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Sample records for acid polymerase activity

  1. Ribonucleic acid polymerase activities in Jerusalem-artichoke tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gore, John R.; Ingle, John

    1974-01-01

    1. Artichoke tuber tissue contained RNA polymerase activity bound to the chromatin and in the supernatant after chromatin sedimentation. 2. The activity in the supernatant, the soluble polymerase, was fractionated into polymerases I and II by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and the properties of each activity were determined. 3. The proportions of chromatin-bound and soluble activities varied with growth of the tissue, and there was a correlation between chromatin-bound activity and RNA accumulation. 4. The properties of the solubilized chromatin activity were compared with those of the soluble activity, and the relationship between these two activities is discussed. PMID:4464848

  2. Characterization of a Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase Activity Associated with Purified Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus of the Silkworm Bombyx mori1

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, L. J.; Kalmakoff, J.; Tanada, Y.

    1969-01-01

    Purified cytoplasmic-polyhedrosis virus has been found to have associated with it a polymerase activity capable of catalyzing the synthesis of virus-specific, single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) from the double-stranded RNA genome. PMID:16789118

  3. Computational investigation of locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides in the active sites of DNA polymerases by molecular docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Madala, Praveen K; Højland, Torben; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers constitute a potential class of therapeutic molecules typically selected from a large pool of oligonucleotides against a specific target. With a scope of developing unique shorter aptamers with very high biostability and affinity, locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides have been investigated as a substrate for various polymerases. Various reports showed that some thermophilic B-family DNA polymerases, particularly KOD and Phusion DNA polymerases, accepted LNA-nucleoside 5'-triphosphates as substrates. In this study, we investigated the docking of LNA nucleotides in the active sites of RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases by molecular docking simulations. The study revealed that the incoming LNA-TTP is bound in the active site of the RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases in a manner similar to that seen in the case of dTTP, and with LNA structure, there is no other option than the locked C3'-endo conformation which in fact helps better orienting within the active site. PMID:25036012

  4. Computational Investigation of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Nucleotides in the Active Sites of DNA Polymerases by Molecular Docking Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Madala, Praveen K.; Højland, Torben; Veedu, Rakesh N.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers constitute a potential class of therapeutic molecules typically selected from a large pool of oligonucleotides against a specific target. With a scope of developing unique shorter aptamers with very high biostability and affinity, locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides have been investigated as a substrate for various polymerases. Various reports showed that some thermophilic B-family DNA polymerases, particularly KOD and Phusion DNA polymerases, accepted LNA-nucleoside 5′-triphosphates as substrates. In this study, we investigated the docking of LNA nucleotides in the active sites of RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases by molecular docking simulations. The study revealed that the incoming LNA-TTP is bound in the active site of the RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases in a manner similar to that seen in the case of dTTP, and with LNA structure, there is no other option than the locked C3′-endo conformation which in fact helps better orienting within the active site. PMID:25036012

  5. The activity of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase and deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in nuclei from brain fractionated by zonal centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Stambolova, M. A.; Cox, D.; Mathias, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    1. The DNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.7) activity in purified intact brain nuclei from infant rats was investigated. The effects of pH, Mg2+, glycerol, sonication and storage of the nuclei under different conditions were examined and a suitable assay system was established. 2. The nuclei from infant brain cells were fractionated by zonal centrifugation in a discontinuous sucrose gradient into five zones: zone (I) contained neuronal nuclei (59%) and astrocytic nuclei (41%); zone (II) contained astrocytic nuclei (81%) and neuronal nuclei (19%); zone (III) contained astrocytic nuclei (82%) and oligodendrocytic nuclei (18%); zone (IV) contained oligodendrocytic nuclei (92%) and zone (V) contained oligodendrocytic nuclei (100%). 3. The content of DNA, RNA and protein for each fraction was measured. 4. The distribution of DNA polymerase activity in the fractionated infant and adult rat brain nuclei was determined. The highest activity was found in the neuronal nuclei from zone (I) and the following zones exhibited a progressive decline. In contrast with the nuclei from infant rats those from adults had a much higher activity and expressed a preference for native DNA as template. 5. The deoxyribonuclease activity in all classes of nuclei was measured with [3H]DNA as substrate. A general correspondence in the pattern of the relative activities in the nuclear fractions with the distribution of DNA polymerase was found. 6. The incorporation of [3H]thymidine into nuclear DNA in infant and adult rat brain was investigated. The specific radioactivity of the DNA in the 10-day-old rats was highest in zone (V) whereas in the nuclei of adult rats, which exhibited a comparatively low incorporation, the highest specific radioactivity was associated with zones (I) and (V). PMID:4780694

  6. Polymerase Activity of Pichinde Virus

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michael F.; Biswal, Nilambar; Rawls, William E.

    1974-01-01

    Pichinde virus, a member of the arenavirus group, was examined for polymerase activity. Purified virus was found to contain RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but not RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. Since RNase but neither DNase nor actinomycin D inhibited the endogenous polymerase reaction, RNA of the virus appeared to be used as the template. The divalent cations Mg2+ and Mn2+ were required for optimal reactivity. The RNA product was partially resistant to RNase and the resistant portion had a sedimentation coefficient of 22 to 26S in sucrose gradients. PMID:4132669

  7. Impairment of the catalytic activity of Escherichia coli ribonucleic acid polymerase by a unique reaction of 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan.

    PubMed Central

    Bratcher, S C; Nitta, K; Kronman, M J

    1979-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase loses 55-65% of its catalytic activity on reaction with Nbf-Cl (4-choro-7-nitrobenzofurazan). This partial inactivation was shown to be the result of specific impairment of RNA-chain elongation, since initiation of RNA chains was not altered after treatment with Nbf-Cl. The site of reaction was shown to be a unique thiol on the beta-subunit. This thiol is not accessible to reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). No protection of the enzyme against reaction with Nbf-Cl could be obtained with the inhibitor rifamycin nor with calf thymus DNA, GTP or 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating that the unique thiol is probably not within the active site. The specific impairment of RNA-chain elongation thus appears to be the result of a local conformational change which leaves chain initiation unimpaired. Changes observed in the tryptophan fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme or reaction with Nbf-Cl are consistent with formation of a Meisenheimer complex of the reagent with a nucleophilic group on the enzyme near the reactive thiol. It is proposed that formation of such a complex and a subsequent conformational change renders this thiol unusually susceptible to reaction with Nbf-Cl. PMID:393251

  8. The origin and early evolution of nucleic acid polymerases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Cappello, R.; Valverde, V.; Llaca, V.; Oro, J.

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis that vestiges of the ancestral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase involved in the replication of RNA genomes of Archean cells are present in the eubacterial RNA-polymerase beta-prime subunit and its homologues is discussed. It is shown that, in the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases from three cellular lineages, a very conserved sequence of eight amino acids, also found in a small RNA-binding site previously described for the E. coli polynucleotide phosphorylase and the S1 ribosomal protein, is present. The optimal conditions for the replicase activity of the avian-myeloblastosis-virus reverse transcriptase are presented. The evolutionary significance of the in vitro modifications of substrate and template specificities of RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases is discussed.

  9. Deoxyribonucleic acid of Cancer pagurus. II. Tempiate activity for a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase of eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    De Recondo, Anne-Marie; Londos-Gagliardi, Danielle; Aubel-Sadron, Geneviève

    1974-01-01

    The template activity of Cancer pagurus DNA and its two components (poly d(A-T) and main component) in response to a DNA polymerase purified from regenerating rat liver has been studied and compared to the results previously obtained with synthetic templates. In the double-stranded native state, whole crab DNA and the main component were poor templates. Their replication was increased by thermal denaturation and inhibited by actinomycin. Like the synthetic copolymer poly[d(A-T)·d(T-A)], native crab poly d(A-T) could be copied and its duplication was not inhibited by actinomycin. The structural difference between native poly d(A-T) Form I, isolated on a density gradient, and partially renatured poly d(A-T) Form II, isolated on hydroxylapatite, resulted in a modification of their template activity. The kinetic studies of [3H] dGMP and [3H] dAMP incorporation confirmed the importance of single-stranded regions (particulary dC regions) in the initiation of the in vitro duplication. PMID:10793685

  10. Directed evolution of novel polymerase activities: Mutation of a DNA polymerase into an efficient RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Gang; Chen, Liangjing; Sera, Takashi; Fa, Ming; Schultz, Peter G.; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2002-01-01

    The creation of novel enzymatic function is of great interest, but remains a challenge because of the large sequence space of proteins. We have developed an activity-based selection method to evolve DNA polymerases with RNA polymerase activity. The Stoffel fragment (SF) of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I is displayed on a filamentous phage by fusing it to a pIII coat protein, and the substrate DNA template/primer duplexes are attached to other adjacent pIII coat proteins. Phage particles displaying SF polymerases, which are able to extend the attached oligonucleotide primer by incorporating ribonucleoside triphosphates and biotinylated UTP, are immobilized to streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and subsequently recovered. After four rounds of screening an SF library, three SF mutants were isolated and shown to incorporate ribonucleoside triphosphates virtually as efficiently as the wild-type enzyme incorporates dNTP substrates. PMID:12011423

  11. Directed evolution of DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activity in a single polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer L; Loakes, David; Jaroslawski, Szymon; Too, Kathleen; Holliger, Philipp

    2006-08-18

    DNA polymerases enable key technologies in modern biology but for many applications, native polymerases are limited by their stringent substrate recognition. Here we describe short-patch compartmentalized self-replication (spCSR), a novel strategy to expand the substrate spectrum of polymerases in a targeted way. spCSR is based on the previously described CSR, but unlike CSR only a short region (a "patch") of the gene under investigation is diversified and replicated. This allows the selection of polymerases under conditions where catalytic activity and processivity are compromised to the extent that full self-replication is inefficient. We targeted two specific motifs involved in substrate recognition in the active site of DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and selected for incorporation of both ribonucleotide- (NTP) and deoxyribonucleotide-triphosphates (dNTPs) using spCSR. This allowed the isolation of multiple variants of Taq with apparent dual substrate specificity. They were able to synthesize RNA, while still retaining essentially wild-type (wt) DNA polymerase activity as judged by PCR. One such mutant (AA40: E602V, A608V, I614M, E615G) was able to incorporate both NTPs and dNTPs with the same catalytic efficiency as the wt enzyme incorporates dNTPs. AA40 allowed the generation of mixed RNA-DNA amplification products in PCR demonstrating DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase as well as reverse transcriptase activity within the same polypeptide. Furthermore, AA40 displayed an expanded substrate spectrum towards other 2'-substituted nucleotides and was able to synthesize nucleic acid polymers in which each base bore a different 2'-substituent. Our results suggest that spCSR will be a powerful strategy for the generation of polymerases with altered substrate specificity for applications in nano- and biotechnology and in the enzymatic synthesis of antisense and RNAi probes. PMID:16859707

  12. Structure-activity relationship studies of new rifamycins containing l-amino acid esters as inhibitors of bacterial RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Czerwonka, Dominika; Domagalska, Joanna; Pyta, Krystian; Kubicka, Marcelina M; Pecyna, Paulina; Gajecka, Marzena; Przybylski, Piotr

    2016-06-30

    New rifamycins (1-12) combined with different l-amino acids, containing methyl, ethyl, tert-butyl and benzyl groups at the ester part, via amine linkage, were synthesized and their structures in solution were determined by spectroscopic FT-IR and 1D and 2D NMR methods as well as visualized by DFT calculations. Two types of rifamycin structures were detected in solution: a zwitterionic one with the transferred proton from O(8)H phenol to secondary N(38) atom and a pseudocyclic structure stabilized via formation of intramolecular H-bond within the protonated basic C(3)-substituent. The presence of these rifamycins' structures influenced physico-chemical (logP, solubility) parameters and antibacterial properties. The bulkiness at the ester substituent of new rifamycins containing aromatic l-amino acids was found to be an important factor, besides the solubility, to achieve relatively high antibacterial activity against reference S. epidermidis and reference S. aureus and MRSA strains (MICs 0.016-0.063 μg/mL), comparable to that of rifampicin. SAR for the novel derivatives was discussed in view of the calculated structures of rifamycin-RNAP complexes. PMID:27061985

  13. Characteristic amino acid changes of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus PA protein enhance A(H7N9) viral polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Tan, Likai; Lu, Gen; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Human coinfection with a novel H7N9 influenza virus and the 2009 pandemic A(H1N1) influenza virus, H1N1pdm09, has recently been reported in China. Because reassortment can occur during coinfection, it is necessary to clarify the effects of gene reassortment between these two viruses. Among the viral ribonucleoprotein complex (vRNP) genes, only the PA gene of H1N1pdm09 enhances the avian influenza viral polymerase activity. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, we show a special evolutionary feature of the H1N1pdm09 PA gene, which clustered with those of the novel H7N9 virus and related H9N2 viruses, rather than in the outgroup as the H1N1pdm09 genes do on the phylogenetic trees of other vRNP genes. Using a minigenome system of the novel H7N9 virus, we further demonstrate that replacement of its PA gene significantly enhanced its polymerase activity, whereas replacement of the other vRNP genes reduced its polymerase activity. We also show that the residues of PA evolutionarily conserved between H1N1pdm09 and the novel H7N9 virus are associated with attenuated or neutral polymerase activity. The mutations associated with the increased activity of the novel H7N9 polymerase are characteristic of the H1N1pdm09 gene, and are located almost adjacent to the surface of the PA protein. Our results suggest that the novel H7N9 virus has more effective PB1, PB2, and NP genes than H1N1pdm09, and that H1N1pdm09-like PA mutations enhance the novel H7N9 polymerase function. PMID:26980671

  14. New Deoxyribonucleic Acid Polymerase Induced by Bacillus subtilis Bacteriophage PBS2

    PubMed Central

    Price, Alan R.; Cook, Sandra J.

    1972-01-01

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of Bacillus subtilis phage PBS2 has been confirmed to contain uracil instead of thymine. PBS2 phage infection of wild-type cells or DNA polymerase-deficient cells results in an increase in the specific activity of DNA polymerase. This induction of DNA polymerase activity is prevented by actinomycin D and chloramphenicol. In contrast to the major B. subtilis DNA polymerase, which prefers deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) to deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP), the DNA polymerase in crude extracts of PBS2-infected cells is equally active whether dTTP or dUTP is employed. This phage-induced polymerase may be responsible for the synthesis of uracil-containing DNA during PBS2 phage infection. PMID:4623224

  15. Contemporaneous isolation of deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid polymerase and poly(A) polymerase from rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Gallerani, R; di Istituto; Istituto di, Ch; Saccone, C

    1976-01-01

    1. Poly(A) polymerase and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from rat liver mitochondria can be completely separated by using two different chromatographic procedures. 2. Poly(A) polymerase can only incorporate ATP into acid-insoluble material and strongly depends on the addition of an endogenous factor (probably containing a mixture of oligoribonucleotides), but it is not stimulated by DNA. 3. RNA polymerase is fully DNA-dependent and rifampicin-sensitive, but was not stimulated by the endogenous factor mentioned above. 4. The chromatographic behaviour of the two enzymes, together with the properties described, suggest that they represent two different protein molecules. PMID:962867

  16. Inhibition of ribonucleic acid polymerase by a bacteriocin from Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Mossie, K G; Robb, F T; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1981-01-01

    The Bacteroides fragilis bacteriocin which inhibits ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase activity had a narrow activity spectrum in vivo and only inhibited the growth of certain B. fragilis strains. In vitro the bacteriocin was not specific and inhibited RNA polymerases from widely diverse bacterial genera. RNA polymerases from rifampin-resistant strains of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Clostridium acetobutylicum were resistant to the bacteriocin in vitro. Purified bacteriocin bound to partially purified RNA polymerase, and both proteins were cosedimented in a glycerol gradient. In the RNA polymerase reaction, the bacteriocin acted as a competitive inhibitor for adenosine, cytidine, and uridine 5'-triphosphates and as a noncompetitive inhibitor for guanosine 5'-triphosphate. The bacteriocin did not inhibit RNA polymerase from chicken embryos. PMID:6177280

  17. Hepatitis B virus: DNA polymerase activity of deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Hong, Y B; Jung, G

    1999-02-01

    The hepadnavirus P gene product is a multifunctional protein with priming, DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, and RNase H activities. Nested N- or C-terminal deletion mutations and deletions of domain(s) in human HBV polymerase have been made. Wild-type and deletion forms of MBP-fused HBV polymerase were expressed in E. coli, purified by amylose column chromatography, and the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activities of the purified proteins were compared. Deletion of the terminal protein or spacer regions reduced enzyme activity to 70%, respectively. However, deletion of the RNase H domain affected polymerase activity more than that of the terminal protein or spacer region. The polymerase domain alone or the N-terminal deletion of the polymerase domain still exhibited enzymatic activity. In this report, it is demonstrated that the minimal domain for the polymerizing activity of the HBV polymerase is smaller than the polymerase domain. PMID:10205676

  18. Fractionation of nuclei from brain by zonal centrifugation and a study of the ribonucleic acid polymerase activity in the various classes of nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Austoker, J.; Cox, D.; Mathias, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    1. The nuclei of the cells of the whole rat brain have been fractionated in a B-XIV zonal rotor with a discontinuous gradient of sucrose. Five fractions were obtained. Zone (I) contained neuronal nuclei (70%) and astrocytic nuclei (23%). Zone (II) contained astrocytic nuclei (81%) and neuronal nuclei (15%). Zone (III) contained astrocytic nuclei (84%) and oligodendrocytic nuclei (15%). Zone (IV) contained oligodendrocytic nuclei (92%) and zone (V) contained only oligodendrocytic nuclei. 2. The content of DNA, RNA and protein per nucleus was determined for each zone. Although the amount of DNA per nucleus is constant (7pg) the RNA varies from 4.5 to 2.5pg/nucleus and the protein from 38 to 17.6pg/nucleus. The neuronal nuclei have the greatest amounts of protein. The oligodendrocytic nuclei have the least content of RNA and protein. 3. The effects of pH, ionic strength, and Mg2+ and Mn2+ concentration on the activity of the nuclear system for synthesis in vitro of RNA have been investigated for unfractionated nuclei. From these studies a standard set of conditions for the assay of nuclear RNA polymerase has been established. 4. The activity of the RNA polymerase in each of the zonal fractions has been determined in the presence and in the absence of α-amanitin. Zone (II) is the most active, followed by zone (I). The nuclei of zones (IV) and (V) have comparable activity, which is 40% of that of zone (II). 5. The extent of incorporation of each of the four labelled nucleoside triphosphates by the nuclei from each zone has been measured. These values have been used to calculate the base composition of the RNA synthesized in vitro in each class of nucleus. 6. The effect of changes in the condition of assay of RNA polymerase in the different classes of nuclei has been investigated. Significant differences in the response to concentrations of metal ions and ammonium sulphate have been observed. 7. Homopolymer formation in each zone of brain nuclei has been determined. The

  19. relA-dependent RNA polymerase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ryals, J; Bremer, H

    1982-01-01

    Parameters relating to RNA synthesis were measured after a temperature shift from 30 to 42 degrees C, in a relA+ and relA- isogenic pair of Escherichia coli strains containing a temperature-sensitive valyl tRNA synthetase. The following results were obtained: (i) the rRNA chain growth rate increased 2-fold in both strains; (ii) newly synthesized rRNA became unstable in both strains; (iii) the stable RNA gene activity (rRNA and tRNA, measured as stable RNA synthesis rate relative to the total instantaneous rate of RNA synthesis) decreased 1.7-fold in the relA+ strain and increased 1.9-fold in the relA mutant; and (iv) the RNA polymerase activity (measured by the percentage of total RNA polymerase enzyme active in transcription an any instant) decreased from 20 to 3.6% in the relA+ strain and remained unchanged (or increased at most to 22%) in the relA mutant. It is suggested that both rRNA gene activity and the RNA polymerase activity depend on the intracellular concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate, whereas the altered chain elongation rate and stability of rRNA are temperature or amino acid starvation effects, respectively, without involvement of relA function. PMID:6174501

  20. Mutations affecting two adjacent amino acid residues in the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase block transcriptional activation by the bacteriophage P2 Ogr protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, D J; Sunshine, M G; Six, E W; Christie, G E

    1994-01-01

    The bacteriophage P2 ogr gene product is a positive regulator of transcription from P2 late promoters. The ogr gene was originally defined by compensatory mutations that overcame the block to P2 growth imposed by a host mutation, rpoA109, in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase. DNA sequence analysis has confirmed that this mutation affects the C-terminal region of the alpha subunit, changing a leucine residue at position 290 to a histidine (rpoAL290H). We have employed a reporter plasmid system to screen other, previously described, rpoA mutants for effects on activation of a P2 late promoter and have identified a second allele, rpoA155, that blocks P2 late transcription. This mutation lies just upstream of rpoAL290H, changing the leucine residue at position 289 to a phenylalanine (rpoAL289F). The effect of the rpoAL289F mutation is not suppressed by the rpoAL290H-compensatory P2 ogr mutation. P2 ogr mutants that overcome the block imposed by rpoAL289F were isolated and characterized. Our results are consistent with a direct interaction between Ogr and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase and support a model in which transcription factor contact sites within the C terminus of alpha are discrete and tightly clustered. PMID:8002564

  1. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells. PMID:27258298

  2. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells. PMID:27258298

  3. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  4. Improving Polymerase Activity with Unnatural Substrates by Sampling Mutations in Homologous Protein Architectures.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Matthew R; Otto, Carine; Fenton, Kathryn E; Chaput, John C

    2016-05-20

    The ability to synthesize and propagate genetic information encoded in the framework of xeno-nucleic acid (XNA) polymers would inform a wide range of topics from the origins of life to synthetic biology. While directed evolution has produced examples of engineered polymerases that can accept XNA substrates, these enzymes function with reduced activity relative to their natural counterparts. Here, we describe a biochemical strategy that enables the discovery of engineered polymerases with improved activity for a given unnatural polymerase function. Our approach involves identifying specificity determining residues (SDRs) that control polymerase activity, screening mutations at SDR positions in a model polymerase scaffold, and assaying key gain-of-function mutations in orthologous protein architectures. By transferring beneficial mutations between homologous protein structures, we show that new polymerases can be identified that function with superior activity relative to their starting donor scaffold. This concept, which we call scaffold sampling, was used to generate engineered DNA polymerases that can faithfully synthesize RNA and TNA (threose nucleic acid), respectively, on a DNA template with high primer-extension efficiency and low template sequence bias. We suggest that the ability to combine phenotypes from different donor and recipient scaffolds provides a new paradigm in polymerase engineering where natural structural diversity can be used to refine the catalytic activity of synthetic enzymes. PMID:26860781

  5. A DNA polymerase activity is associated with Cauliflower Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed Central

    Menissier, J; Laquel, P; Lebeurier, G; Hirth, L

    1984-01-01

    A DNA polymerase activity is found within the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) particle. Analysis of the reaction product reveals that the linear form of the virion DNA is preferentially labelled. The molecular weight of the DNA polymerase as determined on an "activity gel" is 76 kDa. Images PMID:6514573

  6. Escherichia coli DnaE Polymerase Couples Pyrophosphatase Activity to DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lapenta, Fabio; Montón Silva, Alejandro; Brandimarti, Renato; Lanzi, Massimiliano; Gratani, Fabio Lino; Vellosillo Gonzalez, Perceval; Perticarari, Sofia; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    DNA Polymerases generate pyrophosphate every time they catalyze a step of DNA elongation. This elongation reaction is generally believed as thermodynamically favoured by the hydrolysis of pyrophosphate, catalyzed by inorganic pyrophosphatases. However, the specific action of inorganic pyrophosphatases coupled to DNA replication in vivo was never demonstrated. Here we show that the Polymerase-Histidinol-Phosphatase (PHP) domain of Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III α subunit features pyrophosphatase activity. We also show that this activity is inhibited by fluoride, as commonly observed for inorganic pyrophosphatases, and we identified 3 amino acids of the PHP active site. Remarkably, E. coli cells expressing variants of these catalytic residues of α subunit feature aberrant phenotypes, poor viability, and are subject to high mutation frequencies. Our findings indicate that DNA Polymerases can couple DNA elongation and pyrophosphate hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for the control of DNA extension rate, and suggest a promising target for novel antibiotics. PMID:27050298

  7. Sphingosine, a modulator of human translesion DNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Kamath-Loeb, Ashwini S; Balakrishna, Sharath; Whittington, Dale; Shen, Jiang-Cheng; Emond, Mary J; Okabe, Takayoshi; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Nishimura, Susumu; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2014-08-01

    Translesion (TLS) DNA polymerases are specialized, error-prone enzymes that synthesize DNA across bulky, replication-stalling DNA adducts. In so doing, they facilitate the progression of DNA synthesis and promote cell proliferation. To potentiate the effect of cancer chemotherapeutic regimens, we sought to identify inhibitors of TLS DNA polymerases. We screened five libraries of ∼ 3000 small molecules, including one comprising ∼ 600 nucleoside analogs, for their effect on primer extension activity of DNA polymerase η (Pol η). We serendipitously identified sphingosine, a lipid-signaling molecule that robustly stimulates the activity of Pol η by ∼ 100-fold at low micromolar concentrations but inhibits it at higher concentrations. This effect is specific to the Y-family DNA polymerases, Pols η, κ, and ι. The addition of a single phosphate group on sphingosine completely abrogates this effect. Likewise, the inclusion of other sphingolipids, including ceramide and sphingomyelin to extension reactions does not elicit this response. Sphingosine increases the rate of correct and incorrect nucleotide incorporation while having no effect on polymerase processivity. Endogenous Pol η activity is modulated similarly as the recombinant enzyme. Importantly, sphingosine-treated cells exhibit increased lesion bypass activity, and sphingosine tethered to membrane lipids mimics the effects of free sphingosine. Our studies have uncovered sphingosine as a modulator of TLS DNA polymerase activity; this property of sphingosine may be associated with its known role as a signaling molecule in regulating cell proliferation in response to cellular stress. PMID:24928506

  8. Modified pseudomonas oleovorans phaC1 nucleic acids encoding bispecific polyhydroxyalkanoate polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Srienc, Friedrich; Jackson, John K.; Somers, David A.

    2000-01-01

    A genetically engineered Pseudomonas oleovorans phaC1 polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymerase having tailored substrate specificity is provided. The modified PHA polymerase is preferably a "bispecific" PHA polymerase capable of copolymerizing a short chain length monomer and a medium chain length monomer is provided. Methods for making the modified PHA polymerase and for making nucleic acids encoding the modified PHA polymerase are also disclosed, as are methods of producing PHA using the modified PHA polymerase. The invention further includes methods to assay for altered substrate specificity.

  9. Poliovirus Polyuridylic Acid Polymerase and RNA Replicase Have the Same Viral Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Flanegan, James B.; Baltimore, David

    1979-01-01

    A poliovirus-specific polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] polymerase that copies a polyadenylic acid template complexed to an oligouridylic acid primer was isolated from the membrane fraction of infected HeLa cells and was found to sediment at 4 to 5S on a linear 5 to 20% glycerol gradient. When the poly(U) polymerase was isolated from cells labeled with [35S]methionine and was analyzed by glycerol gradient centrifugation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the position of only one viral protein was found to correlate with the location of enzyme activity. This protein had an apparent molecular weight of 62,500 based on its electrophoretic mobility relative to that of several molecular weight standards and was designated p63. When the poly(U) polymerase was isolated from the soluble fraction of a cytoplasmic extract, the activity was found to sediment at about 7S. In this case, however, both p63 and NCVP2 (77,000-dalton precursor of p63) cosedimented with the 7S activity peak. When the 7S polymerase activity was purified by phosphocellulose chromatography, both p63 and NCVP2 were found to co-chromatograph with poly(U) polymerase activity. The poliovirus replicase complexed with its endogenous RNA template was isolated from infected cells labeled with [35S]methionine and was centrifuged through a linear 15 to 30% glycerol gradient. The major viral polypeptide component in a 26S peak of replicase activity was p63, but small amounts of other poliovirus proteins were also present. When the replicase-template complex was treated with RNase T1 before centrifugation, a single peak of activity was found that sedimented at 20S and contained only labeled p63. Thus, p63 was found to be the only viral polypeptide in the replicase bound to its endogenous RNA template, and appears to be active as a poly(U) polymerase either as a monomer protein or as a 7S complex. Images PMID:219230

  10. Regulation of the Nucleolar DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase by Amino Acids in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Franze-Fernández, M. T.; Pogo, A. O.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were performed to ascertain the degree to which the amount of amino acids might be one of the regulatory factors that control the activity of the nucleolar RNA polymerase. Assays of the enzymatic activity were done with isolated nuclei from cells incubated with low and high concentrations of amino acids. Soon after the cells were exposed to a medium enriched in amino acids, a rapid increase of nucleolar RNA polymerase activity occurred. A similar result was obtained in cells incubated with lower concentrations of amino acids. However, the rate of ribosomal RNA synthesized was regularly much higher in cells incubated in a medium enriched with amino acids than in a medium low in amino acids. Apparently, the amino acids only controlled ribosomal RNA synthesis. Thus, neither maturation, processing, and transport of nuclear precursors into cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA, nor the synthesis of rapidly labeled RNA was affected. PMID:4108870

  11. Active RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei Harbors a Novel Subunit Essential for Transcription▿

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tu N.; Schimanski, Bernd; Günzl, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    A unique characteristic of the protistan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is a multifunctional RNA polymerase I which, in addition to synthesizing rRNA as in other eukaryotes, transcribes gene units encoding the major cell surface antigens variant surface glycoprotein and procyclin. Thus far, purification of this enzyme has revealed nine orthologues of known subunits but no active enzyme. Here, we have epitope tagged the specific subunit RPB6z and tandem affinity purified RNA polymerase I from crude extract. The purified enzyme was active in both a nonspecific and a promoter-dependent transcription assay and exhibited enriched protein bands with apparent sizes of 31, 29, and 27 kDa. p31 and its trypanosomatid orthologues were identified, but their amino acid sequences have no similarity to proteins of other eukaryotes, nor do they contain a conserved sequence motif. Nevertheless, p31 cosedimented with purified RNA polymerase I, and RNA interferance-mediated silencing of p31 was lethal, affecting the abundance of rRNA. Moreover, extract of p31-silenced cells exhibited a specific defect in transcription of class I templates, which was remedied by the addition of purified RNA polymerase I, and an anti-p31 serum completely blocked RNA polymerase I-mediated transcription. We therefore dubbed this novel functional component of T. brucei RNA polymerase I TbRPA31. PMID:17606628

  12. Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase by Nucleic Acid Metabolite 7-Methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Nilov, D. K.; Tararov, V. I.; Kulikov, A. V.; Zakharenko, A. L.; Gushchina, I. V.; Mikhailov, S. N.; Lavrik, O. I.; Švedas, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of 7-methylguanine, a nucleic acid metabolite, to inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-2 (PARP-2) has been identified in silico and studied experimentally. The amino group at position 2 and the methyl group at position 7 were shown to be important substituents for the efficient binding of purine derivatives to PARPs. The activity of both tested enzymes, PARP-1 and PARP-2, was suppressed by 7-methylguanine with IC50 values of 150 and 50 μM, respectively. At the PARP inhibitory concentration, 7-methylguanine itself was not cytotoxic, but it was able to accelerate apoptotic death of BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells induced by cisplatin and doxorubicin, the widely used DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents. 7-Methylguanine possesses attractive predictable pharmacokinetics and an adverse-effect profile and may be considered as a new additive to chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:27437145

  13. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  14. Interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four nucleic acid binding proteins DNase I, RNase A, reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Utpal; Giri, Kalyan; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.

    2009-12-01

    In the investigation of interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four biologically important proteins we observed inhibition of enzymatic activity of DNase I, RNase A, M-MLV reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase by ATA in vitro assay. As the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the main catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, we also monitored effect of ATA on telomerase activity in vivo and observed dose-dependent inhibition of telomerase activity in Chinese hamster V79 cells treated with ATA. Direct association of ATA with DNase I ( Kd = 9.019 μM)), RNase A ( Kd = 2.33 μM) reverse transcriptase ( Kd = 0.255 μM) and Taq polymerase ( Kd = 81.97 μM) was further shown by tryptophan fluorescence quenching studies. Such association altered the three-dimensional conformation of DNase I, RNase A and Taq polymerase as detected by circular dichroism. We propose ATA inhibits enzymatic activity of the four proteins through interfering with DNA or RNA binding to the respective proteins either competitively or allosterically, i.e. by perturbing three-dimensional structure of enzymes.

  15. Polymerase/DNA interactions and enzymatic activity: multi-parameter analysis with electro-switchable biosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Andreas; Schräml, Michael; Strasser, Ralf; Daub, Herwin; Myers, Thomas; Heindl, Dieter; Rant, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The engineering of high-performance enzymes for future sequencing and PCR technologies as well as the development of many anticancer drugs requires a detailed analysis of DNA/RNA synthesis processes. However, due to the complex molecular interplay involved, real-time methodologies have not been available to obtain comprehensive information on both binding parameters and enzymatic activities. Here we introduce a chip-based method to investigate polymerases and their interactions with nucleic acids, which employs an electrical actuation of DNA templates on microelectrodes. Two measurement modes track both the dynamics of the induced switching process and the DNA extension simultaneously to quantitate binding kinetics, dissociation constants and thermodynamic energies. The high sensitivity of the method reveals previously unidentified tight binding states for Taq and Pol I (KF) DNA polymerases. Furthermore, the incorporation of label-free nucleotides can be followed in real-time and changes in the DNA polymerase conformation (finger closing) during enzymatic activity are observable.

  16. Effect of nitroso-chloramphenicol on mitochondrial DNA polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.O.; Abou-Khalil, W.H.; Yunis, A.A.; Abou-Khalil, S.

    1984-08-01

    A study was made of the effects of nitroso-chloramphenicol, chloramphenicol, amino-chloramphenicol, and thiamphenicol on the activity of mitochondrial DNA polymerase of rat liver. /sup 3/H-thymidine triphosphate incorporation into DNA was used to measure the DNA polymerase activity in the mitochondrial matrix fraction. This fraction was in the supernatant of sonicated mitochondria obtained by ultracentrifugation. Under standard experimental conditions, thymidine triphosphate incorporation was time dependent up to 10 minutes. This activity was enhanced by ..beta..-mercaptoethanol and was blocked by the known polymerase inhibitors ethidium bromide and 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate. Chloramphenicol and its analogues, amino-chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol, did not have a significant effect on the polymerase activity, whereas nitroso-chloramphenicol was inhibitory. The degree of inhibition was dependent on the experimental conditions. Thus, in the absence of ..beta..-mercaptoethanol, nitroso-chloramphenicol was inhibitory. The degree of inhibition was dependent on the experimental conditions. Under similar conditions, the addition of dithiothreitol also provided partial protection. On the other hand, the inhibition by nitroso-chloramphenicol was significantly enhanced with its preincubation in the mitochondrial matrix fraction before the addition of nucleotides and DNA; thus after 40 minutes of preincubation, nitroso-chloramphenicol at a concentration of 200 ..mu..mol/L gave 53% inhibition, and produced total inhibition at 600 ..mu..mol/L. The addition of NADH or NADPH to the preincubation medium produced substantial protection against nitroso-chloramphenicol, whereas nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide had no effect. These results suggest that mitochondrial DNA polymerase may be a target for nitroso-chloramphenicol action.

  17. Hydroxyquinolines inhibit ribonucleic acid-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase and inactivate Rous sarcoma virus and herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Rohde, W; Mikelens, P; Jackson, J; Blackman, J; Whitcher, J; Levinson, W

    1976-08-01

    8-Hydroxyquinoline and several of its derivatives inactivate the transforming ability of Rous sarcoma virus and inhibit its ribonucleic acid-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase activity. The copper complex of these metal-binding ligands is as active as the free ligand. The activity of the 8-hydroxyquinolines is approximately 50-fold more effective than another group of metal-binding compounds that we have tested, the thiosemicarbazones. In contrast to the potency of the 8-hydroxyquinolines to inactivate Rous sarcoma virus, no intracellular inhibition of transformation could be demonstrated at a concentration that did not affect the growth and appearance of the cells. Cellular deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was inhibited to a greater extent than was ribonucleic acid or protein synthesis. The phenomenon of "concentration quenching" was observed with high concentrations of drug, causing less inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis than was observed with lower concentrations. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was inactivated also by the 8-hydroxyquinolines and their copper complexes. No intracellular inhibition of plaque formation was observed. Treatment with 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate had no effect on the resolution of herpetic keratitis in rabbits. Some 8-hydroxyquinolines bind to deoxyribonucleic acid in the presence of copper, a phenomenon that may be important in their antiviral activity. PMID:185949

  18. Interactions between the Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase Components and Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weizhong; Chen, Hongjun; Sutton, Troy; Obadan, Adebimpe

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influenza A virus genome possesses eight negative-strand RNA segments in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein particles (vRNPs) in association with the three viral RNA polymerase subunits (PB2, PB1, and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP). Through interactions with multiple host factors, the RNP subunits play vital roles in replication, host adaptation, interspecies transmission, and pathogenicity. In order to gain insight into the potential roles of RNP subunits in the modulation of the host's innate immune response, the interactions of each RNP subunit with retinoic acid-inducible gene I protein (RIG-I) from mammalian and avian species were investigated. Studies using coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP), bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFc), and colocalization using confocal microscopy provided direct evidence for the RNA-independent binding of PB2, PB1, and PA with RIG-I from various hosts (human, swine, mouse, and duck). In contrast, the binding of NP with RIG-I was found to be RNA dependent. Expression of the viral NS1 protein, which interacts with RIG-I, did not interfere with the association of RNA polymerase subunits with RIG-I. The association of each individual virus polymerase component with RIG-I failed to significantly affect the interferon (IFN) induction elicited by RIG-I and 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) RNA in reporter assays, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and IRF3 phosphorylation tests. Taken together, these findings indicate that viral RNA polymerase components PB2, PB1, and PA directly target RIG-I, but the exact biological significance of these interactions in the replication and pathogenicity of influenza A virus needs to be further clarified. IMPORTANCE RIG-I is an important RNA sensor to elicit the innate immune response in mammals and some bird species (such as duck) upon influenza A virus infection. Although the 5′-triphosphate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) panhandle structure at the end of viral genome RNA is

  19. Subunit-selective mutagenesis indicates minimal polymerase activity in heterodimer-associated p51 HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Le Grice, S F; Naas, T; Wohlgensinger, B; Schatz, O

    1991-12-01

    We have purified and determined functional parameters of reconstituted, recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) heterodimers within which either the p66 or p51 polypeptide was selectively mutated in one or both aspartic acid residues constituting the proposed polymerase active site (-Y-M-D-D-). Heterodimers containing a mutated p51 polypeptide retain almost wild type levels of both RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNaseH) activity. In contrast, heterodimers whose p66 polypeptide was likewise mutated exhibit wild type RNaseH activity but are deficient in RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. These results indicate that in heterodimer RT, the p51 component cannot compensate for active site mutations eliminating the activity of p66, indirectly implying that solely the p66 aspartic acid residues of heterodimer are crucial for catalysis. PMID:1718745

  20. The Crystal Structure of a Cardiovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Reveals an Unusual Conformation of the Polymerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Vives-Adrian, Laia; Lujan, Celia; Oliva, Baldo; van der Linden, Lonneke; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2014-01-01

    target for the development of antiviral therapies. Solving the X-ray structure of the first cardiovirus RdRp, EMCV 3Dpol, we captured an altered conformation of a conserved motif in the polymerase active site (motif A) containing the aspartic acid residue involved in rNTP selection and binding. This altered conformation of motif A, which interferes with the correct positioning of the rNTP substrate in the active site, is stabilized by a number of residues strictly conserved among picornaviruses. The rearrangements observed suggest that this motif A segment is a dynamic element that can be modulated by external effectors, either activating or inhibiting enzyme activity, and this type of modulation appears to be general to all picornaviruses. PMID:24600002

  1. Polymerase-directed synthesis of C5-ethynyl locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Burri, Harsha V; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-11-15

    Modified nucleic acids have considerable potential in nanobiotechnology for the development of nanomedicines and new materials. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far and we herein for the first time report the enzymatic incorporation of LNA-U and C5-ethynyl LNA-U nucleotides into oligonucleotides. Phusion High Fidelity and KOD DNA polymerases efficiently incorporated LNA-U and C5-ethynyl LNA-U nucleotides into a DNA strand and T7 RNA polymerase successfully accepted the LNA-U nucleoside 5'-triphosphate as substrate for RNA transcripts. PMID:20932755

  2. Cystoviral polymerase complex protein P7 uses its acidic C-terminal tail to regulate the RNA-directed RNA polymerase P2.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Sébastien; Arnold, Jamie J; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Wang, Hsin; Kloss, Brian; Cameron, Craig E; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2014-07-15

    In bacteriophages of the cystovirus family, the polymerase complex (PX) encodes a 75-kDa RNA-directed RNA polymerase (P2) that transcribes the double-stranded RNA genome. Also a constituent of the PX is the essential protein P7 that, in addition to accelerating PX assembly and facilitating genome packaging, plays a regulatory role in transcription. Deletion of P7 from the PX leads to aberrant plus-strand synthesis suggesting its influence on the transcriptase activity of P2. Here, using solution NMR techniques and the P2 and P7 proteins from cystovirus ϕ12, we demonstrate their largely electrostatic interaction in vitro. Chemical shift perturbations on P7 in the presence of P2 suggest that this interaction involves the dynamic C-terminal tail of P7, more specifically an acidic cluster therein. Patterns of chemical shift changes induced on P2 by the P7 C-terminus resemble those seen in the presence of single-stranded RNA suggesting similarities in binding. This association between P2 and P7 reduces the affinity of the former toward template RNA and results in its decreased activity both in de novo RNA synthesis and in extending a short primer. Given the presence of C-terminal acidic tracts on all cystoviral P7 proteins, the electrostatic nature of the P2/P7 interaction is likely conserved within the family and could constitute a mechanism through which P7 regulates transcription in cystoviruses. PMID:24813120

  3. Human placental DNA polymerase delta: identification of a 170-kilodalton polypeptide by activity staining and immunoblotting

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.Y.W.T.; Toomey, N.L.

    1987-02-24

    DNA polymerase delta was isolated from human placenta and identified as such on the basis of its association with a 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activity. The association of the polymerase and exonuclease activities was maintained throughout purification and attempted separations by physical or electrophoretic methods. Moreover, ratios of the two activities remained constant during the purification steps, and both activities were inhibited by aphidicolin, oxidized glutathione, and n-ethylmaleimide. The purified enzyme had an estimated molecular weight of 172,000, on the basis of a Stokes radius of 53.6 A and a sedimentation coefficient of 7.8 S. On sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis, polymerase delta preparations contained a band of ca. 170 kilodaltons (kDa) as well as several smaller polypeptides. The 170-kDa polypeptide was identified as the largest polypeptides component in the preparation possessing DNA polymerase activity by an activity staining procedure following gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS. Western blotting of DNA polymerase delta with polyclonal antisera also revealed a single 170-kDa immunoreactive polypeptide. Monoclonal antibodies to KB cell polymerase ..cap alpha.. inhibited placental polymerase ..cap alpha.. but did not inhibit DNA polymerase delta, while the murine polyclonal antisera to polymerase delta inhibited delta but not ..cap alpha... These findings establish the existence of DNA polymerase delta in a human tissue and support the view that both its polymerase and its exonuclease activities may be associated with a single protein.

  4. Single-Molecule Electronic Monitoring of DNA Polymerase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchak, Denys O.; Pugliese, Kaitlin M.; Turvey, Mackenzie W.; Choi, Yongki; Gul, O. Tolga; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Rajapakse, Arith J.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    Single-molecule techniques can reveal new spatial and kinetic details of the conformational changes occurring during enzymatic catalysis. Here, we investigate the activity of DNA polymerases using an electronic single-molecule technique based on carbon nanotube transistors. Single molecules of the Klenow fragment (KF) of polymerase I were conjugated to the transistors and then monitored via fluctuations in electrical conductance. Continuous, long-term monitoring recorded single KF molecules incorporating up to 10,000 new bases into single-stranded DNA templates. The duration of individual incorporation events was invariant across all analog and native nucleotides, indicating that the precise structure of different base pairs has no impact on the timing of incorporation. Despite similar timings, however, the signal magnitudes generated by certain analogs reveal alternate conformational states that do not occur with native nucleotides. The differences induced by these analogs suggest that the electronic technique is sensing KF's O-helix as it tests the stability of nascent base pairs.

  5. Short deoxyribonucleic acid repair patch length in Escherichia coli is determined by the processive mechanism of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Matson, S W; Bambara, R A

    1981-01-01

    The lengths of ultraviolet irradiation-induced repair resynthesis patches were measured in repair-competent extracts of Escherichia coli. Extracts containing wild-type deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase I introduced a patch 15 to 20 nucleotides in length during repair of ColE1 plasmid DNA; extracts containing the polA5 mutant form of DNA polymerase I introduced a patch only about 5 nucleotides in length in a similar reaction. The repair patch length in the presence of either DNA polymerase corresponded to the processivity of that polymerase (the average number of nucleotides added per enzyme-DNA binding event) as determined with purified enzymes and DNA treated with a nonspecific endonuclease. The base composition of the repair patch inserted by the wild-type DNA polymerase was similar to that of the bacterial genome, whereas the patch inserted by the mutant enzyme was skewed toward greater pyrimidine incorporation. This skewing is expected, considering the predominance of pyrimidine incorporation occurring at the ultraviolet lesion and the short patch made by the mutant enzyme. Since the defect in the polA5 DNA polymerase which causes premature dissociation from DNA is reflected exactly in the repair patch length, the processive mechanism of the polymerase must be a central determinant of patch length. PMID:7012116

  6. Conserved Overlapping Gene Arrangement, Restricted Expression, and Biochemical Activities of DNA Polymerase ν (POLN)*

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kei-ichi; Tomida, Junya; Reh, Shelley; Swanhart, Lisa M.; Takata, Minoru; Hukriede, Neil A.; Wood, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase ν (POLN) is one of 16 DNA polymerases encoded in vertebrate genomes. It is important to determine its gene expression patterns, biological roles, and biochemical activities. By quantitative analysis of mRNA expression, we found that POLN from the zebrafish Danio rerio is expressed predominantly in testis. POLN is not detectably expressed in zebrafish embryos or in mouse embryonic stem cells. Consistent with this, injection of POLN-specific morpholino antisense oligonucleotides did not interfere with zebrafish embryonic development. Analysis of transcripts revealed that vertebrate POLN has an unusual gene expression arrangement, sharing a first exon with HAUS3, the gene encoding augmin-like complex subunit 3. HAUS3 is broadly expressed in embryonic and adult tissues, in contrast to POLN. Differential expression of POLN and HAUS3 appears to arise by alternate splicing of transcripts in mammalian cells and zebrafish. When POLN was ectopically overexpressed in human cells, it specifically coimmunoprecipitated with the homologous recombination factors BRCA1 and FANCJ, but not with previously suggested interaction partners (HELQ and members of the Fanconi anemia core complex). Purified zebrafish POLN protein is capable of thymine glycol bypass and strand displacement, with activity dependent on a basic amino acid residue known to stabilize the primer-template. These properties are conserved with the human enzyme. Although the physiological function of pol ν remains to be clarified, this study uncovers distinctive aspects of its expression control and evolutionarily conserved properties of this DNA polymerase. PMID:26269593

  7. Molecular cytogenetics by polymerase catalyzed amplification or in situ labelling of specific nucleic acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bolund, L.; Brandt, C.; Hindkjaer, J.; Koch, J.; Koelvraa, S.; Pedersen, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) can be performed on isolated cells or chromosomes and the product can be analyzed by DNA technology or by FISH to test metaphases. The authors have good experiences analyzing aberrant chromosomes by FACS sorting, PCR with degenerated primers and painting of test metaphases with the PCR product. They also utilize polymerases for PRimed IN Situ labelling (PRINS) of specific nucleic acid sequences. In PRINS oligonucleotides are hybridized to their target sequences and labeled nucleotides are incorporated at the site of hybridization with the oligonucleotide as primer. PRINS may eventually allow the study of individual genes, gene expression and even somatic mutations (in mRNA) in single cells.

  8. A RecA Protein Surface Required for Activation of DNA Polymerase V

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Angela J.; Erdem, Aysen L.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Karata, Kiyonobu; Jaszczur, Malgorzata M.; Vo, Dan D.; Olsen, Tayla M.; Woodgate, Roger; Goodman, Myron F.; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase V (pol V) of Escherichia coli is a translesion DNA polymerase responsible for most of the mutagenesis observed during the SOS response. Pol V is activated by transfer of a RecA subunit from the 3'-proximal end of a RecA nucleoprotein filament to form a functional complex called DNA polymerase V Mutasome (pol V Mut). We identify a RecA surface, defined by residues 112-117, that either directly interacts with or is in very close proximity to amino acid residues on two distinct surfaces of the UmuC subunit of pol V. One of these surfaces is uniquely prominent in the active pol V Mut. Several conformational states are populated in the inactive and active complexes of RecA with pol V. The RecA D112R and RecA D112R N113R double mutant proteins exhibit successively reduced capacity for pol V activation. The double mutant RecA is specifically defective in the ATP binding step of the activation pathway. Unlike the classic non-mutable RecA S117F (recA1730), the RecA D112R N113R variant exhibits no defect in filament formation on DNA and promotes all other RecA activities efficiently. An important pol V activation surface of RecA protein is thus centered in a region encompassing amino acid residues 112, 113, and 117, a surface exposed at the 3'-proximal end of a RecA filament. The same RecA surface is not utilized in the RecA activation of the homologous and highly mutagenic RumA'2B polymerase encoded by the integrating-conjugative element (ICE) R391, indicating a lack of structural conservation between the two systems. The RecA D112R N113R protein represents a new separation of function mutant, proficient in all RecA functions except SOS mutagenesis. PMID:25811184

  9. Detection of DNA polymerase activities associated with purified duck hepatitis B virus core particles by using an activity gel assay.

    PubMed Central

    Oberhaus, S M; Newbold, J E

    1993-01-01

    Replication of hepadnaviruses involves reverse transcription of an intermediate RNA molecule. It is generally accepted that this replication scheme is carried out by a virally encoded, multifunctional polymerase which has DNA-dependent DNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase, and RNase H activities. Biochemical studies of the polymerase protein(s) have been limited by the inability to purify useful quantities of functional enzyme from virus particles and, until recently, to express enzymatically active polymerase proteins in heterologous systems. An activity gel assay which detects in situ catalytic activities of DNA polymerases after electrophoresis in partially denaturing polyacrylamide gels was used by M.R. Bavand and O. Laub (J. Virol. 62:626-628, 1988) to show the presence of DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activities associated with hepatitis B virus particles produced in vitro. This assay has provided the only means by which hepadnavirus polymerase proteins have been detected in association with enzymatic activities. Since conventional methods have not allowed purification of useful quantities of enzymatically active polymerase protein(s), we have devised a protocol for purifying large quantities of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core particles to near homogeneity. These immature virus particles contain DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activities, as shown in the endogenous DNA polymerase assay. We have used the activity gel assay to detect multiple DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase proteins associated with these purified DHBV core particles. These enzymatically active proteins appear larger than, approximately the same size as, and smaller than an unmodified DHBV polymerase protein predicted from the polymerase open reading frame. This is the first report of the detection of active hepadnavirus core-associated DNA polymerase proteins derived from a natural host. Images PMID:8411359

  10. The highly conserved amino acid sequence motif Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser in alpha-like DNA polymerases is required by phage phi 29 DNA polymerase for protein-primed initiation and polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Lázaro, J M; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-like DNA polymerases from bacteriophage phi 29 and other viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes contain an amino acid consensus sequence that has been proposed to form part of the dNTP binding site. We have used site-directed mutants to study five of the six highly conserved consecutive amino acids corresponding to the most conserved C-terminal segment (Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser). Our results indicate that in phi 29 DNA polymerase this consensus sequence, although irrelevant for the 3'----5' exonuclease activity, is essential for initiation and elongation. Based on these results and on its homology with known or putative metal-binding amino acid sequences, we propose that in phi 29 DNA polymerase the Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser consensus motif is part of the dNTP binding site, involved in the synthetic activities of the polymerase (i.e., initiation and polymerization), and that it is involved particularly in the metal binding associated with the dNTP site. Images PMID:2191296

  11. Synthesis of nucleoside and nucleotide conjugates of bile acids, and polymerase construction of bile acid-functionalized DNA.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, Satu; Macícková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Sanda, Miloslav; Hocek, Michal

    2010-03-01

    Aqueous Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions of 5-iodopyrimidine or 7-iodo-7-deazaadenine nucleosides with bile acid-derived terminal acetylenes linked via an ester or amide tether gave the corresponding bile acid-nucleoside conjugates. Analogous reactions of halogenated nucleoside triphosphates gave directly bile acid-modified dNTPs. Enzymatic incorporation of these modified nucleotides to DNA was successfully performed using Phusion polymerase for primer extension. One of the dNTPs (dCTP bearing cholic acid) was also efficient for PCR amplification. PMID:20165813

  12. In-ice evolution of RNA polymerase ribozyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Attwater, James; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of molecular self-replication have the potential to shed light upon the origins of life. In particular, self-replication through RNA-catalysed templated RNA synthesis is thought to have supported a primordial ‘RNA World’. However, existing polymerase ribozymes lack the capacity to synthesise RNAs approaching their own size. Here we report the in vitro evolution of such catalysts directly in the RNA-stabilising medium of water-ice, which yielded RNA polymerase ribozymes specifically adapted to sub-zero temperatures and able to synthesise RNA in ices at temperatures as low as −19°C. Combination of cold-adaptive mutations with a previously described 5′ extension operating at ambient temperatures enabled the design of a first polymerase ribozyme capable of catalysing the accurate synthesis of an RNA sequence longer than itself (adding up to 206 nucleotides), an important stepping stone towards RNA self-replication. PMID:24256864

  13. Effect of. gamma. -irradiated DNA on the activity of DNA polymerase. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A.; Ward, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    A cell-free assay was developed to measure the effect of ..gamma..-irradiated DNA template on the ability of DNA polymerase to copy unirradiated template. Doses as low as 1 krad were able to decrease (approx. 15%) the activity of both bacterial and mammalian DNA polymerases in the assay. The percentage of polymerase activity decreased as the dose received by the template increased. The reduction in DNA polymerase activity was shown to be due to an inhibition of the enzyme by the irradiated DNA. Irradiated poly(dA-dT) was more effective in reducing polymerase activity than calf thymus DNA. Thus the polymerase-inhibition site(s) appears to be associated with base damage, specifically adenine or thymine. Using a free-radical scavenger, OH radicals were found to be involved in producing the damage sites. The interaction between irradiated DNA and DNA polymerase was found to be specific for the enzyme and not for other proteins present in the assay. The inhibition of DNA polymerase occurred prior to or during the initiation of DNA synthesis rather than after initiation of synthesis, i.e., during elongation.

  14. A bridge to transcription by RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D; Kornberg, Roger D

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of single amino-acid substitution mutations critical for RNA polymerase function published in Journal of Biology supports a proposed mechanism for polymerase action in which movement of the polymerase 'bridge helix' promotes transcriptional activity in cooperation with a critical substrate-interaction domain, the 'trigger loop'. PMID:19090964

  15. Phosphorothioate primers improve the amplification of DNA sequences by DNA polymerases with proofreading activity.

    PubMed Central

    Skerra, A

    1992-01-01

    Two thermostable DNA polymerases with proofreading activity--Vent DNA polymerase and Pfu DNA polymerase--have attracted recent attention, mainly because of their enhanced fidelities during amplification of DNA sequences by the polymerase chain reaction. A severe disadvantage for their practical application, however, results from the observation that due to their 3' to 5' exonuclease activities these enzymes degrade the oligodeoxynucleotides serving as primers for the DNA synthesis. It is demonstrated that this exonucleolytic attack on the primer molecules can be efficiently prevented by the introduction of single phosphorothioate bonds at their 3' termini. This strategy, which can be easily accomplished using routine DNA synthesis methodology, may open the way to a widespread use of these novel enzymes in the polymerase chain reaction. Images PMID:1641322

  16. Studies on the pathogenesis of liver necrosis by α-amanitin. Effect of α-amanitin on ribonucleic acid synthesis and on ribonucleic acid polymerase in mouse liver nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Stirpe, F.; Fiume, L.

    1967-01-01

    1. Injection of α-amanitin to mice causes a decreased incorporation of [6-14C]-orotic acid into liver RNA in vivo. 2. The activity of RNA polymerase activated by Mn2+ and ammonium sulphate is greatly impaired in liver nuclei isolated from mice poisoned with α-amanitin, and is inhibited by the addition of the same toxin in vitro. 3. The activity of the Mg2+-activated RNA polymerase is only slightly affected by α-amanitin either administered to mice or added in vitro. PMID:5584017

  17. Family-wide analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Uchima, Lilen; Rood, Jenny; Zaja, Roko; Hay, Ronald T.; Ahel, Ivan; Chang, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein family generates ADP-ribose (ADPr) modifications onto target proteins using NAD+ as substrate. Based on the composition of three NAD+ coordinating amino acids, the H-Y-E motif, each PARP is predicted to generate either poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) or mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR). However, the reaction product of each PARP has not been clearly defined, and is an important priority since PAR and MAR function via distinct mechanisms. Here we show that the majority of PARPs generate MAR, not PAR, and demonstrate that the H-Y-E motif is not the sole indicator of PARP activity. We identify automodification sites on seven PARPs, and demonstrate that MAR and PAR generating PARPs modify similar amino acids, suggesting that the sequence and structural constraints limiting PARPs to MAR synthesis do not limit their ability to modify canonical amino acid targets. In addition, we identify cysteine as a novel amino acid target for ADP-ribosylation on PARPs. PMID:25043379

  18. The Polymerase Activity of Mammalian DNA Pol ζ Is Specifically Required for Cell and Embryonic Viability

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Tomida, Junya; Boulware, Karen S.; Bhetawal, Sarita; Wood, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase ζ (pol ζ) is exceptionally important for maintaining genome stability. Inactivation of the Rev3l gene encoding the polymerase catalytic subunit causes a high frequency of chromosomal breaks, followed by lethality in mouse embryos and in primary cells. Yet it is not known whether the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ is specifically essential, as the large REV3L protein also serves as a multiprotein scaffold for translesion DNA synthesis via multiple conserved structural domains. We report that Rev3l cDNA rescues the genomic instability and DNA damage sensitivity of Rev3l-null immortalized mouse fibroblast cell lines. A cDNA harboring mutations of conserved catalytic aspartate residues in the polymerase domain of REV3L could not rescue these phenotypes. To investigate the role of REV3L DNA polymerase activity in vivo, a Rev3l knock-in mouse was constructed with this polymerase-inactivating alteration. No homozygous mutant mice were produced, with lethality occurring during embryogenesis. Primary fibroblasts from mutant embryos showed growth defects, elevated DNA double-strand breaks and cisplatin sensitivity similar to Rev3l-null fibroblasts. We tested whether the severe Rev3l-/- phenotypes could be rescued by deletion of DNA polymerase η, as has been reported with chicken DT40 cells. However, Rev3l-/- Polh-/- mice were inviable, and derived primary fibroblasts were as sensitive to DNA damage as Rev3l-/- Polh+/+ fibroblasts. Therefore, the functions of REV3L in maintaining cell viability, embryonic viability and genomic stability are directly dependent on its polymerase activity, and cannot be ameliorated by an additional deletion of pol η. These results validate and encourage the approach of targeting the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ to sensitize tumors to DNA damaging agents. PMID:26727495

  19. Domain-level rocking motion within a polymerase that translocates on single-stranded nucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huiyung; Li, Changzheng; Zhou, Sufeng; Poulos, Thomas L.; Gershon, Paul David

    2013-04-01

    An X-ray crystallographic structure is described for unliganded Vaccinia virus poly(A) polymerase monomer (VP55), showing the first domain-level structural isoforms among either VP55, it’s processivity factor VP39, or the VP55-VP39 heterodimer. The occurrence of domain-level motion specifically in monomeric VP55 is consistent with the finding that the monomeric protein undergoes saltatory translocation whereas the heterodimer does not. Vaccinia virus poly(A) polymerase (VP55) is the only known polymerase that can translocate independently with respect to single-stranded nucleic acid (ssNA). Previously, its structure has only been solved in the context of the VP39 processivity factor. Here, a crystal structure of unliganded monomeric VP55 has been solved to 2.86 Å resolution, showing the first backbone structural isoforms among either VP55 or its processivity factor (VP39). Backbone differences between the two molecules of VP55 in the asymmetric unit indicated that unliganded monomeric VP55 can undergo a ‘rocking’ motion of the N-terminal domain with respect to the other two domains, which may be ‘rigidified’ upon VP39 docking. This observation is consistent with previously demonstrated experimental molecular dynamics of the monomer during translocation with respect to nucleic acid and with different mechanisms of translocation in the presence and absence of processivity factor VP39. Side-chain conformational changes in the absence of ligand were observed at a key primer contact site and at the catalytic center of VP55. The current structure completes the trio of possible structural forms for VP55 and VP39, namely the VP39 monomer, the VP39–VP55 heterodimer and the VP55 monomer.

  20. Identification of a nucleic acid-binding region within the largest subunit of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kontermann, R. E.; Kobor, M.; Bautz, E. K.

    1993-01-01

    The largest and the second-largest subunit of the multisubunit eukaryotic RNA polymerases are involved in interaction with the DNA template and the nascent RNA chain. Using Southwestern DNA-binding techniques and nitrocellulose filter binding assays of bacterially expressed fusion proteins, we have identified a region of the largest, 215-kDa, subunit of Drosophila RNA polymerase II that has the potential to bind nucleic acids nonspecifically. This nucleic acid-binding region is located between amino acid residues 309-384 and is highly conserved within the largest subunits of eukaryotic and bacterial RNA polymerases. A homology to a region of the DNA-binding cleft of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I involved in binding of the newly synthesized DNA duplex provides indirect evidence that the nucleic acid-binding region of the largest subunit participates in interaction with double-stranded nucleic acids during transcription. The nonspecific DNA-binding behavior of the region is similar to that observed for the native enzyme in nitrocellulose filter binding assays and that of the separated largest subunit in Southwestern assays. A high content of basic amino acid residues is consistent with the electrostatic nature of nonspecific DNA binding by RNA polymerases. PMID:8443600

  1. Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR): A novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Chen, Zeliang; Yuan, Jing; Huang, Liuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method only requires one pair of primers and one enzyme, termed Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR) with high specificity, efficiency, and rapidity under isothermal condition. The recombinant plasmid of blaNDM-1 was imported to Escherichia coli BL21, and selected as the microbial target. PSR method employs a Bst DNA polymerase and a pair of primers designed targeting the blaNDM-1 gene sequence. The forward and reverse Tab primer sequences are reverse to each other at their 5’ end (Nr and N), whereas their 3’ end sequences are complementary to their respective target nucleic acid sequences. The PSR method was performed at a constant temperature 61 °C–65 °C, yielding a complicated spiral structure. PSR assay was monitored continuously in a real-time turbidimeter instrument or visually detected with the aid of a fluorescent dye (SYBR Greenı), and could be finished within 1 h with a high accumulation of 109 copies of the target and a fine sensitivity of 6 CFU per reaction. Clinical evaluation was also conducted using PSR, showing high specificity of this method. The PSR technique provides a convenient and cost-effective alternative for clinical screening, on-site diagnosis and primary quarantine purposes. PMID:26220251

  2. Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR): A novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Chen, Zeliang; Yuan, Jing; Huang, Liuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method only requires one pair of primers and one enzyme, termed Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR) with high specificity, efficiency, and rapidity under isothermal condition. The recombinant plasmid of blaNDM-1 was imported to Escherichia coli BL21, and selected as the microbial target. PSR method employs a Bst DNA polymerase and a pair of primers designed targeting the blaNDM-1 gene sequence. The forward and reverse Tab primer sequences are reverse to each other at their 5' end (Nr and N), whereas their 3' end sequences are complementary to their respective target nucleic acid sequences. The PSR method was performed at a constant temperature 61 °C-65 °C, yielding a complicated spiral structure. PSR assay was monitored continuously in a real-time turbidimeter instrument or visually detected with the aid of a fluorescent dye (SYBR Greenı), and could be finished within 1 h with a high accumulation of 10(9) copies of the target and a fine sensitivity of 6 CFU per reaction. Clinical evaluation was also conducted using PSR, showing high specificity of this method. The PSR technique provides a convenient and cost-effective alternative for clinical screening, on-site diagnosis and primary quarantine purposes. PMID:26220251

  3. Label-free molecular beacon for real-time monitoring of DNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbei; Liu, Haisheng; Wang, Jun; Jin, Shunxin; Wang, Kemin

    2016-05-01

    Traditional methods for assaying DNA polymerase activity are discontinuous, time consuming, and laborious. Here, we report a new approach for label-free and real-time monitoring of DNA polymerase activity using a Thioflavin T (ThT) probe. In the presence of DNA polymerase, the DNA primer could be elongated through polymerase reaction to open MB1, leading to the release of the G-quartets. These then bind to ThT to form ThT/G-quadruplexes with an obvious fluorescence generation. It exhibits a satisfying detection result for the activity of DNA polymerase with a low detection limit of 0.05 unit/ml. In addition, no labeling with a fluorophore or a fluorophore-quencher pair is required; this method is fairly simple, fast, and low cost. Furthermore, the proposed method was also applied to assay the inhibition of DNA polymerase activity. This approach may offer potential applications in drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and some other related biomedical research. PMID:26894757

  4. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm2 area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10-1 to 4 × 10-3 copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  5. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  6. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kelley; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-09-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. PMID:25079859

  7. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. PMID:25079859

  8. DNA polymerase beta reveals enhanced activity and processivity in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Anarbaev, Rashid O; Rogozina, Anastasia L; Lavrik, Olga I

    2009-04-01

    Water is essential for the stability and functions of proteins and DNA. Reverse micelles are simple model systems where the structure and dynamics of water are controlled. We have estimated the size of complex reverse micelles by light scattering technique and examined the local microenvironment using fluorescein as molecular probe. The micelle size and water polarity inside reverse micelles depend on water volume fraction. We have investigated the different hydration and confinement effects on activity, processivity, and stability of mammalian DNA polymerase beta in reverse micelles. The enzyme displays high processivity on primed single-stranded M13mp19 DNA with maximal activity at 10% of water content. The processivity and activity of DNA polymerase strongly depend on the protein concentration. The enzyme reveals also the enhanced stability in the presence of template-primer and at high protein concentration. The data provide direct evidence for strong influence of microenvironment on DNA polymerase activity. PMID:19138815

  9. Transcription In Vitro by Reovirus-Associated Ribonucleic Acid-Dependent Polymerase 1

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A. K.; Shatkin, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Digestion of purified reovirus type 3 with chymotrypsin degrades 70% of the viral protein and converts the virions to subviral particles (SVP). The SVP contain 3 of the 6 viral structural proteins and all 10 double-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) genome segments but not adenine-rich, single-stranded RNA. An RNA polymerase which is structurally associated with SVP transcribes one strand of each genome segment by a conservative mechanism in vitro. The single-stranded products include large (1.2 × 106 daltons), medium (0.7 × 106 daltons), and small (0.4 × 106 daltons) molecules which hybridize exclusively with the corresponding genome segments. The enzyme obtained by heating virions at 60 C synthesizes similar products. Kinetic and pulse-chase studies indicate that the different-sized products are synthesized simultaneously but at rates which are in the order: small > medium > large. Images PMID:5529847

  10. Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William

    2011-11-21

    The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

  11. Detection of hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid in the serum by amplification with polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, N; Yokosuka, O; Omata, M; Hosoda, K; Ohto, M

    1990-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was detected in the sera of patients with non-A, non-B chronic liver disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RNA was extracted from the serum, reverse transcribed to cDNA, and amplified by PCR. With this method, 30 patients with non-A, non-B chronic liver disease and 10 healthy subjects were tested. HCV RNA was detected in 13 of 16 (81%) anti-HCV-positive patients and also in 7 of 14 (50%) anti-HCV-negative patients, but in none of 10 anti-HCV-negative healthy subjects. Specificity of this method was confirmed by direct sequencing of amplified cDNA segment. The nucleotide sequences (37 nucleotides) obtained from 15 patients showed only 68-78% homology compared with the prototype HCV nucleotide sequence. In addition, of 15 nucleotide sequences, there were 12 different types. But the translated amino acid sequences (12 amino acids) showed 83-100% homology compared with the prototype HCV amino acid sequence. These data suggest the majority of anti-HCV-positive patients are carriers of HCV. But to detect all the viremic patients, the anti-HCV antibody testing may be insufficient. Direct detection of HCV RNA may be useful in the study of virus replication and its association with various liver diseases. Images PMID:2173727

  12. Synthesis of selenomethylene-locked nucleic acid (SeLNA)-modified oligonucleotides by polymerases.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Megan; Chardon, Antoine; Goubet, Astrid; Morihiro, Kunihiko; Tsan, Sze Yee; Edwards, Stacey L; Kodama, Tetsuya; Obika, Satoshi; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2012-11-18

    Enzymatic recognition of SeLNA nucleotides was investigated. KOD XL DNA polymerase was found to be an efficient enzyme in primer extension reactions. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of SeLNA-modified DNA templates was also efficiently achieved by Phusion and KOD XL DNA polymerases. PMID:23042489

  13. Oxidative-Nitrosative Stress and Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase (PARP) Activation in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Obrosova, Irina G.; Drel, Viktor R.; Pacher, Pal; Ilnytska, Olga; Wang, Zhong Q.; Stevens, Martin J.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation, an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications, is considered a downstream effector of oxidative-nitrosative stress. However, some recent findings suggest that it is not necessarily the case and that PARP activation may precede and contribute to free radical and oxidant-induced injury. This study evaluated the effect of PARP inhibition on oxidative-nitrosative stress in diabetic peripheral nerve, vasa nervorum, aorta, and high glucose–exposed human Schwann cells. In vivo experiments were performed in control rats and streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats treated with and without the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (ABA) (30 mg · kg−1 · day−1 i.p. for 2 weeks after 2 weeks of untreated diabetes). Human Schwann cells (HSC) (passages 7–10; ScienCell Research Labs) were cultured in 5.5 or 30 mmol/l glucose with and without 5 mmol/l ABA. Diabetes-induced increase in peripheral nerve nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity, epineurial vessel superoxide and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivities, and aortic superoxide production was reduced by ABA. PARP-1 (Western blot analysis) was abundantly expressed in HSC, and its expression was not affected by high glucose or ABA treatment. High-glucose–induced superoxide production and overexpression of nitrosylated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated protein, chemically reduced amino acid-(4)-hydroxynonenal adducts, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were decreased by ABA. We concluded that PARP activation contributes to superoxide anion radical and peroxynitrite formation in peripheral nerve, vasa nervorum, and aorta of STZ-induced diabetic rats and high-glucose–exposed HSC. The relations between oxidative-nitrosative stress and PARP activation in diabetes are bi-rather than unidirectional, and PARP activation cannot only result from but also lead to free radical and oxidant generation. PMID:16306359

  14. PDIP46 (DNA polymerase δ interacting protein 46) is an activating factor for human DNA polymerase δ

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rong; Yue, Fu; Lin, Szu Hua Sharon; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Lee, Ernest Y. C.; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Marietta Y. W. T.

    2016-01-01

    PDIP46 (SKAR, POLDIP3) was discovered through its interaction with the p50 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Its functions in DNA replication are unknown. PDIP46 associates with Pol δ in cell extracts both by immunochemical and protein separation methods, as well as by ChIP analyses. PDIP46 also interacts with PCNA via multiple copies of a novel PCNA binding motif, the APIMs (AlkB homologue-2 PCNA-Interacting Motif). Sites for both p50 and PCNA binding were mapped to the N-terminal region containing the APIMs. Functional assays for the effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ activity on singly primed ssM13 DNA templates revealed that it is a novel and potent activator of Pol δ. The effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ in primer extension, strand displacement and synthesis through simple hairpin structures reveal a mechanism where PDIP46 facilitates Pol δ4 synthesis through regions of secondary structure on complex templates. In addition, evidence was obtained that PDIP46 is also capable of exerting its effects by a direct interaction with Pol δ, independent of PCNA. Mutation of the Pol δ and PCNA binding region resulted in a loss of PDIP46 functions. These studies support the view that PDIP46 is a novel accessory protein for Pol δ that is involved in cellular DNA replication. This raises the possibility that altered expression of PDIP46 or its mutation may affect Pol δ functions in vivo, and thereby be a nexus for altered genomic stability. PMID:26819372

  15. Characterization of a novel RNA polymerase mutant that alters DksA activity.

    PubMed

    Satory, Dominik; Halliday, Jennifer A; Sivaramakrishnan, Priya; Lua, Rhonald C; Herman, Christophe

    2013-09-01

    The auxiliary factor DksA is a global transcription regulator and, with the help of ppGpp, controls the nutritional stress response in Escherichia coli. Although the consequences of its modulation of RNA polymerase (RNAP) are becoming better explained, it is still not fully understood how the two proteins interact. We employed a series of genetic suppressor selections to find residues in RNAP that alter its sensitivity to DksA. Our approach allowed us to identify and genetically characterize in vivo three single amino acid substitutions: β' E677G, β V146F, and β G534D. We demonstrate that the mutation β' E677G affects the activity of both DksA and its homolog, TraR, but does not affect the action of other secondary interactors, such as GreA or GreB. Our mutants provide insight into how different auxiliary transcription factors interact with RNAP and contribute to our understanding of how different stages of transcription are regulated through the secondary channel of RNAP in vivo. PMID:23852871

  16. The structure and duplex context of DNA interstrand crosslinks affects the activity of DNA polymerase η

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Upasana; Mukherjee, Shivam; Sharma, Anjali; Frank, Ekaterina G.; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2016-01-01

    Several important anti-tumor agents form DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), but their clinical efficiency is counteracted by multiple complex DNA repair pathways. All of these pathways require unhooking of the ICL from one strand of a DNA duplex by nucleases, followed by bypass of the unhooked ICL by translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases. The structures of the unhooked ICLs remain unknown, yet the position of incisions and processing of the unhooked ICLs significantly influence the efficiency and fidelity of bypass by TLS polymerases. We have synthesized a panel of model unhooked nitrogen mustard ICLs to systematically investigate how the state of an unhooked ICL affects pol η activity. We find that duplex distortion induced by a crosslink plays a crucial role in translesion synthesis, and length of the duplex surrounding an unhooked ICL critically affects polymerase efficiency. We report the synthesis of a putative ICL repair intermediate that mimics the complete processing of an unhooked ICL to a single crosslinked nucleotide, and find that it provides only a minimal obstacle for DNA polymerases. Our results raise the possibility that, depending on the structure and extent of processing of an ICL, its bypass may not absolutely require TLS polymerases. PMID:27257072

  17. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibitor AZ-27 Differentially Inhibits Different Polymerase Activities at the Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Nagendra, Kartikeya; Dunn, Ewan F.; Mawhorter, Michael E.; Yu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of pediatric respiratory disease. RSV has an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that transcribes and replicates the viral negative-sense RNA genome. The large polymerase subunit (L) has multiple enzymatic activities, having the capability to synthesize RNA and add and methylate a cap on each of the viral mRNAs. Previous studies (H. Xiong et al., Bioorg Med Chem Lett, 23:6789–6793, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.10.018; C. L. Tiong-Yip et al., Antimicrob Agents Chemother, 58:3867–3873, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02540-14) had identified a small-molecule inhibitor, AZ-27, that targets the L protein. In this study, we examined the effect of AZ-27 on different aspects of RSV polymerase activity. AZ-27 was found to inhibit equally both mRNA transcription and genome replication in cell-based minigenome assays, indicating that it inhibits a step common to both of these RNA synthesis processes. Analysis in an in vitro transcription run-on assay, containing RSV nucleocapsids, showed that AZ-27 inhibits synthesis of transcripts from the 3′ end of the genome to a greater extent than those from the 5′ end, indicating that it inhibits transcription initiation. Consistent with this finding, experiments that assayed polymerase activity on the promoter showed that AZ-27 inhibited transcription and replication initiation. The RSV polymerase also can utilize the promoter sequence to perform a back-priming reaction. Interestingly, addition of AZ-27 had no effect on the addition of up to three nucleotides by back-priming but inhibited further extension of the back-primed RNA. These data provide new information regarding the mechanism of inhibition by AZ-27. They also suggest that the RSV polymerase adopts different conformations to perform its different activities at the promoter. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs to treat RSV infection. The RSV polymerase is an

  18. Antimutator Variants of DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Alan J.; Williams, Lindsey N.; Preston, Bradley D.

    2011-01-01

    Evolution balances DNA replication speed and accuracy to optimize replicative fitness and genetic stability. There is no selective pressure to improve DNA replication fidelity beyond the background mutation rate from other sources, such as DNA damage. However, DNA polymerases remain amenable to amino-acid substitutions that lower intrinsic error rates. Here, we review these ‘antimutagenic’ changes in DNA polymerases and discuss what they reveal about mechanisms of replication fidelity. Pioneering studies with bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase (T4 Pol) established the paradigm that antimutator amino-acid substitutions reduce replication errors by increasing proofreading efficiency at the expense of polymerase processivity. The discoveries of antimutator substitutions in proofreading-deficient ‘mutator’ derivatives of bacterial Pols I and III and yeast Pol δ suggest there must be additional antimutagenic mechanisms. Remarkably, many of the affected amino-acid positions from Pol I, Pol III, and Pol δ are similar to the original T4 Pol substitutions. The locations of antimutator substitutions within DNA polymerase structures suggest that they may increase nucleotide selectivity and/or promote dissociation of primer termini from polymerases poised for misincorporation, leading to expulsion of incorrect nucleotides. If misincorporation occurs, enhanced primer dissociation from polymerase domains may improve proofreading in cis by an intrinsic exonuclease or in trans by alternate cellular proofreading activities. Together, these studies reveal that natural selection can readily restore replication error rates to sustainable levels following an adaptive mutator phenotype. PMID:21977975

  19. Biflavonoids of Dacrydium balansae with potent inhibitory activity on dengue 2 NS5 polymerase.

    PubMed

    Coulerie, Paul; Eydoux, Cécilia; Hnawia, Edouard; Stuhl, Laetitia; Maciuk, Alexandre; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Canard, Bruno; Figadère, Bruno; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Nour, Mohammed

    2012-05-01

    In order to find new molecules for antiviral drug design, we screened 102 ethyl acetate extracts from New-Caledonian flora for antiviral activity against the dengue 2 virus RNA-dependant RNA polymerase (DV-NS5 RdRp). The leaf extract of Dacrydium balansae, which strongly inhibited the DV-NS5, was submitted to bioguided fractionation. Four biflavonoids ( 1- 4), three sterols ( 5- 7), and two stilbene derivatives ( 8- 9) were identified and evaluated for their antiviral potential on the DV-NS5 RdRp. Biflavonoids appeared to be potent inhibitors of DV-NS5 RdRp with IC (50)s between 0.26 and 3.12 µM. Inhibitory activity evaluations against the RNA polymerase from other Flaviviridae viruses allowed us to conclude that these compounds are specific inhibitors of the DV RNA polymerase. The strongest inhibitions were observed with hinokiflavone ( 4), but podocarpusflavone A ( 2) is the strongest noncytotoxic inhibitor of the DV-NS5 and it also displayed polymerase inhibitory activity in a DV replicon. A preliminary structure-activity relationship study (SARs) revealed the necessity of the biflavonoid skeleton, the influence of number and position of methoxylations, and the importance of a free rotation of the linkage between the two apigenin monomers of the biflavonoids. To the best of our knowledge, podocarpusflavone A ( 2) is the strongest noncytotoxic non-nucleotide molecule exhibiting a specific inhibitory activity against the RNA polymerase domain of DV-NS5 and thus is promising for chemotherapy development against dengue fever. PMID:22411725

  20. PolDIP2 interacts with human PrimPol and enhances its DNA polymerase activities.

    PubMed

    Guilliam, Thomas A; Bailey, Laura J; Brissett, Nigel C; Doherty, Aidan J

    2016-04-20

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) employs specialized DNA polymerases to bypass replication fork stalling lesions. PrimPol was recently identified as a TLS primase and polymerase involved in DNA damage tolerance. Here, we identify a novel PrimPol binding partner, PolDIP2, and describe how it regulates PrimPol's enzymatic activities. PolDIP2 stimulates the polymerase activity of PrimPol, enhancing both its capacity to bind DNA and the processivity of the catalytic domain. In addition, PolDIP2 stimulates both the efficiency and error-free bypass of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxoG) lesions by PrimPol. We show that PolDIP2 binds to PrimPol's catalytic domain and identify potential binding sites. Finally, we demonstrate that depletion of PolDIP2 in human cells causes a decrease in replication fork rates, similar to that observed in PrimPol(-/-)cells. However, depletion of PolDIP2 in PrimPol(-/-)cells does not produce a further decrease in replication fork rates. Together, these findings establish that PolDIP2 can regulate the TLS polymerase and primer extension activities of PrimPol, further enhancing our understanding of the roles of PolDIP2 and PrimPol in eukaryotic DNA damage tolerance. PMID:26984527

  1. PolDIP2 interacts with human PrimPol and enhances its DNA polymerase activities

    PubMed Central

    Guilliam, Thomas A.; Bailey, Laura J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2016-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) employs specialized DNA polymerases to bypass replication fork stalling lesions. PrimPol was recently identified as a TLS primase and polymerase involved in DNA damage tolerance. Here, we identify a novel PrimPol binding partner, PolDIP2, and describe how it regulates PrimPol's enzymatic activities. PolDIP2 stimulates the polymerase activity of PrimPol, enhancing both its capacity to bind DNA and the processivity of the catalytic domain. In addition, PolDIP2 stimulates both the efficiency and error-free bypass of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxoG) lesions by PrimPol. We show that PolDIP2 binds to PrimPol's catalytic domain and identify potential binding sites. Finally, we demonstrate that depletion of PolDIP2 in human cells causes a decrease in replication fork rates, similar to that observed in PrimPol−/− cells. However, depletion of PolDIP2 in PrimPol−/− cells does not produce a further decrease in replication fork rates. Together, these findings establish that PolDIP2 can regulate the TLS polymerase and primer extension activities of PrimPol, further enhancing our understanding of the roles of PolDIP2 and PrimPol in eukaryotic DNA damage tolerance. PMID:26984527

  2. Inhibition of non-templated nucleotide addition by DNA polymerases in primer extension using twisted intercalating nucleic acid modified templates.

    PubMed

    Güixens-Gallardo, Pedro; Hocek, Michal; Perlíková, Pavla

    2016-01-15

    A simple and elegant method for inhibition of non-templated nucleotide addition by DNA polymerases and for following DNA 3'-heterogeneity in enzymatic DNA synthesis by primer extension (PEX) is described. When template bearing ortho-twisted intercalating nucleic acid (ortho-TINA) at the 5'-end is used, non-templated nucleotide addition is reduced in both the A- and B-family DNA polymerases (KOD XL, KOD (exo-), Bst 2.0, Therminator, Deep Vent (exo-) and Taq). Formation of a single oligonucleotide product was observed with ortho-TINA modified template and KOD XL, KOD (exo-), Bst 2.0, Deep Vent (exo-) and Taq DNA polymerases. This approach can be applied to the synthesis of both unmodified and base-modified oligonucleotides. PMID:26707394

  3. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  4. DNA polymerase-α regulates the activation of type I interferons through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations that disrupt nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts the expression of POLA1, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency resulted in increased production of type I interferons. This enzyme is necessary for the synthesis of RNA:DNA primers during DNA replication and, strikingly, we found that POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Together this work identifies POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  5. Inactivation of hepatitis B virus: evaluation of the efficacy of the disinfectant 'Solprogel' using a DNA-polymerase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Hernández, A; Belda, F J; Domínguez, J; Matas, L; Giménez, M; Caraballo, M; Ramil, C; Ausina, V

    1997-08-01

    The effects of sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) and Solprogel (Laboratorios Inibsa, S.A., Barcelona, Spain), a compound that contains NaDCC plus a biodegradable polymer of acrylic acid, on the activity of DNA polymerase (DNA-P) associated with hepatitis B virus in serum were evaluated. DNA-P positive and negative pools of human serum samples were used as positive and negative stock virus. Inhibition of DNA-P activity by NaDCC and the commercial product was found to be concentration-dependent. Two minutes exposure to the minimum effective concentration of NaDCC (1000 ppm available chlorine) or Solprogel 16% (960 ppm available chlorine) totally inhibited DNA-P activity. PMID:9261760

  6. Simple but highly effective three-dimensional chemical-feature-based pharmacophore model for diketo acid derivatives as hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Roberto; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Ferrone, Marco; Paneni, Maria Silvia; Costi, Roberta; Artico, Marino; Roux, Alessandra; Gabriele, Mirko; Tardif, Keith D; Siddiqui, Aleem; Pricl, Sabrina

    2005-10-01

    A molecular modeling strategy using aryl diketo acid (ADK) derivatives recently reported in the literature as hepatitis C virus (HCV) polymerase inhibitors was designed. A 3D chemical-feature-based pharmacophore model was developed using Catalyst software, which produced 10 pharmacophore hypotheses. The top-ranked one (Hypo 1), characterized by a high correlation coefficient (r = 0.965), consisted of two hydrogen bond acceptors, one negative ionizable moiety, and two hydrophobic aromatics. This model was used to predict the anti-RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (anti-RdRp) activity of 6-(1-arylmethylpyrrol-2-yl)-1,4-dioxo-5-hexenoic acids and other ADK derivatives previously synthesized in our laboratories as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Furthermore, the experimental IC50 values of 9 compounds, tested in vitro against recombinant HCV polymerase, were compared with the corresponding values predicted using Hypo1. A good agreement between experimental and simulated data was obtained. The results demonstrate that the hypothesis derived in this study can be considered to be a useful tool in designing new leads based on ADK scaffolds as HCV RdRp inhibitors. PMID:16190757

  7. Characterization of the components and activity of Sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J D; Jackson, A O

    1997-01-01

    Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV) is the best-characterized member of a group of plant rhabdoviruses that replicate in the host cell nucleus. Using a recently developed method for partial purification of active SYNV polymerase by salt extraction of nuclei from infected plant tissue (J. D. O. Wagner et al, J. Virol. 70:468-477, 1996), we have identified the nucleocapsid (N), M2, and L proteins as polymerase complex components (based on copurification with the polymerase activity and by coimmunoprecipitation assays). Furthermore, the L protein was shown by antibody inhibition analysis to be a functional component of the polymerase. A second complex of M2 and L proteins, thought to be a precursor to the polymerase complex, was also identified. In addition, we conducted a detailed characterization of SYNV RNA synthesis in vitro. The results demonstrate that the RNAs are transcribed sequentially, beginning with the N mRNA and followed successively by the remaining five mRNAs in the order of their genome organization. Gene expression conforms to a cascade pattern, with synthesis of the 3'-proximal N mRNA occurring at the highest level, followed by consecutively lower levels of transcription from each subsequent gene. The reaction conditions favor transcription over minus-sense RNA replication, which, we posit, is inhibited near specific signal sequences located on the antigenomic template. The results support the concept that the mechanism of transcription is highly conserved among diverse rhabdoviruses and are compatible with a unified model for the regulation of genomic and antigenomic RNA synthesis. PMID:9032374

  8. DNA polymerase activity in heat killing and hyperthermic radiosensitization of mammalian cells as observed after fractionated heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, J B; Burgman, P; Kampinga, H H; Konings, A W

    1986-03-01

    Possible relations between hyperthermic inactivation of alpha and beta DNA polymerase activity and hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization were investigated. Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells and HeLa S3 cells were treated with fractionated doses of hyperthermia. The heating schedules were chosen such that the initial heat treatment resulted in either thermotolerance or thermosensitization (step-down heating) for the second heat treatment. The results show that for DNA polymerase activity and heat radiosensitization (cell survival) no thermotolerance or thermosensitization is observed. Thus hyperthermic cell killing and DNA polymerase activity are not correlated. The correlation of hyperthermic radiosensitization and DNA polymerase activity was substantially less than observed in previous experiments with normotolerant and thermotolerant HeLa S3 cells. We conclude that alpha and beta DNA polymerase inactivation is not always the critical cellular process responsible for hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization. Other possible cellular systems that might determine these processes are discussed. PMID:3754338

  9. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. PMID:18834537

  10. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin and Mark Ragan. PMID:18834537

  11. The active site of RNA polymerase II participates in transcript cleavage within arrested ternary complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, M D; Izban, M G; Luse, D S

    1994-01-01

    RNA polymerase II may become arrested during transcript elongation, in which case the ternary complex remains intact but further RNA synthesis is blocked. To relieve arrest, the nascent transcript must be cleaved from the 3' end. RNAs of 7-17 nt are liberated and transcription continues from the newly exposed 3' end. Factor SII increases elongation efficiency by strongly stimulating the transcript cleavage reaction. We show here that arrest relief can also occur by the addition of pyrophosphate. This generates the same set of cleavage products as factor SII, but the fragments produced with pyrophosphate have 5'-triphosphate termini. Thus, the active site of RNA polymerase II, in the presence of pyrophosphate, appears to be capable of cleaving phosphodiester linkages as far as 17 nt upstream of the original site of polymerization, leaving the ternary complex intact and transcriptionally active. Images PMID:8058756

  12. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  13. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  14. Structural basis for the antagonistic roles of RNP-8 and GLD-3 in GLD-2 poly(A)-polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Nakel, Katharina; Bonneau, Fabien; Basquin, Claire; Habermann, Bianca; Eckmann, Christian R; Conti, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation drives the translational activation of specific mRNAs in early metazoan development and is performed by distinct complexes that share the same catalytic poly(A)-polymerase subunit, GLD-2. The activity and specificity of GLD-2 depend on its binding partners. In Caenorhabditis elegans, GLD-2 promotes spermatogenesis when bound to GLD-3 and oogenesis when bound to RNP-8. GLD-3 and RNP-8 antagonize each other and compete for GLD-2 binding. Following up on our previous mechanistic studies of GLD-2-GLD-3, we report here the 2.5 Å resolution structure and biochemical characterization of a GLD-2-RNP-8 core complex. In the structure, RNP-8 embraces the poly(A)-polymerase, docking onto several conserved hydrophobic hotspots present on the GLD-2 surface. RNP-8 stabilizes GLD-2 and indirectly stimulates polyadenylation. RNP-8 has a different amino-acid sequence and structure as compared to GLD-3. Yet, it binds the same surfaces of GLD-2 by forming alternative interactions, rationalizing the remarkable versatility of GLD-2 complexes. PMID:27288313

  15. Structural basis for the antagonistic roles of RNP-8 and GLD-3 in GLD-2 poly(A)-polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakel, Katharina; Bonneau, Fabien; Basquin, Claire; Habermann, Bianca; Eckmann, Christian R.; Conti, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation drives the translational activation of specific mRNAs in early metazoan development and is performed by distinct complexes that share the same catalytic poly(A)-polymerase subunit, GLD-2. The activity and specificity of GLD-2 depend on its binding partners. In Caenorhabditis elegans, GLD-2 promotes spermatogenesis when bound to GLD-3 and oogenesis when bound to RNP-8. GLD-3 and RNP-8 antagonize each other and compete for GLD-2 binding. Following up on our previous mechanistic studies of GLD-2–GLD-3, we report here the 2.5 Å resolution structure and biochemical characterization of a GLD-2–RNP-8 core complex. In the structure, RNP-8 embraces the poly(A)-polymerase, docking onto several conserved hydrophobic hotspots present on the GLD-2 surface. RNP-8 stabilizes GLD-2 and indirectly stimulates polyadenylation. RNP-8 has a different amino-acid sequence and structure as compared to GLD-3. Yet, it binds the same surfaces of GLD-2 by forming alternative interactions, rationalizing the remarkable versatility of GLD-2 complexes. PMID:27288313

  16. A Rapid Technique for the Estimation of Polynucleotide Adenylyltransferase and Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase in Plant Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Trevor J.; Mans, Rusty J.

    1975-01-01

    Nucleic acid-dependent polynucleotide adenylytransferase (EC 2.7.7.19) and ribonucleic acid polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) have been partially purified from maize tissues (Zea mays L.) utilizing ammonium sulfate precipitation and batch diethylaminoethylcellulose chromatography. The technique is applicable to the simultaneous processing of up to eight samples of plant tissue and affords a rapid and reproducible means of assaying these two enzymes from small quantities of kernels or seedlings. The kinetic characteristics of the partially purified enzymes resemble those from more extensively purified preparations. PMID:16659402

  17. Basic mechanisms of RNA polymerase II activity and alteration of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2013-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation. PMID:23022618

  18. The coactivator dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135 is sufficient to recruit a polymerase complex and activate basal transcription mediated by CREB.

    PubMed

    Felinski, E A; Quinn, P G

    2001-11-01

    A specific TATA binding protein-associated factor (TAF), dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135, interacts with cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) through its constitutive activation domain (CAD), which recruits a polymerase complex and activates transcription. The simplest explanation is that the TAF is a coactivator, but several studies have questioned this role of TAFs. Using a reverse two-hybrid analysis in yeast, we previously mapped the interaction between dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308) and CREB to conserved hydrophobic amino acid residues in the CAD. That mapping was possible only because CREB fails to activate transcription in yeast, where all TAFs are conserved, except for the TAF recognizing CREB. To test whether CREB fails to activate transcription in yeast because it lacks a coactivator, we fused dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308) to the TATA binding protein domain of the yeast scaffolding TAF, yTAF(II)130. Transformation of yeast with this hybrid TAF conferred activation by the CAD, indicating that interaction with yTFIID is sufficient to recruit a polymerase complex and activate transcription. The hybrid TAF did not mediate activation by VP16 or vitamin D receptor, each of which interacts with TFIIB, but not with dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308). Enhancement of transcription activation by dTAF(II)110 in mammalian cells required interaction with both the CAD and TFIID and was inhibited by mutation of core hydrophobic residues in the CAD. These data demonstrate that dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135 acts as a coactivator to recruit TFIID and polymerase and that this mechanism of activation is conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:11687654

  19. Regulation of Mutagenic DNA Polymerase V Activation in Space and Time

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Andrew; McDonald, John P.; Caldas, Victor E. A.; Patel, Meghna; Wood, Elizabeth A.; Punter, Christiaan M.; Ghodke, Harshad; Cox, Michael M.; Woodgate, Roger; Goodman, Myron F.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation is often encountered as a component of multi-tiered regulatory systems in eukaryotes, where processes are readily segregated by organelle boundaries. Well-characterized examples of spatial regulation are less common in bacteria. Low-fidelity DNA polymerase V (UmuD′2C) is produced in Escherichia coli as part of the bacterial SOS response to DNA damage. Due to the mutagenic potential of this enzyme, pol V activity is controlled by means of an elaborate regulatory system at transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to visualize UmuC inside living cells in space and time, we now show that pol V is also subject to a novel form of spatial regulation. After an initial delay (~ 45 min) post UV irradiation, UmuC is synthesized, but is not immediately activated. Instead, it is sequestered at the inner cell membrane. The release of UmuC into the cytosol requires the RecA* nucleoprotein filament-mediated cleavage of UmuD→UmuD′. Classic SOS damage response mutants either block [umuD(K97A)] or constitutively stimulate [recA(E38K)] UmuC release from the membrane. Foci of mutagenically active pol V Mut (UmuD′2C-RecA-ATP) formed in the cytosol after UV irradiation do not co-localize with pol III replisomes, suggesting a capacity to promote translesion DNA synthesis at lesions skipped over by DNA polymerase III. In effect, at least three molecular mechanisms limit the amount of time that pol V has to access DNA: (1) transcriptional and posttranslational regulation that initially keep the intracellular levels of pol V to a minimum; (2) spatial regulation via transient sequestration of UmuC at the membrane, which further delays pol V activation; and (3) the hydrolytic activity of a recently discovered pol V Mut ATPase function that limits active polymerase time on the chromosomal template. PMID:26317348

  20. Regulation of Mutagenic DNA Polymerase V Activation in Space and Time.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew; McDonald, John P; Caldas, Victor E A; Patel, Meghna; Wood, Elizabeth A; Punter, Christiaan M; Ghodke, Harshad; Cox, Michael M; Woodgate, Roger; Goodman, Myron F; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2015-08-01

    Spatial regulation is often encountered as a component of multi-tiered regulatory systems in eukaryotes, where processes are readily segregated by organelle boundaries. Well-characterized examples of spatial regulation are less common in bacteria. Low-fidelity DNA polymerase V (UmuD'2C) is produced in Escherichia coli as part of the bacterial SOS response to DNA damage. Due to the mutagenic potential of this enzyme, pol V activity is controlled by means of an elaborate regulatory system at transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to visualize UmuC inside living cells in space and time, we now show that pol V is also subject to a novel form of spatial regulation. After an initial delay (~ 45 min) post UV irradiation, UmuC is synthesized, but is not immediately activated. Instead, it is sequestered at the inner cell membrane. The release of UmuC into the cytosol requires the RecA* nucleoprotein filament-mediated cleavage of UmuD→UmuD'. Classic SOS damage response mutants either block [umuD(K97A)] or constitutively stimulate [recA(E38K)] UmuC release from the membrane. Foci of mutagenically active pol V Mut (UmuD'2C-RecA-ATP) formed in the cytosol after UV irradiation do not co-localize with pol III replisomes, suggesting a capacity to promote translesion DNA synthesis at lesions skipped over by DNA polymerase III. In effect, at least three molecular mechanisms limit the amount of time that pol V has to access DNA: (1) transcriptional and posttranslational regulation that initially keep the intracellular levels of pol V to a minimum; (2) spatial regulation via transient sequestration of UmuC at the membrane, which further delays pol V activation; and (3) the hydrolytic activity of a recently discovered pol V Mut ATPase function that limits active polymerase time on the chromosomal template. PMID:26317348

  1. De Novo Polymerase Activity and Oligomerization of Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases from Genotypes 1 to 5

    PubMed Central

    Bellón-Echeverría, Itxaso; Encinar, José Antonio; Martínez-Alfaro, Elisa; Pérez-Flores, Ricardo; Mas, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) shows a great geographical diversity reflected in the high number of circulating genotypes and subtypes. The response to HCV treatment is genotype specific, with the predominant genotype 1 showing the lowest rate of sustained virological response. Virally encoded enzymes are candidate targets for intervention. In particular, promising antiviral molecules are being developed to target the viral NS3/4A protease and NS5B polymerase. Most of the studies with the NS5B polymerase have been done with genotypes 1b and 2a, whilst information about other genotypes is scarce. Here, we have characterized the de novo activity of NS5B from genotypes 1 to 5, with emphasis on conditions for optimum activity and kinetic constants. Polymerase cooperativity was determined by calculating the Hill coefficient and oligomerization through a new FRET-based method. The Vmax/Km ratios were statistically different between genotype 1 and the other genotypes (p<0.001), mainly due to differences in Vmax values, but differences in the Hill coefficient and NS5B oligomerization were noted. Analysis of sequence changes among the studied polymerases and crystal structures show the αF helix as a structural component probably involved in NS5B-NS5B interactions. The viability of the interaction of αF and αT helixes was confirmed by docking studies and calculation of electrostatic surface potentials for genotype 1 and point mutants corresponding to mutations from different genotypes. Results presented in this study reveal the existence of genotypic differences in NS5B de novo activity and oligomerization. Furthermore, these results allow us to define two regions, one consisting of residues Glu128, Asp129, and Glu248, and the other consisting of residues of αT helix possibly involved in NS5B-NS5B interactions. PMID:21490973

  2. Identification of terminal adenylyl transferase activity of the poliovirus polymerase 3Dpol.

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, K L; Galarza, J M; Richards, O C; Summers, D F; Ehrenfeld, E

    1994-01-01

    A terminal adenylyl transferase (TATase) activity has been identified in preparations of purified poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3Dpol). Highly purified 3Dpol is capable of adding [32P]AMP to the 3' ends of chemically synthesized 12-nucleotide (nt)-long RNAs. The purified 52-kDa polypeptide, isolated after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and renatured, retained the TATase activity. Two 3Dpol mutants, purified from Escherichia coli expression systems, displayed no detectable polymerase activity and were unable to catalyze TATase activity. Likewise, extracts from the parental E. coli strain that harbored no expression plasmid were unable to catalyze formation of the TATase products. With the RNA oligonucleotide 5'-CCUGCUUUUGCA-3' used as an acceptor, the products formed by wild-type 3Dpol were 9 and 18 nt longer than the 12-nt oligomer. GTP, CTP, and UTP did not serve as substrates for transfer to this RNA, either by themselves or when all deoxynucleoside triphosphates were present in the reaction. Results from kinetic and stoichiometric analyses suggest that the reaction is catalytic and shows substrate and enzyme dependence. The 3'-terminal 13 nt of poliovirus minus-strand RNA also served as an acceptor for TATase activity, raising the possibility that this activity functions in poliovirus RNA replication. The efficiency of utilization and the nature of the products formed during the reaction were dependent on the acceptor RNA. Images PMID:8057462

  3. The influence of nucleotide sequence and temperature on the activity of thermostable DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jesse L; Rejali, Nick; Wittwer, Carl T

    2014-05-01

    Extension rates of a thermostable, deletion-mutant polymerase were measured from 50°C to 90°C using a fluorescence activity assay adapted for real-time PCR instruments. Substrates with a common hairpin (6-base loop and a 14-bp stem) were synthesized with different 10-base homopolymer tails. Rates for A, C, G, T, and 7-deaza-G incorporation at 75°C were 81, 150, 214, 46, and 120 seconds(-1). Rates for U were half as fast as T and did not increase with increasing concentration. Hairpin substrates with 25-base tails from 0% to 100% GC content had maximal extension rates near 60% GC and were predicted from the template sequence and mononucleotide incorporation rates to within 30% for most sequences. Addition of dimethyl sulfoxide at 7.5% increased rates to within 1% to 17% of prediction for templates with 40% to 90% GC. When secondary structure was designed into the template region, extension rates decreased. Oligonucleotide probes reduced extension rates by 65% (5'-3' exo-) and 70% (5'-3' exo+). When using a separate primer and a linear template to form a polymerase substrate, rates were dependent on both the primer melting temperature (Tm) and the annealing/extension temperature. Maximum rates were observed from Tm to Tm - 5°C with little extension by Tm + 5°C. Defining the influence of sequence and temperature on polymerase extension will enable more rapid and efficient PCR. PMID:24607271

  4. DNA-dependent DNA polymerase from yeast mitochondria. Dependence of enzyme activity on conditions of cell growth, and properties of the highly purified polymerase.

    PubMed

    Wintersberger, U; Blutsch, H

    1976-09-01

    The activity of DNA polymerase was determined in gradient-purified mitochondria from yeast cells grown under a variety of conditions. The specific enzyme activity was found to be dependent on the degree of aeration of the cells, and on the carbon source used for the medium. It was sensitive to glucose repression, and was enhanced about two-fold by the growth of yeast cells in the presence of ethidium bromide. Mitochondria DNA polymerase was highly purified and several properties were determined. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and dodecylsulfate-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the following structure: a monomer of molecular weight around 60 000 aggregated under relatively high salt concentration (0.2 M phosphate buffer) to a dimer of about 120 000 which under low salt concentration (0.2 M Tris-HCl buffer) formed higher aggregates. For optimal activity an Mg2+ ion concentration of 50 mM was found necessary, Mn ions did not promote activity at any concentration tested (0.5--50 mM). Indeed, if added to Mg2+-containing assays, Mn2+ strongly inhibited enzyme activity at low concentrations. This might be an explanation for the inducation of mitochondrial mutants in yeast cells grown in the presence of Mn2+ ions. Mitochondrial DNA polymerase activity was strongly inhibited by low concentrations of the -SH reagent p-chloromercuribenzoate, the nucleotide analogue cytosine arabinoside triphosphate also exerted an inhibitory effect. An about 50% decrease of activity was observed in the presence of 1 mM o-phenanthroline in assay mixture containing DNA at about the Km concentration. The enzyme preferred a gapped template primer, poly(dA) - (dT)10, over nicked DNA and was unable to use a polyribonucleotide template, poly(rA) - (dT)10. In the purest preparations no exonuclease activity could be detected. PMID:786635

  5. Two Distinctive Binding Modes of Endonuclease Inhibitors to the N-Terminal Region of Influenza Virus Polymerase Acidic Subunit.

    PubMed

    Fudo, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Norio; Nukaga, Michiyoshi; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2016-05-10

    Influenza viruses are global threat to humans, and the development of new antiviral agents are still demanded to prepare for pandemics and to overcome the emerging resistance to the current drugs. Influenza polymerase acidic protein N-terminal domain (PAN) has endonuclease activity and is one of the appropriate targets for novel antiviral agents. First, we performed X-ray cocrystal analysis on the complex structures of PAN with two endonuclease inhibitors. The protein crystallization and the inhibitor soaking were done at pH 5.8. The binding modes of the two inhibitors were different from a common binding mode previously reported for the other influenza virus endonuclease inhibitors. We additionally clarified the complex structures of PAN with the same two endonuclease inhibitors at pH 7.0. In one of the crystal structures, an additional inhibitor molecule, which chelated to the two metal ions in the active site, was observed. On the basis of the crystal structures at pH 7.0, we carried out 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for both of the complexes. The analysis of simulation results suggested that the binding mode of each inhibitor to PAN was stable in spite of the partial deviation of the simulation structure from the crystal one. Furthermore, crystal structure analysis and MD simulation were performed for PAN in complex with an inhibitor, which was already reported to have a high compound potency for comparison. The findings on the presence of multiple binding sites at around the PAN substrate-binding pocket will provide a hint for enhancing the binding affinity of inhibitors. PMID:27088785

  6. Increased poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity in cells infected by human immunodeficiency virus type-1.

    PubMed

    Furlini, G; Re, M C; La Placa, M

    1991-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase is a chromatin-bound enzyme which is activated by free DNA ends and is therefore stimulated by a variety of DNA-damaging agents. The enzyme transfers the ADP moiety of NAD to nuclear proteins to create protein-bound ADP-ribose polymers. Under conditions favouring an accelerated poly(ADP-ribose) polymer formation, the enzyme may exhaust cellular NAD pools. At the same time, or shortly thereafter ATP levels drop and cell viability eventually declines. As a series of chemical and physical agents which may play a role in activating latent HIV-1 infection or favouring HIV-1 replication, have a DNA-damaging activity, we investigated the behaviour of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity in various types of HIV-1-infected cells. The results obtained show that HIV-1-infected cells to possess an increased poly(ADP-ribosol)ating activity together with an accentuated fragmentation of cellular DNA which are associated with the time course of HIV-1 replication. These data give circumstantial support to the hypothesis that a NAD-depdendent cellular suicide response to DNA damage, could play a role in the death of HIV-1 infected cells. In this respect, the impared immunocompetence of HIV-1-infected patients could bear some resemblance to immune attribution that sometimes accompanies some inborn errors affecting DNA precursor metabolism and DNA integrity. PMID:1906973

  7. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase II basal transcription activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Chibazakura, T; Kitajima, S; Yasukochi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II) in eukaryotic cells requires both basal and regulatory transcription factors. In this report we have investigated in vitro pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle by using nuclear extracts from synchronized HeLa cells. It is shown that pol II basal transcription activity is low in the S and G2 phases and high in early G1 phase and TFIID is the rate limiting component of pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle. Further analyses reveal that TFIID exists as a less active form in the S and G2 phases and nuclear extracts from S and G2 phase cells contain a heat-sensitive repressor(s) of TATA box binding protein (TBP). These results suggest that pol II basal transcription activity is regulated by a qualitative change in the TFIID complex, which could involve repression of TBP, during the cell cycle. Images PMID:7479063

  8. Duality of polynucleotide substrates for Phi29 DNA polymerase: 3′→5′ RNase activity of the enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Lagunavicius, Arunas; Kiveryte, Zivile; Zimbaite-Ruskuliene, Vilma; Radzvilavicius, Tomas; Janulaitis, Arvydas

    2008-01-01

    Phi29 DNA polymerase is a small DNA-dependent DNA polymerase that belongs to eukaryotic B-type DNA polymerases. Despite the small size, the polymerase is a multifunctional proofreading-proficient enzyme. It catalyzes two synthetic reactions (polymerization and deoxynucleotidylation of Phi29 terminal protein) and possesses two degradative activities (pyrophosphorolytic and 3′→5′ DNA exonucleolytic activities). Here we report that Phi29 DNA polymerase exonucleolyticaly degrades ssRNA. The RNase activity acts in a 3′ to 5′ polarity. Alanine replacements in conserved exonucleolytic site (D12A/D66A) inactivated RNase activity of the enzyme, suggesting that a single active site is responsible for cleavage of both substrates: DNA and RNA. However, the efficiency of RNA hydrolysis is ∼10-fold lower than for DNA. Phi29 DNA polymerase is widely used in rolling circle amplification (RCA) experiments. We demonstrate that exoribonuclease activity of the enzyme can be used for the target RNA conversion into a primer for RCA, thus expanding application potential of this multifunctional enzyme and opening new opportunities for RNA detection. PMID:18230765

  9. Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity. PMID:27112574

  10. Single-molecule imaging of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) activity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Zhang, P.; Wang, Q.; Wu, N.; Zhang, F.; Hu, J.; Fan, C. H.; Li, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA.We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06544e

  11. Site-specific incorporation of probes into RNA polymerase by unnatural-amino-acid mutagenesis and Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Mazumder, Abhishek; Lin, Miaoxin; Hasemeyer, Adam; Xu, Qumiao; Wang, Dongye; Ebright, Yon W.; Ebright, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A three-step procedure comprising (i) unnatural-amino-acid mutagenesis with 4-azido-phenylalanine, (ii) Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation with a probe-phosphine derivative, and (iii) in vitro reconstitution of RNA polymerase (RNAP) enables the efficient site-specific incorporation of a fluorescent probe, a spin label, a crosslinking agent, a cleaving agent, an affinity tag, or any other biochemical or biophysical probe, at any site of interest in RNAP. Straightforward extensions of the procedure enable the efficient site-specific incorporation of two or more different probes in two or more different subunits of RNAP. We present protocols for synthesis of probe-phosphine derivatives, preparation of RNAP subunits and the transcription initiation factor σ, unnatural amino acid mutagenesis of RNAP subunits and σ, Staudinger ligation with unnatural-amino-acid-containing RNAP subunits and σ, quantitation of labelling efficiency and labelling specificity, and reconstitution of RNAP. PMID:25665560

  12. A Targeting Modality for Destruction of RNA Polymerase I that Possesses Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Karita; Colis, Laureen; Liu, Hester; Trivedi, Rishi; Moubarek, Michael S.; Moore, Henna M.; Bai, Bayoan; Rudek, Michelle A.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Laiho, Marikki

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We define here the activity and mechanisms of action of a small molecule lead compound for cancer targeting. We show that the compound, BMH-21, has wide and potent antitumorigenic activity across NCI60 cancer cell lines and represses tumor growth in vivo. BMH-21 binds GC-rich sequences, which is present at high frequency in ribosomal DNA genes, and potently and rapidly represses RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription. Strikingly, we find that BMH-21 causes proteasome-dependent destruction of RPA194, the large catalytic subunit protein of Pol I holocomplex, and this correlates with cancer cell killing. Our results show that Pol I activity is under proteasome-mediated control, which reveals an unexpected therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24434211

  13. Basic Mechanisms of RNA Polymerase II Activity and Alteration of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Craig D.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23022618

  14. Assays for Hepatitis B Virus DNA-and RNA-Dependent DNA Polymerase Activities.

    PubMed

    Shaw, T; Locarnini, S A

    2000-01-01

    Genomes of the hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) consist of approx 3.2 kb of partly double-stranded DNA containing three or four overlapping open reading frames, the largest of which encodes the viral polymerase (Pol) protein. After entry into the cell and uncoating, the viral genome is transported to the nucleus where it is converted into a covalently closed circular (CCC) or supercoiled molecule by cellular repair mechanisms. The viral CCC DNA is transcribed, presumably by host cell RNA polymerase II, into unspliced, capped polyadenylated mRNA species from which viral proteins are transcribed. In addition, terminally redundant 3.5-kb RNA transcripts, which function as pregenomes, are produced and exported to the cytoplasm where they are packaged into viral core particles in which reverse transcription, pregenome degradation, and duplication occurs, reproducing the partly double-stranded HBV genome (for recent review, see ref. 1). Besides its essential role in HBV genome replication, HBV Pol is also involved in virus assembly, and because hepadnaviruses do not encode enzymes functionally equivalent to deoxynucleoside kinases (2), functions associated with HBV Pol are probably the only virus-specific targets for antiviral activity of nucleoside analogs. In vitro assays for inhibition of HBV Pol functions by deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) analogs are useful indicators but, because of restrictions imposed by hepatocyte enzymology, provide no guarantee of potential anti-HBV activity of the parent (deoxy)nucleoside analogs in intact cells (2). PMID:21331902

  15. Polymerase chain displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire L; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma J; Olson, Ken E; Alphey, Luke; Fu, Guoliang

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PCR assays are now the standard method for viral diagnostics. These assays must be specific, as well as sensitive, to detect the potentially low starting copy number of viral genomic material. We describe a new technique, polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR), which uses multiple nested primers in a rapid, capped, one-tube reaction that increases the sensitivity of normal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Sensitivity was increased by approximately 10-fold in a proof-of-principle test on dengue virus sequence. In PCDR, when extension occurs from the outer primer, it displaces the extension strand produced from the inner primer by utilizing a polymerase that has strand displacement activity. This allows a greater than 2-fold increase of amplification product for each amplification cycle and therefore increased sensitivity and speed over conventional PCR. Increased sensitivity in PCDR would be useful in nucleic acid detection for viral diagnostics. PMID:23384180

  16. The upstream activator CTF/NF1 and RNA polymerase II share a common element involved in transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Lis, J T; Xiao, H; Greenblatt, J; Friesen, J D

    1994-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II consists of tandem repeats of a heptapeptide with the consensus YSPTSPS. It has been shown that the heptapeptide repeat interacts directly with the general transcription factor TFIID. We report here that the CTD activates transcription when fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. More importantly, we find that the proline-rich transcriptional activation domain of the CCAAT-box-binding factor CTF/NF1 contains a sequence with striking similarity to the heptapeptide repeats of the CTD. We show that this CTD-like motif is essential for the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain of CTF/NF1. Deletion of and point mutations in this CTD-like motif abolish the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain, while natural CTD repeats from RNA polymerase II are fully functional in place of the CTD-like motif. We further show that the proline-rich activation domain of CTF/NF1 interacts directly with the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP), and that a mutation in the CTD-like motif that abolishes transcriptional activation reduces the affinity of the proline-rich domain for TBP. These results demonstrate that a class of proline-rich activator proteins and RNA polymerase II possess a common structural and functional component which can interact with the same target in the general transcription machinery. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanisms of transcriptional activation in eucaryotes. Images PMID:8029001

  17. DNA polymerase-mediated synthesis of unbiased threose nucleic acid (TNA) polymers requires 7-deazaguanine to suppress G:G mispairing during TNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Matthew R; Larsen, Andrew C; Zahurancik, Walter J; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Meyers, Madeline; Suo, Zucai; Chaput, John C

    2015-04-01

    Threose nucleic acid (TNA) is an unnatural genetic polymer capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution to generate folded molecules with ligand-binding activity. This property, coupled with a nuclease-resistant backbone, makes TNA an attractive candidate for future applications in biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that an engineered form of the Archaean replicative DNA polymerase 9°N, known commercially as Therminator DNA polymerase, can copy a three-letter genetic alphabet (A,T,C) from DNA into TNA. However, our ability to transcribe four-nucleotide libraries has been limited by chain termination events that prevent the synthesis of full-length TNA products. Here, we show that chain termination is caused by tG:dG mispairing in the enzyme active site. We demonstrate that the unnatural base analogue 7-deazaguanine (7dG) will suppress tGTP misincorporation by inhibiting the formation of Hoogsteen tG:dG base pairs. DNA templates that contain 7dG in place of natural dG residues replicate with high efficiency and >99% overall fidelity. Pre-steady-state kinetic measurements indicate that the rate of tCTP incorporation is 5-fold higher opposite 7dG than dG and only slightly lower than dCTP incorporation opposite either 7dG or dG. These results provide a chemical solution to the problem of how to synthesize large, unbiased pools of TNA molecules by polymerase-mediated synthesis. PMID:25785966

  18. Nucleotide-dependent interactions between a fork junction–RNA polymerase complex and an AAA+ transcriptional activator protein

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, W. V.; Schumacher, J.; Buck, M.

    2004-01-01

    Enhancer-dependent transcriptional activators that act upon the σ54 bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme belong to the extensive AAA+ superfamily of mechanochemical ATPases. Formation and collapse of the transition state for ATP hydrolysis engenders direct interactions between AAA+ activators and the σ54 factor, required for RNA polymerase isomerization. A DNA fork junction structure present within closed complexes serves as a nucleation point for the DNA melting seen in open promoter complexes and restricts spontaneous activator-independent RNA polymerase isomerization. We now provide physical evidence showing that the ADP·AlFx bound form of the AAA+ domain of the transcriptional activator protein PspF changes interactions between σ54-RNA polymerase and a DNA fork junction structure present in the closed promoter complex. The results suggest that one functional state of the nucleotide-bound activator serves to alter DNA binding by σ54 and σ54-RNA polymerase and appears to drive events that precede DNA opening. Clear evidence for a DNA-interacting activity in the AAA+ domain of PspF was obtained, suggesting that PspF may make a direct contact to the DNA component of a basal promoter complex to promote changes in σ54-RNA polymerase–DNA interactions that favour open complex formation. We also provide evidence for two distinct closed promoter complexes with differing stabilities. PMID:15333692

  19. The Human Tim-Tipin Complex Interacts Directly with DNA Polymerase ϵ and Stimulates Its Synthetic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Aria, Valentina; De Felice, Mariarita; Di Perna, Roberta; Uno, Shuji; Masai, Hisao; Syväoja, Juhani E.; van Loon, Barbara; Hübscher, Ulrich; Pisani, Francesca M.

    2013-01-01

    The Tim-Tipin complex plays an important role in the S phase checkpoint and replication fork stability in metazoans, but the molecular mechanism underlying its biological function is poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that the recombinant human Tim-Tipin complex (and Tim alone) markedly enhances the synthetic activity of DNA polymerase ϵ. In contrast, no significant effect on the synthetic ability of human DNA polymerase α and δ by Tim-Tipin was observed. Surface plasmon resonance measurements and co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that recombinant DNA polymerase ϵ directly interacts with either Tim or Tipin. In addition, the results of DNA band shift assays suggest that the Tim-Tipin complex (or Tim alone) is able to associate with DNA polymerase ϵ bound to a 40-/80-mer DNA ligand. Our results are discussed in view of the molecular dynamics at the human DNA replication fork. PMID:23511638

  20. Active transcription and essential role of RNA polymerase II at the centromere during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, F. Lyn; Marshall, Owen J.; Saffery, Richard; Won Kim, Bo; Earle, Elizabeth; Choo, K. H. Andy; Wong, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the centromeric regions has been reported to occur in G1 and S phase in different species. Here, we investigate whether transcription also occurs and plays a functional role at the mammalian centromere during mitosis. We show the presence of actively transcribing RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and its associated transcription factors, coupled with the production of centromere satellite transcripts at the mitotic kinetochore. Specific inhibition of RNAPII activity during mitosis leads to a decrease in centromeric α-satellite transcription and a concomitant increase in anaphase-lagging cells, with the lagging chromosomes showing reduced centromere protein C binding. These findings demonstrate an essential role of RNAPII in the transcription of α-satellite DNA, binding of centromere protein C, and the proper functioning of the mitotic kinetochore. PMID:22308327

  1. PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF PROTOCATECHUIC ACID.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Rashid, Rehana; Fatima, Nighat; Mahmood, Sadaf; Mir, Sadullah; Khan, Sara; Jabeen, Nyla; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, PCA) is a simple phenolic acid. It is found in a large variety of edible plants and possesses various pharmacological activities. This article aims to review the modern trends in phytochemical isolation and extraction of PCA from plants and other natural resources. Moreover, this article also encompasses pharmacological and biological activities of PCA. It is well known to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hyperglycemia, antibacterial, anticancer, anti-ageing, anti-athro- genic, anti-tumoral, anti-asthma, antiulcer, antispasmodic and neurological properties. PMID:26647619

  2. Biochemical properties of the stimulatory activity of DNA polymerase alpha by the hyper-phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Masaharu

    2002-06-01

    Previously, my colleagues and I have reported that the immunopurified hyper-phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (ppRb) stimulates the activity of DNA polymerase alpha. I describe here the biochemical characteristics of this stimulatory activity. DNA polymerase alpha-stimulatory activity of ppRb was most remarkable when using activated DNA as a template-primer, rather than using poly(dT)-(rA)(10), poly(dA)-(dT)(12-18), and so on. Kinetic analysis showed that there was no significant difference in K(m) value for deoxyribonucleotides of DNA polymerase alpha in the presence of ppRb. Adding ppRb resulted in the overcoming pause site on the template, but did not affect the rate of misincorporation of incorrect deoxyribonucleotides. By adding ppRb, the optimal concentration of template-primer was shifted to a higher region, but not using M13 singly primed DNA. The ppRb seemed to assist the process that DNA polymerase alpha changed its conformation resulting in appropriate enzyme activity. These results suggest that ppRb affects both template-primer and DNA polymerase alpha and makes appropriate circumstances for the enzyme reaction. PMID:12049795

  3. Factors affecting detection of PVY in dormant tubers by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and nucleic acid spot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Singh, R P

    1996-06-01

    A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed using two 20-mer primers located in nuclear inclusion genes NIa and NIb of potato virus Y (PVY). A 1017 bp PCR-product was detected in dormant potato tubers, infected with PVY(O), but not in tubers from healthy plants. The PCR product was specific to PVY, as determined by Southern blot detection by hybridization with a PVY(O)-specific probe. As little as 1 pg of purified PVY(O)-RNA can be detected after RT-PCR amplification. The presence of phenolics or polysaccharides in tuber nucleic acids inhibited PVY(O) amplification, which was eliminated by diluting nucleic acid preparations prior to cDNA synthesis, modifying the nucleic acid extraction procedure by isopropanol precipitation and using phosphate-buffered saline-Tween in the cDNA mix. Potato cultivars differed in PVY(O) concentration in tubers as much as 128-fold. Tuber parts used for nucleic acid extractions were important in potato cultivars with low virus titres and did not result in reduced detection of PVY(O) by both nucleic acid spot hybridization and RT-PCR, but RT-PCR band intensity was lower at longer storage periods. The primer pair developed in this study exhibited broad specificities with field isolates from Peru, Scotland and North America. PMID:8795005

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1 DNA polymerase is an A-family DNA polymerase demonstrating ssDNA and dsDNA 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Binyan; Gu, Shiling; Liang, Nengsong; Xiong, Mei; Xue, Qizhen; Lu, Shuguang; Hu, Fuquan; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-08-01

    Most phages contain DNA polymerases, which are essential for DNA replication and propagation in infected host bacteria. However, our knowledge on phage-encoded DNA polymerases remains limited. This study investigated the function of a novel DNA polymerase of PaP1, which is the lytic phage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PaP1 encodes its sole DNA polymerase called Gp90 that was predicted as an A-family DNA polymerase with polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. The sequence of Gp90 is homologous but not identical to that of other A-family DNA polymerases, such as T7 DNA polymerases (Pol) and DNA Pol I. The purified Gp90 demonstrated a polymerase activity. The processivity of Gp90 in DNA replication and its efficiency in single-dNTP incorporation are similar to those of T7 Pol with processive thioredoxin (T7 Pol/trx). Gp90 can degrade ssDNA and dsDNA in 3'-5' direction at a similar rate, which is considerably lower than that of T7 Pol/trx. The optimized conditions for polymerization were a temperature of 37 °C and a buffer consisting of 40 mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), 30 mM MgCl2, and 200 mM NaCl. These studies on DNA polymerase encoded by PaP1 help advance our knowledge on phage-encoded DNA polymerases and elucidate PaP1 propagation in infected P. aeruginosa. PMID:27052734

  5. Regulation by phosphorylation of Xenopus laevis poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme activity during oocyte maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Aoufouchi, S; Shall, S

    1997-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is an abundant nuclear enzyme that is dependent on DNA breaks and nicks for its enzyme activity. These DNA nicks and breaks function as allosteric effectors of the enzyme activity. This reaction is important for efficient DNA base excision repair, although it is not a component of the elementary repair pathway itself. The physiological relevance of this reaction might be to ensure correct and efficient DNA repair. We have examined the enzyme activity of PARP in oocytes and eggs of Xenopus laevis. Although both oocytes and eggs contain approximately the same amounts of enzyme protein, there is no detectable enzyme activity in the oocytes, whereas in the eggs the enzyme is active. Enzyme activity appears during oocyte maturation, approx. 4 h after induction by progesterone. This enzyme activation coincides with the appearance of active maturation-promoting factor. Enzyme activation is accompanied by a shift in the electrophoretic mobility of the polypeptide, from an apparent molecular mass of 116 kDa to 125 kDa. Treatment with either bacterial or potato phosphatase reverses the mobility shift and abolishes enzyme activity. Incubation of maturing X. laevis eggs with radioactive inorganic phosphate and subsequent immunoprecipitation demonstrate that the PARP protein is phosphorylated in vivo. We show that maturation-promoting factor (Cyclin B/cdc2) cannot itself be responsible for the phosphorylation and activation of PARP in maturing X. laevis eggs. Together, these results demonstrate that the enzyme activity of PARP in X. laevis oocytes and eggs is regulated by post-translational, covalent phosphorylation. PMID:9230139

  6. Conformational coupling, bridge helix dynamics and active site dehydration in catalysis by RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Steve A.; Singh, Badri Nath; Zhang, Chunfen; Kireeva, Maria; Domecq, Céline; Bouchard, Annie; Nazione, Anthony M.; Feig, Michael; Cukier, Robert I.; Coulombe, Benoit; Kashlev, Mikhail; Hampsey, Michael; Burton, Zachary F.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of Thermus thermophilus (Tt) RNA polymerase (RNAP) in a catalytic conformation demonstrates that the active site dNMP-NTP base pair must be substantially dehydrated to support full active site closing and optimum conditions for phosphodiester bond synthesis. In silico mutant β R428A RNAP, which was designed based on substitutions at the homologous position (Rpb2 R512) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) RNAP II, was used as a reference structure to compare to Tt RNAP in simulations. Long range conformational coupling linking a dynamic segment of the bridge α-helix, the extended fork loop, the active site, and the trigger loop-trigger helix is apparent and adversely affected in β R428A RNAP. Furthermore, bridge helix bending is detected in the catalytic structure, indicating that bridge helix dynamics may regulate phosphodiester bond synthesis as well as translocation. An active site “latch” assembly that includes a key trigger helix residue Tt β’ H1242 and highly conserved active site residues β E445 and R557 appears to help regulate active site hydration/dehydration. The potential relevance of these observations in understanding RNAP and DNAP induced fit and fidelity is discussed. PMID:20478425

  7. Activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase by sulfur mustard in HeLa cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, O.E.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-05-13

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) E.C.2.4.2.30 has been proposed to play a key role in the NAD+ depletion following alkylation of DNA in sulfur mustard (HD) exposures. Papirmeister et al. (Fundam Appl Toxicol 5:Sl34, 1985) hypothesized that activation of PADPRP was central to the subsequent depletion of NAD+ and activation of proteolytic enzymes leading to vesication. NAD+ depletion following HD exposure has been previously documented and the results have been used to infer the effect of HD exposure on PADPRP. The present study was undertaken to demonstrate the direct effect of HD on PADPRP activity. HeLa cells culture were used as the model system. At 10 microns HD PADPRP activity was increased above the levels of controls in the first hour. The activity peaked at 4 hrs and by 6 hrs had returned to control levels. The 24-hour level of PADPRP activity was again elevated above the controls. The 100 microns HD exposures had maximal enzymatic response in HeLa cells within the first hour. The level had decreased 40% from the maximum by the second hour reaching a plateau at 30% of the maximum response after 4 hrs. Cells exposed to 100 microns HD showed enzyme levels at or below those seen with the 10 microns dose after 24 hours. The doses of HD used did not decrease viability as measured by trypan blue dye exclusion within 24 hr.

  8. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  9. Three-dimensional structural model analysis of the binding site of lithocholic acid, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase beta and DNA topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Y; Kasai, N; Sugawara, F; Iida, A; Yoshida, H; Sakaguchi, K

    2001-11-01

    The molecular action of lithocholic acid (LCA), a selective inhibitor of mammalian DNA polymerase beta (pol beta), was investigated. We found that LCA could also strongly inhibit the activity of human DNA topoisomerase II (topo II). No other DNA metabolic enzymes tested were affected by LCA. Therefore, LCA should be classified as an inhibitor of both pol beta and topo II. Here, we report the molecular interaction of LCA with pol beta and topo II. By three-dimensional structural model analysis and by comparison with the spatial positioning of specific amino acids binding to LCA on pol beta (Lys60, Leu77, and Thr79), we obtained supplementary information that allowed us to build a structural model of topo II. Modeling analysis revealed that the LCA-interaction interface in both enzymes has a pocket comprised of three amino acids in common, which binds to the LCA molecule. In topo II, the three amino acid residues were Lys720, Leu760, and Thr791. These results suggested that the LCA binding domains of pol beta and topo II are three-dimensionally very similar. PMID:11686928

  10. Activation of an Mg2+-dependent DNA endonuclease of avian myeloblastosis virus alpha beta DNA polymerase by in vitro proteolytic cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Grandgenett, D P; Golomb, M; Vora, A C

    1980-01-01

    Partial chymotryptic digestion of purified avian myeloblastosis virus alpha beta DNA polymerase resulted in the activation of a Mg2+-dependent DNA endonuclease activity. Incubation of the polymerase-protease mixture in the presence of super-coiled DNA and Mg2+ permitted detection of the cleaved polymerase fragment possessing DNA nicking activity. Protease digestion conditions were established permitting selective cleavage of beta to alpha, which contained DNA polymerase and RNase H activity and to a family of polypeptides ranging in size from 30,000 to 34,000 daltons. These latter beta-unique fragments were purified by polyuridylate-Sepharose 4B chromatography and were shown to contain both DNA binding and DNA endonuclease activities. We have demonstrated that this group of polymerase fragments derived by chymotryptic digestion of alpha beta DNA polymerase is similar to the in vivo-isolated avian myeloblastosis virus p32pol in size, sequence, and DNA endonuclease activity. Images PMID:6154149

  11. A Region of Bdp1 Necessary for Transcription Initiation That Is Located within the RNA Polymerase III Active Site Cleft.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui-Lan; Wu, Chih-Chien; Lee, Jin-Cheng; Chen, Hung-Ta

    2015-08-01

    The RNA polymerase III (Pol III)-specific transcription factor Bdp1 is crucial to Pol III recruitment and promoter opening in transcription initiation, yet structural information is sparse. To examine its protein-binding targets within the preinitiation complex at the residue level, photoreactive amino acids were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bdp1. Mutations within the highly conserved SANT domain cross-linked to the transcription factor IIB (TFIIB)-related transcription factor Brf1, consistent with the findings of previous studies. In addition, we identified an essential N-terminal region that cross-linked with the Pol III catalytic subunit C128 as well as Brf1. Closer examination revealed that this region interacted with the C128 N-terminal region, the N-terminal half of Brf1, and the C-terminal domain of the C37 subunit, together positioning this region within the active site cleft of the preinitiation complex. With our functional data, our analyses identified an essential region of Bdp1 that is positioned within the active site cleft of Pol III and necessary for transcription initiation. PMID:26055328

  12. A Region of Bdp1 Necessary for Transcription Initiation That Is Located within the RNA Polymerase III Active Site Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui-Lan; Wu, Chih-Chien; Lee, Jin-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The RNA polymerase III (Pol III)-specific transcription factor Bdp1 is crucial to Pol III recruitment and promoter opening in transcription initiation, yet structural information is sparse. To examine its protein-binding targets within the preinitiation complex at the residue level, photoreactive amino acids were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bdp1. Mutations within the highly conserved SANT domain cross-linked to the transcription factor IIB (TFIIB)-related transcription factor Brf1, consistent with the findings of previous studies. In addition, we identified an essential N-terminal region that cross-linked with the Pol III catalytic subunit C128 as well as Brf1. Closer examination revealed that this region interacted with the C128 N-terminal region, the N-terminal half of Brf1, and the C-terminal domain of the C37 subunit, together positioning this region within the active site cleft of the preinitiation complex. With our functional data, our analyses identified an essential region of Bdp1 that is positioned within the active site cleft of Pol III and necessary for transcription initiation. PMID:26055328

  13. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase regulates glycolytic activity in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hana; Yoon, Sang Pil

    2016-01-01

    After renal injury, selective damage occurs in the proximal tubules as a result of inhibition of glycolysis. The molecular mechanism of damage is not known. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation plays a critical role of proximal tubular cell death in several renal disorders. Here, we studied the role of PARP on glycolytic flux in pig kidney proximal tubule epithelial LLC-PK1 cells using XFp extracellular flux analysis. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP activation was increased approximately 2-fold by incubation of the cells in 10 mM glucose for 30 minutes, but treatment with the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) does-dependently prevented the glucose-induced PARP activation (approximately 14.4% decrease in 0.1 mM 3-AB–treated group and 36.7% decrease in 1 mM 3-AB–treated group). Treatment with 1 mM 3-AB significantly enhanced the glucose-mediated increase in the extracellular acidification rate (61.1±4.3 mpH/min vs. 126.8±6.2 mpH/min or approximately 2-fold) compared with treatment with vehicle, indicating that PARP inhibition increases only glycolytic activity during glycolytic flux including basal glycolysis, glycolytic activity, and glycolytic capacity in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. Glucose increased the activities of glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphofructokinase-1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, enolase, and pyruvate kinase in LLC-PK1 cells. Furthermore, PARP inhibition selectively augmented the activities of hexokinase (approximately 1.4-fold over vehicle group), phosphofructokinase-1 (approximately 1.6-fold over vehicle group), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (approximately 2.2-fold over vehicle group). In conclusion, these data suggest that PARP activation may regulate glycolytic activity via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase-1, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. PMID:27382509

  14. Different functional modes of p300 in activation of RNA polymerase III transcription from chromatin templates.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Claudia; Roeder, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    Transcriptional coactivators that regulate the activity of human RNA polymerase III (Pol III) in the context of chromatin have not been reported. Here, we describe a completely defined in vitro system for transcription of a human tRNA gene assembled into a chromatin template. Transcriptional activation and histone acetylation in this system depend on recruitment of p300 by general initiation factor TFIIIC, thus providing a new paradigm for recruitment of histone-modifying coactivators. Beyond its role as a chromatin-modifying factor, p300 displays an acetyltransferase-independent function at the level of preinitiation complex assembly. Thus, direct interaction of p300 with TFIIIC stabilizes binding of TFIIIC to core promoter elements and results in enhanced transcriptional activity on histone-free templates. Additional studies show that p300 is recruited to the promoters of actively transcribed tRNA and U6 snRNA genes in vivo. These studies identify TFIIIC as a recruitment factor for p300 and thus may have important implications for the emerging concept that tRNA genes or TFIIIC binding sites act as chromatin barriers to prohibit spreading of silenced heterochromatin domains. PMID:18644873

  15. Different Functional Modes of p300 in Activation of RNA Polymerase III Transcription from Chromatin Templates▿

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Claudia; Roeder, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional coactivators that regulate the activity of human RNA polymerase III (Pol III) in the context of chromatin have not been reported. Here, we describe a completely defined in vitro system for transcription of a human tRNA gene assembled into a chromatin template. Transcriptional activation and histone acetylation in this system depend on recruitment of p300 by general initiation factor TFIIIC, thus providing a new paradigm for recruitment of histone-modifying coactivators. Beyond its role as a chromatin-modifying factor, p300 displays an acetyltransferase-independent function at the level of preinitiation complex assembly. Thus, direct interaction of p300 with TFIIIC stabilizes binding of TFIIIC to core promoter elements and results in enhanced transcriptional activity on histone-free templates. Additional studies show that p300 is recruited to the promoters of actively transcribed tRNA and U6 snRNA genes in vivo. These studies identify TFIIIC as a recruitment factor for p300 and thus may have important implications for the emerging concept that tRNA genes or TFIIIC binding sites act as chromatin barriers to prohibit spreading of silenced heterochromatin domains. PMID:18644873

  16. Thermal denaturation of double-stranded nucleic acids: prediction of temperatures critical for gradient gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Steger, G

    1994-07-25

    A program is described which calculates the thermal stability and the denaturation behaviour of double-stranded DNAs and RNAs up to a length of 1000 base pairs. The algorithm is based on recursive generation of conditional and a priori probabilities for base stacking. Output of the program may be compared directly to experimental results; thus the program may be used to optimize the nucleic acid fragments, the primers and the experimental conditions prior to experiments like polymerase chain reactions, temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis, denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis and hybridizations. The program is available in three versions; the first version runs interactively on VAXstations producing graphics output directly, the second is implemented as part of the HUSAR package at GENIUSnet, the third runs on any computer producing text output which serves as input to available graphics programs. PMID:8052531

  17. A bacterial ATP-dependent, enhancer binding protein that activates the housekeeping RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, William C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A commonly accepted view of gene regulation in bacteria that has emerged over the last decade is that promoters are transcriptionally activated by one of two general mechanisms. The major type involves activator proteins that bind to DNA adjacent to where the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds, usually assisting in recruitment of the RNAP to the promoter. This holoenzyme uses the housekeeping ς70 or a related factor, which directs the core RNAP to the promoter and assists in melting the DNA near the RNA start site. A second type of mechanism involves the alternative sigma factor (called ς54 or ςN) that directs RNAP to highly conserved promoters. In these cases, an activator protein with an ATPase function oligomerizes at tandem sites far upstream from the promoter. The nitrogen regulatory protein (NtrC) from enteric bacteria has been the model for this family of activators. Activation of the RNAP/ς54 holoenzyme to form the open complex is mediated by the activator, which is tethered upstream. Hence, this class of protein is sometimes called the enhancer binding protein family or the NtrC class. We describe here a third system that has properties of each of these two types. The NtrC enhancer binding protein from the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus, is shown in vitro to activate the housekeeping RNAP/ς70 holoenzyme. Transcriptional activation by this NtrC requires ATP binding but not hydrolysis. Oligomerization at distant tandem binding sites on a supercoiled template is also necessary. Mechanistic and evolutionary questions of these systems are discussed. PMID:9637689

  18. Activation of the catBCA promoter: probing the interaction of CatR and RNA polymerase through in vitro transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Chugani, S A; Parsek, M R; Hershberger, C D; Murakami, K; Ishihama, A; Chakrabarty, A M

    1997-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida is capable of degrading many aromatic compounds, including benzoate, through catechol as an intermediate. The catabolism of catechol is mediated by the catBCA operon, whose induction requires the pathway intermediate cis,cis-muconate as an inducer and the regulatory protein, CatR. CatR also regulates the plasmid-borne pheBA operon of P. putida PaW85, which is involved in phenol catabolism. We have used an in vitro transcription system to study the roles of CatR, cis,cis-muconate, Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, and promoter sequences in expression of the cat and phe operons. The assay confirmed the requirement of both CatR and cis,cis-muconate for transcript formation. We also examined the in vitro transcription of three site-directed mutants of the catBCA promoter; the results obtained compared favorably with previous in vivo data. The requirement of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase for expression of the catBCA and the pheBA transcripts was also examined. The C-terminal region of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase has been implicated in direct protein-protein contact with transcriptional regulatory proteins and/or direct contact with the DNA. We show that the carboxyl terminus of the alpha subunit is required for the expression of the catBCA and the pheBA operons because RNA polymerases with truncated alpha subunits were deficient in activation. Further experiments demonstrated the arginine at position 265 and the asparagine at position 268 of the alpha subunit as possible amino acids involved in activation. On the basis of these and previous results, we propose a model to explain the interaction of the different regulatory components leading to CatR-dependent activation of the catBCA operon. PMID:9079907

  19. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  20. The antiviral activity of tetrazole phosphonic acids and their analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, D W; Naylor, M

    1985-01-01

    5-(Phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and a number of related tetrazoles have been prepared and their effects on the replication of Herpes Simplex Viruses-1 and -2 have been investigated as well as their abilities to inhibit the DNA polymerases induced by these viruses and the RNA transcriptase activity of influenza virus A. Contrary to an earlier report, 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was not an efficient inhibitor of the replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in tissue culture. Analogues of 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole were also devoid of significant antiviral activity. Only 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and 5-(thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole inhibited the influenza virus transcriptase, and both were more effective as inhibitors than phosphonoacetic acid under the same conditions. The DNA polymerases induced by HSV-1 and HSV-2 were inhibited slightly by 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and to a lesser extent by its N-ethyl analogue and 3-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole. None of these compounds were as effective as phosphonoacetic acid. 5-(Thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was a better inhibitor of the DNA polymerase induced by HSV-1 than 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole. PMID:2417198

  1. Transcription of fractionated mammalian chromatin by mammalian ribonucleic acid polymerase. Demonstration of temperature-dependent rifampicin-resistant initiation sites in euchromatin deoxyribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Chesterton, C. James; Coupar, Barbara E. H.; Butterworth, Peter H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The chromatin fractionation method of Frenster et al. (1963) as modified by Leake et al. (1972) was used to prepare fragments of euchromatin from rat liver nuclei. These remain soluble in 5mm-MgCl2, and contain DNA of maximum mol.wt. 1×106–2×106. The fragments were separated from condensable chromatin on a sucrose gradient. Euchromatin contains endogenous DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and most of the nascent RNA labelled in vivo or in vitro. Euchromatin fragments allow initiation of transcription by added purified rat liver form-B RNA polymerase and contain temperature-dependent rifampicin-resistant initiation sites for the form-B enzyme. These findings indicate that transcription of the euchromatin regions of interphase chromosomes is not initiated in condensed chromatin, but is initiated within the euchromatin stretches. Condensable chromatin also contains most of these activities, but is not associated with nascent RNA. PMID:4464858

  2. The primary structure of Plasmodium falciparum DNA polymerase delta is similar to drug sensitive delta-like viral DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Fox, B A; Bzik, D J

    1991-12-01

    We report the isolation and sequencing of genomic DNA clones that encode the 1094-amino acid catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase delta from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Protein sequence comparison to other DNA polymerases revealed the presence of six highly conserved regions found in alpha-like DNA polymerases from different prokaryotic, viral, and eukaryotic sources. Five additional regions of amino acid sequence similarity that are only conserved in delta and delta-like DNA polymerases, so far, were present in P. falciparum DNA polymerase delta. P. falciparum DNA polymerase delta was highly similar to both Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase delta (DNA polymerase III; CDC2) and Epstein-Barr virus DNA polymerase at the amino acid sequence, and the predicted protein secondary structure levels. The gene that encodes DNA polymerase delta resides as a single copy on chromosome 10, and is expressed as a 4.5-kb mRNA during the trophozoite and schizont stages when parasite chromosomal DNA synthesis is active. PMID:1775172

  3. The RNA polymerase activity of SARS-coronavirus nsp12 is primer dependent

    PubMed Central

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J. W.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; van den Worm, Sjoerd H. E.; Snijder, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is the central catalytic subunit of the RNA-synthesizing machinery of all positive-strand RNA viruses. Usually, RdRp domains are readily identifiable by comparative sequence analysis, but biochemical confirmation and characterization can be hampered by intrinsic protein properties and technical complications. It is presumed that replication and transcription of the ∼30-kb severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) RNA genome are catalyzed by an RdRp domain in the C-terminal part of nonstructural protein 12 (nsp12), one of 16 replicase subunits. However, thus far full-length nsp12 has proven refractory to expression in bacterial systems, which has hindered both the biochemical characterization of coronavirus RNA synthesis and RdRp-targeted antiviral drug design. Here, we describe a combined strategy involving bacterial expression of an nsp12 fusion protein and its in vivo cleavage to generate and purify stable SARS-CoV nsp12 (106 kDa) with a natural N-terminus and C-terminal hexahistidine tag. This recombinant protein possesses robust in vitro RdRp activity, as well as a significant DNA-dependent activity that may facilitate future inhibitor studies. The SARS-CoV nsp12 is primer dependent on both homo- and heteropolymeric templates, supporting the likeliness of a close enzymatic collaboration with the intriguing RNA primase activity that was recently proposed for coronavirus nsp8. PMID:19875418

  4. Multiple mechanisms contribute to the activation of RNA polymerase III transcription in cells transformed by papovaviruses.

    PubMed

    Felton-Edkins, Zoë A; White, Robert J

    2002-12-13

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription is abnormally active in fibroblasts transformed by polyomavirus (Py) or simian virus 40 (SV40). Several distinct mechanisms contribute to this effect. In untransformed fibroblasts, the basal pol III transcription factor (TF) IIIB is repressed through association with the retinoblastoma protein RB; this restraint is overcome by large T antigens of Py and SV40. Furthermore, cells transformed by these papovaviruses overexpress the BDP1 subunit of TFIIIB, at both the protein and mRNA levels. Despite the overexpression of BDP1, the abundance of the other TFIIIB components is unperturbed following papovavirus transformation. In contrast, mRNAs encoding all five subunits of the basal factor TFIIIC2 are found at elevated levels in fibroblasts transformed by Py or SV40. Thus, both papovaviruses stimulate pol III transcription by boosting production of selected components of the basal machinery. Py differs from SV40 in encoding a highly oncogenic middle T antigen that localizes outside the nucleus and activates several signal transduction pathways. Middle T can serve as a potent activator of a pol III reporter in transfected cells. Several distinct mechanisms therefore contribute to the high levels of pol III transcription that accompany transformation by Py and SV40. PMID:12370195

  5. High sensitivity detection of active botulinum neurotoxin by glyco-quantitative polymerase chain-reaction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Jeong, Eun Ji; Yoo, Yung Choon; Cai, Chao; Yang, Gi-Hyeok; Lee, Jae Chul; Dordick, Jonathan S; Linhardt, Robert J; Lee, Kyung Bok

    2014-03-01

    The sensitive detection of highly toxic botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) from Clostridium botulinum is of critical importance because it causes human illnesses if foodborne or introduced in wounds and as an iatrogenic substance. Moreover, it has been recently considered a possible biological warfare agent. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in BoNT detection technologies, including mouse lethality assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and endopeptidase assays and by mass spectrometry. Critical assay requirements, including rapid assay, active toxin detection, sensitive and accurate detection, still remain challenging. Here, we present a novel method to detect active BoNTs using a Glyco-quantitative polymerase chain-reaction (qPCR) approach. Sialyllactose, which interacts with the binding-domain of BoNTs, is incorporated into a sialyllactose-DNA conjugate as a binding-probe for active BoNT and recovered through BoNT-immunoprecipitation. Glyco-qPCR analysis of the bound sialyllactose-DNA is then used to detect low attomolar concentrations of BoNT and attomolar to femtomolar concentrations of BoNT in honey, the most common foodborne source of infant botulism. PMID:24506443

  6. The Closing Mechanism of DNA Polymerase I at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bill R; Beese, Lorena S; Parish, Carol A; Wu, Eugene Y

    2015-09-01

    DNA polymerases must quickly and accurately distinguish between similar nucleic acids to form Watson-Crick base pairs and avoid DNA replication errors. Deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) binding to the DNA polymerase active site induces a large conformational change that is difficult to characterize experimentally on an atomic level. Here, we report an X-ray crystal structure of DNA polymerase I bound to DNA in the open conformation with a dNTP present in the active site. We use this structure to computationally simulate the open to closed transition of DNA polymerase in the presence of a Watson-Crick base pair. Our microsecond simulations allowed us to characterize the key steps involved in active site assembly, and propose the sequence of events involved in the prechemistry steps of DNA polymerase catalysis. They also reveal new features of the polymerase mechanism, such as a conserved histidine as a potential proton acceptor from the primer 3'-hydroxyl. PMID:26211612

  7. Triplet amino acids located at positions 145/146/147 of the RNA polymerase of very virulent infectious bursal disease virus contribute to viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Shen, Nan; Kong, Xiangang; Wang, Xiaomei

    2014-04-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an economically significant disease of chickens worldwide. The emergence of very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) has brought more challenges for effective prevention of this disease. The molecular basis for the virulence of vvIBDV is not fully understood. In this study, 20 IBDV strains were analysed phylogenically and clustered in three branches based on their full-length B segments. The amino acid triplet located at positions 145/146/147 of VP1 was found highly conserved in branch I non-vvIBDVs as asparagine/glutamic acid/glycine (NEG), in branch II vvIBDVs as threonine/glutamic acid/glycine (TEG) and in branch III vvIBDVs as threonine/aspartic acid/asparagine (TDN). Further studies showed that the three amino acids play a critical role in the replication and pathogenicity of vvIBDV. Substitution of the TDN triplet with TEG or NEG reduced viral replication and pathogenicity of the vvIBDV HuB-1 strain in chickens. However, the replication of the attenuated IBDV Gt strain was reduced in chicken embryo fibroblast cells, whilst it was enhanced in the bursa by substituting NEG with TEG or TDN. The exchange of the three amino acids was also found to be capable of affecting the polymerase activity of VP1. The important role of segment B in the pathogenicity of IBDV was confirmed in this study. These results also provided new insights into the mechanism of the virulence of vvIBDVs and may offer new targets for their attenuation to develop potential vaccines using reverse genetics. PMID:24431234

  8. Activation and modulation of cardiac poly-adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase activity in a rat model of brain death.

    PubMed

    Brain, John G; Rostron, Anthony J; Dark, John H; Kirby, John A

    2008-05-15

    DNA damage during transplantation can activate poly-adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) resulting in the generation of polymers of adenosine diphosphate-ribose (PAR). Excessive linkage of PAR to nuclear proteins can induce cell death, thereby limiting the function of transplanted organs. This study uses a rat model of brain death to determine the profile of PARP activation and whether mechanisms that lead to cell death can be ameliorated by appropriate donor resuscitation. The expression of PAR-linked nuclear proteins within cardiac myocytes was greatly increased after the induction of donor brain death. Importantly, infusion of noradrenaline or vasopressin to normalize the chronic hypotension produced by brain death reduced the expression of PAR to a level below baseline. These data suggest that chronic hypotension after donor brain death has the potential to limit cardiac function through the activation of PARP; however, this early cause of graft damage can be mitigated by appropriate donor resuscitation. PMID:18475194

  9. Optimal Replication Activity of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Polymerase Requires Phosphorylation of a Residue(s) at Carboxy-Terminal Domain II of Its Accessory Subunit, Phosphoprotein P

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Leroy N.; Englund, Nathan; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Amiya K.; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    1999-01-01

    The phosphoprotein, P, of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a key subunit of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex. The protein is phosphorylated at multiple sites in two different domains. We recently showed that specific serine and threonine residues within the amino-terminal acidic domain I of P protein must be phosphorylated for in vivo transcription activity, but not for replication activity, of the polymerase complex. To examine the role of phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain II residues of the P protein in transcription and replication, we have used a panel of mutant P proteins in which the phosphate acceptor sites (Ser-226, Ser-227, and Ser-233) were altered to alanines either individually or in various combinations. Analyses of the mutant proteins for their ability to support replication of a VSV minigenomic RNA suggest that phosphorylation of either Ser-226 or Ser-227 is necessary for optimal replication activity of the protein. The mutant protein (P226/227) in which both of these residues were altered to alanines was only about 8% active in replication compared to the wild-type (wt) protein. Substitution of alanine for Ser-233 did not have any adverse effect on replication activity of the protein. In contrast, all the mutant proteins showed activities similar to that of the wt protein in transcription. These results indicate that phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain II residues of P protein are required for optimal replication activity but not for transcription activity. Furthermore, substitution of glutamic acid residues for Ser-226 and Ser-227 resulted in a protein that was only 14% active in replication but almost fully active in transcription. Taken together, these results, along with our earlier studies, suggest that phosphorylation of residues at two different domains in the P protein regulates its activity in transcription and replication of the VSV genome. PMID:10364310

  10. Protein kinase activity of RNA polymerase I purified from a rat hepatoma: probable function of Mr 42,000 and 24,600 polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, K M; Stetler, D A; Jacob, S T

    1981-01-01

    RNA polymerase I was purified to homogeneity from Morris hepatoma 3924A. Purified RNA polymerase I contained a protein kinase activity but comigrated with the polymerase in nondenaturing gels. RNA polymerase II, purified from the same hepatoma, lacked protein kinase activity. Analysis of the subunit composition of the RNA polymerase I showed the presence of eight polypeptides: S1, Mr 190,000; S2, Mr 120,000; S3, Mr 62,000; S4, Mr 42,000; S5, Mr 24,600; S6, Mr 21,000; S7, Mr 19,500; and S8, Mr 17,500. Antibodies prepared against purified polymerase I specifically inhibited RNA synthesis catalyzed by RNA polymerase I. When subunits of the enzyme were covalently linked to diazobenzyloxymethyl paper, complexes between the antibody preparation and S1-S6 were visualized. No immune complexes were formed between RNA polymerase I antibodies and RNA polymerase II subunits. The antibody preparation was able to inhibit both the protein phosphorylation catalyzed by RNA polymerase I and that catalyzed by a nuclear kinase (NII) purified from the same hepatoma. The two polypeptides of the nuclear kinase--Mr 42,000 and 24,600 (identical in size to S4 and S5 of polymerase I)--formed visible complexes with the RNA polymerase I antibodies. Both S4 and S5 of the polymerase contained an ATP binding site, a property associated with protein phosphorylation and also exhibited by the polypeptides of the purified kinase. These data suggest that polypeptides of Mr 42,000 and 24,600 associated with polymerase I are responsible for its kinase activity. Images PMID:6942406

  11. Evidence for the kinetic partitioning of polymerase activity on G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Sarah; Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K.; Henninger, Erin E.; Pursell, Zachary F.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the action of the human DNA polymerase epsilon (hpol ε) and eta (hpol η) catalytic cores on G-quadruplex (G4) DNA substrates derived from the promoter of the c-MYC proto-oncogene. The translesion enzyme hpol η exhibits a 6.2-fold preference for binding to G4 DNA relative to non-G4 DNA, while hpol ε binds both G4 and non-G4 substrates with near equal affinity. Kinetic analysis of single-nucleotide insertion by hpol η reveals that it is able to maintain greater than 25% activity on G4 substrates compared to non-G4 DNA substrates, even when the primer template junction is positioned directly adjacent to G22 (the first tetrad-associated guanine in the c-MYC G4 motif). Surprisingly, hpol η fidelity increases ~15-fold when copying G22. By way of comparison, hpol ε retains ~4% activity and has a 33-fold decrease in fidelity when copying G22. The fidelity of hpol η is ~100-fold more accurate than hpol ε when comparing the mis-insertion frequencies of the two enzymes opposite a tetrad-associated guanine. The kinetic differences observed for the B- and Y-family pols on G4 DNA support a model where a simple kinetic switch between replicative and TLS pols could help govern fork progress during G4 DNA replication. PMID:25903680

  12. Structural Basis for Dimerization and Activity of Human PAPD1 a Noncanonical Poly(A) Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Y Bai; S Srivastava; J Chang; J Manley; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Poly(A) polymerases (PAPs) are found in most living organisms and have important roles in RNA function and metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human PAPD1, a noncanonical PAP that can polyadenylate RNAs in the mitochondria (also known as mtPAP) and oligouridylate histone mRNAs (TUTase1). The overall structure of the palm and fingers domains is similar to that in the canonical PAPs. The active site is located at the interface between the two domains, with a large pocket that can accommodate the substrates. The structure reveals the presence of a previously unrecognized domain in the N-terminal region of PAPD1, with a backbone fold that is similar to that of RNP-type RNA binding domains. This domain (named the RL domain), together with a {beta}-arm insertion in the palm domain, contributes to dimerization of PAPD1. Surprisingly, our mutagenesis and biochemical studies show that dimerization is required for the catalytic activity of PAPD1.

  13. The non-coding B2 RNA binds to the DNA cleft and active-site region of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Ponicsan, Steven L; Houel, Stephane; Old, William M; Ahn, Natalie G; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2013-10-01

    The B2 family of short interspersed elements is transcribed into non-coding RNA by RNA polymerase III. The ~180-nt B2 RNA has been shown to potently repress mRNA transcription by binding tightly to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and assembling with it into complexes on promoter DNA, where it keeps the polymerase from properly engaging the promoter DNA. Mammalian Pol II is an ~500-kDa complex that contains 12 different protein subunits, providing many possible surfaces for interaction with B2 RNA. We found that the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit was not required for B2 RNA to bind Pol II and repress transcription in vitro. To identify the surface on Pol II to which the minimal functional region of B2 RNA binds, we coupled multi-step affinity purification, reversible formaldehyde cross-linking, peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, and analysis of peptide enrichment. The Pol II peptides most highly recovered after cross-linking to B2 RNA mapped to the DNA binding cleft and active-site region of Pol II. These studies determine the location of a defined nucleic acid binding site on a large, native, multi-subunit complex and provide insight into the mechanism of transcriptional repression by B2 RNA. PMID:23416138

  14. Differential roles of phosphorylation in the formation of transcriptional active RNA polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Fath, Stephan; Milkereit, Philipp; Peyroche, Gerald; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe; Tschochner, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of rDNA transcription depends on the formation and dissociation of a functional complex between RNA polymerase I (pol I) and transcription initiation factor Rrn3p. We analyzed whether phosphorylation is involved in this molecular switch. Rrn3p is a phosphoprotein that is predominantly phosphorylated in vivo when it is not bound to pol I. In vitro, Rrn3p is able both to associate with pol I and to enter the transcription cycle in its nonphosphorylated form. By contrast, phosphorylation of pol I is required to form a stable pol I-Rrn3p complex for efficient transcription initiation. Furthermore, association of pol I with Rrn3p correlates with a change in the phosphorylation state of pol I in vivo. We suggest that phosphorylation at specific sites of pol I is a prerequisite for proper transcription initiation and that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of pol I is one possibility to modulate cellular rDNA transcription activity. PMID:11717393

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity controls plant growth by promoting leaf cell number.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Philipp; Jansseune, Karel; Degenkolbe, Thomas; Méret, Michaël; Claeys, Hannes; Skirycz, Aleksandra; Teige, Markus; Willmitzer, Lothar; Hannah, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    A changing global environment, rising population and increasing demand for biofuels are challenging agriculture and creating a need for technologies to increase biomass production. Here we demonstrate that the inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity is a promising technology to achieve this under non-stress conditions. Furthermore, we investigate the basis of this growth enhancement via leaf series and kinematic cell analysis as well as single leaf transcriptomics and plant metabolomics under non-stress conditions. These data indicate a regulatory function of PARP within cell growth and potentially development. PARP inhibition enhances growth of Arabidopsis thaliana by enhancing the cell number. Time course single leaf transcriptomics shows that PARP inhibition regulates a small subset of genes which are related to growth promotion, cell cycle and the control of metabolism. This is supported by metabolite analysis showing overall changes in primary and particularly secondary metabolism. Taken together the results indicate a versatile function of PARP beyond its previously reported roles in controlling plant stress tolerance and thus can be a useful target for enhancing biomass production. PMID:24587323

  16. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-02-18

    The RpoS/σ(S) sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σ(S)-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σ(S) has been proposed to result largely from competition between σ(S) and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σ(S) binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σ(S) protein proficient for Eσ(S) complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σ(S) requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σ(S) are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by Eσ(S). PMID:25578965

  17. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The RpoS/σS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σS-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σS has been proposed to result largely from competition between σS and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σS binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σS protein proficient for EσS complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σS requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σS are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by EσS. PMID:25578965

  18. Differential furanose selection in the active sites of archaeal DNA polymerases probed by fixed-conformation nucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L

    2012-11-13

    DNA polymerases select for the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) using amino acid side-chains that act as a "steric-gate" to bar improper incorporation of rNTPs. An additional factor in the selection of nucleotide substrates resides in the preferred geometry for the furanose moiety of the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. We have probed the role of sugar geometry during nucleotide selection by model DNA polymerases from Sulfolobus solfataricus using fixed conformation nucleotide analogues. North-methanocarba-dATP (N-MC-dATP) locks the central ring into a RNA-type (C2'-exo, North) conformation near a C3'-endo pucker, and South-methanocarba-dATP (S-MC-dATP) locks the central ring system into a (C3'-exo, South) conformation near a C2'-endo pucker. Dpo4 preferentially inserts N-MC-dATP and in the crystal structure of Dpo4 in complex with N-MC-dAMP, the nucleotide analogue superimposes almost perfectly with Dpo4 bound to unmodified dATP. Biochemical assays indicate that the S. solfataricus B-family DNA polymerase Dpo1 can insert and extend from both N-MC-dATP and S-MC-dATP. In this respect, Dpo1 is unexpectedly more tolerant of substrate conformation than Dpo4. The crystal structure of Dpo4 bound to S-MC-dADP shows that poor incorporation of the Southern pucker by the Y-family polymerase results from a hydrogen bond between the 3'-OH group of the nucleotide analogue and the OH group of the steric gate residue, Tyr12, shifting the S-MC-dADP molecule away from the dNTP binding pocket and distorting the base pair at the primer-template junction. These results provide insights into substrate specificity of DNA polymerases, as well as molecular mechanisms that act as a barrier against insertion of rNTPs. PMID:23050956

  19. I. Novel HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors: discovery of indole 2-carboxylic acids with C3-heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Anilkumar, Gopinadhan N; Lesburg, Charles A; Selyutin, Oleg; Rosenblum, Stuart B; Zeng, Qingbei; Jiang, Yueheng; Chan, Tin-Yau; Pu, Haiyan; Vaccaro, Henry; Wang, Li; Bennett, Frank; Chen, Kevin X; Duca, Jose; Gavalas, Stephen; Huang, Yuhua; Pinto, Patrick; Sannigrahi, Mousumi; Velazquez, Francisco; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Agrawal, Sony; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Feld, Boris; Ferrari, Eric; He, Zhiqing; Jiang, Chuan-Kui; Palermo, Robert E; McMonagle, Patricia; Huang, H-C; Shih, Neng-Yang; Njoroge, George; Kozlowski, Joseph A

    2011-09-15

    SAR development of indole-based palm site inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase exemplified by initial indole lead 1 (NS5B IC(50)=0.9 μM, replicon EC(50)>100 μM) is described. Structure-based drug design led to the incorporation of novel heterocyclic moieties at the indole C3-position which formed a bidentate interaction with the protein backbone. SAR development resulted in leads 7q (NS5B IC(50)=0.032 μM, replicon EC(50)=1.4 μM) and 7r (NS5B IC(50)=0.017 μM, replicon EC(50)=0.3 μM) with improved enzyme and replicon activity. PMID:21840715

  20. I. Novel HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors: Discovery of indole 2-carboxylic acids with C3-heterocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Anilkumar, Gopinadhan N.; Lesburg, Charles A.; Selyutin, Oleg; Rosenblum, Stuart B.; Zeng, Qingbei; Jiang, Yueheng; Chan, Tin-Yau; Pu, Haiyan; Vaccaro, Henry; Wang, Li; Bennett, Frank; Chen, Kevin X.; Duca, Jose; Gavalas, Stephen; Huang, Yuhua; Pinto, Patrick; Sannigrahi, Mousumi; Velazquez, Francisco; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Agrawal, Sony; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Feld, Boris; Ferrari, Eric; He, Zhiqing; Jiang, Chuan-kui; Palermo, Robert E.; Mcmonagle, Patricia; Huang, H.-C.; Shih, Neng-Yang; Njoroge, George; Kozlowski, Joseph A.

    2012-05-03

    SAR development of indole-based palm site inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase exemplified by initial indole lead 1 (NS5B IC{sub 50} = 0.9 {micro}M, replicon EC{sub 50} > 100 {micro}M) is described. Structure-based drug design led to the incorporation of novel heterocyclic moieties at the indole C3-position which formed a bidentate interaction with the protein backbone. SAR development resulted in leads 7q (NS5B IC{sub 50} = 0.032 {micro}M, replicon EC{sub 50} = 1.4 {micro}M) and 7r (NS5B IC{sub 50} = 0.017 {micro}M, replicon EC{sub 50} = 0.3 {micro}M) with improved enzyme and replicon activity.

  1. The Arabidopsis DNA Polymerase δ Has a Role in the Deposition of Transcriptionally Active Epigenetic Marks, Development and Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Francisco M.; Bruera, Natalia A.; Dergan-Dylon, Sebastián; Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Lorenzi, Hernán; Mateos, Julieta L.; Turck, Franziska; Coupland, George; Cerdán, Pablo D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication is a key process in living organisms. DNA polymerase α (Polα) initiates strand synthesis, which is performed by Polε and Polδ in leading and lagging strands, respectively. Whereas loss of DNA polymerase activity is incompatible with life, viable mutants of Polα and Polε were isolated, allowing the identification of their functions beyond DNA replication. In contrast, no viable mutants in the Polδ polymerase-domain were reported in multicellular organisms. Here we identify such a mutant which is also thermosensitive. Mutant plants were unable to complete development at 28°C, looked normal at 18°C, but displayed increased expression of DNA replication-stress marker genes, homologous recombination and lysine 4 histone 3 trimethylation at the SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) locus at 24°C, which correlated with ectopic expression of SEP3. Surprisingly, high expression of SEP3 in vascular tissue promoted FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) expression, forming a positive feedback loop with SEP3 and leading to early flowering and curly leaves phenotypes. These results strongly suggest that the DNA polymerase δ is required for the proper establishment of transcriptionally active epigenetic marks and that its failure might affect development by affecting the epigenetic control of master genes. PMID:25693187

  2. A Novel Functional Site in the PB2 Subunit of Influenza A Virus Essential for Acetyl-CoA Interaction, RNA Polymerase Activity, and Viral Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Dai; Shoji, Masaki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Hirota, Takenori; Nagae, Monami; Yanagisawa, Shin; Nakano, Masahiro; Ohmi, Naho; Noda, Takeshi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits, components of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus, are essential for viral transcription and replication. The PB2 subunit binds to the host RNA cap (7-methylguanosine triphosphate (m7GTP)) and supports the endonuclease activity of PA to “snatch” the cap from host pre-mRNAs. However, the structure of PB2 is not fully understood, and the functional sites remain unknown. In this study, we describe a novel Val/Arg/Gly (VRG) site in the PB2 cap-binding domain, which is involved in interaction with acetyl-CoA found in eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs). In vitro experiments revealed that the recombinant PB2 cap-binding domain that includes the VRG site interacts with acetyl-CoA; moreover, it was found that this interaction could be blocked by CoA and various HAT inhibitors. Interestingly, m7GTP also inhibited this interaction, suggesting that the same active pocket is capable of interacting with acetyl-CoA and m7GTP. To elucidate the importance of the VRG site on PB2 function and viral replication, we constructed a PB2 recombinant protein and recombinant viruses including several patterns of amino acid mutations in the VRG site. Substitutions of the valine and arginine residues or of all 3 residues of the VRG site to alanine significantly reduced the binding ability of PB2 to acetyl-CoA and its RNA polymerase activity. Recombinant viruses containing the same mutations could not be replicated in cultured cells. These results indicate that the PB2 VRG sequence is a functional site that is essential for acetyl-CoA interaction, RNA polymerase activity, and viral replication. PMID:25063805

  3. Investigation on natural diets of larval marine animals using peptide nucleic acid-directed polymerase chain reaction clamping.

    PubMed

    Chow, Seinen; Suzuki, Sayaka; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lavery, Shane; Jeffs, Andrew; Takeyama, Haruko

    2011-04-01

    The stomach contents of the larvae of marine animals are usually very small in quantity and amorphous, especially in invertebrates, making morphological methods of identification very difficult. Nucleotide sequence analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a likely approach, but the large quantity of larval (host) DNA present may mask subtle signals from the prey genome. We have adopted peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-directed PCR clamping to selectively inhibit amplification of host DNA for this purpose. The Japanese spiny lobster (Panulirus japonicus) and eel (Anguilla japonica) were used as model host and prey organisms, respectively. A lobster-specific PNA oligomer (20 bases) was designed to anneal to the sequence at the junction of the 18 S rDNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the lobster. PCR using eukaryote universal primers for amplifying the ITS1 region used in conjunction with the lobster-specific PNA on a mixed DNA template of lobster and eel demonstrated successful inhibition of lobster ITS1 amplification while allowing efficient amplification of eel ITS1. This method was then applied to wild-caught lobster larvae of P. japonicus and P. longipes bispinosus collected around Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. ITS1 sequences of a wide variety of animals (Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Crustacea, Teleostei, Mollusca, and Chaetognatha) were detected. PMID:20535520

  4. Purification and characterization of the DNA polymerase and RNase H activities in Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, G F; Grandgenett, D P

    1975-01-01

    Two RNase H (RNA-DNA hybrid ribonucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.34) activities separable by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration were identified in lysates of Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus (MSV). The larger enzyme, which we have called RNase H-I, represented about 10% of the RNase H activity in the virion. RNase H-I (i) copurified with RNA-directed DNA polymerase from the virus, (ii) had a sedimentation coefficient of 4.4S (corresponds to an apparent mol wt of 70,000), (iii) required Mn-2+ (2 mM optimum) for activity with a [3-h]poly(A)-poly(dT) substrate, (iv) eluted from phosphocellulose at 0.2 M KC1, and (v) degraded [3-H]poly(A)-poly(dT) and [3-H]poly(C)-poly(dG) at approximately equal rates. The smaller enzyme, designated RNase H-II, which represented the majority of the RNase H activity in the virus preparation, was shown to be different since it (i) had no detectable, associated DNA polymerase activity, (ii) had a sedmimentation coefficient of 2.6S (corresponds to an apparent mol wt of 30,000), (iii) preferred Mg-2+ (10 to 15 mM optimum) over Mn-2+ (5 to 10 mM optimum) 2.5-fold for the degradation of [3-H]poly(A)-poly(dT), and (iv) degraded [3-H]poly(A)-poly(dT) 6 and 60 times faster than [3-H]poly(C)-poly(dG) in the presence of Mn-2+ and Mg-2+, respectively. Moloney MSV DNA polymerase (RNase H-I), purified by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration followed by phosphocellulose, poly(A)-oligo(dT)-cellulose, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography, transcribed heteropolymeric regions of avian myeloblastosis virus 70S RNA at a rate comparable to avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase purified by the same procedure. PMID:46924

  5. Oleanolic acid and ursolic acid: novel hepatitis C virus antivirals that inhibit NS5B activity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbao; Li, Shanshan; Liao, Qingjiao; Zhang, Yanni; Sun, Ruina; Zhu, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyu; Fang, Xiaonan; Zhu, Ying

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects up to 170 million people worldwide and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, current therapy is only curative in approximately 50% of HCV patients and has adverse side effects, which warrants the need to develop novel and effective antivirals against HCV. We have previously reported that the Chinese herb Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) directly inhibited HCV NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity (Kong et al., 2007). In this study, we found that the FLL aqueous extract strongly suppressed HCV replication. Further high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis combined with inhibitory assays indicates that oleanolic acid and ursolic acid are two antiviral components within FLL aqueous extract that significantly suppressed the replication of HCV genotype 1b replicon and HCV genotype 2a JFH1 virus. Moreover, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid exhibited anti-HCV activity at least partly through suppressing HCV NS5B RdRp activity as noncompetitive inhibitors. Therefore, our results for the first time demonstrated that natural products oleanolic acid and ursolic acid could be used as potential HCV antivirals that can be applied to clinic trials either as monotherapy or in combination with other HCV antivirals. PMID:23422646

  6. The Nun protein of bacteriophage HK022 inhibits translocation of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase without abolishing its catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Siu Chun; Gottesman, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Bacteriophage HK022 Nun protein blocks transcription elongation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in vitro without dissociating the transcription complex. Nun is active on complexes located at any template site tested. Ultimately, only the 3′-OH terminal nucleotide of the nascent transcript in an arrested complex can turn over; it is removed by pyrophosphate and restored with NTPs. This suggests that Nun inhibits the translocation of RNA polymerase without abolishing its catalytic activities. Unlike spontaneously arrested complexes, Nun-arrested complexes cannot be reactivated by transcription factor GreB. The various complexes show distinct patterns of nucleotide incorporation and pyrophosphorolysis before or after treatment with Nun, suggesting that the configuration of RNAP, transcript, and template DNA is different in each complex. PMID:9334329

  7. Cofactor bypass variants reveal a conformational control mechanism governing cell wall polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Markovski, Monica; Bohrhunter, Jessica L; Lupoli, Tania J; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Walker, Suzanne; Kahne, Daniel E; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2016-04-26

    To fortify their cytoplasmic membrane and protect it from osmotic rupture, most bacteria surround themselves with a peptidoglycan (PG) exoskeleton synthesized by the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). As their name implies, these proteins are the targets of penicillin and related antibiotics. We and others have shown that the PG synthases PBP1b and PBP1a of Escherichia coli require the outer membrane lipoproteins LpoA and LpoB, respectively, for their in vivo function. Although it has been demonstrated that LpoB activates the PG polymerization activity of PBP1b in vitro, the mechanism of activation and its physiological relevance have remained unclear. We therefore selected for variants of PBP1b (PBP1b*) that bypass the LpoB requirement for in vivo function, reasoning that they would shed light on LpoB function and its activation mechanism. Several of these PBP1b variants were isolated and displayed elevated polymerization activity in vitro, indicating that the activation of glycan polymer growth is indeed one of the relevant functions of LpoB in vivo. Moreover, the location of amino acid substitutions causing the bypass phenotype on the PBP1b structure support a model in which polymerization activation proceeds via the induction of a conformational change in PBP1b initiated by LpoB binding to its UB2H domain, followed by its transmission to the glycosyl transferase active site. Finally, phenotypic analysis of strains carrying a PBP1b* variant revealed that the PBP1b-LpoB complex is most likely not providing an important physical link between the inner and outer membranes at the division site, as has been previously proposed. PMID:27071112

  8. Evolving a polymerase for hydrophobic base analogues.

    PubMed

    Loakes, David; Gallego, José; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Kool, Eric T; Holliger, Philipp

    2009-10-21

    Hydrophobic base analogues (HBAs) have shown great promise for the expansion of the chemical and coding potential of nucleic acids but are generally poor polymerase substrates. While extensive synthetic efforts have yielded examples of HBAs with favorable substrate properties, their discovery has remained challenging. Here we describe a complementary strategy for improving HBA substrate properties by directed evolution of a dedicated polymerase using compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) with the archetypal HBA 5-nitroindole (d5NI) and its derivative 5-nitroindole-3-carboxamide (d5NIC) as selection substrates. Starting from a repertoire of chimeric polymerases generated by molecular breeding of DNA polymerase genes from the genus Thermus, we isolated a polymerase (5D4) with a generically enhanced ability to utilize HBAs. The selected polymerase. 5D4 was able to form and extend d5NI and d5NIC (d5NI(C)) self-pairs as well as d5NI(C) heteropairs with all four bases with efficiencies approaching, or exceeding, those of the cognate Watson-Crick pairs, despite significant distortions caused by the intercalation of the d5NI(C) heterocycles into the opposing strand base stack, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Unlike Taq polymerase, 5D4 was also able to extend HBA pairs such as Pyrene: varphi (abasic site), d5NI: varphi, and isocarbostyril (ICS): 7-azaindole (7AI), allowed bypass of a chemically diverse spectrum of HBAs, and enabled PCR amplification with primers comprising multiple d5NI(C)-substitutions, while maintaining high levels of catalytic activity and fidelity. The selected polymerase 5D4 promises to expand the range of nucleobase analogues amenable to replication and should find numerous applications, including the synthesis and replication of nucleic acid polymers with expanded chemical and functional diversity. PMID:19778048

  9. Structure-activity relationship study of biflavonoids on the Dengue virus polymerase DENV-NS5 RdRp.

    PubMed

    Coulerie, Paul; Nour, Mohammed; Maciuk, Alexandre; Eydoux, Cécilia; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Leblanc, Karine; Lewin, Guy; Canard, Bruno; Figadère, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Dengue virus is the world's most prevalent human pathogenic arbovirus. There is currently no treatment or vaccine, and solutions are urgently needed. We previously demonstrated that biflavonoids from Dacrydium balansae, an endemic gymnosperm from New Caledonia, are potent inhibitors of the Dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Herein we describe the structure-activity relationship study of 23 compounds: biflavonoids from D. balansae (1-4) and from D. araucarioides (5-10), hexamethyl-amentoflavone (11), cupressuflavone (12), and apigenin derivatives (13-23). We conclude that 1) over the four different biflavonoid skeletons tested, amentoflavone (1) and robustaflavone (5) are the most promising ones for antidengue drug development, 2) the number and position of methyl groups on the biflavonoid moiety modulate their inhibition of Dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and 3) the degree of oxygenation of flavonoid monomers influences their antidengue potential. Sotetsuflavone (8), with an IC50 = 0.16 µM, is the most active compound of this series and is the strongest inhibitor of the Dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase described in the literature. PMID:23929244

  10. Recombinant dengue type 1 virus NS5 protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibits RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Tan, B H; Fu, J; Sugrue, R J; Yap, E H; Chan, Y C; Tan, Y H

    1996-02-15

    The complete nonstructural NS5 gene of dengue type 1 virus, Singapore strain S275/90 (D1-S275/90) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (126 kDa). The GST-NS5 fusion protein was purified and the recombinant NS5 protein released from the fusion protein by thrombin cleavage. The recombinant NS5 had a predicted molecular weight of 100 kDa and reacted with antiserum against D1-S275/90 virus in Western blot analysis. The purified recombinant NS5 protein possessed RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity which was inhibited (>99%) by antibodies against the recombinant NS5 protein. The polymerase product was shown to be a negative-stranded RNA molecule, of template size, which forms a double-stranded complex with the template RNA. PMID:8607261

  11. Altered immunoglobulin hypermutation pattern and frequency in complementary mouse models of DNA polymerase ζ activity

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Janssen; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Watt, Danielle L.; Richter, Kathleen; Jiang, Chuancang; Zhao, Ming-Lang; Ray, Madhumita; McGregor, W. Glenn; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Diaz, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA polymerase ζ participates in immunoglobulin hypermutation, we generated two mouse models of Pol ζ function: a B-cell specific conditional knock-out and a knock-in strain with a Pol ζ mutagenesis-enhancing mutation. Pol ζ-deficient B-cells had a reduction in mutation frequency at immunoglobulin loci in the spleen and in Peyer’s Patches, while knock-in mice with a mutagenic Pol ζ, displayed a marked increase in mutation frequency in Peyer’s Patches revealing a pattern that was similar to mutations in yeast strains with a homologous mutation in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of Pol ζ. Combined, these data are best explained by a direct role for DNA polymerase ζ in immunoglobulin hypermutation. PMID:22547703

  12. Anti-Tumor Effects of Novel 5-O-Acyl Plumbagins Based on the Inhibition of Mammalian DNA Replicative Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Moe; Kuriyama, Isoko; Maruo, Sayako; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that vitamin K3 (menadione, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) inhibits the activity of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we focused on plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), and chemically synthesized novel plumbagins conjugated with C2:0 to C22:6 fatty acids (5-O-acyl plumbagins). These chemically modified plumbagins enhanced mammalian pol inhibition and their cytotoxic activity. Plumbagin conjugated with chains consisting of more than C18-unsaturated fatty acids strongly inhibited the activities of calf pol α and human pol γ. Plumbagin conjugated with oleic acid (C18:1-acyl plumbagin) showed the strongest suppression of human colon carcinoma (HCT116) cell proliferation among the ten synthesized 5-O-acyl plumbagins. The inhibitory activity on pol α, a DNA replicative pol, by these compounds showed high correlation with their cancer cell proliferation suppressive activity. C18:1-Acyl plumbagin selectively inhibited the activities of mammalian pol species, but did not influence the activities of other pols and DNA metabolic enzymes tested. This compound inhibited the proliferation of various human cancer cell lines, and was the cytotoxic inhibitor showing strongest inhibition towards HT-29 colon cancer cells (LD50 = 2.9 µM) among the nine cell lines tested. In an in vivo anti-tumor assay conducted on nude mice bearing solid tumors of HT-29 cells, C18:1-acyl plumbagin was shown to be a promising tumor suppressor. These data indicate that novel 5-O-acyl plumbagins act as anti-cancer agents based on mammalian DNA replicative pol α inhibition. Moreover, the results suggest that acylation of plumbagin is an effective chemical modification to improve the anti-cancer activity of vitamin K3 derivatives, such as plumbagin. PMID:24520419

  13. Pif1 removes a Rap1-dependent barrier to the strand displacement activity of DNA polymerase δ

    PubMed Central

    Koc, Katrina N.; Singh, Saurabh P.; Stodola, Joseph L.; Burgers, Peter M.; Galletto, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Using an in vitro reconstituted system in this work we provide direct evidence that the yeast repressor/activator protein 1 (Rap1), tightly bound to its consensus site, forms a strong non-polar barrier for the strand displacement activity of DNA polymerase δ. We propose that relief of inhibition may be mediated by the activity of an accessory helicase. To this end, we show that Pif1, a 5′–3′ helicase, not only stimulates the strand displacement activity of Pol δ but it also allows efficient replication through the block, by removing bound Rap1 in front of the polymerase. This stimulatory activity of Pif1 is not limited to the displacement of a single Rap1 molecule; Pif1 also allows Pol δ to carry out DNA synthesis across an array of bound Rap1 molecules that mimics a telomeric DNA-protein assembly. This activity of Pif1 represents a novel function of this helicase during DNA replication. PMID:27001517

  14. Yeast DEAD box protein Mss116p is a transcription elongation factor that modulates the activity of mitochondrial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Wojtas, Ireneusz D; Tessitore, Kassandra; Henderson, Simmone; McAllister, William T

    2014-07-01

    DEAD box proteins have been widely implicated in regulation of gene expression. Here, we show that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD box protein Mss116p, previously known as a mitochondrial splicing factor, also acts as a transcription factor that modulates the activity of the single-subunit mitochondrial RNA polymerase encoded by RPO41. Binding of Mss116p stabilizes paused mitochondrial RNA polymerase elongation complexes in vitro and favors the posttranslocated state of the enzyme, resulting in a lower concentration of nucleotide substrate required to escape the pause; this mechanism of action is similar to that of elongation factors that enhance the processivity of multisubunit RNA polymerases. In a yeast strain in which the RNA splicing-related functions of Mss116p are dispensable, overexpression of RPO41 or MSS116 increases cell survival from colonies that were exposed to low temperature, suggesting a role for Mss116p in enhancing the efficiency of mitochondrial transcription under stress conditions. PMID:24732805

  15. Determination of lysine residues affinity labeled in the active site of yeast RNA polymerase II(B) by mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Treich, I; Carles, C; Sentenac, A; Riva, M

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study, yeast RNA polymerase II(B) was affinity labeled with two nucleotide derivatives (III and VIII) (1). In both cases, the labeled site was localized to the C-terminal part of the B150 subunit. The potential target lysyl residues of derivative III were mapped to the conserved domain H, between Asn946 and Met999. In the present work, we have mutagenized to arginine the five lysines present in domain H. Three lysines can be replaced, individually or simultaneously, without affecting cell growth, and each mutated enzyme can still be affinity labeled. Hence one or both of the other two lysyl residues, Lys979 and Lys987, is the target of the affinity reagent. These two lysines were each found to be essential for cell viability. Derivative VIII labeled another domain in addition to domain H. Supported by analogous results obtained for E. coli RNA polymerase using derivative VIII (2), we hypothesized that the second domain labeled by this derivative in the B150 subunit was domain I. Mutagenesis of the unique lysine present in domain I demonstrated that Lys 1102 was the target of derivative VIII. These results indicate that in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases, domains H and I are in close proximity and participate to the active site. Images PMID:1408783

  16. Identification of a New Motif in Family B DNA Polymerases by Mutational Analyses of the Bacteriophage T4 DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Vincent; Hogg, Matthew; Reha-Krantz, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    Structure-based protein sequence alignments of family B DNA polymerases revealed a conserved motif that is formed from interacting residues between loops from the N-terminal and palm domains and between the N-terminal loop and a conserved proline residue. The importance of the motif for function of the bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase was revealed by suppressor analysis. T4 DNA polymerases that form weak replicating complexes cannot replicate DNA when the dGTP pool is reduced. The conditional lethality provides the means to identify amino acid substitutions that restore replication activity under low dGTP conditions by either correcting the defect produced by the first amino acid substitution or by generally increasing the stability of polymerase complexes; the second type are global suppressors that can effectively counter the reduced stability caused by a variety of amino acid substitutions. Some amino acid substitutions that increase the stability of polymerase complexes produce a new phenotype - sensitivity to the antiviral drug phosphonoacetic acid. Amino acid substitutions that confer decreased ability to replicate DNA under low dGTP conditions or drug sensitivity were identified in the new motif, which suggests that the motif functions in regulating the stability of polymerase complexes. Additional suppressor analyses revealed an apparent network of interactions that link the new motif to the fingers domain and to two patches of conserved residues that bind DNA. The collection of mutant T4 DNA polymerases provides a foundation for future biochemical studies to determine how DNA polymerases remain stably associated with DNA while waiting for the next available dNTP, how DNA polymerases translocate, and the biochemical basis for sensitivity to antiviral drugs. PMID:20493878

  17. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  18. Human DNA polymerase θ possesses 5′-dRP lyase activity and functions in single-nucleotide base excision repair in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rajendra; Longley, Matthew J.; Sharief, Farida S.; Hou, Esther W.; Copeland, William C.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerase θ (Pol θ) is a low-fidelity DNA polymerase that belongs to the family A polymerases and has been proposed to play a role in somatic hypermutation. Pol θ has the ability to conduct translesion DNA synthesis opposite an AP site or thymine glycol, and it was recently proposed to be involved in base excision repair (BER) of DNA damage. Here, we show that Pol θ has intrinsic 5′-deoxyribose phosphate (5′-dRP) lyase activity that is involved in single-nucleotide base excision DNA repair (SN-BER). Full-length human Pol θ is a ∼300-kDa polypeptide, but we show here that the 98-kDa C-terminal region of Pol θ possesses both DNA polymerase activity and dRP lyase activity and is sufficient to carry out base excision repair in vitro. The 5′-dRP lyase activity is independent of the polymerase activity, in that a polymerase inactive mutant retained full 5′-dRP lyase activity. Domain mapping of the 98-kDa enzyme by limited proteolysis and NaBH4 cross-linking with a BER intermediate revealed that the dRP lyase active site resides in a 24-kDa domain of Pol θ. These results are consistent with a role of Pol θ in BER. PMID:19188258

  19. Differential Incorporation of β-actin as A Component of RNA Polymerase II into Regulatory Regions of Stemness/Differentiation Genes in Retinoic Acid-Induced Differentiated Human Embryonic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Shahhoseini, Maryam; Afsharian, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nuclear actin is involved in transcription regulation by recruitment of histone modifiers and chromatin remodelers to the regulatory regions of active genes. In recent years, further attention has been focused on the role of actin as a nuclear protein in transcriptional processes. In the current study, the epigenetic role of nuclear actin on transcription regulation of two stemness (OCT4 and NANOG) and two differentiation) NESTIN and PAX6) marker genes was evaluated in a human embryonal carcinoma cell line (NT2) before and after differentiation induction. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, differentiation of embryonal cells was induced by retinoic acid (RA), and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to evaluate differential expression of marker genes before and 3 days after RA- induced differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with real-time PCR was then undertaken to monitor the incorporation of β-actin, as a functional component of RNA polymerase II, in the regulatory regions of marker genes. Results Data showed significant change in nuclear actin incorporation into the promoter regions of NESTIN and PAX6 after RA-induction. Conclusion We emphasize the dynamic functional role of nuclear actin in differentiation of embryonal cells and its role as a subunit of RNA polymerase II. PMID:27540526

  20. Structural basis for the activation of the C. elegans noncanonical cytoplasmic poly(A)-polymerase GLD-2 by GLD-3

    PubMed Central

    Nakel, Katharina; Bonneau, Fabien; Eckmann, Christian R.; Conti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans germ-line development defective (GLD)-2–GLD-3 complex up-regulates the expression of genes required for meiotic progression. GLD-2–GLD-3 acts by extending the short poly(A) tail of germ-line–specific mRNAs, switching them from a dormant state into a translationally active state. GLD-2 is a cytoplasmic noncanonical poly(A) polymerase that lacks the RNA-binding domain typical of the canonical nuclear poly(A)-polymerase Pap1. The activity of C. elegans GLD-2 in vivo and in vitro depends on its association with the multi-K homology (KH) domain-containing protein, GLD-3, a homolog of Bicaudal-C. We have identified a minimal polyadenylation complex that includes the conserved nucleotidyl-transferase core of GLD-2 and the N-terminal domain of GLD-3, and determined its structure at 2.3-Å resolution. The structure shows that the N-terminal domain of GLD-3 does not fold into the predicted KH domain but wraps around the catalytic domain of GLD-2. The picture that emerges from the structural and biochemical data are that GLD-3 activates GLD-2 both indirectly by stabilizing the enzyme and directly by contributing positively charged residues near the RNA-binding cleft. The RNA-binding cleft of GLD-2 has distinct structural features compared with the poly(A)-polymerases Pap1 and Trf4. Consistently, GLD-2 has distinct biochemical properties: It displays unusual specificity in vitro for single-stranded RNAs with at least one adenosine at the 3′ end. GLD-2 thus appears to have evolved specialized nucleotidyl-transferase properties that match the 3′ end features of dormant cytoplasmic mRNAs. PMID:26124149

  1. Antimutator Mutations in the α Subunit of Escherichia Coli DNA Polymerase III: Identification of the Responsible Mutations and Alignment with Other DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Fijalkowska, I. J.; Schaaper, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The dnaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the DNA polymerase (α subunit) of the main replicative enzyme, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. We have previously identified this gene as the site of a series of seven antimutator mutations that specifically decrease the level of DNA replication errors. Here we report the nucleotide sequence changes in each of the different antimutator dnaE alleles. For each a single, but different, amino acid substitution was found among the 1,160 amino acids of the protein. The observed substitutions are generally nonconservative. All affected residues are located in the central one-third of the protein. Some insight into the function of the regions of polymerase III containing the affected residues was obtained by amino acid alignment with other DNA polymerases. We followed the principles developed in 1990 by M. Delarue et al. who have identified in DNA polymerases from a large number of prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources three highly conserved sequence motifs, which are suggested to contain components of the polymerase active site. We succeeded in finding these three conserved motifs in polymerase III as well. However, none of the amino acid substitutions responsible for the antimutator phenotype occurred at these sites. This and other observations suggest that the effect of these mutations may be exerted indirectly through effects on polymerase conformation and/or DNA/polymerase interactions. PMID:8375647

  2. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  3. New insight into role of myosin motors for activation of RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sarshad, Aishe A; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2014-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, actin and myosin are emerging as essential regulators of nuclear function. At gene level, they regulate chromatin and modulate RNA polymerase transcription, and at the RNA level, they are involved in the metabolism of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Furthermore, actin and myosin are involved in maintaining the structure of cell nucleus by mediating chromatin movement and by interacting with components of the nuclear lamina. This plethora of functions is now supported by evidence that nuclear actin polymerizes just like the cytoplasmic actin fraction. Based on these considerations, we now hypothesize that the nuclear myosin forms function as actin-based motors. In this chapter, our goal is to start from the knowledge acquired in the cytoplasmic field to explore how nuclear myosin functions in gene transcription. One of the pressing issues discussed here is whether nuclear myosin produces local tension or functions as transporters. Based on two current models reported in the literature, we discuss the topology of the actin-based nuclear myosin 1 motor and how it is believed to facilitate propulsion of the RNA polymerase machinery while maintaining chromatin that is compatible with transcription. These mechanisms will be placed in the context of cell cycle progression. PMID:24952918

  4. Multiple forms of mammalian deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase. An attempt to relate their interactions with nuclei and free deoxyribonucleic acid in vitro with their possible functions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Patricia G.; Hewish, D. R.; Venning, M. M.; Burgoyne, L. A.

    1971-01-01

    The DNA polymerases of the following eukaryotic tissues were studied: regenerating rat liver, normal rat liver, rat thymus, normal mouse liver and Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells. In all cases two main polymerase forms are observed, one of mol.wt. 200000, preferring denatured DNA to native calf thymus DNA primer, designated type I, and the other, designated type II, of mol.wt. 100000, showing a variable and slight preference for native calf thymus DNA primer. Some catalytic properties of these polymerases are described. Nuclei have been isolated from some of these tissues by using two different buffer systems. The ionic composition of the isolation medium is found to affect greatly the amounts and types of polymerase that bind to the nuclei, and also affects the kinetic properties of the polymerases. The way the polymerases and nuclei change properties as the ionic composition of the buffers is changed suggests that ionic effects may be a significant factor in the control of DNA synthesis in vivo. These ionic effects also explain much of the previous confusion over the localization of specific DNA polymerases. PMID:5158922

  5. Activity of a potent hepatitis C virus polymerase inhibitor in the chimpanzee model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ming; He, Yupeng; Lu, Liangjun; Lim, Hock Ben; Tripathi, Rakesh L; Middleton, Tim; Hernandez, Lisa E; Beno, David W A; Long, Michelle A; Kati, Warren M; Bosse, Todd D; Larson, Daniel P; Wagner, Rolf; Lanford, Robert E; Kohlbrenner, William E; Kempf, Dale J; Pilot-Matias, Tami J; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2007-12-01

    A-837093 is a potent and specific nonnucleoside inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. It possesses nanomolar potencies in both enzymatic and replicon-based cell culture assays. In rats and dogs this compound demonstrated an oral plasma half-life of greater than 7 h, and its bioavailability was >60%. In monkeys it had a half-life of 1.9 h and 15% bioavailability. Its antiviral efficacy was evaluated in two chimpanzees infected with HCV in a proof-of-concept study. The design included oral dosing of 30 mg per kg of body weight twice a day for 14 days, followed by a 14-day posttreatment observation. Maximum viral load reductions of 1.4 and 2.5 log(10) copies RNA/ml for genotype 1a- and 1b-infected chimpanzees, respectively, were observed within 2 days after the initiation of treatment. After this initial drop in the viral load, a rebound of plasma HCV RNA was observed in the genotype 1b-infected chimpanzee, while the genotype 1a-infected chimpanzee experienced a partial rebound that lasted throughout the treatment period. Clonal analysis of NS5B gene sequences derived from the plasma of A-837093-treated chimpanzees revealed the presence of several mutations associated with resistance to A-837093, including Y448H, G554D, and D559G in the genotype 1a-infected chimpanzee and C316Y and G554D in the genotype 1b-infected chimpanzee. The identification of resistance-associated mutations in both chimpanzees is consistent with the findings of in vitro selection studies, in which many of the same mutations were selected. These findings validate the antiviral efficacy and resistance development of benzothiadiazine HCV polymerase inhibitors in vivo. PMID:17908950

  6. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K.; Liu, Ke J.; Lau, Serrine S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  7. Nucleolar targeting of proteins by the tandem array of basic amino acid stretches identified in the RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49

    SciTech Connect

    Ushijima, Ryujiro; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Nagata, Izumi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2008-05-16

    There is accumulating evidence to indicate that the regulation of subnuclear compartmentalization plays important roles in cellular processes. The RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49 has been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus in growing cells, but disperse into the nucleoplasm in growth-arrested cells. Serial deletion analysis revealed that amino acids 199-338 were necessary for the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Combinatorial point mutation analysis indicated that the individual basic amino acid stretches (BS) within the central (BS1-4) and the C-terminal (BS5 and 6) regions may cooperatively confer the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Addition of the basic stretches in tandem to a heterologous protein, such as the interferon regulatory factor-3, translocated the tagged protein into the nucleolus, even in the presence of an intrinsic nuclear export sequence. Thus, tandem array of the basic amino acid stretches identified here functions as a dominant nucleolar targeting sequence.

  8. GDP-Mannose-4,6-Dehydratase Is a Cytosolic Partner of Tankyrase 1 That Inhibits Its Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Kamlesh K.; Dudognon, Charles; Chang, William G.; Sokol, Ethan S.; Ramirez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Tankyrase 1 is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) that participates in a broad range of cellular activities due to interaction with multiple binding partners. Tankyrase 1 recognizes a linear six-amino-acid degenerate motif and, hence, has hundreds of potential target proteins. Binding of partner proteins to tankyrase 1 usually results in their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARsylation) and can lead to ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. However, it is not known how tankyrase 1 PARP activity is regulated. Here we identify GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) as a binding partner of tankyrase 1. GMD is a cytosolic protein required for the first step of fucose synthesis. We show that GMD is complexed to tankyrase 1 in the cytosol throughout interphase, but its association with tankyrase 1 is reduced upon entry into mitosis, when tankyrase 1 binds to its other partners TRF1 (at telomeres) and NuMA (at spindle poles). In contrast to other binding partners, GMD is not PARsylated by tankyrase 1. Indeed, we show that GMD inhibits tankyrase 1 PARP activity in vitro, dependent on the GMD tankyrase 1 binding motif. In vivo, depletion of GMD led to degradation of tankyrase 1, dependent on the catalytic PARP activity of tankyrase 1. We speculate that association of tankyrase 1 with GMD in the cytosol sequesters tankyrase 1 in an inactive stable form that can be tapped by other target proteins as needed. PMID:22645305

  9. Effects of intermediates between vitamins K(2) and K(3) on mammalian DNA polymerase inhibition and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Jun; Irino, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Masayuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Kuriyama, Isoko; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiromi; Yoshida, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that vitamin K(3) (VK(3)), but not VK(1) or VK(2) (=MK-4), inhibits the activity of human DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we chemically synthesized three intermediate compounds between VK(2) and VK(3), namely MK-3, MK-2 and MK-1, and investigated the inhibitory effects of all five compounds on the activity of mammalian pols. Among these compounds, MK-2 was the strongest inhibitor of mammalian pols α, κ and λ, which belong to the B, Y and X families of pols, respectively; whereas VK(3) was the strongest inhibitor of human pol γ, an A-family pol. MK-2 potently inhibited the activity of all animal species of pol tested, and its inhibitory effect on pol λ activity was the strongest with an IC(50) value of 24.6 μM. However, MK-2 did not affect the activity of plant or prokaryotic pols, or that of other DNA metabolic enzymes such as primase of pol α, RNA polymerase, polynucleotide kinase or deoxyribonuclease I. Because we previously found a positive relationship between pol λ inhibition and anti-inflammatory action, we examined whether these compounds could inhibit inflammatory responses. Among the five compounds tested, MK-2 caused the greatest reduction in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced acute inflammation in mouse ear. In addition, in a cell culture system using mouse macrophages, MK-2 displayed the strongest suppression of the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, MK-2 was found to inhibit the action of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In an in vivo mouse model of LPS-evoked acute inflammation, intraperitoneal injection of MK-2 in mice led to suppression of TNF-α production in serum. In conclusion, this study has identified VK(2) and VK(3) intermediates, such as MK-2, that are promising anti-inflammatory candidates. PMID:21541047

  10. Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of anacardic acids.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae Joung; Kubo, Isao

    2005-06-01

    6[8'(Z)-pentadecenyl]salicylic acid, otherwise known as anacardic acid (C15:1), inhibited the linoleic acid peroxidation catalyzed by soybean lipoxygenase-1 (EC 1.13.11.12, type 1) with an IC50 of 6.8 microM. The inhibition of the enzyme by anacardic acid (C15:1) is a slow and reversible reaction without residual activity. The inhibition kinetics analyzed by Dixon plots indicates that anacardic acid (C15:1) is a competitive inhibitor and the inhibition constant, KI, was obtained as 2.8 microM. Although anacardic acid (C15:1) inhibited the linoleic acid peroxidation without being oxidized, 6[8'(Z),11'(Z)-pentadecadienyl]salicylic acid, otherwise known as anacardic acid (C15:2), was dioxygenated at low concentrations as a substrate. In addition, anacardic acid (C15:2) was also found to exhibit time-dependent inhibition of lipoxygenase-1. The alk(en)yl side chain of anacardic acids is essential to elicit the inhibitory activity. However, the hydrophobic interaction alone is not enough because cardanol (C15:1), which possesses the same side chain as anacardic acid (C15:1), acted neither as a substrate nor as an inhibitor. PMID:15913294

  11. The human interferon-regulated ISG95 protein interacts with RNA polymerase II and shows methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haline-Vaz, Thais; Lima Silva, Tereza Cristina; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.

    2008-08-08

    A major mechanism of cellular resistance to viral invasion involves genes from the interferon signaling pathway, called ISGs (interferon stimulated genes). Global transcriptional profiling studies have linked increased expression of ISG95 (KIAA0082) to response to interferon treatment and viral infection, suggesting that it may be part of the cellular defense against viral replication. In this work, we show that the ISG95 promoter can drive interferon-induced transcription of a reporter gene in Vero cells. Recombinant ISG95 shows RNA- and S-adenosyl-methionine binding and protein methyltransferase activity in vitro. ISG95 interacts with the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, which is consistent with its nuclear localization and with the predicted function of the WW domain found in the C-terminal region of ISG95. The results presented in this work indicate that ISG95 is part of the interferon response pathway and functions in the pre-mRNA processing events mediated by the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II.

  12. A general strategy for expanding polymerase function by droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Dunn, Matthew R; Hatch, Andrew; Sau, Sujay P; Youngbull, Cody; Chaput, John C

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases that synthesize artificial genetic polymers hold great promise for advancing future applications in synthetic biology. However, engineering natural polymerases to replicate unnatural genetic polymers is a challenging problem. Here we present droplet-based optical polymerase sorting (DrOPS) as a general strategy for expanding polymerase function that employs an optical sensor to monitor polymerase activity inside the microenvironment of a uniform synthetic compartment generated by microfluidics. We validated this approach by performing a complete cycle of encapsulation, sorting and recovery on a doped library and observed an enrichment of ∼1,200-fold for a model engineered polymerase. We then applied our method to evolve a manganese-independent α-L-threofuranosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase that functions with >99% template-copying fidelity. Based on our findings, we suggest that DrOPS is a versatile tool that could be used to evolve any polymerase function, where optical detection can be achieved by Watson-Crick base pairing. PMID:27044725

  13. A general strategy for expanding polymerase function by droplet microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Andrew C.; Dunn, Matthew R.; Hatch, Andrew; Sau, Sujay P.; Youngbull, Cody; Chaput, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases that synthesize artificial genetic polymers hold great promise for advancing future applications in synthetic biology. However, engineering natural polymerases to replicate unnatural genetic polymers is a challenging problem. Here we present droplet-based optical polymerase sorting (DrOPS) as a general strategy for expanding polymerase function that employs an optical sensor to monitor polymerase activity inside the microenvironment of a uniform synthetic compartment generated by microfluidics. We validated this approach by performing a complete cycle of encapsulation, sorting and recovery on a doped library and observed an enrichment of ∼1,200-fold for a model engineered polymerase. We then applied our method to evolve a manganese-independent α-L-threofuranosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase that functions with >99% template-copying fidelity. Based on our findings, we suggest that DrOPS is a versatile tool that could be used to evolve any polymerase function, where optical detection can be achieved by Watson–Crick base pairing. PMID:27044725

  14. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  15. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K.; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  16. TERATOGENIC ACTIVITY OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA)is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. It is detectable finished drinking water at levels comparable to the trihalomethanes (30-60). TCA is also formed in vivo after ingestion of hypochlorite and has be...

  17. Fatty acid activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR).

    PubMed

    Bocos, C; Göttlicher, M; Gearing, K; Banner, C; Enmark, E; Teboul, M; Crickmore, A; Gustafsson, J A

    1995-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferators such as clofibric acid, nafenopin, and WY-14,643 have been shown to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. We have cloned the cDNA from rat that is homologous to that from mouse, which encodes a 97% similar protein. To search for physiologically occurring activators, we established a transcriptional transactivation assay by stably expressing in CHO cells a chimera of rat PPAR and the human glucocorticoid receptor that activates expression of the placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. 150 microM concentrations of arachidonic or linoleic acid but not of dehydroepiandrosterone, cholesterol, or 25-hydroxy-cholesterol, activated the receptor chimera. In addition, saturated fatty acids induced the reporter gene. Shortening the chain length to n = 6 or introduction of an omega-terminal carboxylic group abolished the activation potential of the fatty acid. To test whether a common PPAR binding metabolite might be formed from free fatty acids we tested the effects of differentially beta-oxidizable fatty acids and inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. The peroxisomal proliferation-inducing, non-beta-oxidizable, tetradecylthioacetic acid activated PPAR to the same extent as the strong peroxisomal proliferator WY-14,643, whereas the homologous beta-oxidizable tetradecylthiopropionic acid was only as potent as a non-substituted fatty acid. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors, radical scavengers or cytochrome P450 inhibitors did not affect activation of PPAR. In conclusion, beta-oxidation is apparently not required for the formation of the PPAR-activating molecule and this moiety might be a fatty acid, its ester with CoA, or a further derivative of the activated fatty acid prior to beta-oxidation of the acyl-CoA ester. PMID:7626496

  18. Structural basis for lack of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-13/zinc finger antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Tobias; Klepsch, Mirjam; Thorsell, Ann-Gerd; Andersson, C David; Linusson, Anna; Schüler, Herwig

    2015-03-20

    The mammalian poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family includes ADP-ribosyltransferases with diphtheria toxin homology (ARTD). Most members have mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PARP13/ARTD13, also called zinc finger antiviral protein, has roles in viral immunity and microRNA-mediated stress responses. PARP13 features a divergent PARP homology domain missing a PARP consensus sequence motif; the domain has enigmatic functions and apparently lacks catalytic activity. We used x-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and biochemical analyses to investigate the structural requirements for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in human PARP13 and two of its functional partners in stress granules: PARP12/ARTD12, and PARP15/BAL3/ARTD7. The crystal structure of the PARP homology domain of PARP13 shows obstruction of the canonical active site, precluding NAD(+) binding. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this closed cleft conformation is maintained in solution. Introducing consensus side chains in PARP13 did not result in 3-aminobenzamide binding, but in further closure of the site. Three-dimensional alignment of the PARP homology domains of PARP13, PARP12, and PARP15 illustrates placement of PARP13 residues that deviate from the PARP family consensus. Introducing either one of two of these side chains into the corresponding positions in PARP15 abolished PARP15 ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Taken together, our results show that PARP13 lacks the structural requirements for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PMID:25635049

  19. A full-coordinate model of the polymerase domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and its interaction with a nucleic acid substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlik, R. F.; Meyer, D. J.; Shibata, M.; Roskwitalski, R.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a full-coordinate model of residues 1-319 of the polymerase domain of HIV-I reverse transcriptase. This model was constructed from the x-ray crystallographic structure of Jacobo-Molina et al. (Jacobo-Molina et al., P.N.A.S. USA 90, 6320-6324 (1993)) which is currently available to the degree of C-coordinates. The backbone and side-chain atoms were constructed using the MAXSPROUT suite of programs (L. Holm and C. Sander, J. Mol. Biol. 218, 183-194 (1991)) and refined through molecular modeling. A seven base pair A-form dsDNA was positioned in the nucleic acid binding cleft to represent the template-primer complex. The orientation of the template-primer complex in the nucleic acid binding cleft was guided by the positions of phosphorus atoms in the crystal structure.

  20. Analysis of the earliest steps of hepadnavirus replication: genome repair after infectious entry into hepatocytes does not depend on viral polymerase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Köck, J; Schlicht, H J

    1993-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses contain a relaxed circular DNA genome (RC-DNA) with discontinuities in both strands. Upon infectious entry into a host cell, this genome is converted into a covalently closed superhelical form (CCC-DNA), which later serves as the template for transcription. Here we examined whether the viral polymerase activity is required for this repair reaction. Primary hepatocytes prepared from embryonated duck eggs were infected with the duck hepatitis B virus. Conversion of the RC-DNA into the CCC-DNA was then analyzed by a newly developed polymerase chain reaction technique. This method allows the efficient discrimination between the two DNA forms and is sensitive enough to monitor repair of the infecting viral DNA in the absence of replication and amplification. Thus, we were able to monitor this process in the presence of a potent inhibitor of the viral polymerase, the nucleoside analog 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine. The data show that inhibition of the viral polymerase activity has no influence on genome repair, suggesting that this enzymatic function is not required for conversion of the RC-DNA into the CCC-DNA. Consequently, antiviral drugs blocking the polymerase activity cannot prevent the infectious entry of the virus into a host cell. Images PMID:8331730

  1. Permutation of the active site of putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in a newly identified species of plant alpha-like virus.

    PubMed

    Sabanadzovic, Sead; Ghanem-Sabanadzovic, Nina Abou; Gorbalenya, Alexander E

    2009-11-10

    To direct the genome synthesis, RNA viruses without a DNA stage in the replication cycle use RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). All RdRps have conserved right hand-like shape that includes characteristic A-->B-->C sequence motifs forming the active site. Recently, the structural permutation of the RdRp active site (C-->A-->B) has been described in few double-stranded RNA birnaviruses and a subset of positive-stranded RNA tetraviruses distantly related to Picorna-like viruses. Here we describe a permuted RdRp in the newly identified plant alpha-like virus with 6.5 kb-long polyadenylated genome, dubbed Grapevine virus Q (GVQ). The multi-domain layout and sequence similarities place GVQ into the genus Marafivirus of the family Tymoviridae. In contrast to other tymovirids, GVQ has 21 amino acid residues corresponding to the motif C relocated upstream of the motif A in the putative RdRp. This unique sequence characteristic was extensively verified and identified in several GVQ isolates infecting wild and cultivated Vitis and Rubus spp. PMID:19793602

  2. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-11-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ(70)-dependent and the contrasting σ(54)-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ(54)-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ(70)-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ(54)-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ(54) Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  3. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ70-dependent and the contrasting σ54-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ54-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ70-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ54-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ54 Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  4. Structure-function studies of the herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Haffey, M L; Novotny, J; Bruccoleri, R E; Carroll, R D; Stevens, J T; Matthews, J T

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA polymerase reported here suggests that the polymerase structure consists of domains carrying separate biological functions. The HSV-1 enzyme is known to possess 5'-3'-exonuclease (RNase H), 3'-5'-exonuclease, and DNA polymerase catalytic activities. Sequence analysis suggests an arrangement of these activities into distinct domains resembling the organization of Escherichia coli polymerase I. In order to more precisely define the structure and C-terminal limits of a putative catalytic domain responsible for the DNA polymerization activity of the HSV-1 enzyme, we have undertaken in vitro mutagenesis and computer modeling studies of the HSV-1 DNA polymerase gene. Sequence analysis predicts that the major DNA polymerization domain of the HSV-1 enzyme will be contained between residues 690 and 1100, and we present a three-dimensional model of this region, on the basis of the X-ray crystallographic structure of the E. coli polymerase I. Consistent with these structural and modeling studies, deletion analysis by in vitro mutagenesis of the HSV-1 DNA polymerase gene expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has confirmed that certain amino acids from the C terminus (residues 1073 to 1144 and 1177 to 1235) can be deleted without destroying HSV-1 DNA polymerase catalytic activity and that the extreme N-terminal 227 residues are also not required for this activity. Images PMID:2168983

  5. Promoter-distal RNA polymerase II binding discriminates active from inactive CCAAT/ enhancer-binding protein beta binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Daniel; Roberts, Brian S.; Carleton, Julia B.; Partridge, E. Christopher; White, Michael A.; Cohen, Barak A.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to thousands of DNA sequences in mammalian genomes, but most of these binding events appear to have no direct effect on gene expression. It is unclear why only a subset of TF bound sites are actively involved in transcriptional regulation. Moreover, the key genomic features that accurately discriminate between active and inactive TF binding events remain ambiguous. Recent studies have identified promoter-distal RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) binding at enhancer elements, suggesting that these interactions may serve as a marker for active regulatory sequences. Despite these correlative analyses, a thorough functional validation of these genomic co-occupancies is still lacking. To characterize the gene regulatory activity of DNA sequences underlying promoter-distal TF binding events that co-occur with RNAP2 and TF sites devoid of RNAP2 occupancy using a functional reporter assay, we performed cis-regulatory element sequencing (CRE-seq). We tested more than 1000 promoter-distal CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB)-bound sites in HepG2 and K562 cells, and found that CEBPB-bound sites co-occurring with RNAP2 were more likely to exhibit enhancer activity. CEBPB-bound sites further maintained substantial cell-type specificity, indicating that local DNA sequence can accurately convey cell-type–specific regulatory information. By comparing our CRE-seq results to a comprehensive set of genome annotations, we identified a variety of genomic features that are strong predictors of regulatory element activity and cell-type–specific activity. Collectively, our functional assay results indicate that RNAP2 occupancy can be used as a key genomic marker that can distinguish active from inactive TF bound sites. PMID:26486725

  6. Mapping of the Tacaribe Arenavirus Z-Protein Binding Sites on the L Protein Identified both Amino Acids within the Putative Polymerase Domain and a Region at the N Terminus of L That Are Critically Involved in Binding▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilda, Maximiliano; Lopez, Nora; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Franze-Fernandez, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Tacaribe virus (TacV) is the prototype of the New World group of arenaviruses. The TacV genome encodes four proteins: the nucleoprotein (N), the glycoprotein precursor, the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z). Using a reverse genetics system, we demonstrated that TacV N and L are sufficient to drive transcription and replication mediated by TacV-like RNAs and that Z is a powerful inhibitor of these processes (Lopez et al., J. Virol. 65:12241-12251, 2001). More recently, we provided the first evidence of an interaction between Z and L and showed that Z's inhibitory activity was dependent on its ability to bind to L (Jácamo et al., J. Virol. 77:10383-10393, 2003). In the present study, we mapped the TacV Z-binding sites on the 2,210-amino-acid L polymerase. To that end, we performed deletion analysis and point mutations of L and studied the Z-L interaction by coimmunoprecipitation with specific sera. We found that the C-terminal region of L was not essential for the interaction and identified two noncontiguous regions that were critical for binding: one at the N-terminus of L between residues 156 and 292 and a second one in the polymerase domain (domain III). The importance of domain III in binding was revealed by substitutions in D1188 and H1189 within motif A and in each residue of the conserved SDD sequence (residues 1328, 1329, and 1330) within motif C. Our results showed that of the substituted residues, only H1189 and D1329 appeared to be critically involved in binding Z. PMID:18799569

  7. Pathophysiological role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation during acetaminophen-induced liver cell necrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Fickert, Peter; Knight, Tamara R; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Farhood, Anwar; Trauner, Michael; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2005-03-01

    DNA fragmentation in hepatocytes occurs early after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose in mice. DNA strandbreaks can induce excessive activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP), which may lead to oncotic necrosis. Based on controversial findings with chemical PARP inhibitors, the role of PARP-1 activation in AAP hepatotoxicity remains unclear. To investigate PARP-1 activation and evaluate a pathophysiological role of PARP-1, we used both PARP inhibitors (3-aminobenzamide; 5-aminoisoquinolinone) and PARP gene knockout mice (PARP-/-). Treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg AAP resulted in DNA fragmentation and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release as early as 3 h, with further increase of these parameters up to 12 h. Few nuclei of hepatocytes stained positive for poly-ADP-ribosylated nuclear proteins (PAR) as indicator for PARP-1 activation at 4.5 h. However, the number of PAR-positive cells and staining intensity increased substantially at 6 and 12 h. Pretreatment with 500 mg/kg 3-aminobenzamide before AAP attenuated hepatic glutathione depletion and completely eliminated DNA fragmentation and liver injury. Delayed treatment several hours after AAP was still partially protective. On the other hand, liver injury was not attenuated in PARP-/- mice compared to wild-type animals. Similarly, the specific PARP-1 inhibitor 5-aminoisoquinolinone (5 mg/kg) was not protective. However, 3-aminobenzamide attenuated liver injury in WT and PARP-/- mice. In summary, PARP-1 activation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation after AAP overdose. However, PARP-1 activation is not a relevant event for AAP-induced oncotic necrosis. The protection of 3-aminobenzamide against AAP-induced liver injury was due to reduced metabolic activation and potentially its antioxidant effect but independent of PARP-1 inhibition. PMID:15601672

  8. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (PARP3), a potential repressor of telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering previous result in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), we investigated in human cancer cells the role of PARP3 in the regulation of telomerase activity. Methods We selected A549 (lung adenocarcinoma cell line) and Saos-2 (osteosarcoma cell line), with high and low telomerase activity levels, respectively. The first one was transfected using a plasmid construction containing a PARP3 sequence, whereas the Saos-2 cells were submitted to shRNA transfection to get PARP3 depletion. PARP3 expression on both cell systems was evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR and PARP3 protein levels, by Western-blot. Telomerase activity was determined by TRAP assay. Results In A549 cells, after PARP3 transient transfection, data obtained indicated that twenty-four hours after transfection, up to 100-fold increased gene expression levels were found in the transfected cells with pcDNA/GW-53/PARP3 in comparison to transfected cells with the empty vector. Moreover, 48 hours post-transfection, telomerase activity decreased around 33%, and around 27%, 96 hours post-transfection. Telomerase activity average ratio was 0.67 ± 0.05, and 0.73 ± 0.06, respectively, with significant differences. In Saos-2 cells, after shRNA-mediated PARP3 silencing, a 2.3-fold increase in telomerase activity was detected in relation to the control. Conclusion Our data indicated that, at least in some cancer cells, repression of PARP3 could be responsible for an increased telomerase activity, this fact contributing to telomere maintenance and, therefore, avoiding genome instability. PMID:24528514

  9. RNA polymerase activity in PtK1 micronuclei containing individual chromosomes: an in vitro and in situ study

    SciTech Connect

    Labidi, B.; Gregoire, M.; Frackowiak, S.; Hernandez-Verdun, D.; Bouteille, M.

    1987-03-01

    Micronuclei have been induced by colchicine in rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylis) PtK1 cells. The synthesis of RNA was investigated both in isolated micronuclei by quantifying RNA polymerase activities at different ionic strengths with or without inhibitors, and in micronucleated cells by radioautography after (/sup 3/H)uridine pulse labeling. In vitro transcription shows that isolated micronuclei are able to take up (/sup 3/H)UTP. The rate curves of incorporation are close to those of isolated diploid nuclei, though the level of incorporation was relatively lower (65-70%) than control nuclei. This indicates that micronuclei react to the ionic environment and to inhibitors in the same manner as described for many species of isolated diploid nuclei. The labelling distributions plotted from radioautographs show that micronuclei were able to efficiently incorporate the hot precursor. Furthermore, for short pulses there is no homogeneity in the labelling density among the different micronuclei and there is no correlation between the labelling intensity and the size of micronuclei. After 60-min pulse time, there is an enhanced uptake of (/sup 3/H)uridine and all the micronuclei exhibit considerable labelling, although less than control cells. Thus, the micronuclei exhibit some characteristic RNA transcriptional activity in situ as well as after isolation. This material should be a particular interesting model with which to study the physiological activity and the role of each individual interphasic chromosome.

  10. Temporal sequence of events during the initiation process in Escherichia coli deoxyribonucleic acid replication: roles of the dnaA and dnaC gene products and ribonucleic acid polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Zyskind, J W; Deen, L T; Smith, D W

    1977-01-01

    Three thermosensitive deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) initiation mutants of Escherichia coli exposed to the restrictive temperature for one to two generations were examined for the ability to reinitiate DNA replication after returning to the permissive temperature in the presence of rifampin, chloramphenicol, or nalidixic acid. Reinitiation in the dnaA mutant was inhibited by rifampin but not by chloramphenicol, whereas renitiation was not inhibited by rifampin but not by chloramphenicol, whereas reinitiation was not inhibited in two dnaC mutants by either rifampin or chloramphenicol. To observe the rifampin inhibition, the antibiotic must be added at least 10 min before return to the permissive temperature. The rifampin inhibition of reinitiation was not observed when a rifampin-resistant ribonucleic acid ((RNA) polymerase gene was introduced into the dnaA mutant, demonstrating that RNA polymerase synthesizes one or more RNA species required for the initation of DNA replication (origin-RNA). Reinitiation at 30 degrees C was not inhibited by streptolydigin in a stretolydigin-sensitive dnaA muntant. Incubation in the presence of nalidixic acid prevented subsequent reinitiation in the dnaC28 mutant but did not inhibit reinitiation in the dnaA5 muntant. These results demonstrate that the dnaA gene product acts before or during the synthesis of an origin-RNA, RNA polymerase synthesizes this origin RNA, and the dnaC gene product is involved in a step after this RNA synthesis event. Furthermore, these results suggest that the dnaC gene product is involved in the first deoxyribounucleotide polymerization event wheareas the dnaA gene product acts prior to this event. A model is presented describing the temporal sequence of events that occur during initiation of a round of DNA replication, based on results in this and the accompanying paper. PMID:321429

  11. A PB1 T296R substitution enhance polymerase activity and confer a virulent phenotype to a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijun; Cheng, Kaihui; Sun, Weiyang; Zhang, Xinghai; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Hualei; Zhang, Qianyi; Xin, Yue; Xue, Li; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Jing; Yang, Songtao; Qin, Chuan; Wilker, Peter R; Yue, Donghui; Chen, Hualan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-12-01

    While the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus has become established in the human population as a seasonal influenza virus, continued adaptation may alter viral virulence. Here, we passaged a 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (A/Changchun/01/2009) in mice. Serial passage in mice generated viral variants with increased virulence. Adapted variants displayed enhanced replication kinetics in vitro and vivo. Analysis of the variants genomes revealed 6 amino acid changes in the PB1 (T296R), PA (I94V), HA (H3 numbering; N159D, D225G, and R226Q), and NP (D375N). Using reverse genetics, we found that a PB1-T296R substitution found in all adapted viral variants enhanced viral replication kinetics in vitro and vivo, increased viral polymerase activity in human cells, and was sufficient for enhanced virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in mice. Therefore, we defined a novel influenza pathogenic determinant, providing further insights into the pathogenesis of influenza viruses in mammals. PMID:26453960

  12. Discovery of an essential nucleotidylating activity associated with a newly delineated conserved domain in the RNA polymerase-containing protein of all nidoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Kathleen C.; Gulyaeva, Anastasia; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Janssen, George M. C.; Ruben, Mark; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Samborskiy, Dmitry V.; Kravchenko, Alexander A.; Leontovich, Andrey M.; Sidorov, Igor A.; Snijder, Eric J.; Posthuma, Clara C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that catalyzes the synthesis of their RNA(s). In the case of positive-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the order Nidovirales, the RdRp resides in a replicase subunit that is unusually large. Bioinformatics analysis of this non-structural protein has now revealed a nidoviral signature domain (genetic marker) that is N-terminally adjacent to the RdRp and has no apparent homologs elsewhere. Based on its conservation profile, this domain is proposed to have nucleotidylation activity. We used recombinant non-structural protein 9 of the arterivirus equine arteritis virus (EAV) and different biochemical assays, including irreversible labeling with a GTP analog followed by a proteomics analysis, to demonstrate the manganese-dependent covalent binding of guanosine and uridine phosphates to a lysine/histidine residue. Most likely this was the invariant lysine of the newly identified domain, named nidovirus RdRp-associated nucleotidyltransferase (NiRAN), whose substitution with alanine severely diminished the described binding. Furthermore, this mutation crippled EAV and prevented the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in cell culture, indicating that NiRAN is essential for nidoviruses. Potential functions supported by NiRAN may include nucleic acid ligation, mRNA capping and protein-primed RNA synthesis, possibilities that remain to be explored in future studies. PMID:26304538

  13. Influence of growth stage on activities of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymerase and PHA depolymerase in Pseudomonas putida U

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Medium chain length (mcl-) polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are synthesized by many bacteria in the cytoplasm as storage compounds for energy and carbon. The key enzymes for PHA metabolism are PHA polymerase (PhaC) and depolymerase (PhaZ). Little is known of how mcl-PHA accumulation and degradation are controlled. It has been suggested that overall PHA metabolism is regulated by the β-oxidation pathway of which the flux is governed by intracellular ratios of [NADH]/[NAD] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA]. Another level of control could relate to modulation of the activities of PhaC and PhaZ. In order to investigate the latter, assays for in vitro activity measurements of PhaC and PhaZ in crude cell extracts are necessary. Results Two in vitro assays were developed which allow the measurement of PhaC and PhaZ activities in crude cell extracts of Pseudomonas putida U. Using the assays, it was demonstrated that the activity of PhaC decreased 5-fold upon exponential growth on nitrogen limited medium and octanoate. In contrast, the activity of PhaZ increased only 1.5-fold during growth. One reason for the changes in the enzymatic activity of PhaC and PhaZ could relate to a change in interaction with the phasin surface proteins on the PHA granule. SDS-PAGE analysis of isolated PHA granules demonstrated that during growth, the ratio of [phasins]/[PHA] decreased. In addition, it was found that after eliminating phasins (PhaF and PhaI) from the granules PhaC activity decreased further. Conclusion Using the assays developed in this study, we followed the enzymatic activities of PhaC and PhaZ during growth and correlated them to the amount of phasins on the PHA granules. It was found that in P. putida PhaC and PhaZ are concomitantly active, resulting in parallel synthesis and degradation of PHA. Moreover PhaC activity was found to be decreased, whereas PhaZ activity increased during growth. Availability of phasins on PHA granules affected the activity of PhaC. PMID:20937103

  14. Base-pair-resolution genome-wide mapping of active RNA polymerases using precision nuclear run-on (PRO-seq).

    PubMed

    Mahat, Dig Bijay; Kwak, Hojoong; Booth, Gregory T; Jonkers, Iris H; Danko, Charles G; Patel, Ravi K; Waters, Colin T; Munson, Katie; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T

    2016-08-01

    We provide a protocol for precision nuclear run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) and its variant, PRO-cap, which map the location of active RNA polymerases (PRO-seq) or transcription start sites (TSSs) (PRO-cap) genome-wide at high resolution. The density of RNA polymerases at a particular genomic locus directly reflects the level of nascent transcription at that region. Nuclei are isolated from cells and, under nuclear run-on conditions, transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases incorporate one or, at most, a few biotin-labeled nucleotide triphosphates (biotin-NTPs) into the 3' end of nascent RNA. The biotin-labeled nascent RNA is used to prepare sequencing libraries, which are sequenced from the 3' end to provide high-resolution positional information for the RNA polymerases. PRO-seq provides much higher sensitivity than ChIP-seq, and it generates a much larger fraction of usable sequence reads than ChIP-seq or NET-seq (native elongating transcript sequencing). Similarly to NET-seq, PRO-seq maps the RNA polymerase at up to base-pair resolution with strand specificity, but unlike NET-seq it does not require immunoprecipitation. With the protocol provided here, PRO-seq (or PRO-cap) libraries for high-throughput sequencing can be generated in 4-5 working days. The method has been applied to human, mouse, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans cells and, with slight modifications, to yeast. PMID:27442863

  15. Dnmt2/Trdmt1 as Mediator of RNA Polymerase II Transcriptional Activity in Cardiac Growth

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Beatrice; Baudouy, Delphine; Kiani, Jafar; Michiels, Jean-François; Cuzin, François; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2016-01-01

    Dnmt2/Trdmt1 is a methyltransferase, which has been shown to methylate tRNAs. Deficient mutants were reported to exhibit various, seemingly unrelated, defects in development and RNA-mediated epigenetic heredity. Here we report a role in a distinct developmental regulation effected by a noncoding RNA. We show that Dnmt2-deficiency in mice results in cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic measurements revealed that cardiac function is preserved notwithstanding the increased dimensions of the organ due to cardiomyocyte enlargement. Mechanistically, activation of the P-TEFb complex, a critical step for cardiac growth, results from increased dissociation of the negatively regulating Rn7sk non-coding RNA component in Dnmt2-deficient cells. Our data suggest that Dnmt2 plays an unexpected role for regulation of cardiac growth by modulating activity of the P-TEFb complex. PMID:27270731

  16. Double-stranded DNA translocase activity of transcription factor TFIIH and the mechanism of RNA polymerase II open complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Fishburn, James; Tomko, Eric; Galburt, Eric; Hahn, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Formation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) open complex (OC) requires DNA unwinding mediated by the transcription factor TFIIH helicase-related subunit XPB/Ssl2. Because XPB/Ssl2 binds DNA downstream from the location of DNA unwinding, it cannot function using a conventional helicase mechanism. Here we show that yeast TFIIH contains an Ssl2-dependent double-stranded DNA translocase activity. Ssl2 tracks along one DNA strand in the 5′ → 3′ direction, implying it uses the nontemplate promoter strand to reel downstream DNA into the Pol II cleft, creating torsional strain and leading to DNA unwinding. Analysis of the Ssl2 and DNA-dependent ATPase activity of TFIIH suggests that Ssl2 has a processivity of approximately one DNA turn, consistent with the length of DNA unwound during transcription initiation. Our results can explain why maintaining the OC requires continuous ATP hydrolysis and the function of TFIIH in promoter escape. Our results also suggest that XPB/Ssl2 uses this translocase mechanism during DNA repair rather than physically wedging open damaged DNA. PMID:25775526

  17. RNA Polymerase II Second Largest Subunit Molecular Identification of Boletus griseipurpureus Corner From Thailand and Antibacterial Activity of Basidiocarp Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Aung-aud-chariya, Amornrat; Bangrak, Phuwadol; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Phupong, Worrapong; Aggangan, Nelly Siababa; Kamlangdee, Niyom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Boletus griseipurpureus Corner, an edible mushroom, is a putative ectomycorrhizal fungus. Currently, the taxonomic boundary of this mushroom is unclear and its bitter taste makes it interesting for evaluating its antibacterial properties. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic variation of this mushroom and also to evaluate any antibacterial activities. Materials and Methods: Basidiocarps were collected from 2 north-eastern provinces, Roi Et and Ubon Ratchathani, and from 2 southern provinces, Songkhla and Surat Thani, in Thailand. Genomic DNA was extracted and molecular structure was examined using the RNA polymerase II (RPB2) analysis. Antibacterial activities of basidiocarp extracts were conducted with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29523 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 189 using the agar-well diffusion method. Results: All the samples collected for this study constituted a monophyletic clade, which was closely related with the Boletus group of polypore fungi. For the antibacterial study, it was found that the crude methanol extract of basidiomes inhibited the growth of all bacteria in vitro more than the crude ethyl acetate extract. Conclusions: Basidomes collected from four locations in Thailand had low genetic variation and their extracts inhibited the growth of all tested bacteria. The health benefits of this edible species should be evaluated further. PMID:25834720

  18. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease. PMID:27518095

  19. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease. PMID:27518095

  20. Simultaneous analysis of biologically active aminoalkanephosphonic acids.

    PubMed

    Kudzin, Zbigniew H; Gralak, Dorota K; Andrijewski, Grzegorz; Drabowicz, Józef; Luczak, Jerzy

    2003-05-23

    A new approach for simultaneous analysis of biologically active aminoalkanephosphonic acids, namely glyphosate, phosphonoglycine, phosphonosarcosine, phosphonoalanine, phosphono-beta-alanine, phosphonohomoalanine, phosphono-gamma-homoalanine and glufosinate, is presented. This includes a preliminary 31p NMR analysis of these amino acids, their further derivatization to volatile phosphonates (phosphinates) by means of trifluoroacetic acid-trifluoroacetic anhydride-trimethyl orthoacetate reagent and subsequent analysis of derivatization products using MS and/or GC-MS (chemical ionization and/or electron impact ionization). PMID:12862383

  1. Inaccurate DNA Synthesis in Cell Extracts of Yeast Producing Active Human DNA Polymerase Iota

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Alena V.; Grabow, Corinn; Gening, Leonid V.; Tarantul, Vyacheslav Z.; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian Pol ι has an unusual combination of properties: it is stimulated by Mn2+ ions, can bypass some DNA lesions and misincorporates “G” opposite template “T” more frequently than incorporates the correct “A.” We recently proposed a method of detection of Pol ι activity in animal cell extracts, based on primer extension opposite the template T with a high concentration of only two nucleotides, dGTP and dATP (incorporation of “G” versus “A” method of Gening, abbreviated as “misGvA”). We provide unambiguous proof of the “misGvA” approach concept and extend the applicability of the method for the studies of variants of Pol ι in the yeast model system with different cation cofactors. We produced human Pol ι in baker's yeast, which do not have a POLI ortholog. The “misGvA” activity is absent in cell extracts containing an empty vector, or producing catalytically dead Pol ι, or Pol ι lacking exon 2, but is robust in the strain producing wild-type Pol ι or its catalytic core, or protein with the active center L62I mutant. The signature pattern of primer extension products resulting from inaccurate DNA synthesis by extracts of cells producing either Pol ι or human Pol η is different. The DNA sequence of the template is critical for the detection of the infidelity of DNA synthesis attributed to DNA Pol ι. The primer/template and composition of the exogenous DNA precursor pool can be adapted to monitor replication fidelity in cell extracts expressing various error-prone Pols or mutator variants of accurate Pols. Finally, we demonstrate that the mutation rates in yeast strains producing human DNA Pols ι and η are not elevated over the control strain, despite highly inaccurate DNA synthesis by their extracts. PMID:21304950

  2. Synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides containing C5-ethynylbenzenesulfonamide-modified nucleotides (EBNA) by polymerases towards the construction of base functionalized nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Goubet, Astrid; Chardon, Antoine; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2013-02-01

    C5-Ethynylbenzenesulfonamide-modified nucleotide (EBNA) was investigated as substrate of various DNA polymerases. The experiments revealed that KOD, Phusion and Klenow DNA polymerases successfully accepted EBNA-T nucleotide as a substrate and yielded the fully extended DNA. KOD DNA polymerase was found to be the most efficient enzyme to furnish EBNA-T containing DNA in good yields. Phusion DNA polymerase efficiently amplified the template containing EBNA-T nucleotides by PCR. PMID:23265899

  3. Relationships Between RNA Polymerase II Activity and Spt Elongation Factors to Spt- Phenotype and Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ping; Jin, Huiyan; Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between adjacent transcription units can result in transcription-dependent alterations in chromatin structure or recruitment of factors that determine transcription outcomes, including the generation of intragenic or other cryptic transcripts derived from cryptic promoters. Mutations in a number of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confer both cryptic intragenic transcription and the Suppressor of Ty (Spt(-)) phenotype for the lys2-128∂ allele of the LYS2 gene. Mutants that suppress lys2-128∂ allow transcription from a normally inactive Ty1 ∂ promoter, conferring a LYS(+) phenotype. The arrangement of transcription units at lys2-128∂ is reminiscent of genes containing cryptic promoters within their open reading frames. We set out to examine the relationship between RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) activity, functions of Spt elongation factors, and cryptic transcription because of the previous observation that increased-activity Pol II alleles confer an Spt(-) phenotype. We identify both cooperating and antagonistic genetic interactions between Pol II alleles and alleles of elongation factors SPT4, SPT5, and SPT6 We find that cryptic transcription at FLO8 and STE11 is distinct from that at lys2-128∂, though all show sensitivity to reduction in Pol II activity, especially the expression of lys2-128∂ found in Spt(-) mutants. We determine that the lys2-128∂ Spt(-) phenotypes for spt6-1004 and increased activity rpo21/rpb1 alleles each require transcription from the LYS2 promoter. Furthermore, we identify the Ty1 transcription start site (TSS) within the ∂ element as the position of Spt(-) transcription in tested Spt(-) mutants. PMID:27261007

  4. Relationships Between RNA Polymerase II Activity and Spt Elongation Factors to Spt- Phenotype and Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ping; Jin, Huiyan; Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Kaplan, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between adjacent transcription units can result in transcription-dependent alterations in chromatin structure or recruitment of factors that determine transcription outcomes, including the generation of intragenic or other cryptic transcripts derived from cryptic promoters. Mutations in a number of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confer both cryptic intragenic transcription and the Suppressor of Ty (Spt-) phenotype for the lys2-128∂ allele of the LYS2 gene. Mutants that suppress lys2-128∂ allow transcription from a normally inactive Ty1 ∂ promoter, conferring a LYS+ phenotype. The arrangement of transcription units at lys2-128∂ is reminiscent of genes containing cryptic promoters within their open reading frames. We set out to examine the relationship between RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) activity, functions of Spt elongation factors, and cryptic transcription because of the previous observation that increased-activity Pol II alleles confer an Spt- phenotype. We identify both cooperating and antagonistic genetic interactions between Pol II alleles and alleles of elongation factors SPT4, SPT5, and SPT6. We find that cryptic transcription at FLO8 and STE11 is distinct from that at lys2-128∂, though all show sensitivity to reduction in Pol II activity, especially the expression of lys2-128∂ found in Spt- mutants. We determine that the lys2-128∂ Spt- phenotypes for spt6-1004 and increased activity rpo21/rpb1 alleles each require transcription from the LYS2 promoter. Furthermore, we identify the Ty1 transcription start site (TSS) within the ∂ element as the position of Spt- transcription in tested Spt- mutants. PMID:27261007

  5. Prolonged poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity regulates JP-8-induced sustained cytokine expression in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Luis A; Smulson, Mark E; Chen, Zun

    2007-05-01

    Environmental pollutants inducing oxidative stress stimulate chronic inflammatory responses in the lung leading to pulmonary tissue dysfunction. In response to oxidative stress, alveolar macrophages produce both reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which induce the expression of a wide variety of immune-response genes. We found that a prolonged exposure of alveolar macrophages to a nonlethal dose (8 microg/ml) of JP-8, the kerosene-based hydrocarbon jet fuel, induced the persistent expression of IL-1, iNOS, and COX-2, as well as cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1). Because poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1), a coactivator of NF-kappaB, regulates inflammatory responses and associated disorders in the airways, we determined whether JP-8 induces the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation automodification of PARP-1 in alveolar macrophages. We observed that PARP-1 is activated in a time-dependent manner, which was temporally coincident with the prolonged activation of NF-kappaB and with the augmented expression of the proinflammatory factors described above. The 4 microg/ml dilution of JP-8 also increased the activity of PARP-1 as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2, indicating that lower doses of JP-8 also affect the regulation of proinflammatory factors in pulmonary macrophages. Together, these results demonstrate that an extensive induction of PARP-1 might coordinate the persistent expression of proinflammatory mediators in alveolar macrophages activated by aromatic hydrocarbons that can result in lung injury from occupational exposure. PMID:17395016

  6. Testing promoter activity in the trypanosome genome: isolation of a metacyclic-type VSG promoter, and unexpected insights into RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, M; Graham, S; Hartmann, C; Clayton, C

    1998-09-01

    In trypanosomes, most genes are arranged in polycistronic transcription units. Individual mRNAs are generated by 5'-trans splicing and 3' polyadenylation. Remarkably, no regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription has been detected although many RNAs are differentially expressed during kinetoplastid life cycles. Demonstration of specific class II promoters is complicated by the difficulty in distinguishing between genuine promoter activity and stimulation of trans splicing. Using vectors that were designed to allow the detection of low promoter activities in a transcriptionally silent chromosomal context, we isolated a novel trypanosome RNA polymerase I promoter. We were however unable to detect class II promoter activity in any tested DNA fragment. We also integrated genes which were preceded by a T3 promoter into the genome of cells expressing bacteriophage T3 polymerase: surprisingly, transcription was alpha-amanitin sensitive. One possible interpretation of these results is that in trypanosomes, RNA polymerase II initiation is favored by genomic accessibility and double-strand melting. PMID:9709032

  7. Selectivity of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase E sigma 38 for overlapping promoters and ability to support CRP activation.

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, A; Kotlarz, D; Kusano, S; Ishihama, A

    1995-01-01

    A series of gal promoter mutants has been used to compare the in vitro selectivities of the two forms of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, E sigma 38 and E sigma 70. In the absence of the CRP-cAMP complex, E sigma 38 shows a strong preference for the ga/P1 promoter, whereas E sigma 70 preferentially initiates transcription from the ga/P2 promoter. E sigma 38 selectivity is not affected by the nature and position of the upstream sequences or by the phasing between synthetic upstream curved sequences and the -10 regions. In fact, all effects of mutations in the extended -10 region can be accounted for without evoking strong new sequence preferences for E sigma 38. Finally, both E sigma 38 and E sigma 70 initiate transcription from the ga/P1 promoter in the presence of CRP-cAMP complex and support direct cAMP-CRP activation at several CRP-dependent promoters. Images PMID:7708498

  8. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation induces high mobility group box 1 release from proximal tubular cells during cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, J

    2016-06-20

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs against cancer, but its major side effect such as nephrotoxicity limits its use. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protects against various renal diseases via gene transactivation and/or ADP-ribosylation. However, the role of PARP in necrotic cell death during cisplatin nephrotoxicity remains an open question. Here we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of PARP by postconditioning dose-dependently prevented tubular injury and renal dysfunction following cisplatin administration in mice. PARP inhibition by postconditioning also attenuated ATP depletion during cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Systemic release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein in plasma induced by cisplatin administration was significantly diminished by PARP inhibition by postconditioning. In in vitro kidney proximal tubular cell lines, PARP inhibition by postconditioning also diminished HMGB1 release from cells. These data demonstrate that cisplatin-induced PARP1 activation contributes to HMGB1 release from kidney proximal tubular cells, resulting in the promotion of inflammation during cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:26447520

  9. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of influenza A virus acts by suppressing PA endonuclease activity of the viral polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Singh, Kailash; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Kao, Richard Y. T.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus comprises conserved and independently-folded subdomains with defined functionalities. The N-terminal domain of the PA subunit (PAN) harbors the endonuclease function so that it can serve as a desired target for drug discovery. To identify a class of anti-influenza inhibitors that impedes PAN endonuclease activity, a screening approach that integrated the fluorescence resonance energy transfer based endonuclease inhibitory assay with the DNA gel-based endonuclease inhibitory assay was conducted, followed by the evaluation of antiviral efficacies and potential cytotoxicity of the primary hits in vitro and in vivo. A small-molecule compound ANA-0 was identified as a potent inhibitor against the replication of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2, in cell cultures. Combinational treatment of zanamivir and ANA-0 exerted synergistic anti-influenza effect in vitro. Intranasal administration of ANA-0 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. In summary, ANA-0 shows potential to be developed to novel anti-influenza agents. PMID:26956222

  10. Canonical Poly(A) Polymerase Activity Promotes the Decay of a Wide Variety of Mammalian Nuclear RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bresson, Stefan M.; Hunter, Olga V.; Hunter, Allyson C.; Conrad, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    The human nuclear poly(A)-binding protein PABPN1 has been implicated in the decay of nuclear noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). In addition, PABPN1 promotes hyperadenylation by stimulating poly(A)-polymerases (PAPα/γ), but this activity has not previously been linked to the decay of endogenous transcripts. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying target specificity have remained elusive. Here, we inactivated PAP-dependent hyperadenylation in cells by two independent mechanisms and used an RNA-seq approach to identify endogenous targets. We observed the upregulation of various ncRNAs, including snoRNA host genes, primary miRNA transcripts, and promoter upstream antisense RNAs, confirming that hyperadenylation is broadly required for the degradation of PABPN1-targets. In addition, we found that mRNAs with retained introns are susceptible to PABPN1 and PAPα/γ-mediated decay (PPD). Transcripts are targeted for degradation due to inefficient export, which is a consequence of reduced intron number or incomplete splicing. Additional investigation showed that a genetically-encoded poly(A) tail is sufficient to drive decay, suggesting that degradation occurs independently of the canonical cleavage and polyadenylation reaction. Surprisingly, treatment with transcription inhibitors uncouples polyadenylation from decay, leading to runaway hyperadenylation of nuclear decay targets. We conclude that PPD is an important mammalian nuclear RNA decay pathway for the removal of poorly spliced and nuclear-retained transcripts. PMID:26484760

  11. Epstein-Barr virus induces cellular transcription factors to allow active expression of EBER genes by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Felton-Edkins, Zoë A; Kondrashov, Alexander; Karali, Dimitra; Fairley, Jennifer A; Dawson, Christopher W; Arrand, John R; Young, Lawrence S; White, Robert J

    2006-11-10

    The EBER genes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are transcribed by RNA polymerase (pol) III to produce untranslated RNAs that are implicated in oncogenesis. These EBER transcripts are the most highly expressed viral gene products in EBV-transformed cells. We have identified changes to the cellular transcription machinery that may contribute to the high levels of EBER RNA. These include phosphorylation of ATF2, which interacts with EBER promoters. A second is induction of TFIIIC, a pol III-specific factor that activates EBER genes; all five subunits of TFIIIC are overexpressed in EBV-positive cells. In addition, EBV induces BDP1, a subunit of the pol III-specific factor TFIIIB. Although BDP1 is the only TFIIIB subunit induced by EBV, its induction is sufficient to stimulate EBER expression in vivo, implying a limiting function. The elevated levels of BDP1 and TFIIIC in EBV-positive cells stimulate production of tRNA, 7SL, and 5S rRNA. Abnormally high expression of these cellular pol III products may contribute to the ability of EBV to enhance growth potential. PMID:16956891

  12. Natural and glucosyl flavonoids inhibit poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and induce synthetic lethality in BRCA mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    MAEDA, JUNKO; ROYBAL, ERICA J.; BRENTS, COLLEEN A.; UESAKA, MITSURU; AIZAWA, YASUSHI; KATO, TAKAMITSU A.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have been proven to represent superior clinical agents targeting DNA repair mechanisms in cancer therapy. We investigated PARP inhibitory effects of the natural and synthetic flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, monoglucosyl rutin and maltooligosyl rutin) and tested the synthetic lethality in BRCA2 mutated cells. In vitro ELISA assay suggested that the flavonoids have inhibitory effects on PARP activity, but glucosyl modifications reduced the inhibitory effect. Cytotoxicity tests of Chinese hamster cells defective in BRCA2 gene (V-C8) and its parental V79 cells showed BRCA2-dependent synthetic lethality when treated with the flavonoids. BRCA2 mutated cells were three times more sensitive to the flavonoids than the wild-type and gene complemented cells. Reduced toxicity was observed in a glucosyl modification-dependent manner. The present study provides support for the clinical use of new treatment drugs, and is the beginning of the potential application of flavonoids in cancer prevention and the periodic consumption of appropriate flavonoids to reduce cancer risk in individuals carrying a mutant allele of the BRCA2 gene. PMID:24317580

  13. The interaction of ω2 with the RNA polymerase β’ subunit functions as an activation to repression switch

    PubMed Central

    Volante, Andrea; Carrasco, Begoña; Tabone, Mariangela; Alonso, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The ω gene is encoded in broad-host range and low-copy plasmids. It is genetically linked to antibiotic resistance genes of the major human pathogens of phylum Firmicutes. The homodimeric forms of ω (ω2) coordinate the plasmid copy number control, faithful partition (ω2 and δ2) and better-than-random segregation (ζϵ2ζ) systems. The promoter (P) of the ωϵζ operon (Pω) transiently interacts with ω2. Adding δ2 facilitates the formation of stable ω2·Pω complexes. Here we show that limiting ω2 interacts with the N-terminal domain of the β’ subunit of the Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase (RNAP-σA) vegetative holoenzyme. In this way ω2 recruits RNAP-σA onto Pω DNA. Partial Pω occupancy by ω2 increases the rate at which RNAP-σA complex shifts from its closed (RPC) to open (RPO) form. This shift increases transcription activation. Adding δ2 further increases the rate of Pω transcription initiation, perhaps by stabilizing the ω2·Pω complex. In contrast, full operator occupancy by ω2 facilitates RPC formation, but it blocks RPO isomerization and represses Pω utilization. The stimulation and inhibition of RPO formation is the mechanism whereby ω2 mediates copy number fluctuation and stable plasmid segregation. By this mechanism, ω2 also indirectly influences the acquisition of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26243774

  14. The 5'UTR Intron of Arabidopsis GGT1 Aminotransferase Enhances Promoter Activity by Recruiting RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Laxa, Miriam; Müller, Kristin; Lange, Natalie; Doering, Lennart; Pruscha, Jan Thomas; Peterhänsel, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Photorespiration is essential for the detoxification of glycolate and recycling of carbon to the Calvin Benson Bassham cycle. Enzymes participating in the pathway have been identified, and investigations now focus on the regulation of photorespiration by transporters and metabolites. However, regulation of photorespiration on the gene level has not been intensively studied. Here, we show that maximum transcript abundance of Glu:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (GGT1) is regulated by intron-mediated enhancement (IME) of the 5' leader intron rather than by regulatory elements in the 5' upstream region. The intron is rich in CT-stretches and contains the motif TGTGATTTG that is highly similar to the IME-related motif TTNGATYTG. The GGT1 intron also confers leaf-specific expression of foreign promoters. Quantitative PCR analysis and GUS activity measurements revealed that IME of the GGT1 5'UTR intron is controlled on the transcriptional level. IME by the GGT1 5'UTR intron was at least 2-fold. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the abundance of RNA polymerase II binding to the intron-less construct is reduced. PMID:27418588

  15. Expression of an active form of recombinant Ty1 reverse transcriptase in Escherichia coli: a fusion protein containing the C-terminal region of the Ty1 integrase linked to the reverse transcriptase-RNase H domain exhibits polymerase and RNase H activities.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, M; Boutabout, M; Wilhelm, F X

    2000-01-01

    Replication of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 retrotransposon requires a reverse transcriptase capable of synthesizing Ty1 DNA. The first description of an active form of a recombinant Ty1 enzyme with polymerase and RNase H activities is reported here. The Ty1 enzyme was expressed as a hexahistidine-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli to facilitate purification of the recombinant protein by metal-chelate chromatography. Catalytic activity of the recombinant protein was detected only when amino acid residues encoded by the integrase gene were added to the N-terminus of the reverse transcriptase-RNase H domain. This suggests that the integrase domain could play a role in proper folding of reverse transcriptase. Several biochemical properties of the Ty1 enzyme were analysed, including the effect of MgCl(2), NaCl, temperature and of the chain terminator dideoxy GTP on its polymerase activity. RNase H activity was examined by monitoring the cleavage of a RNA-DNA template-primer. Our results suggest that the distance between the RNase H and polymerase active sites corresponds to the length of a 14-nucleotide RNA-DNA heteroduplex. The recombinant protein produced in E. coli should be useful for further biochemical and structural analyses and for a better understanding of the role of integrase in the activation of reverse transcriptase. PMID:10816427

  16. Design, Synthesis, Biochemical, and Antiviral Evaluations of C6 Benzyl and C6 Biarylmethyl Substituted 2-Hydroxylisoquinoline-1,3-diones: Dual Inhibition against HIV Reverse Transcriptase-Associated RNase H and Polymerase with Antiviral Activities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) remains the only virally encoded enzymatic function not targeted by current chemotherapy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although numerous chemotypes have been reported to inhibit HIV RNase H biochemically, few show significant antiviral activity against HIV. We report herein the design, synthesis, and biological evaluations of a novel variant of 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione (HID) scaffold featuring a crucial C-6 benzyl or biarylmethyl moiety. The synthesis involved a recently reported metal-free direct benzylation between tosylhydrazone and boronic acid, which allowed the generation of structural diversity for the hydrophobic aromatic region. Biochemical studies showed that the C-6 benzyl and biarylmethyl HID analogues, previously unknown chemotypes, consistently inhibited HIV RT-associated RNase H and polymerase with IC50s in low to submicromolar range. The observed dual inhibitory activity remained uncompromised against RT mutants resistant to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), suggesting the involvement of binding site(s) other than the NNRTI binding pocket. Intriguingly, these same compounds inhibited the polymerase, but not the RNase H function of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MoMLV) RT and also inhibited Escherichia coli RNase H. Additional biochemical testing revealed a substantially reduced level of inhibition against HIV integrase. Molecular docking corroborates favorable binding of these analogues to the active site of HIV RNase H. Finally, a number of these analogues also demonstrated antiviral activity at low micromolar concentrations. PMID:25522204

  17. Antidepressant activity of aspartic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Petrov, V I; Sergeev, V S; Onishchenko, N V; Piotrovskii, L B

    2001-04-01

    Antidepressant activity of N-phenyl(benzyl)amino derivatives of aspartic acid was studied on various experimental models of depression. IEM-1770 (30 mg/kg) and IEM-1944 (20 mg/kg) exhibited antidepressant activity after single injection in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Antidepressant effect of 14-day administration of these compounds and reference drugs maprotiline (10 mg/kg) and citalopram (10 mg/kg) was confirmed on the model of learned helplessness. PMID:11550022

  18. A Role for Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Melanoma Growth Stimulatory Activity (CXCL1) Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Nirodi, Chaitanya; NagDas, Subir; Gygi, Steven P.; Olson, Gary; Aebersold, Ruedi; Richmond, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The melanoma growth stimulatory activity/growth-regulated protein, CXCL1, is constitutively expressed at high levels during inflammation and progression of melanocytes into malignant melanoma. It has been shown previously that CXCL1 overexpression in melanoma cells is due to increased transcription as well as stability of the CXCL1 message. The transcription of CXCL1 is regulated through several cis-acting elements including Sp1, NF-κB, HMGI(Y), and the immediate upstream region (IUR) element (nucleotides −94 to −78), which lies immediately upstream to the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) element. Previously, it has been shown that the IUR is necessary for basal and cytokine-induced transcription of the CXCL1 gene. UV cross-linking and Southwestern blot analyses indicate that the IUR oligonucleotide probe selectively binds a 115-kDa protein. In this study, the IUR element has been further characterized. We show here that proximity of the IUR element to the adjacent NF-κB element is critical to its function as a positive regulatory element. Using binding site oligonucleotide affinity chromatography, we have selectively purified the 115-kDa IUR-F. Mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight spectroscopy and amino acid analysis as well as microcapillary reverse phase chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified this protein as the 114-kDa poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP1). Furthermore, 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of PARP-specific ADP-ribosylation, inhibits CXCL1 promoter activity and reduces levels of CXCL1 mRNA. The data point to the possibility that PARP may be a coactivator of CXCL1 transcription. PMID:11112786

  19. Analogues and derivatives of Oncrasin-1, a Novel Inhibitor of the C-Terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II, and Their Antitumor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuhong; Wang, Li; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Jinsong; Wei, Xiaoli; Fang, Bingliang

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the antitumor activity of oncrasin-1, a small molecule RNA polymerase II inhibitor, we evaluated 69 oncrasin-1 analogues for their cytotoxic activity against normal human epithelial cells and K-Ras mutant tumor cells. About 40 of those compounds were as potent as or more potent than oncrasin-1 in tumor cells and had minimal cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Structure-activity relationship analysis revealed that most of the active compounds contained either a hydroxymethyl group or an aldehyde group as a substitute at the 3-position of the indole. Both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups in the benzene ring were well tolerated. The hydroxymethyl compounds ranged from equipotent with to 100 times as potent as the corresponding aldehyde compounds. We tested 3 active analogues’ effect on RNA polymerase phosphorylation and found that they all inhibited phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the active compounds might act through the same mechanisms as oncrasin-1. PMID:21443218

  20. On the anticonvulsant activity of kaurenic acid.

    PubMed

    Daló, Nelson L; Sosa-Sequera, Miriam C; Usubillaga, Alfredo

    2007-09-01

    Kaurenic acid [(-)-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid] is a diterpene isolated from the aerial parts of Espeletia semiglobulata, one of 85 species of Espeletiinae found in Venezuela. Its anticonvulsive activity was studied using two different models of experimental seizures: spinal seizures induced by sudden cooling (SSSC) in amphibians and seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) in mice. In SSSC, kaurenic acid (KA) inhibited the tonic hind-limb extension with an ED50 of 2.5 mg/kg. It was 4-fold more potent than known anticonvulsant drugs such as carbamazepine and phenytoin and 100-fold more potent than valproic acid. However, KA as well as valproic acid were ineffective against the clonic phase of SSSC. In the PTZ-induced seizures, KA at doses of 0.625 and 1.25 mg/kg increased the latency of seizure onset and protected against generalized clonic-tonic seizures by 45% and 65%, respectively. The sedative effects of KA had an ED50 of 8.5 mg/kg in mice and 75 mg/kg in amphibians. This work provides experimental evidence supporting the potential value of kaurenic acid as an anticonvulsive drug. PMID:17853794

  1. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5′ end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5′ end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique’s simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  2. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5' end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5' end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique's simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  3. RNA Polymerase I-Specific Subunit CAST/hPAF49 Has a Role in the Activation of Transcription by Upstream Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Panov, Kostya I.; Panova, Tatiana B.; Gadal, Olivier; Nishiyama, Kaori; Saito, Takashi; Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are large complexes, 12 subunits of which are structurally or functionally homologous across the three polymerase classes. Each class has a set of specific subunits, likely targets of their cognate transcription factors. We have identified and characterized a human RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-specific subunit, previously identified as ASE-1 (antisense of ERCC1) and as CD3ɛ-associated signal transducer (CAST), and here termed CAST or human Pol I-associated factor of 49 kDa (hPAF49), after mouse orthologue PAF49. We provide evidence for growth-regulated Tyr phosphorylation of CAST/hPAF49, specifically in initiation-competent Pol Iβ complexes in HeLa cells, at a conserved residue also known to be important for signaling during T-cell activation. CAST/hPAF49 can interact with activator upstream binding factor (UBF) and, weakly, with selectivity factor 1 (SL1) at the rDNA (ribosomal DNA repeat sequence encoding the 18S, 5.8S, and 28S rRNA genes) promoter. CAST/hPAF49-specific antibodies and excess CAST/hPAF49 protein, which have no effect on basal Pol I transcription, inhibit UBF-activated transcription following functional SL1-Pol I-rDNA complex assembly and disrupt the interaction of UBF with CAST/hPAF49, suggesting that interaction of this Pol I-specific subunit with UBF is crucial for activation. Drawing on parallels between mammalian and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol I transcription machineries, we advance one model for CAST/hPAF49 function in which the network of interactions of Pol I-specific subunits with UBF facilitates conformational changes of the polymerase, leading to stabilization of the Pol I-template complex and, thereby, activation of transcription. PMID:16809778

  4. Computational investigations on polymerase actions in gene transcription and replication: Combining physical modeling and atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases are protein enzymes that move along nucleic acid chains and catalyze template-based polymerization reactions during gene transcription and replication. The polymerases also substantially improve transcription or replication fidelity through the non-equilibrium enzymatic cycles. We briefly review computational efforts that have been made toward understanding mechano-chemical coupling and fidelity control mechanisms of the polymerase elongation. The polymerases are regarded as molecular information motors during the elongation process. It requires a full spectrum of computational approaches from multiple time and length scales to understand the full polymerase functional cycle. We stay away from quantum mechanics based approaches to the polymerase catalysis due to abundant former surveys, while addressing statistical physics modeling approaches along with all-atom molecular dynamics simulation studies. We organize this review around our own modeling and simulation practices on a single subunit T7 RNA polymerase, and summarize commensurate studies on structurally similar DNA polymerases as well. For multi-subunit RNA polymerases that have been actively studied in recent years, we leave systematical reviews of the simulation achievements to latest computational chemistry surveys, while covering only representative studies published very recently, including our own work modeling structure-based elongation kinetic of yeast RNA polymerase II. In the end, we briefly go through physical modeling on elongation pauses and backtracking activities of the multi-subunit RNAPs. We emphasize on the fluctuation and control mechanisms of the polymerase actions, highlight the non-equilibrium nature of the operation system, and try to build some perspectives toward understanding the polymerase impacts from the single molecule level to a genome-wide scale. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 11275022).

  5. Activated sludge degradation of adipic acid esters.

    PubMed Central

    Saeger, V W; Kalley, R G; Hicks, O; Tucker, E S; Mieure, J P

    1976-01-01

    The biodegradability of three aliphatic adipic acid diesters and a 1,3-butylene glycol adipic acid polyester was determined in acclimated, activated sludge systems. Rapid primary biodegradation from 67 to 99+% was observed at 3- and 13-mg/liter feed levels for di-n-hexyl adipate, di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, and di(heptyl, nonyl) adipate in 24 h. When acclimated, activated sludge microorganisms were employed as the seed for two carbon dioxide evolution procedures, greater than 75% of the theoretical carbon dioxide was evolved for the three diesters and the polyester in a 35-day test period. The essentially complete biodegradation observed in these studies suggests that these esters would not persist when exposed to similar mixed microbial populations in the environment. PMID:1275494

  6. Amino Acid Precursor Supply in the Biosynthesis of the RNA Polymerase Inhibitor Streptolydigin by Streptomyces lydicus▿†

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Cristina; Horna, Dina H.; Olano, Carlos; Palomino-Schätzlein, Martina; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Carbajo, Rodrigo J.; Braña, Alfredo F.; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the hybrid polyketide-nonribosomal peptide antibiotic streptolydigin, 3-methylaspartate, is utilized as precursor of the tetramic acid moiety. The three genes from the Streptomyces lydicus streptolydigin gene cluster slgE1-slgE2-slgE3 are involved in 3-methylaspartate supply. SlgE3, a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase, is responsible for the biosynthesis of glutamate from glutamine and 2-oxoglutarate. In addition to slgE3, housekeeping NADPH- and ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase genes have been identified in S. lydicus. The expression of slgE3 is increased up to 9-fold at the onset of streptolydigin biosynthesis and later decreases to ∼2-fold over the basal level. In contrast, the expression of housekeeping glutamate synthases decreases when streptolydigin begins to be synthesized. SlgE1 and SlgE2 are the two subunits of a glutamate mutase that would convert glutamate into 3-methylaspartate. Deletion of slgE1-slgE2 led to the production of two compounds containing a lateral side chain derived from glutamate instead of 3-methylaspartate. Expression of this glutamate mutase also reaches a peak increase of up to 5.5-fold coinciding with the onset of antibiotic production. Overexpression of either slgE3 or slgE1-slgE2 in S. lydicus led to an increase in the yield of streptolydigin. PMID:21665968

  7. Amplification of Chloroplast DNA Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): A Practical Activity for Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kenny; Barfoot, Jan; Crawford, Kathleen E.; Simpson, Craig G.; Beaumont, Paul C.; Bownes, Mary

    2006-01-01

    We describe a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol suitable for use in secondary schools and colleges. This PCR protocol can be used to investigate genetic variation between plants. The protocol makes use of primers which are complementary to sequences of nucleotides that are highly conserved across different plant genera. The regions of…

  8. Discovery and Structure-Based Optimization of 2-Ureidothiophene-3-carboxylic Acids as Dual Bacterial RNA Polymerase and Viral Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Elgaher, Walid A M; Sharma, Kamal K; Haupenthal, Jörg; Saladini, Francesco; Pires, Manuel; Real, Eleonore; Mély, Yves; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2016-08-11

    We are concerned with the development of novel anti-infectives with dual antibacterial and antiretroviral activities for MRSA/HIV-1 co-infection. To achieve this goal, we exploited for the first time the mechanistic function similarity between the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) "switch region" and the viral non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) binding site. Starting from our previously discovered RNAP inhibitors, we managed to develop potent RT inhibitors effective against several resistant HIV-1 strains with maintained or enhanced RNAP inhibitory properties following a structure-based design approach. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis revealed distinct molecular features necessary for RT inhibition. Furthermore, mode of action (MoA) studies revealed that these compounds inhibit RT noncompetitively, through a new mechanism via closing of the RT clamp. In addition, the novel RNAP/RT inhibitors are characterized by a potent antibacterial activity against S. aureus and in cellulo antiretroviral activity against NNRTI-resistant strains. In HeLa and HEK 293 cells, the compounds showed only marginal cytotoxicity. PMID:27339173

  9. Amplification of RNA by an RNA polymerase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Horning, David P; Joyce, Gerald F

    2016-08-30

    In all extant life, genetic information is stored in nucleic acids that are replicated by polymerase proteins. In the hypothesized RNA world, before the evolution of genetically encoded proteins, ancestral organisms contained RNA genes that were replicated by an RNA polymerase ribozyme. In an effort toward reconstructing RNA-based life in the laboratory, in vitro evolution was used to improve dramatically the activity and generality of an RNA polymerase ribozyme by selecting variants that can synthesize functional RNA molecules from an RNA template. The improved polymerase ribozyme is able to synthesize a variety of complex structured RNAs, including aptamers, ribozymes, and, in low yield, even tRNA. Furthermore, the polymerase can replicate nucleic acids, amplifying short RNA templates by more than 10,000-fold in an RNA-catalyzed form of the PCR. Thus, the two prerequisites of Darwinian life-the replication of genetic information and its conversion into functional molecules-can now be accomplished with RNA in the complete absence of proteins. PMID:27528667

  10. Polymerase chain reaction coupling with magnetic nanoparticles-based biotin-avidin system for amplification of chemiluminescent detection signals of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyang; He, Lei; He, Nongyue; Deng, Yan; Shi, Zhiyang; Wang, Hua; Li, Song; Liu, Hongna; Wang, Zhifei; Wang, Daxin

    2011-02-01

    A novel method was established through the detection of chemiluminescent signals of nucleic acid hybridization based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and PCR. 5' amino- modified specific probes were immobilized on the surface of silanized MNPs by Schiff reaction between amino and aldehyde group. The probes were used to capture the synthetic biotin-dUTP-labeled DNA fragments which were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then these complexes were bonded with streptavidin-modified alkaline phosphatase (SA-AP). Finally the chemiluminescent signals were detected by adding 3-(2'-spiroadamantane)- 4-methoxy -4-(3"-phosphoryloxy) phenyl-1, 2-dioxetane (AMPPD) which was the substrate reagent of AP. The concentration of probes which were immobilized on the surface of MNPs was studied, how to reduce the adsorption of SA-AP on the surface of MNPs was also researched. It was shown that 12.5 pmol of probes were immobilized on 1 mg of MNPs. Aldehyde-MNPs modified with probes could adsorb SA-AP, affecting the sensitivity of chemiluminescene consequently. Reduction of aldehyde group by sodium borohydride and blocking the bare position of MNPs with bovine serum albumin (BSA) could decrease the background of chemiluminescence, and this method has good specificity in detection of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. PMID:21456141

  11. Development of a peptide nucleic acid polymerase chain reaction clamping assay for semiquantitative evaluation of genetically modified organism content in food.

    PubMed

    Peano, C; Lesignoli, F; Gulli, M; Corradini, R; Samson, M C; Marchelli, R; Marmiroli, N

    2005-09-15

    In the present study a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamping method was developed and applied to the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO), to test PCR products for band identity and to obtain a semiquantitative evaluation of GMO content. The minimal concentration of PNA necessary to block the PCR was determined by comparing PCRs containing a constant amount of DNA in the presence of increasing concentration of target-specific PNA. The lowest PNA concentration at which specific inhibition took place, by the inhibition of primer extension and/or steric hindrance, was the most efficient condition. Optimization of PCR clamping by PNA was observed by testing five different PNAs with a minimum of 13 bp to a maximum of 15 bp, designed on the target sequence of Roundup Ready soybean. The results obtained on the DNA extracted from Roundup Ready soybean standard flour were verified also on DNA extracted from standard flours of maize GA21, Bt176, Bt11, and MON810. A correlation between the PNA concentration necessary for inducing PCR clamping and the percentage of the GMO target sequence in the sample was found. PMID:16055074

  12. DnaJA1/Hsp40 Is Co-Opted by Influenza A Virus To Enhance Its Viral RNA Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mengmeng; Wei, Candong; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Qiannan; Wang, Xue

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of influenza A virus is a heterotrimeric complex composed of the PB1, PB2, and PA subunits. The interplay between host factors and the three subunits of the RdRp is critical to enable viral RNA synthesis to occur in the nuclei of infected cells. In this study, we newly identified host factor DnaJA1, a member of the type I DnaJ/Hsp40 family, acting as a positive regulator for influenza virus replication. We found that DnaJA1 associates with the bPB2 and PA subunits and enhances viral RNA synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, DnaJA1 could be translocated from cytoplasm into the nucleus upon influenza virus infection. The translocation of DnaJA1 is specifically accompanied by PB1-PA nuclear import. Interestingly, we observed that the effect of DnaJA1 on viral RNA synthesis is mainly dependent on its C-terminal substrate-binding domain and not on its typical J domain, while the J domain normally mediates the Hsp70-DnaJ interaction required for regulating Hsp70 ATPase activity. Therefore, we propose that DnaJA1 is co-opted by the influenza A virus to enter the nucleus and to enhance its RNA polymerase activity in an Hsp70 cochaperone-independent manner. IMPORTANCE The interplay between host factors and influenza virus RNA polymerase plays a critical role in determining virus pathogenicity and host adaptation. In this study, we newly identified a host protein, DnaJA1/Hsp40, that is co-opted by influenza A virus RNA polymerase to enhance its viral RNA synthesis in the nuclei of infected cells. We found that DnaJA1 associates with both PB2 and PA subunits and translocates into the nucleus along with the nuclear import of the PB1-PA dimer during influenza virus replication. Interestingly, the effect of DnaJA1 is mainly dependent on its C-terminal substrate-binding domain and not on its typical J domain, which is required for its Hsp70 cochaperone function. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a member of the

  13. Molecular characterization of a 13-amino acid deletion in VP1 (1D) protein and novel amino acid substitutions in 3D polymerase protein of foot and mouth disease virus subtype A/Iran87

    PubMed Central

    Jelokhani-Niaraki, Saber; Hashemnejad, Khadije; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Lotfi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the VP1 (1D) and partial 3D polymerase (3Dpol) coding regions of the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine strain A/Iran87, a highly passaged isolate (~150 passages), was determined and aligned with previously published FMDV serotype A sequences. Overall analysis of the amino acid substitutions revealed that the partial 3Dpol coding region contained four amino acid alterations. Amino acid sequence comparison of the VP1 coding region of the field isolates revealed deletions in the highly passaged Iranian isolate (A/Iran87). The prominent G-H loop of the FMDV VP1 protein contains the conserved arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide, which is a well-known ligand for a specific cell surface integrin. Despite losing the RGD sequence of the VP1 protein and an Asp26→Glu substitution in a beta sheet located within a small groove of the 3Dpol protein, the virus grew in BHK 21 suspension cell cultures. Since this strain has been used as a vaccine strain, it may be inferred that the RGD deletion has no critical role in virus attachment to the cell during the initiation of infection. It is probable that this FMDV subtype can utilize other pathways for cell attachment. PMID:22122902

  14. The β2 clamp in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA polymerase III αβ2ε replicase promotes polymerization and reduces exonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shoujin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hongtai; Fleming, Joy; Yang, Weiqiang; Wang, Shihua; Wei, Wenjing; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Guofeng; Deng, Jiaoyu; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase III (DNA pol III) is a multi-subunit replication machine responsible for the accurate and rapid replication of bacterial genomes, however, how it functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires further investigation. We have reconstituted the leading-strand replication process of the Mtb DNA pol III holoenzyme in vitro, and investigated the physical and functional relationships between its key components. We verify the presence of an αβ2ε polymerase-clamp-exonuclease replicase complex by biochemical methods and protein-protein interaction assays in vitro and in vivo and confirm that, in addition to the polymerase activity of its α subunit, Mtb DNA pol III has two potential proofreading subunits; the α and ε subunits. During DNA replication, the presence of the β2 clamp strongly promotes the polymerization of the αβ2ε replicase and reduces its exonuclease activity. Our work provides a foundation for further research on the mechanism by which the replication machinery switches between replication and proofreading and provides an experimental platform for the selection of antimicrobials targeting DNA replication in Mtb. PMID:26822057

  15. Oxidant injury of cells. DNA strand-breaks activate polyadenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase and lead to depletion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstatter, I U; Hinshaw, D B; Hyslop, P A; Spragg, R G; Cochrane, C G

    1986-01-01

    To determine the biochemical basis of the oxidant-induced injury of cells, we have studied early changes after exposure of P388D1 murine macrophages to hydrogen peroxide. Total intracellular NAD+ levels in P388D1 cells decreased with H2O2 concentrations of 40 microM or higher. Doses of H2O2 between 0.1 and 2.5 mM led to an 80% depletion of NAD within 20 min. With doses of H2O2 of 250 microM or lower, the fall in NAD and, as shown previously, ATP, was reversible. Higher doses of H2O2 that cause ultimate lysis of the cells, induced an irreversible depletion of NAD and ATP. Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, a nuclear enzyme associated with DNA damage and repair, which catalyzes conversion of NAD to nicotinamide and protein-bound poly-ADP-ribose, was activated by exposure of the cells to concentrations of 40 microM H2O2 or higher. Activation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase was also observed in peripheral lymphocytes incubated in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Examination of the possibility that DNA alteration was involved was performed by measurement of thymidine incorporation and determination of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in cells exposed to H2O2. H2O2 at 40 microM or higher inhibited DNA synthesis, and induced SSB within less than 30 s. These results suggest that DNA damage induced within seconds after addition of oxidant may lead to stimulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, and a consequent fall in NAD. Excessive stimulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase leads to a fall in NAD sufficient to interfere with ATP synthesis. PMID:2937805

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of fatty acid amides on the N-oleoylethanolamide-like activation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α.

    PubMed

    Takao, Koichi; Noguchi, Kaori; Hashimoto, Yosuke; Shirahata, Akira; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of fatty acid amides were synthesized and their peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) agonistic activities were evaluated in a normal rat liver cell line, clone 9. The mRNAs of the PPAR-α downstream genes, carnitine-palmitoyltransferase-1 and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as PPAR-α agonistic activities. We prepared nine oleic acid amides. Their PPAR-α agonistic activities were, in decreasing order, N-oleoylhistamine (OLHA), N-oleoylglycine, Oleamide, N-oleoyltyramine, N-oleoylsertonin, and Olvanil. The highest activity was found with OLHA. We prepared and evaluated nine N-acylhistamines (N-acyl-HAs). Of these, OLHA, C16:0-HA, and C18:1Δ(9)-trans-HA showed similar activity. Activity due to the different chain length of the saturated fatty acid peaked at C16:0-HA. The PPAR-α antagonist, GW6471, inhibited the induction of the PPAR-α downstream genes by OLHA and N-oleoylethanolamide (OEA). These data suggest that N-acyl-HAs could be considered new PPAR-α agonists. PMID:25832022

  17. Species difference in ANP32A underlies influenza A virus polymerase host restriction.

    PubMed

    Long, Jason S; Giotis, Efstathios S; Moncorgé, Olivier; Frise, Rebecca; Mistry, Bhakti; James, Joe; Morisson, Mireille; Iqbal, Munir; Vignal, Alain; Skinner, Michael A; Barclay, Wendy S

    2016-01-01

    Influenza pandemics occur unpredictably when zoonotic influenza viruses with novel antigenicity acquire the ability to transmit amongst humans. Host range breaches are limited by incompatibilities between avian virus components and the human host. Barriers include receptor preference, virion stability and poor activity of the avian virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells. Mutants of the heterotrimeric viral polymerase components, particularly PB2 protein, are selected during mammalian adaptation, but their mode of action is unknown. We show that a species-specific difference in host protein ANP32A accounts for the suboptimal function of avian virus polymerase in mammalian cells. Avian ANP32A possesses an additional 33 amino acids between the leucine-rich repeats and carboxy-terminal low-complexity acidic region domains. In mammalian cells, avian ANP32A rescued the suboptimal function of avian virus polymerase to levels similar to mammalian-adapted polymerase. Deletion of the avian-specific sequence from chicken ANP32A abrogated this activity, whereas its insertion into human ANP32A, or closely related ANP32B, supported avian virus polymerase function. Substitutions, such as PB2(E627K), were rapidly selected upon infection of humans with avian H5N1 or H7N9 influenza viruses, adapting the viral polymerase for the shorter mammalian ANP32A. Thus ANP32A represents an essential host partner co-opted to support influenza virus replication and is a candidate host target for novel antivirals. PMID:26738596

  18. Transcription initiation complexes and upstream activation with RNA polymerase II lacking the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Buratowski, S; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II assembles with other factors on the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter to generate pairs of transcription initiation complexes resolvable by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. The pairing of the complexes is caused by the presence or absence of the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit. This domain is not required for transcription stimulation by the major late transcription factor in vitro. Images PMID:2398901

  19. Domain movements of the enhancer-dependent sigma factor drive DNA delivery into the RNA polymerase active site: insights from single molecule studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Leach, Robert N.; Gell, Christopher; Zhang, Nan; Burrows, Patricia C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Smith, David Alastair; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin; Stockley, Peter G.; Tuma, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of bacterial promoters is regulated by two distinct classes of sequence-specific sigma factors, σ70 or σ54, that differ both in their primary sequence and in the requirement of the latter for activation via enhancer-bound upstream activators. The σ54 version controls gene expression in response to stress, often mediating pathogenicity. Its activator proteins are members of the AAA+ superfamily and use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to remodel initially auto-inhibited holoenzyme promoter complexes. We have mapped this remodeling using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Initial remodeling is nucleotide-independent and driven by binding both ssDNA during promoter melting and activator. However, DNA loading into the RNA polymerase active site depends on co-operative ATP hydrolysis by the activator. Although the coupled promoter recognition and melting steps may be conserved between σ70 and σ54, the domain movements of the latter have evolved to require an activator ATPase. PMID:24553251

  20. Domain movements of the enhancer-dependent sigma factor drive DNA delivery into the RNA polymerase active site: insights from single molecule studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Leach, Robert N; Gell, Christopher; Zhang, Nan; Burrows, Patricia C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Smith, David Alastair; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin; Stockley, Peter G; Tuma, Roman

    2014-04-01

    Recognition of bacterial promoters is regulated by two distinct classes of sequence-specific sigma factors, σ(70) or σ(54), that differ both in their primary sequence and in the requirement of the latter for activation via enhancer-bound upstream activators. The σ(54) version controls gene expression in response to stress, often mediating pathogenicity. Its activator proteins are members of the AAA+ superfamily and use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to remodel initially auto-inhibited holoenzyme promoter complexes. We have mapped this remodeling using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Initial remodeling is nucleotide-independent and driven by binding both ssDNA during promoter melting and activator. However, DNA loading into the RNA polymerase active site depends on co-operative ATP hydrolysis by the activator. Although the coupled promoter recognition and melting steps may be conserved between σ(70) and σ(54), the domain movements of the latter have evolved to require an activator ATPase. PMID:24553251

  1. DNA polymerase mu, a candidate hypermutase?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J F; Domínguez, O; Laín de Lera, T; Garcia-Díaz, M; Bernad, A; Blanco, L

    2001-01-01

    A novel DNA polymerase (Pol mu) has been recently identified in human cells. The amino-acid sequence of Pol mu is 42% identical to that of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), a DNA-independent DNA polymerase that contributes to antigen-receptor diversity. In this paper we review the evidence supporting the role of Pol mu in somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, a T-dependent process that selectively occurs at germinal centres: (i) preferential expression in secondary lymphoid organs; (ii) expression associated to developing germinal centres; and (iii) very low base discrimination during DNA-dependent DNA polymerization by Pol mu, a mutator phenotype enormously accentuated by the presence of activating Mn2+ ions. Moreover, its similarity to TdT, together with extrapolation to the crystal structure of DNA polymerase beta complexed (Pol beta) with DNA, allows us to discuss the structural basis for the unprecedented error proneness of Pol mu, and to predict that Pol mu is structurally well suited to participate also in DNA end-filling steps occurring both during V(D)J recombination and repair of DNA double-strand breaks that are processed by non-homologous end-joining. PMID:11205337

  2. High and low molecular weight hyaluronic acid differentially influence macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Rayahin, Jamie E.; Buhrman, Jason S.; Zhang, Yu; Koh, Timothy J.; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic diversity permitting wide-ranging roles in maintaining physiologic homeostasis. Hyaluronic acid, a major glycosaminoglycan of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to have differential signaling based on its molecular weight. With this in mind, the main objective of this study was to elucidate the role of hyaluronic acid molecular weight on macrophage activation and reprogramming. Changes in macrophage activation were assessed by activation state selective marker measurement, specifically quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, and cytokine enzyme-linked immunoassays, after macrophage treatment with differing molecular weights of hyaluronic acid under four conditions: the resting state, concurrent with classical activation, and following inflammation involving either classically or alternatively activated macrophages. Regardless of initial polarization state, low molecular weight hyaluronic acid induced a classically activated-like state, confirmed by up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes, including nos2, tnf, il12b, and cd80, and enhanced secretion of nitric oxide and TNF-α. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid promoted an alternatively activated-like state, confirmed by up regulation of pro-resolving gene transcription, including arg1, il10, and mrc1, and enhanced arginase activity. Overall, our observations suggest that macrophages undergo phenotypic changes dependent on molecular weight of hyaluronan that correspond to either (1) pro-inflammatory response for low molecular weight HA or (2) pro-resolving response for high molecular weight HA. These observations bring significant further understanding of the influence of extracellular matrix polymers, hyaluronic acid in particular, on regulating the inflammatory response of macrophages. This knowledge can be used to guide the design of HA-containing biomaterials to better utilize the natural response to HAs. PMID:26280020

  3. Rapid deoxyribonucleic acid analysis by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of mutations in the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.C.; Wei, J.Q.; Cheng, K.C.

    1995-05-01

    Rapid DNA analysis based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mutation site-specific primers was developed to detect mutations in the CYP21 gene known to cause steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency. In contrast to the previous method, in which PCR of genomic DNA was followed by dot blot analysis with radio active probes and multiple rounds of stripping and reprobing for each of the 8 most common mutation sites, the results using this new method were immediately visualized after the PCR run by ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel electrophoresis. Using allele-specific PCR, mutation(s) were identified on 148 affected chromosomes out of 160 tested. Although mutation(s) were identified on only one chromosome of 11 of these patients, their parents showed a consistent pattern on DNA analysis. The only exception was that in one family, in which the parents each had a detectable mutation, a mutation was detected on only one allele of the patient. Most likely there is a mutation in the patient`s other allele that could have arisen de novo or was inherited from the parent and was not evident in the transmitting parent`s phenotype. When compared with the dot blot procedure, allele-specific PCR is more rapid, less labor-intensive, and avoids the use of radioactivity. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Latonduine Analogs Restore F508del-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Trafficking through the Modulation of Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase 3 and Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase 16 Activity.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Graeme W; Robert, Renaud; Matthes, Elizabeth; Yang, Qi; Solari, Roberto; Hatley, Richard; Edge, Colin M; Hanrahan, John W; Andersen, Raymond; Thomas, David Y; Birault, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a major lethal genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). This encodes a chloride ion channel on the apical surface of epithelial cells. The most common mutation in CFTR (F508del-CFTR) generates a protein that is misfolded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Identifying small molecules that correct this CFTR trafficking defect is a promising approach in CF therapy. However, to date only modest efficacy has been reported for correctors in clinical trials. We identified the marine sponge metabolite latonduine as a corrector. We have now developed a series of latonduine derivatives that are more potent F508del-CFTR correctors with one (MCG315 [2,3-dihydro-1H-2-benzazepin-1-one]) having 10-fold increased corrector activity and an EC50 of 72.25 nM. We show that the latonduine analogs inhibit poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) isozymes 1, 3, and 16. Further our molecular modeling studies point to the latonduine analogs binding to the PARP nicotinamide-binding domain. We established the relationship between the ability of the latonduine analogs to inhibit PARP-16 and their ability to correct F508del-CFTR trafficking. We show that latonduine can inhibit both PARP-3 and -16 and that this is necessary for CFTR correction. We demonstrate that latonduine triggers correction by regulating the activity of the unfolded protein response activator inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE-1) via modulation of the level of its ribosylation by PARP-16. These results establish latonduines novel site of action as well as its proteostatic mechanism of action. PMID:27193581

  5. The RNA cleavage activity of RNA polymerase III is mediated by an essential TFIIS-like subunit and is important for transcription termination

    PubMed Central

    Chédin, Stéphane; Riva, Michel; Schultz, Patrick; Sentenac, André; Carles, Christophe

    1998-01-01

    Budding yeast RNA polymerase III (Pol III) contains a small, essential subunit, named C11, that is conserved in humans and shows a strong homology to TFIIS. A mutant Pol III, heterocomplemented with Schizosaccharomyces pombe C11, was affected in transcription termination in vivo. A purified form of the enzyme (Pol III Δ), deprived of C11 subunit, initiated properly but ignored pause sites and was defective in termination. Remarkably, Pol III Δ lacked the intrinsic RNA cleavage activity of complete Pol III. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that Pol III RNA cleavage activity is mediated by C11. Mutagenesis in C11 of two conserved residues, which are critical for the TFIIS-dependent cleavage activity of Pol II, is lethal. Immunoelectron microscopy data suggested that C11 is localized on the mobile thumb-like stalk of the polymerase. We propose that C11 allows the enzyme to switch between an RNA elongation and RNA cleavage mode and that the essential role of the Pol III RNA cleavage activity is to remove the kinetic barriers to the termination process. The integration of TFIIS function into a specific Pol III subunit may stem from the opposite requirements of Pol III and Pol II in terms of transcript length and termination efficiency. PMID:9869639

  6. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase: The Story of a Misguided DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Motea, Edward A.; Berdis, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Nearly every DNA polymerase characterized to date exclusively catalyzes the incorporation of mononucleotides into a growing primer using a DNA or RNA template as a guide to direct each incorporation event. There is, however, one unique DNA polymerase designated terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase that performs DNA synthesis using only single-stranded DNA as the nucleic acid substrate. In this chapter, we review the biological role of this enigmatic DNA polymerase and the biochemical mechanism for its ability to perform DNA synthesis in the absence of a templating strand. We compare and contrast the molecular events for template-independent DNA synthesis catalyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase with other well-characterized DNA polymerases that perform template-dependent synthesis. This includes a quantitative inspection of how terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase binds DNA and dNTP substrates, the possible involvement of a conformational change that precedes phosphoryl transfer, and kinetic steps that are associated with the release of products. These enzymatic steps are discussed within the context of the available structures of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase in the presence of DNA or nucleotide substrate. In addition, we discuss the ability of proteins involved in replication and recombination to regulate the activity of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Finally, the biomedical role of this specialized DNA polymerase is discussed focusing on its involvement in cancer development and its use in biomedical applications such as labeling DNA for detecting apoptosis. PMID:19596089

  7. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  8. Metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitory activity of phthalic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Yukiko; Morinaka, Akihiro; Fukushima, Takayoshi; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2009-09-01

    4-Butyl-3-methylphthalic acid was recognized as a metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitor. The structure-activity relationship study of substituted phthalic acids afforded 3-phenylphthalic acid derivatives as potent IMP-1 inhibitors. On the other hand, 3-substituted with 4-hydroxyphenyl phthalic acid derivative displayed a potent combination effect with biapenem (BIPM) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produce IMP-1. PMID:19632114

  9. E sub 1 BF is an essential RNA polymerase I transcription factor with an intrinsic protein kinase activity that can modulate rRNA gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhang; Huifeng Niu; Jacob, S.T. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors previously described the purification and characterization of E{sub 1}BF, a rat rRNA gene core promoter-binding factor that consists of two polypeptides of 89 and 79 kDa. When this factor was incubated in the absence of any exogenous protein kinase under conditions optimal for protein phosphorylation, the 79-kDa polypeptide of E{sub 1}BF was selectively phosphorylated. The labeled phosphate could be removed from the E{sub 1}BF polypeptide by treatment with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase or potato acid phosphatase. Elution of the protein from the E{sub 1}BF-promoter complex formed in an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay followed by incubation of the concentrated eluent with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the selective labeling o the 79-kDa band. The E{sub 1}BF-associated protein kinase did not phosphorylate casein or histone H1. These data demonstrate that (1) polymerase I promoter-binding factor E{sub 1}BF contains an intrinsic substrate-specific protein kinase and (2) E{sub 1}BF is an essential polymerase I transcription factor that can modulate rRNA gene transcription by protein phosphorylation. Further, these studies have provided a direct means to identify a protein kinase or any other enzyme that can interact with a specific DNA sequence.

  10. CDC42-Interacting Protein 4 Gene Is Down Trans-Regulated by HBV DNA polymerase Trans Activated Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    LUN, Yongzhi; XU, Chongbo; CHI, Qing; WANG, Xuelei; SUI, Wen; JIANG, Sujuan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1 (HBVDNAPTP1) is a novel protein transactivated by HBV DNA polymerase, screened by suppression subtractive hybridization technique (GenBank accession no: AY450389). The biological function of HBVDNAPTP1 was investigated in this study. Methods We constructed a vector pcDNA3.1 (-)/myc-His A-HBVDNAPTP1 and used it to transfect acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. HBVDNAPTP1 expression was detected by western blot analysis in the cells. A cDNA library of genes transactivated by HBVDNAPTP1 in THP-1 cells was made in pGEM-T Easy using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The cDNAs were sequenced and analyzed with BLAST search against the sequences in GenBank. Results Some sequences, such as CIP4, might be involved in apoptosis development. mRNA and protein expression of CIP4 was identified by Real time RT-PCR and western blot in THP-1 cells. HBVDNAPTP1 could down-regulate the expression of CIP4 at both transcription and translation levels. Conclusion HBVDNAPTP1 may be involved in the positive regulation on the initiation of monocyte apoptosis. The result contribute to reveal the HBVDNAPTP1 biological functions and provide new evidences for further exploration of the regulatory mechanism of HBVDNAPTP1. PMID:25988087

  11. Micelles Protect and Concentrate Activated Acetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe; House, C.

    2014-01-01

    As more and more exoplanets are discovered and the habitability of such planets is considered, one can turn to searching for the origin of life on Earth in order to better understand what makes a habitable planet. Activated acetic acid, or methyl thioacetate, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life on Earth, and also as an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about three orders of magnitude faster (K = 0.00663 s^-1; 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration = 0.33mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, we also observed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. We found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid micelles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic micelles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. Methyl thioacetate could thus be important for the origin of life on Earth and perhaps for better understanding the potential habitability of other planets.

  12. "JCE" Classroom Activity #109: My Acid Can Beat Up Your Acid!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putti, Alice

    2011-01-01

    In this guided-inquiry activity, students investigate the ionization of strong and weak acids. Bead models are used to study acid ionization on a particulate level. Students analyze seven strong and weak acid models and make generalizations about the relationship between acid strength and dissociation. (Contains 1 table and 2 figures.)

  13. Reconstitution of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus in vitro using separately expressed different functional domains of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anirban; Roychowdhury, Amlan; Bose, Madhuparna; Das, Amit Kumar; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2016-07-01

    Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus is a segmented dsRNA virus of the family Reoviridae. Segment 2 (S2)-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) helps the virus to propagate its genome in the host cell of the silkworm, Antheraea mylitta. Cloning, expression, purification and functional analysis of individual domains of RdRp have demonstrated that the purified domains interact in vitro. The central polymerase domain (PD) shows nucleotide binding properties, but neither the N-terminal domain (NTD) nor the C-terminal domain (CTD). Isolated PD does not exhibit RdRp activity but this activity can be reconstituted when all three domains are included in the reaction mixture. Molecular dynamics simulation suggests that the isolated PD has increased internal motions in comparison to when it is associated with the NTD and CTD. The motions of the separated PD may lead to the formation of a less accessible RNA template-binding channel and, thus, impair RdRp activity. PMID:27008451

  14. Transcriptional activation of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesfeld, J M; Johnson, D L; Nyborg, J K

    1996-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus-encoded tax protein is a potent activator of many viral and cellular genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We find that both chromatin and cell extracts derived from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected human T lymphocytes support higher levels of 5S rRNA and tRNA gene transcription than chromatin or extracts from uninfected T lymphocytes. The viral protein Tax was likely responsible for this higher level of class II gene transcription, as purified Tax was found to stimulate both genes when added to the uninfected cell extract or in reconstituted systems. Both limiting-component transcription assays and DNA binding assays identified the class III gene transcription factor TFIIIB as the principle target of Tax activity. Surprisingly, we find that Tax increases the effective concentration of active TFIIIB molecules. These data suggest that Tax stimulates RNA polymerase III-dependent gene expression by accelerating the rate and/or extent of transcription initiation complex assembly. PMID:8657153

  15. Large-scale structure-activity relationship study of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibition using SMILES-based descriptors.

    PubMed

    Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is composed of structural and non-structural proteins involved in viral transcription and propagation. In particular, NS5B is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase for viral transcription and genome replication and is a target for designing anti-viral agents. In this study, classification and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models of HCV NS5B inhibitors were constructed using the Correlation and Logic software. Molecular descriptors for a set of 970 HCV NS5B inhibitors were encoded using the simplified molecular input line entry system notation, and predictive models were built via the Monte Carlo method. The QSAR models provided acceptable correlation coefficients of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] in the ranges of 0.6038-0.7344 and 0.6171-0.7294, respectively, while the classification models displayed sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in ranges of 88.24-98.84, 83.87-93.94, and 86.50-94.41 %, respectively. Furthermore, molecular fragments as substructures involved in increased and decreased inhibitory activities were explored. The results provide information on QSAR and classification models for high-throughput screening and mechanistic insights into the inhibitory activity of HCV NS5B polymerase. PMID:26164590

  16. TCDD-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP/PARP7) mono-ADP-ribosylates and co-activates liver X receptors.

    PubMed

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Tan, Susanna; Bott, Debbie; Cho, Tiffany; Tamblyn, Laura; MacPherson, Laura; Grønning-Wang, Line; Nebb, Hilde Irene; Matthews, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Members of the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) family catalyse the ADP-ribosylation of target proteins and are known to play important roles in many cellular processes, including DNA repair, differentiation and transcription. The majority of PARPs exhibit mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity rather than PARP activity; however, little is known about their biological activity. In the present study, we report that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP), mono-ADP-ribosylates and positively regulates liver X receptor α (LXRα) and LXRβ activity. Overexpression of TIPARP enhanced LXR-reporter gene activity. TIPARP knockdown or deletion reduced LXR regulated target gene expression levels in HepG2 cells and inTiparp(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) respectively. Deletion and mutagenesis studies showed that TIPARP's zinc-finger and catalytic domains were required to enhance LXR activity. Protein interaction studies using TIPARP and LXRα/β peptide arrays revealed that LXRs interacted with an N-terminal sequence (a.a. 209-236) of TIPARP, which also overlapped with a putative co-activator domain of TIPARP (a.a. 200-225). Immunofluorescence studies showed that TIPARP and LXRα or LXRβ co-localized in the nucleus.In vitroribosylation assays provided evidence that TIPARP mono-ADP-ribosylated both LXRα and LXRβ. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) studies revealed that ADP-ribosylase macrodomain 1 (MACROD1), but not MACROD2, interacted with LXRs in a TIPARP-dependent manner. This was complemented by reporter gene studies showing that MACROD1, but not MACROD2, prevented the TIPARP-dependent increase in LXR activity. GW3965-dependent increases in hepatic Srebp1 mRNA and protein expression levels were reduced inTiparp(-/-)mice compared withTiparp(+/+)mice. Taken together, these data identify a new mechanism of LXR regulation that involves TIPARP, ADP-ribosylation and MACROD1. PMID:26814197

  17. A transposon-derived DNA polymerase from Entamoeba histolytica displays intrinsic strand displacement, processivity and lesion bypass.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Palacios, Guillermo; López-Ramírez, Varinia; Cardona-Felix, Cesar S; Brieba, Luis G

    2012-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica encodes four family B2 DNA polymerases that vary in amino acid length from 813 to 1279. These DNA polymerases contain a N-terminal domain with no homology to other proteins and a C-terminal domain with high amino acid identity to archetypical family B2 DNA polymerases. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that these family B2 DNA polymerases are grouped with DNA polymerases from transposable elements dubbed Polintons or Mavericks. In this work, we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of the smallest family B2 DNA polymerase from E. histolytica. To facilitate its characterization we subcloned its 660 amino acids C-terminal region that comprises the complete exonuclease and DNA polymerization domains, dubbed throughout this work as EhDNApolB2. We found that EhDNApolB2 displays remarkable strand displacement, processivity and efficiently bypasses the DNA lesions: 8-oxo guanosine and abasic site.Family B2 DNA polymerases from T. vaginalis, G. lambia and E. histolytica contain a Terminal Region Protein 2 (TPR2) motif twice the length of the TPR2 from φ29 DNA polymerase. Deletion studies demonstrate that as in φ29 DNA polymerase, the TPR2 motif of EhDNApolB2 is solely responsible of strand displacement and processivity. Interestingly the TPR2 of EhDNApolB2 is also responsible for efficient abasic site bypass. These data suggests that the 21 extra amino acids of the TPR2 motif may shape the active site of EhDNApolB2 to efficiently incorporate and extended opposite an abasic site. Herein we demonstrate that an open reading frame derived from Politons-Mavericks in parasitic protozoa encode a functional enzyme and our findings support the notion that the introduction of novel motifs in DNA polymerases can confer specialized properties to a conserved scaffold. PMID:23226232

  18. Nonstructural Proteins 7 and 8 of Feline Coronavirus Form a 2:1 Heterotrimer That Exhibits Primer-Independent RNA Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yibei; Ma, Qingjun; Restle, Tobias; Shang, Weifeng; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Sczakiel, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Nonstructural proteins 7 and 8 of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) have previously been shown by X-ray crystallography to form an 8:8 hexadecamer. In addition, it has been demonstrated that N-terminally His6-tagged SARS-CoV Nsp8 is a primase able to synthesize RNA oligonucleotides with a length of up to 6 nucleotides. We present here the 2.6-Å crystal structure of the feline coronavirus (FCoV) Nsp7:Nsp8 complex, which is a 2:1 heterotrimer containing two copies of the α-helical Nsp7 with conformational differences between them, and one copy of Nsp8 that consists of an α/β domain and a long-α-helix domain. The same stoichiometry is found for the Nsp7:Nsp8 complex in solution, as demonstrated by chemical cross-linking, size exclusion chromatography, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Furthermore, we show that FCoV Nsp8, like its SARS-CoV counterpart, is able to synthesize short oligoribonucleotides of up to 6 nucleotides in length when carrying an N-terminal His6 tag. Remarkably, the same protein harboring the sequence GPLG instead of the His6 tag at its N terminus exhibits a substantially increased, primer-independent RNA polymerase activity. Upon addition of Nsp7, the RNA polymerase activity is further enhanced so that RNA up to template length (67 nucleotides) can be synthesized. Further, we show that the unprocessed intermediate polyprotein Nsp7-10 of human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E is also capable of synthesizing oligoribonucleotides up to a chain length of six. These results indicate that in case of FCoV as well as of HCoV 229E, the formation of a hexadecameric Nsp7:Nsp8 complex is not necessary for RNA polymerase activity. Further, the FCoV Nsp7:Nsp8 complex functions as a noncanonical RNA polymerase capable of synthesizing RNA of up to template length. PMID:22318142

  19. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sova, M

    2012-07-01

    Cinnamic acid is an organic acid occurring naturally in plants that has low toxicity and a broad spectrum of biological activities. In the search for novel pharmacologically active compounds, cinnamic acid derivatives are important and promising compounds with high potential for development into drugs. Many cinnamic acid derivatives, especially those with the phenolic hydroxyl group, are well-known antioxidants and are supposed to have several health benefits due to their strong free radical scavenging properties. It is also well known that cinnamic acid has antimicrobial activity. Cinnamic acid derivatives, both isolated from plant material and synthesized, have been reported to have antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. Acids, esters, amides, hydrazides and related derivatives of cinnamic acid with such activities are here reviewed. PMID:22512578

  20. Detection of DNA polymerase λ activity during seed germination and enhancement after salinity stress and dehydration in the plumules of indica rice (Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Sihi, Sayantani; Bakshi, Sankar; Sengupta, Dibyendu Narayan

    2015-02-01

    DNA polymerase λ (DNA pol λ) is the only reported X-family DNA polymerases in plants and has been shown to play a significant role in dry quiescent seeds, growth, development and nuclear DNA repair. cDNA for DNA pol λ has been reported in Arabidopsis and japonica rice cultivar and has been characterized from E. coli expressed protein, but very little is known about its activity at protein level in plants. The enzymatic activity of DNA pol λ was studied in dry, imbibed and during different germination stages of indica rice IR-8 (salt sensitive) by in-gel activity assay to determine its physiological role in important stages of growth and development. The upstream sequence was also analyzed using plantCARE database and was found to contain several cis-acting elements, including light responsive elements, dehydration responsive elements, Myb binding sites, etc. Hence, 4-day-old germinating seedlings of IR29, a salt-sensitive, but high yielding indica rice cultivar and Nonabokra, a salt-tolerant, but low yielding cultivar were treated with water (control) or 250 mM NaCl or 20% polyethyleneglycol-6000 for 4 and 8 h. The protein was analyzed by in vitro DNA pol λ activity assay, in-gel activity assay and Western blot analysis. DNA pol λ was not detected in dry seeds, but enhanced after imbibition and detectable from low level to high level during subsequent germination steps. Both salinity and dehydration stress led to the enhancement of the activity and protein level of DNA pol λ, as compared to control tissues. This is the first evidence of the salinity or dehydration stress induced enhancement of DNA pol λ activity in the plumules of rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars. PMID:26040115

  1. Species difference in ANP32A underlies influenza A virus polymerase host restriction

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jason S.; Giotis, Efstathios S.; Moncorgé, Olivier; Frise, Rebecca; Mistry, Bhakti; James, Joe; Morisson, Mireille; Iqbal, Munir; Vignal, Alain; Skinner, Michael A.; Barclay, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza pandemics occur unpredictably when zoonotic influenza viruses with novel antigenicity acquire the ability to transmit amongst humans 1. Incompatibilities between avian virus components and the human host limit host range breaches. Barriers include receptor preference, virion stability and poor activity of the avian virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells 2. Mutants of the heterotrimeric viral polymerase components, particularly PB2 protein, are selected during mammalian adaptation, but their mode of action is unknown 3–6. We show that a species-specific difference in host protein ANP32A accounts for the suboptimal function of avian virus polymerase in mammalian cells. Avian ANP32A possesses an additional 33 amino acids between the LRR and LCAR domains. In mammalian cells, avian ANP32A rescued the suboptimal function of avian virus polymerase to levels similar to mammalian adapted polymerase. Deletion of the avian-specific sequence from chicken ANP32A abrogated this activity whereas its insertion into human ANP32A, or closely related ANP32B, supported avian virus polymerase function. Substitutions, such as PB2 E627K, rapidly selected upon infection of humans with avian H5N1 or H7N9 influenza viruses, adapt the viral polymerase for the shorter mammalian ANP32A. Thus ANP32A represents an essential host partner co-opted to support influenza virus replication and is a candidate host target for novel antivirals. PMID:26738596

  2. Acaricidal activity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaofei; Miao, Xiaolou; Lv, Huiping; Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Jiqin; He, Hua; Yang, Zhiqiang; Pan, Hu

    2014-06-01

    Usnic acid, a major active compound in lichens, was first isolated in 1884. Since then, usnic acid and its sodium salt (sodium usnic acid) have been used in medicine, perfumery, cosmetics, and other industries due to its extensive biological activities. However, its acaricidal activity has not been studied. In this paper, we investigated the acaricidal activity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro. After evaluating the acaricidal activity and toxicity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid in vitro, the results showed that at doses of 250, 125, and 62.5 mg/ml, usnic acid and sodium usnic acid can kill mites with 91.67, 85.00, and 55.00% and 100, 100, and 60.00% mortality after treatment 24 h. The LT50 values were 4.208, 8.249, and 16.950 h and 3.712, 7.339, and 15.773 h for usnic acid and sodium usnic acid, respectively. Sodium usnic acid has a higher acaricidal activity than usnic acid, which may be related to the difference in their structures. PMID:24770718

  3. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  4. Metal A and Metal B Sites of Nuclear RNA Polymerases Pol IV and Pol V Are Required for siRNA-Dependent DNA Methylation and Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontes, Olga; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    Plants are unique among eukaryotes in having five multi-subunit nuclear RNA polymerases: the ubiquitous RNA polymerases I, II and III plus two plant-specific activities, nuclear RNA polymerases IV and V (previously known as Polymerases IVa and IVb). Pol IV and Pol V are not required for viability but play non-redundant roles in small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated pathways, including a pathway that silences retrotransposons and endogenous repeats via siRNA-directed DNA methylation. RNA polymerase activity has not been demonstrated for Polymerases IV or V in vitro, making it unclear whether they are catalytically active enzymes. Their largest and second-largest subunit sequences have diverged considerably from Pol I, II and III in the vicinity of the catalytic center, yet retain the invariant Metal A and Metal B amino acid motifs that bind magnesium ions essential for RNA polymerization. By using site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with in vivo functional assays, we show that the Metal A and Metal B motifs of Polymerases IV and V are essential for siRNA production, siRNA-directed DNA methylation, retrotransposon silencing, and the punctate nuclear localization patterns typical of both polymerases. Collectively, these data show that the minimal core sequences of polymerase active sites, the Metal A and B sites, are essential for Pol IV and Pol V biological functions, implying that both are catalytically active. PMID:19119310

  5. Amino Acid Substitutions in the Caenorhabditis elegans RNA Polymerase II Large Subunit AMA-1/RPB-1 that Result in α-Amanitin Resistance and/or Reduced Function.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Elizabeth Anne; Riddle, Donald L; Kelly, William

    2011-11-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans RNA polymerase II AMA-1/RPB-1 subunit that cause α-amanitin resistance and/or developmental defects were isolated previously. We identified 12 of these mutations and mapped them onto the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPB1 structure to provide insight into AMA-1 regions that are essential for development in a multicellular organism. PMID:22384351

  6. The transcription factor TFIIS zinc ribbon dipeptide Asp-Glu is critical for stimulation of elongation and RNA cleavage by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, C; Yoon, H; Agarwal, K

    1994-01-01

    The eukaryotic transcription factor TFIIS enhances elongation and nascent transcript cleavage activities of RNA polymerase II in a stalled elongation complex. By site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that invariant residues Asp-261 and Glu-262 of the nucleic acid-binding TFIIS Zn ribbon are critical for stimulation of both elongation and RNA cleavage activities of RNA polymerase II. Substitution of either of these residues inactivates both TFIIS functions, suggesting a related role in both activities. These acidic residues may participate in phosphoryl transfer reactions by a two-metal-ion mechanism in a manner analogous to Klenow fragment. The RNA polymerase II itself may contain a Zn ribbon, in as much as the polymerase's 15-kDa subunit contains a sequence that aligns well with the TFIIS Zn ribbon sequence, including a similarly placed pair of acidic residues. Images PMID:8090778

  7. Transcriptional activation of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA promoter by NTRC is face-of-the-helix dependent and the activator stabilizes the interaction of sigma 54-RNA polymerase with the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Minchin, S D; Austin, S; Dixon, R A

    1989-01-01

    Activation of transcription at the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA promoter requires the phosphorylated form of the positive control protein NTRC, together with RNA polymerase modified by the alternative sigma factor sigma 54. Dimethylsulphate and potassium permanganate were used as probes to analyse the interaction of NTRC and sigma 54-RNA polymerase with supercoiled nifLA promoter DNA in vitro. In contrast to the glnAp2 promoter, sigma 54 holoenzyme did not protect guanine residues in the nifLA promoter from methylation in the absence of the activator. We propose that NTRC stabilizes the interaction of sigma 54-RNA polymerase with the -24, -12 region, in addition to its role in catalysing open complex formation. Phosphorylated NTRC binds to two sites located greater than 100 nucleotides upstream of the -24, -12 region; it also induces hyper-methylation of a G residue at -23. Enhanced methylation at -23 is not co-operative with the binding of activator to the upstream sites and may account for the ability of NTRC, when present at high concentration, to activate transcription in the absence of the upstream binding sites. The insertion of spacer mutations at -86 indicates that transcriptional activation of the nifLA promoter at low NTRC concentrations is face-of-the-helix dependent, both in vivo and in vitro. We propose that correct positioning of activator molecules at the upstream binding sites stabilizes the interaction of sigma 54-RNA polymerase with the downstream region via the formation of a DNA loop. Images PMID:2684643

  8. Eukaryotic TLS polymerases.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Przemysław; Synowiec, Ewelina; Wysokiński, Daniel; Woźniak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    TLS polymerases are able to replicate damaged DNA (called translesion DNA synthesis, TLS). Their presence prevents cell death as a result of violating the integrity of the genome. In vitro, they are mutator, but in vivo are recruited by specific types of DNA damage and usually replicate them in a correct manner. The best-known TLS polymerases belong to the Y family, such as Rev1, κ, η, ι, and polymerase ζ from the B family. There are two mechanisms of TLS polymerases action: polymerase-switching model and the gap-filling model. Selection of the mechanism primarily depends on the phase of the cell cycle. The regulation of these polymerases may take place at the transcriptional level and at level of recruitment to the sites of DNA damage. In the latter case post-translational modification of proteins - ubiquitination and sumoylation, and protein-protein interactions are crucial. PMID:27333922

  9. Optimization of Potent and Selective Quinazolinediones: Inhibitors of Respiratory Syncytial Virus That Block RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerase Complex Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A quinazolinedione-derived screening hit 2 was discovered with cellular antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (CPE EC50 = 2.1 μM), moderate efficacy in reducing viral progeny (4.2 log at 10 μM), and marginal cytotoxic liability (selectivity index, SI ∼ 24). Scaffold optimization delivered analogs with improved potency and selectivity profiles. Most notable were compounds 15 and 19 (EC50 = 300–500 nM, CC50 > 50 μM, SI > 100), which significantly reduced viral titer (>400,000-fold), and several analogs were shown to block the activity of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase complex of RSV. PMID:25399509

  10. Acidic microenvironments induce lymphangiogenesis and IL-8 production via TRPV1 activation in human lymphatic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masako; Morita, Yoshihiro; Hata, Kenji; Muragaki, Yasuteru

    2016-07-15

    Local acidosis is one of the characteristic features of the cancer microenvironment. Many reports indicate that acidosis accelerates the proliferation and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, whether acidic conditions affect lymphatic metastasis is currently unknown. In the present study, we focused on the effects of acidosis on lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) to assess the relationship between acidic microenvironments and lymph node metastasis. We demonstrated that normal human LECs express various acid receptors by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Acidic stimulation with low pH medium induced morphological changes in LECs to a spindle shape, and significantly promoted cellular growth and tube formation. Moreover, real-time PCR revealed that acidic conditions increased the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-8. Acidic stimulation increased IL-8 production in LECs, whereas a selective transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin, decreased IL-8 production. IL-8 accelerated the proliferation of LECs, and inhibition of IL-8 diminished tube formation and cell migration. In addition, phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was induced by acidic conditions, and inhibition of NF-κB activation reduced acid-induced IL-8 expression. These results suggest that acidic microenvironments in tumors induce lymphangiogenesis via TRPV1 activation in LECs, which in turn may promote lymphatic metastasis. PMID:27312995

  11. UBF complexes with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in nucleolar organizer regions regardless of ongoing RNA polymerase I activity

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Margarita; Yildirim, Sukriye; Philimonenko, Vlada V; Marášek, Pavel; Castaño, Enrique; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    To maintain growth and division, cells require a large-scale production of rRNAs which occurs in the nucleolus. Recently, we have shown the interaction of nucleolar phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) with proteins involved in rRNA transcription and processing, namely RNA polymerase I (Pol I), UBF, and fibrillarin. Here we extend the study by investigating transcription-related localization of PIP2 in regards to transcription and processing complexes of Pol I. To achieve this, we used either physiological inhibition of transcription during mitosis or inhibition by treatment the cells with actinomycin D (AMD) or 5,6-dichloro-1β-d-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB). We show that PIP2 is associated with Pol I subunits and UBF in a transcription-independent manner. On the other hand, PIP2/fibrillarin colocalization is dependent on the production of rRNA. These results indicate that PIP2 is required not only during rRNA production and biogenesis, as we have shown before, but also plays a structural role as an anchor for the Pol I pre-initiation complex during the cell cycle. We suggest that throughout mitosis, PIP2 together with UBF is involved in forming and maintaining the core platform of the rDNA helix structure. Thus we introduce PIP2 as a novel component of the NOR complex, which is further engaged in the renewed rRNA synthesis upon exit from mitosis. PMID:24513678

  12. Physiological activities of hydroxyl fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the search of value-added products from surplus soybean oil, we produced many new hydroxy fatty acids through microbial bioconversion. Hydroxy fatty acids are used in a wide range of industrial products, such as resins, waxes, nylons plastics, lubricants, cosmetics, and additives in coatings and...

  13. Croconaine rotaxane for acid activated photothermal heating and ratiometric photoacoustic imaging of acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Guha, Samit; Shaw, Gillian Karen; Mitcham, Trevor M; Bouchard, Richard R; Smith, Bradley D

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of 808 nm laser light by liposomes containing a pH sensitive, near-infrared croconaine rotaxane dye increases dramatically in weak acid. A stealth liposome composition permits acid activated, photothermal heating and also acts as an effective nanoparticle probe for ratiometric photoacoustic imaging of acidic pH in deep sample locations, including a living mouse. PMID:26502996

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate inhibits activation of caspases that cleave poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and lamins during Fas- and ceramide-mediated apoptosis in Jurkat T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, O; Rosenthal, D S; Smulson, M E; Spiegel, S

    1998-01-30

    Ceramide, a sphingolipid generated by the hydrolysis of membrane-associated sphingomyelin, appears to play a role as a gauge of apoptosis. A further metabolite of ceramide, sphingosine 1-phosphate (SPP), prevents ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and it has been suggested that the balance between intracellular ceramide and SPP levels may determine the cell fate (Cuvillier, O., Pirianov, G, Kleuser, B., Vanek, P. G., Coso, O. A., Gutkind, J. S., and Spiegel, S. (1996) Nature 381, 800-803). Here, we investigated the role of SPP and the protein kinase C activator, phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), in the caspase cascade leading to the proteolysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and lamins. In Jurkat T cells, Fas ligation or addition of exogenous C2-ceramide induced activations of caspase-3/CPP32 and caspase-7/Mch3 followed by PARP cleavage, effects that can be blocked either by SPP or TPA. Furthermore, both SPP and TPA inhibit the activation of caspase-6/Mch2 and subsequent lamin B cleavage. Ceramide, in contrast to Fas ligation, did not induce activation of caspase-8/FLICE and neither SPP nor TPA were able to prevent this activation. Thus, SPP, likely generated via protein kinase C-mediated activation of sphingosine kinase, suppresses the apoptotic pathway downstream of FLICE but upstream of the executioner caspases, caspase-3, -6, and -7. PMID:9446602

  15. Structure of transcribing mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Bernecky, Carrie; Herzog, Franz; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-01-28

    RNA polymerase (Pol) II produces messenger RNA during transcription of protein-coding genes in all eukaryotic cells. The Pol II structure is known at high resolution from X-ray crystallography for two yeast species. Structural studies of mammalian Pol II, however, remain limited to low-resolution electron microscopy analysis of human Pol II and its complexes with various proteins. Here we report the 3.4 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of mammalian Pol II in the form of a transcribing complex comprising DNA template and RNA transcript. We use bovine Pol II, which is identical to the human enzyme except for seven amino-acid residues. The obtained atomic model closely resembles its yeast counterpart, but also reveals unknown features. Binding of nucleic acids to the polymerase involves 'induced fit' of the mobile Pol II clamp and active centre region. DNA downstream of the transcription bubble contacts a conserved 'TPSA motif' in the jaw domain of the Pol II subunit RPB5, an interaction that is apparently already established during transcription initiation. Upstream DNA emanates from the active centre cleft at an angle of approximately 105° with respect to downstream DNA. This position of upstream DNA allows for binding of the general transcription elongation factor DSIF (SPT4-SPT5) that we localize over the active centre cleft in a conserved position on the clamp domain of Pol II. Our results define the structure of mammalian Pol II in its functional state, indicate that previous crystallographic analysis of yeast Pol II is relevant for understanding gene transcription in all eukaryotes, and provide a starting point for a mechanistic analysis of human transcription. PMID:26789250

  16. Functional Genomics Reveals Linkers Critical for Influenza Virus Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lulan; Wu, Aiping; Wang, Yao E.; Quanquin, Natalie; Li, Chunfeng; Wang, Jingfeng; Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Liu, Suyang; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus mRNA synthesis by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase involves binding and cleavage of capped cellular mRNA by the PB2 and PA subunits, respectively, and extension of viral mRNA by PB1. However, the mechanism for such a dynamic process is unclear. Using high-throughput mutagenesis and sequencing analysis, we have not only generated a comprehensive functional map for the microdomains of individual subunits but also have revealed the PA linker to be critical for polymerase activity. This PA linker binds to PB1 and also forms ionic interactions with the PA C-terminal channel. Nearly all mutants with five-amino-acid insertions in the linker were nonviable. Our model further suggests that the PA linker plays an important role in the conformational changes that occur between stages that favor capped mRNA binding and cleavage and those associated with viral mRNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus consists of the PB1, PB2, and PA subunits. By combining genome-wide mutagenesis analysis with the recently discovered crystal structure of the influenza polymerase heterotrimer, we generated a comprehensive functional map of the entire influenza polymerase complex. We identified the microdomains of individual subunits, including the catalytic domains, the interaction interfaces between subunits, and nine linkers interconnecting different domains. Interestingly, we found that mutants with five-amino-acid insertions in individual linkers were nonviable, suggesting the critical roles these linkers play in coordinating spatial relationships between the subunits. We further identified an extended PA linker that binds to PB1 and also forms ionic interactions with the PA C-terminal channel. PMID:26719244

  17. Mapping the domain structure of the influenza A virus polymerase acidic protein (PA) and its interaction with the basic protein 1 (PB1) subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Guu, Tom S.Y.; Dong Liping; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Tao, Yizhi J.

    2008-09-15

    The influenza A virus polymerase consists of three subunits (PA, PB1, and PB2) necessary for viral RNA synthesis. The heterotrimeric polymerase complex forms through PA interacting with PB1 and PB1 interacting with PB2. PA has been shown to play critical roles in the assembly, catalysis, and nuclear localization of the polymerase. To probe the structure of PA, we isolated recombinant PA from insect cells. Limited proteolysis revealed that PA contained two domains connected by a 20-residue linker (residues 257-276). Far-UV circular dichroism established that the two domains folded into a mixed {alpha}/{beta} structure when separately expressed. In vitro pull-down assays showed that neither individually nor cooperatively expressed PA domains, without the linker, could assure PA-PB1 interaction. Protease treatment of PA-PB1 complex indicated that its PA subunit was significantly more stable than free PA, suggesting that the linker is protected and it constitutes an essential component of the PA-PB1 interface.

  18. Isolation of a soluble and template-dependent poliovirus RNA polymerase that copies virion RNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Flanegan, J B; Van Dyke, T A

    1979-01-01

    A soluble RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was isolated from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells and was shown to copy poliovirus RNA in vitro. The enzyme was purified from a 200,000-X-g supernatant of a cytoplasmic extract of infected cells. The activity of the enzyme was measured throughout the purification by using a polyadenylic acid template and oligouridylic acid primer. The enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, glycerol gradient centrifugation, and phosphocellulose chromatography. The polymerase precipitated in a 35% saturated solution of ammonium sulfate, sedimented at about 7S on a glycerol gradient, and eluted from phosphocellulose with 0.15 M KC1. The polymerase was purified about 40-fold and was shown to be totally dependent on exogenous RNA for activity and relatively free of contaminating nuclease. The partially purified polymerase was able to use purified polio virion RNA as well as a template. Under the reaction conditions used, the polymerase required an oligouridylic acid primer and all four ribonucleside triphosphates for activity. The optimum ratio of oligouridylic acid molecules to poliovirus RNA molecules for priming activity was about 16:1. A nearest-neighbor analysis of the in vitro RNA product shows it to be heteropolymeric. Annealing the in vitro product with poliovirus RNA product shows it to be heteropolymeric. Annealing the in vitro product with poliovirus RNA rendered it resistant to RNase digestion, thus suggesting that the product RNA was complementary to the virion RNA template. PMID:232168

  19. Synthesis of potent and broad genotypically active NS5B HCV non-nucleoside inhibitors binding to the thumb domain allosteric site 2 of the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Pierra Rouvière, Claire; Amador, Agnès; Badaroux, Eric; Convard, Thierry; Da Costa, Daniel; Dukhan, David; Griffe, Ludovic; Griffon, Jean-François; LaColla, Massimiliano; Leroy, Frédéric; Liuzzi, Michel; Loi, Anna Giulia; McCarville, Joe; Mascia, Valeria; Milhau, Julien; Onidi, Loredana; Paparin, Jean-Laurent; Rahali, Rachid; Sais, Efisio; Seifer, Maria; Surleraux, Dominique; Standring, David; Dousson, Cyril

    2016-09-15

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) plays a central role in virus replication. NS5B has no functional equivalent in mammalian cells and, as a consequence, is an attractive target for selective inhibition. This Letter describes the discovery of a new family of HCV NS5B non-nucleoside inhibitors, based on the bioisosterism between amide and phosphonamidate functions. As part of this program, SAR in this new series led to the identification of IDX17119, a potent non-nucleoside inhibitor, active on the genotypes 1b, 2a, 3a and 4a. The structure and binding domain of IDX17119 were confirmed by X-ray co-crystallization study. PMID:27520942

  20. Natural cinnamic acids, synthetic derivatives and hybrids with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan David

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships. PMID:25429559

  1. Differential regulation of activator protein-1 and heat shock factor-1 in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury: role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Zingarelli, Basilia; Hake, Paul W; O'Connor, Michael; Denenberg, Alvin; Wong, Hector R; Kong, Sue; Aronow, Bruce J

    2004-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme activated in response to DNA strand breaks, has been implicated in cell dysfunction in myocardial reperfusion injury. PARP-1 has also been shown to participate in transcription and regulation of gene expression. In this study, we investigated the role of PARP-1 on the signal transduction pathway of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) in myocardial reperfusion injury. Mice genetically deficient of PARP-1 (PARP-1(-/-) mice) exhibited a significant reduction of myocardial damage after occlusion and reperfusion of the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery compared with their wild-type littermates. This cardioprotection was associated with a reduction of the phosphorylative activity of JNK and, subsequently, reduction of the DNA binding of the signal transduction factor AP-1. On the contrary, in PARP-1(-/-) mice, DNA binding of HSF-1 was enhanced and was associated with a significant increase of the cardioprotective heat shock protein (HSP)70 compared with wild-type mice. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of several AP-1-dependent genes of proinflammatory mediators and HSPs was altered in PARP-1(-/-) mice. The data indicate that PARP-1 may exert a pathological role in reperfusion injury by functioning as an enhancing factor of AP-1 activation and as a repressing factor of HSF-1 activation and HSP70 expression. PMID:14670820

  2. AT7519, A novel small molecule multi-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma via GSK-3beta activation and RNA polymerase II inhibition.

    PubMed

    Santo, L; Vallet, S; Hideshima, T; Cirstea, D; Ikeda, H; Pozzi, S; Patel, K; Okawa, Y; Gorgun, G; Perrone, G; Calabrese, E; Yule, M; Squires, M; Ladetto, M; Boccadoro, M; Richardson, P G; Munshi, N C; Anderson, K C; Raje, N

    2010-04-22

    Dysregulated cell cycling is a universal hallmark of cancer and is often mediated by abnormal activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their cyclin partners. Overexpression of individual complexes are reported in multiple myeloma (MM), making them attractive therapeutic targets. In this study, we investigate the preclinical activity of a novel small-molecule multi-CDK inhibitor, AT7519, in MM. We show the anti-MM activity of AT7519 displaying potent cytotoxicity and apoptosis; associated with in vivo tumor growth inhibition and prolonged survival. At the molecular level, AT7519 inhibited RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) phosphorylation, a CDK9, 7 substrate, associated with decreased RNA synthesis confirmed by [(3)H] Uridine incorporation. In addition, AT7519 inhibited glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) phosphorylation; conversely pretreatment with a selective GSK-3 inhibitor and shRNA GSK-3beta knockdown restored MM survival, suggesting the involvement of GSK-3beta in AT7519-induced apoptosis. GSK-3beta activation was independent of RNA pol II dephosphorylation confirmed by alpha-amanitin, a specific RNA pol II inihibitor, showing potent inhibition of RNA pol II phosphorylation without corresponding effects on GSK-3beta phosphorylation. These results offer new insights into the crucial, yet controversial role of GSK-3beta in MM and show significant anti-MM activity of AT7519, providing the rationale for its clinical evaluation in MM. PMID:20101221

  3. EBV DNA polymerase inhibition of tannins from Eugenia uniflora.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Chiou, J F; Yen, K Y; Yang, L L

    2000-06-30

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the high population malignant tumors among Chinese in southern China and southeast Asia. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human B lymphotropic herpes virus which is known to be closely associated with NPC. EBV DNA polymerase is a key enzyme during EBV replication and is measured by its radioactivity. The addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to Raji cell cultures led to a large increase in EBV DNA polymerase, which was purified by sequential DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose and DNA-cellulose column chromatography. Four tannins were isolated from the active fractions of Eugenia uniflora L., which were tested for the inhibition of EBV DNA polymerase. The results showed the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of gallocatechin, oenothein B, eugeniflorins D(1) and D(2) were 26.5 62.3, 3.0 and 3.5 microM, respectively. Furthermore, when compared with the positive control (phosphonoacetic acid), an inhibitor of EBV replication, the IC(50) value was 16.4 microM. In view of the results, eugeniflorins D(1) and D(2) are the potency principles in the inhibition of EBV DNA polymerase from E. uniflora. PMID:10806300

  4. Active site fingerprinting and pharmacophore screening strategies for the identification of dual inhibitors of protein kinase C [Formula: see text] and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1).

    PubMed

    Chadha, Navriti; Silakari, Om

    2016-08-01

    Current clinical studies have revealed that diabetic complications are multifactorial disorders that target two or more pathways. The majority of drugs in clinical trial target aldose reductase and protein kinase C ([Formula: see text]), while recent studies disclosed a significant role played by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). In light of this, the current study was aimed to identify novel dual inhibitors of [Formula: see text] and PARP-1 using a pharmaco-informatics methodology. Pharmacophore-based 3D QSAR models for these two targets were generated using HypoGen and used to screen three commercially available chemical databases to identify dual inhibitors of [Formula: see text] and PARP-1. Overall, 18 hits were obtained from the screening process; the hits were filtered based on their drug-like properties and predicted binding affinities (docking analysis). Important amino acid residues were predicted by developing a fingerprint of the active site using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. The stability of the complexes (18 hits with both proteins) and their final binding orientations were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, novel hits have been predicted to have good binding affinities for [Formula: see text] and PARP-1 proteins, which could be further investigated for in vitro/in vivo activity. PMID:27216445

  5. Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-based inhibitors of HCV polymerase.

    PubMed

    Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Shipps, Gerald W; Rosner, Kristin E; Deng, Yongqi; Wang, Tong; Curran, Patrick J; Brown, Meredith A; Siddiqui, M Arshad; Cooper, Alan B; Duca, José; Cable, Michael; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2009-11-15

    The present paper describes a novel series of HCV RNA polymerase inhibitors based on a pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine scaffold bearing hydrophobic groups and an acidic functionality. Several compounds were optimized to low nanomolar potencies in a biochemical RdRp assay. SAR trends clearly reveal a stringent preference for a cyclohexyl group as one of the hydrophobes, and improved activities for carboxylic acid derivatives. PMID:19819138

  6. Wnt/Wingless Pathway Activation Is Promoted by a Critical Threshold of Axin Maintained by the Tumor Suppressor APC and the ADP-Ribose Polymerase Tankyrase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenghan; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Yang, Eungi; Thorne, Curtis A; Nojima, Hisashi; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-05-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction directs metazoan development and is deregulated in numerous human congenital disorders and cancers. In the absence of Wnt stimulation, a multiprotein "destruction complex," assembled by the scaffold protein Axin, targets the key transcriptional activator β-catenin for proteolysis. Axin is maintained at very low levels that limit destruction complex activity, a property that is currently being exploited in the development of novel therapeutics for Wnt-driven cancers. Here, we use an in vivo approach in Drosophila to determine how tightly basal Axin levels must be controlled for Wnt/Wingless pathway activation, and how Axin stability is regulated. We find that for nearly all Wingless-driven developmental processes, a three- to fourfold increase in Axin is insufficient to inhibit signaling, setting a lower-limit for the threshold level of Axin in the majority of in vivo contexts. Further, we find that both the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks) have evolutionarily conserved roles in maintaining basal Axin levels below this in vivo threshold, and we define separable domains in Axin that are important for APC- or Tnks-dependent destabilization. Together, these findings reveal that both APC and Tnks maintain basal Axin levels below a critical in vivo threshold to promote robust pathway activation following Wnt stimulation. PMID:26975665

  7. Conformational Activation of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 upon DNA Binding Revealed by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a nuclear protein that plays key roles in several fundamental cellular processes. PARP-1 catalyzes the polymerization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide on itself and other acceptor proteins, forming long branched poly(ADP-ribose) polymers. The catalytic activity of PARP-1 is stimulated upon binding to damaged DNA, but how this signal is transmitted from the N-terminal DNA binding domain to the C-terminal catalytic domain in the context of the full-length enzyme is unknown. In this paper, small-angle X-ray scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were used to gain insight into the conformational changes that occur during the catalytic activation of PARP-1 by an 8-mer DNA ligand. The data are consistent with a model in which binding of the DNA ligand establishes interdomain interactions between the DNA binding and catalytic domains, which induces an allosteric change in the active site that promotes catalysis. Moreover, the PARP-1–8-mer complex is seen to adopt a conformation that is poised to recruit DNA repair factors to the site of DNA damage. This study provides the first structural information about the DNA-induced conformational activation of full-length PARP-1. PMID:24588584

  8. An RNA polymerase II transcription factor has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1989-01-01

    A transcription factor required for synthesis of accurately initiated run-off transcripts by RNA polymerase II has been purified and shown to have an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity that is strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters. This transcription factor, designated delta, was purified more than 3000-fold from extracts of crude rat liver nuclei and has a native molecular mass of approximately 230 kDa. DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) and transcription activities copurify when delta is analyzed by hydrophobic interaction and ion-exchange HPLC, arguing that transcription factor delta possesses an ATPase (dATPase) activity. ATPase (dATPase) is specific for adenine nucleotides; ATP and dATP, but not CTP, UTP, or GTP, are hydrolyzed. ATPase (dATPase) is stimulated by both double-stranded and single-stranded DNAs, including pUC18, ssM13, and poly(dT); however, DNA fragments containing the TATA region of either the adenovirus 2 major late or mouse interleukin 3 promoters stimulate ATPase as much as 10-fold more effectively than DNA fragments containing nonpromoter sequences. These data suggest the intriguing possibility that delta plays a critical role in the ATP (dATP)-dependent activation of run-off transcription through a direct interaction with the TATA region of promoters. Images PMID:2552440

  9. Design, Synthesis, and Antimycobacterial Activity of Novel Theophylline-7-Acetic Acid Derivatives With Amino Acid Moieties.

    PubMed

    Stavrakov, Georgi; Valcheva, Violeta; Voynikov, Yulian; Philipova, Irena; Atanasova, Mariyana; Konstantinov, Spiro; Peikov, Plamen; Doytchinova, Irini

    2016-03-01

    The theophylline-7-acetic acid (7-TAA) scaffold is a promising novel lead compound for antimycobacterial activity. Here, we derive a model for antitubercular activity prediction based on 14 7-TAA derivatives with amino acid moieties and their methyl esters. The model is applied to a combinatorial library, consisting of 40 amino acid and methyl ester derivatives of 7-TAA. The best three predicted compounds are synthesized and tested against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. All of them are stable, non-toxic against human cells and show antimycobacterial activity in the nanomolar range being 60 times more active than ethambutol. PMID:26502828

  10. Lipoic acid - biological activity and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Gorąca, Anna; Huk-Kolega, Halina; Piechota, Aleksandra; Kleniewska, Paulina; Ciejka, Elżbieta; Skibska, Beata

    2011-01-01

    α-Lipoic acid (LA; 5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)pentanoic acid) was originally isolated from bovine liver by Reed et al. in 1951. LA was once considered a vitamin. Subsequently, it was found that LA is not a vitamin and is synthesized by plants and animals. LA is covalently bound to the ε-amino group of lysine residues and functions as a cofactor for mitochondrial enzymes by catalyzing the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate and branched-chain α-keto acids. LA and its reduced form - dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), meet all the criteria for an ideal antioxidant because they can easily quench radicals, can chelate metals, have an amphiphlic character and they do not exhibit any serious side effects. They interact with other antioxidants and can regenerate them. For this reason, LA is called an antioxidant of antioxidants. LA has an influence on the second messenger nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and attenuates the release of free radicals and cytotoxic cytokines. The therapeutic action of LA is based on its antioxidant properties. Current studies support its use in the ancillary treatment of many diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, autoimmune diseases, cancer and AIDS. This review was undertaken to gather the most recent information regarding the therapeutic properties of LA and its possible utility in disease treatment. PMID:22001972

  11. Perfluoroalkyl acids : Recent activities and research progress

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of man-made fluorinated organic chemicals consisting of a carbon backbone typically of four to fourteen in length and a charged functional moiety (primarily carboxylate, sulfonate or phosphonate). The two most widely known PFAAs are ...

  12. Identification and Antimicrobial Activity Detection of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Corn Stover Silage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxia; Ni, Kuikui; Pang, Huili; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin; Jin, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    A total of 59 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated from corn stover silage. According to phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and recA gene polymerase chain reaction amplification, these LAB isolates were identified as five species: Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum subsp. plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Enterococcus mundtii, Weissella cibaria and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, respectively. Those strains were also screened for antimicrobial activity using a dual-culture agar plate assay. Based on excluding the effects of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide, two L. plantarum subsp. plantarum strains ZZU 203 and 204, which strongly inhibited Salmonella enterica ATCC 43971T, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698T and Escherichia coli ATCC 11775T were selected for further research on sensitivity of the antimicrobial substance to heat, pH and protease. Cell-free culture supernatants of the two strains exhibited strong heat stability (60 min at 100°C), but the antimicrobial activity was eliminated after treatment at 121°C for 15 min. The antimicrobial substance remained active under acidic condition (pH 2.0 to 6.0), but became inactive under neutral and alkaline condition (pH 7.0 to 9.0). In addition, the antimicrobial activities of these two strains decreased remarkably after digestion by protease K. These results preliminarily suggest that the desirable antimicrobial activity of strains ZZU 203 and 204 is the result of the production of a bacteriocin-like substance, and these two strains with antimicrobial activity could be used as silage additives to inhibit proliferation of unwanted microorganism during ensiling and preserve nutrients of silage. The nature of the antimicrobial substances is being investigated in our laboratory. PMID:25924957

  13. Transcription activation at Escherichia coli promoters dependent on the cyclic AMP receptor protein: effects of binding sequences for the RNA polymerase alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Savery, N J; Rhodius, V A; Wing, H J; Busby, S J

    1995-01-01

    Transcription activation at two semi-synthetic Escherichia coli promoters, CC(-41.5) and CC(-72.5), is dependent on the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) that binds to sites centred 41.5 and 72.5 bp upstream from the respective transcription startpoints. An UP-element that can bind the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha-subunit was cloned upstream of the DNA site for CRP at CC(-41.5) and downstream of the DNA site for CRP at CC(-72.5). In both cases CRP-dependent promoter activity was increased by the UP-element, but CRP-independent activity was not increased. DNase I footprinting was exploited to investigate the juxtaposition of bound CRP and RNAP alpha-subunits. In both cases, CRP and RNAP alpha-subunits occupy their cognate binding sites in ternary CRP-RNAP promoter complexes. RNAP alpha-subunits can occupy the UP-element in the absence of CRP, but this is not sufficient for open complex formation. The positive effects of binding RNAP alpha-subunits upstream of the DNA site for CRP at -41.5 are suppressed if the UP-element is incorrectly positioned. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7619086

  14. Regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 activity by the phosphorylation state of the nuclear NAD biosynthetic enzyme NMN adenylyl transferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Felicitas; Lau, Corinna; Ziegler, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear NAD+ metabolism constitutes a major component of signaling pathways. It includes NAD+-dependent protein deacetylation by members of the Sir2 family and protein modification by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 has emerged as an important mediator of processes involving DNA rearrangements. High-affinity binding to breaks in DNA activates PARP-1, which attaches poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to target proteins. NMN adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) catalyze the final step of NAD+ biosynthesis. We report here that the nuclear isoform NMNAT-1 stimulates PARP-1 activity and binds to PAR. Its overexpression in HeLa cells promotes the relocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria to the nucleus, a process known to depend on poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Moreover, NMNAT-1 is subject to phosphorylation by protein kinase C, resulting in reduced binding to PAR. Mimicking phosphorylation, substitution of the target serine residue by aspartate precludes PAR binding and stimulation of PARP-1. We conclude that, depending on its state of phosphorylation, NMNAT-1 binds to activated, automodifying PARP-1 and thereby amplifies poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. PMID:17360427

  15. Acute effect of ascorbic acid on fibrinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Bordia, A; Paliwal, D K; Jain, K; Kothari, L K

    1978-08-01

    The acute effect of 1 g oral ascorbic acid on serum fibrinolytic activity was studied in 40 adult males. In Group I (healthy adults) administration of ascorbic acid raised the serum level by about 71%, while the fibrinolytic activity increased to a peak of 137% at 6 h. In patients with CAD (Group II) an essentially similar increase in FA was observed. In Group III, simultaneous administration of ascorbic acid with 100 g fat effectively prevented a fall in fibrinolytic activity and actually raised it by 64% above the fasting level. PMID:568476

  16. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  17. Regulation of RNA Polymerase I-Dependent Promoters by the Hepatitis B Virus X Protein via Activated Ras and TATA-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Horng-Dar; Trivedi, Alpa; Johnson, Deborah L.

    1998-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein is essential for viral infectivity, and evidence indicates that it is a strong contributor to HBV-mediated oncogenesis. X has been shown to transactivate a wide variety of RNA polymerase (Pol) II-dependent, as well as RNA Pol III-dependent, promoters. In this study, we have investigated the possibility that X modulates RNA Pol I-dependent rRNA transcription. In both human hepatoma Huh7 and Drosophila Schneider S2 cell lines, X expression stimulated rRNA promoter activity. Extracts prepared from X-expressing cells stably transfected with an X gene also exhibited an increased ability to transcribe the rRNA promoter. The mechanism for X transactivation was examined by determining whether this regulatory event was dependent on Ras activation and increased TATA-binding protein (TBP) levels. Our previous studies have demonstrated that X, and the activation of Ras, produces an increase in the cellular levels of TBP (H.-D. Wang, A. Trivedi, and D. L. Johnson, Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:6838–6846, 1997). Expression of a dominant negative form of Ras blocked the X-mediated induction of the rRNA promoters, whereas expression of a constitutively activated form of Ras mimicked the enhancing effect of X on rRNA promoter activity. When TBP was overexpressed in either Huh7 or S2 cells, a dose-dependent increase in rRNA promoter activity was observed. To analyze whether the increase in TBP was modulating rRNA promoter activity indirectly, by increasing activity of RNA Pol II-dependent promoters, a Drosophila TBP cDNA was constructed with a mutation that eliminated its ability to stimulate RNA Pol II-dependent promoters. Transient expression of wild-type TBP in S2 cells increased the activities of specific RNA Pol I- and Pol II-dependent promoters. Expression of the mutant TBP protein failed to enhance the activity of the RNA Pol II-dependent promoters, yet the protein completely retained its ability to stimulate the rRNA promoter. Furthermore, the

  18. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Dykstra, Holly; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms comprising countless cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators regulate the transcription of HIV-1 (HIV). Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates numerous genes through its interaction with various transcription factors, inhibition of PARP-1 has surfaced recently as a powerful anti-inflammatory tool. We suggest a novel tactic to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition in an in vitro model system, exploiting human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PARP-1 inhibition was capable to lessen HIV replication in MDM by 60–80% after 7 days infection. Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are known triggers of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR), which can switch virus replication. Tat overexpression in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid resulted in a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition caused 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85–95%). PARP inhibition in MDM exhibited 90% diminution in NFκB activity (known to mediate TNFα- and PMA-induced HIV LTR activation). Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These discoveries suggest that inactivation of PARP suppresses HIV replication in MDM by via attenuation of LTR activation, NFκB suppression and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide an effective approach to management of HIV infection. PMID:26379653

  19. Radical scavenging activity and cytotoxicity of ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Takako; Satoh, Kazue; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Murakami, Yukio; Unten, Senwa; Atsumi, Toshiko; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2002-01-01

    Ferulic acid and eugenol were examined for their superoxide (O2-), hydroxyl radical (.OH) and nitric oxide (NO)-scavenging ability, using ESR spectroscopy with spin trap agents DMPO and carboxy-PTIO/NOC-7. Ferulic acid more efficiently scavenged .OH and NO than eugenol. The O2- scavenging activity of ferulic acid was comparable with that of eugenol. Ferulic acid significantly reduced the NO production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophage-like cells (Raw 264.7 cells) compared to eugenol. The cytotoxic activity of ferulic acid against Raw 264.7 cells was comparable with that against human submandibular gland carcinoma (HSG) cells and the cytotoxicity of ferulic acid was about 10-fold smaller than that of eugenol. The stoichiometric factor (n) (number of moles of peroxy radical trapped by moles of the relevant phenol) of ferulic acid and eugenol was investigated, using the induction period methods of the methyl methacrylate polymerization system. The n-value of ferulic acid (1.5) was higher than that of eugenol (1.0) and was similar to that of 2, 6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). Ferulic acid as well as eugenol may produce a dimer during the induction period due to an n-value less than 2. These results suggested that ferulic acid may be useful for preventing cell damage perhaps caused by O2-, and in particular by .OH and NO, in living systems. PMID:12529986

  20. The Bile Acid Chenodeoxycholic Acid Increases Human Brown Adipose Tissue Activity.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Evie P M; Nascimento, Emmani B M; Havekes, Bas; Brans, Boudewijn; Roumans, Kay H M; Tailleux, Anne; Schaart, Gert; Kouach, Mostafa; Charton, Julie; Deprez, Benoit; Bouvy, Nicole D; Mottaghy, Felix; Staels, Bart; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    The interest in brown adipose tissue (BAT) as a target to combat metabolic disease has recently been renewed with the discovery of functional BAT in humans. In rodents, BAT can be activated by bile acids, which activate type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) in BAT via the G-coupled protein receptor TGR5, resulting in increased oxygen consumption and energy expenditure. Here we examined the effects of oral supplementation of the bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) on human BAT activity. Treatment of 12 healthy female subjects with CDCA for 2 days resulted in increased BAT activity. Whole-body energy expenditure was also increased upon CDCA treatment. In vitro treatment of primary human brown adipocytes derived with CDCA or specific TGR5 agonists increased mitochondrial uncoupling and D2 expression, an effect that was absent in human primary white adipocytes. These findings identify bile acids as a target to activate BAT in humans. PMID:26235421

  1. Sensitivity of human cells expressing low-fidelity or weak-catalytic-activity variants of DNA polymerase ζ to genotoxic stresses.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Grúz, Petr; Honma, Masamitsu; Adachi, Noritaka; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2016-09-01

    Translesion DNA polymerases (TLS pols) play critical roles in defense mechanisms against genotoxic agents. The defects or mutations of TLS pols are predicted to result in hypersensitivity of cells to environmental mutagens. In this study, human cells expressing DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) variants with low fidelity or weak catalytic activity have been established with Nalm-6-MSH+ cells and their sensitivity to mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) and ultraviolet-C light (UV-C) was examined. The low-fidelity mutants were engineered by knocking-in DNA sequences that direct changes of leucine 2618 to either phenylalanine (L2618F) or methionine (L2618M) of Pol ζ. The weak-catalytic-activity mutants were generated by knocking-in DNA sequences that direct changes of either tyrosine 2779 to phenylalanine (Y2779F) or aspartate 2781 to asparagine (D2781N). In addition, a +1 frameshift mutation, i.e., CCC to CCCC, was introduced in the coding region of the TK1 gene to measure the mutant frequencies. Doubling time and spontaneous TK mutant frequencies of the established cell lines were similar to those of the wild-type cells. The low-fidelity mutants displayed, however, higher sensitivity to the mutagenicity of BPDE and UV-C than the wild-type cells although their cytotoxic sensitivity was not changed. In contrast, the weak-catalytic-activity mutants were more sensitive to the cytotoxicity of BPDE and UV-C than the wild-type cells, and displayed much higher sensitivity to the clastogenicity of BPDE than the wild-type cells in an in vitro micronucleus assay. These results indicate that human Pol ζ is involved in TLS across DNA lesions induced by BPDE and UV-C and also that the TLS plays important roles in induction of mutations, clastogenicity and in cellular survival of the damaged human cells. Similarities and differences in in vivo roles of yeast and human Pol ζ in genome integrity are discussed. PMID:27338670

  2. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  3. New nalidixic acid resistance mutations related to deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, J; Furutani, Y; Inoue, S; Ohue, T; Nakamura, S; Shimizu, M

    1981-01-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12 mutants which had a new nalidixic acid resistance mutation at about 82 min on the chromosome map, cell growth was resistant to or hypersusceptible to nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, piromidic acid, pipemidic acid, and novobiocin. Deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase activity as tested by supercoiling of lambda phage deoxyribonucleic acid inside the mutants was similarly resistant or hypersusceptible to the compounds. The drug concentrations required for gyrase inhibition were much higher than those for cell growth inhibition but similar to those for inhibition of lambda phage multiplication. Transduction analysis with lambda phages carrying the chromosomal fragment of the tnaA-gyrB region suggested that one of the mutations, nal-31, was located on the gyrB gene. PMID:6271730

  4. The TFIIF-like Rpc37/53 dimer lies at the center of a protein network to connect TFIIIC, Bdp1, and the RNA polymerase III active center.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Chien; Lin, Yu-Chun; Chen, Hung-Ta

    2011-07-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase III (Pol III) relies on a transcription factor TFIIF-like Rpc37/53 subcomplex for promoter opening, elongation, termination, and reinitiation. By incorporating the photoreactive amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (BPA) into Rpc37, Rpc53, and the Rpc2 subunit of Pol III, we mapped protein-protein interactions, revealing the position of Rpc37/53 within the Pol III preinitiation complex (PIC). BPA photo-cross-linking was combined with site-directed hydroxyl radical probing to localize the Rpc37/53 dimerization module on the lobe/external 2 domains of Rpc2, in similarity to the binding of TFIIF on Pol II. N terminal to the dimerization domain, Rpc53 binds the Pol III-specific subunits Rpc82 and Rpc34, the Pol III stalk, and the assembly factor TFIIIC, essential for PIC formation. The C-terminal domain of Rpc37 interacts extensively with Rpc2 and Rpc34 and contains binding sites for initiation factor Bdp1. We also located the C-terminal domain of Rpc37 within the Pol III active center in the ternary elongation complex, where it likely functions in accurate termination. Our work explains how the Rpc37/53 dimer is anchored on the Pol III core and acts as a hub to integrate a protein network for initiation and termination. PMID:21536656

  5. Conserved Features of the PB2 627 Domain Impact Influenza Virus Polymerase Function and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kirui, James; Bucci, Michael D.; Poole, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful replication of influenza virus requires the coordinated expression of viral genes and replication of the genome by the viral polymerase, composed of the subunits PA, PB1, and PB2. Polymerase activity is regulated by both viral and host factors, yet the mechanisms of regulation and how they contribute to viral pathogenicity and tropism are poorly understood. To characterize these processes, we created a series of mutants in the 627 domain of the PB2 subunit. This domain contains a conserved “P[F/P]AAAPP” sequence motif and the well-described amino acid 627, whose identity regulates host range. A lysine present at position 627 in most mammalian viral isolates creates a basic face on the domain surface and confers high-level activity in humans compared to the glutamic acid found at this position in avian isolates. Mutation of the basic face or the P[F/P]AAAPP motif impaired polymerase activity, assembly of replication complexes, and viral replication. Most of these residues are required for general polymerase activity, whereas PB2 K586 and R589 were preferentially required for function in human versus avian cells. Thus, these data identify residues in the 627 domain and other viral proteins that regulate polymerase activity, highlighting the importance of the surface charge and structure of this domain for virus replication and host adaptation. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus faces barriers to transmission across species as it emerges from its natural reservoir in birds to infect mammals. The viral polymerase is an important regulator of this process and undergoes discrete changes to adapt to replication in mammals. Many of these changes occur in the polymerase subunit PB2. Here we describe the systematic analysis of a key region in PB2 that controls species-specific polymerase activity. We report the importance of conserved residues that contribute to the overall charge of the protein as well as those that likely affect protein structure. These

  6. Activation of Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase by Cellular Heat Shock Protein 70 Is Enhanced by Phospholipids In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pogany, Judit

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, tombusviruses are replicated by the membrane-bound viral replicase complex (VRC). The VRC consists of the p92 virus-coded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), the viral p33 RNA chaperone, and several co-opted host proteins. In order to become a functional RdRp after its translation, the p92 replication protein should be incorporated into the VRC, followed by its activation. We have previously shown in a cell-free yeast extract-based assay that the activation of the Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) RdRp requires a soluble host factor(s). In this article, we identify the cellular heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) as the co-opted host factor required for the activation of an N-terminally truncated recombinant TBSV RdRp. In addition, small-molecule-based blocking of Hsp70 function inhibits RNA synthesis by the tombusvirus RdRp in vitro. Furthermore, we show that neutral phospholipids, namely, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC), enhance RdRp activation in vitro. In contrast, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) shows a strong and dominant inhibitory effect on in vitro RdRp activation. We also demonstrate that PE and PC stimulate RdRp-viral plus-strand RNA [(+)RNA] interaction, while PG inhibits the binding of the viral RNA to the RdRp. Based on the stimulatory versus inhibitory roles of various phospholipids in tombusvirus RdRp activation, we propose that the lipid composition of targeted subcellular membranes might be utilized by tombusviruses to regulate new VRC assembly during the course of infection. IMPORTANCE The virus-coded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is responsible for synthesizing the viral RNA progeny in infected cells of several positive-strand RNA viruses, is initially inactive. This strategy is likely to avoid viral RNA synthesis in the cytosol that would rapidly lead to induction of RNA-triggered cellular antiviral responses. During the assembly of the membrane-bound replicase

  7. Purification of a soluble template-dependent rhinovirus RNA polymerase and its dependence on a host cell protein for viral RNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, C D; Lubinski, J; Hocko, J; Gibbons, G F; Dasgupta, A

    1985-01-01

    The soluble phase of the cytoplasm of human rhinovirus type 2-infected cells contains an enzymatic activity able to copy rhinovirion RNA without an added primer. This RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (replicase) makes a specific copy of the added rhinovirion RNA, as shown by hybridization of the product to its template RNA but not to other RNAs. The same replicase preparation also contains a virus-specific polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] polymerase activity which is dependent on added polyadenylic acid-oligouridylic acid template-primer. Both activities purify together until a step at which poly(U) polymerase but no replicase activity is recovered. Addition of a purified HeLa cell protein (host factor) to this poly(U) polymerase completely reconstitutes rhinovirus replicase activity. Host factor activity can be supplied by adding oligouridylic acid, suggesting that the host cell protein acts at the initiation step of rhinovirus RNA replication. A virus-specific 64,000-dalton protein purifies with both poly(U) polymerase and replicase activities. Images PMID:2981346

  8. Label-free and sensitive fluorescence detection of nucleic acid, based on combination of a graphene oxid /SYBR green I dye platform and polymerase assisted signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao; Xing, Da

    2012-12-01

    A new label-free isothermal fluorescence amplification detection for nucleic acid has been developed. In this paper, we first developed a novel sensitive and specific detection platform with an unmodified hairpin probe (HP) combination of the graphene oxid (GO)/ SYBR green I dye (SG), which was relied on the selective principle of adsorption and the high quenching efficiency of GO. Then for the application of this new strategy, we used Mirco RNA-21 (Mir-21) as the target to evaluate this working principle of our design. When the target was hybridizing with the HP and inducing its conformation of change, an efficient isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction was activating to assist the first signal amplification. In this format, the formed complex conformation of DNA would interact with its high affinity dye, then detached from the surface of GO after incubating with the platform of GO/intercalating dye. This reaction would accompany with obvious fluorescence recovery, and accomplish farther signal enhancement by a mass of intercalating dye inserting into the minor groove of the long duplex replication product. By taking advantage of the multiple amplification of signal, this method exerted substantial enhancement in sensitivity and could be used for rapid and selective detection of Mir-21 with attomole range. It is expected that this cost-effective GO based sensor might hold considerable potential to apply in bioanalysis studies.

  9. ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLITE AND PLATELET ACTIVATING FACTOR PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites of arachidonic acid ("eicosanoids") and platelet activating factor are important bioactive lipids that may be involved in the pathobiological alterations in animals induced by pollutant exposure. nalysis of these substances in biological tissue and fluids is important...

  10. Effects of abamectin exposure on male fertility in rats: potential role of oxidative stress-mediated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation.

    PubMed

    Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Tasatargil, Arda; Tekcan, Merih; Sati, Leyla; Gungor, Ece; Isbir, Mehmet; Demir, Ramazan

    2011-12-01

    Despite the known adverse effects of abamectin pesticide, little is known about its action on male fertility. To explore the effects of exposure to abamectin on male fertility and its mechanism, low (1mg/kg/day) and high dose (4 mg/kg/day) abamectin were applied to male rats by oral gavage for 1week and for 6weeks. Weight of testes, serum reproductive hormone levels, sperm dynamics and histopathology of testes were used to evaluate the reproductive efficiency of abamectin-exposed rats. Abamectin level was determined at high concentrations in plasma and testicular tissues of male rats exposed to this pesticide. The testes weights of animals and serum testosterone concentrations did not show any significant changes after abamectin exposure. Abamectin administration was associated with decreased sperm count and motility and increased seminiferous tubule damage. In addition, significant elevations in the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE)-modified proteins and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) expression, as markers for oxidative stress and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation, were observed in testes of rats exposed to abamectin. These results showed that abamectin exposure induces testicular damage and affects sperm dynamics. Oxidative stress-mediated PARP activation might be one of the possible mechanism(s) underlying testicular damage induced by abamectin. PMID:21945325

  11. Activity of CEP-9722, a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in urothelial carcinoma correlates inversely with homologous recombination repair response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jian, Weiguo; Xu, Hua-Guo; Chen, Jianfeng; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Levitt, Jonathan M; Stanley, Jennifer A; Yang, Eddy S; Lerner, Seth P; Sonpavde, Guru

    2014-09-01

    As loss of DNA-repair proteins is common in urothelial carcinoma (UC), a rationale can be made to evaluate the activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors to exploit synthetic lethality. We aimed to preclinically evaluate a PARP inhibitor, CEP-9722, and its active metabolite, CEP-8983, in UC. The activity of CEP-8983 was evaluated using a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay against human UC cell lines. Flow cytometry, COMET assay, and western blot were performed to assess apoptosis, DNA damage, and DNA-repair proteins, respectively. RT4 xenografts received placebo or CEP-9722 (100 or 200 mg/kg/day) orally. Xenografts were subjected to immunohistochemistry for apoptosis [cleaved caspase (cc)-3] and angiogenesis (CD31). CEP-8983 (1 μmol/l) reduced the viability of RT4 and T24 cells by 20%, but did not reduce the viability of 5637 and TCC-SUP cells. Apoptosis and necrosis occurred in 9.7 and 9.1% of RT4 and 5637 cells, respectively. RT4 cells showed greater DNA damage compared with 5637 cells. Increased DNA damage occurred with combination versus CEP-8983 or cisplatin alone in RT4 and 5637 cells. T24 and RT4 showed the least RAD51 foci 8 h following radiation, whereas TCC-SUP and 5637 robustly induced RAD51 foci. CEP-9722 showed dose-dependent antitumor activity in RT4 xenografts; 200 mg/kg daily was better than control (P=0.04) and 100 mg/kg was not (P=0.26). Immunohistochemistry of xenografts showed a significant increase in cc-3 and decrease in CD31 with both doses (P<0.05). Biomarker-driven evaluation of PARP inhibitors in UC is justified as the activity of CEP-9722 correlated inversely with homologous recombination repair response to DNA damage. PMID:24714082

  12. A binding free energy decomposition approach for accurate calculations of the fidelity of DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, Robert; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Warshel, Arieh

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerase β (pol β) is a small eukaryotic enzyme with the ability to repair short single-stranded DNA gaps that has found use as a model system for larger replicative DNA polymerases. For all DNA polymerases, the factors determining their catalytic power and fidelity are the interactions between the bases of the base pair, amino acids near the active site, and the two magnesium ions. In this report, we study effects of all three aspects on human pol β transition state (TS) binding free energies by reproducing a consistent set of experimentally determined data for different structures. Our calculations comprise the combination of four different base pairs (incoming pyrimidine nucleotides incorporated opposite both matched and mismatched purines) with four different pol β structures (wild type and three separate mutations of ionized residues to alanine). We decompose the incoming deoxynucleoside 5′-triphosphate-TS, and run separate calculations for the neutral base part and the highly charged triphosphate part, using different dielectric constants in order to account for the specific electrostatic environments. This new approach improves our ability to predict the effect of matched and mismatched base pairing and of mutations in DNA polymerases on fidelity and may be a useful tool in studying the potential of DNA polymerase mutations in the development of cancer. It also supports our point of view with regards to the origin of the structural control of fidelity, allowing for a quantified description of the fidelity of DNA polymerases. PMID:19842163

  13. Structural Requirements for the Procoagulant Activity of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gansler, Julia; Jaax, Miriam; Leiting, Silke; Appel, Bettina; Greinacher, Andreas; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects. PMID:23226277

  14. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer. PMID:25510639

  15. The role of RNA polymerase sigma-factor (RpoS) in induction of glutamate-dependent acid-resistance of Escherichia albertii under anaerobic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia albertii is a potential enteric foodborne pathogen with poorly defined genetic and biochemical properties. Acid resistance is perceived to be an important property of enteric pathogens, enabling them to survive passage through stomach acidity so that they may colonize the mammalian gast...

  16. Biological Activities of Oleanolic Acid Derivatives from Calendula officinalis Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmed; Ashour, Ahmed; Mira, Amira; Kishikawa, Asuka; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Zhu, Qinchang; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Phytochemical examination of butanol fraction of Calendula officinalis seeds led to the isolation of two compounds identified as 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS1) and oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS2). Biological evaluation was carried out for these two compounds such as melanin biosynthesis inhibitory, hyaluronic acid production activities, anti obesity using lipase inhibition and adipocyte differentiation as well as evaluation of the protective effect against hydrogen peroxide induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells. The results showed that, compound CS2 has a melanin biosynthesis stimulatory activity; however, compound CS1 has a potent stimulatory effect for the production of hyaluronic acid on normal human dermal fibroblast from adult (NHDF-Ad). Both compounds did not show any inhibitory effect on both lipase and adipocyte differentiation. Compound CS2 could protect neuro-2A cells and increased cell viability against H2 O2 . These activities (melanin biosynthesis stimulatory and protective effect against H2 O2 of CS2 and hyaluronic acid productive activities of these triterpene derivatives) have been reported for the first time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26887328

  17. Fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, T; Sumiyoshi, M; Okuda, H

    1999-12-01

    The fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) was characterized using bovine milk LPL. Synthesizing activities were determined in an aqueous medium using oleic acid or trioleylglycerol as the acyl donor and equimolar amounts of long-chain alcohols as the acyl acceptor. When oleic acid and hexadecanol emulsified with gum arabic were incubated with LPL, palmityl oleate was synthesized, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apo-very low density lipoprotein (apoVLDL) stimulated LPL-catalyzed palmityl oleate synthesis. The apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/oleic acid was estimated using a high concentration of LPL and a long (20 h) incubation period. The equilibrium ratio was affected by the incubation pH and the alcohol chain length. When the incubation pH was below pH 7.0 and long chain fatty acyl alcohols were used as substrates, the fatty acid alcohol ester/free fatty acid equilibrium ratio favored ester formation, with an apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/fatty acid of about 0.9/0.1. The equilibrium ratio decreased sharply at alkaline pH (above pH 8.0). The ratio also decreased when fatty alcohols with acyl chains shorter than dodecanol were used. When a trioleoylglycerol/fatty acyl alcohol emulsion was incubated with LPL, fatty acid alcohol esters were synthesized in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Fatty acid alcohol esters were easily synthesized from trioleoylglycerol when fatty alcohols with acyl chains longer than dodecanol were used, but synthesis was decreased with fatty alcohols with acyl chain lengths shorter than decanol, and little synthesizing activity was detected with shorter-chain fatty alcohols such as butanol or ethanol. PMID:10578059

  18. Lipoteichoic Acid in Streptomyces hygroscopicus: Structural Model and Immunomodulatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cot, Marlène; Ray, Aurélie; Gilleron, Martine; Vercellone, Alain; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Armau, Elise; Gauthier, Sophie; Tiraby, Gérard; Puzo, Germain; Nigou, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    Gram positive bacteria produce cell envelope macroamphiphile glycopolymers, i.e. lipoteichoic acids or lipoglycans, whose functions and biosynthesis are not yet fully understood. We report for the first time a detailed structure of lipoteichoic acid isolated from a Streptomyces species, i.e. Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T. Chemical, MS and NMR analyses revealed a polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituted with α-glucosaminyl and α-N-acetyl-glucosaminyl residues but devoid of any amino-acid substituent. This structure is very close, if not identical, to that of the wall teichoic acid of this organism. These data not only contribute to the growing recognition that lipoteichoic acid is a cell envelope component of Gram positive Actinobacteria but also strongly support the recently proposed hypothesis of an overlap between the pathways of lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid synthesis in these bacteria. S. hygroscopicus lipoteichoic acid induced signalling by human innate immune receptor TLR2, confirming its role as a microbe-associated molecular pattern. Its activity was partially dependant on TLR1, TLR6 and CD14. Moreover, it stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 production by a human macrophage cell line to an extent similar to that of Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. These results provide new clues on lipoteichoic acid structure/function relationships, most particularly on the role of the polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituents. PMID:22028855

  19. Differential activation of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes by the polyomavirus enhancer and the adenovirus E1A gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, S L; Folk, W R

    1985-01-01

    We have compared the effect of the polyomavirus cis-acting transcriptional enhancer and the adenovirus trans-acting E1A gene on expression of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (the adenovirus VAI gene and a bacterial tRNA gene) using DNA transfection and transient expression assays. The polyomavirus enhancer has little effect upon transcription of the VAI gene by RNA polymerase III in any cell type tested (murine, hamster, or human). In contrast, expression of the E1A gene within adenovirus infected cells stimulates transcription of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes from co-transfected DNAs. Human 293 cells, which constitutively produce adenovirus E1A gene products, also express high levels of RNA polymerase III transcripts from transfected DNAs. Images PMID:2987823

  20. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-15

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTS+ scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties. PMID:24813273

  1. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-01

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties.

  2. Flavonoids inhibit iNOS production via mitogen activated proteins in lipoteichoic acid stimulated cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Ventura-Arroyo, Jairo Agustín; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio; Ostoa-Pérez, María Fernanda

    2014-08-01

    Infective endocarditis is caused by oral commensal bacteria which are important etiologic agents in this disease and can induce release of nitric oxide (NO), promoting an inflammatory response in the endocardium. In this study, we investigated the properties of kaempherol, epigallocatechin, apigenin, and naringin in embryonic mouse heart cells (H9c2) treated with lipoteichoic acid (LTA) obtained from Streptococcus sanguinis. NO production was measured with the Griess method. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, western blot assays and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess translocation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB), degradation of IκB, and activity of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). And the effects of these flavonoids on cell viability were also assessed. Our results showed that flavonoids blocked activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 in cardiomyocytes treated with LTA. Moreover, the flavonoids showed no cytotoxic effects and blocked NF-κB translocation and IκB degradation and inhibited LTA-induced NF-κB promoter activity, iNOS expression and NO production. In conclusion these effects are consistent with some of the observed anti-inflammatory properties of other flavonoids. PMID:24768712

  3. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Protects against Hyperglycemic-Induced Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Improves Myocardial Dysfunction by Suppressing Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Zhang, Guang-hao; Feng, Min; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jia-ning; Dong, Wen-qian; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Under high glucose conditions, endothelial cells respond by acquiring fibroblast characteristics, that is, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), contributing to diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has cardioprotective properties independent of its glucose-lowering effect. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully clarified. Here we investigated whether GLP-1 inhibits myocardial EndMT in diabetic mice and whether this is mediated by suppressing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice were treated with or without GLP-1 analog (24 nmol/kg daily) for 24 wks. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac function. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured in normal glucose (NG) (5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG) (30 mmol/L) medium with or without GLP-1analog. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were performed to evaluate EndMT and PARP-1 activity. Diabetes mellitus attenuated cardiac function and increased cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with the GLP-1 analog improved diabetes mellitus–related cardiac dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that hyperglycemia markedly increased the percentage of von Willebrand factor (vWF)+/alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)+ cells in total α-SMA+ cells in diabetic hearts compared with controls, which was attenuated by GLP-1 analog treatment. In cultured HAECs, immunofluorescent staining and Western blot also showed that both GLP-1 analog and PARP-1 gene silencing could inhibit the HG-induced EndMT. In addition, GLP-1 analog could attenuate PARP-1 activation by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, GLP-1 treatment could protect against the hyperglycemia-induced EndMT and myocardial dysfunction. This effect is mediated, at least partially, by suppressing PARP-1 activation. PMID:25715248

  4. Metalloregulator CueR biases RNA polymerase's kinetic sampling of dead-end or open complex to repress or activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Martell, Danya J; Joshi, Chandra P; Gaballa, Ahmed; Santiago, Ace George; Chen, Tai-Yen; Jung, Won; Helmann, John D; Chen, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Metalloregulators respond to metal ions to regulate transcription of metal homeostasis genes. MerR-family metalloregulators act on σ(70)-dependent suboptimal promoters and operate via a unique DNA distortion mechanism in which both the apo and holo forms of the regulators bind tightly to their operator sequence, distorting DNA structure and leading to transcription repression or activation, respectively. It remains unclear how these metalloregulator-DNA interactions are coupled dynamically to RNA polymerase (RNAP) interactions with DNA for transcription regulation. Using single-molecule FRET, we study how the copper efflux regulator (CueR)--a Cu(+)-responsive MerR-family metalloregulator--modulates RNAP interactions with CueR's cognate suboptimal promoter PcopA, and how RNAP affects CueR-PcopA interactions. We find that RNAP can form two noninterconverting complexes at PcopA in the absence of nucleotides: a dead-end complex and an open complex, constituting a branched interaction pathway that is distinct from the linear pathway prevalent for transcription initiation at optimal promoters. Capitalizing on this branched pathway, CueR operates via a "biased sampling" instead of "dynamic equilibrium shifting" mechanism in regulating transcription initiation; it modulates RNAP's binding-unbinding kinetics, without allowing interconversions between the dead-end and open complexes. Instead, the apo-repressor form reinforces the dominance of the dead-end complex to repress transcription, and the holo-activator form shifts the interactions toward the open complex to activate transcription. RNAP, in turn, locks CueR binding at PcopA into its specific binding mode, likely helping amplify the differences between apo- and holo-CueR in imposing DNA structural changes. Therefore, RNAP and CueR work synergistically in regulating transcription. PMID:26483469

  5. Antiviral activity of carnosic acid against respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory infection and a major public health threat worldwide. To date, no vaccine or effective therapeutic agent has been developed. In a screen for potential therapeutic agents against hRSV, we discovered that an extract of Rosmarinus officinalis exerted a strong inhibitory effect against hRSV infection. Subsequent studies identified carnosic acid as a bioactive constituent responsible for anti-hRSV activity. Carnosic acid has been shown to exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-cancer activities. Anti-RSV activity of carnosic acid was further investigated in this study. Methods Effects of extracts from various plants and subfractions from R. officinalis on hRSV replication were determined by microneutralization assay and plaque assay. Several constituents were isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of R. officinalis and their anti-RSV activities were assessed by plaque assay as well as reverse-transcription quantitative PCR to determine the synthesis of viral RNAs. Results Among the tested bioactive constituents of R. officinalis, carnosic acid displayed the most potent anti-hRSV activity and was effective against both A- and B-type viruses. Carnosic acid efficiently suppressed the replication of hRSV in a concentration-dependent manner. Carnosic acid effectively suppressed viral gene expression without inducing type-I interferon production or affecting cell viability, suggesting that it may directly affect viral factors. A time course analysis showed that addition of carnosic acid 8 hours after infection still effectively blocked the expression of hRSV genes, further suggesting that carnosic acid directly inhibited the replication of hRSV. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that carnosic acid, a natural compound that has already been shown to be safe for human consumption, has anti-viral activity against hRSV, efficiently blocking the replication of this virus. Carnosic

  6. Catalytic Ethanol Dehydration over Different Acid-activated Montmorillonite Clays.

    PubMed

    Krutpijit, Chadaporn; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the catalytic dehydration of ethanol to obtain ethylene over montmorillonite clays (MMT) with mineral acid activation including H2SO4 (SA-MMT), HCl (HA-MMT) and HNO3 (NA-MMT) was investigated at temperature range of 200 to 400°C. It revealed that HA-MMT exhibited the highest catalytic activity. Ethanol conversion and ethylene selectivity were found to increase with increased reaction temperature. At 400°C, the HA-MMT yielded 82% of ethanol conversion having 78% of ethylene yield. At lower temperature (i.e. 200 to 300°C), diethyl ether (DEE) was a major product. The highest activity obtained from HA-MMT can be attributed to an increase of weak acid sites and acid density by the activation of MMT with HCl. It can be also proven by various characterization techniques that in most case, the main structure of MMT did not alter by acid activation (excepted for NA-MMT). Upon the stability test for 72 h during the reaction, the MMT and HA-MMT showed only slight deactivation due to carbon deposition. Hence, the acid activation of MMT by HCl is promising to enhance the catalytic dehydration of ethanol. PMID:27041515

  7. Synthesis and antihyperlipidemic activity of piperic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    A, Rong; Bao, Narisu; Sun, Zhaorigetu; Borjihan, Gereltu; Qiao, Yanjiang; Jin, Zhuang

    2015-02-01

    A series of piperic acid derivatives were designed and synthesized from piperine/piperlonguminine, and their antihyperlipidemic activities evaluated in diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats with respect to simvastatin. Two promising analogues 3 and 10 were discovered and their antihyperlipidemic activities were comparable to or better than those of simvastatin. PMID:25920263

  8. Both cis and trans Activities of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus 3D Polymerase Are Essential for Viral RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Herod, Morgan R.; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Ward, Joseph C.; Verdaguer, Nuria; Rowlands, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Picornaviridae is a large family of positive-sense RNA viruses that contains numerous human and animal pathogens, including foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The picornavirus replication complex comprises a coordinated network of protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions involving multiple viral and host-cellular factors. Many of the proteins within the complex possess multiple roles in viral RNA replication, some of which can be provided in trans (i.e., via expression from a separate RNA molecule), while others are required in cis (i.e., expressed from the template RNA molecule). In vitro studies have suggested that multiple copies of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3D are involved in the viral replication complex. However, it is not clear whether all these molecules are catalytically active or what other function(s) they provide. In this study, we aimed to distinguish between catalytically active 3D molecules and those that build a replication complex. We report a novel nonenzymatic cis-acting function of 3D that is essential for viral-genome replication. Using an FMDV replicon in complementation experiments, our data demonstrate that this cis-acting role of 3D is distinct from the catalytic activity, which is predominantly trans acting. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that both cis- and trans-acting 3D molecules localize to the same cellular compartment. However, our genetic and structural data suggest that 3D interacts in cis with RNA stem-loops that are essential for viral RNA replication. This study identifies a previously undescribed aspect of picornavirus replication complex structure-function and an important methodology for probing such interactions further. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an important animal pathogen responsible for foot-and-mouth disease. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world with outbreaks within livestock resulting in major economic losses. Propagation of the viral genome

  9. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of new higher amino acid Schiff base derivatives of 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-aminocephalosporanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir (nee Güngör), Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan; Özçelik, Berrin; Oyardı, Özlem

    2016-02-01

    Novel β-lactam derivatives (1c-3c) (1d-3d) were produced by using 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) and the higher amino acid Schiff bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H/13C NMR and UV-vis spectra. Antibacterial activities of all the higher amino acid Schiff bases (1a-3a) (1b-3b) and β-lactam derivatives were screened against three gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Acinetobacter baumannii RSKK 02026), three gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 07005, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and their drug-resistant isolates by using broth microdilution method. Two fungi (Candida albicans and Candida krusei) were used for antifungal activity.

  10. p38γ Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Contributes to Oncogenic Properties Maintenance and Resistance to Poly (ADP-Ribose)-Polymerase-1 Inhibition in Breast Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyan; Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Gang; Kreike, Bas; Chen, Wei; Sethi, Seema; Miller, Fred R; Wu, Guojun

    2011-01-01

    p38γ MAPK, one of the four members of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), has previously been shown to harbor oncogenic functions. However, the biologic function of p38γ MAPK in breast cancer has not been well defined. In this study, we have shown that p38γ MAPK is overexpressed in highly metastatic human and mouse breast cancer cell lines and p38γ MAPK expression is preferentially associated with basal-like and metastatic phenotypes of breast tumor samples. Ectopic expression of p38γ MAPK did not lead to an increase in oncogenic properties in vitro in most tested mammary epithelial cells. However, knockdown of p38γ MAPK expression resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, invasion in vitro and significant retardation of tumorigenesis, and long-distance metastasis to the lungs in vivo. Moreover, knockdown of p38γ MAPK triggered the activation of AKT signaling. Inhibition of this feedback loop with various PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitors facilitated the effect of targeting p38γ MAPK. We further found that overexpression of p38γ MAPK did not promote cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents doxorubicin and paclitaxel but significantly increased cell resistance to PJ-34, a DNA damage agent poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP) inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we identified that p38γ MAPK overexpression led to marked cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Our study for the first time clearly demonstrates that p38γ MAPK is a promising target for the design of targeted therapies for basal-like breast cancer with metastatic characteristics and for overcoming potential resistance against the PARP inhibitor. PMID:21532888

  11. The Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Enzyme Tankyrase Antagonizes Activity of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex through ADP-ribosylation of Axin and APC2.

    PubMed

    Croy, Heather E; Fuller, Caitlyn N; Giannotti, Jemma; Robinson, Paige; Foley, Andrew V A; Yamulla, Robert J; Cosgriff, Sean; Greaves, Bradford D; von Kleeck, Ryan A; An, Hyun Hyung; Powers, Catherine M; Tran, Julie K; Tocker, Aaron M; Jacob, Kimberly D; Davis, Beckley K; Roberts, David M

    2016-06-10

    Most colon cancer cases are initiated by truncating mutations in the tumor suppressor, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). APC is a critical negative regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway that participates in a multi-protein "destruction complex" to target the key effector protein β-catenin for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Prior work has established that the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme Tankyrase (TNKS) antagonizes destruction complex activity by promoting degradation of the scaffold protein Axin, and recent work suggests that TNKS inhibition is a promising cancer therapy. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen and uncovered TNKS as a putative binding partner of Drosophila APC2, suggesting that TNKS may play multiple roles in destruction complex regulation. We find that TNKS binds a C-terminal RPQPSG motif in Drosophila APC2, and that this motif is conserved in human APC2, but not human APC1. In addition, we find that APC2 can recruit TNKS into the β-catenin destruction complex, placing the APC2/TNKS interaction at the correct intracellular location to regulate β-catenin proteolysis. We further show that TNKS directly PARylates both Drosophila Axin and APC2, but that PARylation does not globally regulate APC2 protein levels as it does for Axin. Moreover, TNKS inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases β-catenin signaling, which we find cannot be explained solely through Axin stabilization. Instead, our findings suggest that TNKS regulates destruction complex activity at the level of both Axin and APC2, providing further mechanistic insight into TNKS inhibition as a potential Wnt pathway cancer therapy. PMID:27068743

  12. The role of interleukin-6 in mitogenic T-cell activation: detection of interleukin-2 heteronuclear RNA by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Walz, G; Stevens, C; Zanker, B; Melton, L B; Clark, S C; Suthanthiran, M; Strom, T B

    1991-05-01

    It has been documented that interleukin-6 (IL-6) supports the proliferation of purified, anti-CD3-stimulated murine T cells. We found that stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with anti-CD3 induced a significant accumulation of IL-6 mRNA, indicating that antigen-mediated T-cell activation may involve IL-6 release from accessory cells. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) had little effect upon IL-6 gene expression. In keeping with these findings, anti-IL-6 reduced but did not abolish anti-CD3-mediated proliferation of PBMCs, but had no significant effect upon PHA-stimulated proliferation. The addition of recombinant (r) IL-6 enhanced the proliferation of anti-CD3-stimulated PBMCs and increased the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA in PHA-stimulated PBMCs during the first 5 hr of culture. Nuclear run-off experiments did not reveal significant changes in IL-2 transcription in PHA plus rIL-6-treated PBMCs attempting to assume that IL-6 mediates stabilization of IL-2 mRNA. However, monitoring of partially spliced IL-2 mRNA by polymerase chain reaction revealed a clear increase in IL-2 heteronuclear RNA. Thus IL-6 increases the rate of IL-2 transcription which was not detectable by conventional in vitro transcription assays. We conclude that anti-CD3 triggers T-cell proliferation through a process that is partially but not entirely dependent upon release of IL-6. IL-6, in turn, supports IL-2 transcription. Insofar as anti-CD3 mimics antigen-triggered activation of the T-cell receptor complex, IL-6 appears to support the early immune response by augmenting antigen-triggered IL-2 gene expression. PMID:1827050

  13. Design and characterization of an acid-activated antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Li, Lina; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Yarbrough, Daniel; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell; Shi, Wenyuan

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries is a microbial biofilm infection in which the metabolic activities of plaque bacteria result in a dramatic pH decrease and shift the demineralization/remineralization equilibrium on the tooth surface towards demineralization. In addition to causing a net loss in tooth minerals, creation of an acidic environment favors growth of acid-enduring and acid-generating species, which causes further reduction in the plaque pH. In this study, we developed a prototype antimicrobial peptide capable of achieving high activity exclusively at low environmental pH to target bacterial species like Streptococcus mutans that produce acid and thrive under the low pH conditions detrimental for tooth integrity. The features of clavanin A, a naturally occurring peptide rich in histidine and phenylalanine residues with pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, served as a design basis for these prototype 'acid-activated peptides' (AAPs). Employing the major cariogenic species S. mutans as a model system, the two AAPs characterized in this study exhibited a striking pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, which correlated well with the calculated charge distribution. This type of peptide represents a potential new way to combat dental caries. PMID:19878192

  14. First total synthesis of prasinic acid and its anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Chakor, Narayan; Patil, Ganesh; Writer, Diana; Periyasamy, Giridharan; Sharma, Rajiv; Roychowdhury, Abhijit; Mishra, Prabhu Dutt

    2012-11-01

    The first total synthesis of prasinic acid is being reported along with its biological evaluation. The ten step synthesis involved readily available and cheap starting materials and can easily be transposed to large scale manufacturing. The crucial steps of the synthesis included the formation of two different aromatic units (7 and 9) and their coupling reaction. The synthetic prasinic acid exhibited moderate antitumor activity (IC(50) 4.3-9.1 μM) in different lines of cancer cells. PMID:23031589

  15. Arginine methylation of HSP70 regulates retinoid acid-mediated RARβ2 gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei-wei; Xiao, Rong-quan; Peng, Bing-ling; Xu, Huan-teng; Shen, Hai-feng; Huang, Ming-feng; Shi, Tao-tao; Yi, Jia; Zhang, Wen-juan; Wu, Xiao-nan; Gao, Xiang; Lin, Xiang-zhi; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Liu, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Although “histone” methyltransferases and demethylases are well established to regulate transcriptional programs and to use nonhistone proteins as substrates, their possible roles in regulation of heat-shock proteins in the nucleus have not been investigated. Here, we report that a highly conserved arginine residue, R469, in HSP70 (heat-shock protein of 70 kDa) proteins, an evolutionarily conserved protein family of ATP-dependent molecular chaperone, was monomethylated (me1), at least partially, by coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1/protein arginine methyltransferase 4 (CARM1/PRMT4) and demethylated by jumonji-domain–containing 6 (JMJD6), both in vitro and in cultured cells. Functional studies revealed that HSP70 could directly regulate retinoid acid (RA)-induced retinoid acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) gene transcription through its binding to chromatin, with R469me1 being essential in this process. HSP70’s function in gene transcriptional regulation appears to be distinct from its protein chaperon activity. R469me1 was shown to mediate the interaction between HSP70 and TFIIH, which involves in RNA polymerase II phosphorylation and thus transcriptional initiation. Our findings expand the repertoire of nonhistone substrates targeted by PRMT4 and JMJD6, and reveal a new function of HSP70 proteins in gene transcription at the chromatin level aside from its classic role in protein folding and quality control. PMID:26080448

  16. Inhibition of urease activity by dipeptidyl hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Odake, S; Nakahashi, K; Morikawa, T; Takebe, S; Kobashi, K

    1992-10-01

    A series of dipeptidyl hydroxamic acids (H-X-Gly-NHOH: X = amino acid residues) was synthesized, and the inhibitory activity against Jack bean and Proteus mirabilis ureases [EC 3.5.1.5] was examined. A number of H-X-Gly-NHOH inhibited Jack bean urease with an I50 of the order of 10(-6) M and inhibited Proteus mirabilis urease with an I50 of the order of 10(-5) M. The inhibition against Jack bean urease was more potent than that with the corresponding aminoacyl hydroxamic acids (H-X-NHOH). PMID:1464106

  17. Antiparasitic activity of prenylated benzoic acid derivatives from Piper species.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ninoska; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Giménez, Alberto; Ruiz, Grace; Gutiérrez, David; Bourdy, Genevieve; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2009-03-01

    Fractionation of dichloromethane extracts from the leaves of Piper heterophyllum and P. aduncum afforded three prenylated hydroxybenzoic acids, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl)-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-13-hydroxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl]-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-14-hydroxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,15-hexadecatetraenyl]-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, along with the known compounds, 4,5-dihydroxy-3-(E,E,E-11-formyl-3,7,15-trimethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid (arieianal), 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(E,E,E-3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-(E,E,E-3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid, 3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)-4-methoxy-benzoic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)benzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-1-oxo-2-butenyl)-5-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)benzoic acid. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data, including homo- and heteronuclear correlation NMR experiments (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) and comparison with data reported in the literature. Riguera ester reactions and optical rotation measurements established the compounds as racemates. The antiparasitic activity of the compounds were tested against three strains of Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium falciparum. The results showed that 3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)-4-methoxy-benzoic acid exhibited potent and selective activity against L. braziliensis (IC(50) 6.5 microg/ml), higher that pentamidine used as control. Moreover, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-3,7,15-trimethyl- 2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl)-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-1-oxo-2-butenyl)-5-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)benzoic acid showed moderate antiplasmodial (IC(50) 3.2 microg/ml) and trypanocidal (16.5 microg/ml) activities, respectively. PMID:19361822

  18. Selection of enhanced antimicrobial activity posing lactic acid bacteria characterised by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Šalomskienė, Joana; Abraitienė, Asta; Jonkuvienė, Dovilė; Mačionienė, Irena; Repečkienė, Jūratė

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was a detail evaluation of genetic diversity among the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains having an advantage of a starter culture in order to select genotypically diverse strains with enhanced antimicrobial effect on some harmfull and pathogenic microorganisms. Antimicrobial activity of LAB was performed by the agar well diffusion method and was examined against the reference strains and foodborne isolates of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium. Antifungal activity was tested against the foodborne isolates of Candida parapsilosis, Debaromyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia guilliermondii, Yarowia lipolytica, Aspergillus brasiliensis, Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium herbarum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. A total 40 LAB strains representing Lactobacillus (23 strains), Lactococcus (13 strains) and Streptococcus spp. (4 strains) were characterised by repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting which generated highly discriminatory profiles, confirmed the identity and revealed high genotypic heterogeneity among the strains. Many of tested LAB demonstrated strong antimicrobial activity specialised against one or few indicator strains. Twelve LAB strains were superior in suppressing growth of the whole complex of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. These results demonstrated that separate taxonomic units offered different possibilities of selection for novel LAB strains could be used as starter cultures enhancing food preservation. PMID:26139877

  19. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  20. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  1. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Sauguet, Ludovic; Raia, Pierre; Henneke, Ghislaine; Delarue, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has the same ‘double-psi β-barrel' architecture seen in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) superfamily, which includes multi-subunit transcriptases of all domains of life, homodimeric RNA-silencing pathway RNAPs and atypical viral RNAPs. This finding bridges together, in non-viral world, DNA transcription and DNA replication within the same protein superfamily. This study documents further the complex evolutionary history of the DNA replication apparatus in different domains of life and proposes a classification of all extant DNAPs. PMID:27548043

  2. Archaeoglobus Fulgidus DNA Polymerase D: A Zinc-Binding Protein Inhibited by Hypoxanthine and Uracil.

    PubMed

    Abellón-Ruiz, Javier; Waldron, Kevin J; Connolly, Bernard A

    2016-07-17

    Archaeal family-D DNA polymerases (Pol-D) comprise a small (DP1) proofreading subunit and a large (DP2) polymerase subunit. Pol-D is one of the least studied polymerase families, and this publication investigates the enzyme from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (Afu Pol-D). The C-terminal region of DP2 contains two conserved cysteine clusters, and their roles are investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. The cluster nearest the C terminus is essential for polymerase activity, and the cysteines are shown to serve as ligands for a single, critical Zn(2+) ion. The cysteines farthest from the C terminal were not required for activity, and a role for these amino acids has yet to be defined. Additionally, it is shown that Afu Pol-D activity is slowed by the template strand hypoxanthine, extending previous results that demonstrated inhibition by uracil. Hypoxanthine was a weaker inhibitor than uracil. Investigations with isolated DP2, which has a measurable polymerase activity, localised the deaminated base binding site to this subunit. Uracil and hypoxanthine slowed Afu Pol-D "in trans", that is, a copied DNA strand could be inhibited by a deaminated base in the alternate strand of a replication fork. The error rate of Afu Pol-D, measured in vitro, was 0.24×10(-5), typical for a polymerase that has been proposed to carry out genome replication in the Archaea. Deleting the 3'-5' proofreading exonuclease activity reduced fidelity twofold. The results presented in this publication considerably increase our knowledge of Pol-D. PMID:27320386

  3. Replicative DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Dixon, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    In 1959, Arthur Kornberg was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on the principles by which DNA is duplicated by DNA polymerases. Since then, it has been confirmed in all branches of life that replicative DNA polymerases require a single-stranded template to build a complementary strand, but they cannot start a new DNA strand de novo. Thus, they also depend on a primase, which generally assembles a short RNA primer to provide a 3'-OH that can be extended by the replicative DNA polymerase. The general principles that (1) a helicase unwinds the double-stranded DNA, (2) single-stranded DNA-binding proteins stabilize the single-stranded DNA, (3) a primase builds a short RNA primer, and (4) a clamp loader loads a clamp to (5) facilitate the loading and processivity of the replicative polymerase, are well conserved among all species. Replication of the genome is remarkably robust and is performed with high fidelity even in extreme environments. Work over the last decade or so has confirmed (6) that a common two-metal ion-promoted mechanism exists for the nucleotidyltransferase reaction that builds DNA strands, and (7) that the replicative DNA polymerases always act as a key component of larger multiprotein assemblies, termed replisomes. Furthermore (8), the integrity of replisomes is maintained by multiple protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, many of which are inherently weak. This enables large conformational changes to occur without dissociation of replisome components, and also means that in general replisomes cannot be isolated intact. PMID:23732474

  4. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects. PMID:26629697

  5. Taq DNA Polymerase Mutants and 2'-Modified Sugar Recognition.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Hayley J; Gochi, Andrea M; Chia, Hannah E; Ogonowsky, Alexie L; Chiang, Sharon; Filipovic, Nedim; Weiden, Aurora G; Hadley, Emma E; Gabriel, Sara E; Leconte, Aaron M

    2015-09-29

    Chemical modifications to DNA, such as 2' modifications, are expected to increase the biotechnological utility of DNA; however, these modified forms of DNA are limited by their inability to be effectively synthesized by DNA polymerase enzymes. Previous efforts have identified mutant Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Taq) enzymes capable of recognizing 2'-modified DNA nucleotides. While these mutant enzymes recognize these modified nucleotides, they are not capable of synthesizing full length modified DNA; thus, further engineering is required for these enzymes. Here, we describe comparative biochemical studies that identify useful, but previously uncharacterized, properties of these enzymes; one enzyme, SFM19, is able to recognize a range of 2'-modified nucleotides much wider than that previously examined, including fluoro, azido, and amino modifications. To understand the molecular origins of these differences, we also identify specific amino acids and combinations of amino acids that contribute most to the previously evolved unnatural activity. Our data suggest that a negatively charged amino acid at 614 and mutation of the steric gate residue, E615, to glycine make up the optimal combination for modified oligonucleotide synthesis. These studies yield an improved understanding of the mutational origins of 2'-modified substrate recognition as well as identify SFM19 as the best candidate for further engineering, whether via rational design or directed evolution. PMID:26334839

  6. Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Komadel, P.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2009-04-01

    Modified bentonites are of widespread technological importance. Common modifications include acid activation and organic treatment. Acid activation has been used for decades to prepare bleaching earths for adsorbing impurities from edible and industrial oils. Organic treatment has sparked an explosive interest in a class of materials called polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNs). The most commonly used clay mineral in PCNs is montmorillonite, which is the main constituent of bentonite. PCN materials are used for structural reinforcement and mechanical strength, for gas permeability barriers, as flame retardants, and to minimize surface erosion (ablation). Other specialty applications include use as conducting nanocomposites and bionanocomposites.

  7. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jason M.; Beuning, Penny J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides. PMID:22720133

  8. Evidence that sigma factors are components of chloroplast RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, R F; Zhang, F; Hu, J; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase(s), which have been incompletely characterized and have been examined in a limited number of species. Plastid genomes contain rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1, and rpoC2 coding for alpha, beta, beta', and beta" RNA polymerase subunits that are homologous to the alpha, beta, and beta' subunits that constitute the core moiety of RNA polymerase in bacteria. However, genes with homology to sigma subunits in bacteria have not been found in plastid genomes. An antibody directed against the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was used to probe western blots of purified chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize, rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Cyanidium caldarium. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize and rice contained an immunoreactive 64-kD protein. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. reinhardtii contained immunoreactive 100- and 82-kD proteins, and chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. caldarium contained an immunoreactive 32-kD protein. The elution profile of enzyme activity of both algal chloroplast RNA polymerases coeluted from DEAE with the respective immunoreactive proteins, indicating that they are components of the enzyme. These results provide immunological evidence for sigma-like factors in chloroplast RNA polymerase in higher plants and algae. PMID:8159791

  9. c-Jun controls histone modifications, NF-kappaB recruitment, and RNA polymerase II function to activate the ccl2 gene.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Sabine; Doerrie, Anneke; Weber, Axel; Schneider, Heike; Hoffmann, Elke; von der Ohe, Juliane; Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F; Resch, Klaus; Kracht, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced mRNA expression of ccl2 (also called MCP-1), a prototypic highly regulated inflammatory gene, is severely suppressed in cells lacking c-Jun or Jun N-terminal protein kinase 1 (JNK1)/JNK2 genes and is only partially restored in cells expressing a c-Jun(SS63/73AA) mutant protein. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify three c-Jun-binding sites located in the far 5' region close to the transcriptional start site and in the far 3' region of murine and human ccl2 genes. Mutational analysis revealed that the latter two sites contribute to ccl2 transcription in response to the presence of IL-1 or of ectopically expressed c-Jun-ATF-2 dimers. Further experiments comparing wild-type and c-Jun-deficient cells revealed that c-Jun regulates Ser10 phosphorylation of histone H3, acetylation of histones H3 and H4, and recruitment of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), NF-kappaB subunits, and RNA polymerase II across the ccl2 locus. c-Jun also coimmunoprecipitated with p65 NF-kappaB and HDAC3. Based on DNA microarray analysis, c-Jun was required for full expression of 133 out of 162 IL-1-induced genes. For inflammatory genes, these data support the idea of an activator function of c-Jun that is executed by multiple mechanisms, including phosphorylation-dependent interaction with p65 NF-kappaB and HDAC3 at the level of chromatin. PMID:18443042

  10. c-Jun Controls Histone Modifications, NF-κB Recruitment, and RNA Polymerase II Function To Activate the ccl2 Gene▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, Sabine; Doerrie, Anneke; Weber, Axel; Schneider, Heike; Hoffmann, Elke; von der Ohe, Juliane; Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F.; Resch, Klaus; Kracht, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced mRNA expression of ccl2 (also called MCP-1), a prototypic highly regulated inflammatory gene, is severely suppressed in cells lacking c-Jun or Jun N-terminal protein kinase 1 (JNK1)/JNK2 genes and is only partially restored in cells expressing a c-Jun(SS63/73AA) mutant protein. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify three c-Jun-binding sites located in the far 5′ region close to the transcriptional start site and in the far 3′ region of murine and human ccl2 genes. Mutational analysis revealed that the latter two sites contribute to ccl2 transcription in response to the presence of IL-1 or of ectopically expressed c-Jun-ATF-2 dimers. Further experiments comparing wild-type and c-Jun-deficient cells revealed that c-Jun regulates Ser10 phosphorylation of histone H3, acetylation of histones H3 and H4, and recruitment of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), NF-κB subunits, and RNA polymerase II across the ccl2 locus. c-Jun also coimmunoprecipitated with p65 NF-κB and HDAC3. Based on DNA microarray analysis, c-Jun was required for full expression of 133 out of 162 IL-1-induced genes. For inflammatory genes, these data support the idea of an activator function of c-Jun that is executed by multiple mechanisms, including phosphorylation-dependent interaction with p65 NF-κB and HDAC3 at the level of chromatin. PMID:18443042

  11. Directed tagging of the Arabidopsis FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene with the maize transposon activator.

    PubMed Central

    James, D W; Lim, E; Keller, J; Plooy, I; Ralston, E; Dooner, H K

    1995-01-01

    The FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene of Arabidopsis is required for the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids in the seed. The product of the FAE1 gene is presumed to be a condensing enzyme that extends the chain length of fatty acids from C18 to C20 and C22. We report here the cloning of FAE1 by directed transposon tagging with the maize element Activator (Ac). An unstable fae1 mutant was isolated in a line carrying Ac linked to the FAE1 locus on chromosome 4. Cosegregation and reversion analyses established that the new mutant was tagged by Ac. A DNA fragment flanking Ac was cloned by inverse polymerase chain reaction and used to isolate FAE1 genomic clones and a cDNA clone from a library made from immature siliques. The predicted amino acid sequence of the FAE1 protein shares homology with those of other condensing enzymes (chalcone synthase, stilbene synthases, and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III), supporting the notion that FAE1 is the structural gene for a synthase or condensing enzyme. FAE1 is expressed in developing seed, but not in leaves, as expected from the effect of the fae1 mutation on the fatty acid compositions of those tissues. PMID:7734965

  12. Synthesis and biological activity of tetralone abscisic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Nyangulu, James M; Nelson, Ken M; Rose, Patricia A; Gai, Yuanzhu; Loewen, Mary; Lougheed, Brenda; Quail, J Wilson; Cutler, Adrian J; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2006-04-01

    Bicyclic analogues of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) were designed to incorporate the structural elements and functional groups of the parent molecule that are required for biological activity. The resulting tetralone analogues were predicted to have enhanced biological activity in plants, in part because oxidized products would not cyclize to forms corresponding to the inactive catabolite phaseic acid. The tetralone analogues were synthesized in seven steps from 1-tetralone and a range of analogues were accessible through a second route starting with 2-methyl-1-naphthol. Tetralone ABA 8 was found to have greater activity than ABA in two bioassays. The absolute configuration of (+)-8 was established by X-ray crystallography of a RAMP hydrazone derivative. The hydroxymethyl compounds 10 and 11, analogues for studying the roles of 8- and 9-hydroxy ABA 3 and 6, were also synthesized and found to be active. PMID:16557330

  13. Development of amino acid uptake activity in Neurospora.

    PubMed

    Railey, R M; Kinsey, J A

    1976-02-01

    During the germination and growth of Neurospora conidia, amino acid permease systems I (neutral) and II (general) increase in specific activity. System III (basic) decreases in specific activity with the onset of germination. System I shows two peaks of activity during the logarithmic phase of growth. One peak occurs at 6 h, the other at 12 h of growth. Both peaks are abolished in the mtr mutant. Both peaks have a Km for phenylalanine of 40 muM. The peaks of system I activity appear to correlate with morphological changes. PMID:4208

  14. DNA replication: polymerase epsilon as a non-catalytic converter of the helicase.

    PubMed

    Zegerman, Philip

    2013-04-01

    In eukaryotes DNA polymerase epsilon (ε) synthesises the leading DNA strand during replication. A new study provides insight into how this polymerase also functions independently of its enzyme activity to assemble and activate the replicative helicase. PMID:23578873

  15. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Teacher's Resource Guide on Acidic Precipitation with Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    The purpose of this teacher's resource guide is to help science teachers incorporate the topic of acidic precipitation into their curricula. A survey of recent junior high school science textbooks found a maximum of one paragraph devoted to the subject; in addition, none of these books had any related laboratory activities. It was on the basis of…

  19. Fungicidal Activities of Dihydroferulic Acid Alkyl Ester Analogues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural product dihydroferulic acid (DFA, 1) and the synthesized DFA methyl (4a), ethyl (4b), propyl (4c), hexyl (4d), octyl (4e), and decyl (4f) esters were examined for antifungal activity. Test fungi included Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wild type, and deletion mutants slt2delta and bck1delta), ...

  20. Zoosporicidal activities of anacardic acids against Aphanomyces cochlioides.

    PubMed

    Begum, Parvin; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Islam, Md Tofazzal; Ogawa, Yuko; Tahara, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    The EtOAc soluble constituents of the unripe fruits of Ginkgo biloba showed motility inhibition followed by lysis of zoospores of the phytopathogenic Aphanomyces cochlioides. We purified 22:1-omega7-anacardic acid (1), 24:1-omega9-anacardic acid (2) and 22:0-anacardic acid (3), together with other related compounds, 21:1-omega7-cardol (4) and 21:1-omega7-cardanol (5) from the crude extracts of Ginkgo fruits. Amongst them, compound 1 was a major active agent in quality and quantity, and showed potent motility inhibition (98% in 30 min) followed by lysis (55% in 3 h) of the zoospores at 1 x 10(-7) M. The 2-O-methyl derivative (1-c) of 1 displayed antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, but practically inactive to Escherichia coli. A brief study on structure-activity relationships revealed that a carboxyl group on the aromatic ring and an unsaturated side chain in the anacardic acid derivative are important for strong motility inhibitory and lytic activities against the zoospore. PMID:12440727

  1. Fungicidal Activities of Dihydroferulic Acid Alkyl Ester Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural product dihydroferulic acid (DFA, 1) and the synthesized DFA methyl (4a), ethyl (4b), propyl (4c), hexyl (4d), octyl (4e), and decyl (4f) esters were examined for antifungal activity. Test fungi included Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wild type, and deletion mutants slt2' and bck1'), Aspergil...

  2. ACID RAIN AND SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY: EFFECTS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the investigation, our aim was to determine if acid rain affects soil microbial activity and to identify possible mechanisms of observed effects. A Sierran forest soil (pH 6.4) planted with Ponderosa pine seedlings was exposed to simulated rain (pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.6) with ...

  3. Problem-Solving Test: Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: polymerase chain reaction, DNA amplification, electrophoresis, breast cancer, "HER2" gene, genomic DNA, "in vitro" DNA synthesis, template, primer, Taq polymerase, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] elongation activity, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] exonuclease activity, deoxyribonucleoside…

  4. Ribonucleotide Discrimination and Reverse Transcription by the Human Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase*

    PubMed Central

    Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Copeland, William C.

    2011-01-01

    During DNA synthesis, DNA polymerases must select against ribonucleotides, present at much higher levels compared with deoxyribonucleotides. Most DNA polymerases are equipped to exclude ribonucleotides from their active site through a bulky side chain residue that can sterically block the 2′-hydroxyl group of the ribose ring. However, many nuclear replicative and repair DNA polymerases incorporate ribonucleotides into DNA, suggesting that the exclusion mechanism is not perfect. In this study, we show that the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ discriminates ribonucleotides efficiently but differentially based on the base identity. Whereas UTP is discriminated by 77,000-fold compared with dTTP, the discrimination drops to 1,100-fold for GTP versus dGTP. In addition, the efficiency of the enzyme was reduced 3–14-fold, depending on the identity of the incoming nucleotide, when it extended from a primer containing a 3′-terminal ribonucleotide. DNA polymerase γ is also proficient in performing single-nucleotide reverse transcription reactions from both DNA and RNA primer terminus, although its bypass efficiency is significantly diminished with increasing stretches of ribonucleotides in template DNA. Furthermore, we show that the E895A mutant enzyme is compromised in its ability to discriminate ribonucleotides, mainly due to its defects in deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate binding, and is also a poor reverse transcriptase. The potential biochemical defects of a patient harboring a disease mutation in the same amino acid (E895G) are discussed. PMID:21778232

  5. Antisense myb inhibition of purified erythroid progenitors in development and differentiation is linked to cycling activity and expression of DNA polymerase alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Valtieri, M.; Venturelli, D.; Care, A.; Fossati, C.; Pelosi, E.; Labbaye, C.; Mattia, G.; Gewirtz, A.M.; Calabretta, B.; Peschle, C. )

    1991-03-15

    These studies aimed to determine the expression and functional role of c-myb in erythroid progenitors with different cycling activities. In the first series of experiments the erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E) and colony-forming unit (CFU-E) populations from adult peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and embryonic-fetal liver (FL) were treated with either c-myb antisense oligomers or 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR). A direct correlation was always observed between the inhibitory effect of anti-myb oligomers and the level of cycling activity. Thus, the inhibitory effect of antisense c-myb on the number of BFU-E colonies was 28.3% +/- 15.8% in PB, 53.4% +/- 9.3% in BM, and 68.2% +/- 24.5% in FL. Both adult and embryonic CFU-E were markedly inhibited. Using purified PB progenitors, we observed a similar pattern, although with slightly lower inhibitory effects. In the 3H-TdR suicide assay the killing index of BFU-E was 8.9% +/- 4.2% in PB, 29.4% +/- 6.5% in BM, and 40.1% +/- 9.6% in FL. The values for adult and embryonic CFU-E were 55.7% +/- 7.9% and 60.98% +/- 6.6%, respectively. We then investigated the kinetics of c-myb mRNA level during the erythroid differentiation of purified adult PB and FL BFU-E, as evaluated in liquid-phase culture by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Adult erythroid precursors showed a gradual increase of c-myb mRNA from day 4 through day 8 of culture and a sharp decrease at later times, whereas the expression of c-myb mRNA and protein in differentiation embryonic precursors peaked 2 days earlier. In both cases, c-myb mRNA level peaked at the CFU-E stage of differentiation. Finally, highly purified adult PB BFU-E were stimulated into cycling by a 3-day treatment with interleukin-3 in liquid phase: both the sensitivity to c-myb antisense oligomers and the 3H-TdR suicide index showed a gradual, strictly parallel increase.

  6. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  7. miR-155 Over-expression Promotes Genomic Instability by Reducing High-fidelity Polymerase Delta Expression and Activating Error-prone DSB Repair

    PubMed Central

    Czochor, Jennifer R.; Sulkowski, Parker; Glazer, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    miR-155 is an oncogenic microRNA (miR) that is often over-expressed in cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. miR-155 can target several DNA repair factors including RAD51, MLH1, and MSH6, and its over-expression results in an increased mutation frequency in vitro, although the mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that over-expression of miR-155 drives an increased mutation frequency both in vitro and in vivo, promoting genomic instability by affecting multiple DNA repair pathways. miR-155 over-expression causes a decrease in homologous recombination, but yields a concurrent increase in the error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. Despite repressing established targets MLH1 and MSH6, the identified mutation pattern upon miR-155 over-expression does not resemble that of a mismatch repair-deficient background. Further investigation revealed that all four subunits of polymerase delta, a high-fidelity DNA replication and repair polymerase, are down-regulated at the mRNA level in the context of miR-155 over-expression. FOXO3a, a transcription factor and known target of miR-155, has one or more putative binding site(s) in the promoter of all four polymerase delta subunits. Finally, suppression of FOXO3a by miR-155 or by siRNA knockdown is sufficient to repress the expression of the catalytic subunit of polymerase delta, POLD1, at the protein level, indicating that FOXO3a contributes to the regulation of polymerase delta levels. PMID:26850462

  8. Molecular modeling benzo[a]pyrene N2-dG adducts in the two overlapping active sites of the Y-family DNA polymerase Dpo4.

    PubMed

    Chandani, Sushil; Loechler, Edward L

    2007-01-01

    The potent, ubiquitous environmental mutagen/carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) induces a single major adduct [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG, whose bypass in most cases results in either no mutation (dCTP insertion) or a G-->T mutation (dATP insertion). Translesion synthesis (TLS) of [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG generally requires DNA polymerases (DNAPs) in the Y-family, which exist in cells to bypass DNA damage caused by chemicals and radiation. A molecular dynamics (MD) study is described with dCTP opposite [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG in Dpo4, which is the best studied Y-family DNAP from a structural point of view. Two orientations of B[a]P-N2-dG (BPmi5 and BPmi3) are considered, along with two orientations of the dCTP (AS1 and AS2), as outlined next. Based on NMR studies, the pyrene moiety of B[a]P-N2-dG is in the minor groove, when paired with dC, and can point toward either the base on the 5'-side (BPmi5) or the 3'-side (BPmi3). Based on published X-ray structures, Dpo4 appears to have two partially overlapping active sites. The architecture of active site 1 (AS1) is similar to all other families of DNAPs (e.g., the shape of the dNTP). Active site 2 (AS2), however, is non-canonical (e.g., the beta- and gamma-phosphates in AS2 are approximately where the alpha- and beta-phosphates are in AS1). In the Dpo4 models generated herein, using the BPmi3 orientation the pyrene moiety of [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG points toward the duplex region of the DNA, and is accommodated without distortions in AS1, but with distortions in AS2. Considering the BPmi5 orientation, the pyrene moiety points toward the ss-region of DNA in Dpo4, and sits in a hole defined by the fingers and little fingers domain ("chimney"); BPmi5 is accommodated in AS2 without significant distortions, but poorly in AS1. In summary, when dCTP is paired with [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG in the two overlapping active sites in Dpo4, the pyrene in the BPmi3 orientation is accommodated better in active site 1 (AS1), while the pyrene in the BPmi5 orientation is

  9. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis of escherichia coli RNA polymerase and polymerase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, T; Niedziela-Majka, A

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a technique allowing measurements of atomic-scale distances in diluted solutions of macromolecules under native conditions. This feature makes FRET a powerful tool to study complicated biological assemblies. In this report we review the applications of FRET to studies of transcription initiation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. The versatility of FRET for studies of a large macromolecular assembly such as RNA polymerase is illustrated by examples of using FRET to address several different aspects of transcription initiation by polymerase. FRET has been used to determine the architecture of polymerase, its complex with single-stranded DNA, and the conformation of promoter fragment bound to polymerase. FRET has been also used as a binding assay to determine the thermodynamics of promoter DNA fragment binding to the polymerase. Functional conformational changes in the specificity subunit of polymerase responsible for the modulation of the promoter binding activity of the enzyme and the mechanistic aspects of the transition from the initiation to the elongation complex were also investigated. PMID:11987181

  10. Inhibition of bacterial activity in acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Bhatnagar, Miss Mridula

    1988-12-01

    Acid mine drainage water give rise to rapid growth and activity of an iron- and sulphur- oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidians which greatly accelerate acid producing reactions by oxidation of pyrite material associated with coal and adjoining strata. The role of this bacterium in production of acid mine drainage is described. This study presents the data which demonstrate the inhibitory effect of certain organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate, quarternary ammonium compounds on the growth of the acidophilic aerobic autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidians. In each experiment, 10 milli-litres of laboratory developed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians was added to 250 milli-litres Erlenmeyer flask containing 90 milli-litres of 9-k media supplemented with FeSO4 7H2O and organic compounds at various concentrations. Control experiments were also carried out. The treated and untreated (control) samples analysed at various time intervals for Ferrous Iron and pH levels. Results from this investigation showed that some organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate and quarternary ammonium compounds at low concentration (10-2 M, 10-50 ppm concentration levels) are effective bactericides and able to inhibit and reduce the Ferrous Iron oxidation and acidity formation by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians is also discussed and presented

  11. DksA regulates RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli through a network of interactions in the secondary channel that includes Sequence Insertion 1.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Andrey; Shiver, Anthony L; Lee, Jookyung; Ozerova, Maria; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Gross, Carol A; Borukhov, Sergei

    2015-12-15

    Sensing and responding to nutritional status is a major challenge for microbial life. In Escherichia coli, the global response to amino acid starvation is orchestrated by guanosine-3',5'-bisdiphosphate and the transcription factor DksA. DksA alters transcription by binding to RNA polymerase and allosterically modulating its activity. Using genetic analysis, photo-cross-linking, and structural modeling, we show that DksA binds and acts upon RNA polymerase through prominent features of both the nucleotide-access secondary channel and the active-site region. This work is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a molecular function for Sequence Insertion 1 in the β subunit of RNA polymerase and significantly advances our understanding of how DksA binds to RNA polymerase and alters transcription. PMID:26604313

  12. DksA regulates RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli through a network of interactions in the secondary channel that includes Sequence Insertion 1

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Andrey; Shiver, Anthony L.; Lee, Jookyung; Ozerova, Maria; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Gross, Carol A.; Borukhov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Sensing and responding to nutritional status is a major challenge for microbial life. In Escherichia coli, the global response to amino acid starvation is orchestrated by guanosine-3′,5′-bisdiphosphate and the transcription factor DksA. DksA alters transcription by binding to RNA polymerase and allosterically modulating its activity. Using genetic analysis, photo–cross-linking, and structural modeling, we show that DksA binds and acts upon RNA polymerase through prominent features of both the nucleotide-access secondary channel and the active-site region. This work is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a molecular function for Sequence Insertion 1 in the β subunit of RNA polymerase and significantly advances our understanding of how DksA binds to RNA polymerase and alters transcription. PMID:26604313

  13. The vitamin-like dietary supplement para-aminobenzoic acid enhances the antitumor activity of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Sandhya; MacDonald, Shannon; Roth, Jennifer; Caunt, Maresa; Akalu, Abebe; Morais, Danielle; Buckley, Michael T.; Liebes, Leonard; Formenti, Silvia C.; Brooks, Peter C. . E-mail: peter.brooks@med.nyu.edu

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) alters the sensitivity of tumor cells to ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: Cellular proliferation was assessed by WST-1 assays. The effects of PABA and radiation on tumor growth were examined with chick embryo and murine models. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to quantify p21{sup CIP1} and CDC25A levels. Results: Para-aminobenzoic acid enhanced (by 50%) the growth inhibitory activity of radiation on B16F10 cells, whereas it had no effect on melanocytes. Para-aminobenzoic acid enhanced (50-80%) the antitumor activity of radiation on B16F10 and 4T1 tumors in vivo. The combination of PABA and radiation therapy increased tumor apoptosis. Treatment of tumor cells with PABA increased expression of CDC25A and decreased levels of p21{sup CIP1}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that PABA might represent a compound capable of enhancing the antitumor activity of ionizing radiation by a mechanism involving altered expression of proteins known to regulate cell cycle arrest.

  14. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0. PMID:25351717

  15. Impairment of NFkappaB activity by unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Julia; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2010-08-01

    Using a luciferase reporter gene assay, we identified polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) to impair NF kappaB signaling. Furthermore, we could demonstrate the PUFA ability to derogate NF kappaB activity to be independent from the family the fatty acid belongs to. Instead, we found a relation between the number of bis-allyl-methylene positions of the PUFA added and the NF kappaB activity of stimulated, long-term supplemented cells. The data presented provide new insights into the biological mechanisms PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects. Since suppression of NF kappaB activity could be of benefit in a number of inflammatory diseases as well as cancer, our findings are of clinical implication. According to our data dietary supplementation with PUFA-containing oils is likely to provide an at least palliative therapy for disorders linked to inappropriate NF kappaB signaling. PMID:20580946

  16. Glycerol Ester Hydrolase Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Oterholm, Anders; Ordal, Z. John; Witter, Lloyd D.

    1968-01-01

    Seventeen strains of lactic acid bacteria were assayed for their glycerol ester hydrolase activity by using an improved agar-well technique, and eight strains by determining the activity in cell-free extracts using a pH-stat procedure. All cultures tested showed activity and hydrolyzed tributyrin more actively than they did tricaproin. The cell extract studies demonstrated that the cells contained intracellular esterases and lipases. The culture supernatant fluid was without activity. The lipase and the esterase differed in their relative activity to each other in the different extracts and in the ease by which they could be freed from the cellular debris. It is suggested that the lipase of these organisms is an endoenzyme and the esterase an ectoenzyme. PMID:5649866

  17. A potential plant-derived antifungal acetylenic acid mediates its activity by interfering with fatty acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Nonadecynoic acid (6-NDA), a plant-derived acetylenic acid, exhibits strong inhibitory activity against the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses...

  18. Surface for Catalysis by Poliovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Lyle, John M.; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, replicates the viral genomic RNA on the surface of virus-induced intracellular membranes. Macromolecular assemblies of 3Dpol form linear array of subunits that propagate along a strong protein-protein interaction called interface-I, as was observed in the crystal structure of wild-type poliovirus polymerase. These “filaments” recur with slight modifications in planar sheets and, with additional modifications that accommodate curvature, in helical tubes of the polymerase, by packing filaments together via a second set of interactions. Periodic variations of subunit orientations within 3Dpol tubes give rise to “ghost reflections” in diffraction patterns computed from electron cryomicrographs of helical arrays. The ghost reflections reveal that polymerase tubes are formed by bundles of 4–6 interface-I filaments, which are then connected to the next bundle of filaments with a perturbation of interface interactions between bundles. While enzymatically inactive polymerase is also capable of oligomerization, much thinner tubes are formed that lack interface-I interactions between adjacent subunits, suggesting that long-range allostery produces conformational changes that extend from the active site to the protein-protein interface. Macromolecular assemblies of poliovirus polymerase show repeated use of flexible interface interactions for polymerase lattice formation, suggesting that adaptability of polymerase-polymerase interactions facilitates RNA replication. In addition, the presence of a positively charged groove identified in polymerase arrays may help position and stabilize the RNA template during replication. PMID:23583774

  19. Effects of Twelve Germline Missense Variations on DNA Lesion and G-Quadruplex Bypass Activities of Human DNA Polymerase REV1.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Mina; Kim, In-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Kwon; Kang, KyeongJin; Eoff, Robert L; Guengerich, F Peter; Choi, Jeong-Yun

    2016-03-21

    The Y-family DNA polymerase REV1 is involved in replicative bypass of damaged DNA and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA. In addition to a scaffolding role in the replicative bypass, REV1 acts in a catalytic role as a deoxycytidyl transferase opposite some replication stall sites, e.g., apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, N(2)-guanyl lesions, and G4 sites. We characterized the biochemical properties of 12 reported germline missense variants of human REV1, including the N373S variant associated with high risk of cervical cancer, using the recombinant REV1 (residues 330-833) proteins and DNA templates containing a G, AP site, N(2)-CH2(2-naphthyl)G (N(2)-NaphG), or G4. In steady-state kinetic analyses, the F427L, R434Q, M656V, D700N, R704Q, and P831L variants displayed 2- to 8-fold decreases in kcat/Km for dCTP insertion opposite all four templates, compared to that of wild-type, while the N373S, M407L, and N497S showed 2- to 3-fold increases with all four and the former three or two templates, respectively. The F427L, R434Q, M656V, and R704Q variants also had 2- to 3-fold lower binding affinities to DNA substrates containing G, an AP site, and/or N(2)-NaphG than wild-type. Distinctively, the N373S variant had a 3-fold higher binding affinity to G4 DNA than the wild-type, as well as a 2-fold higher catalytic activity opposite the first tetrad G, suggesting a facilitating effect of this variation on replication of G4 DNA sequences in certain human papillomavirus genomes. Our results suggest that the catalytic function of REV1 is moderately or slightly altered by at least nine genetic variations, and the G4 DNA processing function of REV1 is slightly enhanced by the N373S variation, which might provide the possibility that certain germline missense REV1 variations affect the individual susceptibility to carcinogenesis by modifying the capability of REV1 for replicative bypass past DNA lesions and G4 motifs derived from chemical and viral carcinogens. PMID:26914252

  20. An unusual polyanion from Physarum polycephalum that inhibits homologous DNA polymerase. alpha. in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, H.; Erdmann, S.; Holler, E. )

    1989-06-13

    From extracts of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum and their culture medium, an unusual substance was isolated which inhibited homologous DNA polymerase {alpha} of this slime mold but not {beta}-like DNA polymerase and not heterologous DNA polymerases. Analysis, especially NMR spectroscopy, revealed the major component to be an anionic polyester of L-malic acid and the inhibition to be due to poly(L-malate) in binding reversibly to DNA polymerase {alpha}. The mode of inhibition is competitive with substrate DNA and follows an inhibition constant K{sub i} = 10 ng/mL. Inhibition is reversed in the presence of spermine, spermidine, poly(ethylene imine), and calf thymus histone H1. According to its ester nature, the inhibitor is slightly labile at neutral and instable at acid and alkaline conditions. Its largest size corresponds to a molecular mass of 40-50 kDa, but the bulk of the material after purification has lower molecular masses. The inhibitory activity depends on the polymer size and has a minimal size requirement.

  1. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  2. Structural and Regulatory Elements of HCV NS5B Polymerase – β-Loop and C-Terminal Tail – Are Required for Activity of Allosteric Thumb Site II Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Sarah E.; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Perry, Jason; Wong, Melanie; Kan, Elaine; Lagpacan, Leanna; Barauskas, Ona; Hung, Magdeleine; Fenaux, Martijn; Appleby, Todd; Watkins, William J.; Schmitz, Uli; Sakowicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of action of the HCV NS5B polymerase thumb site II inhibitors has presented a challenge. Current opinion holds that these allosteric inhibitors stabilize the closed, inactive enzyme conformation, but how this inhibition is accomplished mechanistically is not well understood. Here, using a panel of NS5B proteins with mutations in key regulatory motifs of NS5B – the C-terminal tail and β-loop – in conjunction with a diverse set of NS5B allosteric inhibitors, we show that thumb site II inhibitors possess a distinct mechanism of action. A combination of enzyme activity studies and direct binding assays reveals that these inhibitors require both regulatory elements to maintain the polymerase inhibitory activity. Removal of either element has little impact on the binding affinity of thumb site II inhibitors, but significantly reduces their potency. NS5B in complex with a thumb site II inhibitor displays a characteristic melting profile that suggests stabilization not only of the thumb domain but also the whole polymerase. Successive truncations of the C-terminal tail and/or removal of the β-loop lead to progressive destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, the thermal unfolding transitions characteristic for thumb site II inhibitor – NS5B complex are absent in the inhibitor – bound constructs in which interactions between C-terminal tail and β-loop are abolished, pointing to the pivotal role of both regulatory elements in communication between domains. Taken together, a comprehensive picture of inhibition by compounds binding to thumb site II emerges: inhibitor binding provides stabilization of the entire polymerase in an inactive, closed conformation, propagated via coupled interactions between the C-terminal tail and β-loop. PMID:24416288

  3. Structural and regulatory elements of HCV NS5B polymerase--β-loop and C-terminal tail--are required for activity of allosteric thumb site II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Sarah E; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Perry, Jason; Wong, Melanie; Kan, Elaine; Lagpacan, Leanna; Barauskas, Ona; Hung, Magdeleine; Fenaux, Martijn; Appleby, Todd; Watkins, William J; Schmitz, Uli; Sakowicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of action of the HCV NS5B polymerase thumb site II inhibitors has presented a challenge. Current opinion holds that these allosteric inhibitors stabilize the closed, inactive enzyme conformation, but how this inhibition is accomplished mechanistically is not well understood. Here, using a panel of NS5B proteins with mutations in key regulatory motifs of NS5B--the C-terminal tail and β-loop--in conjunction with a diverse set of NS5B allosteric inhibitors, we show that thumb site II inhibitors possess a distinct mechanism of action. A combination of enzyme activity studies and direct binding assays reveals that these inhibitors require both regulatory elements to maintain the polymerase inhibitory activity. Removal of either element has little impact on the binding affinity of thumb site II inhibitors, but significantly reduces their potency. NS5B in complex with a thumb site II inhibitor displays a characteristic melting profile that suggests stabilization not only of the thumb domain but also the whole polymerase. Successive truncations of the C-terminal tail and/or removal of the β-loop lead to progressive destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, the thermal unfolding transitions characteristic for thumb site II inhibitor-NS5B complex are absent in the inhibitor-bound constructs in which interactions between C-terminal tail and β-loop are abolished, pointing to the pivotal role of both regulatory elements in communication between domains. Taken together, a comprehensive picture of inhibition by compounds binding to thumb site II emerges: inhibitor binding provides stabilization of the entire polymerase in an inactive, closed conformation, propagated via coupled interactions between the C-terminal tail and β-loop. PMID:24416288

  4. High processivity polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Shamoo, Yousif; Sun, Siyang

    2014-06-10

    Chimeric proteins comprising a sequence nonspecific single-stranded nucleic-acid-binding domain joined to a catalytic nucleic-acid-modifying domain are provided. Methods comprising contacting a nucleic acid molecule with a chimeric protein, as well as systems comprising a nucleic acid molecule, a chimeric protein, and an aqueous solution are also provided. The joining of sequence nonspecific single-stranded nucleic-acid-binding domain and a catalytic nucleic-acid-modifying domain in chimeric proteins, among other things, may prevent the separation of the two domains due to their weak association and thereby enhances processivity while maintaining fidelity.

  5. Structural requirements for the interdomain linker of alpha subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Fujita, N; Endo, S; Ishihama, A

    2000-05-23

    The carboxy-terminal domain of the alpha subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, which is connected with the core part of RNA polymerase through a long flexible linker, plays decisive roles in transcription activation by directly interacting with a large number of transcription factors and upstream (UP) element DNA. Here we constructed a set of mutant RNA polymerases, each containing a mutant alpha subunit with an altered interdomain linker. Deletion of three amino acids from the linker exhibited 50% inhibition of cAMP receptor protein- (CRP-) dependent lac P1 transcription. Deletion of six amino acids completely knocked out the activity. Insertion of three amino acids did not affect the activity, whereas 40-60% inhibition was observed after insertion of one, two, or four amino acids. Substitution of 10 consecutive glycine residues resulted in nearly 90% reduction of the CRP-dependent activity, whereas 50% activity was retained after substitution of 10 proline residues or a sequence expected to form a strong alpha-helix. Essentially the same results were obtained with UP element-dependent rrnB P1 transcription. These observations altogether suggest that (i) sufficient length of the interdomain linker is required for transcription activation mediated by the alpha carboxy-terminal domain, (ii) the linker is not totally unstructured but has structural and torsional preferences to facilitate positioning of the carboxy-terminal domain to a proper location for the interaction with CRP and UP element, and (iii) CRP-dependent activation and UP element-dependent activation share a common intermediary state in which the positioning of the alpha carboxy-terminal domain is of primary importance. PMID:10821700

  6. Suppressor analysis of temperature-sensitive mutations of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a suppressor gene encodes the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Yano, R; Nomura, M

    1991-01-01

    The SRP3-1 mutation is an allele-specific suppressor of temperature-sensitive mutations in the largest subunit (A190) of RNA polymerase I from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two mutations known to be suppressed by SRP3-1 are in the putative zinc-binding domain of A190. We have cloned the SRP3 gene by using its suppressor activity and determined its complete nucleotide sequence. We conclude from the following evidence that the SRP3 gene encodes the second-largest subunit (A135) of RNA polymerase I. First, the deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product contains several regions with high homology to the corresponding regions of the second-largest subunits of RNA polymerases of various origins, including those of RNA polymerase II and III from S. cerevisiae. Second, the deduced amino acid sequence contains known amino acid sequences of two tryptic peptides from the A135 subunit of RNA polymerase I purified from S. cerevisiae. Finally, a strain was constructed in which transcription of the SRP3 gene was controlled by the inducible GAL7 promoter. When this strain, which can grow on galactose but not on glucose, was shifted from galactose medium to glucose medium, a large decrease in the cellular concentration of A135 was observed by Western blot analysis. We have also identified the specific amino acid alteration responsible for suppression by SRP3-1 and found that it is located within the putative zinc-binding domain conserved among the second-largest subunits of eucaryotic RNA polymerases. From these results, it is suggested that this putative zinc-binding domain is in physical proximity to and interacts with the putative zinc-binding domain of the A190 subunit. Images PMID:1990281

  7. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  8. Guanine-rich sequences inhibit proofreading DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Jing; Sun, Shuhui; Xie, Binghua; Hu, Xuemei; Zhang, Zunyi; Qiu, Mengsheng; Dai, Zhong-Min

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerases with proofreading activity are important for accurate amplification of target DNA. Despite numerous efforts have been made to improve the proofreading DNA polymerases, they are more susceptible to be failed in PCR than non-proofreading DNA polymerases. Here we showed that proofreading DNA polymerases can be inhibited by certain primers. Further analysis showed that G-rich sequences such as GGGGG and GGGGHGG can cause PCR failure using proofreading DNA polymerases but not Taq DNA polymerase. The inhibitory effect of these G-rich sequences is caused by G-quadruplex and is dose dependent. G-rich inhibitory sequence-containing primers can be used in PCR at a lower concentration to amplify its target DNA fragment. PMID:27349576

  9. Fatty acid transport and activation and the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Fraisl, Peter; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Dirusso, Concetta C; Singer, Diane; Sealls, Whitney; Black, Paul N

    2008-09-15

    These studies defined the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid transport, activation and trafficking using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and established the kinetic constants of fatty acid transport in an effort to define whether vectorial acylation represents a common mechanism in different cell types (3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes, Caco-2 and HepG2 cells and three endothelial cell lines (b-END3, HAEC, and HMEC)). As expected, fatty acid transport protein (FATP)1 and long-chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl)1 were the predominant isoforms expressed in adipocytes consistent with their roles in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids destined for storage in the form of triglycerides. In cells involved in fatty acid processing including Caco-2 (intestinal-like) and HepG2 (liver-like), FATP2 was the predominant isoform. The patterns of Acsl expression were distinct between these two cell types with Acsl3 and Acsl5 being predominant in Caco-2 cells and Acsl4 in HepG2 cells. In the endothelial lines, FATP1 and FATP4 were the most highly expressed isoforms; the expression patterns for the different Acsl isoforms were highly variable between the different endothelial cell lines. The transport of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid C(1)-BODIPY-C(12) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes followed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the apparent efficiency (k(cat)/K(T)) of this process increases over 2-fold (2.1 x 10(6)-4.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)) upon adipocyte differentiation. The V(max) values for fatty acid transport in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were essentially the same, yet the efficiency was 55% higher in Caco-2 cells (2.3 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1) versus 1.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)). The kinetic parameters for fatty acid transport in three endothelial cell types demonstrated they were the least efficient cell types for this process giving V(max) values that were nearly 4-fold lower than those defined form 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Caco-2 cells and HepG2 cells. The

  10. Fatty Acid-Elongating Activity in Rapidly Expanding Leek Epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, K. J.; Post-Beittenmiller, D.

    1995-01-01

    A microsomal fatty acid elongase activity measured in epidermis of rapidly expanding leek (Allium porrum L.) was 10-fold higher in specific activity than preparations from store-bought leek. These preparations elongated acyl chains effectively using endogenous or supplied primers. Elongation of C20:0 was specifically inhibited by 2 [mu]M cerulenin, and labeling experiments with [3H]cerulenin labeled two polypeptides (65 and 88 kD). ATP was required for maximal elongase activity in expanding leaves but was lost in nonexpanding tissues. Both [14C]stearoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and [14C]stearate were maximally elongated in the presence of ATP. Addition of fully reduced CoA, however, inhibited [14C]stearate elongation, suggesting that stearoyl-CoA synthesis was not a prerequisite for elongation. Furthermore, microsomes preincubated with [14C]stearoyl-CoA plus ATP resulted in loss of radiolabel from the acyl-CoA pool without a corresponding loss in elongating activity. The lack of correlation between elongating activity and the label retained in the putative acyl-CoA substrate pool suggests that acyl-CoAs may not be the immediate precursors for elongation and that ATP plays a critical, yet undefined, role in the elongation process. We propose that an ATP-dependent elongating activity may generate the long-chain fatty acids required for wax biosynthesis. PMID:12228624

  11. Adsorption of naphthenic acids on high surface area activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Sobhan; Harding, Thomas; Abedi, Jalal; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry; Layzell, David B

    2014-01-01

    In oil sands mining extraction, water is an essential component; however, the processed water becomes contaminated through contact with the bitumen at high temperature, and a portion of it cannot be recycled and ends up in tailing ponds. The removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) from tailing pond water is crucial, as they are corrosive and toxic and provide a substrate for microbial activity that can give rise to methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. In this study, the conversion of sawdust into an activated carbon (AC) that could be used to remove NAs from tailings water was studied. After producing biochar from sawdust by a slow-pyrolysis process, the biochar was physically activated using carbon dioxide (CO2) over a range of temperatures or prior to producing biochar, and the sawdust was chemically activated using phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The physically activated carbon had a lower surface area per gram than the chemically activated carbon. The physically produced ACs had a lower surface area per gram than chemically produced AC. In the adsorption tests with NAs, up to 35 mg of NAs was removed from the water per gram of AC. The chemically treated ACs showed better uptake, which can be attributed to its higher surface area and increased mesopore size when compared with the physically treated AC. Both the chemically produced and physically produced AC provided better uptake than the commercially AC. PMID:24766592

  12. Immune Activation in the Liver by Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian; Wang, Qingde; Scott, Melanie J.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Viral infection in the liver, including hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, is a major health problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. The infection triggers a pro-inflammatory response in patients that is crucial for host defense. Recent studies have identified multiple transmembrane and cytosolic receptors that recognize pathogen-derived nucleic acids, and these receptors are essential for driving immune activation in the liver. In addition to sensing DNA/RNA from pathogens, these intracellular receptors can be activated by nucleic acids of host origin in response to sterile injuries. In this review, we discuss the expanding roles of these receptors in both immune and nonimmune cells in the liver. PMID:27350945

  13. Synthesis and antifungal activity of bile acid-derived oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía R; Svetaz, Laura; Butassi, Estefanía; Zacchino, Susana A; Palermo, Jorge A; Sánchez, Marianela

    2016-04-01

    Peracetylated bile acids (1a-g) were used as starting materials for the preparation of fourteen new derivatives bearing an oxazole moiety in their side chain (6a-g, 8a-g). The key step for the synthetic path was a Dakin-West reaction followed by a Robinson-Gabriel cyclodehydration. A simpler model oxazole (12) was also synthesized. The antifungal activity of the new compounds (6a-g) as well as their starting bile acids (1a-g) was tested against Candida albicans. Compounds 6e and 6g showed the highest percentages of inhibition (63.84% and 61.40% at 250 μg/mL respectively). Deacetylation of compounds 6a-g, led to compounds 8a-g which showed lower activities than the acetylated derivatives. PMID:26827629

  14. In Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Deacetylasperulosidic Acid in Noni

    PubMed Central

    Ma, De-Lu; Chen, Mai; Su, Chen X.; West, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    Deacetylasperulosidic acid (DAA) is a major phytochemical constituent of Morinda citrifolia (noni) fruit. Noni juice has demonstrated antioxidant activity in vivo and in human trials. To evaluate the role of DAA in this antioxidant activity, Wistar rats were fed 0 (control group), 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight per day for 7 days. Afterwards, serum malondialdehyde concentration and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured and compared among groups. A dose-dependent reduction in malondialdehyde was evident as well as a dose-dependent increase in superoxide dismutase activity. DAA ingestion did not influence serum glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that DAA contributes to the antioxidant activity of noni juice by increasing superoxide dismutase activity. The fact that malondialdehyde concentrations declined with increased DAA dose, despite the lack of glutathione peroxidase-inducing activity, suggests that DAA may also increase catalase activity. It has been previously reported that noni juice increases catalase activity in vivo but additional research is required to confirm the effect of DAA on catalase. Even so, the current findings do explain a possible mechanism of action for the antioxidant properties of noni juice that have been observed in human clinical trials. PMID:24371540

  15. In vivo antioxidant activity of deacetylasperulosidic Acid in noni.

    PubMed

    Ma, De-Lu; Chen, Mai; Su, Chen X; West, Brett J

    2013-01-01

    Deacetylasperulosidic acid (DAA) is a major phytochemical constituent of Morinda citrifolia (noni) fruit. Noni juice has demonstrated antioxidant activity in vivo and in human trials. To evaluate the role of DAA in this antioxidant activity, Wistar rats were fed 0 (control group), 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight per day for 7 days. Afterwards, serum malondialdehyde concentration and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured and compared among groups. A dose-dependent reduction in malondialdehyde was evident as well as a dose-dependent increase in superoxide dismutase activity. DAA ingestion did not influence serum glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that DAA contributes to the antioxidant activity of noni juice by increasing superoxide dismutase activity. The fact that malondialdehyde concentrations declined with increased DAA dose, despite the lack of glutathione peroxidase-inducing activity, suggests that DAA may also increase catalase activity. It has been previously reported that noni juice increases catalase activity in vivo but additional research is required to confirm the effect of DAA on catalase. Even so, the current findings do explain a possible mechanism of action for the antioxidant properties of noni juice that have been observed in human clinical trials. PMID:24371540

  16. Bactericidal Activity of the Human Skin Fatty Acid cis-6-Hexadecanoic Acid on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, Michaël L.; England, Simon R.; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Josten, Michaele; Turner, Robert; Rauter, Yvonne; Hurd, Alexander; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Jones, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Human skin fatty acids are a potent aspect of our innate defenses, giving surface protection against potentially invasive organisms. They provide an important parameter in determining the ecology of the skin microflora, and alterations can lead to increased colonization by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Harnessing skin fatty acids may also give a new avenue of exploration in the generation of control measures against drug-resistant organisms. Despite their importance, the mechanism(s) whereby skin fatty acids kill bacteria has remained largely elusive. Here, we describe an analysis of the bactericidal effects of the major human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C6H) on the human commensal and pathogen S. aureus. Several C6H concentration-dependent mechanisms were found. At high concentrations, C6H swiftly kills cells associated with a general loss of membrane integrity. However, C6H still kills at lower concentrations, acting through disruption of the proton motive force, an increase in membrane fluidity, and its effects on electron transfer. The design of analogues with altered bactericidal effects has begun to determine the structural constraints on activity and paves the way for the rational design of new antistaphylococcal agents. PMID:24709265

  17. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Dioxin Targets Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) for ADP-ribosylation via 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (TiPARP)*

    PubMed Central

    Diani-Moore, Silvia; Zhang, Sheng; Ram, Payal; Rifkind, Arleen B.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the environmental toxin and carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) include a wasting syndrome associated with decreased gluconeogenesis. TCDD is a potent activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand activated transcription factor. The relationship between gene activation by the AHR and TCDD toxicities is not well understood. We recently identified a pathway by which the AHR target gene TiPARP (TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) contributes to TCDD suppression of transcription of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key regulator of gluconeogenesis, by consuming NAD+ and decreasing Sirtuin 1 activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), a transcriptional activator of PEPCK. We report here that TCDD-induced TiPARP also targets PEPCK for ADP-ribosylation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of PEPCK were found to undergo ADP-ribosylation. Unexpectedly, AHR suppression also enhanced ADP-ribosylation and did so by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-independent mechanism. This report 1) identifies ADP-ribosylation as a new posttranslational modification for PEPCK, 2) describes a pathway by which transcriptional induction of TiPARP by the AHR can lead to a downstream posttranslational change in a TCDD target protein (PEPCK), and 3) reveals that the AHR exerts complex, previously unidentified modulatory effects on ADP-ribosylation. PMID:23770670

  18. Toxocara canis: Larvicidal activity of fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, Taís; D'Oca, Caroline da Ros Montes; Mata-Santos, Hílton Antônio; Fenalti, Juliana; Pinto, Nitza; Coelho, Tatiane; Berne, Maria Elisabeth; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-02-01

    Considering the therapeutic potential of fatty acid amides, the present study aimed to evaluate their in vitro activity against Toxocara canis larvae and their cytotoxicity for the first time. Linoleylpyrrolidilamide was the most potent, with a minimal larvicidal concentration (MLC) of 0.05 mg/mL and 27% cytotoxicity against murine peritoneal macrophages C57BL/6 mice, as assessed by the MTT assay. PMID:26783180

  19. N-Amino acid linoleoyl conjugates: anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Sumner; McQuain, Catherine; Salmonsen, Rebecca; Seicol, Benjamin

    2012-01-15

    Several N-linked amino acid-linoleic acid conjugates were studied for their potential as anti inflammatory agents. The parent molecule, N-linoleoylglycine was tested in an in vivo model, the mouse peritonitis assay where it showed activity in reducing leukocyte migration at doses as low as 0.3mg/kg when administered by mouth in safflower oil. Harvested peritoneal cells produced elevated levels of the inflammation-resolving eicosanoid 15-deoxy-Δ(13,14)-PGJ(2). These results are similar to those obtained in earlier studies with N-arachidonoylglycine. An in vitro model using mouse macrophage RAW cells was used to evaluate a small group of structural analogs for their ability to stimulate 15-deoxy-Δ(13,14)-PGJ(2) production. The d-alanine derivative was the most active while the d-phenylalanine showed almost no response. A high degree of stereo specificity was observed comparing the d and l alanine isomers; the latter being the less active. It was concluded that linoleic acid conjugates could provide suitable templates in a drug discovery program leading to novel agents for promoting the resolution of chronic inflammation. PMID:22217875

  20. Intraluminal acid activates esophageal nodose C fibers after mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Zhenyu; Heldsinger, Andrea; Owyang, Chung; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-02-01

    Acid reflux in the esophagus can induce esophageal painful sensations such as heartburn and noncardiac chest pain. The mechanisms underlying acid-induced esophageal nociception are not clearly understood. In our previous studies, we characterized esophageal vagal nociceptive afferents and defined their responses to noxious mechanical and chemical stimulation. In the present study, we aim to determine their responses to intraluminal acid infusion. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose ganglion neurons with intact nerve endings in the esophagus using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal intraluminal acid perfusion were compared in naive and ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged animals, followed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the expression of tight junction proteins (zona occludens-1 and occludin). In naive guinea pigs, intraluminal infusion with either acid (pH = 2-3) or capsaicin did not evoke an action potential discharge in esophageal nodose C fibers. In OVA-sensitized animals, following esophageal mast cell activation by in vivo OVA inhalation, intraluminal acid infusion for about 20 min started to evoke action potential discharges. This effect is further confirmed by selective mast cell activation using in vitro tissue OVA challenge in esophageal-vagal preparations. OVA inhalation leads to decreased TEER and zona occludens-1 expression, suggesting an impaired esophageal epithelial barrier function after mast cell activation. These data for the first time provide direct evidence of intraluminal acid-induced activation of esophageal nociceptive C fibers and suggest that mast cell activation may make esophageal epithelium more permeable to acid, which subsequently may increase esophageal vagal nociceptive C fiber activation. PMID:24264049

  1. Differential regulation of RNA polymerases I, II, and III by the TBP-binding repressor Dr1.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Khoo, B C; Inostroza, J A; Reinberg, D; Jackson, S P

    1994-10-21

    RNA polymerases I, II, and III each use the TATA-binding protein (TBP). Regulators that target this shared factor may therefore provide a means to coordinate the activities of the three nuclear RNA polymerases. The repressor Dr1 binds to TBP and blocks the interaction of TBP with polymerase II- and polymerase III-specific factors. This enables Dr1 to coordinately regulate transcription by RNA polymerases II and III. Under the same conditions, Dr1 does not inhibit polymerase I transcription. By selectively repressing polymerases II and III, Dr1 may shift the physiological balance of transcriptional output in favor of polymerase I. PMID:7939686

  2. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  3. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore » rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.« less

  4. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  5. Biological Activity of Aminophosphonic Acids and Their Short Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejczak, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel

    The biological activity and natural occurrence of the aminophosphonic acids were described half a century ago. Since then the chemistry and biology of this class of compounds have developed into the separate field of phosphorus chemistry. Today it is well acknowledged that these compounds possess a wide variety of promising, and in some cases commercially useful, physiological activities. Thus, they have found applications ranging from agrochemical (with the herbicides glyphosate and bialaphos being the most prominent examples) to medicinal (with the potent antihypertensive fosinopril and antiosteoporetic bisphosphonates being examples).

  6. In Vitro Resistance Study of AG-021541, a Novel Nonnucleoside Inhibitor of the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, S.T.; Herlihy, K.J.; Graham, J.P.; Fuhrman, S.A.; Doan, C.; Parge, H.; Hickey, M.; Gao, J.; Yu, X.; Chau, F.; Gonzalez, J.; Li, H.; Lewis, C.; Patrick, A.K.; Duggal, R.

    2009-05-27

    A novel class of nonnucleoside hepatitis C virus (HCV) polymerase inhibitors characterized by a dihydropyrone core was identified by high-throughput screening. Crystallographic studies of these compounds in complex with the polymerase identified an allosteric binding site close to the junction of the thumb and finger domains, approximately 30 A away from the catalytic center. AG-021541, a representative compound from this series, displayed measurable in vitro antiviral activity against the HCV genotype 1b subgenomic replicon with a mean 50% effective concentration of 2.9 muM. To identify mutations conferring in vitro resistance to AG-021541, resistance selection was carried out using HCV replicon cells either by serial passages in increasing concentrations of AG-021541 or by direct colony formation at fixed concentrations of the compound. We identified several amino acid substitutions in the AG-021541-binding region of the polymerase, including M423(T/V/I), M426T, I482(S/T), and V494A, with M423T as the predominant change observed. These mutants conferred various levels of resistance to AG-021541 and structurally related compounds but remained sensitive to interferon and HCV polymerase inhibitors known to interact with the active site or other allosteric sites of the protein. In addition, dihydropyrone polymerase inhibitors retained activity against replicons that contain signature resistance changes to other polymerase inhibitors, including S282T, C316N, M414T, and P495(S/L), indicating their potential to be used in combination therapies with these polymerase inhibitors. AG-021541-resistant replicon cell lines provide a valuable tool for mechanism-of-action studies of dihydropyrone polymerase inhibitors. The clinical relevance of in vitro resistance to HCV polymerase inhibitors remains to be investigated.

  7. Sulfation mediates activity of zosteric acid against biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Cavas, Levent; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Zosteric acid (ZA), a metabolite from the marine sea grass Zostera marina, has attracted much attention due to its attributed antifouling (AF) activity. However, recent results on dynamic transformations of aromatic sulfates in marine phototrophic organisms suggest potential enzymatic desulfation of metabolites like ZA. The activity of ZA was thus re-investigated using biofilm assays and simultaneous analytical monitoring by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Comparison of ZA and its non-sulfated form para-coumaric acid (CA) revealed that the active substance was in all cases the non-sulfated CA while ZA was virtually inactive. CA exhibited a strong biofilm inhibiting activity against Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens. The LC/MS data revealed that the apparent biofilm inhibiting effects of ZA on V. natriegens can be entirely attributed to CA released from ZA by sulfatase activity. In the light of various potential applications, the (a)biotic transformation of ZA to CA has thus to be considered in future AF formulations. PMID:25915112

  8. Non-acidic activation of pain-related Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 by lipids.

    PubMed

    Marra, Sébastien; Ferru-Clément, Romain; Breuil, Véronique; Delaunay, Anne; Christin, Marine; Friend, Valérie; Sebille, Stéphane; Cognard, Christian; Ferreira, Thierry; Roux, Christian; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Noel, Jacques; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular pH variations are seen as the principal endogenous signal that triggers activation of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which are basically considered as proton sensors, and are involved in various processes associated with tissue acidification. Here, we show that human painful inflammatory exudates, displaying non-acidic pH, induce a slow constitutive activation of human ASIC3 channels. This effect is largely driven by lipids, and we identify lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and arachidonic acid (AA) as endogenous activators of ASIC3 in the absence of any extracellular acidification. The combination of LPC and AA evokes robust depolarizing current in DRG neurons at physiological pH 7.4, increases nociceptive C-fiber firing, and induces pain behavior in rats, effects that are all prevented by ASIC3 blockers. Lipid-induced pain is also significantly reduced in ASIC3 knockout mice. These findings open new perspectives on the roles of ASIC3 in the absence of tissue pH variation, as well as on the contribution of those channels to lipid-mediated signaling. PMID:26772186

  9. Mouse models of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Miriam R; Sweasy, Joann B

    2012-12-01

    In 1956, Arthur Kornberg discovered the mechanism of the biological synthesis of DNA and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1959 for this contribution, which included the isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Now there are 15 known DNA polymerases in mammalian cells that belong to four different families. These DNA polymerases function in many different cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA repair, and damage tolerance. Several biochemical and cell biological studies have provoked a further investigation of DNA polymerase function using mouse models in which polymerase genes have been altered using gene-targeting techniques. The phenotypes of mice harboring mutant alleles reveal the prominent role of DNA polymerases in embryogenesis, prevention of premature aging, and cancer suppression. PMID:23001998

  10. Influence of ethylenediamine-n,n’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) concentration on the bactericidal activity of fatty acids in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibacterial activity of mixtures of ethylenediamine-N,N’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) and antibacterial fatty acids (FA) was examined using the agar diffusion assay. Solutions of caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids dissolved in potassium hydroxide (KOH) were supplemented with 0, 5, or 10 mM ...

  11. Human DNA polymerase. alpha. : Predicted functional domains and relationships with viral DNA polymerases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Wong, S.W.; Korn, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The primary sequence of human DNA polymerase {alpha} deduced from the full-length cDNA contains regions of striking similarity to sequences in replicative DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli phages PRD1 and T4, Bacillus phage {phi}19, yeast DNA polymerase I, yeast linear plasmid pGKL1, maize S1 mitochondrial DNA, herpes family viruses, vaccinia virus, and adenovirus. The conservation of these homologous regions across this vast phylogenetic expanse indicates that these prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases may all have evolved from a common primordial gene. Based on the sequence analysis and genetic results from yeast and herpes simplex virus studies, these consensus sequences are suggested to define potential sites that subserve essential roles in the DNA polymerase reaction. Two of these conserved regions appear to participate directly in the active site required for substrate deoxynucleotide interaction. One region toward the carboxyl-terminus has the potential to be the DNA interacting domain is predicted toward the amino-terminus. The provisional assignment of these domains can be used to identify unique or dissimilar features of functionally homologous catalytic sites in viral DBA polymerases of pathogenetic significance and thereby serve to guide more rational antiviral drug design.

  12. Induction of renal cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid epoxygenase activity by dietary gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhigang; Ng, Valerie Y; Su, Ping; Engler, Marguerite M; Engler, Mary B; Huang, Yong; Lin, Emil; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2006-05-01

    Dietary gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid found in borage oil (BOR), lowers systolic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). GLA is converted into arachidonic acid (AA) by elongation and desaturation steps. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) are cytochrome P450 (P450)-derived AA eicosanoids with important roles in regulating blood pressure. This study tested the hypothesis that the blood pressure-lowering effect of a GLA-enriched diet involves alteration of P450-catalyzed AA metabolism. Microsomes and RNA were isolated from the renal cortex of male SHRs fed a basal fat-free diet for 5 weeks to which 11% by weight of sesame oil (SES) or BOR was added. There was a 2.6- to 3.5-fold increase in P450 epoxygenase activity in renal microsomes isolated from the BOR-fed SHRs compared with the SES-fed rats. Epoxygenase activity accounted for 58% of the total AA metabolism in the BOR-treated kidney microsomes compared with 33% in the SES-treated rats. More importantly, renal 14,15- and 8,9-EET levels increased 1.6- to 2.5-fold after dietary BOR treatment. The increase in EET formation is consistent with increases in CYP2C23, CYP2C11, and CYP2J protein levels. There were no differences in the level of renal P450 epoxygenase mRNA between the SES- and BOR-treated rats. Enhanced synthesis of the vasodilatory EETs and decreased formation of the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE suggests that changes in P450-mediated AA metabolism may contribute, at least in part, to the blood pressure-lowering effect of a BOR-enriched diet. PMID:16421287

  13. Bacteriophage λ N protein inhibits transcription slippage by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Parks, Adam R; Court, Carolyn; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Jin, Ding J; Kashlev, Mikhail; Court, Donald L

    2014-05-01

    Transcriptional slippage is a class of error in which ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase incorporates nucleotides out of register, with respect to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) template. This phenomenon is involved in gene regulation mechanisms and in the development of diverse diseases. The bacteriophage λ N protein reduces transcriptional slippage within actively growing cells and in vitro. N appears to stabilize the RNA/DNA hybrid, particularly at the 5' end, preventing loss of register between transcript and template. This report provides the first evidence of a protein that directly influences transcriptional slippage, and provides a clue about the molecular mechanism of transcription termination and N-mediated antitermination. PMID:24711367

  14. Bacteriophage λ N protein inhibits transcription slippage by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Adam R.; Court, Carolyn; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Jin, Ding J.; Kashlev, Mikhail; Court, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional slippage is a class of error in which ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase incorporates nucleotides out of register, with respect to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) template. This phenomenon is involved in gene regulation mechanisms and in the development of diverse diseases. The bacteriophage λ N protein reduces transcriptional slippage within actively growing cells and in vitro. N appears to stabilize the RNA/DNA hybrid, particularly at the 5′ end, preventing loss of register between transcript and template. This report provides the first evidence of a protein that directly influences transcriptional slippage, and provides a clue about the molecular mechanism of transcription termination and N-mediated antitermination. PMID:24711367

  15. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  16. Mutability of DNA polymerase I: implications for the creation of mutant DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ern; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2005-12-01

    DNA polymerases of the Family A catalyze the addition of deoxynucleotides to a primer with high efficiency, processivity, and selectivity-properties that are critical to their function both in nature and in the laboratory. These polymerases tolerate many amino acid substitutions, even in regions that are evolutionarily conserved. This tolerance can be exploited to create DNA polymerases with novel properties and altered substrate specificities, using rational design and molecular evolution. These efforts have focused mainly on the Family A DNA polymerises -Taq, E. coli Pol I, and T7 - because they are widely utilized in biotechnology today. The redesign of polymerases often requires knowledge of the function of specific residues in the protein, including those located in six evolutionarily conserved regions. The most well characterized of these are motifs A and B, which regulate the fidelity of replication and the incorporation of nucleotide analogs such as dideoxynucleotides. Regions that remain to be more thoroughly characterized are motif C, which is critical for catalysis, and motifs 1, 2 and 6, all of which bind to DNA primer or template. Several recently identified mutants with abilities to incorporate nucleotides with bulky adducts have mutations that are not located within conserved regions and warrant further study. Analysis of these mutants will help advance our understanding of how DNA polymerases select bases with high fidelity. PMID:16230053

  17. Creatinyl amino acids: new hybrid compounds with neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dorosh, Marina; Dobrodumov, Anatoliy; Veselkina, Olga

    2011-09-01

    Prolonged oral creatine administration resulted in remarkable neuroprotection in experimental models of brain stroke. However, because of its polar nature creatine has poor ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) without specific creatine transporter (CRT). Thus, synthesis of hydrophobic derivatives capable of crossing the BBB by alternative pathway is of great importance for the treatment of acute and chronic neurological diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury and hereditary CRT deficiency. Here we describe synthesis of new hybrid compounds-creatinyl amino acids, their neuroprotective activity in vivo and stability to degradation in different media. The title compounds were synthesized by guanidinylation of corresponding sarcosyl peptides or direct creatine attachment using isobutyl chloroformate method. Addition of lipophilic counterion (p-toluenesulfonate) ensures efficient creatine dissolution in DMF with simultaneous protection of guanidino group towards intramolecular cyclization. It excludes the application of expensive guanidinylating reagents, permits to simplify synthetic procedure and adapt it to large-scale production. The biological activity of creatinyl amino acids was tested in vivo on ischemic stroke and NaNO(2) -induced hypoxia models. One of the most effective compounds-creatinyl-glycine ethyl ester increases life span of experimental animals more than two times in hypoxia model and has neuroprotective action in brain stroke model when applied both before and after ischemia. These data evidenced that creatinyl amino acids can represent promising candidates for the development of new drugs useful in stroke treatment. PMID:21644247

  18. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C-50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO₄(-)• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO₄(-)•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF₂-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn-1F2n-1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  19. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  20. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression. PMID:26842135

  1. Large Fragment of DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus sp. 777: Cloning and Comparison with DNA Polymerases I in Practical Applications.

    PubMed

    Oscorbin, Igor P; Boyarskikh, Ulyana A; Filipenko, Maksim L

    2015-10-01

    A truncated gene of DNA polymerase I from the thermophilic bacteria Geobacillus sp. 777 encoding a large fragment of enzyme (LF Gss pol) was cloned and sequenced. The resulting sequence is 1776-bp long and encodes a 592 aa protein with a predicted molecular mass of 69.8 kDa. Enzyme was overexpressed in E. coli, purified by metal-chelate chromatography, and biochemically characterized. The specific activity of LF Gss pol is 104,000 U/mg (one unit of enzyme was defined as the amount of enzyme that incorporated 10 nmol of dNTP into acid insoluble material in 30 min at 65 °C). The properties of LF Gss pol were compared to commercially available large fragments of DNA polymerase I from G. stearothermophilus (LF Bst pol) and Bacillus smithii (LF Bsm pol). Studied enzymes showed maximum activity at similar pH and concentrations of monovalent/divalent ions, whereas LF Gss pol and LF Bst pol were more thermostable than LF Bsm pol. LF Gss pol is more resistant to enzyme inhibitors (SYBR Green I, heparin, ethanol, urea, blood plasma) in comparison with LF Bst pol and LF Bsm pol. LF Gss pol is also suitable for loop-mediated isothermal amplification and whole genome amplification of human genomic DNA. PMID:26289299

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Oleanolic and Ursolic Acids: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Jéssica A.; Lago, João Henrique G.; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Yamamoto, Eduardo S.; Passero, Luiz Felipe D.

    2015-01-01

    Triterpenoids are the most representative group of phytochemicals, as they comprise more than 20,000 recognized molecules. These compounds are biosynthesized in plants via squalene cyclization, a C30 hydrocarbon that is considered to be the precursor of all steroids. Due to their low hydrophilicity, triterpenes were considered to be inactive for a long period of time; however, evidence regarding their wide range of pharmacological activities is emerging, and elegant studies have highlighted these activities. Several triterpenic skeletons have been described, including some that have presented with pentacyclic features, such as oleanolic and ursolic acids. These compounds have displayed incontestable biological activity, such as antibacterial, antiviral, and antiprotozoal effects, which were not included in a single review until now. Thus, the present review investigates the potential use of these triterpenes against human pathogens, including their mechanisms of action, via in vivo studies, and the future perspectives about the use of compounds for human or even animal health are also discussed. PMID:25793002

  3. The biological activities of protein/oleic acid complexes reside in the fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Angelo; Spolaore, Barbara; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia

    2013-06-01

    A complex formed by human α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and oleic acid (OA), named HAMLET, has been shown to have an apoptotic activity leading to the selective death of tumor cells. In numerous publications it has been reported that in the complex α-LA is monomeric and adopts a partly folded or "molten globule" state, leading to the idea that partly folded proteins can have "beneficial effects". The protein/OA molar ratio initially has been reported to be 1:1, while recent data have indicated that the OA-complex is given by an oligomeric protein capable of binding numerous OA molecules per protein monomer. Proteolytic fragments of α-LA, as well as other proteins unrelated to α-LA, can form OA-complexes with biological activities similar to those of HAMLET, thus indicating that a generic protein can form a cytotoxic complex under suitable experimental conditions. Moreover, even the selective tumoricidal activity of HAMLET-like complexes has been questioned. There is recent evidence that the biological activity of long chain unsaturated fatty acids, including OA, can be ascribed to their effect of perturbing the structure of biological membranes and consequently the function of membrane-bound proteins. In general, it has been observed that the cytotoxic effects exerted by HAMLET-like complexes are similar to those reported for OA alone. Overall, these findings can be interpreted by considering that the protein moiety does not have a toxic effect on its own, but merely acts as a solubilising agent for the inherently toxic fatty acid. PMID:23499846

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid and palmitic acid reciprocally modulate monocyte activation in part through endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Ryan G; Huang, Shurong; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Jandali, Ola; Shao, Tiffany; Sama, Spandana; Brüne, Bernhard; Hwang, Daniel H

    2016-06-01

    Palmitic acid (C16:0) and TLR2 ligand induce, but docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibits monocyte activation. C16:0 and TLR2 or TLR4 ligand induce certain ER stress markers; thus, we determined whether ER stress induced by these agonists is sufficient to induce monocyte activation, and whether the ER stress is inhibited by DHA which is known to inhibit C16:0- or ligand-induced TLR activation. Monocyte activation and ER stress were assessed by TLR/inflammasome-induced IL-1β production, and phosphorylation of IRE-1 and eIF2 and expression of CHOP, respectively in THP-1 cells. TLR2 ligand Pam3CSK4 induced phosphorylation of eIF2, but not phosphorylation of IRE-1 and CHOP expression. LPS also induced phosphorylation of both IRE-1 and eIF2 but not CHOP expression suggesting that TLR2 or TLR4 ligand, or C16:0 induces different ER stress responses. C16:0-, Pam3CSK4-, or LPS-induced IL-1β production was inhibited by 4-phenylbutyric acid, an inhibitor of ER stress suggesting that IL-1β production induced by these agonists is partly mediated through ER stress. Among two ER stress-inducing molecules, thapsigargin but not tunicamycin led to the expression of pro-IL-1β and secretion of IL-1β. Thus, not all types of ER stress are sufficient to induce inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion in monocytes. Although both C16:0 and thapsigargin-induced IL-1β secretion was inhibited by DHA, only C16:0-mediated ER stress was responsive to DHA. These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of DHA are at least in part mediated through modulating ER homeostasis and that the propensity of ER stress can be differentially modulated by the types of dietary fat we consume. PMID:27142735

  5. Antiproliferative Activity of β-Hydroxy-β-Arylalkanoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Sanda P.; Žižak, Željko S.; Stanojković, Tatjana P.; Juranić, Zorica D.; Drakulić, Branko J.; Juranić, Ivan O.

    2007-01-01

    Article describes the synthesis of fifteen β-hydroxy-β-arylalkanoic acids by Reformatsky reaction using the 1-ethoxyethyl-2-bromoalkanoates, aromatic or cycloalkyl ketones or aromatic aldehydes. The short survey of previously reported synthetic procedures for title compounds, is given. The majority of obtained compounds exert antiproliferative activity in vitro toward human: HeLa, Fem-X cells, K562, and LS174 cells, having IC50 values from 62.20 to 205 μM. The most active compound is 3-OH-2,2-di-Me-3-(4- biphenylyl)-butanoic acid, having the IC50 value 62.20 μM toward HeLa cells. Seven examined compounds did not affect proliferation of healthy human blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC and PBMC+ PHA), IC50 > 300 μM. The preliminary QSAR results show that estimated lipophilicity of compounds influences their antiproliferative activity in the first place. The ability of dehydration, and the spatial arrangement of hydrophobic portion, HBD and HBA in molecules are has almost equal importance as lipophilicity.

  6. The RNA Polymerase of Marine Cyanophage Syn5*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Tabor, Stanley; Raytcheva, Desislava A.; Hernandez, Alfredo; King, Jonathan A.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    A single subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified and purified to apparent homogeneity from cyanophage Syn5 that infects the marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus. Syn5 is homologous to bacteriophage T7 that infects Escherichia coli. Using the purified enzyme its promoter has been identified by examining transcription of segments of Syn5 DNA and sequencing the 5′-termini of the transcripts. Only two Syn5 RNAP promoters, having the sequence 5′-ATTGGGCACCCGTAA-3′, are found within the Syn5 genome. One promoter is located within the Syn5 RNA polymerase gene and the other is located close to the right genetic end of the genome. The purified enzyme and its promoter have enabled a determination of the requirements for transcription. Unlike the salt-sensitive bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, this marine RNA polymerase requires 160 mm potassium for maximal activity. The optimal temperature for Syn5 RNA polymerase is 24 °C, much lower than that for T7 RNA polymerase. Magnesium is required as a cofactor although some activity is observed with ferrous ions. Syn5 RNA polymerase is more efficient in utilizing low concentrations of ribonucleotides than T7 RNA polymerase. PMID:23258537

  7. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF. PMID:12504106

  8. Biocatalytic amidation of carboxylic acids and their antinemic activity.

    PubMed

    Bose, Abinesh; Shakil, Najam Akhtar; Pankaj; Kumar, Jitendra; Singh, Manish K

    2010-04-01

    A series of novel N-alkyl substituted amides, synthesized by enzyme catalysis, were evaluated against root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita and found to have potential antinemic activity. The corresponding amides were prepared by the condensation of equimolar amounts of carboxylic acids with different alkyl amines in the presence of Candida antarctica lipase at 60-90 degrees C in 16-20 h. The reactions were carried out in a non - solvent system without the use of any activating agents. All the products were obtained in appreciable amounts and the yields for different compounds varied between 77.4-82.3%. The synthesized compounds were characterized using spectroscopy techniques namely Infra Red (IR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) ((1)H and (13)C). Nematicidal activity of synthesized amides was evaluated against J(2)s of Meloidogyne incognita at 500, 250, 125 and 62.5 ppm concentrations after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h of exposure. Among all the tested compounds, N-propyl-butyramide, N-propyl-pentanamide and N-propyl-hexanamide were found to possess significant activity with LC(50) values of 67.46, 83.49 and 96.53 respectively. N-propyl-butyramide with LC(50) value of 67.46 ppm was found to be most active amide against J(2)s of Meloidogyne incognita. The bioactivity study showed that an increase in alkyl chain significantly decreased the activity of amides against root-knot nematode. PMID:20390959

  9. Synthesis and biological activity of novel deoxycholic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popadyuk, Irina I; Markov, Andrey V; Salomatina, Oksana V; Logashenko, Evgeniya B; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Zenkova, Marina A; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis and biological activity of new semi-synthetic derivatives of naturally occurring deoxycholic acid (DCA) bearing 2-cyano-3-oxo-1-ene, 3-oxo-1(2)-ene or 3-oxo-4(5)-ene moieties in ring A and 12-oxo or 12-oxo-9(11)-ene moieties in ring C. Bioassays using murine macrophage-like cells and tumour cells show that the presence of the 9(11)-double bond associated with the increased polarity of ring A or with isoxazole ring joined to ring A, improves the ability of the compounds to inhibit cancer cell growth. PMID:26037611

  10. Novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs attenuate cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Liu, Jing; Kumar, Ganesh; Skapek, Stephen X.; Falck, John R.; Imig, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity severely limits the use of the anticancer drug cisplatin. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contribute to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. We developed novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs and investigated their prophylactic effect in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was manifested by increases in blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, urinary N-acetyl-β-(d)-glucosaminidase activity, kidney injury molecule 1, and histopathology. EET analogs (10 mg/kg/d) attenuated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing these renal injury markers by 40–80% along with a 50–70% reduction in renal tubular cast formation. This attenuated renal injury is associated with reduced oxidative stress, inflammation, and ER stress evident from reduction in related biomarkers and in the renal expression of genes involved in these pathways. Moreover, we demonstrated that the attenuated nephrotoxicity correlated with decreased apoptosis that is associated with 50–90% reduction in Bcl-2 protein family mediated proapoptotic signaling, reduced renal caspase-12 expression, and a 50% reduction in renal caspase-3 activity. We further demonstrated in vitro that the protective activity of EET analogs does not compromise the anticancer effects of cisplatin. Collectively, our data provide evidence that EET analogs attenuate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, inflammation, ER stress, and apoptosis without affecting the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin.—Khan, Md. A. H., Liu, J., Kumar, G., Skapek, S. X., Falck, J. R., Imig, J. D. Novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs attenuate cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:23603837

  11. Activity-Based Probe for N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elisa; Ponzano, Stefano; Armirotti, Andrea; Summa, Maria; Bertozzi, Fabio; Garau, Gianpiero; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-09-18

    N-Acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA) is a lysosomal cysteine hydrolase involved in the degradation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), a family of endogenous lipid signaling molecules that includes oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Among the reported NAAA inhibitors, α-amino-β-lactone (3-aminooxetan-2-one) derivatives have been shown to prevent FAE hydrolysis in innate-immune and neural cells and to reduce reactions to inflammatory stimuli. Recently, we disclosed two potent and selective NAAA inhibitors, the compounds ARN077 (5-phenylpentyl-N-[(2S,3R)-2-methyl-4-oxo-oxetan-3-yl]carbamate) and ARN726 (4-cyclohexylbutyl-N-[(S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl]carbamate). The former is active in vivo by topical administration in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia, while the latter exerts systemic anti-inflammatory effects in mouse models of lung inflammation. In the present study, we designed and validated a derivative of ARN726 as the first activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe for the in vivo detection of NAAA. The newly synthesized molecule 1 is an effective in vitro and in vivo click-chemistry activity based probe (ABP), which is able to capture the catalytically active form of NAAA in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cells overexpressing human NAAA as well as in rat lung tissue. Competitive ABPP with 1 confirmed that ARN726 and ARN077 inhibit NAAA in vitro and in vivo. Compound 1 is a useful new tool to identify activated NAAA both in vitro and in vivo and to investigate the physiological and pathological roles of this enzyme. PMID:26102511

  12. Synthesis and anticancer activity of novel fluorinated asiatic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruno M F; Salvador, Jorge A R; Marín, Silvia; Cascante, Marta

    2016-05-23

    A series of novel fluorinated Asiatic Acid (AA) derivatives were successfully synthesized, tested for their antiproliferative activity against HeLa and HT-29 cell lines, and their structure activity relationships were evaluated. The great majority of fluorinated derivatives showed stronger antiproliferative activity than AA in a concentration dependent manner. The most active compounds have a pentameric A-ring containing an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group. The compounds with better cytotoxic activity were then evaluated against MCF-7, Jurkat, PC-3, A375, MIA PaCa-2 and BJ cell lines. Derivative 14 proved to be the most active compound among all tested derivatives and its mechanism of action was further investigated in HeLa cell line. The results showed that compound 14 induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 stage as a consequence of up-regulation of p21(cip1/waf1) and p27(kip1) and down-regulation of cyclin D3 and Cyclin E. Furthermore, compound 14 was found to induce caspase driven-apoptosis with activation of caspases-8 and caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP. The cleavage of Bid into t-Bid, the up-regulation of Bax and the down-regulation of Bcl-2 were also observed after treatment of HeLa cells with compound 14. Taken together, these mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways in the apoptotic process induced by compound 14. Importantly, the antiproliferative activity of this compound on the non-tumor BJ human fibroblast cell line is weaker than in the tested cancer cell lines. The enhanced potency (between 45 and 90-fold more active than AA in a panel of cancer cell lines) and selectivity of this new AA derivative warrant further preclinical evaluation. PMID:26974379

  13. Activity of capryloyl collagenic acid against bacteria involved in acne.

    PubMed

    Fourniat, J; Bourlioux, P

    1989-12-01

    Synopsis Capryloyl collagenic acid (Lipacide C8Co) has similar bacteriostatic activity in vitro to that of benzoyl peroxide towards the bacteria found in acne lesions (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes) (MIC between 1 and 4 mg ml(-1) for C8Co, and between 0.5 and 5 mg ml(-1) for benzoyl peroxide). The presence of Emulgine M8 did not affect the bacteriostatic activity of C8Co. A 4% w/v solution of C8Co (incorporating Emulgine M8) fulfilled the criteria for an antiseptic preparation as laid down by the French Pharmacopoeia (10th Edition), and had a spectrum 5 bactericidal activity according to the French Standard AFNOR NF T 72-151. The excellent cutaneous tolerance of capryloyl collagenic acid would indicate that an aqueous solution might be of value for topical treatment of the bacterial component of acne. Résumé Activité antibactérienne de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique vis à vis des bactéries impliquées dans l'etiologie de l'acné L'acide capryloyl-collagénique (Lipacide C8Co) et le peroxyde de benzoyle présentent une activité bactériostatique in-vitroéquivalente vis à vis des espèces bactériennes retrouvées au niveau des lésions acnéiques (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis et Propionibacterium acnes) (CMI comprise entre 1 et 4 mg ml(-1) pour le lipoaminoacide, et 0,5 et 5 mg ml(-1) pour le peroxyde de benzoyle). La mise en solution aqueuse de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique en présence d'Emulgine M8 ne modifie pas son activité bactériostatique. Une telle solution, à 4% m/V d'acide capryloyl-collagénique et 5% m/V d'Emulgine M8, satisfait à l'essai d'activité des préparations antiseptiques décrit à la Pharmacopée Française (Xème Ed.) (concentration minimale antiseptique: 10% v/V, pour un temps de contact de 5 min à 32 degrees C entre les germes tests et la solution diluée en eau distillée), et posséde une activité bactéricide antiseptique spectre 5 conforme à la norme AFNOR NF T

  14. Phosphoesterase domains associated with DNA polymerases of diverse origins.

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    1998-01-01

    Computer analysis of DNA polymerase protein sequences revealed previously unidentified conserved domains that belong to two distinct superfamilies of phosphoesterases. The alpha subunits of bacterial DNA polymerase III and two distinct family X DNA polymerases are shown to contain an N-terminal domain that defines a novel enzymatic superfamily, designated PHP, after polymerase and histidinol phosphatase. The predicted catalytic site of the PHP superfamily consists of four motifs containing conserved histidine residues that are likely to be involved in metal-dependent catalysis of phosphoester bond hydrolysis. The PHP domain is highly conserved in all bacterial polymerase III alpha subunits, but in proteobacteria and mycoplasmas, the conserved motifs are distorted, suggesting a loss of the enzymatic activity. Another conserved domain, found in the small subunits of archaeal DNA polymerase II and eukaryotic DNA polymerases alpha and delta, is shown to belong to the superfamily of calcineurin-like phospho-esterases, which unites a variety of phosphatases and nucleases. The conserved motifs required for phospho-esterase activity are intact in the archaeal DNA polymerase subunits, but are disrupted in their eukaryotic orthologs. A hypothesis is proposed that bacterial and archaeal replicative DNA polymerases possess intrinsic phosphatase activity that hydrolyzes the pyrophosphate released during nucleotide polymerization. As proposed previously, pyrophosphate hydrolysis may be necessary to drive the polymerization reaction forward. The phosphoesterase domains with disrupted catalytic motifs may assume an allosteric, regulatory function and/or bind other subunits of DNA polymerase holoenzymes. In these cases, the pyrophosphate may be hydrolyzed by a stand-alone phosphatase, and candidates for such a role were identified among bacterial PHP superfamily members. PMID:9685491

  15. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  16. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of glutamic acid-based dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Silveira-Dorta, Gastón; Martín, Víctor S; Padrón, José M

    2015-08-01

    A small and focused library of 22 dipeptides derived from N,N-dibenzylglutamic acid α- and γ-benzyl esters was prepared in a straightforward manner. The evaluation of the antiproliferative activity in the human solid tumor cell lines HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast), and WiDr (colon) provided γ-glutamyl methionine (GI50 = 6.0-41 μM) and α-glutamyl proline (GI50 = 7.5-18 μM) as lead compounds. In particular, glutamyl serine and glutamyl proline dipeptides were more active in the resistant cancer cell line WiDr than the conventional anticancer drugs cisplatin and etoposide. Glutamyl tryptophan dipeptides did not affect cell growth of HBL-100, while in T-47D cells, proliferation was inhibited. This result might be attributed to the inhibition of the ATB(0,+) transporter. PMID:25900811

  17. The Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 Activates the TRPA1 Channel to Induce Itch in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, TinaMarie; Jayaweera, Gihan; Zhao, Peishen; Poole, Daniel P.; Jensen, Dane; Grace, Megan; McIntyre, Peter; Bron, Romke; Wilson, Yvette M.; Krappitz, Matteus; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Steinhoff, Martin S.; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Corvera, Carlos U.; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with cholestatic disease have increased systemic concentrations of bile acids (BAs) and profound pruritus. The G-protein–coupled BA receptor 1 TGR5 (encoded by GPBAR1) is expressed by primary sensory neurons; its activation induces neuronal hyperexcitability and scratching by unknown mechanisms. We investigated whether the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is involved in BA-evoked, TGR5-dependent pruritus in mice. METHODS Co-expression of TGR5 and TRPA1 in cutaneous afferent neurons isolated from mice was analyzed by immunofluorescence, in situ hybridization, and single-cell polymerase chain reaction. TGR5-induced activation of TRPA1 was studied in in HEK293 cells, Xenopus laevis oocytes, and primary sensory neurons by measuring Ca2+ signals. The contribution of TRPA1 to TGR5-induced release of pruritogenic neuropeptides, activation of spinal neurons, and scratching behavior were studied using TRPA1 antagonists or Trpa1−/− mice. RESULTS TGR5 and TRPA1 protein and messenger RNA were expressed by cutaneous afferent neurons. In HEK cells, oocytes, and neurons co-expressing TGR5 and TRPA1, BAs caused TGR5-dependent activation and sensitization of TRPA1 by mechanisms that required Gβγ, protein kinase C, and Ca2+. Antagonists or deletion of TRPA1 prevented BA-stimulated release of the pruritogenic neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide and atrial natriuretic peptide B in the spinal cord. Disruption of Trpa1 in mice blocked BA-induced expression of Fos in spinal neurons and prevented BA-stimulated scratching. Spontaneous scratching was exacerbated in transgenic mice that overexpressed TRG5. Administration of a TRPA1 antagonist or the BA sequestrant colestipol, which lowered circulating levels of BAs, prevented exacerbated spontaneous scratching in TGR5 overexpressing mice. CONCLUSIONS BAs induce pruritus in mice by co-activation of TGR5 and TRPA1. Antagonists of TGR5 and TRPA1, or inhibitors of the signaling mechanism by

  18. Sorption of perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluoroheptanoic acid on granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Luo, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Woodward, David; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    The sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) on granular activated carbon (GAC) was characterized and compared to explore the underlying mechanisms. Sorption of the three perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on GAC appeared to be a rapid intra-particle diffusion process, which were well represented by the pseudo-second-order rate model with the sorption rate following the order PFOS > PFOA > PFHpA. Sorption isotherm data were well fitted by the Freundlich model with the sorption capacity (Kf) of PFOS, PFOA and PFHpA being 4.45, 2.42 and 1.66 respectively. This suggests that the hydrophilic head group on PFAAs, i.e. sulfonate vs carboxylic, has a strong influence on their sorption. Comparison between PFOA and PFHpA revealed that hydrophobicity could also play a role in the sorption of PFAAs on GAC when the fluorocarbon chain length is different. Analyses using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR)-Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested possible formation of a negative charge-assisted H-bond between PFAAs and the functionalities on GAC surfaces, including non-aromatic ketones, sulfides, and halogenated hydrocarbons. PMID:26606188

  19. Antithrombotic activities of ferulic acid via intracellular cyclic nucleotide signaling.

    PubMed

    Hong, Qian; Ma, Zeng-Chun; Huang, Hao; Wang, Yu-Guang; Tan, Hong-Ling; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Liang, Qian-De; Zhang, Han-Ting; Gao, Yue

    2016-04-15

    Ferulic acid (FA) produces protective effects against cardiovascular dysfunctions. However, the mechanisms of FA is still not known. Here we examined the antithrombotic effects of FA and its potential mechanisms. Anticoagulation assays and platelet aggregation was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Thromboxane B2 (TXB2), cyclic adenosine monophosphate(cAMP), and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) was determined using enzyme immunoassay kits. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured using the Griess reaction. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting analysis. Oral administration of FA prevented death caused by pulmonary thrombosis and prolonged the tail bleeding and clotting time in mice,while, it did not alter the coagulation parameters, including the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). In addition, FA (50-200µM) dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation induced by various platelet agonists, including adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin, collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), and U46619. Further, FA attenuated intracellular Ca(2)(+) mobilization and TXB2 production induced by the platelet agonists. FA increased the levels of cAMP and cGMP and phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) while decreased phospho-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) in washed rat platelets, VASP is a substrate of cyclic nucleotide and PDE is an enzyme family responsible for hydrolysis of cAMP/cGMP. These results suggest that antithrombotic activities of FA may be regulated by inhibition of platelet aggregation, rather than through inhibiting the release of thromboplastin or formation of thrombin. The mechanism of this action may involve activation of cAMP and cGMP signaling. PMID:26948317

  20. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying; Naleway, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson's Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  1. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  2. Activated carbon passes tests for acid-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-06-24

    Use of activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid-gas feed to Claus sulfur-recovery units has been successfully pilot tested in Saudi Arabia. Pilot plant results are discussed here along with issues involved in scale-up to commercial size. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}+s from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated by use of low-pressure steam. A post-regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. The paper discusses feed contaminants, vapor-phase cleanup, testing design, test parameters and results, bed drying after regeneration, regeneration conditions, basic flow, system control, and full-scale installation.

  3. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  4. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activity of dihydroasparagusic acid in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Salemme, Adele; Togna, Anna Rita; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Cammisotto, Vittoria; Ottaviani, Monica; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Venditti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The activation of microglia and subsequent release of toxic pro-inflammatory factors are crucially associated with neurodegenerative disease, characterized by increased oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and multiple sclerosis. Dihydroasparagusic acid is the reduced form of asparagusic acid, a sulfur-containing flavor component produced by Asparagus plants. It has two thiolic functions able to coordinate the metal ions, and a carboxylic moiety, a polar function, which may enhance excretion of the complexes. Thiol functions are also present in several biomolecules with important physiological antioxidant role as glutathione. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential effect of dihydroasparagusic acid on microglial activation in an in vitro model of neuroinflammation. We have used lipopolysaccharide to induce an inflammatory response in primary rat microglial cultures. Our results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid significantly prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced production of pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators such as nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, prostaglandin E2, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression and lipoxygenase activity in microglia cells. Moreover it effectively suppressed the level of reactive oxygen species and affected lipopolysaccharide-stimulated activation of mitogen activated protein kinase, including p38, and nuclear factor-kB pathway. These results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid's neuroprotective properties may be due to its ability to dampen induction of microglial activation. It is a compound that can effectively inhibit inflammatory and oxidative processes that are important factors of the etiopathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26592472

  6. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  7. Lipopolysaccharide prevents valproic acid-induced apoptosis via activation of nuclear factor-κB and inhibition of p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Haque, Abedul; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on valproic acid (VPA)-induced cell death was examined by using mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS inhibited the activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS inhibited VPA-induced p53 activation and pifithrin-α as a p53 inhibitor as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS abolished the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which is a critical indicator of p53-mediated mitochondrial damage, in response to VPA. The nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors, Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide, abolished the preventive action of LPS on VPA-induced apoptosis. A series of toll-like receptor ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly I:C, and CpG DNA as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, LPS was suggested to prevent VPA-induced apoptosis via activation of anti-apoptotic NF-κB and inhibition of pro-apoptotic p53 activation. The detailed inhibitory mechanism of VPA-induced apoptosis by LPS is discussed. PMID:23770718

  8. DNA Polymerase β Ribonucleotide Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Nisha A.; Beard, William A.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerases must select nucleotides that preserve Watson-Crick base pairing rules and choose substrates with the correct (deoxyribose) sugar. Sugar discrimination represents a great challenge because ribonucleotide triphosphates are present at much higher cellular concentrations than their deoxy-counterparts. Although DNA polymerases discriminate against ribonucleotides, many therapeutic nucleotide analogs that target polymerases have sugar modifications, and their efficacy depends on their ability to be incorporated into DNA. Here, we investigate the ability of DNA polymerase β to utilize nucleotides with modified sugars. DNA polymerase β readily inserts dideoxynucleoside triphosphates but inserts ribonucleotides nearly 4 orders of magnitude less efficiently than natural deoxynucleotides. The efficiency of ribonucleotide insertion is similar to that reported for other DNA polymerases. The poor polymerase-dependent insertion represents a key step in discriminating against ribonucleotides because, once inserted, a ribonucleotide is easily extended. Likewise, a templating ribonucleotide has little effect on insertion efficiency or fidelity. In contrast to insertion and extension of a ribonucleotide, the chemotherapeutic drug arabinofuranosylcytosine triphosphate is efficiently inserted but poorly extended. These results suggest that the sugar pucker at the primer terminus plays a crucial role in DNA synthesis; a 3′-endo sugar pucker facilitates nucleotide insertion, whereas a 2′-endo conformation inhibits insertion. PMID:20519499

  9. An acidic sphingomyelinase Type C activity from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garza, Jorge; González-Salazar, Francisco; Quinn, Frederick D; Karls, Russell K; De La Garza-Salinas, Laura Hermila; Guzmán-de la Garza, Francisco J; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Sphingolipids are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes mediating cell cycle control, differentiation, stress response, cell migration, adhesion, and apoptosis. Bacterial SMases are virulence factors for several species of pathogens. Whole cell extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains H37Rv and CDC1551 were assayed using [N-methyl-(14)C]-sphingomyelin as substrate. Acidic Zn(2+)-dependent SMase activity was identified in both strains. Peak SMase activity was observed at pH 5.5. Interestingly, overall SMase activity levels from CDC1551 extracts are approximately 1/3 of those of H37Rv. The presence of exogenous SMase produced by M. tuberculosis during infection may interfere with the normal host inflammatory response thus allowing the establishment of infection and disease development. This Type C activity is different from previously identified M. tuberculosis SMases. Defining the biochemical characteristics of M. tuberculosis SMases helps to elucidate the roles that these enzymes play during infection and disease. PMID:26948102

  10. Novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs attenuate cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Abdul Hye; Liu, Jing; Kumar, Ganesh; Skapek, Stephen X; Falck, John R; Imig, John D

    2013-08-01

    Nephrotoxicity severely limits the use of the anticancer drug cisplatin. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contribute to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. We developed novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs and investigated their prophylactic effect in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was manifested by increases in blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, urinary N-acetyl-β-(d)-glucosaminidase activity, kidney injury molecule 1, and histopathology. EET analogs (10 mg/kg/d) attenuated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing these renal injury markers by 40-80% along with a 50-70% reduction in renal tubular cast formation. This attenuated renal injury is associated with reduced oxidative stress, inflammation, and ER stress evident from reduction in related biomarkers and in the renal expression of genes involved in these pathways. Moreover, we demonstrated that the attenuated nephrotoxicity correlated with decreased apoptosis that is associated with 50-90% reduction in Bcl-2 protein family mediated proapoptotic signaling, reduced renal caspase-12 expression, and a 50% reduction in renal caspase-3 activity. We further demonstrated in vitro that the protective activity of EET analogs does not compromise the anticancer effects of cisplatin. Collectively, our data provide evidence that EET analogs attenuate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, inflammation, ER stress, and apoptosis without affecting the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin. PMID:23603837

  11. Structure and activity of the acid-sensing ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Thomas W.; Frey, Erin N.

    2012-01-01

    The acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of proton-sensing channels expressed throughout the nervous system. Their activity is linked to a variety of complex behaviors including fear, anxiety, pain, depression, learning, and memory. ASICs have also been implicated in neuronal degeneration accompanying ischemia and multiple sclerosis. As a whole, ASICs represent novel therapeutic targets for several clinically important disorders. An understanding of the correlation between ASIC structure and function will help to elucidate their mechanism of action and identify potential therapeutics that specifically target these ion channels. Despite the seemingly simple nature of proton binding, multiple studies have shown that proton-dependent gating of ASICs is quite complex, leading to activation and desensitization through distinct structural components. This review will focus on the structural aspects of ASIC gating in response to both protons and the newly discovered activators GMQ and MitTx. ASIC modulatory compounds and their action on proton-dependent gating will also be discussed. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dale Benos, who made a substantial contribution to our understanding of ASIC activity. PMID:22843794

  12. Structure-activity relationship studies of microbiologically active thiosemicarbazides derived from hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazides.

    PubMed

    Plech, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Kaproń, Barbara; Kosikowska, Urszula; Malm, Anna; Strzelczyk, Aleksandra; Stączek, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    Forty-five derivatives of thiosemicarbazide were synthesized, and their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was evaluated. Some of the described compounds exhibited interesting activity against reference strains of Gram-positive bacteria, whereas only two derivatives had the ability to inhibit the growth of Gram-negative species (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883, Proteus mirabilis ATCC 12453). The most potent antimicrobial activity was observed in the cases of salicylic acid hydrazide derivatives. The differences in activity inspired us to conduct conformational analysis using molecular mechanics level. The obtained results suggest that the molecule geometry, especially at the N4-terminus of thiosemicarbazide skeleton, determines the antibacterial activity. Unfortunately, in opposition to what we expected, only one of the tested compounds inhibited the activity of the topoIV enzyme, and none of them was active against DNA gyrase. PMID:25043121

  13. A novel nucleic acid analogue shows strong angiogenic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Maruyama, Tokumi; Igarashi, Junsuke; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Kubota, Yasuo; Tokuda, Masaaki; Ashino, Hiromi; Hattori, Kenichi; Tanaka, Shinji; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Konishi, Ryoji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} A novel nucleic acid analogue (2Cl-C.OXT-A, m.w. 284) showed angiogenic potency. {yields} It stimulated the tube formation, proliferation and migration of HUVEC in vitro. {yields} 2Cl-C.OXT-A induced the activation of ERK1/2 and MEK in HUVEC. {yields} Angiogenic potency in vivo was confirmed in CAM assay and rabbit cornea assay. {yields} A synthesized small angiogenic agent would have great clinical therapeutic value. -- Abstract: A novel nucleic acid analogue (2Cl-C.OXT-A) significantly stimulated tube formation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Its maximum potency at 100 {mu}M was stronger than that of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a positive control. At this concentration, 2Cl-C.OXT-A moderately stimulated proliferation as well as migration of HUVEC. To gain mechanistic insights how 2Cl-C.OXT-A promotes angiogenic responses in HUVEC, we performed immunoblot analyses using phospho-specific antibodies as probes. 2Cl-C.OXT-A induced robust phosphorylation/activation of MAP kinase ERK1/2 and an upstream MAP kinase kinase MEK. Conversely, a MEK inhibitor PD98059 abolished ERK1/2 activation and tube formation both enhanced by 2Cl-C.OXT-A. In contrast, MAP kinase responses elicited by 2Cl-C.OXT-A were not inhibited by SU5416, a specific inhibitor of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase. Collectively these results suggest that 2Cl-C.OXT-A-induces angiogenic responses in HUVEC mediated by a MAP kinase cascade comprising MEK and ERK1/2, but independently of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase. In vivo assay using chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and rabbit cornea also suggested the angiogenic potency of 2Cl-C.OXT-A.

  14. Anti-Thrombosis Activity of Sinapic Acid Isolated from the Lees of Bokbunja Wine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Shin, Woo-Chang; Kang, Dong-Kyoon; Sohn, Ho-Yong

    2016-01-01

    From the lees of bokbunja wine (LBW) made from Rubus coreanus Miquel, we have identified six compounds (1: trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid; 2: trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid; 3: 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid; 4: 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid; 5: 3,5-dimethoxy-4- hydroxybenzoic acid; and 6: 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (sinapic acid)) through silica gel chromatography and UHPLC-MS. The compounds 1-6 showed strong anticoagulation and platelet aggregation inhibitory activities without hemolytic effect against human red blood cells. To date, this is the first report of the in vitro anti-thrombosis activity of sinapic acid. Our results suggest that different cinnamic and benzoic acid derivatives are closely linked to the anti-thrombosis activity of LBW, and sinapic acid could be developed as a promising anti-thrombosis agent. PMID:26387815

  15. Mutations in the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase gene can confer resistance to 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine.

    PubMed Central

    Coen, D M; Furman, P A; Gelep, P T; Schaffer, P A

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 resistant to the antiviral drug 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (araA) have been isolated and characterized. AraA-resistant mutants can be isolated readily and appear at an appreciable frequency in low-passage stocks of wild-type virus. Of 13 newly isolated mutants, at least 11 were also resistant to phosphonoacetic acid (PAA). Of four previo