore, these labelling techniques distinguish two clearly different sets of acidic vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. This finding should be taken into account whenever vesicle dynamics is studied using these techniques.

  12. Carboxylic Acid Ionophores as Probes of the Role of Calcium in Biological Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, P. W.

    1983-01-01

    The biological effects of calcium ionophores are described, focusing on arachidonic acid oxygenation, and the formation of a number of oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid. These metabolites are involved in a number of bodily functions, and their production may be regulated by calcium.

  13. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  14. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-09-29

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  15. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1998-01-01

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods thereof based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-07-21

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  17. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-02-24

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  18. Climate variability from the Florida Bay sedimentary record: Possible teleconnections to ENSO, PNA and CNP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Schwede, S.B.; Vann, C.D.; Dowsett, H.

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed decadal and interannual climate variability in South Florida since 1880 using geochemical and faunal paleosalinity indicators from isotopically dated sediment cores at Russell Bank in Florida Bay (FB). Using the relative abundance of 2 ostracode species and the Mg/Ca ratios in Loxoconcha matagordensis shells to reconstruct paleosalinity, we found evidence for cyclic oscillations in the salinity of central FB. During this time salinity fluctuated from as low as ???18 parts per thousand (ppt) to as high as ???57 ppt. Time series analyses suggest, in addition to a 5.6 yr Mg/Ca based salinity periodicity, there are 3 other modes of variability in paleosalinity indicators: 6-7, 8-9, and 13-14 yr periods which occur in all paleo-proxies. To search for factors that might cause salinity to vary in FB, we compared the Russell Bank paleosalinity record to South Florida winter rainfall, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the winter Pacific North American (PNA) index, and a surrogate for the PNA in the winter season, the Central North Pacific (CNP) index. SOI and PNA/CNP appear to be associated with South Florida winter precipitation. Time series analyses of SOI and winter rainfall for the period 1910-1999 suggest ???5, 6-7, 8-9 and 13-14 yr cycles. The 6-7 yr and 13-14 yr cycles correspond to those observed in the faunal and geochemical time series from Russell Bank. The main periods of the CNP index are 5-6 and 13-15 yr, which are similar to those observed in FB paleosalinity. Cross-spectral analyses show that winter rainfall and salinity are coherent at 5.6 yr with a salinity lag of ???1.6 mo. These results suggest that regional rainfall variability influences FB salinity over interannual and decadal timescales and that much of this variability may have its origin in climate variability in the Pacific Ocean/atmosphere system.

  19. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  20. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal.

  1. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies on the binding of DNA bases and PNA base monomers to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gourishankar, A; Shukla, Sourabh; Ganesh, Krishna N; Sastry, Murali

    2004-10-20

    An isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) investigation of the interaction of DNA bases and PNA base monomers with gold nanoparticles is described revealing a binding sequence in the order C > G > A > T. Direct measurement of the strength of interaction of ligands with nanogold by ITC has important implications in surface modification strategies for biomedical, catalysis, and nanoarchitecture applications.

  2. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  3. Probing Phosphorus Efficient Low Phytic Acid Content Soybean Genotypes with Phosphorus Starvation in Hydroponics Growth System.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varun; Singh, Tiratha Raj; Hada, Alkesh; Jolly, Monica; Ganapathi, Andy; Sachdev, Archana

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient required for soybean growth but is bound in phytic acid which causes negative effects on both the environment as well as the animal nutrition. Lowering of phytic acid levels is associated with reduced agronomic characteristics, and relatively little information is available on the response of soybean plants to phosphorus (P) starvation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different P starvation concentrations on the phytic acid content, growth, and yield of seven mutant genotypes along with the unirradiated control, JS-335, in a hydroponics growth system. The low phytic acid containing mutant genotypes, IR-JS-101, IR-DS-118, and IR-V-101, showed a relatively high growth rate in low P concentration containing nutrient solution (2 μM), whereas the high P concentration (50 μM) favored the growth of IR-DS-111 and IR-DS-115 mutant genotypes containing moderate phytate levels. The mutant genotypes with high phytic acid content, IR-DS-122, IR-DS-114, and JS-335, responded well under P starvation and did not have any significant effect on the growth and yield of plants. Moreover, the reduction of P concentration in nutrient solution from 50 to 2 μM also reduced the phytic acid content in the seeds of all the soybean genotypes under study. The desirable agronomic performance of low phytic acid containing mutant genotype IR-DS-118 reported in this study suggested it to be a P-efficient genotype which could be considered for agricultural practices under P limiting soils.

  4. Boronic acids as probes for investigation of allosteric modulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Admas, Tizita Haimanot; Brox, Regine; Heinemann, Frank W; Tschammer, Nuska

    2014-11-21

    The chemokine receptor CXCR3 is a G protein-coupled receptor, which conveys extracellular signals into cells by changing its conformation upon agonist binding. To facilitate the mechanistic understanding of allosteric modulation of CXCR3, we combined computational modeling with the synthesis of novel chemical tools containing boronic acid moiety, site-directed mutagenesis, and detailed functional characterization. The design of boronic acid derivatives was based on the predictions from homology modeling and docking. The choice of the boronic acid moiety was dictated by its unique ability to interact with proteins in a reversible covalent way, thereby influencing conformational dynamics of target biomolecules. During the synthesis of the library we have developed a novel approach for the purification of drug-like boronic acids. To validate the predicted binding mode and to identify amino acid residues responsible for the transduction of signal through CXCR3, we conducted a site-directed mutagenesis study. With the use of allosteric radioligand RAMX3 we were able to establish the existence of a second allosteric binding pocket in CXCR3, which enables different binding modes of structurally closely related allosteric modulators of CXCR3. We have also identified residues Trp109(2.60) and Lys300(7.35) inside the transmembrane bundle of the receptor as crucial for the regulation of the G protein activation. Furthermore, we report the boronic acid 14 as the first biased negative allosteric modulator of the receptor. Overall, our data demonstrate that boronic acid derivatives represent an outstanding tool for determination of key receptor-ligand interactions and induction of ligand-biased signaling.

  5. Helix 69 of E. coli 23S ribosomal RNA as a peptide nucleic acid target.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Wojciechowska, Monika; Grzela, Renata; Wituła, Tomasz; Trylska, Joanna

    2017-04-07

    A fragment of 23S ribosomal RNA (nucleotides 1906-1924 in E. coli), termed Helix 69, forms a hairpin that is essential for ribosome function. Helix 69 forms a conformationally flexible inter-subunit connection with helix 44 of 16S ribosomal RNA, and the nucleotide A1913 of Helix 69 influences decoding accuracy. Nucleotides U1911 and U1917 are post-transcriptionally modified with pseudouridines () and U1915 with 3-methyl-. We investigated Helix 69 as a target for a complementary synthetic oligonucleotide - peptide nucleic acid (PNA). We determined thermodynamic properties of Helix 69 and its complexes with PNA. We also verified the performance of PNA targeted at Helix 69 in inhibiting translation in cell-free extracts and growth of E. coli cells. First, we examined the interactions of a PNA oligomer complementary to the G1907-A1919 fragment of Helix 69 with the sequences corresponding to human and bacterial species (with or without pseudouridine modifications). PNA invades the Helix 69 hairpin creating stable complexes and PNA binding to the pseudouridylated bacterial sequence is stronger than to Helix 69 without any modifications. Second, we confirmed the binding of PNA to 23S rRNA and 70S ribosomes. Third, we verified the efficiency of translation inhibition of these PNA oligomers in the cell-free translation/transcription E. coli system, which turned out to be in a similar range as tetracycline. Next, we confirmed that PNA conjugated to the (KFF)3K transporter peptide inhibited E. coli growth in micromolar concentrations. Overall, targeting Helix 69 with PNA or other sequence-specific oligomers could be a promising way to inhibit bacterial translation.

  6. Efficacy of peptide nucleic acid and selected conjugates against specific cellular pathologies of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Elisse C; Parakh, Sonam; Duncan, Luke F; Langford, Steven J; Atkin, Julie D; Abbott, Belinda M

    2016-04-01

    Cellular studies have been undertaken on a nonamer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence, which binds to mRNA encoding superoxide dismutase 1, and a series of peptide nucleic acids conjugated to synthetic lipophilic vitamin analogs including a recently prepared menadione (vitamin K) analog. Reduction of both mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusion formation and endoplasmic reticulum stress, two of the key cellular pathological hallmarks in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by two of the prepared PNA oligomers is reported for the first time.

  7. Array of nucleic acid probes on biological chips for diagnosis of HIV and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Hubble, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.

    1999-01-19

    The invention provides an array of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a solid support for analysis of a target sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. The array comprises at least four sets of oligonucleotide probes 9 to 21 nucleotides in length. A first probe set has a probe corresponding to each nucleotide in a reference sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. A probe is related to its corresponding nucleotide by being exactly complementary to a subsequence of the reference sequence that includes the corresponding nucleotide. Thus, each probe has a position, designated an interrogation position, that is occupied by a complementary nucleotide to the corresponding nucleotide. The three additional probe sets each have a corresponding probe for each probe in the first probe set. Thus, for each nucleotide in the reference sequence, there are four corresponding probes, one from each of the probe sets. The three corresponding probes in the three additional probe sets are identical to the corresponding probe from the first probe or a subsequence thereof that includes the interrogation position, except that the interrogation position is occupied by a different nucleotide in each of the four corresponding probes.

  8. Probing the Influence of Amino Acids on Photoluminescence from Carbon Nanotubes Suspended with DNA.

    PubMed

    Kurnosov, N V; Leontiev, V S; Karachevtsev, V A

    2016-11-01

    The quantitative analysis of amino acid levels in the human organism is required for the early clinical diagnosis of a variety of diseases. In this work the influence of 13 amino acid doping on the photoluminescence (PL) from the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) suspended with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in water has been studied. Amino acid doping leads to the PL enhancement and the strongest increase was found after cysteine doping of the nanotube suspension while addition of other amino acids yielded the significantly smaller effect. The emphasis of cysteine molecules is attributed to presence of the reactive thiol group that turns cysteine into reducing agent that passivates the p-defects on the nanotube sidewall and increases the PL intensity. The reasons of PL enhancement after doping with other amino acids are discussed. The response of nanotube PL to cysteine addition depends on the nanotube aqueous suspension preparation with tip or bath sonication treatment. The enhancement of the emission from different nanotube species after cysteine doping was analyzed too. It was shown that the increase of the carbon nanotube PL at addition of cysteine allows successful monitoring of the cysteine concentration in aqueous solution in the range of 50-1000 μM.

  9. d-Amino Acid Probes for Penicillin Binding Protein-based Bacterial Surface Labeling*

    PubMed Central

    Fura, Jonathan M.; Kearns, Daniel; Pires, Marcos M.

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is an essential and highly conserved mesh structure that surrounds bacterial cells. It plays a critical role in retaining a defined cell shape, and, in the case of pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, it lies at the interface between bacterial cells and the host organism. Intriguingly, bacteria can metabolically incorporate unnatural d-amino acids into the peptidoglycan stem peptide directly from the surrounding medium, a process mediated by penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). Metabolic peptidoglycan remodeling via unnatural d-amino acids has provided unique insights into peptidoglycan biosynthesis of live bacteria and has also served as the basis of a synthetic immunology strategy with potential therapeutic implications. A striking feature of this process is the vast promiscuity displayed by PBPs in tolerating entirely unnatural side chains. However, the chemical space and physical features of this side chain promiscuity have not been determined systematically. In this report, we designed and synthesized a library of variants displaying diverse side chains to comprehensively establish the tolerability of unnatural d-amino acids by PBPs in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In addition, nine Bacillus subtilis PBP-null mutants were evaluated with the goal of identifying a potential primary PBP responsible for unnatural d-amino acid incorporation and gaining insights into the temporal control of PBP activity. We empirically established the scope of physical parameters that govern the metabolic incorporation of unnatural d-amino acids into bacterial peptidoglycan. PMID:26499795

  10. Ninhydrin-sodium molybdate chromogenic analytical probe for the assay of amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Shivakumar; Padmarajaiah, Nagaraja; Al-Tayar, Naef Ghllab Saeed; Shrestha, Ashwinee Kumar

    2017-02-15

    A sensitive method has been proposed for the quantification of amino acids and proteins using ninhydrin and sodium molybdate as chromogenic substrates in citrate buffer of pH5.6. A weak molybdate-hydrindantin complex plays the role in the formation of Ruhemann's purple. The linear response for the amino acid, amino acid mixture and Bovine serum albumin is between 0.999 and 66.80μM, 1.52 and 38μM and 5 and 100μg/L, respectively. The molar absorptivity of the individual amino acid by the proposed reaction extends from 0.58×10(4) to 2.86×10(4)M(-1)cm(-1). The linearity equations for the proposed ninhydrin-molybdate for amino acid mixture is Abs=0.021×Conc (μM)-0.002. The applicability of the proposed method has been justified in food and biological samples in conjunction with Kjeldahl method.

  11. Ninhydrin-sodium molybdate chromogenic analytical probe for the assay of amino acids and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaman, Shivakumar; Padmarajaiah, Nagaraja; Al-Tayar, Naef Ghllab Saeed; Shrestha, Ashwinee Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A sensitive method has been proposed for the quantification of amino acids and proteins using ninhydrin and sodium molybdate as chromogenic substrates in citrate buffer of pH 5.6. A weak molybdate-hydrindantin complex plays the role in the formation of Ruhemann's purple. The linear response for the amino acid, amino acid mixture and Bovine serum albumin is between 0.999 and 66.80 μM, 1.52 and 38 μM and 5 and 100 μg/L, respectively. The molar absorptivity of the individual amino acid by the proposed reaction extends from 0.58 × 104 to 2.86 × 104 M- 1 cm- 1. The linearity equations for the proposed ninhydrin-molybdate for amino acid mixture is Abs = 0.021 × Conc (μM) - 0.002. The applicability of the proposed method has been justified in food and biological samples in conjunction with Kjeldahl method.

  12. Proteomic-based stable isotope probing reveals taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Robert L. Hettich; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan S.

    2016-04-26

    Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual global primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure these microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, we utilized proteomics-based stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) to characterize the assimilation of amino acids by coastal marine bacterioplankton populations. We incubated microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, OR and Monterey Bay, CA with 1 M 13C-amino acids for 15 and 32 hours. Subsequent analysis of 13C incorporation into protein biomass quantified the frequency and extent of isotope enrichment for identified proteins. Using these metrics we tested whether amino acid assimilation patterns were different for specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales and Alteromonadales tended to have a significantly high number of tandem mass spectra from 13C-enriched peptides, while Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins generally had significantly low numbers of 13C-enriched spectra. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of 13C-enriched spectra at time-point 2, while Alteromonadales ribosomal proteins were 13C- enriched across time-points. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of dissolved free amino acids assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population-level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities.

  13. Label-free electronic probing of nucleic acids and proteins at the nanoscale using the nanoneedle biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Javanmard, Mehdi; Koochak, Zahra; Esfandyarpour, Hesaam; Harris, James S.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of proteins and nucleic acids is dominantly performed using optical fluorescence based techniques, which are more costly and timely than electrical detection due to the need for expensive and bulky optical equipment and the process of fluorescent tagging. In this paper, we discuss our study of the electrical properties of nucleic acids and proteins at the nanoscale using a nanoelectronic probe we have developed, which we refer to as the Nanoneedle biosensor. The nanoneedle consists of four thin film layers: a conductive layer at the bottom acting as an electrode, an oxide layer on top, and another conductive layer on top of that, with a protective oxide above. The presence of proteins and nucleic acids near the tip results in a decrease in impedance across the sensing electrodes. There are three basic mechanisms behind the electrical response of DNA and protein molecules in solution under an applied alternating electrical field. The first change stems from modulation of the relative permittivity at the interface. The second mechanism is the formation and relaxation of the induced dipole moment. The third mechanism is the tunneling of electrons through the biomolecules. The results presented in this paper can be extended to develop low cost point-of-care diagnostic assays for the clinical setting. PMID:24404047

  14. Novel emissive bio-inspired non-proteinogenic coumarin-alanine amino acid: fluorescent probe for polyfunctional systems.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Elisabete; Capelo, José Luis; Lima, João Carlos; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    Two new bio-inspired non-proteinogenic compounds L1 and L2, containing coumarin and/or acridine chromophores and bearing as spacer an alanine amino acid were successfully synthesized and fully characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H and (13)C NMR, infrared spectroscopy (KBr discs), melting point, ESI-TOF (electrospray ionization-time of flight-mass), UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime measurements. A relative fluorescence quantum yield of 0.02 was determined for both compounds. In L2 the presence of an intramolecular energy transfer from the coumarin to the acridine unit was observed. L1 and L2 are quite sensitive to the basicity of the environment. At alkaline values both compounds show a strong quenching in the fluorescence emission, attributed to the photoinduced electron transfer (PET). However, both deprotonated forms recover the emission with the addition of Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Al(3+) metal ions. As multifunctional emissive probes, the titration of L1 and L2 with lanthanides (III), Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) was also explored as new visible bio-probes in the absence and in the presence of liposomes. In a liposomal environment a lower energy transfer was observed.

  15. Identification and quantification of acetic acid bacteria in wine and vinegar by TaqMan-MGB probes.

    PubMed

    Torija, M J; Mateo, E; Guillamón, J M; Mas, A

    2010-04-01

    A Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) assay was developed using TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes for the specific detection and quantification of five acetic acid bacteria (AAB) species (Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter aceti, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Gluconobacter oxydans) in wine and vinegar. The primers and probes, designed from the 16S rRNA gene, showed good specificity with the target AAB species. The technique was tested on AAB grown in glucose medium (GY) and inoculated samples of red wine and wine vinegar. Standard curves were constructed with the five target species in all these matrices. Quantification was linear over at least 5 log units using both serial dilution of purified DNA and cells. When this technique was tested in GY medium and inoculated matrices, at least 10(2)-10(3) cells/ml were detected. To quantify low populations of AAB in microbiologically complex samples, a PCR enrichment including part of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region was needed to increase the amount of target DNA compared to non-target DNA. The RT-PCR assay used in this study is a reliable, specific and fast method for quantifying these five AAB species in wine and vinegar.

  16. Information transfer from DNA to peptide nucleic acids by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Christensen, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are analogs of nucleic acids in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is replaced by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. Oligocytidylates have been shown to act as templates for formation of longer oligomers of G from PNA G2 dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from DNA to PNA. DNA C4T2C4 is an efficient template for synthesis of PNA G4A2G4 using G2 and A2 units as substrates. The corresponding synthesis of PNA G4C2G4 on DNA C4G2C4 is less efficient. Incorporation of PNA T2 into PNA products on DNA C4A2C4 is the least efficient of the three reactions. These results, obtained using PNA dimers as substrates, parallel those obtained using monomeric activated nucleotides.

  17. Phenylboronic acid-based (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of hydrogen peroxide utilizing its large chemical-shift change.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; An, Qi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Doura, Tomohiro; Tsuchiya, Akira; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Sando, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a new (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of H2O2. Our designed 2-fluorophenylboronic acid-based (19)F probe promptly reacted with H2O2 to produce 2-fluorophenol via boronic acid oxidation. The accompanying (19)F chemical-shift change reached 31 ppm under our experimental conditions. Such a large chemical-shift change allowed for the imaging of H2O2 by (19)F chemical-shift-selective MRI.

  18. Energetics of side-chain snorkeling in transmembrane helices probed by nonproteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Öjemalm, Karin; Higuchi, Takashi; Lara, Patricia; Lindahl, Erik; Suga, Hiroaki; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2016-09-20

    Cotranslational translocon-mediated insertion of membrane proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum is a key process in membrane protein biogenesis. Although the mechanism is understood in outline, quantitative data on the energetics of the process is scarce. Here, we have measured the effect on membrane integration efficiency of nonproteinogenic analogs of the positively charged amino acids arginine and lysine incorporated into model transmembrane segments. We provide estimates of the influence on the apparent free energy of membrane integration (ΔGapp) of "snorkeling" of charged amino acids toward the lipid-water interface, and of charge neutralization. We further determine the effect of fluorine atoms and backbone hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) on ΔGapp These results help establish a quantitative basis for our understanding of membrane protein assembly in eukaryotic cells.

  19. Energetics of side-chain snorkeling in transmembrane helices probed by nonproteinogenic amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Öjemalm, Karin; Higuchi, Takashi; Lara, Patricia; Lindahl, Erik; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Cotranslational translocon-mediated insertion of membrane proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum is a key process in membrane protein biogenesis. Although the mechanism is understood in outline, quantitative data on the energetics of the process is scarce. Here, we have measured the effect on membrane integration efficiency of nonproteinogenic analogs of the positively charged amino acids arginine and lysine incorporated into model transmembrane segments. We provide estimates of the influence on the apparent free energy of membrane integration (ΔGapp) of “snorkeling” of charged amino acids toward the lipid–water interface, and of charge neutralization. We further determine the effect of fluorine atoms and backbone hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) on ΔGapp. These results help establish a quantitative basis for our understanding of membrane protein assembly in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27601675

  20. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with a fibre-optic probe for the prediction of the amino acid composition in animal feeds.

    PubMed

    González-Martín, Inmaculada; Alvarez-García, Noelia; González-Cabrera, José Miguel

    2006-05-15

    The amino acids alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, phenylalanine, valine, lysine, proline, and tyrosine present in feeds with different textures (blocks, tablets, granules and flour (meal) and used in different stages of animal feeding regimes (lactation, growth, maintenance, etc.) were analysed using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) technology together with a remote reflectance fibre-optic probe. The method allows immediate control of the animal feeds without prior sample treatment or destruction through direct application of the fibre-optic probe on the sample. The regression method used was Modified Partial Least Squares (MPLS). The equations developed to determine the amino acid contents of the feeds afforded high values for the RSQ coefficient (0.814-0.963) in all the amino acids with the exception of lysine (0.687). The statistical prediction descriptors SEP, SEP(C) (with values between 0.134 for valine and 0.015 for aspartic acid) and bias indicated that the amino acid values in feeds predicted with NIRS with a fibre optic probe are comparable to those obtained with the chemical ion-exchange HPLC method.

  1. Amino acid-based ionic liquids: using XPS to probe the electronic environment via binding energies.

    PubMed

    Hurisso, Bitu Birru; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Licence, Peter

    2011-10-21

    Here we report the synthesis and characterisation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of eight high purity amino acid-based ionic liquids (AAILs), each containing the 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium, [C(8)C(1)Im](+), as a standard reference cation. All expected elements were observed and the electronic environments of these elements identified. A fitting model for the carbon 1s region of the AAILs is reported; the C aliphatic component of the cation was used as an internal reference to obtain a series of accurate and reproducible binding energies. Comparisons are made between XP spectra of the eight AAILs and selected non-functionalised ionic liquids. 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate was also studied as a model of the carboxyl containing amino acid anion. The influence of anionic substituent groups on the measured binding energies of all elements is presented, and communication between anion and cation is investigated. This data is interpreted in terms of hard and soft anions and compared to the Kamlet-Taft hydrogen bond acceptor ability, β, for the ionic liquids. A linear correlation is presented which suggests that the functional side chain, or R group, of the amino acid has little impact upon the electronic environment of the charge-bearing moieties within the anions and cations studied.

  2. Re-engineering of CYP2C9 to probe acid-base substrate selectivity.

    PubMed

    Tai, Guoying; Dickmann, Leslie J; Matovic, Nicholas; DeVoss, James J; Gillam, Elizabeth M J; Rettie, Allan E

    2008-10-01

    A common feature of many CYP2C9 ligands is their weak acidity. As revealed by crystallography, the structural basis for this behavior involves a charge-pairing interaction between an anionic moiety on the substrate and an active site R108 residue. In the present study we attempted to re-engineer CYP2C9 to better accept basic ligands by charge reversal at this key residue. We expressed and purified the R108E and R108E/D293N mutants and compared their ability with that of native CYP2C9 to interact with (S)-warfarin, diclofenac, pyrene, propranolol, and ibuprofen amine. As expected, the R108E mutant maintained all the native enzyme's pyrene 1-hydroxylation activity, but catalytic activity toward diclofenac and (S)-warfarin was abrogated. In contrast, the double mutant displayed much less selectivity in its behavior toward these control ligands. Neither of the mutants displayed significant enhancement of propranolol metabolism, and all three preparations exhibited a type II (inhibitor) rather than type I (substrate) spectrum with ibuprofen amine, although binding became progressively weaker with the single and double mutants. Collectively, these data underscore the importance of the amino acid at position 108 in the acid substrate selectivity of CYP2C9, highlight the accommodating nature of the CYP2C9 active site, and provide a cautionary note regarding facile re-engineering of these complex cytochrome P450 active sites.

  3. Using modern tools to probe the structure-function relationship of fatty acid synthases

    PubMed Central

    Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential to life and represents one of the most conserved pathways in Nature, preserving the same handful of chemical reactions over all species. Recent interest in the molecular details of the de novo fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been heightened by demand for renewable fuels and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial strains. Central to FAS is the acyl carrier protein (ACP), a protein chaperone that shuttles the growing acyl chain between catalytic enzymes within the FAS. Human efforts to alter fatty acid biosynthesis for oil production, chemical feedstock or antimicrobial purposes has been met with limited success in part due to a lack of detailed molecular information behind the ACP-partner protein interactions inherent to the pathway. This review will focus on recently developed tools for the modification of ACP and analysis of protein-protein interactions, such as mechanism-based crosslinking, and the studies exploiting them. Discussion specific to each enzymatic domain focuses first on mechanism and known inhibitors, followed by available structures and known interactions with ACP. While significant unknowns remain, new understandings into the intricacies of FAS point to future advances in manipulating this complex molecular factory. PMID:25676190

  4. Vanadium-fulvic acid chemistry: conformational and binding studies by electron spin probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, G. Daniel, III; Chasteen, N. Dennis

    1980-05-01

    Two fractions of soil fulvic acid (FA) were separated by gel filtration chromatography. An observed increase in volume of the heavier fraction (FA I) with increasing pH was attributed to aggregation, intramolecular negative charge repulsions and the rupture of hydrogen bonds, which control molecular conformation. Optical absorption properties and elemental analyses of both fractions were determined. The stability constants and stoichiometries of FA complexes with vanadyl, VO 2+, at pH 5.0 and ionic strength of 0.04 M were measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra of model VO 2+ complexes with phthalic and salicylic acids, which are the probable functional groups present in FA, are identical to those of the VO 2+-FA complexes. Aggregation of FA I occurs in the presence of VO 2+ to form a complex that can be approximated as '(VO) 2(FA I) 6'. The average site distance between vanadyl ions in this complex is shown to be greater than 1.2 nm. EPR parameters for FA I suggest binding by carboxylate groups. These parameters are compared with those of other vanadyl complexes with fulvic and humic acids reported by others. Reduction of VO 3- to VO 2+ by these materials is discussed.

  5. Convenient and Scalable Synthesis of Fmoc-Protected Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Feagin, Trevor A.; Shah, Nirmal I.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  6. Locked Nucleic Acid Probe-Based Real-Time PCR Assay for the Rapid Detection of Rifampin-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Li, Guilian; Sun, Chongyun; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaochen; Liu, Haican; Zhang, Pingping; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wang, Xinrui; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Ruifu; Wan, Kanglin; Zhou, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be rapidly diagnosed through nucleic acid amplification techniques by analyzing the variations in the associated gene sequences. In the present study, a locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed to identify the mutations in the rpoB gene associated with rifampin (RFP) resistance in M. tuberculosis. Six LNA probes with the discrimination capability of one-base mismatch were designed to monitor the 23 most frequent rpoB mutations. The target mutations were identified using the probes in a "probe dropout" manner (quantification cycle = 0); thus, the proposed technique exhibited superiority in mutation detection. The LNA probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed in a two-tube format with three LNA probes and one internal amplification control probe in each tube. The assay showed excellent specificity to M. tuberculosis with or without RFP resistance by evaluating 12 strains of common non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. The limit of detection of M. tuberculosis was 10 genomic equivalents (GE)/reaction by further introducing a nested PCR method. In a blind validation of 154 clinical mycobacterium isolates, 142/142 (100%) were correctly detected through the assay. Of these isolates, 88/88 (100%) were determined as RFP susceptible and 52/54 (96.3%) were characterized as RFP resistant. Two unrecognized RFP-resistant strains were sequenced and were found to contain mutations outside the range of the 23 mutation targets. In conclusion, this study established a sensitive, accurate, and low-cost LNA probe-based assay suitable for a four-multiplexing real-time PCR instrument. The proposed method can be used to diagnose RFP-resistant tuberculosis in clinical laboratories.

  7. Fatty acid binding sites of human and bovine albumins: Differences observed by spin probe ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravsky, Vladimir; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Berezenko, Stephen; Schnurr, Kerstin; Gurachevsky, Andrey

    2009-09-01

    Bovine and human serum albumins and recombinant human albumin, all non-covalently complexed with 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acids, were investigated by ESR spectroscopy in solution over a range of pH values (5.5-8.0) and temperatures (25-50 °C), with respect to the allocation and mobility of fatty acid (FA) molecules bound to the proteins and conformation of the binding sites. In all proteins bound FA undergo a permanent intra-albumin migration between the binding sites and inter-domain residence. Nature identity of the recombinant human albumin to its serum-derived analog was observed. However, the binding sites of bovine albumin appeared shorter in length and wider in diameter than those of human albumin. Presumably, less tightly folded domains in bovine albumin allow better penetration of water molecules in the interior of the globule that resulted in higher activation energy of FA dissociation from the binding site. Thus, the sensitive technique based on ESR non-covalent spin labeling allowed quantitative analysis and reliable comparison of the fine features of binding proteins.

  8. Probing the transition state for nucleic acid hybridization using phi-value analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jandi; Shin, Jong-Shik

    2010-04-27

    Genetic regulation by noncoding RNA elements such as microRNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) involves hybridization of a short single-stranded RNA with a complementary segment in a target mRNA. The physical basis of the hybridization process between the structured nucleic acids is not well understood primarily because of the lack of information about the transition-state structure. Here we use transition-state theory, inspired by phi-value analysis in protein folding studies, to provide quantitative analysis of the relationship between changes in the secondary structure stability and the activation free energy. Time course monitoring of the hybridization reaction was performed under pseudo-steady-state conditions using a single fluorophore. The phi-value analysis indicates that the native secondary structure remains intact in the transition state. The nativelike transition state was confirmed via examination of the salt dependence of the hybridization kinetics, indicating that the number of sodium ions associated with the transition state was not substantially affected by changes in the native secondary structure. These results propose that hybridization between structured nucleic acids undergoes a transition state leading to formation of a nucleation complex and then is followed by sequential displacement of preexisting base pairings involving successive small energy barriers. The proposed mechanism might provide new insight into physical processes during small RNA-mediated gene silencing, which is essential to selection of a target mRNA segment for siRNA design.

  9. Adaptation and validation of E-probe diagnostic nucleic acid analysis for detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in metagenomic data of complex food matrices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens are an increasing problem threatening the US food supply. The need for rapid sensitive diagnostic tools that can address multiple types and taxonomic classes of foodbourne pathogens is growing. This paper describes the adaptation of E-probe Diagnostic Nucleic acid Analysis (EDNA)...

  10. ESTIMATION OF BACTERIAL CELL NUMBERS IN HUMIC ACID-RICH SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS WITH PROBES DIRECTED TO 16S RIBOSOMAL DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membr...

  11. Association of a cucumber mosaic virus strain with mosaic disease of banana, Musa paradisiaca--an evidence using immuno/nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Raj, S K; Haq, Q M; Srivastava, K M; Singh, B P; Sane, P V

    1995-12-01

    Virus causing severe chlorosis/mosaic disease of banana was identified as a strain of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Association of CMV with the disease was established by Western immunoblot using polyclonal antibodies to CMV-T and slot blot hybridization with nucleic acid probe of CMV-P genome.

  12. New Real-Time PCR Assay Using Locked Nucleic Acid Probes To Assess Prevalence of ParC Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from France

    PubMed Central

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Methlouthi, Imen; Pina, Patrick; Collignon, Anne; Allouch, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay with locked nucleic acid probes was developed to screen mutations at codons 79 and 83 of the Streptococcus pneumoniae parC gene. Only silent mutations were detected among 236 French invasive fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains. This test could be useful for some high-risk patients or in national surveys. PMID:16569894

  13. ESA mission ROSETTA will probe for chirality of cometary amino acids.

    PubMed

    Thiemann, W H; Meierhenrich, U

    2001-01-01

    New crucial theoretical investigations on the origin of biomolecular chirality are reviewed briefly. With the goal to investigate these theories our team is going to perform the 'chirality-experiment' in the near future with cometary matter. In 2012 the robotical lander RoLand will detach from the orbiter of the ROSETTA spacecraft and set down on the surface of comet 46P/Wirtanen in order to separate and identify cometary organic compounds via GC-MS in situ. Chiral organics will be separated into their enantiomers by application of 3 capillary columns coated with different kinds of stationary phases. Non-volatile compounds like amino acids will be derivatized in especially developed gas phase alkylation steps avoiding reactions in the liquid phase. The results of these preliminary gas phase reactions are presented in this article.

  14. A chromo- and fluorogenic sensor for probing the cancer biomarker lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenwen; Liu, Weimin; Zhang, Wenjun; Zeng, Lintao; Fan, Zhiyuan; Wu, Jiasheng; Wang, Pengfei

    2012-04-21

    A novel chromo- and fluorogenic sensor, 4-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-hexadecylpyridinium (DSHP) for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was successfully developed by incorporating a long alkyl chain into the cyanine molecule. DSHP shows excellent selectivity and high sensitivity towards LPA with a detection limit of about 7.09 × 10(-7) M based on electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the sensor and LPA. Upon addition of LPA ranging from 0 to 7.5 × 10(-4) M, DSHP displays an 'on-off-on' fluorescence response and obvious colour change. Good linear relationships between the fluorescence intensity and LPA concentrations were achieved in the fluorescence quenching ranges of 0-28 μM and 34-52 μM, which could be attributed to the combined effects of the photoinduced electron transfer and LPA-induced aggregation of the sensor molecules.

  15. Pharmacophore-based database mining for probing fragmental drug-likeness of diketo acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Bak, A; Magdziarz, T; Polanski, J

    2012-01-01

    A number of the structurally diverse chemical compounds with functional diketo acid (DKA) subunit(s) have been revealed by combined online and MoStBiodat 3D pharmacophore-guided ZINC and PubChem database screening. We used the structural data available from such screening to analyse the similarities of the compounds containing the DKA fragment. Generally, the analysis by principal component analysis and self-organizing neural network approaches reveals four families of compounds complying with the chemical constitution (aromatic, aliphatic) of the compounds. From a practical point of view, similar studies may reveal potential bioisosteres of known drugs, e.g. raltegravir/elvitegravir. In this context, it seems that mono-halogenated aryl substructures with para group show the closest similarity to these compounds, in contrast to structures where the aromatic ring is halogenated in both ortho- and para-locations.

  16. In vivo quantitative visualization of hypochlorous acid in the liver using a novel selective two-photon fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haolu; Jayachandran, Aparna; Gravot, Germain; Liang, Xiaowen; Thorling, Camilla A.; Zhang, Run; Liu, Xin; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) plays a vital role in physiological events and diseases. During hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, HOCl is generated by neutrophils and diffuses into hepatocytes, causing oxidant stress-mediated injury. Although many probes have been developed to detect HOCl, most were difficult to be distinguished from endogenous fluorophores in intravital imaging and only can be employed under one-photon microscopy. A novel iridium(III) complex-based ferrocene dual-signaling chemosensor (Ir-Fc) was designed and synthesized. Ir-Fc exhibited a strong positive fluorescent response only in the presence of HOCl, whereas negligible fluorescent signals were observed upon the additions of other reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and metal ions. There was a good linear relationship between probe responsive fluorescent intensity and HOCl concentration. Ir-Fc was then intravenously injected into BALB/c mice at the final concentration of 50 μM and the mouse livers were imaged using multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In the I/R liver, reduced autofluorescence was detected by MPM, indicating the hepatocyte necrosis. Remarkable enhancement of red fluorescence was observed in hepatocytes with decreased autofluorescence, indicating the reaction of Ir-Fc with endogenous HOCl molecules. The cellular concentration of HOCl was first calculated based on the intensity of MPM images. No obvious toxic effects were observed in histological examination of major organs after Ir-Fc injection. In summary, Ir-Fc has low cytotoxicity, high specificity to HOCl, and rapid "off-on" fluorescence. It is suitable for dynamic quantitatively monitoring HOCl generation using MPM at the cellular level. This technique can be readily extended to examination of liver diseases and injury.

  17. Chemical structure requirements and cellular targeting of microRNA-122 by peptide nucleic acids anti-miRs

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Adrian G.; Fabani, Martin M.; Vigorito, Elena; Williams, Donna; Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Wojciechowski, Filip; Hudson, Robert H. E.; Seitz, Oliver; Gait, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Anti-miRs are oligonucleotide inhibitors complementary to miRNAs that have been used extensively as tools to gain understanding of specific miRNA functions and as potential therapeutics. We showed previously that peptide nucleic acid (PNA) anti-miRs containing a few attached Lys residues were potent miRNA inhibitors. Using miR-122 as an example, we report here the PNA sequence and attached amino acid requirements for efficient miRNA targeting and show that anti-miR activity is enhanced substantially by the presence of a terminal-free thiol group, such as a Cys residue, primarily due to better cellular uptake. We show that anti-miR activity of a Cys-containing PNA is achieved by cell uptake through both clathrin-dependent and independent routes. With the aid of two PNA analogues having intrinsic fluorescence, thiazole orange (TO)-PNA and [bis-o-(aminoethoxy)phenyl]pyrrolocytosine (BoPhpC)-PNA, we explored the subcellular localization of PNA anti-miRs and our data suggest that anti-miR targeting of miR-122 may take place in or associated with endosomal compartments. Our findings are valuable for further design of PNAs and other oligonucleotides as potent anti-miR agents. PMID:22070883

  18. The Impact of Monthly Variation of the Pacific-North America (PNA) Teleconnection Pattern on Wintertime Surface-layer Aerosol Concentrations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, J.; Liao, H.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific-North America teleconnection (PNA) is the leading general circulation pattern in the troposphere over the region of North Pacific to North America during wintertime. The PNA exhibits positive (negative) phases with positive (negative) anomalies in geopotential height in the vicinity of Hawaii and over the intermountain region of North America, and negative (positive) anomalies in geopotential height over south of the Aleutian Islands and the Gulf Coast region of the United States. This study examined the impacts of monthly variation of the PNA phase on wintertime surface-layer aerosol concentrations in the United States by analyzing observations during 1999-2013 from the Air Quality System of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-AQS) and the model results for 1986-2006 from the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The composite analyses on the EPA-AQS observations over 1999-2003 showed that the average PM2.5 concentrations were higher in the PNA positive phases than in the PNA negative phases by 1.0 μg m-3 (8.6%), 2.1μg m-3 (24.1%), and 1.1 μg m-3 (10.6%) in the eastern, western, and whole of United States, respectively. Relative to the PNA negative phases, the number of exceedance days (days with the PM2.5 concentrations exceeding 35 μg m-3) in the PNA positive phases increased by 5-8 days month-1 in California and the contiguous Great Salt Lake and by 2-3 days month-1 in Iowa. The simulated geographical patterns of the differences in concentrations of PM2.5, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, OC, and BC between the PNA positive and negative phases were similar to observations. The PNA influences surface-layer aerosol concentrations in the United States by changing meteorological variables such as temperature, precipitation, planetary boundary layer height, relative humidity, and wind speed. We found that that the PNA-induced variation in planetary boundary layer height was the most dominant

  19. On the cellular metabolism of the click chemistry probe 19-alkyne arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Philippe Pierre; Poirier, Samuel J; Boudreau, Luc H; Doiron, Jérémie A; Barnett, David A; Boilard, Eric; Surette, Marc E

    2016-10-01

    Alkyne and azide analogs of natural compounds that can be coupled to sensitive tags by click chemistry are powerful tools to study biological processes. Arachidonic acid (AA) is a FA precursor to biologically active compounds. 19-Alkyne-AA (AA-alk) is a sensitive clickable AA analog; however, its use as a surrogate to study AA metabolism requires further evaluation. In this study, AA-alk metabolism was compared with that of AA in human cells. Jurkat cell uptake of AA was 2-fold greater than that of AA-alk, but significantly more AA-Alk was elongated to 22:4. AA and AA-alk incorporation into and remodeling between phospholipid (PL) classes was identical indicating equivalent CoA-independent AA-PL remodeling. Platelets stimulated in the pre-sence of AA-alk synthesized significantly less 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) and cyclooxygenase products than in the presence of AA. Ionophore-stimulated neutrophils produced significantly more 5-LOX products in the presence of AA-alk than AA. Neutrophils stimulated with only exogenous AA-alk produced significantly less 5-LOX products compared with AA, and leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-alk was 12-fold less potent at stimulating neutrophil migration than LTB4, collectively indicative of weaker leukotriene B4 receptor 1 agonist activity of LTB4-alk. Overall, these results suggest that the use of AA-alk as a surrogate for the study of AA metabolism should be carried out with caution.

  20. Probing Gαi1 Protein Activation at Single Amino Acid Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dawei; Maeda, Shoji; Matkovic, Milos; Mendieta, Sandro; Mayer, Daniel; Dawson, Roger; Schertler, Gebhard F.X.; Madan Babu, M.; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2016-01-01

    We present comprehensive single amino acid resolution maps of the residues stabilising the human Gαi1 subunit in nucleotide- and receptor-bound states. We generated these maps by measuring the effects of alanine mutations on the stability of Gαi1 and of the rhodopsin-Gαi1 complex. We identified stabilization clusters in the GTPase and helical domains responsible for structural integrity and the conformational changes associated with activation. In activation cluster I, helices α1 and α5 pack against strands β1-3 to stabilize the nucleotide-bound states. In the receptor-bound state, these interactions are replaced by interactions between α5 and strands β4-6. Key residues in this cluster are Y320, crucial for the stabilization of the receptor-bound state, and F336, which stabilizes nucleotide-bound states. Destabilization of helix α1, caused by rearrangement of this activation cluster, leads to the weakening of the inter-domain interface and release of GDP. PMID:26258638

  1. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    PubMed

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV.

  2. Probing the interaction of caffeic acid with ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-05-01

    The binding of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and caffeic acid (CFA) was investigated using fluorescence quenching, UV/vis absorption spectrscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) at different temperatures. The study results indicated fluorescence quenching between ZnO NPs and CFA rationalized in terms of a static quenching mechanism or the formation of non-fluorescent CFA-ZnO. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis, the binding constant (K(a)), number of binding sites (n) and thermodynamic properties were determined. Values of the quenching (K(SV)) and binding (K(a)) constants decrease with increasing temperature and the number of binding sites n = 2. The thermodynamic parameters determined using Van't Hoff equation indicated that binding occurs spontaneously involving the hydrogen bond, and van der Waal's forces played a major role in the reaction of ZnO NPs with CFA. The FTIR, TEM and DLS measurements also indicated differences in the structure, morphology and size of CFA, ZnO NPs and their corresponding CFA-ZnO.

  3. “Intrinsic” correlations and their temporal evolutions between winter-time PNA/EPW and winter drought in the west United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Lin; Fu, Zuntao; Yuan, Naiming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, relations between winter-time Pacific-Northern America pattern (PNA)/East Pacific wave-train (EPW) and winter-time drought in the west United States over the period of 1951-2010 are analyzed. Considering traditional Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient can be influenced by non-stationarity and nonlinearity, a recently proposed method, Detrended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis (DPCCA) is applied. With DPCCA, we analyzed the “intrinsic” correlations between PNA/EPW and the winter drought with possible effects of ENSO and PDO removed. We found, i) significant negative correlations between PNA/EPW and drought on time scales of 5-6 years after removing the effects of ENSO, ii) and significant negative correlations between PNA/EPW and drought on time scales of 15-25 years after removing the effects of PDO. By further studying the temporal evolutions of the “intrinsic” correlations, we found on time scales of 5-6 years, the “intrinsic” correlations between PNA/EPW and drought can vary severely with time, but for most time, the correlations are negative. While on interdecadal (15-25 years) time scales, after the effects of PDO removed, unlike the relations between PNA and drought, the “intrinsic” correlations between EPW and drought takes nearly homogeneous-sign over the whole period, indicating a better model can be designed by using EPW.

  4. “Intrinsic” correlations and their temporal evolutions between winter-time PNA/EPW and winter drought in the west United States

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Lin; Fu, Zuntao; Yuan, Naiming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, relations between winter-time Pacific-Northern America pattern (PNA)/East Pacific wave-train (EPW) and winter-time drought in the west United States over the period of 1951–2010 are analyzed. Considering traditional Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient can be influenced by non-stationarity and nonlinearity, a recently proposed method, Detrended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis (DPCCA) is applied. With DPCCA, we analyzed the “intrinsic” correlations between PNA/EPW and the winter drought with possible effects of ENSO and PDO removed. We found, i) significant negative correlations between PNA/EPW and drought on time scales of 5–6 years after removing the effects of ENSO, ii) and significant negative correlations between PNA/EPW and drought on time scales of 15–25 years after removing the effects of PDO. By further studying the temporal evolutions of the “intrinsic” correlations, we found on time scales of 5–6 years, the “intrinsic” correlations between PNA/EPW and drought can vary severely with time, but for most time, the correlations are negative. While on interdecadal (15–25 years) time scales, after the effects of PDO removed, unlike the relations between PNA and drought, the “intrinsic” correlations between EPW and drought takes nearly homogeneous-sign over the whole period, indicating a better model can be designed by using EPW. PMID:26813741

  5. "Intrinsic" correlations and their temporal evolutions between winter-time PNA/EPW and winter drought in the west United States.

    PubMed

    Piao, Lin; Fu, Zuntao; Yuan, Naiming

    2016-01-27

    In this study, relations between winter-time Pacific-Northern America pattern (PNA)/East Pacific wave-train (EPW) and winter-time drought in the west United States over the period of 1951-2010 are analyzed. Considering traditional Pearson's Correlation Coefficient can be influenced by non-stationarity and nonlinearity, a recently proposed method, Detrended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis (DPCCA) is applied. With DPCCA, we analyzed the "intrinsic" correlations between PNA/EPW and the winter drought with possible effects of ENSO and PDO removed. We found, i) significant negative correlations between PNA/EPW and drought on time scales of 5-6 years after removing the effects of ENSO, ii) and significant negative correlations between PNA/EPW and drought on time scales of 15-25 years after removing the effects of PDO. By further studying the temporal evolutions of the "intrinsic" correlations, we found on time scales of 5-6 years, the "intrinsic" correlations between PNA/EPW and drought can vary severely with time, but for most time, the correlations are negative. While on interdecadal (15-25 years) time scales, after the effects of PDO removed, unlike the relations between PNA and drought, the "intrinsic" correlations between EPW and drought takes nearly homogeneous-sign over the whole period, indicating a better model can be designed by using EPW.

  6. Estimation of Bacterial Cell Numbers in Humic Acid-Rich Salt Marsh Sediments with Probes Directed to 16S Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Edgcomb, Virginia P.; McDonald, John H.; Devereux, Richard; Smith, David W.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membrane-bound nucleic acids by using seven group-specific DNA oligonucleotide probes complementary to 16S rRNA coding regions. These included a general eubacterial probe and probes encompassing most members of the gram-negative, mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). DNA was extracted from sediment samples, and contaminating materials were removed by a series of steps. Efficiency of DNA extraction was 48% based on the recovery of tritiated plasmid DNA added to samples prior to extraction. Reproducibility of the extraction procedure was demonstrated by hybridizations to replicate samples. Numbers of target cells in samples were estimated by comparing the amount of hybridization to extracted DNA obtained with each probe to that obtained with a standard curve of genomic DNA for reference strains included on the same membrane. In June, numbers of SRB detected with an SRB-specific probe ranged from 6.0 × 107 to 2.5 × 109 (average, 1.1 × 109 ± 5.2 × 108) cells g of sediment−1. In September, numbers of SRB detected ranged from 5.4 × 108 to 7.3 × 109 (average, 2.5 × 109 ± 1.5 × 109) cells g of sediment−1. The capability of using rDNA probes to estimate cell numbers by hybridization to DNA extracted from complex matrices permits initiation of detailed studies on community composition and changes in communities based on cell numbers in formerly intractable environments. PMID:10103245

  7. Chromatographic analysis of the effects of fatty acids and glycation on binding by probes for Sudlow sites I and II to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Debolt, Erin; Suresh, D; Hage, David S

    2016-05-15

    The primary endogenous ligands of human serum albumin (HSA) are non-esterified fatty acids, with 0.1-2mol of fatty acids normally being bound to HSA. In type II diabetes, fatty acid levels in serum are often elevated, and the presence of high glucose results in an increase in the non-enzymatic glycation of HSA. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used to examine the combined effects of glycation and the presence of long chain fatty acids on the binding of HSA with R-warfarin and l-tryptophan (i.e., probes for Sudlow sites I and II, the major sites for drugs on this protein). Zonal elution competition studies were used to examine the interactions of myristic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid with these probes on HSA. It was found that all these fatty acids had direct competition with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I of normal HSA and glycated HSA, with the glycated HSA typically having stronger binding for the fatty acids at this site. At Sudlow site II, direct competition was observed for all the fatty acids with l-tryptophan when using normal HSA, while glycated HSA gave no competition or positive allosteric interactions between these fatty acids and l-tryptophan. These data indicated that glycation can alter the interactions of drugs and fatty acids at specific binding sites on HSA. The results of this study should lead to a better understanding of how these interactions may change during diabetes and demonstrate how HPAC can be used to examine drug/solute-protein interactions in complex systems.

  8. Preparation and application of cysteine-capped ZnS nanoparticles as fluorescence probe in the determination of nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxin; Chen, Jinlong; Zhu, Changqin; Wang, Lun; Zhao, Danhua; Zhuo, Shujuan; Wu, Yuqin

    2004-07-01

    Cysteine-capped ZnS nanometer-sized fluorescent particles were produced by a colloidal aqueous synthesis. The functionalized nanoparticles are water-soluble and suitable for biological application. A synchronous fluorescence method has been developed for the rapid determination of DNA with functionalized nano-ZnS as a fluorescence probe, based on the synchronous fluorescence enhancement of cysteine-capped nano-ZnS in the presence of DNA. When Δ λ=190 nm, maximum synchronous fluorescence is produced at 267 nm at pH 5.12. Under optimum conditions, the synchronous fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acids in the range 0.1-1.2 μg ml -1 for calf thymus DNA, 0.1-0.6 μg ml -1 for fish sperm DNA. The corresponding detection limit is 32.9 ng ml -1 for calf thymus DNA and 24.6 ng ml -1 for fish sperm DNA. This method is simple, inexpensive, rapid and sensitive. The recovery and relative standard deviation are satisfactory.

  9. Counterion distribution surrounding spherical nucleic acid-Au nanoparticle conjugates probed by small-angle x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Kewalramani, Sumit; Zwanikken, Jos W; Macfarlane, Robert J; Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Mirkin, Chad A; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2013-12-23

    The radial distribution of monovalent cations surrounding spherical nucleic acid-Au nanoparticle conjugates (SNA-AuNPs) is determined by in situ small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and classical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Small differences in SAXS intensity profiles from SNA-AuNPs dispersed in a series of solutions containing different monovalent ions (Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)) are measured. Using the "heavy ion replacement" SAXS (HIRSAXS) approach, we extract the cation-distribution-dependent contribution to the SAXS intensity and show that it agrees with DFT predictions. The experiment-theory comparisons reveal the radial distribution of cations as well as the conformation of the DNA in the SNA shell. The analysis shows an enhancement to the average cation concentration in the SNA shell that can be up to 15-fold, depending on the bulk solution ionic concentration. The study demonstrates the feasibility of HIRSAXS in probing the distribution of monovalent cations surrounding nanoparticles with an electron dense core (e.g., metals).

  10. Synthesis of fluorescent D-amino acids (FDAAs) and their use for probing peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial growth in situ

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Erkin; Tekkam, Srinivas; Hall, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent D-amino acids (FDAAs) are efficiently incorporated into the peptidoglycan of diverse bacterial species at the sites of active peptidoglycan biosynthesis, allowing specific and covalent probing of bacterial growth with minimal perturbation. Here, we provide a protocol for the synthesis of four FDAAs emitting light in blue, green or red and for their use in peptidoglycan labeling of live bacteria. Our modular synthesis protocol gives easy access to a library of different FDAAs made with commercially available fluorophores. FDAAs can be synthesized in a typical chemistry laboratory in 2–3 days. The simple labeling procedure involves addition of the FDAAs to the bacterial sample for the desired labeling duration and stopping further label incorporation by fixation or by washing away excess dye. We discuss several scenarios for the use of these labels including short or long labeling durations, and the combination of different labels in pure culture or complex environmental samples. Depending on the experiment, FDAA labeling can take as little as 30 s for a rapidly growing species such as Escherichia coli. PMID:25474031

  11. Conformers of β-aminoisobutyric acid probed by jet-cooled microwave and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Kuş, N; Sharma, A; Peña, I; Bermúdez, M C; Cabezas, C; Alonso, J L; Fausto, R

    2013-04-14

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) has been studied in isolation conditions: in the gas phase and trapped into a cryogenic N2 matrix. A solid sample of the compound was vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through their rotational spectra in a supersonic expansion using two different spectroscopic techniques: broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and conventional molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Four conformers with structures of two types could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and (14)N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically: type A, bearing an OH⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond and its carboxylic group in the trans geometry (H-O-C=O dihedral ∼180°), and type B, having an NH⋯O bond and the cis arrangement of the carboxylic group. These two types of conformers could also be trapped from the gas phase into a cryogenic N2 matrix and probed by Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In situ irradiation of BAIBA isolated in N2 matrix of type B conformers using near-IR radiation tuned at the frequency of the O-H stretching 1st overtone (∼6930 cm(-1)) of these forms allowed to selectively convert them into type A conformers and into a new type of conformers of higher energy (type D) bearing an NH⋯O=C bond and a O-H "free" trans carboxylic group.

  12. Conformers of β-aminoisobutyric acid probed by jet-cooled microwave and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuş, N.; Sharma, A.; Peña, I.; Bermúdez, M. C.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.; Fausto, R.

    2013-04-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) has been studied in isolation conditions: in the gas phase and trapped into a cryogenic N2 matrix. A solid sample of the compound was vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through their rotational spectra in a supersonic expansion using two different spectroscopic techniques: broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and conventional molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Four conformers with structures of two types could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically: type A, bearing an OH⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond and its carboxylic group in the trans geometry (H-O-C=O dihedral ˜180°), and type B, having an NH⋯O bond and the cis arrangement of the carboxylic group. These two types of conformers could also be trapped from the gas phase into a cryogenic N2 matrix and probed by Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In situ irradiation of BAIBA isolated in N2 matrix of type B conformers using near-IR radiation tuned at the frequency of the O-H stretching 1st overtone (˜6930 cm-1) of these forms allowed to selectively convert them into type A conformers and into a new type of conformers of higher energy (type D) bearing an NH⋯O=C bond and a O-H "free" trans carboxylic group.

  13. A genetically encoded probe for the identification of proteins that form sulfenic acid in response to H2O2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Takanishi, Christina L; Wood, Matthew J

    2011-06-03

    It is widely known that reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide, play important roles in cellular signaling and initiation of oxidative stress responses via thiol modifications. Identification of the targets of these modifications will provide a better understanding of the relationship between ROS and human diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis. Sulfenic acid is the principle product of a reaction between hydrogen peroxide and a reactive protein cysteine. This reversible post-translational modification plays an important role in enzyme active sites, signaling transduction via disulfide bond formation, as well as an intermediate to overoxidation products during oxidative stress. By re-engineering the C-terminal cysteine rich domain (cCRD) of the Yap1 transcription factor, we were able to create a genetically encoded probe for the general detection and identification of proteins that form sulfenic acid in vivo. The Yap1-cCRD probe has been used previously in the identification of proteins that form sulfenic acid in Escherichia coli. Here we demonstrate the successful use of the Yap1-cCRD probe in the identification of proteins that form sulfenic acid in response to hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. Use of dimedone-based chemical probes for sulfenic acid detection evaluation of conditions affecting probe incorporation into redox-sensitive proteins.

    PubMed

    Klomsiri, Chananat; Nelson, Kimberly J; Bechtold, Erika; Soito, Laura; Johnson, Lynnette C; Lowther, W Todd; Ryu, Seong-Eon; King, S Bruce; Furdui, Cristina M; Poole, Leslie B

    2010-01-01

    Sulfenic acids, formed as transient intermediates during the reaction of cysteine residues with peroxides, play significant roles in enzyme catalysis and regulation, and are also involved in the redox regulation of transcription factors and other signaling proteins. Therefore, interest in the identification of protein sulfenic acids has grown substantially in the past few years. Dimedone, which specifically traps sulfenic acids, has provided the basis for the synthesis of a novel group of compounds that derivatize 1,3-cyclohexadione, a dimedone analogue, with reporter tags such as biotin for affinity capture and fluorescent labels for visual detection. These reagents allow identification of the cysteine sites and proteins that are sensitive to oxidation and permit identification of the cellular conditions under which such oxidations occur. We have shown that these compounds are reactive and specific toward sulfenic acids and that the labeled proteins can be detected at high sensitivity using gel analysis or mass spectrometry. Here, we further characterize these reagents, showing that the DCP-Bio1 incorporation rates into three sulfenic acid containing proteins, papaya papain, Escherichia coli fRMsr, and the Salmonella typhimurium peroxiredoxin AhpC, are significantly different and, in the case of fRMsr, are unaffected by changes in buffer pH from 5.5 and 8.0. We also provide protocols to label protein sulfenic acids in cellular proteins, either by in situ labeling of intact cells or by labeling at the time of lysis. We show that the addition of alkylating reagents and catalase to the lysis buffer is critical in preventing the formation of sulfenic acid subsequent to cell lysis. Data presented herein also indicate that the need to standardize, as much as possible, the protein and reagent concentrations during labeling. Finally, we introduce several new test or control proteins that can be used to evaluate labeling procedures and efficiencies.

  15. Development and Evaluation of Novel Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assays with Locked Nucleic Acid Probes Targeting Leader Sequences of Human-Pathogenic Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Choi, Garnet Kwan-Yue; Tsang, Alan Ka-Lun; Tee, Kah-Meng; Lam, Ho-Yin; Yip, Cyril Chik-Yan; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Cheng, Vincent Chi-Chung; Yeung, Man-Lung; Lau, Susanna Kar-Pui; Woo, Patrick Chiu-Yat; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Tang, Bone Siu-Fai; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-08-01

    Based on findings in small RNA-sequencing (Seq) data analysis, we developed highly sensitive and specific real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays with locked nucleic acid probes targeting the abundantly expressed leader sequences of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and other human coronaviruses. Analytical and clinical evaluations showed their noninferiority to a commercial multiplex PCR test for the detection of these coronaviruses.

  16. Fluorescence determination of DNA with 1-pyrenebutyric acid nanoparticles coated with β-cyclodextrin as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Bian, Guirong; Wang, Leyu; Dong, Ling; Chen, Hongqi; Xia, Tingting

    2005-04-01

    A novel ultrasonication method has been successfully developed for the preparation of 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBAC)/β-cyclodextrin(β-CD) complex nanoparticles. The as-prepared nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. Complex nanoparticles prepared with ultrasonication are smaller and better dispersed than single PBAC nanoparticles. At pH 3.0, the relative fluorescence intensity of complex nanoparticles of PBAC/β-CD can be quenched by the concentration of DNA. Based on this, a novel fluorimetric method has been developed for rapid determination of DNA. In comparison with single organic fluorophores, these nanoparticle probes are better water-solubility, more stable and do not suffer from blinking. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range 0.2-15 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.3-12 μg mL -1 for fish sperm DNA (fs-DNA). The corresponding detection limit is 0.01 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.02 μg mL -1 for fs-DNA. The relative standard deviation of seven replicate measurements is 1.2% for 2.0 μg mL -1 ct-DNA and 1.4% for 2.0 μg mL -1 fs-DNA, respectively. The method is simple and sensitive. The recovery and relative standard deviation are very satisfactory. A mechanism proposed to explain the process also has been studied.

  17. Hydrothermal synthetic mercaptopropionic acid stabled CdTe quantum dots as fluorescent probes for detection of Ag⁺.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhao, Nan-Jing; Xiao, Xue; Yin, Gao-Fang; Yu, Shao-Hui; Wang, Huan-Bo; Duan, Jing-Bo; Shi, Chao-Yi; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2012-12-01

    Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with particle size 3 nm have been successfully synthesized in aqueous medium by hydrothermal synthesis method. And the effects of different metal ions on MPA capped CdTe QDs fluorescence were studied using fluorescence spectrometry. The results demonstrated that at the same concentration level, Ag(+) could strongly quench CdTe QDs fluorescence, and the other metal ions had little effect on CdTe QDs fluorescence except Cu(2+). On the basis of this fact, a rapid, simple, highly sensitive and selective method based on fluorescence quenching principle for Ag(+) detection in aqueous solution was proposed. Under optimal conditions, the quenched fluorescence intensity (F(0)-F) increased linearly with the concentration of Ag(+) ranging from 4 × 10(-7) to 32 × 10(-7)mol L(-1). The limit of detection for Ag(+) was 4.106 × 10(-8)mol L(-1). The obtained plot of F(0)/F versus [Ag(+)] was an upward curvature, concave towards the y-axis, rather than a straight line. The modified form of the Stern-Volmer equation was third order in Ag(+) concentration. According to the modified Stern-Volmer equation, it can be inferred that dynamic quenching and static quenching simultaneously occurred when Ag(+) interacted with MPA capped CdTe QDs. At the same time other factors might also influence the quenching process. Based on this study, hydrothermal synthesized MPA capped CdTe QDs with particle size 3 nm may be used as a novel fluorescence probe to quantificationally and selectively detect Ag(+).

  18. Amplification-Free Detection of Circulating microRNA Biomarkers from Body Fluids Based on Fluorogenic Oligonucleotide-Templated Reaction between Engineered Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes: Application to Prostate Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Gavin A D; Shibakawa, Akifumi; Patel, Hinesh; Sita-Lumsden, Ailsa; Zivi, Andrea; Rama, Nona; Bevan, Charlotte L; Ladame, Sylvain

    2016-08-16

    Highly abundant in cells, microRNAs (or miRs) play a key role as regulators of gene expression. A proportion of them are also detectable in biofluids making them ideal noninvasive biomarkers for pathologies in which miR levels are aberrantly expressed, such as cancer. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are engineered uncharged oligonucleotide analogues capable of hybridizing to complementary nucleic acids with high affinity and high specificity. Herein, novel PNA-based fluorogenic biosensors have been designed and synthesized that target miR biomarkers for prostate cancer (PCa). The sensing strategy is based on oligonucleotide-templated reactions where the only miR of interest serves as a matrix to catalyze an otherwise highly unfavorable fluorogenic reaction. Validated in vitro using synthetic RNAs, these newly developed biosensors were then shown to detect endogenous concentrations of miR in human blood samples without the need for any amplification step and with minimal sample processing. This low-cost, quantitative, and versatile sensing technology has been technically validated using gold-standard RT-qPCR. Compared to RT-qPCR however, this enzyme-free, isothermal blood test is amenable to incorporation into low-cost portable devices and could therefore be suitable for widespread public screening.

  19. Porous Silicon and Polymer Nanocomposites for Delivery of Peptide Nucleic Acids as Anti-MicroRNA Therapies.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Werfel, Thomas A; Shen, Tianwei; Kavanaugh, Taylor E; Kilchrist, Kameron V; Mares, Jeremy W; Fain, Joshua S; Wiese, Carrie B; Vickers, Kasey C; Weiss, Sharon M; Duvall, Craig L

    2016-09-01

    Self-assembled polymer/porous silicon nanocomposites overcome intracellular and systemic barriers for in vivo application of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) anti-microRNA therapeutics. Porous silicon (PSi) is leveraged as a biodegradable scaffold with high drug-cargo-loading capacity. Functionalization with a diblock polymer improves PSi nanoparticle colloidal stability, in vivo pharmacokinetics, and intracellular bioavailability through endosomal escape, enabling PNA to inhibit miR-122 in vivo.

  20. Hybridization-modulated ion fluxes through peptide-nucleic-acid- functionalized gold nanotubes. A new approach to quantitative label-free DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Jágerszki, Gyula; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Höfler, Lajos; Pretsch, Ernö

    2007-06-01

    The inner walls of gold nanotubes, prepared by template synthesis in the nanopores of polycarbonate track etch membranes, have been chemically modified with peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and used for label-free quantification of complementary DNA sequences. Selective binding of DNA to the PNA-modified nanotubes is shown to decrease the flux of optically detected anionic markers through the nanotubes in a concentration-dependent manner. The strong dependence of the biorecognition-modulated ion transport through the nanopores on the ionic strength suggests a dominantly electrostatic exclusion mechanism of the ion flux decrease as a result of DNA binding to the PNA-modified nanopores.

  1. Analysis of Protein–Protein Interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Cell Lines Using Phthalic Acid Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein–protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, which were modified using the silanized linker 3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane (APTES). Incubation with cell lysates from breast cancer cell lines revealed interactions between phthalic acid and cellular proteins in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequent proteomics analyses indicated 22 phthalic acid-binding proteins in both cell types, including heat shock cognate 71-kDa protein, ATP synthase subunit beta, and heat shock protein HSP 90-beta. In addition, 21 MCF-7-specific and 32 MDA-MB-231 specific phthalic acid-binding proteins were identified, including related proteasome proteins, heat shock 70-kDa protein, and NADPH dehydrogenase and ribosomal correlated proteins, ras-related proteins, and members of the heat shock protein family, respectively. PMID:25402641

  2. The impact of monthly variation of the Pacific-North America (PNA) teleconnection pattern on wintertime surface-layer aerosol concentrations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jin; Liao, Hong; Li, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    The Pacific-North America teleconnection (PNA) is the leading general circulation pattern in the troposphere over the region of North Pacific to North America during wintertime. This study examined the impacts of monthly variations of the PNA phase (positive or negative phase) on wintertime surface-layer aerosol concentrations in the United States (US) by analyzing observations during 1999-2013 from the Air Quality System of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-AQS) and the model results for 1986-2006 from the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The composite analyses on the EPA-AQS observations over 1999-2013 showed that the average concentrations of PM2.5, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosols over the US were higher in the PNA positive phases (25 % of the winter months examined, and this fraction of months had the highest positive PNA index values) than in the PNA negative phases (25 % of the winter months examined, and this fraction of months had the highest negative PNA index values) by 1.0 µg m-3 (8.7 %), 0.01 µg m-3 (0.5 %), 0.3 µg m-3 (29.1 %), 0.1 µg m-3 (11.9 %), 0.6 µg m-3 (13.5 %), and 0.2 µg m-3 (27.8 %), respectively. The simulated geographical patterns of the differences in concentrations of all aerosol species between the PNA positive and negative phases were similar to observations. Based on the GEOS-Chem simulation, the pattern correlation coefficients were calculated to show the impacts of PNA-induced variations in meteorological fields on aerosol concentrations. The PNA phase was found (i) to influence sulfate concentrations mainly through changes in planetary boundary layer height (PBLH), precipitation (PR), and temperature; (ii) to influence nitrate concentrations mainly through changes in temperature; and (iii) to influence concentrations of ammonium, organic carbon, and black carbon mainly through changes in PR and PBLH. Results from

  3. Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid-mediated multiplex real-time PCR kits for rapid detection of carbapenemase genes in gram-negative clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seri; Kim, Jung Ok; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Bae, Il Kwon; Song, Wonkeun

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of clinical isolates of carbapenemase-producing microbes confers multidrug-resistance to these bacteria and renders them difficult to treat. This study was performed to evaluate peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe-based multiplex real-time PCR kits used to detect carbapenemase genes. In total, 324 carbapenemase genes, collected from 318 gram-negative clinical isolates in 36 different hospital laboratories, were assayed to evaluate multiplex real-time PCR kits (PANAGENE; Daejeon, Korea). The nine most prevalent carbapenemase genes (KPC, OXA-48, GES, IMP, VIM, NDM, ISAba1-OXA-51, OXA-23, and OXA-58) were included in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of the multiplex real-time PCR assay to all of the carbapenemase genes were above 99.0%, except for ISAba1-OXA-51. The detection limit of the assay was 100 target copies per 25 μL of reaction volume for all of the nine genetic types of carbapenemases, and the genes were all detected in a single three-hour PCR. The assay also showed considerable efficiency (above 80.0%), stable reproducibility (coefficient of variation, below 5.0%) and a long shelf-life (more than eight months) with no cross reactivity. The developed PNA-mediated multiplex real-time PCR assay was useful for the rapid, accurate and simultaneous identification of nine carbapenemase genes in gram-negative clinical isolates, suggesting its potential to help choose the appropriate antibiotics and aid the control of carbapenemase genes.

  4. Development of a novel europium complex-based luminescent probe for time-gated luminescence imaging of hypochlorous acid in living samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangli; Guo, Lianying; Song, Bo; Tang, Zhixin; Yuan, Jingli

    2017-03-01

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes are key reagents used in the time-gated luminescence bioassay technique, but functional lanthanide complexes that can act as luminescent probes for specifically responding to analytes are very limited. In this work, we designed and synthesized a novel Eu3+ complex-based luminescence probe for hypochlorous acid (HOCl), NPPTTA-Eu3+, by using terpyridine polyacid-Eu3+, dinitrophenyl, and hydrazine as luminophore, quencher and HOCl-recognizer moieties, respectively. In the absence of HOCl, the probe is non-luminescent due to the strong luminescence quenching of the dinitrophenyl group in the complex. However, upon reaction with HOCl, the dinitrophenyl moiety is rapidly cleaved from the probe, which affords a strongly luminescent Eu3+ complex CPTTA-Eu3+, accompanied by a ∼900-fold luminescence enhancement with a long luminescence lifetime of 1.41 ms. This unique luminescence response of NPPTTA-Eu3+ to HOCl allowed NPPTTA-Eu3+ to be conveniently used as a probe for highly selective and sensitive detection of HOCl under the time-gated luminescence mode. In addition, by loading NPPTTA-Eu3+ into RAW 264.7 macrophage cells and Daphnia magna, the generation of endogenous HOCl in RAW 264.7 cells and the uptake of exogenous HOCl by Daphnia magna were successfully imaged on a true-color time-gated luminescence microscope. The results demonstrated the practical applicability of NPPTTA-Eu3+ as an efficient probe for time-gated luminescence imaging of HOCl in living cells and organisms.

  5. Synthesis of a new Ni-phenanthroline complex and its application as an electrochemical probe for detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua; Guo, Chunhua; Guo, Zhiyong; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2011-01-15

    A new DNA sensor using a nickel(II) phenanthroline complex ([Ni(phen)(2)PHPIP]·2ClO(4)) as the electrochemical probe was developed. The sensor is very sensitive and selective for calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) detection in aqueous medium. The Ni-phenanthroline probe was synthesized by a two-step preparation using p-hydroxy-phenylimidazo-1,10-phenanthroline (PHPIP) as the ligand and characterized with IR, UV and MS. Some interesting electrochemical properties of the Ni-complex and the interactions of the complex with ctDNA were reported. The calculated dynamics parameters of the electrode process indicate that there are obvious interactions between the probe and the ctDNA in aqueous solution. Under constant potential conditions, the redox current peak of the probe (Ni-complex) decreases obviously as the probe interacts/binds with ctDNAs. This unexpected electrochemical behavior may suggest that a new adduct through the binding of Ni-phenanthroline complex with ctDNA is formed electrochemically. By estimation, the binding ratio of the probe and ctDNA was found to be 1:1 with a binding constant β=4.29×10(5) mol L(-1) in aqueous solution at room temperature.

  6. Cadmium and zinc chain and cluster-based layered coordination polymers prepared from flexible-arm aromatic ortho-dicarboxylic acids and 4-pyridylnicotinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Peter E.; Uebler, Jacob W.; LaDuca, Robert L.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrothermal reaction of a d10-metal nitrate salt, a flexible-arm aromatic ortho-dicarboxylic acid, and 4-pyridylnicotinamide (4-pna) afforded four new crystalline coordination polymers, which were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. [Cd(Hhmph)(nic)(H2O)2]n (1, hmph = homophthalate, nic = nicotinate) is a 1-D coordination polymer chain compound whose nic ligands were generated in situ via 4-pna hydrolysis. Addition of base and a shorter reaction duration afforded [Cd(hmph)(4-pna)]n (2), which has dinuclear [Cd2(hmph)2] dimers linked into a 1-D ladder polymer via 4-pna ligands. A similar chain structure, albeit with a different hmph binding mode, is seen in [Zn(hmph)(4-pna)]n (3). {[Zn2(phda)2(4-pna)2(H2O)]ṡH2O}n (4, phda = 1,2-phenylenediacetate) has both anti-syn bridged [Zn2(OCO)2] ring dimers and [Zn2(OCO)4] paddlewheel dimers, linked into a layered coordination polymer by dipodal 4-pna ligands. Luminescent properties of these new materials are also presented.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of metastable, 20 nm-sized Pna21-LiCoPO4 nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Jennifer; Nordlund, Dennis; Doeff, Marca M.; Nilges, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The majority of research activities on LiCoPO4 are focused on the phospho-olivine (space group Pnma), which is a promising high-voltage cathode material for Li-ion batteries. In contrast, comparably little is known about its metastable Pna21 modification. Herein, we present a comprehensive study on the structure-property relationships of 15-20 nm Pna21-LiCoPO4 nanospheres prepared by a simple microwave-assisted solvothermal process. Unlike previous reports, the results indicate that the compound is non-stoichiometric and shows cation-mixing with Co ions on the Li sites, which provides an explanation for the poor electrochemical performance. Co L2,3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic data confirm the local tetrahedral symmetry of Co2+. Comprehensive studies on the thermal stability using thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and in situ powder X-ray diffraction show an exothermic phase transition to olivine Pnma-LiCoPO4 at 527 °C. The influence of the atmosphere and the particle size on the thermal stability is also investigated.

  8. Peptide nucleic acids rather than RNA may have been the first genetic molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, K. E.; Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous problems exist with the current thinking of RNA as the first genetic material. No plausible prebiotic processes have yet been demonstrated to produce the nucleosides or nucleotides or for efficient two-way nonenzymatic replication. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a promising precursor to RNA, consisting of N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and the adenine, uracil, guanine, and cytosine-N-acetic acids. However, PNA has not yet been demonstrated to be prebiotic. We show here that AEG is produced directly in electric discharge reactions from CH(4), N(2), NH(3), and H(2)O. Electric discharges also produce ethylenediamine, as do NH(4)CN polymerizations. AEG is produced from the robust Strecker synthesis with ethylenediamine. The NH(4)CN polymerization in the presence of glycine leads to the adenine and guanine-N(9)-acetic acids, and the cytosine and uracil-N(1)-acetic acids are produced in high yield from the reaction of cyanoacetaldehyde with hydantoic acid, rather than urea. Preliminary experiments suggest that AEG may polymerize rapidly at 100 degrees C to give the polypeptide backbone of PNA. The ease of synthesis of the components of PNA and possibility of polymerization of AEG reinforce the possibility that PNA may have been the first genetic material.

  9. Assessing the acidity of high silica chabazite H-SSZ-13 by FTIR using CO as molecular probe: Comparison with H-SAPO-34.

    PubMed

    Bordiga, Silvia; Regli, Laura; Cocina, Donato; Lamberti, Carlo; Bjørgen, Morten; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-02-24

    Zeolitic materials based on the chabazite topology, such as H-SAPO-34, possess unique shape-selectivity properties for converting methanol into light olefins. In addition to the topology, zeolite acidity is inherently linked to catalyst activity and selectivity. The acidic properties of high silica chabazite (H-SSZ-13) have attracted much attention in the past decade because the material represents an idealized model system having one acidic site per cage. Conclusions drawn so far have essentially been founded on quantum chemical methods. An experimentally based benchmark of the acidity of H-SSZ-13 has hitherto not been available. In this work, transmission FTIR spectroscopy provides a description of the different acidic sites of H-SSZ-13 by using CO as molecular probe at 70 K. The results demonstrate that H-SSZ-13 is a strongly Brønsted acidic material, essentially having two distinct families of acidic sites. In contrast to numerous preceding reports, we find it fundamental to consider proton distributions among all four possible sites, and do not delimit the interpretations to only two sites. The present data consistently suggest the most abundant family of protons to have three members being located on different crystalline positions on the eight-membered-ring window giving access to the chabazite cage. Consequently, these protons are exposed to two neighboring cages. The second, and less abundant family, is constituted by only one site that is situated on the six-membered ring defining the top/bottom of the barrel-shaped chabazite cage. This proton is therefore only exposed to one cage and requires a higher CO pressure to form adducts. Toward CO, both families of sites possess the same acidity. Parallel experiments were also carried out for the isostructural and commercially important H-SAPO-34 having an equal density of acidic sites. This is the first attempt to directly compare, on an experimental basis, the acidity of these two materials.

  10. Cellular delivery of quantum dot-bound hybridization probe for detection of intracellular pre-microRNA using chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid) complex as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yao; Lin, Dajie; Shao, Lijia; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-01-01

    A quantum dot (QD)-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS)/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP) via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene delivery system for highly effective cellular uptake and delivery. After the probe was released from CS/γ-PGA complex to the cytoplasm by electrostatic repulsion at intracellular pH, it hybridized with pre-miRNA precursor as target. The formed product was then cleaved by RNase III Dicer, leading to the separation of QDs from Au NPs and fluorescence emission of QDs, which could be detected by confocal microscopic imaging to monitor the amount of the intracellular pre-miRNA precursor. The in vitro assays revealed that the QD-RNA-Au NP was a robust, sensitive and selective probe for quantitative detection of target pre-miRNA. Using MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as models, the relative amount of pre-miRNA let-7a could be successfully compared. Since the amount of miRNA is related to the progress and prognosis of cancer, this strategy could be expected to hold promising application potential in medical research and clinical diagnostics.

  11. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L; Mohn, William W

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating (13)C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanograms of sample, and we demonstrate its utility in typical DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments. All five nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) were separated and detected by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We detected all isotopic species in samples with as low as 1.5 atom% (13)C above natural abundance, using 1-ng loadings. Quantitation was used to characterize the isotopic enrichment kinetics of cellulose- and lignin-based microcosm experiments and to optimize the recovery of enriched nucleic acids. Application of our method will minimize the quantity of expensive isotopically labeled substrates required and reduce the risk of failed experiments due to insufficient recovery of labeled nucleic acids for sequencing library preparation.

  12. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating 13C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanograms of sample, and we demonstrate its utility in typical DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments. All five nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) were separated and detected by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. We detected all isotopic species in samples with as low as 1.5 atom% 13C above natural abundance, using 1-ng loadings. Quantitation was used to characterize the isotopic enrichment kinetics of cellulose- and lignin-based microcosm experiments and to optimize the recovery of enriched nucleic acids. Application of our method will minimize the quantity of expensive isotopically labeled substrates required and reduce the risk of failed experiments due to insufficient recovery of labeled nucleic acids for sequencing library preparation. PMID:25217022

  13. Design of Selenium-Based Chiral Chemical Probes for Simultaneous Enantio- and Chemosensing of Chiral Carboxylic Acids with Remote Stereogenic Centers by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shyshkanov, Sergey A; Orlov, Nikolai V

    2016-10-17

    Selenium-based enantiopure chiral chemical probes have been designed in a modular way starting from available amino alcohols. The probes developed were found to be efficient in chemoselective interaction with carboxylic functions of chiral substrates leading to diastereomeric amide formation and in sensing α-, β-, and remote (up to seven bonds away from the carboxylic group) chiral centers by using (77) Se NMR spectroscopy. As a result, it was possible to determine the enantiomeric ratio of structurally diverse individual chiral acids including polyfunctional compounds and drugs with high accuracy. An approach to analyzing the crude reaction mixtures has been successfully developed by using bifunctional selenium- and fluorine-containing chiral probes. More importantly, it was revealed that, based on the (77) Se NMR data obtained, it is possible to obtain primary information about the location and nature of the substituents at the chiral center (chemo- and enantiosensing), which can simplify the structural elucidation of complex compounds. The derivatization procedure takes as little as 5 min and can be performed directly in an NMR tube followed by NMR measurements without any isolation and purification steps.

  14. A peptide nucleic acid-aminosugar conjugate targeting transactivation response element of HIV-1 RNA genome shows a high bioavailability in human cells and strongly inhibits tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Das, Indrajit; Désiré, Jérôme; Manvar, Dinesh; Baussanne, Isabelle; Pandey, Virendra N; Décout, Jean-Luc

    2012-07-12

    The 6-aminoglucosamine ring of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin B (ring II) was conjugated to a 16-mer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting HIV-1 TAR RNA. For this purpose, we prepared the aminoglucosamine monomer 15 and attached it to the protected PNA prior to its cleavage from the solid support. We found that the resulting PNA-aminoglucosamine conjugate is stable under acidic conditions, efficiently taken up by the human cells and fairly distributed in both cytosol and nucleus without endosomal entrapment because cotreatment with endosome-disrupting agent had no effect on its cellular distribution. The conjugate displayed very high target specificity in vitro and strongly inhibited Tat mediated transactivation of HIV-1 LTR transcription in a cell culture system. The unique properties of this new class of PNA conjugate suggest it to be a potential candidate for therapeutic application.

  15. Winter Precipitation Isotope Gradients (δ18O) of the Contiguous USA and Their Relationship to the Pacific/North American (PNA) Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Bowen, G. J.; Welker, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the synoptic-dynamic relationship between Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and winter precipitation isotopes of the contiguous USA using 2-year (1990 and 1992) USNIP (the United States Network for Isotopes in Precipitation) dataset. We find that patterns in the spatial gradient of precipitation isotope values reflect the position of the polar jet stream and juxtaposition of air masses associated with variation in the PNA pattern. During the positive PNA winter, a southward shift of zones of steep δ18O gradients in the eastern USA coincides with southward displacement of the polar jet stream, which leads to a greater frequency of polar air masses and typically depleted δ18O values in the region. A coincident eastward shift in high-gradient zones in the western USA is related to more frequent penetration of tropical air masses, which in juxtaposition with polar air in the mid-continent leads to higher gradient values in the western region. Our findings highlight the importance of PNA pattern in determining spatial patterns of precipitation isotopes, with implications for interpretations of paleo-water isotope values and isotopic applications to study modern hydrological processes.

  16. Screening of Israeli Holstein-Friesian cattle for restriction fragment length polymorphisms using homologous and heterologous deoxyribonucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Hallerman, E M; Nave, A; Soller, M; Beckmann, J S

    1988-12-01

    Genomic DNA of Israeli Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle were screened with a battery of 17 cloned or subcloned DNA probes in an attempt to document restriction fragment length polymorphisms at a number of genetic loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed at the chymosin, oxytocin-neurophysin I, lutropin beta, keratin III, keratin VI, keratin VII, prolactin, and dihydrofolate reductase loci. Use of certain genomic DNA fragments as probes produced hybridization patterns indicative of satellite DNA at the respective loci. Means for distinguishing hybridizations to coding sequences for unique genes from those to satellite DNA were developed. Results of this study are discussed in terms of strategy for the systematic development of large numbers of bovine genomic polymorphisms.

  17. Incorporation of extra amino acids in peptide recognition probe to improve specificity and selectivity of an electrochemical peptide-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Zaitouna, Anita J; Maben, Alex J; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2015-07-30

    We investigated the effect of incorporating extra amino acids (AA) at the n-terminus of the thiolated and methylene blue-modified peptide probe on both specificity and selectivity of an electrochemical peptide-based (E-PB) HIV sensor. The addition of a flexible (SG)3 hexapeptide is, in particular, useful in improving sensor selectivity, whereas the addition of a highly hydrophilic (EK)3 hexapeptide has shown to be effective in enhancing sensor specificity. Overall, both E-PB sensors fabricated using peptide probes with the added AA (SG-EAA and EK-EAA) showed better specificity and selectivity, especially when compared to the sensor fabricated using a peptide probe without the extra AA (EAA). For example, the selectivity factor recorded in the 50% saliva was ∼2.5 for the EAA sensor, whereas the selectivity factor was 7.8 for both the SG-EAA and EK-EAA sensors. Other sensor properties such as the limit of detection and dynamic range were minimally affected by the addition of the six AA sequence. The limit of detection was 0.5 nM for the EAA sensor and 1 nM for both SG-EAA and EK-EAA sensors. The saturation target concentration was ∼200 nM for all three sensors. Unlike previously reported E-PB HIV sensors, the peptide probe functions as both the recognition element and antifouling passivating agent; this modification eliminates the need to include an additional antifouling diluent, which simplifies the sensor design and fabrication protocol.

  18. Fluorescence sensing of phosdrin pesticide by the luminescent Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-bis(coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Belal H. M.; Khairy, Gasser M.; Kamel, Rasha M.

    2016-04-01

    Luminescence quenching of the Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-bis (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) (Ln(III)-(CCA)2) probes has been studied in the presence of organophosphorus or organochlorine pesticides; Phosdrin (P1), Malathion (P2), Profenofos (P3), Formothion (P4), Heptachlor (P5), and Endosulfan (P6). The luminescence intensity of lanthanide complex probes Ln(III)-(CCA)2 decreases as the concentration of the Phosdrin pesticide increases, while the other investigated pesticides have no significant influence on the lanthanide fluorescent intensities. It is observed that the quenching of Eu(III) and Tb(III)-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid by Phosdrin proceeds via static quenching processes according to Stern-Volmer plot. The binding constants (K) and the thermodynamic parameters of the interaction of Ln(III)-(CCA)2 with Phosdrin have been determined. A direct method for the determination of the Phosdrin in ethanol has been developed based on the luminescence changes of the Ln(III)-(CCA)2-phosdrin ternary complexes. The detection limits of P1 were 6.28 and 1.07 μM in case of Eu(III) and Tb(III)-complex, respectively. The influence of various interfering species on the detection of P1 has been investigated to assess the analytical applicability of the method. The new method was applied to determine the Phosdrin pesticide in different types of water samples.

  19. Vector-Mediated Delivery of a Polyamide ("Peptide") Nucleic Acid Analogue through the Blood-Brain Barrier in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardridge, William M.; Boado, Ruben J.; Kang, Young-Sook

    1995-06-01

    Polyamide ("peptide") nucleic acids (PNAs) are molecules with antigene and antisense effects that may prove to be effective neuropharmaceuticals if these molecules are enabled to undergo transport through the brain capillary endothelial wall, which makes up the blood-brain barrier in vivo. The model PNA used in the present studies is an 18-mer that is antisense to the rev gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and is biotinylated at the amino terminus and iodinated at a tyrosine residue near the carboxyl terminus. The biotinylated PNA was linked to a conjugate of streptavidin (SA) and the OX26 murine monoclonal antibody to the rat transferrin receptor. The blood-brain barrier is endowed with high transferrin receptor concentrations, enabling the OX26-SA conjugate to deliver the biotinylated PNA to the brain. Although the brain uptake of the free PNA was negligible following intravenous administration, the brain uptake of the PNA was increased at least 28-fold when the PNA was bound to the OX26-SA vector. The brain uptake of the PNA bound to the OX26-SA vector was 0.1% of the injected dose per gram of brain at 60 min after an intravenous injection, approximating the brain uptake of intravenously injected morphine. The PNA bound to the OX26-SA vector retained the ability to bind to synthetic rev mRNA as shown by RNase protection assays. In summary, the present studies show that while the transport of PNAs across the blood-brain barrier is negligible, delivery of these potential neuropharmaceutical drugs to the brain may be achieved by coupling them to vector-mediated peptide-drug delivery systems.

  20. Optimization of peptide nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides for local and systemic dystrophin splice correction in the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Yin, HaiFang; Betts, Corinne; Saleh, Amer F; Ivanova, Gabriela D; Lee, Hyunil; Seow, Yiqi; Kim, Dalsoo; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2010-04-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) have the capacity to alter the processing of pre-mRNA transcripts in order to correct the function of aberrant disease-related genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle degenerative disease that arises from mutations in the DMD gene leading to an absence of dystrophin protein. AOs have been shown to restore the expression of functional dystrophin via splice correction by intramuscular and systemic delivery in animal models of DMD and in DMD patients via intramuscular administration. Major challenges in developing this splice correction therapy are to optimize AO chemistry and to develop more effective systemic AO delivery. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) AOs are an alternative AO chemistry with favorable in vivo biochemical properties and splice correcting abilities. Here, we show long-term splice correction of the DMD gene in mdx mice following intramuscular PNA delivery and effective splice correction in aged mdx mice. Further, we report detailed optimization of systemic PNA delivery dose regimens and PNA AO lengths to yield splice correction, with 25-mer PNA AOs providing the greatest splice correcting efficacy, restoring dystrophin protein in multiple peripheral muscle groups. PNA AOs therefore provide an attractive candidate AO chemistry for DMD exon skipping therapy.

  1. Probing the General Time Scale Question of Boronic Acid Binding with Sugars in Aqueous Solution at Physiological pH

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Nanting; Laughlin, Sarah; Wang, Yingji; Feng, You; Zheng, Yujun

    2012-01-01

    The boronic acid group is widely used in chemosensor design due to its ability to reversibly bind diol-containing compounds. The thermodynamic properties of the boronic acid-diol binding process have been investigated extensively. However, there are few studies of the kinetic properties of such binding processes. In this report, stopped-flow method was used for the first time to study the kinetic properties of the binding between three model arylboronic acids, 4-, 5-, and 8-isoquinolinylboronic acids, and various sugars. With all the boronic acid-diol pair sexamined, reactions were complete within seconds. The kon values with various sugars follow the order of D-fructose >D-tagatose>D-mannose >D-glucose. This trend tracks the thermodynamic binding affinities for these sugars and demonstrates that the “on” rate is the key factor determining the binding constant. PMID:22464680

  2. Multiplexed hybridizations of positively charge-tagged peptide nucleic acids detected by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Oliver; Guerasimova, Anna; Sauer, Sascha; Thamm, Sabine; Steinfath, Matthias; Herwig, Ralf; Janitz, Michal; Lehrach, Hans; Radelof, Uwe

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a novel class of DNA analogues in which the entire sugar-phosphate backbone is replaced by a pseudopeptide counterpart. Owing to its neutral character and the consequent lack of electrostatic repulsion, PNA exhibits very stable heteroduplex formation with complementary nucleic acid that is essentially ionic strength independent and enables hybridization under minimum salt conditions. This feature as well as its superior ion stability and easy ionization compared to DNA renders PNA very attractive for hybridization-based matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) applications. We have developed an approach to DNA characterization that takes advantage of multiplexed PNA hybridizations analyzed by MALDI-TOFMS. Our motivation was the further development of oligonucleotide fingerprinting, an efficient technique for cDNA and genomic DNA library characterization. Through positive 'charge-tagging' of PNA the efficiency of detection in MALDI-TOFMS was considerably enhanced permitting an unparalleled degree of multiplexing. Results from the simultaneous hybridization of 21 charge-tagged PNA hexamer oligonucleotides showed that genomic DNA and cDNA clones are successfully characterized on the basis of their hybridization profiles. The degree of multiplexing achieved may render a significant increase in throughput and hence efficiency of oligonucleotide fingerprinting possible.

  3. The dual temperature/pH-sensitive multiphase behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgels for potential application in in situ gelling system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Yanbing; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2011-05-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgels (PNA) may be an excellent formulation for in situ gelling system due to their high sensitivity and fast response rate. Four monodispersed PNA microgels with various contents of acrylic acid (AA) were synthesized by emulsion polymerization in this paper. Their hydrodynamic diameters decreased reversibly with both decreasing pH and increasing temperature. The dual temperature/pH-sensitivity was influenced by many factors such as AA content, cross-link density and ion strength. In addition, high concentration PNA dispersions underwent multiple phase transition according to different temperatures, pHs and concentrations, which were summarized in a 3D sol-gel phase diagram in this study. According to the sol-gel phase transition, 8% PNA-025 dispersion maintained a relatively low viscosity and favorable fluidity at pH 5.0 in the temperature range of 25-40°C, but it rapidly increased in viscosity at pH 7.4 and gelled at 37°C. This feature enabled the dual temperature/pH-sensitive microgels to overcome the troubles in syringing of temperature sensitive materials during the injection. Apart from this, PNA could form gel well in in vitro (e.g., medium and serum) and in in vivo with low cytotoxicity. Therefore, it is promising for PNA to be applied in the in situ gelling system.

  4. Probing the origin of acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate entering the citric acid cycle from the 13C labeling of citrate released by perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Comte, B; Vincent, G; Bouchard, B; Des Rosiers, C

    1997-10-17

    We present a strategy for simultaneous assessment of the relative contributions of anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation, pyruvate decarboxylation, and fatty acid oxidation to citrate formation in the perfused rat heart. This requires perfusing with a mix of 13C-substrates and determining the 13C labeling pattern of a single metabolite, citrate, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mass isotopomer distributions of the oxaloacetate and acetyl moieties of citrate allow calculation of the flux ratios: (pyruvate carboxylation)/(pyruvate decarboxylation), (pyruvate carboxylation)/(citrate synthesis), (pyruvate decarboxylation)/(citrate synthesis) (pyruvate carboxylation)/(fatty acid oxidation), and (pyruvate decarboxylation)/(fatty acid oxidation). Calculations, based on precursor-product relationship, are independent of pool size. The utility of our method was demonstrated for hearts perfused under normoxia with [U-13C3](lactate + pyruvate) and [1-13C]octanoate under steady-state conditions. Under these conditions, effluent and tissue citrate were similarly enriched in all 13C mass isotopomers. The use of effluent citrate instead of tissue citrate allows probing substrate fluxes through the various reactions non-invasively in the intact heart. The methodology should also be applicable to hearts perfused with other 13C-substrates, such as 1-13C-labeled long chain fatty acid, and under various conditions, provided that assumptions on which equations are developed are valid.

  5. Acid-base equilibrium dynamics in methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide probed by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiho; Son, Hyewon; Park, Sungnam

    2015-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy, which has been proven to be an excellent experimental method for studying thermally-driven chemical processes, was successfully used to investigate the acid dissociation equilibrium of HN3 in methanol (CH3OH) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for the first time. Our 2DIR experimental results indicate that the acid-base equilibrium occurs on picosecond timescales in CH3OH but that it occurs on much longer timescales in DMSO. Our results imply that the different timescales of the acid-base equilibrium originate from different proton transfer mechanisms between the acidic (HN3) and basic (N3(-)) species in CH3OH and DMSO. In CH3OH, the acid-base equilibrium is assisted by the surrounding CH3OH molecules which can directly donate H(+) to N3(-) and accept H(+) from HN3 and the proton migrates through the hydrogen-bonded chain of CH3OH. On the other hand, the acid-base equilibrium in DMSO occurs through the mutual diffusion of HN3 and N3(-) or direct proton transfer. Our 2DIR experimental results corroborate different proton transfer mechanisms in the acid-base equilibrium in protic (CH3OH) and aprotic (DMSO) solvents.

  6. A Rapid Approach for Fabricating Boronic Acid-Functionalized Plates for On-Probe Detection of Glycoprotein and Glycopeptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ching; Chen, Chao-Jung

    2017-01-01

    We developed a rapid and simple approach without using complex mechanical or chemical protocols to fabricate boronic acid-functionalized plates for glycoprotein or glycopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. By coating the boronic acid-functionalized silica particles on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) plate, these particles can form a firmly monolayer of particles on PDMS membrane for sample handling without peeling off. The boronic acid particles-coated PDMS plate (BP plate) was successfully applied to the enrichment of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) protein and their digested glycopeptides. PMID:28337401

  7. A sensitive gel-based method combining distinct cyclophellitol-based probes for the identification of acid/base residues in human retaining β-glucosidases.

    PubMed

    Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Witte, Martin D; Voorn-Brouwer, Tineke M; Walvoort, Marthe T C; Li, Kah-Yee; Codée, Jeroen D C; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Boot, Rolf G; Overkleeft, Herman S; Aerts, Johannes M F G

    2014-12-19

    Retaining β-exoglucosidases operate by a mechanism in which the key amino acids driving the glycosidic bond hydrolysis act as catalytic acid/base and nucleophile. Recently we designed two distinct classes of fluorescent cyclophellitol-type activity-based probes (ABPs) that exploit this mechanism to covalently modify the nucleophile of retaining β-glucosidases. Whereas β-epoxide ABPs require a protonated acid/base for irreversible inhibition of retaining β-glucosidases, β-aziridine ABPs do not. Here we describe a novel sensitive method to identify both catalytic residues of retaining β-glucosidases by the combined use of cyclophellitol β-epoxide- and β-aziridine ABPs. In this approach putative catalytic residues are first substituted to noncarboxylic amino acids such as glycine or glutamine through site-directed mutagenesis. Next, the acid/base and nucleophile can be identified via classical sodium azide-mediated rescue of mutants thereof. Selective labeling with fluorescent β-aziridine but not β-epoxide ABPs identifies the acid/base residue in mutagenized enzyme, as only the β-aziridine ABP can bind in its absence. The Absence of the nucleophile abolishes any ABP labeling. We validated the method by using the retaining β-glucosidase GBA (CAZy glycosylhydrolase family GH30) and then applied it to non-homologous (putative) retaining β-glucosidases categorized in GH1 and GH116: GBA2, GBA3, and LPH. The described method is highly sensitive, requiring only femtomoles (nanograms) of ABP-labeled enzymes.

  8. Pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid homologues: effect of ring size on hybridization properties.

    PubMed

    Mansawat, Woraluk; Vilaivan, Chotima; Balázs, Árpád; Aitken, David J; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2012-03-16

    The effect of ring size of four- to six-membered cyclic β-amino acid on the hybridization properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid with an alternating α/β peptide backbone is reported. The cyclobutane derivatives (acbcPNA) show the highest T(m) and excellent specificity with cDNA and RNA.

  9. A comparative IR characterization of acidic sites on HY zeolite by pyridine and CO probes with silica-alumina and γ-alumina references.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Junko N; Nishitani, Ryoko; Yoda, Eisuke; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Tatsumi, Takashi; Domen, Kazunari

    2010-10-07

    Using IR spectroscopy, three different surface states of HY zeolite were probed by successive adsorption of CO at 143 K followed by evacuation and pyridine adsorption at 523 K: HY zeolite [1] without strong Lewis acid sites (LAS); [2] after high temperature (873 K) evacuation to convert Brønsted acid sites (BAS) to strong LAS; and [3] after water re-adsorption on HY zeolite [2] to recover BAS from LAS. The original surface of HY zeolite [1] seemed to be recovered on HY zeolite [3] after high temperature evacuation and water treatment by CO adsorption, while a part of generated LAS on HY zeolite [2] seemed irreversible on HY zeolite [3] to HY zeolite [1] by pyridine adsorption. To clarify this discrepancy, re-examination of the IR spectra of adsorbed CO and pyridine on γ-alumina and silica-alumina after similar treatments to those on HY zeolite was conducted. Based on the results of CO adsorption on γ-alumina and silica-alumina, the presence of extra-framework aluminium sites on HY zeolite [1] was confirmed. High temperature evacuation of HY zeolite [1] formed very strong LAS, a part of which was irreversible to BAS by water re-adsorption at room temperature. The irreversible sites on HY zeolite [3] were assigned to non-acidic OH groups attributed to silica-alumina. The non-acidic OH groups on HY zeolite [3], which were BAS on HY zeolite [1], hydrogen-bonded to pyridine to show IR spectra similar to those adsorbed on LAS. Thus, LAS on HY zeolite [3] seemed irreversible by pyridine adsorption after water re-adsorption. On the other hand, CO adsorbed on non-acidic OH groups showed a band at only slightly lower frequency (2160 cm(-1)) than that of BAS (2178 cm(-1)), resulting in overlapps and ignoring their presence. Thus, CO adsorption seemed to show that complete recovery of LAS to BAS occurred.

  10. Disrupting Protein Expression with Peptide Nucleic Acids Reduces Infection by Obligate Intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Pelc, Rebecca S.; McClure, Jennifer C.; Kaur, Simran J.; Sears, Khandra T.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Ceraul, Shane M.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) are single-stranded synthetic nucleic acids with a pseudopeptide backbone in lieu of the phosphodiester linked sugar and phosphate found in traditional oligos. PNA designed complementary to the bacterial Shine-Dalgarno or start codon regions of mRNA disrupts translation resulting in the transient reduction in protein expression. This study examines the use of PNA technology to interrupt protein expression in obligate intracellular Rickettsia sp. Their historically intractable genetic system limits characterization of protein function. We designed PNA targeting mRNA for rOmpB from Rickettsia typhi and rickA from Rickettsia montanensis, ubiquitous factors important for infection. Using an in vitro translation system and competitive binding assays, we determined that our PNAs bind target regions. Electroporation of R. typhi and R. montanensis with PNA specific to rOmpB and rickA, respectively, reduced the bacteria’s ability to infect host cells. These studies open the possibility of using PNA to suppress protein synthesis in obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:25781160

  11. Single glass nanopore-based regenerable sensing platforms with a non-immobilized polyglutamic acid probe for selective detection of cupric ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lizhen; He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-08-19

    A single glass capillary nanopore-based sensing platform for rapid and selective detection of cupric ions is demonstrated by utilizing polyglutamic acid (PGA) as a non-immobilized probe. The detection is based on the significant decrease of ionic current through nanopore and the reversal of ion current rectification responses induced by the chelated cupric ions on the probes when in the presence of cupric ions. PGA shows high selectivity for detecting cupric ions rather than other metal ions. The sensitivity of the sensing platform can be improved about 1-2 orders of magnitude by employing asymmetric salt gradients during the measurements. And the PGA-based nanopore sensing platform shows excellent regenerability for Cu(2+) sensing applications. In addition, the method is found effective and reliable for the detection of cupric ions in real samples with small volume down to 20 μL. This nanopore-based sensing platform will find promising practical applications for the detection of cupric ions.

  12. Probing metal ion complexation with salicylic acid and its derivatives with excited state proton transfer and luminescence anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Friedrich, D.M.; Ainsworth, C.C.

    1996-10-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivatives in which the phenolic proton is preserved show a characteristic dual fluorescence: one band in the UV, due to a {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} excited state emission, and the other in the visible range, is assigned to excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The transition energy, quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime as well as fluorescence anisotropy are sensitive to the solvent environment, temperature and properties of the substituents (complexation) at the phenolic and carboxylic oxygens. The ESIPT band disappears in molecules in which the intramolecular hydrogen bond between phenolic hydrogen and the carbonyl oxygen is prohibited. In this work, the complexation of Na(I), Ca(II), Al(III) and La(III) with salicylic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, methylsalicylate and anisic acid in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents has been studied by absorption and steady state luminescence spectroscopy, picosecond to nanosecond luminescence lifetimes and luminescence anisotropy measurements in a range of solvent and in ethanol at 77 K. Speciation in these complex systems, binding characteristics between the metal ion and the ligand, and ligand-centered energetics are discussed in terms of the spectroscopic properties, luminescence and anisotropy decay kinetics.

  13. Probing thermal stability of the β-lactoglobulin-oleic acid complex by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simion (Ciuciu), Ana-Maria; Aprodu, Iuliana; Dumitrașcu, Loredana; Bahrim, Gabriela Elena; Alexe, Petru; Stănciuc, Nicoleta

    2015-09-01

    Bovine β-lactoglobulin is able to interact with different bioactive compounds, thus being an important candidate in the development of delivery systems with improved functionality. The heat induced changes in the β-lactoglobulin-oleic acid complex were examined by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy results indicated a rigid protein structure in the temperature range 25-70 °C, whereas at temperatures over 75 °C, the rearrangements of the polypeptide chains led to higher exposure of hydrophobic residues. The most significant increase of the accessible surface area with temperature increase was identified in case of Tyr99 and Tyr102. The phase diagram method indicated an all or none transition between two conformations. Due to conformational changes, no contact between Ile56 or Lys60 and the fatty acid could be identified at 85 °C, but new non-bonding interaction were established with Ile12 and Val15. The results obtained in this study provide important details about thermal induced changes in the conformation of β-lactoglobulin-oleic acid complex. Significant conformational changes were registered above 75 °C, suggesting the possibility of obtaining highly functional complexes between whey proteins and natural unsaturated fatty acids.

  14. Probing High School Students' Cognitive Structures and Key Areas of Learning Difficulties on Ethanoic Acid Using the Flow Map Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Qing; Wang, Tingting; Zheng, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was primarily to explore high school students' cognitive structures and to identify their learning difficulties on ethanoic acid through the flow map method. The subjects of this study were 30 grade 1 students from Dong Yuan Road Senior High School in Xi'an, China. The interviews were conducted a week after the students…

  15. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  16. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  17. Probing pH and pressure effects on the apomyoglobin heme pocket with the 2'-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-naphthoyl-4-trans-cyclohexanoic acid fluorophore.

    PubMed Central

    Sire, O; Alpert, B; Royer, C A

    1996-01-01

    The environmentally sensitive fluorophore 2'-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-naphthoyl-4-trans-cyclohexanoic acid (DANCA) has been used to probe the apomyoglobin heme pocket. The unexpected polarity of this domain is generally interpreted as arising from dynamic dipolar relaxation of the peptide dipoles surrounding the heme pocket. In the present work we reexamine the photophysical properties of DANCA in a variety of solvents and complexed with apomyoglobin (apoMb) to further probe the heme pocket environment as a function of external solvent conditions. Absorption and excitation spectra in a number of solvents are consistent with the well-known pi*<--pi (LE) and pi*<--n (CT) electronic absorption transitions observed for naphthylamine derivatives. Dual emission is also a well-documented property of such derivatives. Based on the time scale of the heterogeneity in the decay of the DANCA fluorophore observed in a series of solvents, we propose that the emission properties of DANCA in apoMb are not uniquely attributable to dynamic relaxation events, but also reflect dual emission from both a long-lived, red CT state and the shorter-lived, blue LE state. The pH studies in the range of pH 5-9 of the emission properties of DANCA in apoMb support this hypothesis. They also suggest a specific interaction of DANCA with one or both of the pocket histidyl residues, which leads to a drastic static quenching and red shift of the bound DANCA fluorescence upon protonation. Similar effects are observed with increasing pressure, indicating that these two perturbations alter the DANCA-apoMb complex in a similar fashion. The pressure-induced form of the protein is distinct both energetically and structurally from the previously characterized acid intermediate, in that it is populated above pH 5 and retains a significant degree of integrity of the heme pocket. PMID:8744328

  18. Development of a peptide nucleic acid polymerase chain reaction clamping assay for semiquantitative evaluation of genetically modified organism content in food.

    PubMed

    Peano, C; Lesignoli, F; Gulli, M; Corradini, R; Samson, M C; Marchelli, R; Marmiroli, N

    2005-09-15

    In the present study a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamping method was developed and applied to the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO), to test PCR products for band identity and to obtain a semiquantitative evaluation of GMO content. The minimal concentration of PNA necessary to block the PCR was determined by comparing PCRs containing a constant amount of DNA in the presence of increasing concentration of target-specific PNA. The lowest PNA concentration at which specific inhibition took place, by the inhibition of primer extension and/or steric hindrance, was the most efficient condition. Optimization of PCR clamping by PNA was observed by testing five different PNAs with a minimum of 13 bp to a maximum of 15 bp, designed on the target sequence of Roundup Ready soybean. The results obtained on the DNA extracted from Roundup Ready soybean standard flour were verified also on DNA extracted from standard flours of maize GA21, Bt176, Bt11, and MON810. A correlation between the PNA concentration necessary for inducing PCR clamping and the percentage of the GMO target sequence in the sample was found.

  19. A new dual-channel optical signal probe for Cu2+ detection based on morin and boric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yuan, Bin Fang; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2014-01-01

    In this work we utilized the common analytical reagent morin to develop a new a dual-channel, cost-effective, and sensitive method for determination of Cu(2+). It is found that morin is only weakly fluorescent by itself, but forms highly fluorescent complexes with boric acid. Moreover, the fluorescence of complexes of morin with boric acid is quenched linearly by Cu(2+) in a certain concentration range. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence quenching efficiency was linearly proportional to the concentration of cupric ions in the range of 0.5-25 μM with high sensitivity, and the detection limit for Cu(2+) was 0.38 μM. The linear range was 1-25 μM determined by spectrophotometry, and the detection limit for cupric ions was 0.8 μM. Furthermore, the mechanism of sensitive fluorescence quenching response of morin to Cu(2+) is discussed.

  20. Probing the "additive effect" in the proline and proline hydroxamic acid catalyzed asymmetric addition of nitroalkanes to cyclic enones.

    PubMed

    Hanessian, Stephen; Govindan, Subramaniyan; Warrier, Jayakumar S

    2005-11-01

    The effect of chirality and steric bulk of 2,5-disubstituted piperazines as additives in the conjugate addition of 2-nitropropane to cyclohexenone, catalyzed by l-proline, was investigated. Neither chirality nor steric bulk affects the enantioselectivity of addition, which gives 86-93% ee in the presence of achiral and chiral nonracemic 2,5-disubstituted piperazines. Proline hydroxamic acid is shown for the first time to be an effective organocatalyst in the same Michael reaction.

  1. PNA-Based Multivalent Scaffolds Activate the Dopamine D2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid scaffolds represent a promising tool to interrogate the multivalent effects of ligand binding to a membrane receptor. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) are a class of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the formation of higher-ordered structures of these receptors has been associated with the progression of several neurological diseases. In this Letter, we describe the synthesis of a library of ligand-modified PNAs bearing a known D2R agonist, (±)-PPHT. The D2R activity for each construct was assessed, and the multivalent effects were evaluated. PMID:25893044

  2. Stability of free and mineral-protected nucleic acids: Implications for the RNA world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swadling, Jacob B.; Coveney, Peter V.; Christopher Greenwell, H.

    2012-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the structural stability of three different nucleic acids intercalated within a magnesium aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) mineral, at varying degrees of hydration, and free in aqueous solution. The nucleotides investigated are ribose nucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA), all in duplex form. Our simulations show that DNA has enhanced Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonding when intercalated within the LDH clay interlayers, compared with intercalated RNA and PNA, whilst the reverse trend is found for the nucleic acids in bulk water. The tendency for LDH to alter the stability of the three nucleic acids persists for higher temperature and pressure conditions. The uncharged protein backbone of PNA is found to have a detrimental effect on the overall stability of the duplex, as it experiences a greatly reduced electrostatic interaction with the charged LDH sheets compared to RNA and DNA. Assuming an RNA world, in which RNA preceded the DNA/protein world, at some point in time DNA must have taken over the role as the information storage molecule from RNA. These results suggest that a mineral based origin of life may have favoured DNA as the information-storage biomolecule over potentially competing RNA and PNA, providing a route to modern biology from the RNA world.

  3. Probing the chemical mechanism and critical regulatory amino acid residues of Drosophila melanogaster arylalkylamine N-acyltransferase like 2.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Daniel R; Carpenter, Anne-Marie; Ospina, Santiago Rodriguez; Merkler, David J

    2015-11-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acyltransferase like 2 (AANATL2) catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylalkylamides from the corresponding acyl-CoA and arylalkylamine. The N-acylation of biogenic amines in Drosophila melanogaster is a critical step for the inactivation of neurotransmitters, cuticle sclerotization, and melatonin biosynthesis. In addition, D. melanogaster has been used as a model system to evaluate the biosynthesis of fatty acid amides: a family of potent cell signaling lipids. We have previously showed that AANATL2 catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylakylamides, including long-chain N-acylserotonins and N-acyldopamines. Herein, we define the kinetic mechanism for AANATL2 as an ordered sequential mechanism with acetyl-CoA binding first followed by tyramine to generate the ternary complex prior to catalysis. Bell shaped kcat,app - acetyl-CoA and (kcat/Km)app - acetyl-CoA pH-rate profiles identified two apparent pKa,app values of ∼7.4 and ∼8.9 that are critical to catalysis, suggesting the AANATL2-catalyzed formation of N-acetyltyramine occurs through an acid/base chemical mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved glutamate that corresponds to the catalytic base for other D. melanogaster AANATL enzymes did not produce a substantial depression in the kcat,app value nor did it abolish the pKa,app value attributed to the general base in catalysis (pKa ∼7.4). These data suggest that AANATL2 catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylalkylamides using either different catalytic residues or a different chemical mechanism relative to other D. melanogaster AANATL enzymes. In addition, we constructed other site-directed mutants of AANATL2 to help define the role of targeted amino acids in substrate binding and/or enzyme catalysis.

  4. Folic acid-targeted magnetic Tb-doped CeF3 fluorescent nanoparticles as bimodal probes for cellular fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-Ya; Liu, Yu-Ping; Bai, Ling-Yu; An, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Xuan, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2015-10-07

    Magnetic fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential applications for diagnostics, imaging and therapy. We developed a facile polyol method to synthesize multifunctional Fe3O4@CeF3:Tb@CeF3 NPs with small size (<20 nm), high water solubility and good biocompatibility. The NPs were modified by ligand exchange reactions with citric acid (CA) to obtain carboxyl-functionalized NPs (Fe3O4@CeF3:Tb@CeF3-COOH). Folic acid (FA) as an affinity ligand was then covalently conjugated onto NPs to yield Fe3O4@CeF3:Tb@CeF3-FA NPs. They were then applied as multimodal imaging agents for simultaneous in vitro targeted fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of HeLa cells with overexpressed folate receptors (FR). The results indicated that these NPs had strong luminescence and enhanced T2-weighted MR contrast and would be promising candidates as multimodal probes for both fluorescence and MRI imaging.

  5. Probing of the combined effect of bisquaternary ammonium antimicrobial agents and acetylsalicylic acid on model phospholipid membranes: differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry studies.

    PubMed

    Kasian, N A; Pashynska, V A; Vashchenko, O V; Krasnikova, A O; Gömöry, A; Kosevich, M V; Lisetski, L N

    2014-12-01

    A model molecular biosystem of hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers that mimics cell biomembranes is used to probe combined membranotropic effects of drugs by instrumental techniques of molecular biophysics. Differential scanning calorimetry reveals that doping of the DPPC model membrane with individual bisquaternary ammonium compounds (BQAC) decamethoxinum, ethonium, thionium and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) leads to lowering of the membrane melting temperature (Tm) pointing to membrane fluidization. Combined application of the basic BQAC and acidic ASA causes an opposite effect on Tm (increase), corresponding to the membrane densification. Thus, modulation of the membranotropic effects upon combined use of the drugs studied can be revealed at the level of model membranes. Formation of noncovalent supramolecular complexes of the individual BQACs and ASA with DPPC molecules, which may be involved in the mechanism of the drug-membrane interaction at the molecular level, is demonstrated by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry. In the ternary (DPPC + ASA + BQAC) model systems, the stable complexes of the BQAC dication with the ASA anion, which may be responsible for modulation of the membranotropic effects of the drugs, were recorded by ESI mass spectrometry. The proposed approach can be further developed for preliminary evaluation of the combined effects of the drugs at the level of model lipid membranes prior to tests on living organisms.

  6. Probing the Active Site of MIO-dependent Aminomutases, Key Catalysts in the Biosynthesis of amino Acids Incorporated in Secondary Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.; Bruner, S

    2010-01-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-{beta}-tyrosine from L-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been limited reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated intermediates to form {beta}-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray cocrystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with L-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis.

  7. Investigation of Humidity Dependent Surface Morphology and Proton Conduction in Multi-Acid Side Chain Membranes by Conductive Probe Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Economou, Nicholas J; Barnes, Austin M; Wheat, Andrew J; Schaberg, Mark S; Hamrock, Steven J; Buratto, Steven K

    2015-11-05

    In this report, we employ phase-contrast tapping mode and conductive probe atomic force microscopy (cp-AFM) as tools to investigate the nanoscale morphology and proton conductance of a 3M perfluoro-imide acid (PFIA) membrane (625 EW) over a large range of relative humidity (3-95% RH). As a point of comparison, we also investigate 3M perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) (825 EW) and Nafion 212. With AFM, we assess the membrane's water retention and mechanical stability at low RH and high RH, respectively. Cp-AFM allows us to spatially resolve the hydrophilic and electrochemically active domains under a similar set of conditions and observe directly the ties between membrane morphology and proton conductance. From our data, we are able to correlate the improved water retention indicated by the size of the hydrophilic domains with the proton conductance in the PFIA membrane at elevated temperature and compare the result with that observed for the PFSA and Nafion. At high RH conditions, we see evidence of a nearly continuous hydrophilic phase, which indicates a high degree of swelling.

  8. Probing Nucleic Acid Interactions and Pre-mRNA Splicing by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Šimková, Eva; Staněk, David

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is a powerful technique routinely used to monitor interactions between biomolecules. Here, we focus on the techniques that are used for investigating the structure and interactions of nucleic acids (NAs). We present a brief overview of the most commonly used FRET microscopy techniques, their advantages and drawbacks. We list experimental approaches recently used for either in vitro or in vivo studies. Next, we summarize how FRET contributed to the understanding of pre-mRNA splicing and spliceosome assembly. PMID:23203103

  9. Amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon biosensor for the specific identification of unamplified nucleic acid sequences using gold nanoparticle probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Rodrigo; Baptista, Pedro; Raniero, Leandro; Doria, Gonçalo; Silva, Leonardo; Franco, Ricardo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2007-01-01

    Amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon pi 'ii'n devices fabricated on micromachined glass substrates are integrated with oligonucleotide-derivatized gold nanoparticles for a colorimetric detection method. The method enables the specific detection and quantification of unamplified nucleic acid sequences (DNA and RNA) without the need to functionalize the glass surface, allowing for resolution of single nucleotide differences between DNA and RNA sequences—single nucleotide polymorphism and mutation detection. The detector's substrate is glass and the sample is directly applied on the back side of the biosensor, ensuring a direct optical coupling of the assays with a concomitant maximum photon capture and the possibility to reuse the sensor.

  10. Characterisation of embroidered 3D electrodes by use of anthraquinone-1,5-disulfonic acid as probe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiló-Aguayo, Noemí; Bechtold, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    New electrode designs are required for electrochemical applications such as batteries or fuel cells. Embroidered 3D Cu porous electrodes with a geometric surface of 100 cm2 are presented and characterised by means of the anthraquinone-1,5-disfulfonic acid (AQDS2-) redox system in alkaline solution. The electrochemical behaviour of the 3D electrode is established by the comparison of cyclic voltammetry responses using a micro cell and a 100 cm2 plane Cu-plate electrode. Dependencies of the peak currents and peak-to-peak potential separation on scan rate and AQDS2- concentration are studied. The AQDS2- characterisation is also performed by means of spectroelectrochemical experiments.

  11. Optimization of the Alkyl Linker of TO Base Surrogate in Triplex-Forming PNA for Enhanced Binding to Double-Stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takaya; Sato, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Seiichi

    2017-03-23

    A series of triplex-forming peptide nucleic acid (TFP) probes carrying a thiazole orange (TO) base surrogate through an alkyl linker was synthesized, and the interactions between these so-called tFIT probes and purine-rich sequences within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were examined. We found that the TO base surrogate linker significantly affected both the binding affinity and the fluorescence response upon triplex formation with the target dsRNA. Among the probes examined, the TO base surrogate connected through the propyl linker in the tFIT probes increased the binding affinity by a factor of ten while maintaining its function as the fluorescent universal base. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed that the increased binding affinity resulted from the gain in the binding enthalpy, which could be explained by the enhanced π-stacking interaction between the TO base surrogate and the dsRNA part of the triplex. We expect that these results will provide a molecular basis for designing strong binding tFIT probes for fluorescence sensing of various kinds of purine-rich dsRNAs sequences including those carrying a pyrimidine-purine inversion. The obtained data also offers a new insight into further development of the universal bases incorporated in TFP.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of a peptide nucleic acid conjugated to a D-peptide analog of insulin-like growth factor 1 for increased cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Basu, S; Wickstrom, E

    1997-01-01

    DNA therapeutics show great potential for gene-specific, nontoxic therapy of a wide variety of diseases. The deoxyribose phosphate backbone of DNA has been modified in a number of ways to improve nuclease stability and cell membrane permeability. Recently, a new DNA derivative with an amide backbone instead of a deoxyribose phosphate backbone, peptide nucleic acid (PNA), has shown tremendous potential as an antisense agent. Although PNAs hybridize very strongly and specifically to RNA and DNA, they are taken up by cells very poorly, limiting their potential as nucleic acid binding agents. To improve cellular uptake of a PNA sequence, it was conjugated to a D-amino acid analog of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), which binds selectively to the cell surface receptor for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1R). The IGF1 D-peptide analog was assembled on (4-methylbenzhydryl)amine resin, and then the PNA was extended as a continuation of the peptide. The conjugate and control sequences were radiolabeled with 14C or fluorescently labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Cellular uptake of the PNA-peptide conjugate, a control with two alanines in the peptide, and a control PNA without the peptide segment were studied in murine BALB/c 3T3 cells, which express low levels of murine IGF1R, in p6 cells, which are BALB/c 3T3 cells which overexpress a transfected human IGF1R gene, and in human Jurkat cells, which do not express IGF1R, as a negative control. The specific PNA-peptide conjugate displayed much higher uptake than the control PNA, but only in cells expressing IGF1R. This approach may allow cell-specific and tissue-specific application of PNAs as gene-regulating agents in vivo.

  13. A novel magnetic field probing technique for determining state of health of sealed lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Neeta; Singh, Pritpal; Vassiliou, John K.

    2012-11-01

    State of Health (SOH) is a critical index for a Sealed Lead-Acid (SLA) battery diagnostic which provides the information about battery replacement and aging effects. SOH is a complex function of chemical parameters of a battery such as stratification in electrolyte, electrode structure (sulfation and hard sulfation) in addition to electrical parameters of a battery. This paper describes a method of online determination of stratification, electrode structure, electrode polarization and current profile within the battery under the influence of a magnetic field. An AC magnetic field is used as a noninvasive tool during battery cycles. An induced emf in a secondary coil (SCV) is used as a measure of change in the magnetic field. The H+ proton density varies with change in sulfuric acid (electrolyte) concentration during battery cycles. The magnetic flux lines are affected by the density of H+ protons whose magnetic dipole moments try to align along the magnetic flux lines. The stratification is seen by a 12% decrease in magnetic flux linking from the top to the bottom of the electrolyte in a battery. Additional experimental results demonstrate the variation in magnetic flux linking which correlates with current profile across the electrode and electrode structure.

  14. Molecular dynamics approach to probe the allosteric inhibition of PTP1B by chlorogenic and cichoric acid.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Sarath Kumar; Goswami, Nabajyoti; Selvaraj, Sudhagar; Muthusamy, Velusamy Shanmuganathan; Lakshmi, Baddireddi Subhadra

    2012-08-27

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a major negative regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathway, is a potential target for therapeutic intervention against diabetes and obesity. The recent discovery of an allosteric site in PTP1B has created an alternate strategy in the development of PTP1B targeted therapy. The current study investigates the molecular interactions between the allosteric site of PTP1B with two caffeoyl derivatives, chlorogenic acid (CGA) and cichoric acid (CHA), using computational strategies. Molecular docking analysis with CGA and CHA at the allosteric site of PTP1B were performed and the resulting protein-ligand complexes used for molecular dynamics simulation studies for a time scale of 10 ns. Results show stable binding of CGA and CHA at the allosteric site of PTP1B. The flexibility of the WPD loop was observed to be constrained by CGA and CHA in the open (inactive), providing molecular mechanism of allosteric inhibition. The allosteric inhibition of CGA and CHA of PTP1B was shown to be favorable due to no restriction by the α-7 helix in the binding of CGA and CHA at the allosteric binding site. In conclusion, our results exhibit an inhibitory pattern of CGA and CHA against PTP1B through potent binding at the allosteric site.

  15. Using rumen probes to examine effects of conjugated linoleic acids and dietary concentrate proportion on rumen pH and rumen temperature of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Petzold, M; Meyer, U; Spilke, J; Dänicke, S

    2014-08-01

    The study aimed to examine the influence of supplemented conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) to periparturient cows receiving different concentrate proportions antepartum on rumen pH (RpH) and rumen temperature (RT). Twenty pregnant German Holstein cows were equipped with rumen probes for continuous RpH and RT measurement in a frequency of 15 min to investigate effects of dietary concentrate and CLA around parturition and the impact of parturition itself on RpH and RT. Cows had ad libitum access to partial mixed rations, 3 weeks prior to calving until day 7 post-partum. Antepartum, cows received 100 g/day control fat (CON) or CLA supplement, either in low (20%; CON-20, CLA-20) or high concentrate diet (60%; CON-60, CLA-60). Post-partum, concentrate proportion was adjusted to 50% while fat supplementation continued. Compared with adapted feeding, high concentrate proportions antepartum tended to increase DMI and reduced RpH. Groups CON-60 and CLA-60 spent more than 4 h per day below RpH 5.6 during late pregnancy, indicating the presence of subacute rumen acidosis (SARA). The RT remained unaffected antepartum. Before calving, cows spent less time below RpH 5.6 and SARA could be detected in each group post-partum. Mean RpH increased slightly antepartum, whereas few hours before parturition a sharp decrease in RpH could be observed, accompanied with increased RT. Overall, it seems that CLA supplementation influences RpH and RT. Bearing in mind that rumen parameters fluctuate during day and herd level must be known, rumen probes for continuous RpH and RT measurement could be a useful management tool for animal health surveillance and may also help to predict parturition.

  16. Mn-doped ZnS quantum dot imbedded two-fragment imprinting silica for enhanced room temperature phosphorescence probing of domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Dan, Li; Wang, He-Fang

    2013-05-21

    A novel strategy was presented to construct the enhanced molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-based room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) probe by combining the RTP of Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (Mn-ZnS QDs) and two-fragment imprinting. Two fragments or structurally similar parts of the target analytes were used as the dummy templates. Polyethyleneimine capped Mn-ZnS (PEI-Mn-ZnS) QDs, offering the binding sites to interact with the carboxyl groups of templates, were imbedded into MIPs by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The rebinding of the target analytes to their fragments' cavities (recognition sites) modulated the selective aggregation of Mn-ZnS QDs in QDs-MIPs and resulted in the RTP enhancement. This new method was suitable for the selective enhanced RTP detection of nonphosphorescent analytes without any derivatization and inducers. The proposed methodology was applied to construct the high selective enhanced MIP-based RTP probe for domoic acid (DA) detection. The RTP enhancement of two-fragment imprinting silica was about 2 times of one-fragment imprinting silica and 4 times of the nonimprinting silica. The two-fragment imprinting silica exhibited the linear RTP enhancement to DA in the range of 0.25-3.5 μM in buffer and 0.25-1.5 μM in shellfish sample. The precision for 11 replicate detections of 1.25 μM DA was 0.65% (RSD), and the limit of detection was 67 nM in buffer and 2.0 μg g(-1) wet weight (w/w) in shellfish sample.

  17. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Krawack, Franziska; Walda, Claudia; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Jacob, Anette; Hain, Torsten; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA). Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF)3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function. PMID:24193033

  18. Germinal Center Marker GL7 Probes Activation-Dependent Repression of N-Glycolylneuraminic Acid, a Sialic Acid Species Involved in the Negative Modulation of B-Cell Activation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuko; Takematsu, Hiromu; Koyama, Susumu; Miyake, Shizu; Yamamoto, Harumi; Fujinawa, Reiko; Sugai, Manabu; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Sialic acid (Sia) is a family of acidic nine-carbon sugars that occupies the nonreducing terminus of glycan chains. Diversity of Sia is achieved by variation in the linkage to the underlying sugar and modification of the Sia molecule. Here we identified Sia-dependent epitope specificity for GL7, a rat monoclonal antibody, to probe germinal centers upon T cell-dependent immunity. GL7 recognizes sialylated glycan(s), the α2,6-linked N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) on a lactosamine glycan chain(s), in both Sia modification- and Sia linkage-dependent manners. In mouse germinal center B cells, the expression of the GL7 epitope was upregulated due to the in situ repression of CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah), the enzyme responsible for Sia modification of Neu5Ac to Neu5Gc. Such Cmah repression caused activation-dependent dynamic reduction of CD22 ligand expression without losing α2,6-linked sialylation in germinal centers. The in vivo function of Cmah was analyzed using gene-disrupted mice. Phenotypic analyses showed that Neu5Gc glycan functions as a negative regulator for B-cell activation in assays of T-cell-independent immunization response and splenic B-cell proliferation. Thus, Neu5Gc is required for optimal negative regulation, and the reaction is specifically suppressed in activated B cells, i.e., germinal center B cells. PMID:17296732

  19. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA using triple helix-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are attractive targets for molecular recognition because of the central role they play in gene expression. Since most noncoding RNAs are in a double-helical conformation, recognition of such structures is a formidable problem. Herein, we describe a method for sequence-selective recognition of biologically relevant double-helical RNA (illustrated on ribosomal A-site RNA) using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) that form a triple helix in the major grove of RNA under physiologically relevant conditions. Protocols for PNA preparation and binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry are described in detail.

  20. Site-Selective Binding of Nanoparticles to Double-Stranded DNA via Peptide Nucleic Acid "Invasion"

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, A.L.; van der Lelie, D.; Sun, D.; Maye, M. M.; Gang, O.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for by-design placement of nano-objects along double-stranded (ds) DNA. A molecular intercalator, designed as a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA chimera, is able to invade dsDNA at the PNA-side due to the hybridization specificity between PNA and one of the duplex strands. At the same time, the single-stranded (ss) DNA tail of the chimera, allows for anchoring of nano-objects that have been functionalized with complementary ssDNA. The developed method is applied for interparticle attachment and for the fabrication of particle clusters using a dsDNA template. This method significantly broadens the molecular toolbox for constructing nanoscale systems by including the most conventional not yet utilized DNA motif, double helix DNA.

  1. A Comprehensive Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation to Probe the Interaction of Antineoplastic Drug Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid with Serum Albumins.

    PubMed

    Nusrat, Saima; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Zaidi, Nida; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Alam, Parvez; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous drugs that are used as antidote against chemotheray, inflammation or viral infection, gets absorbed and interacts reversibly to the major serum transport protein i.e. albumins, upon entering the circulatory system. To have a structural guideline in the rational drug designing and in the synthesis of drugs with greater efficacy, the binding mechanism of an antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory drug Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) with human and bovine serum albumins (HSA & BSA) were examined by spectroscopic and computational methods. NDGA binds to site II of HSA with binding constant (Kb) ~105 M-1 and free energy (ΔG) ~ -7.5 kcal.mol-1. It also binds at site II of BSA but with lesser binding affinity (Kb) ~105 M-1 and ΔG ~ -6.5 kcal.mol-1. The negative value of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for both the albumins at three different temperatures confirmed that the complex formation process between albumins and NDGA is spontaneous and exothermic. Furthermore, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions are the main forces involved in complex formation of NDGA with both the albumins as evaluated from fluorescence and molecular docking results. Binding of NDGA to both the albumins alter the conformation and causes minor change in the secondary structure of proteins as indicated by the CD spectra.

  2. Preparation of Au Nanoclusters-Modified Polylactic Acid Fiber with Bright Red Fluorescence and its Use as Sensing Probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenli; Li, Huili; Wan, Ajun; Liu, Lanbo

    2017-01-01

    In present work, the Au nanoclusters-modified polylactic acid fiber (PLA-Au NCs) with bright red fluorescence were fabricated by the encapsulation of Au nanoclusters (Au NCs) in the PLA fiber treated with H2O2. The Au25 nanoclusters stabilized by bovine serum albumin (BSA-Au NCs) were prepared via an improved "green" synthetic routine. With pretreatment of the PLA fiber in H2O2 concentration of 12 and 18 %, the as-prepared PLA-Au NCs exhibited brighter red emission with a strong peak centered at ~640 nm than BSA-Au NCs. The fluorescence can be quenched by nitric oxide (NO). A good linear relationship between the relative fluorescence quenching intensity of the as-prepared PLA-Au NCs and the concentration of NO can be obtained in the range of 0.0732 to 0.7320 mM, and the detection limit was 0.0070 mM.

  3. A Comprehensive Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation to Probe the Interaction of Antineoplastic Drug Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid with Serum Albumins

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Saima; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Zaidi, Nida; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Alam, Parvez; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous drugs that are used as antidote against chemotheray, inflammation or viral infection, gets absorbed and interacts reversibly to the major serum transport protein i.e. albumins, upon entering the circulatory system. To have a structural guideline in the rational drug designing and in the synthesis of drugs with greater efficacy, the binding mechanism of an antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory drug Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) with human and bovine serum albumins (HSA & BSA) were examined by spectroscopic and computational methods. NDGA binds to site II of HSA with binding constant (Kb) ~105 M-1 and free energy (ΔG) ~ -7.5 kcal.mol-1. It also binds at site II of BSA but with lesser binding affinity (Kb) ~105 M-1 and ΔG ~ -6.5 kcal.mol-1. The negative value of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for both the albumins at three different temperatures confirmed that the complex formation process between albumins and NDGA is spontaneous and exothermic. Furthermore, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions are the main forces involved in complex formation of NDGA with both the albumins as evaluated from fluorescence and molecular docking results. Binding of NDGA to both the albumins alter the conformation and causes minor change in the secondary structure of proteins as indicated by the CD spectra. PMID:27391941

  4. A novel turn-on fluorescent strategy for sensing ascorbic acid using graphene quantum dots as fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Na, Weidan; Liu, Ziping; Chen, Xueqian; Su, Xingguang

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, a facile and rapid fluorescence turn-on assay for fluorescent detection of ascorbic acid (AA) was developed by using the orange emission graphene quantum dots (GQDs). In the presence of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), catechol can be oxidized by hydroxyl radicals and converted to o-benzoquinone, which can significantly quench the fluorescence of GQDs. However, when AA present in the system, it can consume part of H2O2 and hydroxyl radicals to inhibit the generation of o-benzoquinone, resulting in fluorescence recovery. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of H2O2 in the range of 3.33-500µM with a detection limit of 1.2µM. The linear detection for AA was in the range from 1.11 to 300µM with a detection limit of 0.32µM. The proposed method was applied to the determination of AA in human serum samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Sulphonic acid derivatives as probes of pore properties of volume-regulated anion channels in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Droogmans, G; Maertens, C; Prenen, J; Nilius, B

    1999-09-01

    1. We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the effects of 4-sulphonic-calixarenes and some other poly-sulphonic acid agents, such as suramin and basilen blue, on volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) currents in cultured endothelial cells (CPAE cells). 2. The 4-sulphonic-calixarenes induced a fast inhibition at positive potentials but were ineffective at negative potentials. At small positive potentials, 4-sulphonic-calix[4]arene was a more effective inhibitor than 4-sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene, which became more effective at more positive potentials. 3. Also suramin and basilen blue induced a voltage dependent current inhibition, reaching a maximum around +40 mV and declining at more positive potentials. 4. The voltage dependence of inhibition was modelled by assuming that these negatively charged molecules bind to a site inside VRAC that senses a fraction delta of the applied electrical field, ranging beween 0.16 to 0.32. 4-Sulphonic-calix[4]arene, suramin and basilen blue bind and occlude VRAC at moderate potentials, but permeate the channel at more positive potentials. 4-Sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene however do not permeate the channel. From the structural information of the calixarenes, we estimate a lower and upper limit of 11*12 and 17*12 A2 respectively for the cross-sectional area of the pore.

  6. Molecularly imprinted ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-Based electrochemiluminescence sensing probe for sensitive detection of perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sihua; Li, Aimin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2015-10-08

    Driven by the urgent demand for the determination of low level perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) present in environment, a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor has been first developed for the detection of PFOA using the molecularly imprinted polypyrrole modified two-dimensional ultrathin g-C3N4 (utg-C3N4) nanosheets as a cathodic ECL emitter with S2O8(2-) as coreactant. The prepared molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) functionalized utg-C3N4 nanosheets (MIP@utg-C3N4) exhibit a stable and significantly amplified ECL signal. It is found that the targets of PFOA could be efficiently oxidized by the electro-generated strong oxidants of SO4(-) (from the reduction of coreactant S2O8(2-)), thus leading to a low yield of the excited utg-C3N4 (g-C3N4*) and finally a decrease in ECL signal. Based on this, a highly sensitive and selective MIP@utg-C3N4-based signal-off ECL sensor is developed for sensing PFOA. Such a newly designed ECL sensor exhibits highly linear over the PFOA concentration in two ranges, from 0.02 to 40.0 ng mL(-1) and 50.0-400.0 ng mL(-1). The detection limit (S/N = 3) is estimated to be 0.01 ng mL(-1) (i.e. 0.01 ppb), comparable to the results obtained by using well-established liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Toward practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay was successfully applied to measure PFOA in real water samples, showing fine applicability for the detection of PFOA in real samples.

  7. Probing the role of lysine 16 in ras p[sup 21] protein with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.H.; Benson, D.R.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-07-14

    Mamalian proteins encoded by the ras gene are thought to function as regulators of various signal transduction processes involved in cell growth and differentiation. The chemical basis for the regulation is cycling of the protein between the inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound state and the active guanosine triphophate (GTP)-bound state. Loop 1 of ras contains the GXXXXGK(S/T) motif (residues 10-17), which is found in all ras-related proteins, G proteins, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. Structural and biochemical studies have suggested that Lys 16 of loop 1 is critical for substrate binding and catalysis. The [epsilon]-amino group is involved in ion pair interactions with the [Beta]-and [gamma]-phosphates of GTP and forms hydrogen bonds with the main-chain oxygens of Gly 10 and Ala 11. In order to better understand the role of the key residue in ras function, we have replaced Lys 16 with a number of unnatural amino acid analogues, including (aminoethyl)cysteine, (hydroxyethyl)cysteine, (aminoethyl)homocysteine, and ornithine. We were surprised to find that the [open quotes]unnatural[close quotes] mutant ras proteins retained high levels of GAP-stimulated GTPase activity and GTP dissociation rates comparable to that of wild-type ras. These results may indicate that, in the GAP-activated form, Lys 16 is not involved in transition-state stabilization or GTP binding. However, replacement of Lys 16 with the isosteric uncharged Lys analogue, (hydroxyethyl)cysteine, led to a complete loss of GAP-stimulated GTPase activity, demonstrating the importance of the charged ammonium side chain. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Using Unnatural Amino Acids to Probe the Energetics of Oxyanion Hole Hydrogen Bonds in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are ubiquitous in enzyme active sites, providing binding interactions and stabilizing charge rearrangements on substrate groups over the course of a reaction. But understanding the origin and magnitude of their catalytic contributions relative to hydrogen bonds made in aqueous solution remains difficult, in part because of complexities encountered in energetic interpretation of traditional site-directed mutagenesis experiments. It has been proposed for ketosteroid isomerase and other enzymes that active site hydrogen bonding groups provide energetic stabilization via “short, strong” or “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds that are formed due to matching of their pKa or proton affinity to that of the transition state. It has also been proposed that the ketosteroid isomerase and other enzyme active sites provide electrostatic environments that result in larger energetic responses (i.e., greater “sensitivity”) to ground-state to transition-state charge rearrangement, relative to aqueous solution, thereby providing catalysis relative to the corresponding reaction in water. To test these models, we substituted tyrosine with fluorotyrosines (F-Tyr’s) in the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) oxyanion hole to systematically vary the proton affinity of an active site hydrogen bond donor while minimizing steric or structural effects. We found that a 40-fold increase in intrinsic F-Tyr acidity caused no significant change in activity for reactions with three different substrates. F-Tyr substitution did not change the solvent or primary kinetic isotope effect for proton abstraction, consistent with no change in mechanism arising from these substitutions. The observed shallow dependence of activity on the pKa of the substituted Tyr residues suggests that the KSI oxyanion hole does not provide catalysis by forming an energetically exceptional pKa-matched hydrogen bond. In addition, the shallow dependence provides no indication of an active site electrostatic

  9. ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles as fluorescent probe for sensing of folic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Dan; Liu, Yanhuan; Li, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A novel fluorescent nanosensor for detecting folic acid (FA) in aqueous media has been developed based on 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (ANTS) anchored to the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-layered double hydroxides (LDH) particles. The nanosensor showed high fluorescence intensity and good photostability due to a strong coordination interaction between surface Zn2+ ions of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH and N atoms of ANTS, which were verified by result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). ANTS-anchored on the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH restricted the intra-molecular rotation leading to ANTS-anchored J-type aggregation emission enhancement. ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles exhibited highly sensitive and selective response to FA over other common metal ions and saccharides present in biological fluids. The proposed mechanism was that oxygen atoms of -SO3 groups in ANTS-anchored on the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH were easily collided by FA molecules to form potential hydrogen bonds between ANTS-anchored and FA molecules, which could effectively quench the ANTS-anchored fluorescence. Under the simulated physiological conditions (pH of 7.4), the fluorescence quenching was fitted to Stern-Volmer equation with a linear response in the concentration range of 1 μM to 200 μM with a limit of detection of 0.1 μM. The results indicate that ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles can afford a very sensitive system for the sensing FA in aqueous solution.

  10. Probing the conformation of a conserved glutamic acid within the Cl(-) pathway of a CLC H(+)/Cl(-) exchanger.

    PubMed

    Vien, Malvin; Basilio, Daniel; Leisle, Lilia; Accardi, Alessio

    2017-04-03

    The CLC proteins form a broad family of anion-selective transport proteins that includes both channels and exchangers. Despite extensive structural, functional, and computational studies, the transport mechanism of the CLC exchangers remains poorly understood. Several transport models have been proposed but have failed to capture all the key features of these transporters. Multiple CLC crystal structures have suggested that a conserved glutamic acid, Gluex, can adopt three conformations and that the interconversion of its side chain between these states underlies H(+)/Cl(-) exchange. One of these states, in which Gluex occupies the central binding site (Scen) while Cl(-) ions fill the internal and external sites (Sint and Sext), has only been observed in one homologue, the eukaryotic cmCLC. The existence of such a state in other CLCs has not been demonstrated. In this study, we find that during transport, the prototypical prokaryotic CLC exchanger, CLC-ec1, adopts a conformation with functional characteristics that match those predicted for a cmCLC-like state, with Gluex trapped in Scen between two Cl(-) ions. Transport by CLC-ec1 is reduced when [Cl(-)] is symmetrically increased on both sides of the membrane and mutations that disrupt the hydrogen bonds stabilizing Gluex in Scen destabilize this trapped state. Furthermore, inhibition of transport by high [Cl(-)] is abolished in the E148A mutant, in which the Gluex side chain is removed. Collectively, our results suggest that, during the CLC transport cycle, Gluex can occupy Scen as well as the Sext position in which it has been captured crystallographically and that hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues that coordinate ion binding to Scen play a role in determining the equilibrium between these two conformations.

  11. Detecting asymptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis in females using the BD ProbeTec™ Trichomonas vaginalis Q(x) nucleic acid amplification test.

    PubMed

    Lord, Emily; Newnham, Tana; Dorrell, Lucy; Jesuthasan, Gerald; Clarke, Lorraine; Jeffery, Katie; Sherrard, Jackie

    2017-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) rates in women are increasing and many are asymptomatic. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are becoming the 'gold standard' for diagnosis. We aimed to establish our asymptomatic TV rates by testing all women attending Oxfordshire's Sexual Health service, regardless of symptoms, using the BD ProbeTec™ TV Q(x) NAATs (BDQ(x)). During BDQ(x)'s verification process, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated using results of 220 endocervical samples from symptomatic women, compared with culture. BDQ(x) was subsequently implemented and prospectively evaluated over 6 months in female attendees. Wet mount microscopy was also performed in symptomatics. Demographic and clinical characteristics of those diagnosed were analysed. From 220 samples tested by BDQ(x) and culture: 5 were positive on both and one solely using BDQ(x), giving a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.53%, respectively. In the prospective cohort, of 5775 BDQ(x) tests, 33 (0.57%) were positive. 11/33 (33%) patients were asymptomatic. All patients diagnosed had risk factors: age >25 years (85%), residence in a deprived area (79%) and black ethnicity (21%). Despite BDQ(x) being highly sensitive and specific, with our low TV prevalence universal screening may not be justified. Targeted screening using local demographic data merits further investigation.

  12. Effect of Glucose on the Fatty Acid Composition of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 during 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degradation: Implications for Lipid-Based Stable Isotope Probing Methods▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Thomas Z.; Dignac, Marie-France; Barriuso, Enrique; Mariotti, André

    2011-01-01

    Combining lipid biomarker profiling with stable isotope probing (SIP) is a powerful technique for studying specific microbial populations responsible for the degradation of organic pollutants in various natural environments. However, the presence of other easily degradable substrates may induce significant physiological changes by altering both the rate of incorporation of the target compound into the biomass and the microbial lipid profiles. In order to test this hypothesis, Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacterium, was incubated with [13C]2,4-D, [13C]glucose, or mixtures of both substrates alternatively labeled with 13C. C. necator JMP134 exhibited a preferential use of 2,4-D over glucose. The isotopic analysis showed that glucose had only a small effect on the incorporation of the acetic chain of 2,4-D into the biomass (at days 2 and 3) and no effect on that of the benzenic ring. The addition of glucose did change the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition. However, the overall FAME isotopic signature reflected that of the entire biomass. Compound-specific individual isotopic analyses of FAME composition showed that the 13C-enriched FAME profiles were slightly or not affected when tracing the 2,4-D acetic chain or 2,4-D benzenic ring, respectively. This batch study is a necessary step for validating the use of lipid-based SIP methods in complex environments. PMID:21856833

  13. Probing the interaction induced conformation transitions in acid phosphatase with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Relation to inhibition and bio-activity of Chlorella vulgaris acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Chao

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the interaction and kinetics of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) with acid phosphatase (ACP) by utilizing diverse range of spectroscopic techniques. The results corroborate, the CoFe2O4 NPs cause fluorescence quenching in ACP by static quenching mechanism. The negative values of van't Hoff thermodynamic expressions (ΔH=-0.3293Jmol(-1)K(-1) and ΔG=-3.960kJmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate the spontaneity and exothermic nature of static quenching. The positive value of ΔS (13.2893Jmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate that major contributors of higher and stronger binding affinity among CoFe2O4 NPs with ACP were electrostatic. In addition, FTIR, UV-CD, UV-vis spectroscopy and three dimensional fluorescence (3D) techniques confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs binding induces microenvironment perturbations leading to secondary and tertiary conformation changes in ACP to a great extent. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) affirmed the comparatively significant changes in microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residue by CoFe2O4 NPs. The effect of CoFe2O4 NPs on the activation kinetics of ACP was further examined in Chlorella vulgaris. Apparent Michaelis constant (Km) values of 0.57 and 26.5mM with activation energy values of 0.538 and 3.428kJmol(-1) were determined without and with 200μM CoFe2O4 NPs. Apparent Vmax value of -7Umml(-1) corroborate that enzyme active sites were completely captured by the NPs leaving no space for the substrate. The results confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs ceased the activity by unfolding of ACP enzyme. This suggests CoFe2O4 NPs perturbed the enzyme activity by transitions in conformation and hence the metabolic activity of ACP. This study provides the pavement for novel and simple approach of using sensitive biomarkers for sensing NPs in environment.

  14. Effects of hypoxanthine substitution in peptide nucleic acids targeting KRAS2 oncogenic mRNA molecules: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jeffrey M; Wampole, Matthew E; Chen, Chang-Po; Sethi, Dalip; Singh, Amrita; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Wang, Fan; Gray, Brian D; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-10-03

    Genetic disorders can arise from single base substitutions in a single gene. A single base substitution for wild type guanine in the twelfth codon of KRAS2 mRNA occurs frequently to initiate lung, pancreatic, and colon cancer. We have observed single base mismatch specificity in radioimaging of mutant KRAS2 mRNA in tumors in mice by in vivo hybridization with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) dodecamers. We hypothesized that multimutant specificity could be achieved with a PNA dodecamer incorporating hypoxanthine, which can form Watson-Crick base pairs with adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we show that hypoxanthine substitutions in PNAs are tolerated in KRAS2 RNA:PNA duplexes where wild type guanine is replaced by mutant uracil or adenine in RNA. To validate our predictions, we synthesized PNA dodecamers with hypoxanthine, and then measured the thermal stability of RNA:PNA duplexes. Circular dichroism thermal melting results showed that hypoxanthine-containing PNAs are more stable in duplexes where hypoxanthine-adenine and hypoxanthine-uracil base pairs are formed than single mismatch duplexes or duplexes containing hypoxanthine-guanine opposition.

  15. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of 3-nitroaniline (m-NA) and 4-nitroaniline (p-NA) crystals: A DFT/TDDFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadsetani, M.; Omidi, A. R.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the electronic structure and optical responses of 3-nitroaniline and 4-nitroaniline crystals within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). In addition, the excitonic effects are investigated by using the recently published bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel within the time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Our calculations based on mBJ approximation yield the indirect band gap for both crystals, but the larger one for m-NA. Due to the excitonic effects, the TDDFT calculations gives rise to the enhanced and red-shifted spectra (compared to RPA). Due to the weak intermolecular interactions, band-structure calculations yield bands with low dispersion for both crystals. This study shows that the substituent groups play an important role in the top of valence band and the bottom of conduction band. Due to the linear structure of p-NA molecule, the highest peaks are located in the optical spectra of p-NA crystal, while m-NA has more sharp peaks, especially at lower energies. Both DFT and TDDFT calculations for the energy loss spectra show plasmon peaks around 27 and 28 eV for p-NA and m-NA, respectively. Due to the non-centrosymmetric structure of m-NA crystal, we also have reported its nonlinear spectra and the 2ω/ω intra-band and inter-band contributions to the dominant susceptibilities. Findings indicate the opposite signs for these contributions, especially at higher energies. The comparison between nonlinear spectra and the linear spectra (as a function of both ω and 2ω) reveals the significant resemblance between linear and nonlinear patterns. In addition to the reasonable agreement between our results with experimental data, this study reveals the spectral similarities between crystalline susceptibility and molecular polarizability.

  16. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines.

  17. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  18. In situ hybridization for Coccidioides immitis 5.8S ribosomal RNA sequences in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pulmonary specimens using a locked nucleic acid probe: a rapid means for identification in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Montone, Kathleen T; Litzky, Leslie A; Feldman, Michael D; Peterman, Heather; Mathis, Benjamin; Baliff, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Larry R; Kucharczuk, John; Nachamkin, Irving

    2010-06-01

    Coccidioides immitis/Coccidioides posadasii are common causes of pulmonary infection in certain geographic areas, and are highly infectious when working with culture isolates in the laboratory. Rapid techniques to accurately identify this pathogen in tissues may be of benefit for diagnosis and in limiting the exposure of laboratory personnel to this agent. Locked nucleic acids (LNA) are modified nucleotides in which a ribonucleoside is linked between the 2'-oxygen and the 4'-carbon atoms with a methylene unit. LNA oligonucleotides exhibit increased thermal stability and make excellent probes for in situ hybridization (ISH). In this study, ISH utilizing a biotin-labeled LNA probe targeting Coccidioides sp. ribosomal RNA sequences in 6 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pulmonary tissue specimens from 6 patients with culture positive or histologic findings suggestive of Coccidioides sp. infection is described. The cultures of the pulmonary specimens confirmed C. immitis in 3 of 6 patients. The ISH procedure with the LNA probe was positive in all 6 cases, although the number of organisms that were highlighted varied from rare to numerous. ISH with a biotin-labeled DNA probe of the same sequence was positive in 4 of the 6 cases and the signal intensity and number of organisms was much less than that observed with the LNA probe. Negative control tissues containing a variety of different fungal pathogens including Aspergillus sp., Fusarium sp., Blastomyces dermatitidis, Candida sp, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Zygomyces did not hybridize with the LNA and DNA probes. ISH with an LNA oligonucleotide probe targeting Coccidioides sp. ribosomal RNA is useful for rapid ISH. ISH could be rapidly performed when fungal pathogens are observed in tissue but cultures are negative or have not been performed.

  19. Synthesis of circular double-stranded DNA having single-stranded recognition sequence as molecular-physical probe for nucleic acid hybridization detection based on atomic force microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Matsunaga, Hideshi; Murata, Masaharu; Soh, Nobuaki; Imato, Toshihiko

    2009-08-01

    A new class of DNA probes having a mechanically detectable tag is reported. The DNA probe, which consists of a single-stranded recognition sequence and a double-stranded circular DNA entity, was prepared by polymerase reaction. M13mp18 single strand and a 32mer oligodeoxynucleotide whose 5'-end is decorated with the recognition sequence were used in combination as template and primer, respectively. We have successfully demonstrated that the DNA probe is useful for bioanalytical purposes: by deliberately attaching target DNA molecules onto Au(111) substrates and by mechanically reading out the tag-entity using a high-resolution microscopy including atomic force microscopy, visualization/detection of the individual target/probe DNA conjugate was possible simply yet straightforwardly. The present DNA probe can be characterized as a 100%-nucleic acid product material. It is simply available by one-pod synthesis. A surface topology parameter, image roughness, has witnessed its importance as a quantitative analysis index with particular usability in the present visualization/detection method.

  20. Preparation and application of L-cysteine-modified CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals as a novel fluorescence probe for detection of nucleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fenghua; Chen, Guonan

    2008-07-01

    The water-soluble L-cysteine-modified CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals (expressed as CdSe/CdS/Cys nanocrystals) have been synthesized in aqueous by using L-cysteine as stabilizer. The size, shape, component and spectral property of CdSe/CdS/Cys nanocrystals were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDX), infrared spectrum (IR) and photoluminescence (PL). The results showed that the spherical CdSe/CdS/Cys nanocrystals with an average diameter of 2.3 nm have favorable fluorescent property, theirs photostability and fluorescence intensity are enhanced greatly after overcoating with CdS. The cysteine modified on the surface of core/shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals renders the nanocrystals water-soluble and biocompatible. Based on the fluorescence quenching of the nanocrystals in the presence of calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA), a fluorescence quenching method has been developed for the determination of ct-DNA by using the nanocrystals as a novel fluorescence probe. The pH value of the system was selected at pH 7.4, with excitation and emission wavelength at 380 and 522 nm, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence quenching intensity of the system is linear with the concentration of ct-DNA in the range of 0.1-3.5 μg/mL ( r = 0.9987). The detection limit is 0.06 μg/mL. And two synthetic samples were analyzed satisfactorily.

  1. A turn-on highly selective and ultrasensitive determination of copper (II) in an aqueous medium using folic acid capped gold nanoparticles as the probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasimalai, N.; Prabhakarn, A.; John, S. Abraham

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a ‘turn-on’ fluorescent determination of Cu(II) in an aqueous medium using folic acid capped gold nanoparticles (FA-AuNPs) as the probe. The FA-AuNPs were synthesized by the wet chemical method and were characterized by UV-visible, fluorescence, HR-TEM, XRD, zeta potential, and DLS techniques. The FA-AuNPs show an absorption maximum at 510 nm and an emission maximum at 780 nm (λex: 510 nm). On adding 10 μM Cu(II), the wine-red color of FA-AuNPs changed to purple and the absorbance at 510 nm decreased. The observed changes were ascribed to the aggregation of AuNPs. This was confirmed by DLS and HR-TEM studies. Interestingly, the emission intensity of FA-AuNPs was enhanced even in the presence of a picomolar concentration of Cu(II). Based on the enhancement of the emission intensity, the concentration of Cu(II) was determined. The FA-AuNPs showed an extreme selectivity towards the determination of 10 nM Cu(II) in the presence of 10 000-fold higher concentration of interferences except EDTA and the carboxylate anion. A good linearity was observed from 10 × 10-9 to 1 × 10-12 M Cu(II), and the detection limit was found to be 50 fM l-1 (S/N = 3). The proposed method was successfully applied to determine Cu(II) in real samples. The results obtained were validated with ICP-AES.

  2. Gold nanoclusters as switch-off fluorescent probe for detection of uric acid based on the inner filter effect of hydrogen peroxide-mediated enlargement of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyan; Li, Hongchang; Guo, Bin; Wei, Lijuan; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Youyu

    2017-05-15

    Herein we report a novel switch-off fluorescent probe for highly selective determination of uric acid (UA) based on the inner filter effect (IFE), by using poly-(vinylpyrrolidone)-protected gold nanoparticles (PVP-AuNPs) and chondroitin sulfate-stabilized gold nanoclusters (CS-AuNCs) as the IFE absorber/fluorophore pair. In this IFE-based fluorometric assay, the newly designed CS-AuNCs were explored as an original fluorophore and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) -driven formed PVP-AuNPs can be a powerful absorber to influence the excitation of the fluorophore, due to the complementary overlap between the absorption band of PVP-AuNPs and the emission band of CS-AuNCs. Under the optimized conditions, the extent of the signal quenching depends linearly on the H2O2 concentration in the range of 1-100μM (R(2) =0.995) with a detection limit down to 0.3μM. Based on the H2O2-dependent fluorescence IFE principle, we further developed a new assay strategy to enable selective sensing of UA by using a specific uricase-catalyzed UA oxidation as the in situ H2O2 generator. The proposed uricase-linked IFE-based assay exhibited excellent analytical performance for measuring UA over the concentration ranging from 5 to 100μM (R(2)=0.991), and can be successfully applied to detection of UA as low as 1.7μM (3σ) in diluted human serum samples.

  3. Enzyme-linked PNA lectin binding assay compared with CA19-9 and CEA radioimmunoassay as a diagnostic blood test for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, C. K.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from patients with pancreatic cancer often contain a mucus glycoprotein that expresses the oncofetal antigen galactose 1-3, N-acetyl galactosamine, which is the T blood group antigen and the binding site for the lectin peanut agglutinin (PNA). An enzyme-linked lectin assay has been developed to quantify PNA-binding glycoproteins in serum and has been evaluated as a serological test for pancreatic cancer. Sera were studied from 53 patients with pancreatic cancer and 154 controls, including benign obstructive jaundice, acute and chronic pancreatitis, chronic liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease. The enzyme-linked peanut lectin assay proved highly reproducible and has 77% sensitivity and 83% specificity for pancreatic cancer, results that are very similar to those achieved in the same sera by CA19-9 radioimmunoassay (75% sensitivity, 82% specificity with the upper limit of normal set at 37 u ml-1). CEA assay proved less useful (60% sensitivity, 47% specificity). In this study better results were obtained if an upper limit of normal of 50 u ml-1 was used for CA19-9 (75% sensitivity, 92% specificity). Combination of CA19-9 assay with the upper limit set at 50 u ml-1 and the peanut lectin assay improved the sensitivity to 85% with only a slight fall in specificity (85%). These results compare well with published results for ultrasound and CT scanning. PMID:2736232

  4. Remote Enantioselection Transmitted by an Achiral Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, Igor A.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2000-01-01

    short homochiral segment of DNA into a PNA helix could have guaranteed that the next short segment of DNA to be incorporated would have the same handedness as the first. Once two segments of the same handedness were present, the probability that a third segment would have the same handedness would increase, and so on. Evolution could then slowly dilute out the PNA part. This scenario would ultimately allow the formation of a chiral oligonucleotide by processes that are largely resistant to enantiomeric crossinhibition. It is important to note that the ligation of homochiral dinucleotides on a nucleic acid template would probably be at least as enantiospecific as the reaction that we have studied. The disadvantage of using chiral monomers as components of a replicating system arises from the difficulty of generating a first long homochiral template from a racemic mixture of monomers, although results of experiments designed to overcome this difficulty by employing homochiral tetramers have been reported.l l The probability of obtaining a homochiral n-mer from achiral substrates is approximately 1P-I if the nontemplate-directed extension of the primer is not enantioselective. Hence, it would be very hard to get started with a homochiral 40-mer, for example. No such difficulty exists in a scenario that originates with an achiral genetic material and in which the incorporation of very few chiral monomers in this achiral background gradually progresses towards homochirality. It seems possible that some PNA sequences could act as catalysts, analogous to ribozymes, even though PNA lacks clear metal binding sites. Although such catalysts could not be enantioselective, the incorporation of as few as two chiral nucleotides could then impose chiral specificity on the system. Furthermore, such patch chimeras could help to bridge the gap in catalytic potential between PNA and RNA, while guaranteeing enantioselectivity.

  5. In vivo visualization of endogenous miR-21 using hyaluronic acid-coated graphene oxide for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Han Young; Li, Fangyuan; Park, Ji Yong; Kim, Dohyun; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Hwa Seung; Byun, Jung Woo; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeong, Jae Min; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-03-01

    Oncogene-targeted nucleic acid therapy has been spotlighted as a new paradigm for cancer therapeutics. However, in vivo delivery issues and uncertainty of therapeutic antisense drug reactions remain critical hurdles for a successful targeted cancer therapy. In this study, we developed a fluorescence-switchable theranostic nanoplatform using hyaluronic acid (HA)-conjugated graphene oxide (GO), which is capable of both sensing oncogenic miR-21 and inhibiting its tumorigenicity simultaneously. Cy3-labeled antisense miR-21 peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes loaded onto HA-GO (HGP21) specifically targeted CD44-positive MBA-MB231 cells and showed fluorescence recovery by interacting with endogenous miR-21 in the cytoplasm of the MBA-MB231 cells. Knockdown of endogenous miR-21 by HGP21 led to decreased proliferation and reduced migration of cancer cells, as well as the induction of apoptosis, with enhanced PTEN levels. Interestingly, in vivo fluorescence signals markedly recovered 3 h after the intravenous delivery of HGP21 and displayed signals more than 5-fold higher than those observed in the HGPscr-treated group of tumor-bearing mice. These findings demonstrate the possibility of using the HGP nanoplatform as a cancer theranostic tool in miRNA-targeted therapy.

  6. An antisense peptide nucleic acid against Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibiting bacterial-induced inflammatory responses in the cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cellular model system.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Giulia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cabrini, Giulio; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Lampronti, Ilaria; Finotti, Alessia; Nielsen, Peter E; Gambari, Roberto

    2017-02-03

    Discovery of novel antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa able to inhibit bacterial growth as well as the resulting inflammatory response is a key goal in cystic fibrosis research. We report in this paper that a peptide nucleic acid (PNA3969) targeting the translation initiation region of the essential acpP gene of P. aeruginosa, and previously shown to inhibit bacterial growth, concomitantly also strongly inhibits PAO1 induced up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory markers IL-8, IL-6, G-CSF, IFN-γ, IP-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α in IB3-1 cystic fibrosis cells infected by P. aeruginosa PAO1. Remarkably, no effect on PAO1 induction of VEGF, GM-CSF and IL-17 was observed. Analogous experiments using a two base mis-match control PNA did not show such inhibition. Furthermore, no significant effects of the PNAs were seen on cell growth, apoptosis or secretome profile in uninfected IB3-1 cells (with the exception of a PNA-mediated up-regulation of PDGF, IL-17 and GM-CSF). Thus, we conclude that in cell culture an antimicrobial PNA against Pseudomonas can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines otherwise induced by the infection. In particular, the effects of PNA-3969 on IL-8 gene expression are significant considering the key role of this protein in the cystic fibrosis inflammatory process exacerbated by P. aeruginosa infection.

  7. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  8. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of 4-(5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfon-amido)-3-(4-iodophenyl)butanoic acid as a novel molecular probe for apoptosis imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Wenbin; Miao, Weimin; Le Puil, Michael; Shi, Guangqing; Biggerstaff, John; Kabalka, George W.; Townsend, David

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Annexin V is the gold standard probe for imaging apoptosis. {yields} Unfavorable profiles of Annexin V make it difficult to apply in the clinic. {yields} A novel small-molecular probe DNSBA was designed as an alternative to Annexin V. {yields} DNSBA specifically and selectively detect apoptotic cancer cells at all stages. {yields} DNSBA is a potential SPECT and PET agent when labeled with radioiodine. -- Abstract: Apoptosis (programmed cell death) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of many disorders, thus the detection of apoptotic cells can provide the physician with important information to further therapeutic strategies and would substantially advance patient care. A small molecule, 4-(5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonamido)-3-(4-iodo-phenyl)butanoic acid (DNSBA), was designed as a novel probe for imaging apoptosis and synthesized with good yield. The biological characterization demonstrated that DNSBA can be used to specifically and selectively detect apoptotic cancer cells at all stages. DNSBA is also designed as a potential SPECT and PET probe when labeled with radioiodine (I-123, -124, and -131).

  9. Serotypic differentiation of rotaviruses in field samples from diarrheic pigs by using nucleic acid probes specific for porcine VP4 and human and porcine VP7 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Lopez, S; Flores, J; Saif, L J

    1994-01-01

    Of 216 fecal and intestinal samples collected from nursing or weaned diarrheic pigs in the United States and Canada, 57 were identified as group A rotavirus positive by RNA electrophoresis and silver staining. Fifty-seven and 52 rotavirus-positive samples were analyzed by hybridization with Gottfried and OSU PCR-derived gene 9 and 4 probes, respectively. Only 17 samples were identified with either homologous VP4 (P)- or VP7 (G)-coding genes or both. One rotavirus identified as G4 and P7 was similar to the previously characterized interserotype rotavirus, SB-1A. Additional hybridization analyses were performed with PCR-derived probes prepared from gene 9 cDNA of the human rotaviruses Wa (G1), DS-1 (G2), and P (G3) and of the porcine rotavirus YM (G11). Eleven of 52 samples collected and analyzed from swine in Ohio, California, and Nebraska were identified as G11. No samples with G1-, G2-, or G3-type specificities were detected among the 25 of 57 rotavirus-positive samples analyzed with human rotavirus-derived probes. Further investigations with a PCR-derived gene 4 probe prepared from porcine rotavirus YM revealed hybridization specificities similar to those of the OSU gene 4 probe. Images PMID:8150940

  10. A base-modified PNA-graphene oxide platform as a turn-on fluorescence sensor for the detection of human telomeric repeats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabale, Pramod M.; George, Jerrin Thomas; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2014-08-01

    Given the biological and therapeutic significance of telomeres and other G-quadruplex forming sequences in human genome, it is highly desirable to develop simple methods to study these structures, which can also be implemented in screening formats for the discovery of G-quadruplex binders. The majority of telomere detection methods developed so far are laborious and use elaborate assay and instrumental setups, and hence, are not amenable to discovery platforms. Here, we describe the development of a simple homogeneous fluorescence turn-on method, which uses a unique combination of an environment-sensitive fluorescent nucleobase analogue, the superior base pairing property of PNA, and DNA-binding and fluorescence quenching properties of graphene oxide, to detect human telomeric DNA repeats of varying lengths. Our results demonstrate that this method, which does not involve a rigorous assay setup, would provide new opportunities to study G-quadruplex structures.Given the biological and therapeutic significance of telomeres and other G-quadruplex forming sequences in human genome, it is highly desirable to develop simple methods to study these structures, which can also be implemented in screening formats for the discovery of G-quadruplex binders. The majority of telomere detection methods developed so far are laborious and use elaborate assay and instrumental setups, and hence, are not amenable to discovery platforms. Here, we describe the development of a simple homogeneous fluorescence turn-on method, which uses a unique combination of an environment-sensitive fluorescent nucleobase analogue, the superior base pairing property of PNA, and DNA-binding and fluorescence quenching properties of graphene oxide, to detect human telomeric DNA repeats of varying lengths. Our results demonstrate that this method, which does not involve a rigorous assay setup, would provide new opportunities to study G-quadruplex structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  11. Application of Peptide Nucleic Acid-based Assays Toward Detection of Somatic Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Christopher S; Yang, Chunzhang; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with many applications. Compared with DNA, PNAs bind their complementary DNA strand with higher specificity and strength, an attribute that can make it an effective polymerase chain reaction clamp. A growing body of work has demonstrated the utility of PNAs in detecting low levels of mutant DNA, particularly in the detection of circulating mutated tumor cells in the peripheral blood. The PNA-based assay has greater sensitivity than direct sequencing and is significantly more affordable and rapid than next-generation deep sequencing. We have previously demonstrated that PNAs can successfully detect somatic mosaicism in patients with suspected disease phenotypes. In this report, we detail our methodology behind PNA design and application. We describe our protocol for optimizing the PNA for sequencing use and for determining the sensitivity of the PNA-based assay. Lastly, we discuss the potential applications of our assay for future laboratory and clinical purposes and highlight the role of PNAs in the detection of somatic mosaicism. PMID:27115839

  12. The use of multiple probe molecules for the study of the acid-base properties of aluminium hydroxyfluoride having the hexagonal tungsten bronze structure: FTIR and [36Cl] radiotracer studies.

    PubMed

    Dambournet, Damien; Leclerc, Hervé; Vimont, Alexandre; Lavalley, Jean-Claude; Nickkho-Amiry, Mahmood; Daturi, Marco; Winfield, John M

    2009-03-07

    The combination of several probe molecules has enabled the construction of a detailed picture of the surface of aluminium hydroxyl fluoride, AlF(2.6)(OH)(0.4), which has the hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) structure. Using pyridine as a probe leads to features at 1628 cm(-1), ascribed to very strong Lewis acid sites, and at 1620-1623 cm(-1), which is the result of several different types of Lewis sites. This heterogeneity is indicated also from CO adsorption at 100 K; the presence of five different types of Lewis site is deduced and is suggested to arise from the hydroxylated environment. Brønsted acid sites of medium strength are indicated by adsorption of lutidine and CO. Adsorption of lutidine occurs at OH groups, which are exposed at the surface and CO reveals that these OH groups have a single environment that can be correlated with their specific location inside the bulk, assuming that the surface OH group may reflect the bulk OH periodicity. A correlation between the data obtained from CO and pyridine molecules has been established using co-adsorption experiments, which also highlight the inductive effect produced by pyridine. Adsorption of the strong Brønsted acid, anhydrous hydrogen chloride, detected by monitoring the beta(-) emission of [(36)Cl]-HCl at the surface, indicates that surface hydroxyl groups can behave also as a Brønsted base and that H(2)O-HCl interactions, either within the hexagonal channels or at the surface are possible. Finally, the formation of strongly bound H(36)Cl as a result of the room temperature dehydrochlorination of [(36)Cl]-labelled tert-butyl chloride provides additional evidence that HTB-AlF(2.6)(OH)(0.4) can behave as a Lewis acid.

  13. A nucleic acid probe labeled with desmethyl thiazole orange: a new type of hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide for live-cell RNA imaging.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sugizaki, Kaori; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shuji; Sueoka, Takuma; Hayashi, Gosuke; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2013-01-14

    A new fluorescent nucleotide with desmethyl thiazole orange dyes, D'(505), has been developed for expansion of the function of fluorescent probes for live-cell RNA imaging. The nucleoside unit of D'(505) for DNA autosynthesis was soluble in organic solvents, which made the preparation of nucleoside units and the reactions in the cycles of DNA synthesis more efficient. The dyes of D'(505)-containing oligodeoxynucleotide were protonated below pH 7 and the oligodeoxynucleotide exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission through the control of excitonic interactions of the dyes of D'(505). The simplified procedure and effective hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission produced multicolored hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes, which were useful for live-cell RNA imaging. The acceptor-bleaching method gave us information on RNA in a specific cell among many living cells.

  14. Please do not disturb: Destruction of chromatin structure by supravital nucleic acid probes revealed by a novel assay of DNA-histone interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    The biomarkers designed to be used supravitally are expected to have minimal effect on structure and function of the cell. Unfortunately nearly all fluorochromes developed to probe live cells interact in undesired way with cellular constituents and affect functional pathways. Herein we comment on potential applications of diverse DNA binding probes in view of the recent article by Wojcik & Dobrucki on DRAQ 5 and SYTO 17. The approach used by these authors to assess DNA-histone interactions using the cells having histones tagged with fluorescent proteins offers a valuable tool to study mechanism of action of antitumor drugs targeting DNA. While the effect of many intercalating drugs may be similar to that of DRAQ5, it may be of particular interest to observe the effects induced by intra-strand and inter-strand DNA crosslinking drugs, alkylating agents, histone deacetylase inhibitors or even anti-metabolites. The cells having histones tagged with fluorescent proteins thus may serve as biomarkers to probe mechanism of action of drugs targeting DNA or affecting chromatin structure. In fact, because such gross chromatin changes as revealed by dissociation and segregation of histones from DNA are most likely incompatible with long-term cell survival, the methodology may be applied for rapid screening of investigational antitumor agents. PMID:18671237

  15. Invader probes: Harnessing the energy of intercalation to facilitate recognition of chromosomal DNA for diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Dale C; Anderson, Grace H; Karmakar, Saswata; Anderson, Brooke A; Didion, Bradley A; Guo, Wei; Verstegen, John P; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2015-08-01

    Development of probes capable of recognizing specific regions of chromosomal DNA has been a long-standing goal for chemical biologists. Current strategies such as PNA, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and polyamides are subject to target choice limitations and/or necessitate non-physiological conditions, leaving a need for alternative approaches. Toward this end, we have recently introduced double-stranded oligonucleotide probes that are energetically activated for DNA recognition through modification with +1 interstrand zippers of intercalator-functionalized nucleotide monomers. Here, probes with different chemistries and architectures - varying in the position, number, and distance between the intercalator zippers - are studied with respect to hybridization energetics and DNA-targeting properties. Experiments with model DNA targets demonstrate that optimized probes enable efficient (C50 < 1 μM), fast (t50 < 3h), kinetically stable (> 24h), and single nucleotide specific recognition of DNA targets at physiologically relevant ionic strengths. Optimized probes were used in non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments for detection of gender-specific mixed-sequence chromosomal DNA target regions. These probes present themselves as a promising strategy for recognition of chromosomal DNA, which will enable development of new tools for applications in molecular biology, genomic engineering and nanotechnology.

  16. Invader probes: Harnessing the energy of intercalation to facilitate recognition of chromosomal DNA for diagnostic applications†

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Dale C.; Anderson, Grace H.; Karmakar, Saswata; Anderson, Brooke A.; Didion, Bradley A.; Guo, Wei; Verstegen, John P.; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Development of probes capable of recognizing specific regions of chromosomal DNA has been a long-standing goal for chemical biologists. Current strategies such as PNA, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and polyamides are subject to target choice limitations and/or necessitate non-physiological conditions, leaving a need for alternative approaches. Toward this end, we have recently introduced double-stranded oligonucleotide probes that are energetically activated for DNA recognition through modification with +1 interstrand zippers of intercalator-functionalized nucleotide monomers. Here, probes with different chemistries and architectures – varying in the position, number, and distance between the intercalator zippers – are studied with respect to hybridization energetics and DNA-targeting properties. Experiments with model DNA targets demonstrate that optimized probes enable efficient (C50 < 1 μM), fast (t50 < 3h), kinetically stable (> 24h), and single nucleotide specific recognition of DNA targets at physiologically relevant ionic strengths. Optimized probes were used in non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments for detection of gender-specific mixed-sequence chromosomal DNA target regions. These probes present themselves as a promising strategy for recognition of chromosomal DNA, which will enable development of new tools for applications in molecular biology, genomic engineering and nanotechnology. PMID:26240741

  17. Overtone dissociation of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2): absorption cross sections and photolysis products.

    PubMed

    Stark, Harald; Brown, Steven S; Burkholder, James B; Aldener, Mattias; Riffault, Veronique; Gierczak, Tomasz; Ravishankara, A R

    2008-10-02

    Band strengths for the second (3nuOH) and third (4nuOH) overtones of the OH stretch vibration of peroxynitric acid, HO2NO2 (PNA) in the gas-phase were measured using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). Both OH overtone transitions show diffuse smoothly varying symmetrical absorption profiles without observable rotational structure. Integrated band strengths (base e) at 296 K were determined to be S(3nuOH) = (5.7 +/- 1.1) x 10(-20) and S(4nuOH) = (4.9 +/- 0.9) x 10(-21) cm(2) molecule(-1) cm(-1) with peak cross sections of (8.8 +/- 1.7) x 10(-22) and (7.0 +/- 1.3) x 10(-23) cm(2) molecule(-1) at 10086.0 +/- 0.2 cm(-1) and 13095.8 +/- 0.4 cm(-1), respectively, using PNA concentrations measured on line by Fourier-transform infrared and ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The quoted uncertainties are 2sigma (95% confidence level) and include estimated systematic errors in the measurements. OH overtone spectra measured at lower temperature, 231 K, showed a narrowing of the 3nuOH band along with an increase in its peak absorption cross section, but no change in S(3nuOH) to within the precision of the measurement (+/-9%). Measurement of a PNA action spectrum showed that HO2 is produced from second overtone photodissociation. The action spectrum agreed with the CRDS absorption spectra. The PNA cross sections determined in this work for 3nuOH and 4nuOH will increase calculated atmospheric photolysis rates of PNA slightly.

  18. Hydrogen atoms in acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin): the librating methyl group and probing the potential well in the hydrogen-bonded dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Chick C.

    2001-02-01

    The structure of acetylsalicylic acid (2-(acetoyloxy)benzoic acid; Aspirin) has been studied by variable temperature single crystal neutron diffraction. The usual large torsional librational motion of the terminal methyl group is observed and its temperature dependence analysed using a simple model for the potential, yielding the force constant and barrier height for this motion. In addition, asymmetry of the scattering density of the proton involved in the hydrogen bond forming the carboxylic acid dimer motif is observed at temperatures above 200 K. This asymmetry is discussed in terms of its possible implications for the shape of the hydrogen bonding potential well.

  19. Study of nucleic acid-gold nanorod interactions and detecting nucleic acid hybridization using gold nanorod solutions in the presence of sodium citrate.

    PubMed

    Kanjanawarut, Roejarek; Su, Xiaodi

    2010-09-01

    In this study, the authors report that sodium citrate can aggregate hexadecyl-trimethyl-ammonium ion(+)-coated gold nanorods (AuNRs), and nucleic acids of different charge and structure properties, i.e., single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and PNA-DNA complex, can bind to the AuNRs and therefore retard the sodium citrate-induced aggregation to different extents. The discovery that hybridized dsDNA (and the PNA-DNA complex) has a more pronounced protection effect than ssDNA (and PNA) allows the authors to develop a homogeneous phase AuNRs-based UV-visible (UV-vis) spectral assay for detecting specific sequences of oligonucleotides (20 mer) with a single-base-mismatch selectivity and a limit of detection of 5 nM. This assay involves no tedious bioconjugation and on-particle hybridization. The simple "set and test" format allows for a highly efficient hybridization in a homogeneous phase and a rapid display of the results in less than a minute. By measuring the degree of reduction in AuNR aggregation in the presence of different nucleic acid samples, one can assess how different nucleic acids interact with the AuNRs to complement the knowledge of spherical gold nanoparticles. Besides UV-vis characterization, transmission electron microscopy and zeta potential measurements were conduced to provide visual evidence of the particle aggregation and to support the discussion of the assay principle.

  20. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid-functionalized CuInS2 quantum dots as a near-infrared fluorescence probe for the detection of dicyandiamide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyu; Pang, Shu; Huang, Hui; Su, Xingguang

    2014-11-21

    In this paper, a simple and highly selective method for the determination of dicyandiamide (DCD) was developed based on the fluorescence quenching of functionalized CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs). Water-soluble CuInS2 QDs, capped by mercaptopropionic acid, were directly synthesized in aqueous solution and then covalently linked to 3-aminophenylboronic acid molecules to form the 3-aminophenylboronic acid-functionalized CuInS2 QDs (F-CuInS2 QDs) that had a fairly symmetric fluorescence emission centered at 736 nm. Based on the cyclization of the guanidine group of DCD with 2,3-butanedione and 3-aminophenylboronic acid, the fluorescence of the F-CuInS2 QDs is quenched by DCD in the presence of 2,3-butanedione. This method effectively distinguishes DCD from other amino acids and nitrogen pollutants, such as melamine, in real milk samples. Under optimum conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity of F-CuInS2 QDs and the concentration of DCD in the range of 2.0 × 10(-6) to 2.0 × 10(-3) mol L(-1), with a detection limit of 0.6 μmol L(-1).

  1. Probing the segmental mobility and energy of the active zones of a protein chain (aspartic acid protease) by a coarse-grained bond-fluctuation Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2008-03-01

    A protein chain such as aspartic acid protease is described by a specific sequence of 99 residues each with its own specific characteristics. In a coarse-grained description, the backbone of a protein chain is described by nodes tethered together by peptide bonds where each node (the amino acid group) is characterized by molecular weight and hydrophobicity. A well-developed and somewhat mature computational modeling tool for the polymer chain such as the bond-fluctuation model is used to study such a specific protein chain with its constitutive amino groups and their sequence. The relative magnitude of hydrophobicity is used to develop appropriate interaction potentials for these amino acid groups in explicit solvent. The Metropolis algorithm is used to move each node and solvent constituent. Local energy and mobility of each amino group are analyzed along with global energy, mobility, and conformation of the protein chain. Effect of the solvent interaction and its concentration on these quantities will be presented.

  2. A probe on the intermolecular forces in diisopropyl ether-n-butyric acid mixture by dielectric, FTIR studies and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Arivazhagan, G; Shanmugam, R; Elangovan, A

    2013-03-15

    The results of FTIR spectral measurement on equimolar diisopropyl ether-butyric acid binary mixture and quantum chemical calculations on the complex molecule have been presented. Dielectric studies have been carried out on the binary mixture over the entire composition range and at four different temperatures 303 K, 308 K, 313 K and 318 K. n-Butyric acid seems to prefer less polar ether to interact with it. It appears that the usual interpretation of variation of static dielectric constant and positive deviation of excess permittivity from ideal mixture behavior needs to be relooked.

  3. Non-amplified Quantitative Detection of Nucleic Acid Sequences Using a Gold Nanoparticle Probe Set and Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyonchol Kim,; Atsushi Kira,; Kenji Yasuda,

    2010-06-01

    For the precise detection of the number of expressed biomarkers at the single-cell level, we have developed a method of quantifying and specifying target DNA fragments by using a set of gold nanoparticles as labels and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to measure the number and sizes of gold nanoparticles attached to target samples. One or more target DNAs on a substrate were labeled with a set of different-sized gold nanoparticle probes having complementary sequences to different target candidates. The type and number of the target DNAs having a specific sequence were identified by counting the attached nanoparticles of a specific size in FE-SEM images. The results evaluated using a DNA microarray showed high specificity and sensitivity, and a linear correlation between the number of attached particles and the target DNA concentration, indicating the feasibility of quantitative detection in the femtomolar to nanomolar concentration range.

  4. Use of H2S to Probe the Active Sites in FeNC Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in Acidic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Deepika; Mamtani, Kuldeep; Bruening, Christopher R.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Ozkan, Umit S.

    2014-10-01

    H2S has been used as a probe molecule both in an “in situ” poisoning experiment and in intermediate-temperature heat-treatment steps during and after the preparation of FeNC catalysts in an attempt to analyze its effect on their ORR activity. The heat treatments were employed either on the ball-milled precursor of FeNC or after the Ar-NH3 high temperature heat treatments. ORR activity of the H2S-treated catalysts was seen to be significantly lower than the sulfur-free catalysts, whether the sulfur exposure was during a half-cell testing, or as an intermediate-temperature exposure to H2S. The incorporation of sulfur species and interaction of Fe with sulfur were confirmed by characterization using XPS, EXAFS, TPO, and TPD. This study provides crucial evidence regarding differences in active sites in FeNC versus nitrogen-containing carbon nanostructured (CNx) catalysts.

  5. Polyanionic Carboxyethyl Peptide Nucleic Acids (ce-PNAs): Synthesis and DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kirillova, Yuliya; Boyarskaya, Nataliya; Dezhenkov, Andrey; Tankevich, Mariya; Prokhorov, Ivan; Varizhuk, Anna; Eremin, Sergei; Esipov, Dmitry; Smirnov, Igor; Pozmogova, Galina

    2015-01-01

    New polyanionic modifications of polyamide nucleic acid mimics were obtained. Thymine decamers were synthesized from respective chiral α- and γ-monomers, and their enantiomeric purity was assessed. Here, we present the decamer synthesis, purification and characterization by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and an investigation of the hybridization properties of the decamers. We show that the modified γ-S-carboxyethyl-T10 PNA forms a stable triplex with polyadenine DNA. PMID:26469337

  6. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  7. Constrained photophysics of partially and fully encapsulated charge transfer probe (E)-3-(4-Methylaminophenyl) acrylic acid methyl ester inside cyclodextrin nano-cavities: Evidence of cyclodextrins cavity dependent complex stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shalini; Jana, Sankar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2011-12-01

    The polarity sensitive intra-molecular charge transfer (ICT) emission from (E)-3-(4-Methylaminophenyl) acrylic acid methyl ester (MAPAME) is found to show distinct changes once introduced into the nano-cavities of cyclodextrins in aqueous environment. Movement of the molecule from the more polar aqueous environment to the less polar, hydrophobic cyclodextrin interior is marked by the blue shift of the CT emission band with simultaneous fluorescence intensity enhancement. The emission spectral changes on complexation with the α- and β-CD show different stoichiometries as observed from the Benesi-Hildebrand plots. Fluorescence anisotropy and lifetime measurements were performed to probe the different behaviors of MAPAME in aqueous α- and β-CD solutions.

  8. What Is a pH Probe Study?

    MedlinePlus

    What is a pH Probe Study ? What is pH a probe study? M easuring the pH in the esophagus helps determine whether or not acid is coming up from the stomach. A pH probe study is usually done in patients where ...

  9. A new general model for predicting melting thermodynamics of complementary and mismatched B-form duplexes containing locked nucleic acids: application to probe design for digital PCR detection of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Hughesman, Curtis; Fakhfakh, Kareem; Bidshahri, Roza; Lund, H Louise; Haynes, Charles

    2015-02-17

    Advances in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as well as the emergence of digital PCR (dPCR) and useful modified nucleotide chemistries, including locked nucleic acids (LNAs), have created the potential to improve and expand clinical applications of PCR through their ability to better quantify and differentiate amplification products, but fully realizing this potential will require robust methods for designing dual-labeled hydrolysis probes and predicting their hybridization thermodynamics as a function of their sequence, chemistry, and template complementarity. We present here a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model that accurately predicts the melting thermodynamics of a short oligonucleotide duplexed either to its perfect complement or to a template containing mismatched base pairs. The model may be applied to pure-DNA duplexes or to duplexes for which one strand contains any number and pattern of LNA substitutions. Perturbations to duplex stability arising from mismatched DNA:DNA or LNA:DNA base pairs are treated at the Gibbs energy level to maintain statistical significance in the regressed model parameters. This approach, when combined with the model's accounting of the temperature dependencies of the melting enthalpy and entropy, permits accurate prediction of T(m) values for pure-DNA homoduplexes or LNA-substituted heteroduplexes containing one or two independent mismatched base pairs. Terms accounting for changes in solution conditions and terminal addition of fluorescent dyes and quenchers are then introduced so that the model may be used to accurately predict and thereby tailor the T(m) of a pure-DNA or LNA-substituted hydrolysis probe when duplexed either to its perfect-match template or to a template harboring a noncomplementary base. The model, which builds on classic nearest-neighbor thermodynamics, should therefore be of use to clinicians and biologists who require probes that distinguish and quantify two closely related alleles in either a

  10. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  11. Nematicidal Activity of Kojic Acid Produced by Aspergillus oryzae against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yoon; Jang, Ja Yeong; Jeon, Sun Jeong; Lee, Hye Won; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Yeo, Joo Hong; Lee, Hyang Burm; Kim, In Seon; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-08-28

    The fungal strain EML-DML3PNa1 isolated from leaf of white dogwood (Cornus alba L.) showed strong nematicidal activity with juvenile mortality of 87.6% at a concentration of 20% fermentation broth filtrate at 3 days after treatment. The active fungal strain was identified as Aspergillus oryzae, which belongs to section Flavi, based on the morphological characteristics and sequence analysis of the ITS rDNA, calmodulin (CaM), and β-tubulin (BenA) genes. The strain reduced the pH value to 5.62 after 7 days of incubation. Organic acid analysis revealed the presence of citric acid (515.0 mg/kg), malic acid (506.6 mg/kg), and fumaric acid (21.7 mg/kg). The three organic acids showed moderate nematicidal activities, but the mixture of citric acid, malic acid, and fumaric acid did not exhibit the full nematicidal activity of the culture filtrate of EML- DML3PNa1. Bioassay-guided fractionation coupled with (1)H- and (13)C-NMR and EI-MS analyses led to identification of kojic acid as the major nematicidal metabolite. Kojic acid exhibited dose-dependent mortality and inhibited the hatchability of M. incognita, showing EC50 values of 195.2 µg/ml and 238.3 µg/ml, respectively, at 72 h postexposure. These results suggest that A. oryzae EML-DML3PNa1 and kojic acid have potential as a biological control agent against M. incognita.

  12. Quantification of ultra-trace molybdenum using 4-amino-5-hydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid monosodium salt as a chromogenic probe.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Krishna, Honnur; Shivakumar, Anantharaman; Paulas, Anthonydas Robert; Rangappa, Dinesh

    2011-04-15

    A simple, ultrasensitive, nonextractive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the assay of Mo(VI), which involves Mo-catalyzed oxidation of 4-amino-5-hydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid monosodium salt (AHNDSA) by H(2)O(2) in acetic acid/sodium acetate buffer yielding an intense pink colored product with λ(max) of 540 nm. Beer's law is obeyed in the range of 10-240 ng/ml with molar absorptivity of 3.0137×10(5)L mol(-1)cm(-1). The LOD and LOQ were found to be 0.7696 and 2.565 ng/ml, respectively. The applicability of the method toward water and biological samples was tested and statistically compared with a reference method.

  13. A DFT study of the acid-base properties of anatase TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2 by adsorption of CO and CO2 probe molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi Tiffany; Tosoni, Sergio; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-10-01

    We have performed a comparative study of the acid-base characteristics of the surfaces of anatase TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2. To this end we performed DFT + U calculations on CO and CO2 probe molecules adsorbed both on terraces and steps of the two oxides. For titania, CO adsorption results in a moderate adsorption energy (about - 0.3 eV) and in a positive shift of the Csbnd O stretching frequency (about + 40 cm- 1), typical of Lewis acid sites, with no clear difference in the acidity between terraces or steps. For zirconia we found a similar CO binding energy as for titania, and a CO vibrational shift that depends on the location of the Zr cation: negligible on terraces, similar to TiO2 on steps. We conclude that the acidic properties are similar in the two oxide surfaces. Things are different for CO2 adsorption. On titania the interaction is weak and surface carbonates compete with physisorbed CO2, indicating a weak basic character. On the contrary, on zirconia three types of stable carbonates have been identified. Their vibrational frequencies are consistent with IR measurements reported in the literature. The most stable species forms on steps of the t-ZrO2 surface and consists of a CO32 - unit which lies flat on the surface with the O atoms pointing towards three Zr ions. The species forms spontaneously by extraction of a lattice oxygen by an incoming CO2 molecule. The different reactivity points towards a much more pronounced basic character of zirconia compared to titania, at least if measured by CO2 adsorption.

  14. In vivo correction of anaemia in β-thalassemic mice by γPNA-mediated gene editing with nanoparticle delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bahal, Raman; Ali McNeer, Nicole; Quijano, Elias; Liu, Yanfeng; Sulkowski, Parker; Turchick, Audrey; Lu, Yi-Chien; Bhunia, Dinesh C.; Manna, Arunava; Greiner, Dale L.; Brehm, Michael A.; Cheng, Christopher J.; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Ricciardi, Adele; Beloor, Jagadish; Krause, Diane S.; Kumar, Priti; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Braddock, Demetrios T.; Mark Saltzman, W.; Ly, Danith H.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    The blood disorder, β-thalassaemia, is considered an attractive target for gene correction. Site-specific triplex formation has been shown to induce DNA repair and thereby catalyse genome editing. Here we report that triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) substituted at the γ position plus stimulation of the stem cell factor (SCF)/c-Kit pathway yielded high levels of gene editing in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in a mouse model of human β-thalassaemia. Injection of thalassemic mice with SCF plus nanoparticles containing γPNAs and donor DNAs ameliorated the disease phenotype, with sustained elevation of blood haemoglobin levels into the normal range, reduced reticulocytosis, reversal of splenomegaly and up to 7% β-globin gene correction in HSCs, with extremely low off-target effects. The combination of nanoparticle delivery, next generation γPNAs and SCF treatment may offer a minimally invasive treatment for genetic disorders of the blood that can be achieved safely and simply by intravenous administration. PMID:27782131

  15. As fast and selective as enzymatic ligations: unpaired nucleobases increase the selectivity of DNA-controlled native chemical PNA ligation.

    PubMed

    Ficht, Simon; Dose, Christian; Seitz, Oliver

    2005-11-01

    DNA-controlled reactions offer interesting opportunities in biological, chemical, and nanosciences. In practical applications, such as in DNA sequence analysis, the sequence fidelity of the chemical-ligation reaction is of central importance. We present a ligation reaction that is as fast as and much more selective than enzymatic T4 ligase-mediated oligonucleotide ligations. The selectivity was higher than 3000-fold in discriminating matched from singly mismatched DNA templates. It is demonstrated that this enormous selectivity is the hallmark of the particular ligation architecture, which is distinct from previous ligation architectures designed as "nick ligations". Interestingly, the fidelity of the native chemical ligation of peptide nucleic acids was increased by more than one order of magnitude when performing the ligation in such a way that an abasic-site mimic was formed opposite an unpaired template base. It is shown that the high sequence fidelity of the abasic ligation could facilitate the MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometric analysis of early cancer onset by allowing the detection of as little as 0.2 % of single-base mutant DNA in the presence of 99.8 % wild-type DNA.

  16. A dinuclear ruthenium(II) complex as turn-on luminescent probe for hypochlorous acid and its application for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zonglun; Gao, Kuo; Wang, Beng; Yan, Hui; Xing, Panfei; Zhong, Chongmin; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Wei; Sun, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    A dinuclear ruthenium(II) complex Ruazo was designed and synthesized, in which oxidative cyclization of the azo and o-amino group was employed for the detection of hypochlorous acid (HClO) in aqueous solution. The non-emissive Ruazo formed highly luminescent triazole-ruthenium(II) complex in presence of HClO and successfully imaged HClO in living cell and living mouse. PMID:27356618

  17. Folic acid-conjugated core/shell ZnS:Mn/ZnS quantum dots as targeted probes for two photon fluorescence imaging of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Geszke, Malgorzata; Murias, Marek; Balan, Lavinia; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Korczynski, Jaroslaw; Moritz, Michal; Lulek, Janina; Schneider, Raphaël

    2011-03-01

    This work presents a novel approach to producing water soluble manganese-doped core/shell ZnS/ZnS quantum dots (ZnS:Mn/ZnS). The Mn-doped ZnS core was prepared through a nucleation doping strategy and a ZnS shell was grown on ZnS:Mn d-dots by decomposition of Zn(2+)-3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) complexes at 100 °C. It was found that the Mn2+(4)T1→6A1 fluorescence emission at ∼590 nm significantly increased after growth of the shell when the Mn2+ doping content was 4.0 at.%. A photoluminescence quantum yield of ∼22% was obtained for core/shell nanocrystals. The nanoparticles were structurally and compositionally characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. The surface MPA molecules favor the dispersion of ZnS:Mn/ZnS QDs in aqueous media and make possible conjugation with targeting folic acid molecules. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated ZnS:Mn/ZnS QDs was demonstrated using confocal microscopy with biphotonic excitation. Bare and folate-conjugated QDs exhibit only weak cytotoxicity towards folate receptor-positive T47D cancer cells and MCF-7 cells, used as a reference, at high concentrations (mmolar range) after 72h incubation.

  18. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 1. Photoaffinity labeling of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase and amino acid sequence of the binding region

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Smith, P.L.; Klein, T.E.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-07-28

    N/sup ..cap alpha../-(4-Amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroyl)-N/sup epsilon/-(4-azido-5-(/sup 125/I)iodosalicylyl)-L-lysine, a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, is only 2-fold less potent than methotrexate in the inhibition of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase. Irradiation of the enzyme in the presence of an equimolar concentration of the /sup 125/I-labeled analogue ultimately leads to an 8% incorporation of the photoprobe. A 100-fold molar excess of methotrexate essentially blocks this incorporation. Cyanogen bromide digestion of the labeled enzyme, followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography purification of the generated peptides, indicates that greater than 85% of the total radioactivity is incorporated into a single cyanogen bromide peptide. Sequence analysis revealed this peptide to be residues 53-111, with a majority of the radioactivity centered around residues 63-65 (Lys-Asn-Arg). These data demonstrate that the photoaffinity analogue specifically binds to dihydrofolate reductase and covalently modifies the enzyme following irradiation and is therefore a photolabeling agent useful for probing the inhibitor binding domain of the enzyme.

  19. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  20. Probe tip heating assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  1. High Temperature Antenna Measurement System with GSG or GS Contact Probing Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jennifer L.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.

    2009-01-01

    Applications that require data transmission at high temperatures are becoming more common due to growing commercial and military needs. Antennas are an indispensable part of these systems and the ability to characterize them at elevated temperatures is quite complicated with little or no information being reported on the subject [1]. This paper describes a measurement system that can characterize planar antennas up 600 C with ground-signal-ground (GSG) or ground-signal (GS) probe contacts. The return loss and radiation patterns of a folded slot antenna (FSA), designed to operate at 5 GHz (no ground plane on back side) and fabricated on an alumina substrate, are presented at room temperature (RT) and 250 C [2]. All measurements were made with Agilent's Precision Network Analyzer (PNA) E8361. The return loss and radiation patterns were also measured on a Styrofoam chuck to illustrate the effect the high temperature measurement system has on the patterns.

  2. DAPI: a DNA-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Kapuscinski, J

    1995-09-01

    DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) is a DNA-specific probe which forms a fluorescent complex by attaching in the minor grove of A-T rich sequences of DNA. It also forms nonfluorescent intercalative complexes with double-stranded nucleic acids. The physicochemical properties of the dye and its complexes with nucleic acids and history of the development of this dye as a biological stain are described. The application of DAPI as a DNA-specific probe for flow cytometry, chromosome staining, DNA visualization and quantitation in histochemistry and biochemistry is reviewed. The mechanisms of DAPI-nucleic acid complex formation including minor groove binding, intercalation and condensation are discussed.

  3. A general sensing strategy for detection of Fe3+ by using amino acid-modified graphene quantum dots as fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qi; Song, Jinping; Wang, Shangzhi; Yang, Jie; Guo, Yong; Dong, Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Amino acid-modified graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were synthesized through acylation and amination reactions. The as-synthesized GQDs were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. A general sensing strategy for detection of Fe3+ was successfully developed. The detection limit can reach as low as 50 nM. Moreover, the proposed sensing system was successfully employed to detect Fe3+ in real water sample, and satisfactory results were obtained. This work will open up new avenues to develop potential applications of GQDs materials in environmental monitoring.

  4. Probing the molecular and electronic structure of norhipposudoric and hipposudoric acids from the red sweat of Hippopotamus amphibius: a DFT investigation.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Vinicio; Pichierri, Fabio

    2009-03-19

    Molecular structure and tautomeric/conformational preferences of norhipposudoric and hipposudoric acids, the recently isolated pigments of the Hippopotamus amphibius' sweat, were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) PBE0 formalism. Among a large variety of possible structures, two similar keto-enol tautomer/conformers are nearly isoenergetic and markedly more stable than the others both in the gas phase and aqueous solution. The bulk solvent effect was accounted for with the polarizable continuum model (PCM). A distinctive structural feature is the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the keto-enol O-H...O bridge, as shown by analysis of the atoms-in-molecules topological properties of the electron density. To elucidate the claimed strong acidity of these pigments, the site-specific microscopic dissociation constants were also calculated using the cluster-continuum model, a hybrid approach based on inclusion of explicit solvent molecules and solvation of the cluster by the dielectric continuum. Notably, the first deprotonation should occur predominantly from the enolic group with a remarkably low pk(i) value. This factor could play an important role in the potent antibiotic activity of the pigments. The absorption spectra of the undissociated and dissociated compounds in aqueous solution were interpreted with time-dependent DFT/PCM calculations. The pi-pi* diquinoid excitations, mainly occurring in the fluorenoid nucleus, are the major contributors to the color and strong absorption bands in the UVA and UVB regions, which are closely related to the efficient sunscreen activity exerted by the pigments.

  5. A Novel Electrochemical Sensor for Probing Doxepin Created on a Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified with Poly(4-Amino- benzoic Acid)/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Composite Film

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Li; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Song; Kong, Ji-Lie

    2010-01-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of doxepin was prepared, which was based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with poly(4-aminobenzoic acid)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite film [poly(4-ABA)/MWNTs/GCE]. The sensor was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical methods. It was observed that poly(4-ABA)/MWNTs/GCE showed excellent preconcentration function and electrocatalytic activities towards doxepin. Under the selected conditions, the anodic peak current was linear to the logarithm of doxepin concentration in the range from 1.0 × 10−9 to 1.0 × 10−6 M, and the detection limit obtained was 1.0 × 10−10 M. The poly(4-ABA)/MWNTs/GCE was successfully applied in the measurement of doxepin in commercial pharmaceutical formulations, and the analytical accuracy was confirmed by comparison with a conventional ultraviolet spectrophotometry assay. PMID:22163661

  6. Stealth CD44-targeted hyaluronic acid supramolecular nanoassemblies for doxorubicin delivery: probing the effect of uncovalent pegylation degree on cellular uptake and blood long circulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaopeng; Li, Zhenbao; Sun, Jin; Luo, Cong; Li, Lin; Liu, Yuhai; Du, Yuqian; Qiu, Shuhong; Ai, Xiaoyu; Wu, Chunnuan; Lian, He; He, Zhonggui

    2015-01-10

    Stealth active targeting nanoparticles (NPs) usually include two types of ligand sites: ligand anchored on distal ends of the polyethylene glycol (PEG) and ligand buried under pegylated layer. The latter typical case is hyaluronic acid (HA)-based NPs; however, there is little information available for the latter NPs about effect of the optimal density of surface PEG coating on the blood circulation time, cellular uptake and in vivo anticancer activity. Thus, in this study, in order to optimize the anticancer effects of HA-based NPs, we focus on how uncovalent pegylation degree modulates blood circulation time and cellular uptake of HA-based NPs. We firstly designed a new double-hydrophilic copolymer by conjugating HP-β-cyclodextrin with HA, and this carrier was further pegylated with adamantyl-peg (ADA-PEG) to form inclusion complex HA-HPCD/ADA-PEG, termed as HCPs. The supramolecular nanoassemblies were fabricated by host-guest and polar interactions between HCPs and doxorubicin (Dox), with vitamin E succinate (VES) being a nanobridge. Despite the active recognition between HA and CD44 receptor, the cellular uptake and targeting efficiency of HA-NPs decreased with the increasing peg density, demonstrating HA was partly buried by high density peg coating. However, the high density of peg coating was beneficial to long circulation time, tumor biodistribution and anticancer activity in vivo. NPs with 5% peg coating had the optimal cellular targeting efficiency in vitro and anticancer effects in vivo. The findings suggest that balancing long circulation property and cellular uptake is important to achieve the optimal antitumor efficacy for pegylated HA-based NPs, and that PEG coating densities cannot be extended beyond a certain density for shielding effect without compromising the efficacy of hyaluronic acid targeted delivery.

  7. Bioplex technology: novel synthetic gene delivery pharmaceutical based on peptides anchored to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Svahn, Mathias G; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Lundin, Karin E; Smith, C I E

    2005-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery is an important approach in order to establish safe in vivo gene therapy in the clinic. Although viral vectors currently exhibit superior gene transfer efficacy, the safety aspect of viral gene delivery is a concern. In order to improve non-viral in vivo gene delivery we have designed a pharmaceutical platform called Bioplex (biological complex). The concept of Bioplex is to link functional entities via hybridising anchors, such as Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA), directly to naked DNA. In order to promote delivery functional entities consisting of biologically active peptides or carbohydrates, are linked to the PNA anchor. The PNA acts as genetic glue and hybridises with DNA in a sequence specific manner. By using functional entities, which elicit receptor-mediated endocytosis, improved endosomal escape and enhance nuclear entry we wish to improve the transfer of genetic material into the cell. An important aspect is that the functional entities should also have tissue-targeting properties in vivo. Examples of functional entities investigated to date are the Simian virus 40 nuclear localisation signal to improve nuclear uptake and different carbohydrate ligands in order to achieve receptor specific uptake. The delivery system is also endowed with regulatory capability, since the release of functional entities can be controlled. The aim is to create a safe, pharmaceutically defined and stable delivery system for nucleic acids with enhanced transfection properties that can be used in the clinic.

  8. DNA-Templated Polymerization of Side-Chain-Functionalized Peptide Nucleic Acid Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Ralph E.; Brudno, Yevgeny; Birnbaum, Michael E.; Liu, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA-templated polymerization of synthetic building blocks provides a potential route to the laboratory evolution of sequence-defined polymers with structures and properties not necessarily limited to those of natural biopolymers. We previously reported the efficient and sequence-specific DNA-templated polymerization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) aldehydes. Here, we report the enzyme-free, DNA-templated polymerization of side-chain-functionalized PNA tetramer and pentamer aldehydes. We observed that the polymerization of tetramer and pentamer PNA building blocks with a single lysine-based side chain at various positions in the building block could proceed efficiently and sequence-specifically. In addition, DNA-templated polymerization also proceeded efficiently and in a sequence-specific manner with pentamer PNA aldehydes containing two or three lysine side chains in a single building block to generate more densely functionalized polymers. To further our understanding of side-chain compatibility and expand the capabilities of this system, we also examined the polymerization efficiencies of 20 pentamer building blocks each containing one of five different side-chain groups and four different side-chain regio- and stereochemistries. Polymerization reactions were efficient for all five different side-chain groups and for three of the four combinations of side-chain regio- and stereochemistries. Differences in the efficiency and initial rate of polymerization correlate with the apparent melting temperature of each building block, which is dependent on side-chain regio- and stereochemistry, but relatively insensitive to side-chain structure among the substrates tested. Our findings represent a significant step towards the evolution of sequence-defined synthetic polymers and also demonstrate that enzyme-free nucleic acid-templated polymerization can occur efficiently using substrates with a wide range of side-chain structures, functionalization positions within each

  9. 5 prime -Azido-(3,6- sup 3 H sub 2 )-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, a photoactivatable probe for naphthylphthalamic acid receptor proteins from higher plants: Identification of a 23-kDa protein from maize coleoptile plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, R.; Feldwisch, J.; Schell, J.; Palme, K. ); Boland, W. )

    1992-01-15

    1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) is a specific inhibitor of polar auxin transport that blocks carrier mediated auxin efflux from plant cells. To allow identification of the NPA receptor thought to be part of the auxin efflux carrier, the authors have synthesized a tritiated, photolabile NPA analogue, 5{prime}-azido-(3,6-{sup 3}H{sub 2})NPA (({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA). This analogue was used to identify NPA-binding proteins in fractions highly enriched for plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize coleoptiles (Zea mays L.). Competition studies showed that binding of ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA to maize plasma membrane vesicles was blocked by nonradioactive NPA but not by benzoic acid. After incubation of plasma membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA and exposure to UV light, they observed specific photoaffinity labeling of a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 23 kDa. Pretreatment of the plasma membrane vesicles with indole-3-acetic acid or with the auxin-transport inhibitors NPA and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid strongly reduced specific labeling of this protein. This 23-kDa protein was also labeled by addition of 5-azido-(7-{sup 3}H)indole-3-acetic acid to plasma membranes prior to exposure to UV light. The 23-kDa protein was solubilized from plasma membranes by 1% Triton X-100. The possibility that this 23-kDa polypeptide is part of the auxin efflux carrier system is discussed.

  10. Acidic pH-induced membrane insertion of colicin A into E. coli natural lipids probed by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Pulagam, Lakshmi Padmavathi; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2013-05-27

    Colicin A is a pore-forming toxin that forms a voltage-gated channel in the inner membrane of the target bacteria. The structures of the closed and open channel states of membrane-bound colicin A are not resolved. In the present site-directed spin-labeling study, the insertion-competent state of colicin A is provoked by an acidic pH jump prior to the insertion into liposomes prepared from Escherichia coli natural lipids. The membrane-bound colicin A is able to open a voltage-dependent channel as demonstrated by the efflux of tempophosphate spin label from the lumen of liposomes. The EPR spectra of spin-labeled colicin A variants in the membrane-bound closed channel state reveal a conformational equilibrium with resolved interhelical tertiary contacts. The spin label accessibility and polarity profiles suggest the amphipathic helices (H1-H7 and H10) to be located in the membrane close to the membrane-water interface and the hydrophobic hairpin (H8 and H9) to be immersed more deeply in the membrane.

  11. Selective photo-deposition of Cu onto the surface of monodisperse oleic acid capped TiO2 nanorods probed by FT-IR CO-adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Hikov, Todor; Schroeter, Marie-Katrin; Khodeir, Lamma; Chemseddine, Abdelkrim; Muhler, Martin; Fischer, Roland A

    2006-04-07

    A novel, non-aqueous, organometallic route to nanocomposite Cu@TiO2 materials is presented. TiO2 nanorods stabilized with oleic acid (OLA) were used as support for the photo-assisted deposition of Cu using the organometallic Cu(II) precursor [Cu(OCH(CH3)CH2N(CH3)2)2] (1). The copper precursor penetrates through the shell of OLA and is photo reduced to deposit Cu0 directly at the surface of the TiO2 rods. The obtained Cu decorated nanorods were still soluble in nonpolar organic solvents without change of the morphology of nanorods. The Cu@TiO2 colloid was characterized by means of UV-VIS, XRD, AAS, and HRTEM. FTIR CO adsorption studies provide evidence for Cu0 anchored at the titania surface by a characteristic absorption at 2084 cm-1. Comparative studies of Cu-deposition were performed using CuCl2 as simple Cu source which proved that the concept of organometallic disguise of the metal centre results in a higher reaction rate and the circumvention of non-selective reduction, parasitic side reactions and undesired agglomeration of the OLA stabilized titania nanorods.

  12. A facile carbon dots based fluorescent probe for ultrasensitive detection of ascorbic acid in biological fluids via non-oxidation reduction strategy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weiheng; Wu, Di; Li, Guoliang; Chen, Xuefeng; Gong, Peiwei; Sun, Zhiwei; Chen, Guang; Xia, Lian; You, Jinmao; Wu, Yongning

    2017-04-01

    A rapid, facile and ultrasensitive fluorescence sensing system based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-doped CDs) for the detection of ascorbic acid (AA) was developed. The highly photoluminescent N-doped CDs with excellent solubility in water and good biocompatibility were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal synthesis and gave the fluorescence quantum yield of 47%. The addition of AA can intensively suppress the fluorescence of the N-doped CDs through the synergistic effect of the inner filter effect (IFE) and the static quenching effect (SQE). Benefited from the remarkable synergistic effect of IFE and SQE, a facile and ultrasensitive sensor was constructed successfully for AA sensing. The detection procedure was achieved within 2min. The linear response range of AA was obtained from 10(-3) to 10(-8) M with a detection limit of 5nM. This developed method enjoyed many merits including more simplicity, lost cost, high sensitivity, good selectivity, rapid response and excellent biocompatibility. Notably, the proposed fluorescent sensor exhibits excellent performance and applicability for AA determination in human serum and rat brain microdialysate, and may provide a fast yet facile route for AA detection in physiological and pathological fields.

  13. Hot-wire probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulla, V.

    1976-01-01

    High-temperature platinum probe measures turbulence and Reynolds shear stresses in high-temperature compressible flows. Probe does not vibrate at high velocities and does not react like strain gage on warmup.

  14. Production rate estimation of mycosporine-like amino acids in two Arctic melt ponds by stable isotope probing with NAH(13) CO3.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sun-Yong; Min, Jun-Oh; Joo, Hyun Min; Chung, Kyung Ho; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Yang, EunJin; Kang, Sung-Ho

    2014-10-01

    The net carbon uptake rate and net production rate of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) were measured in phytoplankton from 2 different melt ponds (MPs; closed and open type pond) in the western Arctic Ocean using a (13) C stable isotope tracer technique. The Research Vessel Araon visited ice-covered western-central basins situated at 82°N and 173°E in the summer of 2012, when Arctic sea ice declined to a record minimum. The average net carbon uptake rate of the phytoplankton in polycarbonate (PC) bottles in the closed MP was 3.24 mg C · m(-3) · h(-1) (SD = ±1.12 mg C · m(-3) · h(-1) ), while that in the open MP was 1.3 mg C · m(-3) · h(-1) (SD = ±0.05 mg C · m(-3) · h(-1) ). The net production rate of total MAAs in incubated PC bottles was highest (1.44 (SD = ±0.24) ng C · L(-1) · h(-1) ) in the open MP and lowest (0.05 (SD = ±0.003) ng C · L(-1) · h(-1) ) in the closed MP. The net production rate of shinorine and palythine in incubated PC bottles at the open MP presented significantly high values 0.76 (SD = ±0.12) ng C · L(-1) · h(-1) and 0.53 (SD = ±0.06) ng C · L(-1) · h(-1) . Our results showed that high net production rate of MAAs in the open MP was enhanced by a combination of osmotic and UVR stress and that in situ net production rates of individual MAA can be determined using (13) C tracer in MPs in Arctic sea ice.

  15. Developing an Acidic Residue Reactive and Sulfoxide-Containing MS-Cleavable Homobifunctional Cross-Linker for Probing Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy for defining protein–protein interactions and elucidating architectures of large protein complexes. However, one of the inherent challenges in MS analysis of cross-linked peptides is their unambiguous identification. To facilitate this process, we have previously developed a series of amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers. These MS-cleavable reagents have allowed us to establish a common robust XL-MS workflow that enables fast and accurate identification of cross-linked peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Although amine-reactive reagents targeting lysine residues have been successful, it remains difficult to characterize protein interaction interfaces with little or no lysine residues. To expand the coverage of protein interaction regions, we present here the development of a new acidic residue-targeting sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linker, dihydrazide sulfoxide (DHSO). We demonstrate that DHSO cross-linked peptides display the same predictable and characteristic fragmentation pattern during collision induced dissociation as amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linked peptides, thus permitting their simplified analysis and unambiguous identification by MSn. Additionally, we show that DHSO can provide complementary data to amine-reactive reagents. Collectively, this work not only enlarges the range of the application of XL-MS approaches but also further demonstrates the robustness and applicability of sulfoxide-based MS-cleavability in conjunction with various cross-linking chemistries. PMID:27417384

  16. Binding of fullerenes to cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide surfaces, photoluminescence as a probe of strong, lewis acidity-driven, surface adduct formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.Z.; Geselbracht, M.J.; Ellis, A.B.

    1993-08-25

    The C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} fullerenes can be adsorbed from toluene solution onto the surfaces of etched, single-crystal n-CdS and n-CdSe [n-CdS(e)] semiconductors. These fullerene adsorbates act as Lewis acids toward the CdS(e) surface, causing quenching of the solids` band-edge photoluminescence (PL) intensity relative to the intensity in a reference ambient of pure toluene. For C{sub 60} adsorbed onto CdSe, the quenching of PL intensity is well fit by a dead-layer model that permits estimation of the adduct-induced expansion in depletion width as being as large as approximately 300 A. The degree of quenching is somewhat larger for C{sub 70} at a wavelength where the two fullerenes can be directly compared. PL quenching by both fullerenes is concentration dependent and can be fit to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model to yield large equilibrium binding constants in the range of 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}; the fullerenes can be detected by this PL method at submicromolar concentrations. Use of the polar Cd-rich (0001) and Se-rich (0001O) faces of a n-CdSe sample reveals similar binding constants for C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} on the two faces but larger expansions of the dead-layer thickness from adsorption of either fullerene on the Cd-rich face. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Probing the roles of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in humic acids-induced ultrafiltration membrane fouling using an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long-Fei; He, Dong-Qin; Chen, Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-09-15

    Membrane fouling induced by natural organic matter (NOM) negatively affects the performance of ultrafiltration (UF) technology in producing drinking water. Divalent cation is found to be an important factor that affects the NOM-induced membrane fouling process. In this work, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) coupled with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), assisted by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), is used to explore the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), the two abundant divalent cations in natural water, to the UF membrane fouling caused by humic acid (HA) at a molecular level. The results show that Ca(2+) exhibited superior performance in accelerating fouling compared to Mg(2+). The hydrophobic polyethersulfone (PES) membrane exhibited greater complexation with HA in the presence of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), compared to the hydrophilic cellulose membrane, as evidenced by the more intense polysaccharide C-O, aromatic C=C and carboxylic C=O bands in the FTIR spectra. The QCM and ITC measurements provide quantitative evidence to support that Ca(2+) was more effective than Mg(2+) in binding with HA and accumulating foulants on the membrane surfaces. The higher charge neutralization capacity and more favorable binding ability of Ca(2+) were found to be responsible for its greater contribution to the NOM-induced membrane fouling than Mg(2+). This work offers a new insight into the mechanism of cation-mediated NOM-induced membrane fouling process, and demonstrates that such an integrated ATR-FTIR/QCM/ITC approach could be a useful tool to explore other complicated interaction processes in natural and engineered environments.

  18. The use of retinoic acid to probe the relation between hyperproliferation-associated keratins and cell proliferation in normal and malignant epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    When cells from normal human epidermis and from the human squamous cell carcinoma line SCC-13 were seeded on floating rafts of collagen and fibroblasts, they stratified and underwent terminal differentiation. Although the program of differentiation in SCC-13 cells was morphologically abnormal, the cultures resembled normal epidermal raft cultures by expressing the terminal differentiation-specific keratins, K1/K10, and by restricting their proliferative capacity to the basal- like cells of the population. In addition, the differentiating cells of both normal and SCC-13 raft cultures expressed keratins K6 and K16, which are not normally expressed in epidermis, but are synthesized suprabasally during wound-healing and in various epidermal diseases associated with hyperproliferation. While the behavior of normal and SCC-13 rafts was quite similar when they were cultured over normal medium, significant biochemical differences began to emerge when the cultures were exposed to retinoic acid. Most notably, while the SCC-13 cultures still stratified extensively, they showed a marked inhibition of both abnormal (K6/K16) and normal (K1/K10) differentiation- associated keratins, concomitantly with an overall disappearance of differentiated phenotype. Surprisingly, the reduction in K6/K16 in retinoid-treated SCC-13 cultures was not accompanied by a decrease in cell proliferation. Using immunohistochemistry combined with [3H]thymidine labeling, we demonstrate that while the expression of K6 and K16 are often associated with hyperproliferation, these keratins are only produced in the nondividing, differentiating populations of proliferating cultures. Moreover, since their expression can be suppressed without a corresponding decrease in proliferation, the expression of these keratins cannot be essential to the nature of the hyperproliferative epidermal cell. PMID:2473080

  19. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  20. A Magnetoresistance Measuring Probe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The in line four point probe, commonly used for measuring the sheet resistance in a conductor, cannot measure the anisotropic ferromagnetic magnetoresistance. However, the addition of two contact points that are not collinear with the current contacts give the probe the ability to non-destructively measure the anistropic magnetoresistance. Keywords: Magnetoresistance; Anisotropic; Thin-Film; Permalloy; Four Point Probe; Anisotropic Resistance.

  1. Probing catalysis by Escherichia coli dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase: identification and preliminary characterization of functional amino acid residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, A D; Gross, J W; Frey, P A

    2001-06-05

    A model of the Escherichia coli dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase (4,6-dehydratase) active site has been generated by combining amino acid sequence alignment information with the 3-dimensional structure of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase. The active site configuration is consistent with the partially refined 3-dimensional structure of 4,6-dehydratase, which lacks substrate-nucleotide but contains NAD(+) (PDB file ). From the model, two groups of active site residues were identified. The first group consists of Asp135(DEH), Glu136(DEH), Glu198(DEH), Lys199(DEH), and Tyr301(DEH). These residues are near the substrate-pyranose binding pocket in the model, they are completely conserved in 4,6-dehydratase, and they differ from the corresponding equally well-conserved residues in 4-epimerase. The second group of residues is Cys187(DEH), Asn190(DEH), and His232(DEH), which form a motif on the re face of the cofactor nicotinamide binding pocket that resembles the catalytic triad of cysteine-proteases. The importance of both groups of residues was tested by mutagenesis and steady-state kinetic analysis. In all but one case, a decrease in catalytic efficiency of approximately 2 orders of magnitude below wild-type activity was observed. Mutagenesis of each of these residues, with the exception of Cys187(DEH), which showed near-wild-type activity, clearly has important negative consequences for catalysis. The allocation of specific functions to these residues and the absolute magnitude of these effects are obscured by the complex chemistry in this multistep mechanism. Tools will be needed to characterize each chemical step individually in order to assign loss of catalytic efficiency to specific residue functions. To this end, the effects of each of these variants on the initial dehydrogenation step were evaluated using a the substrate analogue dTDP-xylose. Additional steady-state techniques were employed in an attempt to further limit the assignment of rate limitation. The results are

  2. Raman tags: Novel optical probes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuee; Wang, Zhong; Mu, Xijiao; Ma, Aning; Guo, Shu

    Optical labels are needed for probing specific target molecules in complex biological systems. As a newly emerging category of tags for molecular imaging in live cells, the Raman label attracts much attention because of the rich information obtained from targeted and untargeted molecules by detecting molecular vibrations. Here, we list three types of Raman probes based on different mechanisms: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes, bioorthogonal Raman probes, and Resonance Raman (RR) probes. We review how these Raman probes work for detecting and imaging proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other biomolecules in vitro, within cells, or in vivo. We also summarize recent noteworthy studies, expound on the construction of every type of Raman probe and operating principle, sum up in tables typically targeting molecules for specific binding, and provide merits, drawbacks, and future prospects for the three Raman probes.

  3. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic probe for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe's distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device.

  4. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  5. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  6. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  7. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  8. A peptide nucleic acid targeting nuclear RAD51 sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to melphalan treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alagpulinsa, David Abasiwani; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Shmookler Reis, Robert Joseph

    2015-01-01

    RAD51-mediated recombinational repair is elevated in multiple myeloma (MM) and predicts poor prognosis. RAD51 has been targeted to selectively sensitize and/or kill tumor cells. Here, we employed a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to inhibit RAD51 expression in MM cells. We constructed a PNA complementary to a unique segment of the RAD51 gene promoter, spanning the transcription start site, and conjugated it to a nuclear localization signal (PKKKRKV) to enhance cellular uptake and nuclear delivery without transfection reagents. This synthetic construct, (PNArad51_nls), significantly reduced RAD51 transcripts in MM cells, and markedly reduced the number and intensity of de novo and melphalan-induced nuclear RAD51 foci, while increasing the level of melphalan-induced γH2AX foci. Melphalan alone markedly induced the expression of 5 other genes involved in homologous-recombination repair, yet suppression of RAD51 by PNArad51_nls was sufficient to synergize with melphalan, producing significant synthetic lethality of MM cells in vitro. In a SCID-rab mouse model mimicking the MM bone marrow microenvironment, treatment with PNArad51_nls ± melphalan significantly suppressed tumor growth after 2 weeks, whereas melphalan plus control PNArad4µ_nls was ineffectual. This study highlights the importance of RAD51 in myeloma growth and is the first to demonstrate that anti-RAD51 PNA can potentiate conventional MM chemotherapy. PMID:25996477

  9. Efficient inhibition of miR-155 function in vivo by peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Fabani, Martin M.; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Williams, Donna; Lyons, Paul A.; Torres, Adrian G.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Enright, Anton J.; Gait, Michael J.; Vigorito, Elena

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in diverse physiological processes and are potential therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides (ONs) of different chemistries have proven successful for blocking miRNA expression. However, their specificity and efficiency have not been fully evaluated. Here, we show that peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) efficiently block a key inducible miRNA expressed in the haematopoietic system, miR-155, in cultured B cells as well as in mice. Remarkably, miR-155 inhibition by PNA in primary B cells was achieved in the absence of any transfection agent. In mice, the high efficiency of the treatment was demonstrated by a strong overlap in global gene expression between B cells isolated from anti-miR-155 PNA-treated and miR-155-deficient mice. Interestingly, PNA also induced additional changes in gene expression. Our analysis provides a useful platform to aid the design of efficient and specific anti-miRNA ONs for in vivo use. PMID:20223773

  10. Studies on the oligosaccharide heterogeneity of the isoelectric forms of the lower molecular weight acid phosphatase of frog liver.

    PubMed

    Kubicz, A; Szalewicz, A; Chrambach, A

    1991-01-01

    1. The lower molecular weight, heterogeneous acid phosphatase (AcPase) from the frog liver (Rana esculenta) containing AcPase I, II, III and IV was separated into enzymatically active components by isoelectric focusing in an immobilized pH gradient. 2. The blotted enzyme bands were characterized by their different binding patterns obtained with the lectins concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Lens culinaris hemagglutinin (LcH) and peanut agglutinin (PNA). 3. In situ neuraminidase treatment reduced the staining intensity of some WGA-bands and increased that of PNA-bands. 4. The finding that AcPases I, II, III and IV differ in their carbohydrate chain composition, together with previous results showing different bioactivities of AcPases III and IV, indicates a correlation between the glycosylation state of enzyme forms and their physiological action.

  11. Design of embedded chimeric peptide nucleic acids that efficiently enter and accurately reactivate gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joy; Peterson, Kenneth R; Iancu-Rubin, Camelia; Bieker, James J

    2010-09-28

    Pharmacological treatments designed to reactivate fetal γ-globin can lead to an effective and successful clinical outcome in patients with hemoglobinopathies. However, new approaches remain highly desired because such treatments are not equally effective for all patients, and toxicity issues remain. We have taken a systematic approach to develop an embedded chimeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) that effectively enters the cell and the nucleus, binds to its target site at the human fetal γ-globin promoter, and reactivates this transcript in adult transgenic mouse bone marrow and human primary peripheral blood cells. In vitro and in vivo DNA-binding assays in conjunction with live-cell imaging have been used to establish and optimize chimeric PNA design parameters that lead to successful gene activation. Our final molecule contains a specific γ-promoter-binding PNA sequence embedded within two amino acid motifs: one leads to efficient cell/nuclear entry, and the other generates transcriptional reactivation of the target. These embedded PNAs overcome previous limitations and are generally applicable to the design of in vivo transcriptional activation reagents that can be directed to any promoter region of interest and are of direct relevance to clinical applications that would benefit from such a need.

  12. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  13. Transient internal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Mattick, Arthur T.

    1993-12-01

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) diagnostic is a novel method for probing the interior of hot magnetic fusion plasmas that are inaccessible with ordinary stationary probes. A small probe of magneto-optic (Verdet) material is fired through a plasma at speeds of several km/sec, illuminated by a laser beam. The beam's polarization is rotated in the probe by the local magnetic field and retroreflection back to a polarimetry detector allows determination of the B-field profile across the diameter of a plasma at a spatial resolution of better than 1-cm and an absolute B-field resolution of a few tens of Gauss. The principal components of a TIP diagnostic system were developed and tested. A two-stage light gas gun was constructed that accelerates 30-caliber projectiles to 3 km/sec, and methods were examined for stripping a lexan sabot from a probe prior to entry into a plasma. Probes of CdMnTe and FR-5 Verdet glass were fabricated, and a polarimetry system was constructed for resolving polarization to within 0.25 deg. The diagnostic was validated by measuring a static B-field with a moving (dropped) TIP probe, and finding agreement with Hall-probe measurements to within experimental accuracy (40 Gauss).

  14. Methods for making nucleotide probes for sequencing and synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M; Zhang, Kun; Chou, Joseph

    2014-07-08

    Compositions and methods for making a plurality of probes for analyzing a plurality of nucleic acid samples are provided. Compositions and methods for analyzing a plurality of nucleic acid samples to obtain sequence information in each nucleic acid sample are also provided.

  15. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  16. Probing Skills for Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Beryl E.

    The Office of Academic Support and Instructional Services (OASIS) at the University of California at San Diego sponsors a workshop that teaches tutors to use five types of probing skills. The use of the skills is fundamental to the student learner's acquisition of complex relationships and problem solving skills. The five types of probes are:…

  17. Circumferential pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Fantl, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A probe for measuring circumferential pressure inside a body cavity is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, a urodynamic pressure measurement probe for evaluating human urinary sphincter function is disclosed. Along the length of the probe are disposed a multiplicity of deformable wall sensors which typically comprise support tube sections with flexible side wall areas. These are arranged along the length of the probe in two areas, one just proximal to the tip for the sensing of fluid pressure inside the bladder, and five in the sensing section which is positioned within the urethra at the point at which the urinary sphincter constricts to control the flow of urine. The remainder of the length of the probe comprises multiple rigid support tube sections interspersed with flexible support tube sections in the form of bellows to provide flexibility.

  18. Electron temperature probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2013-11-01

    The electron temperature probe (ETP) was invented in Japan in 1970's. The probe measures the electron temperature accurately and the measurement is not influenced by the electrode contamination. The instrument has low weight, low data transmission bit rate and low power consumption. The probe has been deployed in many sounding rockets, Earth orbiting scientific satellites, and Mars exploration spacecraft in Japan. The probe has also been deployed in sounding rockets in West Germany, India, Canada, USA, and Brazil. The probe has also been deployed in Brazilian satellites, Korean satellites, and recently as a Taiwan satellite payload. The manuscript describes the principle of the ETP instrument, the system configuration, the mechanical interface with respect to the sensor location, the control timing between data processing units; some useful information, the interference with other instruments, and future improvements and tasks. Some useful information for conducting performance check after the instrument fabrication and before the flight deployment is also presented in Appendix A.

  19. Inflatable traversing probe seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An inflatable seal acts as a pressure-tight zipper to provide traversing capability for instrumentation rakes and probes. A specially designed probe segment with a teardrop cross-section in the vicinity of the inflatable seal minimizes leakage at the interface. The probe is able to travel through a lengthwise slot in a pressure vessel or wind tunnel section, while still maintaining pressure integrity. The design uses two commercially available inflatable seals, opposing each other, to cover the probe slot in a wind tunnel wall. Proof-of-concept tests were conducted at vessel pressures up to 30 psig, with seals inflated to 50 psig, showing no measurable leakage along the seal's length or around the probe teardrop cross-section. This seal concept can replace the existing technology of sliding face plate/O-ring systems in applications where lengthwise space is limited.

  20. Application of probe manipulator to repair probe cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Mikihiko; Egashira, Mitsuru; Machida, Kazumichi; Urata, Atsuo

    2006-03-01

    We fabricated an apparatus for manipulation and welding of fine metal objects using a probe. The apparatus is composed of a work probe of a tungsten alloy needle, stages, a DC power supply, and an observation system. The work probe is held vertically above a gold substrate placed on stages to control the relative position against the work probe. The DC power supply is equipped to apply voltage of 0-10kV between the work probe and the substrate. One application of the apparatus is to repair probe cards. Thousands of contact probes (needles) are mounted on the printed circuit board (PCB) in the probe card. The contact probes are mounted one by one by the hands. Recently, an array of the contact probe on the PCB is produced by the LIGA process in response to narrower semiconductor pitch length. The problem is that there are no methods to repair a wrong contact probe. Whole of the contact probes should be a waste owing to one wrong contact probe. We propose to replace a wrong contact probe with a good one using our apparatus. Experiments to remove a contact probe by the apparatus is carried out using the specimen of a mimic probe card, where a cantilever type contact probes are arranged with a pitch of 25 micrometers. Removal of the wrong contact probe is carried out by a non-contact discharge and a contact discharge using the apparatus. High voltage of about 1-2kV is applied after the work probe is moved to above the target contact probe for the non-contact discharge. While high voltage of about10kV is applied after the work probe is positioned in contact with the target contact probe for the contact discharge. The target contact probe is removed by both methods, though the neighboring contact probes are damaged. The latter method is hopeful for removal for repair of the probe card.

  1. Effect of chlorine on incorporation of Helicobacter pylori into drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gião, M S; Azevedo, N F; Wilks, S A; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2010-03-01

    The use of a specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori persisted inside biofilms exposed to low concentrations of chlorine (0.2 and 1.2 mg liter(-1)) for at least 26 days, although no culturable cells were recovered. Coupled with data obtained using viability stains in pure culture, this result suggests that H. pylori can survive chlorination but remain undetectable by culture methods, which can be effectively replaced by PNA hybridization.

  2. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  3. Investigation on natural diets of larval marine animals using peptide nucleic acid-directed polymerase chain reaction clamping.

    PubMed

    Chow, Seinen; Suzuki, Sayaka; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lavery, Shane; Jeffs, Andrew; Takeyama, Haruko

    2011-04-01

    The stomach contents of the larvae of marine animals are usually very small in quantity and amorphous, especially in invertebrates, making morphological methods of identification very difficult. Nucleotide sequence analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a likely approach, but the large quantity of larval (host) DNA present may mask subtle signals from the prey genome. We have adopted peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-directed PCR clamping to selectively inhibit amplification of host DNA for this purpose. The Japanese spiny lobster (Panulirus japonicus) and eel (Anguilla japonica) were used as model host and prey organisms, respectively. A lobster-specific PNA oligomer (20 bases) was designed to anneal to the sequence at the junction of the 18 S rDNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the lobster. PCR using eukaryote universal primers for amplifying the ITS1 region used in conjunction with the lobster-specific PNA on a mixed DNA template of lobster and eel demonstrated successful inhibition of lobster ITS1 amplification while allowing efficient amplification of eel ITS1. This method was then applied to wild-caught lobster larvae of P. japonicus and P. longipes bispinosus collected around Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. ITS1 sequences of a wide variety of animals (Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Crustacea, Teleostei, Mollusca, and Chaetognatha) were detected.

  4. Determination of the solution-bound conformation of an amino acid binding protein by NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement: use of a single flexible paramagnetic probe with improved estimation of its sampling space.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Strub, Marie-Paule; Ho, Chien; Tjandra, Nico

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate the feasibility of elucidating the bound ("closed") conformation of a periplasmic binding protein, the glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP), in solution, using paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) arising from a single paramagnetic group. GlnBP consists of two globular domains connected by a hinge. Using the ligand-free ("open") conformation as a starting point, conjoined rigid-body/torsion-angle simulated annealing calculations were performed using backbone (1)H(N)-PREs as a major source of distance information. Paramagnetic probe flexibility was accounted for via a multiple-conformer representation. A conventional approach where the entire PRE data set is enforced at once during simulated annealing yielded poor results due to inappropriate conformational sampling of the probe. On the other hand, significant improvements in coordinate accuracy were obtained by estimating the probe sampling space prior to structure calculation. Such sampling is achieved by refining the ensemble of probe conformers with intradomain PREs only, keeping the protein backbone fixed in the open form. Subsequently, while constraining the probe to the previously found conformations, the domains are allowed to move relative to each other under the influence of the non-intradomain PREs, giving the hinge region torsional degrees of freedom. Thus, by partitioning the protocol into "probe sampling" and "backbone sampling" stages, structures significantly closer to the X-ray structure of ligand-bound GlnBP were obtained.

  5. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  6. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  7. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  8. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  9. Jupiter probe heatshield configuration optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirling, R. B., Jr.; Binder, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of initial probe heatshield shape on the total probe mass loss during Jovian entry is considered. Modification of the aerothermal environment and probe entry trajectory due to changing probe heatshield shape is included in a computerized technique designed for rapid assessment of the effect of probe initial shape on heatshield mass loss. Results obtained indicate the importance of trajectory and heating distribution coupling with probe shape and mass change.

  10. Arrays of probes for positional sequencing by hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Prezetakiewiczr, Marek; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi

    2008-01-15

    This invention is directed to methods and reagents useful for sequencing nucleic acid targets utilizing sequencing by hybridization technology comprising probes, arrays of probes and methods whereby sequence information is obtained rapidly and efficiently in discrete packages. That information can be used for the detection, identification, purification and complete or partial sequencing of a particular target nucleic acid. When coupled with a ligation step, these methods can be performed under a single set of hybridization conditions. The invention also relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for making and replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  11. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  12. Geological assessment probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, E. R.

    1980-04-01

    A probe is described which can be installed in a side hole that extends from a bore hole in the Earth, to assess the permeability of the strata surrounding the borehole. The probe is elongated and has a plurality of seals spaced therealong and sealed to the walls of the side hole to form a plurality of chambers sealed from one another. A tracer fluid injector on the probe can inject a tracer fluid into one of the chambers, while a tracer fluid detector located in another chamber can detect the tracer fluid, to thereby sense the permeability of the strata surrounding the side hole. The probe can include a train of modules, with each module having an inflatable packer which is inflated by the difference between the borehole pressure and the strata pressure.

  13. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  14. Cryogenic Optoelectronic Probe Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    capability is very important for a few on- going projects under DOD support. Selected Examples of Research Using COPS Example 1: sheet resistance measurement...donor concentration of this thin film contact material, we need to know the sheet resistance . As shown in Fig. 1, four electric probes are landed...voltage of 62.4 mV across probe 2 and 3. Therefore we can determine the sheet resistance by using Eq: = ( ) . This gives the sheet

  15. Adjustable Pitot Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Robbins, W. Eugene; Horsley, Lewis A.

    1991-01-01

    Probe readily positionable in core of uniform flow in hypersonic wind tunnel. Formed of pair of mating cylindrical housings: transducer housing and pitot-tube housing. Pitot tube supported by adjustable wedge fairing attached to top of pitot-tube housing with semicircular foot. Probe adjusted both radially and circumferentially. In addition, pressure-sensing transducer cooled internally by water or other cooling fluid passing through annulus of cooling system.

  16. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-10

    A fiber optic probe is described for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe`s distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device. 5 figs.

  17. Huygens probe on target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-07-01

    In October 1997, a Titan/Centaur rocket lifting-off from Cape Canaveral will boost the spacecraft into a 6.7 year trajectory to reach Saturn. The trajectory will use two swing-bys of Venus in April 1998 and June 1999, followed by an Earth swing-by in August 1999 and a Jupiter swing-by in December 2000 to boost speed and reach Saturn in July 2004. A few months after going into orbit around Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft will release the Huygens probe for its descent through the atmosphere of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn. The Huygens probe will measure the abundance of elements and compounds in Titan's atmosphere, the distribution of trace gases and aerosols, winds, temperature, pressure and surface state and its composition. A multi-spectral camera on the probe will provide images of the landscape of Titan. Titan is a unique planetary body in the solar system. It has an atmosphere which is primarily nitrogen. but is also rich in hydrocarbons. Due to the vast distance of the Saturnian system from the Sun, this atmosphere is at a very low temperature, thus greatly slowing down all the chemical processes. A study of this atmosphere will throw light on the development of our own atmosphere and contribute to our understanding of the origins of life on Earth. The Huygens probe is being developed by ESA with Aerospatiale (F) as the industrial prime contractor. Since the start of the programme in April 1990, very good progress has been made in design and hardware development. The entry into the Titan atmosphere will result in a very high surface temperature on the probe, generated as it decelerates due to the friction of the upper atmospheric layers. After the probe has slowed down sufficiently, a system of parachutes ensures a slow descent to the surface of Titan in approximately two and a half hours. The scientific measurements can only begin after the heat shield, which is needed to protect the probe during the high temperature entry phase, has been ejected

  18. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  19. Question 1: Peptide nucleic acids and the origin and homochirality of life.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2007-10-01

    The possibilities of pseudo peptide DNA mimics like PNA (peptide nucleic acid) having a role for the prebiotic origin of life prior to an RNA world is discussed. In particular a scenario is proposed in which protocells with an achiral genetic material through several generations stepwise is converted into a chiral genetic material, e.g., by incorporation of RNA units. Provided that a sufficiently large sequence space is occupied, a selection process based on catalytic function in which a single cell (first common ancestor) has a definite evolutionary advantage, selection of this cell would by contingency also lock it into homochirality.

  20. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  1. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  2. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  3. Phospholipid Incorporation of Non-Methylene-Interrupted Fatty Acids (NMIFA) in Murine Microglial BV-2 Cells Reduces Pro-Inflammatory Mediator Production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Jung; Chuang, Lu-Te; Liao, Jia-Siang; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Hong-Hsin

    2015-12-01

    Sciadonic acid (SCA), pinolenic acid (PNA), and Δ7-eicosatrienoic acid (Δ7-ETrA) are three non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMIFA). Using murine microglial BV-2 cells, this study determined how NMIFA incorporation modulated phospholipid fatty acid composition and the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Each NMIFA was rapidly taken up and incorporated in BV-2 cells, resulting in the differential redistribution of total lipids. The cellular phospholipid fatty acid compositions were altered, and a significant decrease in the proportions of total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) was observed while the proportions of NMIFA and its metabolites accounted for 38% of the fatty acid total. Incubation of microglial cells with NMIFA suppressed production of LPS-stimulated pro-inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as the over-expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and type 2 cyclooxygenase (COX-2). These inhibitory effects could be accounted for, in part, by the inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling. In conclusion, Δ7-ETrA, PNA, and SCA are anti-inflammatory NMIFA that may be useful in suppressing in vitro immune responses involved in neural inflammation.

  4. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  5. Use of DNA Probes for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    cloned D sequences and mre recently clinical and enviromental sales. The fundamental ongets behind nuc -leic acid inr** m~licatigos. Nucleic acid probe...Professor of Pldical icrobiology and Virology In the School of Public Health and is Director of the Naval Biosciences Laboratory. The research reported here was supported by the Office of Naval Research. - ~-w~ -

  6. Ice-Borehole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  7. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  8. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  9. Fischer carbene mediated covalent grafting of a peptide nucleic acid on gold surfaces and IR optical detection of DNA hybridization with a transition metalcarbonyl label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Pratima; Ghasemi, Mahsa; Ray, Namrata; Sarkar, Amitabha; Kocabova, Jana; Lachmanova, Stepanka; Hromadova, Magdalena; Boujday, Souhir; Cauteruccio, Silvia; Thakare, Pramod; Licandro, Emanuela; Fosse, Céline; Salmain, Michèle

    2016-11-01

    Amine-reactive surfaces comprising N-hydroxysuccinimide ester groups as well as much more unusual Fischer alkoxymetallocarbene groups were generated on gold-coated surfaces via self-assembled monolayers of carboxy- and azido-terminated thiolates, respectively. These functions were further used to immobilize homothymine peptide nucleic acid (PNA) decamer in a covalent fashion involving the primary amine located at its N-terminus. These stepwise processes were monitored by polarization modulation reflection - absorption infrared spectroscopy (PM-RAIRS) that gave useful information on the molecular composition of the organic layers. PNA grafting and hybridization with complementary DNA strand were successfully transduced by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. Unfortunately, attempts to transduce the hybridization optically by IR in a label-free fashion were inconclusive. Therefore we undertook to introduce an IR reporter group, namely a transition metalcarbonyl (TMC) entity at the 5‧ terminus of complementary DNA. Evidence for the formation of PNA-DNA heteroduplex was brought by the presence of ν(Ctbnd O) bands in the 2000 cm-1 region of the IR spectrum of the gold surface owing to the metalcarbonyl label.

  10. Efficiency of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Directed PCR Clamping and Its Application in the Investigation of Natural Diets of the Japanese Eel Leptocephali

    PubMed Central

    Terahara, Takeshi; Chow, Seinen; Kurogi, Hiroaki; Lee, Sun-Hee; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Mochioka, Noritaka; Tanaka, Hideki; Takeyama, Haruko

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-clamping using blocking primer and DNA-analogs, such as peptide nucleotide acid (PNA), may be used to selectively amplify target DNA for molecular diet analysis. We investigated PCR-clamping efficiency by studying PNA position and mismatch with complementary DNA by designing PNAs at five different positions on the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1 of the Japanese eel Anguilla japonica in association with intra-specific nucleotide substitutions. All five PNAs were observed to efficiently inhibit amplification of a fully complementary DNA template. One mismatch between PNA and template DNA inhibited amplification of the template DNA, while two or more mismatches did not. DNA samples extracted from dorsal muscle and intestine of eight wild-caught leptochephalus larvae were subjected to this analysis, followed by cloning, nucleotide sequence analysis, and database homology search. Among 12 sequence types obtained from the intestine sample, six were identified as fungi. No sequence similarities were found in the database for the remaining six types, which were not related to one another. These results, in conjunction with our laboratory observations on larval feeding, suggest that eel leptocephali may not be dependent upon living plankton for their food source. PMID:22069444

  11. Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J.

    1982-01-01

    The deuterium hydrogen abundance ratio in the Venus atmosphere was measured while the inlets to the Pioneer Venus large probe mass spectrometer were coated with sulfuric acid from Venus' clouds. The ratio is (1.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the minus two power. It was found that the 100 fold enrichment of deuterium means that Venus outgassed at least 0.3% of a terrestrial ocean and possibly more.

  12. Chemical Probes to Directly Profile Palmitoleoylation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Baohui; Jarugumilli, Gopala K; Chen, Baoen; Wu, Xu

    2016-11-03

    Palmitoleoylation is a unique fatty acylation of proteins in which a monounsaturated fatty acid, palmitoleic acid (C16:1), is covalently attached to a protein. Wnt proteins are known to be palmitoleoylated by cis-Δ9 palmitoleate at conserved serine residues. O-palmitoleoylation plays a critical role in regulating Wnt secretion, binding to the receptors, and in the dynamics of Wnt signaling. Therefore, protein palmitoleoylation is important in tissue homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Chemical probes based on saturated fatty acids, such as ω-alkynyl palmitic acid (Alk-14 or Alk-C16 ), have been used to study Wnt palmitoleoylation. However, such probes require prior conversion to the unsaturated fatty acid by stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in cells, significantly decreasing their selectivity and efficiency for studying protein palmitoleoylation. We synthesized and characterized ω-alkynyl cis- and trans-palmitoleic acids (cis- and trans-Alk-14:1) as chemical probes to directly study protein palmitoleoylation. We found that cis-Alk-14:1 could more efficiently label Wnt proteins in cells. Interestingly, the DHHC family of palmitoyl acyltransferases can charge both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, potentially using both as acyl donors in protein palmitoylation and palmitoleoylation. Furthermore, proteomic analysis of targets labeled by these probes revealed new cis- and trans-palmitoleoylated proteins. Our studies provided new chemical tools and revealed new insights into palmitoleoylation in cell signaling.

  13. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  14. Laboratory plasma probe studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic experiments performed in a collisionless plasma using CO2 as the working gas are described. In particular, simultaneous measurements that have been performed by means of Langmuir- and RF-probes are presented. A resonance occurring above the parallel resonance in the frequency characteristic of a two electrode system is interpreted as being due to the resonant excitation of electroacoustic waves.

  15. Probing the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  16. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, Timothy D.

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  17. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  18. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  19. The Phoenix Pluto Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunning, George R.; Spapperi, Jeff; Wilkinson, Jeffrey P.; Eldred, Jim; Labij, Dennis; Strinni, Meredith

    1990-01-01

    A design proposal for an unmanned probe to Pluto is presented. The topics covered include: (1) scientific instrumentation; (2) mission management, planning, and costing; (3) power and propulsion system; (4) structural subsystem; (5) command, control, and communication; and (6) attitude and articulation control.

  20. Mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Soleimanpour, Saeideh; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    This article assembles pertinent insights behind the concept of planarizable push-pull probes. As a response to the planarization of their polarized ground state, a red shift of their excitation maximum is expected