Science.gov

Sample records for acid precipitation samples

  1. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  2. ANALYSIS OF ACID PRECIPITATION SAMPLES COLLECTED BY STATE AGENCIES--SAMPLING PERIOD JAN 1988 - DEC 1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents analytical data from the 30 acid precipitation collection sites in the State-operated Network. amples are collected weekly in plastic bag liners and shipped in 500 mL polyethylene bottles to Global Geochemistry Corporation (the central laboratory for the netw...

  3. ANALYSIS OF ACID PRECIPITATION SAMPLES COLLECTED BY STATE AGENCIES SAMPLING PERIOD JANUARY 1990 - DECEMBER 1990

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents analytical data from the 30 acid precipitation collection sites in the State-Operated Network. amples are collected weekly in plastic bag liners and shipped in 500 mL polyethylene bottles to Global Geochemistry Corporation (the central laboratory for the netw...

  4. ANALYSIS OF ACID PRECIPITATION SAMPLES COLLECTED BY STATE AGENCIES SAMPLING PERIOD: JANUARY 1992 - DECEMBER 1992

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents analytical data from 30 acid precipitation collection sites in the State-Operated Network. amples are collected weekly in plastic bag bucket liners and shipped in 500 mL polyethylene bottled to Global Geochemistry Corporation, the central laboratory for the n...

  5. ANALYSIS OF ACID PRECIPITATION SAMPLES COLLECTED BY STATE AGENCIES: JANUARY 1987 - DECEMBER 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the analytical data from the 31 acid precipitation collection sites in the State Operated Network. Samples are collected weekly in plastic bag liners and shipped in 500 mL polyethylene bottles to Global Geochemistry Corp. (the central laboratory for the networ...

  6. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  7. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reviews of available data indicate that precipitation in a large region of North America is highly acidic when its pH is compared with the expected pH value of 5.65 for pure rain water in equilibrium with CO2. A growing body of evidence suggests that acid rain is responsib...

  8. Chemical Data for Precipitate Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Koski, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    During studies of sulfide oxidation in coastal areas of Prince William Sound in 2005, precipitate samples were collected from onshore and intertidal locations near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson mine sites (chapter A, fig. 1; table 7). The precipitates include jarosite and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Ellamar, amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Threeman, and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, and schwertmannite from Beatson. Precipitates occurring in the form of loose, flocculant coatings were harvested using a syringe and concentrated in the field by repetitive decanting. Thicker accumulations were either scraped gently from rocks using a stainless steel spatula or were scooped directly into receptacles (polyethylene jars or plastic heavy-duty zippered bags). Most precipitate samples contain small amounts of sedimentary detritus. With three jarosite-bearing samples from Ellamar, an attempt was made to separate the precipitate from the heavy-mineral fraction of the sediment. In this procedure, the sample was stirred in a graduated cylinder containing deionized water. The jarosite-rich suspension was decanted onto analytical filter paper and air dried before analysis. Eleven precipitate samples from the three mine sites were analyzed in laboratories of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver, Colorado (table 8). Major and trace elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following multiacid (HCl-HNO3-HClO4-HF) digestion (Briggs and Meier, 2002), except for mercury, which was analyzed by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (Brown and others, 2002a). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on powdered samples (<200 mesh) by S. Sutley of the USGS. Additional details regarding sample preparation and detection limits are found in Taggert (2002). Discussions of the precipitate chemistry and associated microbial communities are presented in Koski and others (2008) and Foster and others (2008), respectively.

  9. BOTANICAL ASPECTS OF ACIDIC PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic precipitation can be characterized as wet or frozen atmospheric deposition with a hydrogen ion concentration greater than 2.5 microequivalents liter-1. Acidic precipitation is perceived as a significant air pollution problem derived chiefly from combustion of fossil fuels,...

  10. Acid precipitation in historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.

    1982-02-01

    The history of acid precipitation is traced from the first awareness of the problem in the mid-17th century to the present. An outline of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment program is also given, and the author makes recommendations for future research. (JMT)

  11. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  12. Acid Precipitation: Causes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, Harvey; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article is the first of three articles in a series on the acid rain problem in recent years. Discussed are the causes of acid precipitation and its consequences for the abiotic and biotic components of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and for man-made materials. (Author/SA)

  13. Low-molecular-weight organic acids in the Tibetan Plateau: Results from one-year of precipitation samples at the SET station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Kang, Shichang; Sun, Jimin; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yongjie; Gao, Shaopeng; Cong, Zhiyuan

    2014-04-01

    Background atmospheric organic acids: formic (F), acetic (A), oxalic (O), and methanesulfonic (MSA, abbreviated to M) acids in the southern Tibetan Plateau (TP), were determined in one-year of precipitation measurements at a remote alpine station. These organic acids were dominated by oxalic (volume-weighted mean of 0.51 μmol l-1)/formic acid (0.38 μmol l-1), followed by acetic acid (0.20 μmol l-1) and MSA (0.10 μmol l-1). Their levels were comparable with those from other remote sites, while they were lower than those found in populated areas. The South Asian monsoon is responsible for the seasonal variation of organic acid concentration: a relative abundance of MSA and lower concentrations of other organic acids (by the dilution effect) in the monsoon season, while opposite in the non-monsoon season. Diverse sources were identified by principal component analysis combined with the corresponding tracers. These were anthropogenic disturbances (which explain 41% of the variance), marine emission (24%), and biogenic emission (16%). Moreover, the variances of F/A, M/(F + A), and O/(F + A) in monsoonal versus non-monsoonal samples, were involved with the changes of sources. Furthermore, these chemical indexes suggest that active photochemistry over the TP was significant for the production of organic acids and consequently enhanced the ratios of M/(F + A) and O/(F + A) in monsoonal rainfalls. The elevated organic compounds within the ascending tropical moisture imply potential significances for the secondary formation of organic acids in the high-altitude and the changes of the Asian monsoon.

  14. Acid precipitation; an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltshire, Denise A.; Evans, Margaret L.

    1984-01-01

    This collection of 1660 bibliographies references on the causes and environmental effects of acidic atmospheric deposition was compiled from computerized literature searches of earth-science and chemistry data bases. Categories of information are (1) atmospheric chemistry (gases and aerosols), (2) precipitation chemistry, (3) transport and deposition (wet and dry), (4) aquatic environments (biological and hydrological), (5) terrestrial environments, (6) effects on materials and structures, (7) air and precipitation monitoring and data collection, and (8) modeling studies. References date from the late 1800 's through December 1981. The bibliography includes short summaries of most documents. Omitted are unpublished manuscripts, publications in press, master 's theses and doctoral dissertations, newspaper articles, and book reviews. Coauthors and subject indexes are included. (USGS)

  15. Acid precipitation in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area

    SciTech Connect

    Roffman, A.

    1980-03-01

    Studies on the pH of atmospheric precipitation are reviewed. The effects of acids in precipitation on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are summarized, with emphasis on the Pittsburgh area. Results of the pH content in the rain samples collected at the three stations in the Pittsburgh area between January 6, 1979 through February 18, 1979 are reported. Surprisingly, pH values of samples taken at Station 3, the rural, pollution-free station, were generally not higher, but rather frequently lower than those obtained in those stations considered polluted. The total mean of Station 1 was 4.3, the total mean of Station 2 was 4.2, and the total mean of Station 3 was 4.0. Wind data were obtained for the dates corresponding to the precipitation collection dates. On all of these dates, the maps show that the direction of the wind currents came from the Ohio River Valley Basin and blew in a northwest to southeast, west to east or a southwest to northeast direction. These winds could have carried pollution from this Basin and other areas in the Midwest into the southwestern Pennsylvania areas. Measurements show that all precipitation collection stations had a low pH at the time of the study. The industrial mills, along the Allegheny, Monogahela, and Ohio Rivers seem to have had a little or no effect on the low pH values measured at the closest station during the study period. The coal-burning power plants seem to have had an effect on the pH values of the precipitation samples collected at Station 3 during the course of the study.The data imply that pollution-carrying winds from the Ohio River Valley Basin contribute acidity to the three stations and Station 3 receives additional acidity from the surrounding coal-burning power plants.

  16. Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dochinger, Leon S.; Seliga, Thomas A.

    1975-01-01

    The First International Symposium on Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem dealt with the potential magnitude of the global effects of acid precipitation on aquatic ecosystems, forest soils, and forest vegetation. The problem is discussed in the light of atmospheric chemistry, transport, and precipitation. (Author/BT)

  17. Acid precipitation and human health: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, S.

    1989-08-01

    This report, written for environmental managers in electric utilities, reviews potential indirect human health effects of acid precipitation. Possible exposure routes and materials examined in this review include drinking water contamination (aluminum and mercury), corrosion of metals (lead, cadmium, arsenic, selenium, copper, and zinc) and asbestos from water piping, bioaccumulation of mercury and other metals in fish and game, and uptake of mobilized metals in crops. No direct effects (e.g., skin or eye irritation) of human exposure to acid precipitation have been identified, and air pollutant impacts on health are not included in this review, because these pollutants are acid precipitation precursors, not acid precipitation per se. The literature is summarized, presenting results from researchers' studies to support their conclusions. The review discusses potential acid precipitation impacts on metal levels in drinking water and food, summarizes the health effects of ingestion of these materials, and identifies areas of needed research. Metal-metal interactions in humans that may be related to acid precipitation are identified. Current research programs and planned assessments of the indirect human health effects of acid precipitation are summarized. 136 refs., 38 figs., 17 tabs

  18. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION ON PLANT DISEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most plant diseases consist of delicate interactions between higher plants and microorganisms. Acidic precipitation represents an environmental stress that has been shown to affect expected development of some diseases and similar phenomena under experimental conditions. From the...

  19. Sampling downscaling in summertime precipitation over Hokkaido

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Yuta; Inatsu, Masaru; Kuno, Ryusuke; Nakano, Naoto

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction Recently, the mixture method of dynamical and statistical downscaling have been developed (cf. Kuno and Inatsu 2014, Pinto et al. 2014). Kuno and Inatsu (2014) developed the sampling downscaling (SmDS) method in which a regional atmospheric model is integrated for sampled years. However, in order to know how these mixture methods are able to effectively reduce the computational costs for dynamical downscaling, we need to apply them to other cases. The purpose of this study is to apply SmDS to summertime precipitation over Hokkaido as another case study. 2. Method Singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis is performed from 1981 to 2010 in June-July-August (JJA) months using the moisture flux convergence (JRA25/JCDAS) around Japan and precipitation (APHRO_JP/V1207) over Hokkaido. Next, we selected the top and bottom two years of the moisture flux convergence of the general circulation model projection onto the first SVD mode. This study conducts the dynamical downscaling for 30 years (full DDS) under the current climate experiment in advance to investigate the reproducibility of SmDS. 3. Result The spatial correlation coefficient between SmDS and full DDS shows 0.96 in daily-mean precipitation and 0.85 in 99 percentile value of daily precipitation. This indicates that SmDS can be applied to the place where the synoptic field strongly controls the local precipitation. In addition, we also statistically considered the error in SmDS and it turned out that the mean in SmDS depended on the correlation coefficient between local and synoptic variables, the number of samples, and the standard deviation of seasonal mean precipitation. It was also demonstrated the SmDS selected the group of years where extreme events likely occurred and another group where they rarely occurred. References Kuno, R., and M. Inatsu, 2014, Clim. Dyn., 43, 375-387. Pinto, J. O., A. J. Monaghan, L. D. Monache, E. Vanvyve, and D. L. Rife, 2014, J. Climate, 27, 1524-1538.

  20. Acid precipitation: basic principles and ecological consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.; Davey, C.B.

    1981-08-01

    The pulp and paper industry is involved with both the cause and effects of acid precipitation. Although significant quantities of desirable plant nutrients (nitrogen and sulfur) are added to the forest system by precipitation, the acidity and its detrimental effects may outweigh the benefits. Damage to the ecosystem is most likely to occur when major inputs of acid precipitation coincide with sensitive stages of a life form (such as fish eggs and larvae), and in poorly buffered, noncalcareous soils and rocks. Biological effects of acid precipitation have been demonstrated - necrotic lesions on foliage, nutrient loss from foliar organs, reduced resistance to pathogens, accelerated erosion of waxes on leaf surfaces, reduced rates of decomposition of leaf litter, inhibited formation of terminal buds, increased seedling mortality, and heavy metal accumulation. Soil microbiological processes such as nitrogen fixation, mineralization of forest litter, and nitrification of ammonium compounds are inhibited, the degree depending on degree of cultivation and soil buffering capacity. Water quality is impacted by contact with vegetation, soil, and bedrock. Acid precipitation mobilizes cations, especially the toxic Al, Mn, and Zn, and nutrients, K, Ca, and Mg. 25 references.

  1. Effects of acid precipitation on Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, S.; Cheetham, R.D.

    1980-08-01

    Pollutants derived from fossil fuel combustion and precipitated from the atmosphere have substantially increased in the past decades. These materials, precipitated in such industrialized areas as southeastern Canada, have caused considerable alterations in aquatic ecosystems. Precipitation over most of the eastern United States is presently 10 to 500 times more acidic than is natural. Most affected aquatic ecosystems contain oligotrophic waters in regions of thin poorly buffered soils. Zooplankton are an important link in food chains of aquatic ecosystems and their disappearance or decline could drastically affect trophic relationships. Declines in zooplankton density in response to acid precipitation have been reported and short term survival of Daphnia pulex between pH 4.3 and 10.4; however, its potential for reproduction was limited to a fairly narrow range. Anderson (1944) noted the advantages of using daphnia as test organisms, and concluded that Daphnia magna was representative of other abundant zooplankton in sensitivity to toxic substances.

  2. Primer on acid precipitation. A killing rain: the global threat of acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlick, T.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the book A Killing Rain: The Global Threat of Acid Precipitation by Thomas Pawlick which presents an overview of the problems associated with acid rain. The book covers the effects of acid rain on aquatic ecosystems, forests materials, and agriculture. It also deals with abatement technologies and sociopolitical topics associated with acid rain.

  3. NAPAP (National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program) results on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) was mandated by Congress in 1980 to study the effects of acid rain. The results of 10 years of research on the effect of acid deposition and ozone on forests, particularly high elevation spruce and fir, southern pines, eastern hardwoods and western conifers, will be published this year.

  4. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Don L.; Pometto, III, Anthony L.

    1984-01-01

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  5. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the causes, effects, sources, and controls of acid precipitation and acidification. Techniques and technology for measurement and analysis of acid precipitation are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research of acid precipitation, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification are covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research of acid precipitation, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification are covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the wet and dry precipitation of acid, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Some attention is focused upon the worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Acid precipitation and ionic movements in Adironack forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Mollitor, A.V.; Raynal, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    To examine potential effects of acid precipitation on forest soils in a hardwood and in a coniferous stand in the central Adirondacks of New York State, solution chemistry was studied in five strata of these ecosystems. Bulk precipitation, throughfall, and soil leachates were sampled and analyzed for pH, NO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, K, Ca, Mg, and Na. A subset of the samples were analyzed for Al. Organic anion concentrations were estimated from ionic charge balances. Concentrations of NO/sub 3/, H, and K in B horizon leachates were not significantly different than precipitation concentrations, while concentrations of SO/sub 4/, Ca, Mg, and Na in water leaving the sola were significantly greater than precipitation concentrations. Patterns of movement for most ions were similar for both study sites, but concentrations were generally greater in the conifer system. Cation leaching from the hardwood site appears about equally influenced by SO/sub 4/ and organic anion leaching. Sulfate and organic anion concentrations were greater in the conifer site but organic anion leaching dominated. Sulfate appears highly mobile in these soils. Chronic leaching by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ combined with internally generated organic acids may represent a threat to the nutrient status of many Adirondack forest soils.

  10. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    DOEpatents

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  11. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION ON SOIL LEACHATE QUALITY: COMPUTER CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multipurpose computer program GEOCHEM was employed to calculate the equilibrium speciation in twenty-three examples of acid precipitation from New Hampshire, New York, and Maine, and in the same number of mixtures of acid precipitation with minerals characteristic of soils in...

  12. Sampling problems: The small scale structure of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    The quantitative measurement of precipitation characteristics for any area on the surface of the Earth is not an easy task. Precipitation is rather variable in both space and time, and the distribution of surface rainfall data given location typically is substantially skewed. There are a number of precipitation process at work in the atmosphere, and few of them are well understood. The formal theory on sampling and estimating precipitation appears considerably deficient. Little systematic attention is given to nonsampling errors that always arise in utilizing any measurement system. Although the precipitation measurement problem is an old one, it continues to be one that is in need of systematic and careful attention. A brief history of the presently competing measurement technologies should aid us in understanding the problem inherent in this measurement task.

  13. Acidic precipitation-induced chemical changes in subalpine fir forest organic soil layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of acid precipitation and heavy metal deposition on the surface organic layer of conifer forest soils of New England and Canada were studied. Trends in concentrations of elements across the regional precipitation pH gradient were analyzed. Leaching of Mn, and Ca from subalpine fir forest soil litter increased as precipitation acidity increased. The order of relative susceptibility to increased leaching due to increased precipitation acidity is Mn > Ca > Mg greater than or equal to K greater than or equal to Zn. Sodium and Cd possibly show leaching patterns similar to those of Mg, K, and Zn. Iron and Pb concentrations increased as precipitation acidity increased. The Fe and Pb concentration gradients are partially caused by relative enrichment of Fe and Pb in litter as more mobile cations and compounds are leached. Relative enrichment was greatest at sites receiving precipitation of greater acidity. A large part of the Pb concentration gradient in litter is due to an atmospheric Pb deposition gradient which parallels the regional precipitation-pH gradient. The order of relative accumulation is Pb > Fe. Lead concentrations were highest in soil L and F layers, indicating that Pb accumulation is a recent, continuing phenomenon. Soil litter showed a pH gradient across the sampling transect. Litter generally increased in acidity as precipitation acidity increased. Increased soil litter acidity and increased cation leaching are related; both are caused by acidic precipitation. Cluster analysis of soil litter chemistry data ordered the mountain sites, with one exception, according to their position along the regional precipitation-pH gradient. This implies that precipitation-pH, and associated heavy metal deposition, control soil litter chemistry in subalpine fir forests. 113 references. (MDF)

  14. The influence of dust events on precipitation acidity in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Shigong; Xia, Junrong; Meng, Xiaoyan; Shang, Kezheng; Xie, Yueyu; Wang, Ruibin

    2013-11-01

    Acid rain and dust events are both serious environmental problems striking China nowadays. This study investigates the distribution and change of precipitation pH and discusses the influence of dust events on precipitation acidity qualitatively and quantitatively in China. Acid rain exhibits remarkable regionality with strong acidic in South China and the acidity gradually decreases from the South to the North. This distribution is decided not only by the concentration of SO2 in atmosphere but also has relationship to the occurrence of dust events. Comparing the monthly changes of precipitation pH in the semiarid region (which is influenced by dust events) with those in the humid region (which is acid rain areas), it is found that the variation trends are just opposite in the two regions and there is an obvious peak value of pH in spring in semiarid region which coincides with the increase of dust event days. Chemical analysis results of precipitation in Lanzhou (a semiarid city intruded by dust events frequently, especially in spring) indicate that the ratio of Ca2+ plus Mg2+ concentrations (indicators of soil dust) to the total cation concentrations is the highest in spring, and the Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations are 1.8 and 1.9 times higher in spring than in summer respectively. The acidity of precipitation can be restrained by dust events qualitatively by increasing alkaline materials in the atmosphere and precipitation. The analysis of daily dust events and precipitation data at 6 stations in Northwest China indicates that the pH of precipitation influenced by dust events is greater than the precipitation not influenced by dust events. The increase degrees are different between different stations and have lagging effects. The direct increases are from 0.03 to 0.91 for the precipitation pH. Dust events can promote the precipitation pH to a certain extent quantitatively.

  15. Preparation of polyethylene sacks for collection of precipitation samples for chemical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Bricker, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Polyethylene sacks are used to collect precipitation samples. Washing polyethylene with acetone, hexane, methanol, or nitric acid can change the adsorptive characteristics of the polyethylene. In this study, simulated precipitation at pH 4.5 was in contact with the polyethylene sacks for 21 days; subsamples were removed for chemical analysis at 7, 14, and 21 days after intitial contact. Sacks washed with acetone adsorbed iron and lithium; sacks washed with hexane adsorbed barium, iron , and lithium; sacks washed with methanol adsorbed calcium and iron; and sacks washed with 0.30 N nitric acid adsorbed iron. Leaching the plastic sacks with 0.15 N nitric acid did not result in 100-percent recovery of any of the adsorbed metals. Washing polyethylene sacks with dilute nitric acid caused the pH of the simulated precipitation to be decreased by 0.2 pH unit after 1 week of contact with the polyethylene. The specific conductance increased by 10 microsiemens per centimeter. Contamination of precipitation samples by lead was determined to be about 0.1 microgram per liter from contact with precleaned polyethylene sacks. No measurable contamination of precipitation samples by zinc occurred. (USGS)

  16. Acid Precipitation Awareness Curriculum Materials in the Life Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.

    1983-01-01

    Provides an outline of course content for acid precipitation and two acid rain activities (introduction to pH and effects of acid rain on an organism). Information for obtaining 20 additional activities as well as an information packet containing booklets, pamphlets, and articles are also provided. (JN)

  17. RAINFALL SIMULATOR FOR LABORATORY USE IN ACIDIC PRECIPITATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rainfall simulator, developed on the principle of droplet formation from needle tips, is described. The simulator is designed for laboratory experimentation to examine the effects of acidic precipitation on terrestrial plants. The system offers sufficient flexibility to simulat...

  18. Acid Precipitation in the Pacific Northwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, John; Kozak, David

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the causes, sources, and problems associated with acid deposition in the Pacific Northwest. Includes a learning activity about acid rain, "Deadly Skies," which was adapted from the Project WILD Aquatic Supplement. (TW)

  19. Acid Precipitation: Scientific Progress and Public Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowling, Ellis B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes certain perspectives on scientific research and on the public debates about acid deposition and its effects. Although primary attention is given to European/North American research, the ideas developed are relevant in any world region sensitive to acid deposition resulting from intense industrialization. (Author/JN)

  20. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent evidence indicates that acid rain is a growing environmental phenomenon of potentially far reaching consequences and increasing geographical extent in North America. Acid rain is but one aspect of the broader problem of atmospheric deposition which includes snow, fog, and ...

  1. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the measurement and analysis of acid rain and acidification of areas by precipitation. Both global and regionalized areas of acid rain effects are examined. Control techniques applicable to the sources and causes are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 187 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Use of ion chromatography for analysis of MAP3S precipitation samples

    SciTech Connect

    Rothert, J.

    1980-07-01

    The Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study/Regional Acidity of Industrial Emissions, MAP3S/RAINE program includes measurement and modeling of fossil-fuel effluent concentrations in precipitation and air in the northeastern United States. To determine precipitation concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen oxides as well as PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, Cl/sup -/, Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, NH/sub 4//sup +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, pH, and conductivity, an eight-1 site precipitation network in rural eastern United States has been established. Two Dionex Model 10 ion chromatographs are being used to analyze the precipitation samples. This paper describes the use and operation of these instruments. (ACR)

  3. Effects of acidic precipitation on field crops

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Hendrey, G.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Gmur, N.F.

    1982-02-01

    The effects of acid rain on yields of field-grown soybeans has been investigated. Plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 4.1, 3,3 and 2.7 had decreased seed yields of 10.6, 16.8 and 23.9% below yields of plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 5.6. (ACR)

  4. Organic nitrogen in precipitation: real problem or sampling artefact?

    PubMed

    Cape, J N; Kirika, A; Rowland, A P; Wilson, D R; Jickells, T D; Cornell, S

    2001-11-01

    Published observations of organic nitrogen (N) compounds in precipitation go back almost a century. Several different methods have been used to measure both the total and ionic concentrations of N. There is therefore some uncertainty as to whether reported "organic N" is real, or simply the result of uncertainties in chemical analyses or inadequate sampling methods. We found that the materials from which the collector was made (polypropylene, steel, or glass) had no significant effect on the composition of dissolved organic N (DON). The use of a biocide was found to be very important during sampling and storage of samples before analysis. We set up a network of seven collectors across the U.K., from the Cairngorms to Dorset, all operating to the same protocol, and including a biocide. Samples were analysed centrally, using proven methods. Over 6 months, organic N contributed about 20% to the total N in U.K. precipitation, but with a large variation across the country. This means that current estimates of wet deposited N to the U.K., which are based only on the ammonium and nitrate concentrations, are too small. Organic N is not an artefact, but a real problem that needs to be addressed. PMID:12805792

  5. Variation of low molecular weight organic acids in precipitation and cloudwater at high elevation in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Minghu; Li, Penghui; Li, Yuhua; Xue, Likun; Wang, Wenxing

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the sources and chemical behaviors of carboxylic acids in Southern China, precipitation and corresponding cloudwater samples were collected in an acid rain-prone area of Mount Heng. The carboxylic acid levels in the samples were measured, and the concentration patterns were evaluated with respect to temporal and seasonal variations. Formic and acetic acids were predominant among the carboxylic acids identified for both precipitation and cloudwater. Most of the organic acids in the precipitation had a clear seasonal pattern, reaching higher levels during the warm season; these higher levels were attributed to the stronger source strength of biogenic emissions during this season. The cloud-fog samples did not display a similar trend. A distinctive diurnal pattern in carboxylic acids was only observed in the precipitation samples during the warm season. In cloud-fog, the ratio of formic to acetic acid differed considerably with time, with these values varying little in the precipitation samples. This result indicates that the organic acids in precipitation originate consistently from primary sources throughout the entire period, while those in cloud are mainly associated with direct emissions in the earlier stage and with secondary sources in the later period.

  6. Compositions and method for controlling precipitation when acidizing sour wells

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.; Walker, M.L.

    1989-12-19

    This patent describes an acidizing composition for treating a sour well. It comprises: a base acid solution having an initial ph below 1.9; an iron sequestering agent to combine with iron present in the solution comprising at least one compound selected from the group consisting of aminopolycarboxylic acids, hydroxycarboxylic acids, cyclic polyethers and derivatives of the acids and ethers present in an amount of from about 0.25 to about 5 percent by weight of the acid solution; and a sulfide modifier to combine with sulfides present in the solution comprising at least one member selected from the group consisting of an aldehyde, acetal, hemiacetal and any other compound capable of forming an aldehyde in solution, present in an amount of from about 1 to about 4 percent by weight of the acid solution, whereby precipitation of ferric hydroxide, ferrous sulfide and elemental sulfur is inhibited as acid spending occurs.

  7. Acidic precipitation: considerations for an air-quality standard

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Hendrey, G.R.; Stensland, G.J.; Johnson, D.W.; Francis, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Acidic precipitation, wet or frozen deposition with a hydrogen ion concentration greatern than 2.5 ..mu..eq l/sup -1/ is a significant air pollution problem in the United States. The chief anions accounting for the hydrogen ions in rainfall are nitrate and sulfate. Agricultural systems are more likely to derive net nutritional benefits from increasing inputs of acidic rain than are forest systems when soils alone are considered. Agricultural soils may benefit because of the high N and S requirements of agricultural plants. Detrimental effects to forest soils may result if atmospheric H/sup +/ inputs significantly add to or exceed H/sup +/ production by soils. Acidification of fresh waters of southern Scandinavia, southwestern Scotland, southeastern Canada, and northeastern United States is caused by acid deposition. Areas of these regions in which this acidification occurs have in common, highly acidic precipitation with volume weighted mean annual H/sup +/ concentrations of 25 ..mu..eq l/sup -1/ or higher and slow weathering granitic or precambrian bedrock with thin soils deficient in minerals which would provide buffer capacity. Biological effects of acidification of fresh waters are detectable below pH 6.0. As lake and stream pH levels decrease below pH. 6.0, many species of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates are progressively eliminated. Generally, fisheries are impacted below pH 5.0 and are completely destroyed below pH 4.8. There are few studies that document effects of acidic precipitation on terrestrial vegetation to establish an air quality standard. It must be demonstrated that current levels of precipitation acidity alone significantly injure terrestrial vegetation. In terms of documented damanges, current research indicates that establishing a standard for precipitation for the volume weighted annual H/sup +/ concentration at 25 ..mu..eq l/sup -1/ may protect the most sensitive areas from permanent lake acidification.

  8. Teacher's Resource Guide on Acidic Precipitation with Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    The purpose of this teacher's resource guide is to help science teachers incorporate the topic of acidic precipitation into their curricula. A survey of recent junior high school science textbooks found a maximum of one paragraph devoted to the subject; in addition, none of these books had any related laboratory activities. It was on the basis of…

  9. MODELING IMPACTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION FOR NORTHEASTERN MINNESOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acidification of lakes and streams due to acid precipitation has been documented in southern Sweden and Norway, the northeastern United States and southern Ontario. Geochemistry and regional lithology are recognized to be important factors in the susceptibility of lake ecosys...

  10. PROBABLE EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION ON PENNSYLVANIA WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to search for and identify any trends in water chemistry and fish communities in Pennsylvania waters which would indicate that acid precipitation was affecting them adversely. No new data collection was to be included. Five existing data bases, inc...

  11. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  12. [Concentrations and acidity contributions of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations of China].

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-huan; Xu, Xiao-bin; Yu, Xiao-lan; Tang, Jie

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the concentrations of organic acids in precipitation in China and their contributions to the total acidity of precipitation, samples were taken at 14 stations of regional representativeness in 2007 and analyzed for acetate and formate using ion chromatography. In this paper, data of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations are presented, wet depositions of these organic acids are calculated, and contributions of them to the total free acidity (TFA) of precipitation are estimated. Based on the measurements, the mean concentrations of formate at different stations were in the range of 0.96-3.43 micromol/L, and those of acetate in the range of 0-5.13 micromol/L, close to the levels at remote sites in other countries and at the lower ends of concentration ranges from previous measurements in China. Comparisons indicate that the concentrations of the organic acids at remote sites are lower than those at sites in the vicinity of urban areas. The annual wet depositions of formate and acetate were estimated to be in the ranges of 0.38-4.18 mmol/(m2 x a) and 0.06-5.87 mmol/(m2 x a), respectively, with larger depositions in southern China and smaller depositions in northern China. The relative contributions of the two organic acids to the TFA of precipitation were estimated to be in the range of 0.02%-51.6%, with an overall average of 2.95%. This suggests that although acid rain in China is mainly caused by emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, organic acids can significantly contribute to the acidification of precipitation in some regions and during some periods, hence need to be included in observational studies of acid rain. PMID:20527162

  13. Reconciling Empirical Carbonate Clumped Isotope Calibrations: A Comparison of Calcite Precipitation and Acid Digestion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, J.; Huntington, K. W.; Schauer, A. J.; Saenger, C.; Lechler, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    An accurate empirical calibration is necessary to confidently apply the carbonate clumped isotope (Δ47) thermometer. Previous synthetic carbonate calibrations disagree in temperature sensitivity, with one group of calibrations displaying a shallow Δ47-temperature slope (e.g., Dennis & Schrag, GCA, 2010), and the other a steep slope (e.g., Zaarur et al., EPSL, 2013). These calibrations differ in both the method of mineral precipitation and the temperature of the phosphoric acid used to digest carbonates for analysis, making it difficult to isolate the cause of the discrepancy. Here, we precipitate synthetic carbonates at temperatures of 6-80ºC using 4 different precipitation methods, and analyze the samples using both 90 and 25°C acid digestion. Precipitation experiments varied the use of salts (NaHCO3 and CaCl2) vs. dissolved CaCO3 as a starting solution, the use of carbonic anhydrase to promote isotopic equilibrium among dissolved inorganic carbon species in solution, and the method by which CO2 degasses to force carbonate precipitation. Carbonates precipitated by using salts and allowing CO2 to passively degas produce a shallow calibration slope that we hypothesize to approach isotopic equilibrium. Precipitation methods that bubble CO2 into solution then degas that CO2 (either passively or actively by bubbling N2) produce carbonates with consistently lower Δ47 and higher δ18O values for a given growth temperature. We infer that these carbonates grew in disequilibrium during rapid CO2 degassing. Varying acid digestion temperature does not change the results; acid fractionation factor is not correlated with grain size, Δ47, or d47 values. No precipitation method produces a steep calibration slope. Our large sample set of >60 carbonates lend confidence to a shallow slope calibration, and inform interpretations of Δ47 and δ18O values of natural carbonates that grow under conditions of isotopic disequilibrium.

  14. PH BUFFERING IN FOREST SOIL ORGANIC HORIZONS: RELEVANCE TO ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of organic surface horizons (Oi, Oe, Oa) from New York State forest soils were equilibrated with 0 to 20 cmol HNO3 Kg(-1) soil in the laboratory by a batch technique designed to simulate reactions of acid precipitation with forest floors. Each organic horizon retained a c...

  15. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    PubMed

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  16. Coupling Meteorology, Metal Concentrations, and Pb Isotopes for Source Attribution in Archived Precipitation Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technique that couples lead (Pb) isotopes and multi-element concentrations with meteorological analysis was used to assess source contributions to precipitation samples at the Bondville, Illinois USA National Trends Network (NTN) site. Precipitation samples collected over a 16 ...

  17. Composition and hygroscopicity of aerosol particles at Mt. Lu in South China: Implications for acid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Chi, Jianwei; Shi, Zongbo; Wang, Xinfeng; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan; Li, Tao; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Daizhou; Wang, Zifa; Shi, Chune; Liu, Liangke; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of aerosol particles were studied at Mt. Lu, an elevated site (115°59‧E, 29°35‧N, 1165 m) within the acid precipitation area. Northeast winds transport copious amounts of air pollutants and water vapor from the Yangtze River Delta into this acid precipitation area. NH4+ and SO42- are the dominant ions in PM2.5 and determine aerosol acidity. Individual particle analysis shows abundant S-rich and metals (i.e. Fe-, Zn-, Mn-, and Pb-rich) particles. Unlike aerosol particles in North China and urban areas, there are little soot and mineral particles at Mt. Lu. Lack of mineral particles contributed to the higher acidity in precipitation in the research area. Nano-sized spherical metal particles were observed to be embedded in 37% of S-rich particles. These metal particles were likely originated from heavy industries and fired-power plants. Hygroscopic experiments show that most particles start to deliquesce at 73-76% but organic coating lowers the particle deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) to 63-73%. The DRHs of these aerosol particles are clearly smaller than that of pure ammonium sulfate particles which is 80%. Since RH in ambient air was relatively high, ranging from 65% to 85% during our study period, most particles at our sampling site were in liquid phase. Our results suggest that liquid phase reactions in aerosol particles may contribute to SO2 to sulfuric acid conversion in the acid precipitation area.

  18. Impact of effects of acid precipitation on toxicity of metals.

    PubMed Central

    Nordberg, G F; Goyer, R A; Clarkson, T W

    1985-01-01

    Acid precipitation may increase human exposure to several potentially toxic metals by increasing metal concentrations in major pathways to man, particularly food and water, and in some instances by enhancing the conversion of metal species to more toxic forms. Human exposures to methylmercury are almost entirely by way of consumption of fish and seafood. In some countries, intakes by this route may approach the levels that can give rise to adverse health effects for population groups with a high consumption of these food items. A possible increase in methylmercury concentrations in fish from lakes affected by acid precipitation may thus be of concern to selected population groups. Human exposures to lead reach levels that are near those associated with adverse health effects in certain sensitive segments of the general population in several countries. The possibility exists that increased exposures to lead may be caused by acid precipitation through a mobilization of lead from soils into crops. A route of exposure to lead that may possibly be influenced by acid precipitation is an increased deterioration of surface materials containing lead and a subsequent ingestion by small children. A similar situation with regard to uptake from food exists for cadmium (at least in some countries). Human metal exposures via drinking water may be increased by acid precipitation. Decreasing pH increases corrosiveness of water enhancing the mobilization of metal salts from soil; metallic compounds may be mobilized from minerals, which may eventually reach drinking water. Also, the dissolution of metals (Pb, Cd, Cu) from piping systems for drinking water by soft acidic waters of high corrosivity may increase metal concentrations in drinking water. Exposures have occasionally reached concentrations which are in the range where adverse health effects may be expected in otherwise healthy persons. Dissolution from piping systems can be prevented by neutralizing the water before

  19. Ten-year study on acid precipitation nears conclusion

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H. )

    1990-04-01

    Results from the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) are discussed. Final results are contained in 26 state of the science reports. Seven of the reports provide information on acid rain and aquatic ecosystems. They describe the current state of acidic surface waters, watershed processes affecting surface water chemistry, historical evidence for surface water acidification, methods for forecasting future changes, and the response of acidic surface water to liming. Six areas of the country were found to be of special interest: southwest Adirondacks, New England, forested areas of the mid-Atlantic highlands, the Atlantic coastal plain, the northern Florida highlands, parts of northeastern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Environmental effects, mitigation efforts and possible legislation are briefly discussed.

  20. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  1. Arsenate precipitation using ferric iron in acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cadena, F.; Kirk, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Arsenates (i.e., As(V)) can be removed from aqueous solution by precipitation with ferric iron (i.e., Fe(III)). The chemistry of arsenic acid describes the main properties of arsenates. This triprotic acid resembles the phosphoric acid system. For example, free arsenate ions (i.e., AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}), like free phosphates, are present in significant concentration at pH values above pK{sub a,3}. On the other hand, the concentration of free ferric iron in solution, Fe{sup 3+}, is limited by ferric hydroxide precipitation and hydroxy complexation under neutral or basic conditions. Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant iron form only under very acidic conditions. Therefore, the absence of either ferric ions or arsenate ligands prevents ferric arsenate (FeAsO{sub 4}) precipitation in extreme pH conditions. Precipitation studies using ferric chloride show that the formation of ferric arsenate in water containing 0.667 mM/L (50 mg/L as As) is favored in the pH range between 3 and 4. Ferric iron dose required to remove arsenic from solution increases with pH in the range of 3 to 10. Sludge production also increases with increasing pH conditions. Optimum ferric iron doses at pH 3 and 4 are 4.8 and 10.0 mM/L, respectively, where the arsenate is removed from solution by 98.72 and 99.68 percent. Corresponding iron requirement to arsenate ratios at these two pH conditions are 7.2 and 15.0. Adverse effects on arsenic removal are observed at pH = 3, where the concentration of applied ferric iron exceeds the optimal dose. This effect is probably due to charge reversal on the surface of the precipitates. Overdosing above the optimal iron concentration at pH = 4 does not reduce treatment efficiency significantly. Presence of sodium chloride in solution at a concentration of 171 mM/L (10,000 mg/L as NaCl) does not impair system performance. However, sodium sulfate at a concentration of 104 mM/L (10,000 mg/L) affects adversely treatment performance.

  2. Boric acid precipitation following a cold-leg LOCA

    SciTech Connect

    Twogood, F.J. ); Strong, B.R. ); Lew, B.S. ); Kramer, C. )

    1993-01-01

    For a postulated cold-leg loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor, borated water from the safety injection and recirculation systems is predicted to flow preferentially around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) downcomer and out the rupture, bypassing the core. Flow to the core may therefore be limited to just the flow that is required to make up for boil-off in the core and to maintain an equal static head between the downcomer and core regions. Lacking any mixing of dilute injection water in the core, this would result in the accumulation of boron in the core region until saturation concentrations are reached and boric acid begins to precipitate out of solution. Boric acid precipitation is undesirable because it may interfere with long-term core cooling. Without a reliable estimate of reflux condensation, this time to precipitation establishes the minimum time for the initiation of hot-leg recirculation to flush the core and terminate boric acid concentration. This analysis estimates the boric acid concentration over time for the postulated conditions of a cold-leg LOCA in San Onofre nuclear generating station unit 1, including the explicit incorporation of the stored heat release from the RPV and structures discussed in a companion paper. Earlier analyses assumed that the RPV stored energy was released during the safety injection phase immediately after the LOCA. Recent analyses showed that a significant portion of this stored energy is released into the coolant after core safety injection and needs to be explicitly addressed.

  3. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream-flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid-forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Streamwater pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southeast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site.

  4. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Stream water pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southwast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site. 10 references, 2 tables.

  5. Concentration of trace elements in water samples by reductive precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Skogerboe, R.K.; Hanagan, W.A.; Taylor, H.E.

    1985-12-01

    The use of borohydride reduction as a means of preconcentrating elements by precipitation as the element or as a boride has been explored. It has been shown that the optimized procedure reproducibly effects the precipitation of all 18 elements studied; only four of these exhibited recoveries less than 90%. The general ease of use, the demonstrated accuracy and precision, the high preconcentration factors available, the self-cleansing properties of the primary reagent, the granular character of the precipitate are all factors to recommend this approach. 25 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  6. Precipitation of biomimetic fluorhydroxyapatite/polyacrylic acid nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Kevin J.; Stanton, Kenneth T.

    2015-01-01

    Ordered structures of fluorhydroxyapatite (FHA) nanoparticles that resemble the nanostructure of natural human enamel have been prepared. Wet precipitation in the presence of polyacrylic acid (PAA) was used, and the particle morphology was altered by varying several reaction conditions. High molecular weight PAA increased particle length from around 54 nm to several hundred nanometres, while maintaining particle width at 15 nm. PAA concentration and the order of mixing the reactants also influenced crystal morphology. Optimum conditions produced dense, aligned bundles of highly elongated nanorods, which are very similar to the hierarchical nanostructure of human tooth enamel.

  7. Fe biogeochemistry in reclaimed acid mine drainage precipitates--implications for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Claudia; Martínez, Carmen Enid; Bruns, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    At a 50-year-old coal mine drainage barrens in central Pennsylvania, USA, we evaluated the biogeochemistry of acidic, Fe(III)oxy(hydr)oxide precipitates in reclaimed plots and compared them to untreated precipitates in control areas. Reclaimed plots supported successional vegetation that became established after a one-time compost and lime treatment in 2006, while control plots supported biological crusts. Precipitates were sampled from moist yet unsaturated surface layers in an area with lateral subsurface flow of mine drainage above a fragipan. Fe(II) concentrations were three- to five-fold higher in reclaimed than control precipitates. Organically bound Fe and amorphous iron oxides, as fractions of total Fe, were also higher in reclaimed than control precipitates. Estimates of Fe-reducing and Fe-oxidizing bacteria were four- to tenfold higher in root-adherent than both types of control precipitates. By scaling up measurements from experimental plots, total Fe losses during the 5-yr following reclamation were estimated at 45 t Fe ha(-1) yr(-1). PMID:24063953

  8. Morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) toughened by precipitated barium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinian; Wang, Chuang; Shao, Kaiyun; Ding, Guoxin; Tao, Yulun; Zhu, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-based composites were prepared by blending PLA with precipitated barium sulfate (BaSO4) modified with stearic acid. The morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of samples with increased mass fraction of BaSO4 were investigated. Results showed that PLA was toughened and reinforced simultaneously by incorporation of precipitated BaSO4 particles. The highest impact toughness and elongation at break were both achieved at 15% BaSO4, while the elastic modulus increased monotonically with increasing BaSO4 loading. Little effect of BaSO4 on the thermal behavior of PLA was observed in the present case. However, the thermal stability of PLA/BaSO4 composites at high temperature was enhanced.

  9. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1984 ANNUAL DATA SUMMARY FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a summary of 1984 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. North American wet deposition monitoring networks with data in ADS are NADP/NTN, CANSAP, APN, UAPSP, MAP3S/PCN, W...

  10. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1983 ANNUAL DATA SUMMARY FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a summary of 1983 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. North American wet deposition monitoring networks with data in ADS are NADP/NTN, CANSAP, APN, UAPSP, MAP3S/PCN, W...

  11. Acidity in Precipitation and Solar North-South Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ga-Hee; Ha, Kyoung-Yoon; Kang, Seong-Hoon; Lee, Byoung-Ho; Kim, Ki-Beom; Kim, Jung-Hee; Chang, Heon-Young

    2014-12-01

    We are motivated by both the accumulating evidence for the connection of solar variability to the chemistry of nitrogen oxide in the atmosphere and recent finding that the Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) influx is associated with the solar northsouth asymmetry. We have analyzed the measured pH in precipitation over the 109 stations distributed in the United States. We have found that data of pH in precipitation as a whole appear to be marginally anti-correlated with the solar asymmetry. That is, rain seems to become less acidic when the southern hemisphere of the Sun is more active. The acidity of rain is also found to be correlated with the atmospheric temperature, while not to be correlated with solar activity itself. We have carried on the analysis with two subsamples in which stations located in the east and in the west. We find that the pH data derived from the eastern stations which are possibly polluted by sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides are not correlated with the solar asymmetry, but with the temperature. On the contrary, the pH data obtained from the western stations are found to be marginally anti-correlated with the solar asymmetry. In addition, the pH data obtained from the western stations are found to be correlated with the solar UV radiation. We conclude by briefly pointing out that a role of the solar asymmetry in the process of acidification of rain is to be further examined particularly when the level of pollution by sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides is low.

  12. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a slide presentation on results of dicarboxylic acid concentration trends and sampling artifacts to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on September 10-...

  13. Comparison of daily and weekly precipitation sampling efficiencies using automatic collectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Linthurst, R.A.; Ellson, J.E.; Vozzo, S.F.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation samples were collected for approximately 90 daily and 50 weekly sampling periods at Finley Farm, near Raleigh, North Carolina from August 1981 through October 1982. Ten wet-deposition samplers (AEROCHEM METRICS MODEL 301) were used; 4 samplers were operated for daily sampling, and 6 samplers were operated for weekly-sampling periods. This design was used to determine if: (1) collection efficiences of precipitation are affected by small distances between the Universal (Belfort) precipitation gage and collector; (2) measurable evaporation loss occurs and (3) pH and specific conductance of precipitation vary significantly within small distances. Average collection efficiencies were 97% for weekly sampling periods compared with the rain gage. Collection efficiencies were examined by seasons and precipitation volume. Neither factor significantly affected collection efficiency. No evaporation loss was found by comparing daily sampling to weekly sampling at the collection site, which was classified as a subtropical climate. Correlation coefficients for pH and specific conductance of daily samples and weekly samples ranged from 0.83 to 0.99.Precipitation samples were collected for approximately 90 daily and 50 weekly sampling periods at Finley farm, near Raleigh, North Carolina from August 1981 through October 1982. Ten wet-deposition samplers were used; 4 samplers were operated for daily sampling, and 6 samplers were operated for weekly-sampling periods. This design was used to determine if: (1) collection efficiencies of precipitation are affected by small distances between the University (Belfort) precipitation gage and collector; (2) measurable evaporation loss occurs and (3) pH and specific conductance of precipitation vary significantly within small distances.

  14. Impact of acid precipitation on recreation and tourism in Ontario: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The impacts of acid precipitation on fishing opportunities, waterfowl and moose hunting, water contact activities, and the perception of the environment in Ontario are analyzed. Economic effects and future research needs are also estimated and discussed. These questions have been examined by identifying the likely links between acidic precipitation and recreation and tourism, by developing estimates of the importance of aquatic-based recreation and tourism, by describing the current and estimated future effects of acid precipitation. 101 references, 9 figures, 19 tables.

  15. Research for amino acids in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Rash, J. J.; Aue , W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study was primarily directed toward the examination of Apollo 14 lunar fines for indigenous amino acids or materials which could be converted to amino acids on hydrolysis with 6 N hydrochloric acid. Initial experiments were conducted to confirm the integrity of the derivatization reactions and reagents, and to optimize the gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) instrumental and chromatographic system for the separation and flame ionization detection of the amino acid derivatives. In studies on the recovery of amino acids added to lunar fines, low recoveries were obtained when 10 ng of each amino acid were added to 50 mg of virgin fines, but the subsequent addition of 50 ng of each to the previously extracted sample resulted in much higher recoveries.

  16. Glove-box shielding analysis for sampling radioactive precipitate

    SciTech Connect

    Rainisch, R.

    1997-12-01

    This paper addresses a radiation transport analysis for as-built dose rates near a nitrite analyzer glove box. The glove box will be utilized in a laboratory serving the Late Wash Facility (LWF) at Savannah River site (SRS). The LWF will reduce the concentration of nitrite in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) radioactive aqueous precipitate feed stream to levels acceptable for the DWPF process. A laboratory serving the LWF incorporates nitrite and benzene analyzer glove boxes. The glove boxes will handle radioactive filtrate from the LWF filter and incorporate shielding for the protection of laboratory technicians. The analysis objective is to predict dose rates around the nitrite glove box subsequent to introduction of filtrate.

  17. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of P supply to ecosystems. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment of precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three forests of early-, mid- and advanced-successional stages in Southern China was carried out. Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, no precipitation treatment depressed soil acid phosphatase activity, while doubled precipitation treatment exerted no positive effects on it, and even significantly lowered it in the advanced forest. These indicate the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. The negative responses of soil acid phosphatase activity to precipitation suggest that P supply in subtropical ecosystems might be reduced if there was a drought in a whole year or more rainfall in the wet season in the future. NP, no precipitation; Control, natural precipitation; DP, double precipitation.

  18. Sampling of Atmospheric Precipitation and Deposits for Analysis of Atmospheric Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Skarżyńska, K.; Polkowska, Ż; Namieśnik, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews techniques and equipment for collecting precipitation samples from the atmosphere (fog and cloud water) and from atmospheric deposits (dew, hoarfrost, and rime) that are suitable for the evaluation of atmospheric pollution. It discusses the storage and preparation of samples for analysis and also presents bibliographic information on the concentration ranges of inorganic and organic compounds in the precipitation and atmospheric deposit samples. PMID:17671615

  19. SPATIAL ALLOCATION FACTOR PROCEDURES FOR THE 1980 NAPAP (NATIONAL ACID PRECIPITATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM) EMISSIONS INVENTORY DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the development of spatial allocation factors to apportion National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) area source emissions from counties to individual grid cells for input to the Regional Acid Deposition Models (RADM) and Regional Oxidant Models ...

  20. Colloidal precipitates related to Acid Mine Drainage: bacterial diversity and micro fungi-heavy metal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, G.; Carbone, C.; Consani, S.; Zotti, M.; Di Piazza, S.; Pozzolini, M.; Giovine, M.

    2015-12-01

    In Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) settings colloidal precipitates control the mobility of Potential Toxic Elements (PTEs). Mineral-contaminant relationships (i.e. adsorption, ion-exchange, desorption) are rarely pure abiotic processes. Microbes, mainly bacteria and microfungi, can catalyze several reactions modifying the element speciation, as well as the bioavailability of inorganic pollutants. Soil, sediments, and waters heavily polluted with PTEs through AMD processes are a potential reservoir of extremophile bacteria and fungi exploitable for biotechnological purposes. Two different AMD related colloids, an ochraceous precipitate (deposited in weakly acidic conditions, composed by nanocrystalline goethite) and a greenish-blue precipitate (deposited at near-neutral pH, composed by allophane + woodwardite) were sampled. The aims of this work were to a) characterize the mycobiota present in these colloidal minerals by evaluating the presence of alive fungal propagules and extracting bacteria DNA; b) verify the fungal strains tolerance, and bioaccumulation capability on greenish-blue and ZnSO4 enriched media; c) evaluate potential impact of bacteria in the system geochemistry. The preliminary results show an interesting and selected mycobiota able to survive under unfavourable environmental conditions. A significant number of fungal strains were isolated in pure culture. Among them, species belonging to Penicillium and Trichoderma genera were tested on both greenish-blue and ZnSO4 enriched media. The results show a significant tolerance and bioaccumulation capability to some PTEs. The same colloidal precipitates were processed to extract bacteria DNA by using a specific procedure developed for sediments. The results give a good yield of nucleic acids and a positive PCR amplification of 16S rDNA accomplished the first step for future metagenomic analyses.

  1. Rainfall simulator for laboratory use in acidic precipitation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chevone, B.I.; Yang, Y.S.; Winner, W.E.; Storks-Cotter, I.; Long, S.J.

    1984-04-01

    A rainfall simulator, developed on the principle of droplet formation from needle tips, is described. The simulator is designed for laboratory experimentation to examine the effects of acidic precipitation on terrestrial plants. Droplet diameter can be varied from 2.5 to 3.4 mm with different gauge needles, and rainfall intensities from 0.50 to 1.25 cm h/sup -1/ can be attained by a variable speed peristaltic pump. Uniform distribution of rainfall was achieved by rotating the target area and by spacing needles, using an empirical cumulative probability distribution function, along eight radial tubular arms. Variation in rainfall distribution across a 1.2 m diameter circular target area was < 5%. Integrity of solution chemistry was maintained upon passage through the simulator with variations in cation concentrations < 10%, anion concentrations < 5% and pH < 0.2. The system offers sufficient flexibility to simulate a range of rainfall characteristics by varying needle diameter, changing pump speed and/or altering the number of radial arms on each unit.

  2. OCCURRENCE OF ACID PRECIPITATION ON THE WEST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compilation of published and unpublished data shows acid precipitation to be more widespread in the Pacific coastal states than is generally recognized. Although information is scattered and discontinuous, precipitation is definitely acidic in the Los Angeles Basin and north-cent...

  3. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ting-Chou; Korczyńska, Justyna; Smith, David K.; Brzozowski, Andrzej Marek

    2008-09-01

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here.

  4. Off-gas chemistry study of melter feed by Springborn Laboratories. [Sludge-only and sludge-precipitate feed samples

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, K.R.

    1985-06-05

    The purpose of the off-gas chemistry study of melter feed samples was to support and help substantiate glass melter thermochemistry models developed for the DWPF. Both sludge-only and sludge-precipitate feed samples were analyzed. Each slurry sample was pyrolyzed at temperatures from 150 to 1000/sup 0/C in air and inert atmospheres, and the head space products were analyzed by chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods. Thermogravimetric, differential scanning calorimetric and Fourier transform infrared analyses were also performed on each sample. There were no unusually high exothermic reactions that would be cause for concern in the DWPF melter. Results for two types of sludge-precipitate feed were compared. One type contained simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) product as fed to the SCM-2 melter. The second type contained PHA from the lab-scale acid hydrolysis reactor in 677-T. A major difference between the two types was a small, but distinct, presence of higher aromatics in gas from feed with reactor-produced PHA. This feed also evolved more CO and CO/sub 2/ than feed with simulated PHA at high pyrolytic temperatures (>750/sup 0/C). Recent analyses have identified the higher boiling aromatics in reactor-produced PHA as primarily diphenylamine and p-terphenyl. These compounds will be included in future PHA simulations that are fed to research melters. Under an inert atmosphere, benzene and phenol were the two most abundant organics evolved during pyrolysis of sludge-precipitate feed.

  5. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dicarboxylic acids associated with airborne particulate matter were measured during a summer period in Philadelphia that included multiple air pollution episodes. Samples were collected for two ten hour periods each day using a high volume sampler with two quartz fiber filters in...

  6. Occurrence of acid precipitation on the West Coast of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, C.F.; Rambo, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Compilation of published and unpublished data shows acid precipitation to be more widespread in the Pacific coastal states than is generally recognized. Although information is scattered and discontinuous, precipitation is definitely acidic in the Los Angeles Basin and north-central California and in the Puget Sound region in Washington. Acid-rain occurrences were observed in western and eastern Oregon, but data are inadequate for regional generalization. New stations currently being established in Washington and Oregon, largely in response to the recently renewed activity of Mount St. Helens, will greatly facilitate assessment of precipitation acidity in the Northwest.

  7. Dissolved total hydrolyzable enantiomeric amino acids in precipitation: Implications on bacterial contributions to atmospheric organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ge; Kim, Guebuem; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Yu-Sik; Kim, Young Il

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved enantiomeric amino acids in precipitation samples collected at two sites in Korea over a one-year period. The average concentrations of DOC, DON, and total hydrolyzable amino acids at Seoul (an inland urban area) were lower than those at Uljin (a coastal rural area). The different bulk compositions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) at these two sites (reflected by qualitative indicators) were mainly attributed to differences in contributing sources. The D-enantiomers of four individual amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine) were ubiquitously present, with average enantiomeric (D/L) ratios of 0.34, 0.26, 0.21, and 0.61 for Seoul, and 0.18, 0.11, 0.09, and 0.31 for Uljin, respectively. The much higher D/L ratios observed at Seoul than at Uljin might result from more advanced diagenetic stages as well as higher contributions from bacteria inhabiting terrestrial environments. The C- and N-normalized yields of D-alanine in DOM of our samples were found to be comparable to literature values reported for aquatic systems, where a significant portion of DOM was suggested to be of bacterial origin. Our study suggests that bacteria and their remnants might constitute an important fraction of OM in the atmosphere, contributing significantly to the quality of atmospheric OM and its post-depositional bioavailability in the surface ecosystems.

  8. COMPARISON OF DAILY AND WEEKLY PRECIPITATION SAMPLING EFFICIENCES USING AUTOMATIC COLLECTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Precipitation samples were collected for approximately 90 daily and 50 weekly sampling periods at Finley Farm, near Raleigh, NC from August 1981 through October 1982. Ten wet-deposition samplers were used. Four samplers were operated for daily sampling, and 6 samplers were operat...

  9. Preserving the distribution of inorganic arsenic species in groundwater and acid mine drainage samples.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Garbarino, J R; Ranville, J F; Wildeman, T R

    2002-05-15

    The distribution of inorganic arsenic species must be preserved in the field to eliminate changes caused by metal oxyhydroxide precipitation, photochemical oxidation, and redox reactions. Arsenic species sorb to iron and manganese oxyhydroxide precipitates, and arsenite can be oxidized to arsenate by photolytically produced free radicals in many sample matrices. Several preservatives were evaluated to minimize metal oxyhydroxide precipitation, such as inorganic acids and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). EDTA was found to work best for all sample matrices tested. Storing samples in opaque polyethylene bottles eliminated the effects of photochemical reactions. The preservation technique was tested on 71 groundwater and six acid mine drainage samples. Concentrations in groundwater samples reached 720 microg-As/L for arsenite and 1080 microg-As/L for arsenate, and acid mine drainage samples reached 13 000 microg-As/L for arsenite and 3700 microg-As/L for arsenate. The arsenic species distribution in the samples ranged from 0 to 90% arsenite. The stability of the preservation technique was established by comparing laboratory arsenic speciation results for samples preserved in the field to results for subsamples speciated onsite. Statistical analyses indicated that the difference between arsenite and arsenate concentrations for samples preserved with EDTA in opaque bottles and field speciation results were analytically insignificant. The percentage change in arsenite:arsenate ratios for a preserved acid mine drainage sample and groundwater sample during a 3-month period was -5 and +3%, respectively. PMID:12038832

  10. Chemical characteristics and sources of organic acids in precipitation at a semi-urban site in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Lee, X. Q.; Cao, F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the chemical characteristics and sources of organic acids in precipitation in Southwest China, 105 rainwater samples were collected at a semi-urban site in Anshun from June 2007 to June 2008. Organic acids and major anions were analyzed along with pH and electrical conductivity. The pH values varied from 3.57 to 7.09 for all the rainfall events sampled, with an average of 4.67 which was typical acidic value. Formic, acetic and oxalic acids were found to be the predominant carboxylic acids and their volume weighted average (VWA) concentrations were 8.77, 6.93 and 2.84 μmol l -1, respectively. These organic acids were estimated to account for 8.1% to the total free acidity (TFA) in precipitation. The concentrations of the majority organic acids at studied site had a clear seasonal pattern, reaching higher levels during the non-growing season than those in growing season, which was attributed to dilution effect of heavy rainfall during the growing season. The seasonal variation of wet deposition flux of these organic acids confirmed higher source strength of biogenic emissions from vegetation during the growing season. Formic-to-acetic acids ratio (F/A), an indicator of primary versus secondary sources of these organic acids, suggested that primary sources from vehicular emission, biomass burning, soil and vegetation emissions were dominant sources. In addition, the lowest concentrations of organic acids were found under type S, when air masses originated from the marine (South China Sea) during Southern Asian Monsoon period. And the highest concentrations were observed in precipitation events from Northeast China (type NE), prevailing mostly during winter with the lowest rainfall.

  11. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program: Acidic deposition: An inventory of non-Federal research, monitoring, and assessment information

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    The Acid Precipitation Act of 1990 (Title VII of the Energy Security Act of 1980, P.L. 96-294) established the Interagency Task Force on Acid Precipitation to develop and implement the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The information included in the document was provided to NAPAP's Task Group Leaders and State-of-Science and State-of-Technology authors in July 1989. The early release was intended to assure that the authors would be aware of the information at an early phase in the assessment production process.

  12. Modeling the neutralizing processes of acid precipitation in soils and glacial sediments of northern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Yoram; Hau, Joseph A.

    1992-02-01

    Most studies of the acidic deposition phenomena have been focused on processes occurring in the northeastern USA and Scandinavia. In these regions the soil cover is thin, the bedrock is acidic, and the terrain has very poor acid buffering capacity. Most of the US Midwest, including northern Ohio, has been ignored because the terrain is covered by glacial sediments with an abundance of carbonate minerals. Yet, for the last three decades the area has been experiencing acidic precipitation with a pH range of 3.5-4.5. the lowest in the USA. Samples of precipitation, soil water, and shallow ground water from Leroy Township in Lake County, Ohio, and from Wooster Township in Wayne County, Ohio, were analyzed and processed using WATEQ3 and PHREEQE computer models to quantify the effects of the acidic deposition. The two regions are characterized by very similar topographic, geological and hydrogeological conditions. Although the cation content of the precipitation in both regions is similar, the anion concentrations are much higher (sulfate by 70%, nitrate by 14% and chloride by 167%) in Leroy, located 50 km east-northeast and downwind of the Cleveland-Akron industrial complex, than in Wooster, located 80 km south-southwest and off-wind from the industrial complex. Computer modeling results indicate that buffering of acidic deposition in the surficial sediments and glacial tills of the two regions is dominated apparently by calcite dissolution, and dissolution and exchange of hydrogen for magnesium ions are the dominant neutralizing processes. However, reaction simulations also suggest that the buffering capacity of the Leroy soils and tills has been depleted to a much greater degree than in Wooster Township. In Leroy more acidic input is reacting with less buffering material to produce lower soil and groundwater pH. The depletion of carbonate and alumino-silicate minerals in the soils of Leroy Township is occurring at a rate that is 3-5 times faster than in the same type

  13. Amino acid precursors in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of hot water to extract lunar samples, followed by the hydrolysis of the aqueous extract, appears to be the method of choice for identification and quantitation of amino acid precursors in extraterrestrial sources. The net inferences from the analyses to date are (1) that amino acid precursors are verifiably present in lunar dust, and (2) that they are quite certainly not the consequence of contamination by terrestrial organisms, including man. It is suggested that prebiotic evolutionary pathways such as have been traversed on the earth were terminated on the moon for lack of sufficient water. Although some or all of the amino acid precursors may be indigenous, the low level observed suggests that they may also result from onfall of organic compounds from interstellar matter, comets, tails, solar wind, or meteorites.

  14. Effects of atmospheric precipitation additions on phytoplankton photosynthesis in Lake Michigan water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.I.; Tisue, G.T.; Kennedy, C.W.; Seils, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of incremental additions (0.1 to 50% v/v) of atmospheric precipitation on phytoplankton photosynthesis (/sup 14/C uptake) were tested in Lake Michigan water samples. Wet deposition was used in experiments I, III, and IV, and a melted snow core was used in experiment II. Additions of precipitation significantly reduced photosynthesis in the first three experiments, starting at about the 5 to 15% treatment level. No significant difference occurred in experiment IV, but photosynthesis was greater than in the control samples and this precipitation sample appeared to stimulate primary productivity. Soluble reactive phosphate, nitrate, and ammonia levels in the precipitation samples exceeded the lake water averages by factors of 10, 2, and 50, respectively. Silicon levels in precipitation reduced pH very little and no consistent relationship was observed with reduced photosynthesis. Alkalinity was greatly reduced in the treated samples and special precautions were required in ce, Ti, Be, Co, Cu, Mo, Ni, P,f the Pd crystals of about 30 A. Possible mechanisms are discussed for isotope exchange in CO molecules in these catalysts and for the promoting effect of Pd on the activity of CuO.

  15. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of organic P mineralization potential in soils. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment with precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three successional forests in southern China was carried out. The three forests include Masson pine forest (MPF), coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF). Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, soil acid phosphatase activity was depressed by no precipitation treatment in the three forests. However, doubled precipitation treatment exerted a significantly negative effect on it only in MEBF. These results indicate that the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. A decrease in organic P turnover would occur in the three forests if there was a drought in a whole year in the future. More rainfall in the wet season would also be adverse to organic P turnover in MEBF due to its high soil moisture.

  16. FRAMEWORK FOR UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF THE NAPAP (NATIONAL ACID PRECIPITATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM) EMISSIONS INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop a methodologies framework to assess the uncertainties associated with the emissions values as presented in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) emissions inventory and to implement a prototype computer system ...

  17. Carbonate precipitation under bulk acidic conditions as a potential biosignature for searching life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Preston, Louisa J.; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Huang, L.; Southam, Gordon; Banerjee, Neil R.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Flemming, Roberta; Gómez-Ortíz, David; Prieto Ballesteros, Olga; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo; Darby Dyar, M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent observations of carbonate minerals in ancient Martian rocks have been interpreted as evidence for the former presence of circumneutral solutions optimal for carbonate precipitation. Sampling from surface and subsurface regions of the low-pH system of Río Tinto has shown, unexpectedly, that carbonates can form under diverse macroscopic physicochemical conditions ranging from very low to neutral pH (1.5-7.0). A multi-technique approach demonstrates that carbonate minerals are closely associated with microbial activity. Carbonates occur in the form of micron-size carbonate precipitates under bacterial biofilms, mineralization of subsurface colonies, and possible biogenic microstructures including globules, platelets and dumbbell morphologies. We propose that carbonate precipitation in the low-pH environment of Río Tinto is a process enabled by microbially-mediated neutralization driven by the reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of biomolecules in microbially-maintained circumneutral oases, where the local pH (at the scale of cells or cell colonies) can be much different than in the macroscopic environment. Acidic conditions were likely predominant in vast regions of Mars over the last four billion years of planetary evolution. Ancient Martian microbial life inhabiting low-pH environments could have precipitated carbonates similar to those observed at Río Tinto. Preservation of carbonates at Río Tinto over geologically significant timescales suggests that similarly-formed carbonate minerals could also be preserved on Mars. Such carbonates could soon be observed by the Mars Science Laboratory, and by future missions to the red planet.

  18. Acid-Base and Precipitation Equilibria in Wine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palma, Miguel; Barroso, Carmelo G.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments are performed to establish the changes of pH during the precipitation of potassium hydrogen tartrate, with its unfavorable impact on the stability of wine. Students, thus, obtain a clearer understanding of the interplay between a variety of chemical equilibria within a single medium.

  19. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF ACID PRECIPITATION AND THEIR INTERPRETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using data compiled from seven nationwide precipitation chemistry networks in the U.S. and Canada, the spatial distribution of hydrogen, sulfate, and nitrate ions in North America is discussed. Geographic patterns of concentration and deposition are characterized using isopleth m...

  20. Acidic leaching and precipitation of zinc and manganese from spent battery powders using various reductants.

    PubMed

    Sayilgan, E; Kukrer, T; Yigit, N O; Civelekoglu, G; Kitis, M

    2010-01-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of reductive acidic leaching and further precipitation on the recovery of manganese and zinc from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon battery powders. Ascorbic acid (AA), citric acid (CA) and oxalic acid (OA) were tested as the reductants. Sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide were used as precipitating agents. OA with H(2)SO(4) or HCl was not effective on the leaching of zinc due to the formation of zinc oxalate precipitates. However, the other reducing agents (CA and AA) tested under various experimental conditions were effective in the acidic leaching of both zinc and manganese. Leaching yields of both manganese and zinc were higher at leach temperature of 90 degrees C than those at 30 degrees C. Leach solutions were purified by the selective precipitation of manganese and zinc using KOH or NaOH. Complete precipitation was obtained for Mn at pH 9-10 and for Zn at pH 7-8. The use of ascorbic acid or citric acid as reductants in acidic leaching appears to be effective in the simultaneous leaching and further recovery of zinc and manganese from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon battery powders. PMID:19744786

  1. Compositions and method for controlling precipitation when acidizing sour wells

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.; Walker, M.L.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a method of treating a sour well penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises: introducing into the well a treating fluid comprising an acid solution having a pH below 1.9, an iron sequestering agent comprising at least one compound selected from the group consisting of aminopolycarboxylic acids, hydroxycarboxylic acids, cyclic polyethers and derivatives of the acids and ethers, present in an amount of from about 0.25 to about 5 percent by weight of the acid solution, and a sulfide modifier comprising at least one compound selected from the group consisting of an aldehyde, acetal, hemiacetal and any other compound capable of forming aldehydes in the acid solution, present in an amount of from about 0.25 to about 5 percent of the acid solution; and treating the subterranean formation with the treating fluid.

  2. Determination of trifluoroacetic acid in 1996--1997 precipitation and surface waters in California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Wujcik, C.E.; Cahill, T.M.; Seiber, J.N.

    1999-05-15

    The atmospheric degradation of three chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement compounds, namely HFC-134a, HCFC-123, and HCFC-124, results in the formation of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Concentrations of TFA were determined in precipitation and surface water samples collected in California and Nevada during 1996--1997. Terminal lake systems were found to have concentrations 4--13 times higher than their calculated yearly inputs, providing evidence for accumulation. The results support dry deposition as the primary contributor of TFA to surface waters in arid and semiarid environments. Precipitation samples obtained from three different locations contained 20.7--1530 ng/L with significantly higher concentrations in fogwater over rainwater. Elevated levels of TFA were observed for rainwater collected in Nevada over those collected in California, indicating continual uptake and concentration as clouds move from a semiarid to arid climate. Thus several mechanisms exist, including evaporative concentration, vapor-liquid phase partitioning, lowered washout volumes of atmospheric deposition water, and dry deposition, which may lead to elevated concentrations of TFA in atmospheric and surface waters above levels expected from usual rainfall washout.

  3. Acidity and mineral composition of precipitation in Moscow: Influence of deicing salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, I. D.; Aloyan, A. E.; Arutyunyan, V. O.; Larin, I. K.; Chubarova, N. E.; Yermakov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Monitoring data and analysis of the variation in acidity and mineral composition of atmospheric precipitation in Moscow in 2012 are presented. We have found that the chloride anions in the precipitation are largely caused by chlorides of deicing salts. Here, the chloride anions, along with metal chlorides (components of deicing salts), are partly caused by dissolved hydrogen chloride. The appearance of hydrogen chloride in the atmosphere of Moscow has been shown to result from heterophase chemical reactions involving deicing salts. We have obtained preliminary estimates for the scales of the effect of these salts on the mineral composition and acidity of precipitations in Moscow.

  4. A Study of Realistic Sampling-Variability Effects on Precipitation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, K.; Larsen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have investigated the effects of sampling variability on precipitation measurements using analytically driven simulation models. To explore the effects with more realism, data-derived distribution functions were used to develop a drop­-by-drop rain event simulation. Data based probability distributions for the number of raindrop arrivals in each sample and the event averaged drop size distribution were found using measurements of several precipitation events recorded by a two dimensional video disdrometer. Using these probability distribution functions, Monte-Carlo simulated rain events were developed and explored. The simulated events were sampled at intervals of several different durations associated with different average numbers of raindrops in each sample. The simulations reveal new insights to exploring the sample-size dependent convergence and distribution of bulk rainfall quantities (e.g. Z, R, Dm) as compared to the intrinsic ensemble values.

  5. Analysis of Copper in the In-Tank Precipitation Process Caustic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tovo, L.L.; Boyce, W.T.

    1996-12-12

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) procedures for measuring Cu in In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) caustic samples have been tested and implemented in the Analytical Development Section at the Savannah River Technology Center.

  6. Radar Based Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Estimation: First Results of Large Sample Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciach, G. J.; Krajewski, W. F.; Villarini, G.

    2005-05-01

    Large uncertainties in the operational precipitation estimates produced by the U.S. national network of WSR-88D radars are well-acknowledged. However, quantitative information about these uncertainties is not operationally available. In an effort to fill this gap, the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) is supporting the development of a probabilistic approach to the radar precipitation estimation. The probabilistic quantitative precipitation estimation (PQPE) methodology that was selected for this development is based on the empirically-based modeling of the functional-statistical error structure in the operational WSR-88D precipitation products under different conditions. Our first goal is to deliver a realistic parameterization of the probabilistic error model describing its dependences on the radar-estimated precipitation value, distance from the radar, season, spatiotemporal averaging scale, and the setup of the precipitation processing system (PPS). In the long-term perspective, when large samples of relevant data are available, we will extend the model to include the dependences on different types of precipitation estimates (e.g. polarimeteric and multi-sensor), geographic locations and climatic regimes. At this stage of the PQPE project, we organized a 6-year-long sample of the Level II data from the Oklahoma City radar station (KTLX), and processed it with the Built 4 of the PPS that is currently used in the NWS operations. This first set of operational products was generated with the standard setup of the PPS parameters. The radar estimates are completed with the corresponding raingauge data from the Oklahoma Mesonet, the ARS Little Washita Micronet and the EVAC PicoNet covering different spatial scales. The raingauge data are used as a ground reference (GR) to estimate the required uncertainty characteristics in the radar precipitation products. In this presentation, we describe the first results of the large-sample uncertainty analysis of the products

  7. Considerations of an air-quality standard to protect terrestrial vegetation from acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Studies on the effects of acidic precipitation which is here defined as wet or frozen deposition with a hydrogen ion concentration greater than 2.5 ..mu..eq 1/sup -1/, are reviewed. At the present time there is an inadequate amount of information that shows decreases in crop growth except for one field study. Most studies with plants (crops and forests) are inadequate for standard setting because they are not conducted in the field with adequate randomization of plots coupled with rigorous statistical analyses. Although visible injury to foliage has been documented in a variety of greenhouse studies, no experimental evidence demonstrates loss of field crop value or reduction in plant productivity due to visible foliar injury. Acidic precipitation can contribute nutrients to vegetation and could also influence leaching rates of nutrients from vegetation. Although these processes occur, there are no data that show changes in nutrient levels in foliage that relate to crop or natural ecosystem productivity. Experimental results show that fertilization of ferns is inhibited by current levels of acidic precipitation in the northeastern United States. However, the overall impacts of inhibited fertilization on perpetuation of the species or ecosystem productivity have not been evaluated. Simulated acidic precipitation has been shown to effect plant pathogens in greenhouse and field experiments. Simulated acidic precipitation inhibited pathogen activities under some circumstances and promoted pathogen activities under other circumstances. No conclusion can be drawn about the effects of current levels of precipitation acidity on plant pathogen-host interactions. From these data it must be concluded that research on the effects of acidic precipitation on terrestrial vegetation is too meager to draw any conclusions with regard to an air quality standard.

  8. Acid Precipitation Learning Materials: Science, Environmental and Social Studies, Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessler, Edward W.

    The major environmental problem of acid precipition is addressed through a series of activities contained in this guide for teachers of grades 6 through 12. Exercises are provided to help students learn science inquiry skills, facts, and concepts while focusing on the acid rain situation. Activities are organized by content areas. These include:…

  9. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Ramachandran, Usha; Lu, Sang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2005-12-06

    Citric acid has been shown to act as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous suspensions of aluminum-containing particles. Solutions of aluminum chloride, with and without citric acid added, were titrated with NaO(aq). The presence and size of particles were determined using quasi-elastic light scattering. In solutions that contained no citric acid, particles formed instantaneously when NaOH(aq) was added but these were observed to rapidly diminish in size, disappearing at OH/Al ratios below 2.5 mol/mol. When the OH/Al ratio was raised beyond 2.5 by addingmoreNaOH(aq), suspensions of colloidally stable particles formed. Large polycations containing 13 aluminum atoms were detected by 27Al solution NMR in citric-acid-free solutions with OH/Al ratios slightly lower than 2.5. In comparison, adding citric acid to solutions of aluminum chloride inhibited the formation of large aluminum-containing polycations. The absence of the polycations prevents or retards the subsequent formation of particles, indicating that the polycations, when present, act as seeds to the formation of new particles. Particles did not form in solutions with a citric acid/aluminum ratio of 0.8 until sufficient NaOH(aq) was added to raise the OH/Al ratio to 3.29. By comparison, lower amounts of citric acid did not prevent particles from forming but did retard the rate of growth.

  10. Organic toxicants in air and precipitation samples from the Lake Michigan area

    SciTech Connect

    Harlin, K.S.; Sweet, C.W.; Gatz, D.F.

    1995-12-31

    Measurements of PCBs, organochlorine insecticides, PAHs, and atrazine were made in air and precipitation samples collected at regionally-representative locations near Lake Michigan from 1992-1995. The purpose of these measurements was to provide information needed to estimate the atmospheric deposition of organic toxicants to Lake Michigan. Twenty-four hour samples of airborne particles and vapor were collected at 12-day intervals on quartz fiber filters and XAD-2 resin vapor traps using modified high volume sampleers. Twenty-eight day precipitation samples were collected using wet-only samplers with stainless steel sampling surfaces and heated enclosure containing an XAD-2 resin adsorption column. Samples were Soxhlet extracted for 24 hours with hexane:acetone (1:1), and concentrated by rotary evaporation. Interferences were removed and the samples separated into analyte groups by silica gel chromatography. Four fractions were collected for GC-ECD and GC-Ion Trap MS analyses. Ten pesticides, 101 PCB congeners, 18 PAHs, and atrazine were measured in all samples. Quality assurance was maintained by including field duplicate samples, field blanks, alboratory matrix spikes, laboratory matrix blanks, and laboratory surrogate spikes in the sampling/analytical protocols. Preliminary results from urban and remote sites show geographical variations in the concentrations of some toxicants due to contributions from local sources. For all sites the total PCB levels are higher in the vapor phase than the particulate phase and show strong seasonal variations. Seasonal variations were also observed for several pesticides.

  11. An In Situ Method for Sizing Insoluble Residues in Precipitation and Other Aqueous Samples

    PubMed Central

    Axson, Jessica L.; Creamean, Jessie M.; Bondy, Amy L.; Capracotta, Sonja S.; Warner, Katy Y.; Ault, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Particles are frequently incorporated into clouds or precipitation, influencing climate by acting as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, taking up coatings during cloud processing, and removing species through wet deposition. Many of these particles, particularly ice nuclei, can remain suspended within cloud droplets/crystals as insoluble residues. While previous studies have measured the soluble or bulk mass of species within clouds and precipitation, no studies to date have determined the number concentration and size distribution of insoluble residues in precipitation or cloud water using in situ methods. Herein, for the first time we demonstrate that Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) is a powerful in situ method for determining the total number concentration, number size distribution, and surface area distribution of insoluble residues in precipitation, both of rain and melted snow. The method uses 500 μL or less of liquid sample and does not require sample modification. Number concentrations for the insoluble residues in aqueous precipitation samples ranged from 2.0–3.0(±0.3)×108 particles cm−3, while surface area ranged from 1.8(±0.7)–3.2(±1.0)×107 μm2 cm−3. Number size distributions peaked between 133–150 nm, with both single and multi-modal character, while surface area distributions peaked between 173–270 nm. Comparison with electron microscopy of particles up to 10 μm show that, by number, > 97% residues are <1 μm in diameter, the upper limit of the NTA. The range of concentration and distribution properties indicates that insoluble residue properties vary with ambient aerosol concentrations, cloud microphysics, and meteorological dynamics. NTA has great potential for studying the role that insoluble residues play in critical atmospheric processes. PMID:25705069

  12. An evaluation of trends in the acidity of precipitation and the related acidification of surface water in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turk, John T.

    1983-01-01

    The acidity of precipitation in the Northeastern United States and Southeastern Canada has increased in the past, probably as a result of anthropogenic emissions. The increase in New England and New York occurred primarily before the mid-1950's. Since the mid1960's, there has been no significant change in the acidity of precipitation in this region; however, sulfate concentrations have decreased and nitrate concentrations may have increased. The time of initial acidification in Southeastern Canada is not known because of a lack of historical data. In the Southeastern United States, the evaluation of whether precipitation has been acidified is complicated by meager data. The available data show that precipitation is more acidic than would be expected for sites unaffected by anthropogenic emissions. In addition, comparison of recent data with the meager historical data suggests, but does not unambiguously prove, increased acidification since the 1950's. In the Western United States, available data indicate that precipitation at individual sites has been acidified by anthropogenic emissions. The acidification generally has been attributable to localized sources, and the time of initial acidification is undefined. Acidification of lakes and streams in the Northeastern United States has occurred in a time frame compatible with the hypothesis that acidification of precipitation was the cause. The acidification of surface waters appears to have occurred before the mid- to late 1960's. In Southeastern Canada, the best-documented cases of acidified lakes point to localized sources of acidic emissions as the cause. Sparse evidence of recent regional acidification of lakes and streams exists, but evidence for acidification of precipitation as the cause is largely lacking. In the Southeastern United States, most data on acidification of surface waters are ambiguous, and in the West, most of the data reflect local conditions. However, recent analysis of a national network of

  13. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1987 ANNUAL AND SEASONAL DATA SUMMARIES FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the 1987 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. nterpretative statistical analyses are not a focus of this report; however, users of the report will learn about maj...

  14. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1985 ANNUAL AND SEASONAL DATA SUMMARIES FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a summary of 1985 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. North American wet deposition monitoring networks with data in ADS are NADP/NTN, CANSAP, APN, UAPSP, MAP3S/PCN, W...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF THE 1980 NAPAP (NATIONAL ACID PRECIPITATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM) EMISSIONS INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the development of the 1980 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) Emissions Inventory. The current version of the annual inventory, Version 5.0, and the related Version 5.2 Eulerian Modeling Inventory and Version 5.3 Regional Oxidant Modeling...

  16. IMPROVEMENT UPON THE CARRIER PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONIUM IONS FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    James, R.A.; Thompson, S.G.

    1958-12-23

    A process is reported for improving the removal of plutonlum by carrier precipitation by the addition of nitrite ions to a nitrlc acid solutlon of neutronirradiated unanium so as to destroy any hydrazine that may be present in the solution since the hydrazine tends to complex the tetravalent plutonium and prevents removal by the carrier precipltate, such as bismuth phospbate.

  17. ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS DATA FOR THE 1985 NAPAP (NATIONAL ACID PRECIPITATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM) INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the development of the anthropogenic emissions estimates to be used in the 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) Emissions Inventory. Point and area source data, spanning the contiguous U.S., focus on the NAPAP high priority pollutants S...

  18. PREDICTING THE PRECIPITATION OF ACID AND DIRECT DYES IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple screening test was used to determine whether acid and direct dyes precipitate at calcium concentrations typical of hard waters in the Southeastern Piedmont region of the United States. f 52 dyes tested, only three direct dyes (Direct Black 19, Direct Black 22, and Direct...

  19. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION ON MICROBIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN SOILS: THE FLORIDA EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acid precipitation on microbiological and chemical parameters in soils were investigated under field conditions. The study site consisted of three transects, each including three 75 sq. m. plots. One transect served as a control, the second one was irrigated with a...

  20. AREA SOURCE DOCUMENTATION FOR THE 1985 NATIONAL ACID PRECIPITATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides, to states and other participants and users of the 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Emissions Inventory, a general understanding of the estimating procedures that will be used by NAPAP and EPA's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards t...

  1. Chemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Biological, Precipitate, and Water Samples from Abandoned Copper Mines in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.; Munk, LeeAnn

    2007-01-01

    In the early 20th century, approximately 6 million metric tons of copper ore were mined from numerous deposits located along the shorelines of fjords and islands in Prince William Sound, Alaska. At the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites (fig. 1), rocks containing Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb sulfide minerals are exposed to chemical weathering in abandoned mine workings and remnant waste piles that extend into the littoral zone. Field investigations in 2003 and 2005 as well as analytical data for rock, sediment, precipitate, water, and biological samples reveal that the oxidation of sulfides at these sites is resulting in the generation of acid mine drainage and the transport of metals into the marine environment (Koski and others, 2008; Stillings and others, 2008). At the Ellamar and Threeman sites, plumes of acidic and metal-enriched water are flowing through beach gravels into the shallow offshore environment. Interstitial water samples collected from beach sediment at Ellamar have low pH levels (to ~3) and high concentrations of metals including iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, lead, and mercury. The abundant precipitation of the iron sulfate mineral jarosite in the Ellamar gravels also signifies a low-pH environment. At the Beatson mine site (the largest copper mine in the region) seeps containing iron-rich microbial precipitates drain into the intertidal zone below mine dumps (Foster and others, 2008). A stream flowing down to the shoreline from underground mine workings at Beatson has near-neutral pH, but elevated levels of zinc, copper, and lead (Stillings and others, 2008). Offshore sediment samples at Beatson are enriched in these metals. Preliminary chemical data for tissue from marine mussels collected near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson sites reveal elevated levels of copper, zinc, and lead compared to tissue in mussels from other locations in Prince William Sound (Koski and others, 2008). Three papers presenting results of this ongoing investigation of

  2. Chemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Biological, Precipitate, and Water Samples from Abandoned Copper Mines in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.; Munk, LeeAnn

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In the early 20th century, approximately 6 million metric tons of copper ore were mined from numerous deposits located along the shorelines of fjords and islands in Prince William Sound, Alaska. At the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites (fig. 1), rocks containing Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb sulfide minerals are exposed to chemical weathering in abandoned mine workings and remnant waste piles that extend into the littoral zone. Field investigations in 2003 and 2005 as well as analytical data for rock, sediment, precipitate, water, and biological samples reveal that the oxidation of sulfides at these sites is resulting in the generation of acid mine drainage and the transport of metals into the marine environment (Koski and others, 2008; Stillings and others, 2008). At the Ellamar and Threeman sites, plumes of acidic and metal-enriched water are flowing through beach gravels into the shallow offshore environment. Interstitial water samples collected from beach sediment at Ellamar have low pH levels (to ~3) and high concentrations of metals including iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, lead, and mercury. The abundant precipitation of the iron sulfate mineral jarosite in the Ellamar gravels also signifies a low-pH environment. At the Beatson mine site (the largest copper mine in the region) seeps containing iron-rich microbial precipitates drain into the intertidal zone below mine dumps (Foster and others, 2008). A stream flowing down to the shoreline from underground mine workings at Beatson has near-neutral pH, but elevated levels of zinc, copper, and lead (Stillings and others, 2008). Offshore sediment samples at Beatson are enriched in these metals. Preliminary chemical data for tissue from marine mussels collected near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson sites reveal elevated levels of copper, zinc, and lead compared to tissue in mussels from other locations in Prince William Sound (Koski and others, 2008). Three papers presenting results of this ongoing

  3. Acid deposition in Maryland: Implications of the results of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowmann, M.; Ross, J.; Blundell, C.; Price, R.

    1991-07-01

    Acid deposition, commonly referred to as 'acid rain,' is a major global environmental concern. Acid deposition has reportedly resulted in damage to aquatic, terrestrial, and physical resources and has potentially adverse effects on human health. A component of the Maryland acid deposition program is the preparation of an annual report that summarizes yearly activities and costs of ongoing acid deposition research and monitoring programs.

  4. Leaching of metals from steel samples in peracetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabutani, Tomoki; Nakamura, Takamasa; Takayabagi, Toshio

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, leaching behavior of metallic species from steel samples in peracetic acid was investigated. We compared the leaching efficiency between peracetic acid and acetic acid to estimate the role of peroxo functional group for the leaching. As a result, peracetic acid enhanced the leaching ability of metallic species from the high speed steel and the alloy steel samples. MoO3, Mo, MO2C, W, WO3, VC and MnO2 were effectively leached by peracetic acid, while the stainless steel had a high resistance against corrosion by peracetic acid.

  5. Dissolved, particulate and acid-leachable trace metal concentrations in North Atlantic precipitation collected on the Global Change Expedition

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Jickells, T.D. )

    1990-12-01

    Atmospheric inputs of trace metals into surface waters are an important pathway for the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of many trace constituents. Rainwater samples from six precipitation events were collected on board ship during legs 3 and 4 of the Global Change Expedition over the North Atlantic Ocean and analyzed for dissolved, particulate (Al and Pb), and acid-leachable trace metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn). Acid-leachable concentrations of the elements were similar to reported values from the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans which were measured using comparable acidification procedures. Concentrations of dissolved and particulate Al and Pb were determined in rain events acid-leachable and total trace metal concentrations suggest that the acid-leachable fraction of metals can significantly underestimate total concentrations of crustal elements in rain. The solubilities of Al and Pb in precipitation were variable and mean solubilities of the elements were 13% and 45%, respectively. Recycled sea salt components were less than 14% for Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn, indicating that the net trace metal flux is from the atmosphere to the oceans. Deep sea particle fluxes for these metals through the western tropical North Atlantic exceed atmospheric deposition fluxes by a factor of 18 to 41. 57 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Effects of acid precipitation on reproduction in alpine plant species. [Erythronium grandiflorum; Aquilegia caerulea

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.A.; Hille-Salgueiro, M.; Musselman, R.C. Dept. of Agriculture, Fort Collins, CO )

    1990-01-01

    A series of experiments were designed to determine the impact of acid rain on plant reproductive processes, a critical component of a species life history. Research was carried out in herbaceous alpine communities at the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) Forest Service Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site in the Snowy Mts. of Wyoming. A range of species were surveyed to monitor the sensitivity of pollen to acidification during germination and growth, and all species demonstrated reduced in vitro pollen germination in acidified media. Field pollinations were carried out in Erythronium grandiflorum and Aquilegia caerulea to determine the reproductive success of plants exposed to simulated ambient precipitation (pH 5.6) or simulated acid precipitation (pH 3.6) prior to pollination. In Erythronium, no differences were observed in seed set and seed weight of fruits resulting from the two pollination treatments. In Aquilegia, fruits resulting from the acid spray treatment produced fewer seeds and lighter seeds.

  7. Stable Isotope Analysis of Precipitation Samples Obtained via Crowdsourcing Reveals the Spatiotemporal Evolution of Superstorm Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Good, Stephen P.; Mallia, Derek V.; Lin, John C.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2014-01-01

    Extra-tropical cyclones, such as 2012 Superstorm Sandy, pose a significant climatic threat to the northeastern United Sates, yet prediction of hydrologic and thermodynamic processes within such systems is complicated by their interaction with mid-latitude water patterns as they move poleward. Fortunately, the evolution of these systems is also recorded in the stable isotope ratios of storm-associated precipitation and water vapor, and isotopic analysis provides constraints on difficult-to-observe cyclone dynamics. During Superstorm Sandy, a unique crowdsourced approach enabled 685 precipitation samples to be obtained for oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analysis, constituting the largest isotopic sampling of a synoptic-scale system to date. Isotopically, these waters span an enormous range of values (21‰ for O, 160‰ for H) and exhibit strong spatiotemporal structure. Low isotope ratios occurred predominantly in the west and south quadrants of the storm, indicating robust isotopic distillation that tracked the intensity of the storm's warm core. Elevated values of deuterium-excess (25‰) were found primarily in the New England region after Sandy made landfall. Isotope mass balance calculations and Lagrangian back-trajectory analysis suggest that these samples reflect the moistening of dry continental air entrained from a mid-latitude trough. These results demonstrate the power of rapid-response isotope monitoring to elucidate the structure and dynamics of water cycling within synoptic-scale systems and improve our understanding of storm evolution, hydroclimatological impacts, and paleo-storm proxies. PMID:24618882

  8. Optimal Concentration of 2,2,2-Trichloroacetic Acid for Protein Precipitation Based on Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Albert N; Ezoulin, Miezan JM; Youm, Ibrahima; Youan, Bi-Botti C

    2014-01-01

    For low protein concentrations containing biological samples (in proteomics) and for non proteinaceous compound assays (in bioanalysis), there is a critical need for a simple, fast, and cost-effective protein enrichment or precipitation method. However, 2,2,2-trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is traditionally used for protein precipitation at ineffective concentrations for very low protein containing samples. It is hypothesized that response surface methodology, can be used to systematically identify the optimal TCA concentration for protein precipitation in a wider concentration range. To test this hypothesis, a central composite design is used to assess the effects of two factors (X1 = volume of aqueous solution of protein, and X2 = volume of TCA solution 6.1N) on the optical absorbance of the supernatant (Y1), and the percentage of protein precipitated (Y2). Using either bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein or human urine (with 20 ppm protein content), 4% w/v (a saddle point) is the optimal concentration of the TCA solution for protein precipitation that is visualized by SDS-PAGE analysis. At this optimal concentration, the Y2-values range from 76.26 to 92.67% w/w for 0.016 to 2 mg/mL of BSA solution. It is also useful for protein enrichment and xenobiotic analysis in protein-free supernatant as applied to tenofovir (a model HIV microbicide). In these conditions, the limit of detection and limit of quantitation of tenofovir are respectively 0.0014 mg/mL and 0.0042 mg/mL. This optimal concentration of TCA provides optimal condition for protein purification and analysis of any xenobiotic compound like tenofovir. PMID:25750762

  9. Comparison of trichloroacetic acid with other protein-precipitating agents in enriching abnormal prion protein for Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    LeBrun, Matthew; Huang, Hongsheng; He, Runtao; Booth, Stephanie; Balachandran, Aru; Li, Xuguang

    2008-06-01

    Detection of the abnormal or the pathogenic form of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) by Western blot (WB) is challenging, especially, for samples derived from cell cultures that contain low levels of PrP(Sc). A variety of PrP(Sc) concentration methods have been reported with various PrP(Sc) recovery efficiencies. Ultracentrifugation is one of the methods used frequently to enrich the pathogenic form of PrP(Sc) prior to WB analyses. The resulting PrP(Sc) pellet is extremely insoluble and often requires sonication to be dissolved, potentially generating aerosols. We modified the common protein-precipitating protocol using trichloroacetic acid to concentrate PrP(Sc) by slow-speed centrifugation, followed by solubilization of the pellets with 6 mol/L urea prior to sodium dodecyl sulphate -- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and WB analyses. Comparative studies suggest this simple trichloroacetic acid protocol was more effective in enriching PrP(Sc) presented in cell cultures and brain homogenates than other reported protein-precipitating methods. Furthermore, incorporation of the urea treatment step to dissolve the precipitated PrP(Sc) pellets helped to reduce the infectivity of PrP(Sc). PMID:18535632

  10. Distribution and Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; McLain, H. L.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of organic compounds on the lunar surface has been a question of interest from the Apollo era to the present. Investigations of amino acids immediately after collection of lunar samples yielded inconclusive identifications, in part due to analytical limitations including insensitivity to certain compounds, an inability to separate enantiomers, and lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements. It was not possible to determine if the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the result of terrestrial contamination. Recently, we presented initial data from the analysis of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples and discussed those results in the context of four potential amino acid sources [5]. Here, we expand on our previous work, focusing on amino acid abundances and distributions in seven regolith samples and presenting the first compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios measured for amino acids in a lunar sample.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

    2014-05-12

    A sample of from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) was pulled and sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in June of 2013. The PRFT in DWPF receives Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/ Monosodium Titanate (MST) material from the 512-S Facility via the 511-S Facility. This 2.2 L sample was to be used in small-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing in the Shielded Cells Facility of SRNL. A 1L sub-sample portion was characterized to determine the physical properties such as weight percent solids, density, particle size distribution and crystalline phase identification. Further chemical analysis of the PRFT filtrate and dissolved slurry included metals and anions as well as carbon and base analysis. This technical report describes the characterization and analysis of the PRFT sample from DWPF. At SRNL, the 2.2 L PRFT sample was composited from eleven separate samples received from DWPF. The visible solids were observed to be relatively quick settling which allowed for the rinsing of the original shipping vials with PRFT supernate on the same day as compositing. Most analyses were performed in triplicate except for particle size distribution (PSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PRFT slurry samples were dissolved using a mixed HNO3/HF acid for subsequent Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analyses performed by SRNL Analytical Development (AD). Per the task request for this work, analysis of the PRFT slurry and filtrate for metals, anions, carbon and base were primarily performed to support the planned chemical process cell testing and to provide additional component concentrations in addition to the limited data available from DWPF. Analysis of the insoluble solids portion of the PRFT slurry was aimed at detailed characterization of these solids (TGA, PSD

  12. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  13. Biomediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate and Sulfur in a Faintly Acidic Hot Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L.; Peng, X.; Qiao, H.

    2014-12-01

    A faintly acidic hot spring named "female Tower" (T=73.5 ℃, pH=6.64 ) is located in the Jifei Geothermal Field,Yunnan province, Southwest China. The precipitates in the hot spring are composed of large amounts of calcite and sulfur, as reveals by XRD analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis show the microbial mats are formed of various coccoid, rod and filamentous microbes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis show that intracellular sulfur granules are commonly associated with these microbes. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis shows that the surface of microbes are mainly composed of Ca, C, O and S. A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrates the majority of bacteria in the spring are sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In the spring water, H2S concentration was up to 60 ppm, while SO42- concentration was only about 10 ppm. We suggest that H2S might be utilized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in this hot spring water, leading to the formation of sulfur granules intracellularly and extracellularly. In the meantime, this reaction increases the pH in ambient environments, which fosters the precipitation of calcium carbonate precipitation in the microbial mats. This study suggests that the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria could play an important role in calcium carbonate precipitation in faintly acidic hot spring environments.

  14. Study on Dicarboxylic Acids in Aerosol Samples with Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Heidi; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to study the simultaneous detection of a homologous series of α, ω-dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10), oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and sebacic acids, with capillary electrophoresis using indirect UV detection. Good separation efficiency in 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as background electrolyte modified with myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was obtained. The dicarboxylic acids were ionised and separated within five minutes. For the study, authentic samples were collected onto dry cellulose membrane filters of a cascade impactor (12 stages) from outdoor spring aerosols in an urban area. Hot water and ultrasonication extraction methods were used to isolate the acids from membrane filters. Due to the low concentrations of acids in the aerosols, the extracts were concentrated with solid-phase extraction (SPE) before determination. The enrichment of the carboxylic acids was between 86 and 134% with sample pretreatment followed by 100-time increase by preparation of the sample to 50 μL. Inaccuracy was optimised for all the sample processing steps. The aerosols contained dicarboxylic acids C2–C10. Then, mostly they contained C2, C5, and C10. Only one sample contained succinic acid. In the study, the concentrations of the acids in aerosols were lower than 10 ng/m3. PMID:24729915

  15. Precipitation-chemistry measurements from the California Acid Deposition Monitoring Program, 1985-1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Charles L.; Tonnessen, Kathy A.

    1993-01-01

    The configuration of the California Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (CADMP) precipitation network is described and quality assurance results summarized. Comparison of CADMP and the National Acid Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) data at four parallel sites indicated that mean depth-weighted differences were less than 3 μeq ℓ−1 for all ions, being statistically significant for ammonium, sulfate and hydrogen ion. These apparently small differences were 15–30% of the mean concentrations of ammonium, sulfate and hydrogen ion. Mean depth-weighted concentrations and mass deposition rates for the period 1985–1990 are summarized; the latter were highest either where concentrations or precipitation depths were relatively high.

  16. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the causes, and ecological and economic consequences of acid precipitation and deposition. Emissions of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, loading rates at specific study sites, the role of buffering materials on the acidification of lakes and streams, and the effects on aquatic life are considered. The effects on soil chemistry and vegetation are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Silica precipitation in acidic solutions: mechanism, pH effect, and salt effect.

    PubMed

    Gorrepati, Elizabeth A; Wongthahan, Pattanapong; Raha, Sasanka; Fogler, H Scott

    2010-07-01

    This study is the first to show that silica precipitation under very acidic conditions ([HCl] = 2-8 M) proceeds through two distinct steps. First, the monomeric form of silica is quickly depleted from solution as it polymerizes to form primary particles approximately 5 nm in diameter. Second, the primary particles formed then flocculate. A modified Smoluchowski equation that incorporates a geometric population balance accurately describes the exponential growth of silica flocs. Variation of the HCl concentration between 2 and 8 M further showed that polymerization to form primary particles and subsequent particle flocculation become exponentially faster with increasing acid concentration. The effect of salt was also studied by adding 1 M chloride salts to the solutions; it was found that salts accelerated both particle formation and growth rates in the order: AlCl(3) > CaCl(2) > MgCl(2) > NaCl > CsCl > no salt. It was also found that ionic strength, over cation identity, determines silica polymerization and particle flocculation rates. This research reveals that precipitation of silica products from acid dissolution of minerals can be studied apart from the mineral dissolution process. Thus, silica product precipitation from mineral acidization follows a two-step process--formation of 5 nm primary particles followed by particle flocculation--which becomes exponentially faster with increasing HCl concentration and with salts accelerating the process in the above order. This result has implications for any study of acid dissolution of aluminosilicate or silicate material. In particular, the findings are applicable to the process of acidizing oil-containing rock formations, a common practice of the petroleum industry where silica dissolution products encounter a low-pH, salty environment within the oil well. PMID:20536253

  18. Bioprocess monitoring: minimizing sample matrix effects for total protein quantification with bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Waldschitz, Daniel; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Determining total protein content is a routine operation in many laboratories. Despite substantial work on assay optimization interferences, the widely used bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay remains widely recognized for its robustness. Especially in the field of bioprocess engineering the inaccuracy caused by interfering substances remains hardly predictable and not well understood. Since the introduction of the assay, sample pre-treatment by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation has been indicated as necessary and sufficient to minimize interferences. However, the sample matrix in cultivation media is not only highly complex but also dynamically changing over process time in terms of qualitative and quantitative composition. A significant misestimation of the total protein concentration of bioprocess samples is often observed when following standard work-up schemes such as TCA precipitation, indicating that this step alone is not an adequate means to avoid measurement bias. Here, we propose a modification of the BCA assay, which is less influenced by sample complexity. The dynamically changing sample matrix composition of bioprocessing samples impairs the conventional approach of compensating for interfering substances via a static offset. Hence, we evaluated the use of a correction factor based on an internal spike measurement for the respective samples. Using protein spikes, the accuracy of the BCA protein quantification could be improved fivefold, taking the BCA protein quantification to a level of accuracy comparable to other, more expensive methods. This will allow reducing expensive iterations in bioprocess development to due inaccurate total protein analytics. PMID:27314233

  19. A sampling method for improving the representation of spatially varying precipitation and soil moisture using the Simple Biosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Isaac D.; Denning, A. Scott; Baker, Ian T.; Ramirez, Jorge A.; Randall, David A.

    2014-03-01

    spatially varying precipitation for current grid length scales used in General Circulation Models (GCMs) is a continuing challenge. Furthermore, to fully capture the hydrologic effects of nonuniform precipitation, a representation of soil moisture heterogeneity and distribution of spatially varying precipitation must exist within the same framework. For this study, the explicit and sampling methods of Sellers et al. (2007) are tested off-line using the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3) in an arid, semiarid, and wet site, and are numerically compared to the bulk method, which is currently used in GCMs. To carry out the numerical experiments, an arbitrary grid area was defined by (1) a single instance of SiB3 (bulk method), (2) 100 instances of SiB3 (explicit method), and (3) less than 100 instances of SiB3 (sampling method). Precipitation was randomly distributed over fractions of the grid area for the explicit and sampling methods, while the standard SiB3 exponential distribution relating precipitation intensity to the grid area wet fraction was used in the bulk method. Comparing the sampling and bulk method to the explicit method indicates that 10 instances of SiB3 in the sampling method better captures the spatial variability in soil moisture and grid area flux calculations produced by the explicit method, and deals realistically with spatially varying precipitation at little additional computational cost to the bulk method.

  20. Effect of precipitation, geographical location and biosynthesis on New Zealand milk powder bulk and fatty acids D/H ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, R.; Emad Ehtesham, R.; Van Hale, R.; Hayman, A.; Baisden, T.

    2012-04-01

    D/H ratio measurements provide useful information for the investigation of biogeochemical influences on natural and agricultural produce, particularly with application to food traceability and authentication. Numerous studies have shown that variation of a product's D/H ratio is influenced by both environmental factors and biological processes. This study investigates the D/H ratio of New Zealand milk powder and individual fatty acids, and causal determinants of isotopic variation. One of the key environmental factors is precipitation, and the D/H ratio "isoscaping" of NZ has been undertaken. New Zealand provides a unique geography for these kinds of study in terms of proximity to the ocean and natural geographical variability from sea level to elevations as high as 3700 m. Milk powder samples were collected from different geographical regions from milk processing units, which were supplied by producers in the immediate region. H/D ratios of bulk milk powder and of individual fatty acids were determined. Initial comparison of the precipitation and milk powder bulk D/H data show a very good differentiation from north to southernmost parts of New Zealand and a relation between rain and milk bulk D/H abundance ratio. Almost 98% of milk FAs are in the form of triglycerides that have been extracted and hydrolysed to free FAs. Free FAs were esterified and analyzed with GC-IRMS. Individual FAs show variation in D/H ratio, and all values are depleted relative to the precipitation data. The difference in D/H ratio amongst individual FAs reflects the geographical environment and biological processes i.e. micro-organisms activity in the rumen of the cow. Short chain FAs (less than 8 carbons), particularly C4 (Butyric acid), appear to be key determinants. The variation in the data can be rationalized using statistical multivariate analysis.

  1. Effects of acid precipitation and natural processes on cation leaching from four diverse forest ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Van Miegroet, H.; Cole, D.W.; Richter, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Four forest ecosystems (two in eastern Tennessee and two in western Washington) with a history of intensive nutrient cycling research were selected for studies on the effects of acid precipitation and natural acid production processes on cation leaching rates. At the Tennessee sites, atmospheric acid input in bulk precipitation equaled or exceeded natural leaching by carbonic acid. At the less polluted Washington sites, natural leaching by carbonic acid was slightly larger than atmospheric acid input in the Douglas-fir soil. In the red alder soil, natural nitric acid formation far exceeded atmospheric acid inputs and appeared to have caused significant acidification of both soil and soil solution. The mobility of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ in these four soils was a major factor in their relative susceptibilities to leaching by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and HNO/sub 3/ entering from the atmosphere. In two of the sites (chestnut oak in Tennessee and red alder in Washington), SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ adsorption reduced the potential for sulfate-mediated leaching by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ by as much as one-half. Biological immobilization of NO/sub 3//sup -/ prevented leaching in all but the N-fixing red alder site. Both field and laboratory soil column studies involving artificial additions of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ verified the concept that cation leaching is controlled by the mobility of the associated anion.

  2. Potential health implications for acid precipitation, corrosion, and metals contamination of drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, W E; DeWalle, D R

    1985-01-01

    Potential health effects of drinking water quality changes caused by acid precipitation are presented. Several different types of water supply are discussed and their roles in modifying acid rain impacts on drinking water are explained. Sources of metals contamination in surface water supplies are enumerated. The authors present some results from their research into acid rain impacts on roof-catchment cisterns, small surface water supplies, and lead mobilization in acid soils. A good correlation was obtained between cistern water corrosivity as measured by the Ryznar Index (RI) values and standing tapwater copper concentrations. However, lead concentrations in tapwater did not correlate well with cistern water RI. A modified linear regression model that accounted for Ryznar Index change during storage in vinyl-lined cisterns was used to predict the Ryznar Index value at a copper concentration of 1000 micrograms/L. The predicted RI was greater than the RI of precipitation with a pH of 5.3, indicating that anthropogenically acidified precipitation may result in cistern tapwater copper concentrations in excess of the 1000 micrograms/L suggested drinking water limit. Good correlations between tapwater Ryznar Index and tapwater copper and lead concentrations were not obtained for the small surface water supply. Aluminum concentrations in reservoir water were similar to those in stream source water. Limited data were also presented that indicated lead was present in acid forest soil leachate and streams draining such soils in relatively small concentrations. Where appropriate, recommendations for future research are included with the discussions of research results. PMID:4076096

  3. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2014-06-03

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that “autunite-type” sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to “phosphuranylite-type” sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  4. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A

    2014-06-01

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicated that "autunite-type" sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to "phosphuranylite-type" sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases. PMID:24754743

  5. Effect of atmospheric sulfur pollutants derived from acid precipitation on the benthic dynamics of lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.J.

    1982-11-01

    Sulfuric acid is a major contributor to acid precipitation in the United States. The relationship of acid precipitation to the sulfur dynamics of three lakes in New York was studied. For South Lake, which has probably been acidified, the sulfur profile in the sediment corresponded to historical changes in anthropogenic sulfur inputs. In all three study lakes, the organic sulfur constituents, which generally have been ignored in limnological investigations, played a major role in sulfur dynamics. The transformations and fluxes of inorganic and organic sulfur differed among the lakes and reflected characteristic abiotic and biotic properties, including productivity parameters. The community structure and secondary production of the invertebrate benthos were ascertained and, for South Lake, were similar to other acidified lakes. The importance of benthic insects on sulfur dynamics was demonstrated. Further studies on sulfur in lakes will enhance the understanding of the role of these anthropogenic inputs on lake systems and permit a more accurate appraisal of the present and future impacts of acidic deposition on water quality. 10 references.

  6. Effects of simulated acid precipitation on decomposition and leaching of organic carbon in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Alexander, M.

    1984-09-01

    Soil samples from three watersheds of New York State were treated with simulated rain at pH 3.5, 4.1, and 5.6 daily for 14 d, at 12 3-d intervals in three separate tests, or at 22 7-d intervals. Except for one system of treating the three forest soils, simulated acid rain reduced the amount of organic matter leached from samples of soil from which more than 0.05% of the organic carbon was leached during the exposure period. In the soil samples representing the exceptions, acid rain enhanced the leaching of organic matter. Samples from the organic layer of the treated samples of acid soil were taken at two equal depths, and the rates of organic matter decomposition in the two layers were studied. As compared with simulated rain at pH 5.6, simulated acid rain reduced the decomposition of organic matter in the three soils at both depths in three of the five tests and at both depths of two of the soils in the fourth test. In some instances, organic matter decomposition was enhanced by the simulated acid rain. Except for the sample of soil at the highest initial pH, carbon mineralization was inhibited in soils and treatments in which simulated acid rain reduced the amount of organic carbon leached, and it was stimulated in soils and treatments in which the quantity of organic carbon leached was increased by the simulated acid rain. 12 references, 3 figures, 8 tables.

  7. An Optimized Trichloroacetic Acid/Acetone Precipitation Method for Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Analysis of Qinchuan Cattle Longissimus Dorsi Muscle Containing High Proportion of Marbling

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ruijie; Adoligbe, Camus; Jiang, Bijie; Zhao, Xianlin; Gui, Linsheng; Qu, Kaixing; Wu, Sen; Zan, Linsen

    2015-01-01

    Longissimus dorsi muscle (LD) proteomics provides a novel opportunity to reveal the molecular mechanism behind intramuscular fat deposition. Unfortunately, the vast amounts of lipids and nucleic acids in this tissue hampered LD proteomics analysis. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone precipitation is a widely used method to remove contaminants from protein samples. However, the high speed centrifugation employed in this method produces hard precipitates, which restrict contaminant elimination and protein re-dissolution. To address the problem, the centrifugation precipitates were first grinded with a glass tissue grinder and then washed with 90% acetone (TCA/acetone-G-W) in the present study. According to our result, the treatment for solid precipitate facilitated non-protein contaminant removal and protein re-dissolution, ultimately improving two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis. Additionally, we also evaluated the effect of sample drying on 2-DE profile as well as protein yield. It was found that 30 min air-drying did not result in significant protein loss, but reduced horizontal streaking and smearing on 2-DE gel compared to 10 min. In summary, we developed an optimized TCA/acetone precipitation method for protein extraction of LD, in which the modifications improved the effectiveness of TCA/acetone method. PMID:25893432

  8. Biomediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate in a Slightly Acidic Hot Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L.

    2015-12-01

    A slightly acidic hot spring named "Female Tower" (T=73.5 °C, pH=6.64) is located in the Jifei Geothermal Field, Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The precipitates in the hot spring are composed of large amounts of calcite, aragonite, and sulfur. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses revealed that the microbial mats were formed of various coccoid, rod-shaped, and filamentous microbes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the intracellular sulfur granules were commonly associated with these microbes. A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the majority of the bacteria in the spring were sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In the spring water, H2S concentration was up to 60 ppm, while SO42- concentration was only about 10 ppm. We speculated that H2S might be utilized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in this hot spring water, leading to the intracellular formation of sulfur granules. In the meantime, this reaction increased the pH in the micron-scale microdomains, which fostered the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the microbial mats. The results of this study indicated that the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria could play an important role in calcium carbonate precipitation in slightly acidic hot spring environments.

  9. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

  10. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

  11. Synthesis of WO{sub 3} nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted precipitation and evaluation of their photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Martínez, D.; Martínez-de la Cruz, A.; López-Cuéllar, E.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple citric acid-assisted precipitation. ► WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was able to the partial mineralization of rhB, IC and MO. ► WO{sub 3} can be considered as a photocatalyst active under visible light irradiation. -- Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by citric acid-assisted precipitation method using a 1:1.5 molar ratio of ammonium paratungstate hydrate (H{sub 42}N{sub 10}O{sub 42}W{sub 12}·xH{sub 2}O):citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}). The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} at different temperatures was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmitt–Teller surface area (BET) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). According to the thermal treatment followed during the synthesis of WO{sub 3}, the morphology of the nanoparticles formed was characterized by rectangular and ovoid shapes. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} obtained under different experimental conditions was evaluated in the degradation of rhodamine B (rhB), indigo carmine (IC), methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) in aqueous solution under UV and UV–vis radiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the sample obtained by thermal treatment at 700 °C. In general, the sequence of degradation of the organic dyes was: indigo carmine (IC) > rhodamine B (rhB) > methyl orange (MO) > Congo red (CR). The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalysts was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 82% (rhB), 85% (IC), 28% (MO), and 7% (CR) for 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  12. Preparation of All-Trans Retinoic Acid nanosuspensions using a modified precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Xia, Q; Gu, N

    2006-08-01

    All-Trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA) nanosuspensions were prepared with a modified precipitation method. The ATRA solution in acetone was injected into pure water by an air compressor under the action of ultrasonication. Photon correlation spectroscopy results showed that the mean particle size of ATRA nanoparticles in nanosuspensions reduced from 337 nm to 155 nm as the injection velocity increased and the polydispersity index was 0.45-0.50. The morphology of ATRA nanoparticles varied with the different concentration of ATRA solution in acetone. ATRA nanoparticles showed an amorphous state and stable in 6 months. It could be concluded that this modified precipitation method could produce stable and controllable ATRA nanosuspension to a certain extent, thus benefit for higher saturation solubility. PMID:16908423

  13. Recovery of molybdenum, nickel and cobalt by precipitation from the acidic leachate of a mineral sludge.

    PubMed

    Vemic, M; Bordas, F; Comte, S; Guibaud, G; Lens, P N L; van Hullebusch, E D

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the recovery potential of molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) from synthetic and real acidic leachate of a mineral sludge from a metal recycling plant by sulfide precipitation. The operational parameters (metal sulfide (M/S) ratio 0.1-1, agitation speed 0-100 rpm, contact time 15-120 min and pH 1-5) were optimized in batch conditions on synthetic metal leachate (0.5 M HNO3, Mo = 101.6 mg L(-1), Ni = 70.8 mg L(-1), Co = 27.1 mg L(-1)) with a 0.1 M Na2S solution. Additionally, recovery of the target metals was theoretically simulated with a chemical equilibrium model (Visual MINTEQ 3.0). The optimized Na2S precipitation of metals from the synthetic leachate resulted in the potential selective recovery of Mo at pH 1 (98% by modeling, 95% experimental), after simultaneous precipitation of Ni and Co as sulfide at pH 4 (100% by modeling, 98% experimental). Metal precipitation from the real leachate (18 M H2SO4, Mo = 10,160 mg L(-1), Ni = 7,080 mg L(-1), Co = 2,710 mg L(-1)) was performed with 1 M Na2S, and resulted in a maximal Mo recovery at pH 2 (50%), while maximal recoveries of Ni and Co were observed at pH 4 (56% and 60%, respectively). Real leachate gave a lower metals recovery efficiency compared with synthetic leachate, which can be attributed to changes in the pH, nature of leachant, co-precipitation of Zn and competition for S(2-) ions. PMID:26824137

  14. The origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5-651.1 ppb in 6 M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D- and L-β-amino-n-butyric acid (β-ABA), DL-α-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, β-alanine, and ε-amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic β-ABA were present in some samples. We also examined seven samples from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 that had been previously allocated to a non-curation laboratory, as well as two samples of terrestrial dunite from studies of lunar module engine exhaust that had been stored in the same laboratory. The amino acid content of these samples suggested that contamination had occurred during non-curatorial storage. We measured the compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios of glycine, β-alanine, and L-alanine in Apollo regolith sample 70011 and found values of -21‰ to -33‰. These values are consistent with those seen in terrestrial biology and, together with the enantiomeric compositions of the proteinogenic amino acids, suggest that terrestrial biological contamination is a primary source of the

  15. Isotopic composition of nitrate in sequential Hurricane Irene precipitation samples: Implications for changing NOx sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, J. David; Elliott, Emily M.; Avery, G. Brooks; Kieber, Robert J.; Mead, Ralph N.; Willey, Joan D.; Mullaugh, Katherine M.

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have concentrated on adverse ecosystem effects resulting from nitrogen (N) loading from runoff and increased N2O emissions due to hurricane activity but little focus has been placed on N inputs delivered by hurricane precipitation. Understanding these N inputs during extreme rain events is increasingly important since global climate change may alter hurricane activity. In this study, ten sequential Hurricane Irene rain samples were analyzed for isotopic composition of nitrate (NO3-) to investigate NOx (=NO + NO2) sources contributing to NO3- deposited by a hurricane. The samples were divided into three groups (I, II, II) by k-means clustering using rain event back trajectories, δ15N-NO3- values, and NO3- concentrations. Chemical, physical and isotopic analyses, including δ15N- and δ18O-NO3-, anions, cations, H+, H2O2, DOC, acetaldehyde, ethanol and rainfall intensity, were then used to explore similarities in geographic origins and potential relationships with NOx and other emission sources. While it is possible that all samples had contributions from various NOx sources, group I samples had marine back trajectories and a mean δ15N-NO3- value (-0.7 ± 1.9‰) suggesting primarily lightning-sourced NOx contributions to NO3- deposition. As the hurricane made landfall, Group II samples transitioned to reflect more of a terrestrial signature with a higher mean δ15N-NO3- value (+11.0 ± 0.5‰) indicating NOx emission contributions from vehicles and power plants sources. As the hurricane continued to move inland, Group III δ15N-NO3- values (-5.5 and -5.7‰) reflect the potential mixing of biogenic soil NOx emissions with vehicle and power plant sources. Higher concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, NH4+, and carbohydrates in Group III samples support the influence of biogenic sources. The isotopic composition of NO3- in hurricane rain can aid in discerning varying NOx sources contributing to nitrate concentrations in extreme rain events. This

  16. Comparison of Four Strong Acids on the Precipitation Potential of Gypsum in Brines During Distillation of Pretreated, Augmented Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Two batches of nominally pretreated and augmented urine were prepared with the baseline pretreatment formulation of sulfuric acid and chromium trioxide. The urine was augmented with inorganic salts and organic compounds in order to simulate a urinary ionic concentrations representing the upper 95 percentile on orbit. Three strong mineral acids: phosphoric, hydrochloric, and nitric acid, were substituted for the sulfuric acid for comparison to the baseline sulfuric acid pretreatment formulation. Three concentrations of oxidizer in the pretreatment formulation were also tested. Pretreated urine was distilled to 85% water recovery to determine the effect of each acid and its conjugate base on the precipitation of minerals during distillation. The brines were analyzed for calcium and sulfate ion, total, volatile, and fixed suspended solids. Test results verified that substitution of phosphoric, hydrochloric, or nitric acids for sulfuric acid would prevent the precipitation of gypsum up to 85% recovery from pretreated urine representing the upper 95 percentile calcium concentration on orbit.

  17. Precipitation of heavy metals from acid mine drainage and their geochemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrilakova, Aneta; Balintova, Magdalena; Holub, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Geochemical modeling plays an increasingly vital role in a number of areas of geoscience, ranging from groundwater and surface water hydrology to environmental preservation and remediation. Geochemical modeling is also used to model the interaction processes at the water - sediment interface in acid mine drainage (AMD). AMD contains high concentrations of sulfate and dissolved metals and it is a serious environmental problem in eastern Slovakia. The paper is focused on comparing the results of laboratory precipitation of metal ions from AMD (the Smolnik creek, Slovakia) with the results obtained by geochemical modeling software Visual Minteq 3.0.

  18. Boronic Acid functionalized core-shell polymer nanoparticles prepared by distillation precipitation polymerization for glycopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanyan; Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-07-16

    The boronic acid-functionalized core-shell polymer nanoparticles, poly(N,N-methylenebisacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid)@4-vinylphenylboronic acid (poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA), were successfully synthesized for enriching glycosylated peptides. Such nanoparticles were composed of a hydrophilic polymer core prepared by distillation precipitation polymerization (DPP) and a boronic acid-functionalized shell designed for capturing glycopeptides. Owing to the relatively large amount of residual vinyl groups introduced by DPP on the core surface, the VPBA monomer was coated with high efficiency, working as the shell. Moreover, the overall polymerization route, especially the use of DPP, made the synthesis of nanoparticles facile and time-saving. With the poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA nanoparticles, 18 glycopeptides from horseradish peroxidase (HRP) digest were captured and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis, relative to eight glycopeptides enriched by using commercially available meta-aminophenylboronic acid agarose under the same conditions. When the concentration of the HRP digest was decreased to as low as 5 nmol, glycopeptides could still be selectively isolated by the prepared nanoparticles. Our results demonstrated that the synthetic poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA nanoparticles might be a promising selective enrichment material for glycoproteome analysis. PMID:22707097

  19. Quantitative microanalysis of bile acids in biological samples. Collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, F

    1988-10-28

    The analysis of bile acids in biological samples has always presented a problem because of their complex nature and low concentration. Recently, newer analytical procedures for bile acids have become available, including enzymatic analysis, radioimmunoassay, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selected ion monitoring (SIM). However, they differ greatly with respect to specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and simplicity. On the other hand, the choice of analytical procedure differs according to the specific aims and the nature of biological samples to be analysed. These newer procedures have been compared in a double-blind fashion by distributing bile, plasma and urine samples to seven participating laboratories. GC-MS-SIM was found to be the most sensitive and reliable, but it requires other procedures for preliminary clean-up and fractionation steps. Enzymatic analysis is simple and gives small analytical errors but tends to over-estimate plasma bile acids. Radioimmunoassay gives variable results but is useful as a screening procedure for large numbers of plasma samples. TLC gives reliable results for biliary bile acids in experienced hands, except for differentiation between conjugated dihydroxycholanoic acids. HPLC, whether using derivatization or with fixed 3 alpha-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase detection, is suitable for the analysis of major bile acids in normal human serum but not for the identification of unknown minor peaks. PMID:3243854

  20. Biogenic precipitation of manganese oxides and enrichment of heavy metals at acidic soil pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayanna, Sathish; Peacock, Caroline L.; Schäffner, Franziska; Grawunder, Anja; Merten, Dirk; Kothe, Erika; Büchel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides at acidic pH is rarely reported and poorly understood, compared to biogenic Mn oxide precipitation at near neutral conditions. Here we identified and investigated the precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides in acidic soil, and studied their role in the retention of heavy metals, at the former uranium mining site of Ronneburg, Germany. The site is characterized by acidic pH, low carbon content and high heavy metal loads including rare earth elements. Specifically, the Mn oxides were present in layers identified by detailed soil profiling and within these layers pH varied from 4.7 to 5.1, Eh varied from 640 to 660 mV and there were enriched total metal contents for Ba, Ni, Co, Cd and Zn in addition to high Mn levels. Using electron microprobe analysis, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we identified poorly crystalline birnessite (δ-MnO2) as the dominant Mn oxide in the Mn layers, present as coatings covering and cementing quartz grains. With geochemical modelling we found that the environmental conditions at the site were not favourable for chemical oxidation of Mn(II), and thus we performed 16S rDNA sequencing to isolate the bacterial strains present in the Mn layers. Bacterial phyla present in the Mn layers belonged to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, and from these phyla we isolated six strains of Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria and confirmed their ability to oxidise Mn(II) in the laboratory. The biogenic Mn oxide layers act as a sink for metals and the bioavailability of these metals was much lower in the Mn layers than in adjacent layers, reflecting their preferential sorption to the biogenic Mn oxide. In this presentation we will report our findings, concluding that the formation of natural biogenic poorly crystalline birnessite can occur at acidic pH, resulting in the formation of a biogeochemical barrier which, in turn, can control the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in

  1. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and alternative flame retardants in air and precipitation samples from the northern Lake Victoria region, East Africa.

    PubMed

    Arinaitwe, Kenneth; Muir, Derek C G; Kiremire, Bernard T; Fellin, Phil; Li, Henrik; Teixeira, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    High volume air and precipitation samples were collected close to the shore of Lake Victoria at Entebbe, Uganda, between October 2008 and July 2010 inclusive. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and alternative flame retardants (AFRs) were analyzed by GC-MS. BDEs 47, 99, and 209 were the predominant PBDEs with mean concentrations (in air) of 9.84, 4.38, 8.27 pg m(-3) and mean fluxes in precipitation of 3.40, 6.23, and 7.82 ng m(-2) sample(-1), respectively. 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), anti- and syn-Dechlorane plus were detected at levels comparable with those of PBDEs. Both PBDEs and AFRs in air generally increased from 2008 to 2010. Elevated PBDE concentrations in air were associated with slow moving low altitude air masses from the region immediately adjacent to the lake, while low concentrations were mostly associated with fast moving westerly and southwesterly air masses. Analysis of the octa- and nona-BDE profiles suggested photolysis and pyrolytic debromination of BDE-209 in the air samples. The highly halogenated and most abundant PBDEs and AFRs in air also predominated in precipitation samples. This is the first study to report flame retardants in high volume air samples and precipitation in Equatorial Africa. PMID:24400732

  2. Technical and economical assessment of formic acid to recycle phosphorus from pig slurry by a combined acidification-precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Daumer, M-L; Picard, S; Saint-Cast, P; Dabert, P

    2010-08-15

    Dissolution by acidification followed by a liquid/solid separation and precipitation of phosphorus from the liquid phase is one possibility to recycle phosphorus from livestock effluents. To avoid increase of effluent salinity by using mineral acids in the recycling process, the efficiency of two organic acids, formic and acetic acid, in dissolving the mineral phosphorus from piggery wastewater was compared. The amount of formic acid needed to dissolve the phosphorus was reduced three fold, compared to acetic acid. The amount of magnesium oxide needed for further precipitation was decreased by two with formic acid. Neither the carbon load nor the effluent salinity was significantly increased by using formic acid. An economical comparison was performed for the chemical recycling process (mineral fertilizer) vs. centrifugation (organic fertilizer) considering the centrifugation and the mineral fertilizers sold in the market. After optimisation of the process, the product could be economically competitive with mineral fertilizer as superphosphate in less than 10 years. PMID:20471746

  3. Precipitation-Redispersion of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles with Poly(acrylic acid): Toward Stable Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal,A.; Lalatonne, Y.; Berret, J.; Morvan, M.

    2005-01-01

    We exploit a precipitation-redispersion mechanism for complexation of short chain polyelectrolytes with cerium oxide nanoparticles to extend their stability ranges. As synthesized, cerium oxide sols at pH 1.4 consist of monodisperse cationic nanocrystalline particles having a hydrodynamic diameter of 10 nm and a molecular weight of 400 000 g mol{sup -1}. We show that short chain uncharged poly(acrylic acid) at low pH when added to a cerium oxide sols leads to macroscopic precipitation. As the pH is increased, the solution spontaneously redisperses into a clear solution of single particles with an anionic poly(acrylic acid) corona. The structure and dynamics of cerium oxide nanosols and their hybrid polymer-inorganic complexes in solution are investigated by static and dynamic light scattering, X-ray scattering, and chemical analysis. Quantitative analysis of the redispersed sol gives rise to an estimate of 40-50 polymer chains per particle for stable suspension. This amount represents 20% of the mass of the polymer-nanoparticle complexes. This complexation adds utility to the otherwise unstable cerium oxide dispersions by extending the range of stability of the sols in terms of pH, ionic strength, and concentration.

  4. Effectiveness of coagulation and acid precipitation processes for the pre-treatment of diluted black liquor.

    PubMed

    Garg, Anurag; Mishra, I M; Chand, S

    2010-08-15

    The effectiveness of coagulation (using aluminium-based chemicals and ferrous sulfate) and acid precipitation (using H(2)SO(4)) processes for the pre-treatment of diluted black liquor obtained from a pulp and paper mill is reported. Commercial alum was found to be the most economical among all the aluminium and ferrous salts used as a coagulant. A maximum removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (ca. 63%) and colour reduction (ca. 90%) from the wastewater (COD = 7000 mg l(-1)) at pH 5.0 was obtained with alum. During the acid precipitation process, at pH < 5.0, significant COD reductions (up to 64%) were observed. Solid residue obtained from the alum treatment at a temperature of 95 degrees C showed much better (3 times) settling rate than that for the residue obtained after treatment with the same coagulant at a temperature of 25 degrees C. The settling curves had three parts, namely, hindered, transition and compression zones. Tory plots were used to determine the critical height of suspension-supernatant interface that is used in the design of a clarifier-thickener unit. High heating values and large biomass fraction of the solid residues can encourage the fuel users to use this waste derived sludge as a potential renewable energy source. PMID:20430523

  5. Evaluation of simulated acid precipitation effects on forest microcosms. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Strickland, R.C.; Weatherford, F.P.; Noggle, J.C.

    1984-04-01

    Microcosms were treated for a 30-month period with simulated precipitation acidified to four pH levels (5.7, 4.5, 4.0, and 3.5) to evaluate the impact of acid precipitation on foliar leaching, plant nutrient content, soil leaching, soil nutrient content, and litter decomposition. Direct effects of acid precipitation on diameter growth, bud break, leaf senescence, chlorophyll content, stomatal size, stomatal density, photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and cuticle erosion were evaluated on tulip poplar, white oak, and Virginia pine seedlings growing as mixed stands in the microcosms. None of the plant physiological or morphological parameters evaluated responded in a statistically significant manner as a result of treatment. A significant treatment canopy interaction was observed in the form of a 60 percent increase in calcium input in throughfall in response to the pH 3.5 treatment. Foliar nutrient content did not change in response to treatment nor did field measurements of decomposer activity. Soil analysis indicated a significantly lower concentration of exchangeable calcium and magnesium in the top 3.5 cm of the mineral soil in association with the pH 3.5 treatment. Soil leachate concentrations exhibited significant increases at both the 25 and 50 cm depths. However, at the 100 cm depth no significant response in concentration or elemental loss from the system was observed. Laboratory respiration measurements indicated a small, but statistically significant reduction in decomposer activity in the lower litter (02) horizon. This reduction was masked in the field measurements of decomposer activity due to the relatively small contribution of the 02 to total soil respiration. 38 references, 12 figures, 18 tables.

  6. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples. PMID:1897721

  7. Selective precipitation of potassium in seawater samples for improving the sensitivity of plain γ-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, Marco; Nisi, Stefano; Laubenstein, Matthias; De Angelis, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    An analytical method is presented to reduce the amount of 40K in sea water samples, in order to lower its interference in γ-ray analysis below 1.4 MeV due to the Compton continuum. Sodium tetraphenylborate was used to successfully precipitate 40K in the samples. A custom procedure for precipitation of potassium was developed and it was evaluated for its selectivity, reproducibility and efficiency, using conventional analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This work has shown that the selective precipitation of potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate has led to a decrease of detection limit of radio nuclides such as 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra, 137Cs, 134Cs, 133I, 134I, 60Co in γ-analysis. In particular, the detection limit for nuclides with emissions in the energy window energy below 1400 keV is improved by almost one order of magnitude.

  8. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Uhart, M.; et al,

    2005-08-01

    Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

  9. Application of dissolvable layered double hydroxides as sorbent in dispersive solid-phase extraction and extraction by co-precipitation for the determination of aromatic acid anions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Lee, Hian Kee

    2013-08-01

    Three types of magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides were synthesized and employed as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents to extract several aromatic acids (protocatechuic acid, mandelic acid, phthalic acid, benzoic acid, and salicylic acid) from aqueous samples. An interesting feature of these sorbents is that they dissolve when the pH of the solution is lower than 4. Thus, the analyte elution step, as needed in conventional sorbent-based extraction, was obviated by dissolving the sorbent in acid after extraction and separation from the sample solution. The extract was then directly injected into a high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection system for analysis. In the key adsorption process, both dispersive SPE and co-precipitation extraction with the sorbents were conducted and experimental parameters such as pH, temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The results showed that both extraction methods provided low limits of detection (0.03-1.47 μg/L) and good linearity (r(2) > 0.9903). The optimized extraction conditions were applied to human urine and sports drink samples. This new and interesting extraction approach was demonstrated to be a fast and efficient procedure for the extraction of organic anions from aqueous samples. PMID:23855757

  10. Precipitation of Metallic Cations by the Acidic Exopolysaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) Strain BGA-1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, J.; León-Barrios, M.; Hernando-Rico, V.; Gutierrez-Navarro, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction between the acidic exopolysaccharides produced by two Bradyrhizobium strains and several metal cations has been studied. Aqueous solutions in the millimolar range of Fe3+ but not of Fe2+ precipitated the exopolysaccharides from Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) strain BGA-1 and, to a lesser extent, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110. The precipitation was pH dependent, with a maximum around pH 3. The precipitate was redissolved by changing the pH and by Fe3+ reduction or chelation. Deacetylation of B. japonicum polysaccharide increased its precipitation by Fe3+. At pH near neutrality, the polysaccharide from Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) strain BGA-1 stabilized Fe3+ solutions, despite the insolubility of Fe(OH)3. Aluminum precipitated Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) polysaccharide but not the polysaccharide produced by B. japonicum. The precipitation showed a maximum at about pH 4.8, and the precipitate was redissolved after Al3+ chelation with EDTA. Precipitation was inhibited by increases in the ionic strength over 10 mM. Bradyrhizobium (Chamaecytisus) polysaccharide was also precipitated by Th4+, Sn2+, Mn2+, and Co2+. The presence of Fe3+ increased the exopolysaccharide precipitation by aluminum. No precipitation, gelation, or increase in turbidity of polysaccharide solutions occurred when K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, or U6+ was added at several pH values. The results suggest that the precipitation is based on the interaction between carboxylate groups from different polysaccharide chains and the partially hydrolyzed aquoions of Fe3+, Al3+, Th4+, and Sn2+. PMID:16349466

  11. Nucleic acid isolation from ecological samples--fungal associations, lichens.

    PubMed

    Grube, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Ecological samples of fungal associations pose particular challenges for nucleic acid extraction due to the presence of several genomes. Thorough examination of the samples prior to extraction is important to assess the risks of contamination. If manual separation of symbionts or their axenic cultivation is not feasible, symbiont-specific primers can be applied in PCR experiments. A basic protocol is suggested here which can be optimized for specific applications. PMID:15865960

  12. Aquatic hazard assessment of a commercial sample of naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Swigert, James P; Lee, Carol; Wong, Diana C L; White, Russell; Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents chemical composition and aquatic toxicity characteristics of a commercial sample of naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are derived from the refining of petroleum middle distillates and can contribute to refinery effluent toxicity. NAs are also present in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), but differences in the NAs compositions from these sources precludes using a common aquatic toxicity dataset to represent the aquatic hazards of NAs from both origins. Our chemical characterization of a commercial sample of NAs showed it to contain in order of abundance, 1-ring>2-ring>acyclic>3-ring acids (∼84%). Also present were monoaromatic acids (7%) and non-acids (9%, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocyclic compounds). While the acyclic acids were only the third most abundant group, the five most abundant individual compounds were identified as C(10-14) n-acids (n-decanoic acid to n-tetradecanoic acid). Aquatic toxicity testing of fish (Pimephales promelas), invertebrate (Daphnia magna), algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) showed P. promelas to be the most sensitive species with 96-h LL50=9.0 mg L(-1) (LC50=5.6 mg L(-1)). Acute EL50 values for the other species ranged 24-46 mg L(-1) (EC50 values ranged 20-30 mg L(-1)). Biomimetic extraction via solid-phase-microextraction (BE-SPME) suggested a nonpolar narcosis mode of toxic action for D. magna, P. subcapitata, and V. fischeri. The BE analysis under-predicted fish toxicity, which indicates that a specific mode of action, besides narcosis, may be a factor for fishes. PMID:25434270

  13. Determination of Mycophenolic Acid in Plasma Samples Using the Terbium-Sensitized Luminescence Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayanfar, A.; Ghavimi, H.; Zolali, E.; Jouyban, A.

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this work were to provide an analytical method, for the quantitative determination of the mycophenolic acid (MFA) in plasma samples and its application to quantification of the MFA in rat plasma after oral administration. In order to remove the fluorescence interferences of the plasma, the samples were precipitated by acetonitrile in 1:8 ratio and then a few parameters were optimized and the fluorescence intensity measured at 545 nm using an excitation wavelength of 347 nm. Under the optimized concentration, the method provided a linear range between 1.0 and 10.0 mg/l with a correlation coefficient of 0.998. MFA was detected and the validation was performed according to the FDA guidelines. Linearity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity of the developed method were suitable for th determination of the MFA in plasma samples. The proposed analytical approach was applied to determine the MFA concentration in a rat plasma-time profile study.

  14. Nucleation kinetics of selenium (+4) precipitation from an acidic copper sulphate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangere, M.; Nathoo, J.; Lewis, A. E.

    2010-10-01

    The removal of selenium from copper sulphate solution prior to the electrowinning of copper is desirable in order to minimise contamination of the copper cathodes by selenium and other impurities. The selenium removal is effected by a precipitation process that takes place under high supersaturation conditions, which favour nucleation over any other particle formation processes. There is currently no fundamental information on the nucleation kinetics of this important process. In this study, the nucleation kinetics of selenium (+4) precipitation from an acidic copper sulphate solution was determined using the classical nucleation theory (CNT). Experiments were carried out by varying the levels of supersaturation from 8.66×10 15 to 4.33×10 17 at a temperature of 95 °C under atmospheric pressure. The nucleation rates for four different levels of supersaturation, the nucleation work and the nucleus size were determined. The kinetic constant A was found to be 3.92×10 27 m -3 s -1, which shows that the nucleation process takes place through a homogeneous mechanism. The associated thermodynamic parameter ( B) was determined to be 8.98×10 04.

  15. Effects of ozone, sulfur dioxide and acidic precipitation on formation of ectomycorrhizae by forest tree seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, K.D.; Manning, W.J. )

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous air pollutants and acidic precipitation impact upon forest ecosystems. Forest declines in central Europe and, more recently, in the northeastern United States have been largely attributed to these air pollutants. The possible direct effects of these air pollutants, such as foliar injury and growth reductions, on forests have been extensively investigated. Potential secondary effects of air pollutants, on tree root processes such as ectomycorrhizae, have received much less attention. These secondary effects are addressed in this paper. Ectomycorrhizae are symbiotic fungal-root associations in which fungal hyphae penetrate the cortex of plant roots intercellularly to form a structure called Hartig net. Mycorrhizal fungi typically become associated with the fine feeder roots of their hosts. The ectomyocorrhizae, once associated, results in distinct morphological changes in these roots. Ectomycorrhizae are known to associate with most tree species.

  16. Strong and Biostable Hyaluronic Acid-Calcium Phosphate Nanocomposite Hydrogel via in Situ Precipitation Process.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seol-Ha; Koh, Young-Hag; Kim, Suk-Wha; Park, Ji-Ung; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Song, Juha

    2016-03-14

    Hyaluronic acid (HAc) hydrogel exhibits excellent biocompatibility, but it has limited biomedical application due to its poor biomechanical properties as well as too-fast enzymatic degradation. In this study, we have developed an in situ precipitation process for the fabrication of a HAc-calcium phosphate nanocomposite hydrogel, after the formation of the glycidyl methacrylate-conjugated HAc (GMHA) hydrogels via photo-cross-linking, to improve the mechanical and biological properties under physiological conditions. In particular, our process facilitates the rapid incorporation of calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles of uniform size and with minimal agglomeration into a polymer matrix, homogeneously. Compared with pure HAc, the nanocomposite hydrogels exhibit improved mechanical behavior. Specifically, the shear modulus is improved by a factor of 4. The biostability of the nanocomposite hydrogel was also significantly improved compared with that of pure HAc hydrogels under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. PMID:26878437

  17. Hands-free sample preparation platform for nucleic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Baier, T; Hansen-Hagge, T E; Gransee, R; Crombé, A; Schmahl, S; Paulus, C; Drese, K S; Keegan, H; Martin, C; O'Leary, J J; Furuberg, L; Solli, L; Grønn, P; Falang, I M; Karlgård, A; Gulliksen, A; Karlsen, F

    2009-12-01

    A Lab-On-Chip system with an instrument is presented which is capable of performing total sample preparation and automated extraction of nucleic acid from human cell samples fixed in a methanol based solution. The target application is extraction of mRNA from cervical liquid based cytology specimens for detection of transformed HPV-infections. The device accepts 3 ml of sample and performs the extraction in a disposable polymer chip of credit card size. All necessary reagents for cell lysis, washing, and elution are stored on-chip and the extraction is performed in two filter stages; one for cell pre-concentration and the other for nucleic acid capture. Tests performed using cancer cell lines and cervical liquid based cytology specimens confirm the extraction of HPV-mRNA by the system. PMID:19904407

  18. Strontium and Actinides Removal from Savannah River Site Actual Waste Samples by Freshly Precipitated Manganese Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    2003-10-30

    The authors investigated the performance of freshly precipitated manganese oxide and monosodium titanate (MST) for the removal of strontium (Sr) and actinides from actual high-level waste. Manganese oxide precipitation occurs upon addition of a reductant such as formate (HCO2-) or peroxide (H2O2) to a waste solution containing permanganate (MnO4-). Tests described in this document address the capability of manganese oxide treatment to remove Rs, Pu, and Np from actual high-level waste containing elevated concentrations of Pu. Additionally, tests investigate MST (using two unique batches) performance with the same waste for direct comparison to the manganese oxide performance.

  19. The influence of aliphatic amines, diamines, and amino acids on the polymorph of calcium carbonate precipitated by the introduction of carbon dioxide gas into calcium hydroxide aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuajiw, Wittaya; Takatori, Kazumasa; Igarashi, Teruki; Hara, Hiroki; Fukushima, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The influence of aliphatic organic additives including amines, diamines and amino acids, on the polymorph of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitated from a calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) suspensions and carbon dioxide gas (CO2) was studied by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The amorphous calcium carbonate, vaterite, aragonite and calcite were observed for the precipitated samples with organic additives. While the precipitation without organic additive, only the stable phase; calcite was obtained. The observed crystal phases were related with the alkyl chain length in the aliphatic part of additives. These results suggested that hydrophobic interactions due to the van der Waals force between organic additives and surface of inorganic precipitates could not be ignored. We concluded that covering or adsorbing of these organic additives on the precipitates surfaces retarded the successive dissolution/recrystallisation process in the aqueous systems. The results revealed that not only the polar interaction from the hydrophilic functional groups, as the former reports proposed, but also the van der Waals interactions from the hydrophobic alkyl groups played the important role in the phase transformation of CaCO3.

  20. Multi-Element Preconcentration/Separation of Some Metal Ions in Environmental Samples by Using Co-precipitation.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Aydin, Ayse; Kizil, Nebiye

    2016-01-01

    A preconcentration/separation system for cadmium(II), nickel(II), copper(II), lead(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), and manganese(II) ions has been established prior to their atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The procedure is based on the co-precipitation of these ions by the aid of a praseodymium hydroxide (Pr(OH)3) precipitate. The precipitate was dissolved in 0.5 mL of concentrated HNO3, and made up to 10.0 mL with water. The analytes were determined by a flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The effects of analytical parameters including pH, amounts of praseodymium as carrier element, sample volume, etc. on the recoveries of heavy metals were investigated. The effects of matrix ions were also examined. The limits of detection for analyte ions were found in the range between 0.7-5.2 μg/L. The validation of this present procedure was verified by the analysis of certified reference materials, TMDA-54.4 (fortified water) and NIST 1570a (spinach leaves). The proposed co-precipitation procedure was applied for the determination of cadmium(II), nickel(II), copper(II), lead(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), and manganese(II) ions in various environmental water samples. PMID:27053469

  1. Sampling the oxidative weathering products and the potentially acidic permafrost on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Large areas of Mars' surface are covered by oxidative weathering products containing ferric and sulfate ions having analogies to terrestrial gossans derived from sulfide mineralization associated with iron-rich basalts. Chemical weathering of such massive and disseminated pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages and host basaltic rocks in the Martian environment could have produced metastable gossaniferous phases (limonite containing poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates and oxyhydroxides, clay silicates and opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost on Mars, may still be acidic due to incomplete buffering reactions by wall-rock alteration of unfractured host rock. Such acidic solutions stabilize temperature-sensitive complex ions and sols which flocculate to colloidal precipitates at elevated temperatures. Sampling procedures of Martian regolith will need to be designed bearing in mind that the frozen permafrost may be corrosive and be stabilizing unique complex ions and sols of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni and other minor elements.

  2. Concentration of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus from water samples by tangential flow filtration and polyethylene glycol precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was concentrated from water samples by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, tangential flow filtration (TFF), and by a combination of TFF followed by PEG precipitation of the retentate. Used alone, PEG increased virus titers more than 200-fold, and the efficiency of recovery was as great as 100%. Used alone, TFF concentrated IHNV more than 20-fold, and average recovery was 70%. When the two techniques were combined, 10-L water samples were reduced to about 300 mL by TFF and the virus was precipitated with PEG into a 1 to 2 g pellet; total recovery was as great as 100%. The combined techniques were used to isolate IHNV from water samples taken from a river containing adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and from a hatchery pond containing adult spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha). The combination of these methods was effective in concentrating and detecting IHNV from water containing only three infectious particles per 10-L sample.

  3. Analysis of fish otoliths by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: aspects of precipitating otolith calcium with hydrofluoric acid for trace element determination.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zikri

    2005-03-15

    A method is developed for determination of trace elements, including Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Se, Tl and Zn, in fish otoliths by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS). Hydrofluoric acid was used to precipitate calcium resulting from acid dissolution of otolith calcium carbonate. Initial acidity of the sample solution influenced the precipitation efficiency of calcium fluoride. Up to 99.5% of Ca was precipitated in solutions that contained less than 2% (v/v) HNO(3). Recoveries of the elements obtained from spiked artificial otolith solutions were between 90 and 103%. Stabilization of the elements within the ETV cell was achieved with 0.3mug Pd/0.2mug Rh chemical modifier that also afforded optimum sensitivity for multielement determination. The method was validated by the analysis of a fish otolith reference material (CRM) of emperor snapper, and then applied to the determination of the trace elements in otoliths of several fish species captured in Raritan Bay, New Jersey. Results indicated that fish physiology and biological processes could influence the levels of Cu, Mn, Se and Zn in the otoliths of fish inhabiting a similar aqueous environment. Otolith concentrations of Cr and Ni did not show any significant differences among different species. Concentrations for Ag, As, Cd, Co and Tl were also not significantly different, but were very low indicating low affinity of otolith calcium carbonate to these elements. PMID:18969949

  4. Weathering processes and pickeringite formation in a sulfidic schist: a consideration in acid precipitation neutralization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, R.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Extremely low abrasion pH values (2.8-3.3) characterize the weathering products of the Partridge Formation, a Middle-Ordovician metamorphosed, black, sulfidic shale. The local occurrence is observed of two sulfates that are rare in the Northeast: pickeringite and jarosite. X-ray diffraction studies of the weathering residues and the sulfate efflorescences have also identified dioctahedral and trioctahedral illite, kaolinite, vermiculite, and an 11-12 Angstrom phase, thought to be a type of randomly-interstratified biotite-vermiculite. From the mineralogical studies, qualitative weathering processes for the schist are formulated. A probable mechanism for the intense chemical weathering of the schist appears to be oxidation of iron sulfides to form iron oxide-hydroxides, sulfates, and sulfuric acid. This natural weathering process is proposed as an analog to anthropogenic low pH rock weathering resulting from acid precipitation. In the Northeast, natural weathering rates, may, in places, significantly affect the water chemistry and mineralogy used to quantify total (natural plus anthropogenic) weathering and leaching rates. 27 references, 4 figures.

  5. A simple procedure for preparing chitin oligomers through acetone precipitation after hydrolysis in concentrated hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Kazami, Nao; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Mizutani, Daisuke; Masuda, Tatsuhiko; Wakita, Satoshi; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao; Sugahara, Yasusato

    2015-11-01

    Chitin oligomers are of interest because of their numerous biologically relevant properties. To prepare chitin oligomers containing 4-6 GlcNAc units [(GlcNAc)4-6], α- and β-chitin were hydrolyzed with concentrated hydrochloric acid at 40 °C. The reactant was mixed with acetone to recover the acetone-insoluble material, and (GlcNAc)4-6 was efficiently recovered after subsequent water extraction. Composition analysis using gel permeation chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry indicated that (GlcNAc)4-6 could be isolated from the acetone-insoluble material with recoveries of approximately 17% and 21% from the starting α-chitin and β-chitin, respectively. The acetone precipitation method is highly useful for recovering chitin oligomers from the acid hydrolysate of chitin. The changes in the molecular size and higher-order structure of chitin during the course of hydrolysis were also analyzed, and a model that explains the process of oligomer accumulation is proposed. PMID:26256353

  6. Oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope content in daily-collected precipitation samples at Dome C, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreossi, Giuliano; Stenni, Barbara; Del Guasta, Massimo; Bonazza, Mattia; Grigioni, Paolo; Karlicek, Daniele; Mognato, Riccardo; Scarchilli, Claudio; Turchetti, Filippo; Zannoni, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic ice cores allow to obtain exceptional past climate records, thanks to their water stable isotope content, which provides integrated tracers of the atmospheric water cycle and local climate. Low accumulation sites of the East Antarctic plateau provide the oldest ice core records, with the record-breaking EPICA Dome C drilling covering the last eight climate cycles. However, the isotope-temperature relationship, commonly used to derive the temperature, may be characterized by significant geographical and temporal variations. Moreover, post-depositional effects may further complicate the climate interpretation. A continuous series of precipitation data is needed in order to gain a better understanding of the factors affecting the water stable isotopes in Antarctic precipitation at a specific site. In this study, we use the first and so-far only multi-year series of daily precipitation sampling and isotope measurements from the French-Italian Concordia Station, located at Dome C in East Antarctica (75°06'S 123°21'E; elevation: 3233 m a.s.l.; mean annual temperature: -54.5°C; snow accumulation rate: 25 kg m-2 yr-1), where the oldest deep Antarctic ice core has been retrieved. Surface air temperature data have been provided by the US automatic weather station (AWS), placed 1.5 km away from the base, while tropospheric temperature profiles are obtained by means of a radiosonde, launched once per day by the IPEV/Italian Antarctic Meteo-climatological Observatory. The new dataset also enables us for the first time to study the isotope-temperature relationship distinguishing between different types of precipitation, namely diamond dust, hoar frost and snowfall, identified by the observations carried out by the winter-over personnel collecting the snow samples. Here we present the complete data series of water stable isotopes in precipitation at Dome C spanning the time period from 2008 to 2014, in the framework of the PNRA PRE-REC project.

  7. Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS): contributions to the international conference on the ecological impact of acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) was initiated to study and detail lake acidification processes for three lake watershed basins in the Adirondack Park region of New York. The three basins (Woods, Sagamore, and Panther), receive similar amounts of acid deposition yet observable pH values for the lakes are very dissimilar indicating unequal acid neutralizing capacities among the watersheds. This volume contains a compilation of seven papers. Relevant topics include: a characterization of the geology, hydrology, limnology and vegetation of the three study sites, an analysis of acid precipitation quality and quantity, the effects of vegetative canopy, the effects of snowmelt, the effects of winter lake stratification, comparison of heavy metal transport, examination of acidic sources other than direct precipitation, assessment of lake acidification during spring thaw and integration of all acidification components with a mathematical model.

  8. Determination of Cremophor EL in plasma after sample preparation with solid phase extraction and plasma protein precipitation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T H; Böhler, J; Frahm, A W

    2001-01-01

    The non-ionic emulsifier Cremophor EL can be quantified using a special potentiometric titration technique with barium chloride activation and precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate. The end point of the titration is indicated by an ionsensitive coated wire electrode which responds to an excess of tetraphenylborate ions. Sample preparation is necessary to quantify the excipient in plasma of patients receiving ciclosporin formulations with Cremophor EL (Sandimmun), since plasma proteins cause disturbances of the titration. Solid phase extraction was tested with various sorbent materials. Although some of the sorbents yielded good extraction rates of Cremophor EL from aqueous solutions, the extraction rates from plasma were significantly lower. Therefore, plasma protein precipitation with acetonitrile has been examined as an alternative to SPE and has been proved the superior method. Using the precipitation technique, a recovery rate of above 90% was achieved. Furthermore, the limit of detection from plasma was found to be 30 microg, in analogy to the determination from aqueous solutions. The combination of the plasma protein precipitation with the potentiometric titration allows quantitation and thus pharmakokinetic investigations of Cremophor EL in patients treated with Sandimmun after kidney-transplantation. PMID:11199229

  9. Molecularly imprinted polymer for caffeic acid by precipitation polymerization and its application to extraction of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid from Eucommia ulmodies leaves.

    PubMed

    Miura, Chitose; Matsunaga, Hisami; Haginaka, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for caffeic acid (CA) were prepared using 4-vinylpyridine and methacrylamide (MAM) as functional monomers, divinylbenzene as a crosslinker and acetonitrile-toluene (3:1, v/v) as a porogen by precipitation polymerization. The use of MAM as the co-monomer resulted in the formation of microsphere MIPs and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) with ca. 3- and 5-μm particle diameters, respectively. Binding experiments and Scatchard analyses revealed that the binding capacity and affinity of the MIP to CA are higher than those of the NIP. The retention and molecular-recognition properties of the prepared MIPs were evaluated using water-acetonitrile and sodium phosphate buffer-acetonitrile as mobile phases in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and reversed-phase chromatography, respectively. In HILIC mode, the MIP showed higher molecular-recognition ability for CA than in reversed-phase mode. In addition to shape recognition, hydrophilic interactions seem to work for the recognition of CA on the MIP in HILIC mode, while hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions seem to work for the recognition of CA in reversed-phase mode. The MIP had a specific molecular-recognition ability for CA in HILIC mode, while other structurally related compounds, such as chlorogenic acid (CGA), gallic acid, protocatechuic acid and vanillic acid, could not be recognized by the MIP. Furthermore, the MIP was successfully applied for extraction of CA and CGA in the leaves of Eucommia ulmodies in HILIC mode. PMID:26776340

  10. Proteomic analysis of proteins selectively associated with hydroxyapatite, brushite, and uric acid crystals precipitated from human urine.

    PubMed

    Thurgood, Lauren A; Ryall, Rosemary L

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the intracrystalline protein profiles of hydroxyapatite (HA), brushite (BR), and uric acid (UA) crystals precipitated from the same urine samples. HA, BR, and UA crystals were precipitated on two different occasions from the same pooled healthy urine. Crystals were washed to remove surface-bound proteins, and their composition was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). SDS-PAGE was used for visual comparison of the protein content of the demineralised crystal extracts, which were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). HA comprised nanosized particles interspersed with organic material, which was absent from the BR and UA crystals. The number and type of individual proteins differed between the 3 minerals: 45 proteins were detected in the HA crystal extracts and 77 in the BR crystals, including a number of keratins, which were regarded as methodological contaminants. After excluding the keratins, 21 proteins were common to both HA and BR crystals. Seven nonkeratin proteins were identified in the UA extracts. Several proteins consistently detected in the HA and BR crystal extracts have been previously implicated in kidney stone disease, including osteopontin, prothrombin, protein S100A9 (calgranulin B), inter-α-inhibitor, α1-microglobulin bikunin (AMBP), heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, all of which are strong calcium binders. We concluded that the association of proteins with HA, BR, and UA crystals formed in healthy urine is selective and that only a few of the numerous proteins present in healthy urine are likely to play any significant role in preventing stone pathogenesis. PMID:20795672

  11. Chemical Evolution of Acid Precipitation in Unsaturated Zone of the Pennsylvanian Siltstones and Shales of Central Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North Appalachian Experimental Watershed in Coshocton, Ohio has recorded over a 30-yr period average pH of precipitation of 4.7. The area lies within the Pennsylvanian siltstones and shale dominated by aluminosilicates and <5% calcite. A study was conducted to determine the evolution of acid dep...

  12. Detection of chlorodifluoroacetic acid in precipitation: A possible product of fluorocarbon degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.W.; Franklin, J.; Hanson, M.L.; Solomon, K.R.; Mabury, S.A.; Ellis, D.A.; Scott, B.F.; Muri, D.C.G.

    2000-01-15

    Chlorodiffluoroacetic acid (CDFA) was detected in rain and snow samples from various regions of Canada. Routine quantitative analysis was performed using an in-situ derivatization technique that allowed for the determination of CDFA by GC-MS of the anilide derivative. Validation of environmental CDFA was provided by strong anionic exchange chromatography and detection by {sup 19}F NMR. CDFA concentrations ranges from <7.1 to 170 ng L{sup {minus}1} among all samples analyzed. Monthly volume-weighted CDFA concentrations ranged from <7.1 to 170 ng L{sup {minus}1} among all samples analyzed. Monthly volume-weighted CDFA concentrations in rain event samples showed a seasonal trend between June and November 1998, peaking in late summer and decreasing in the fall for Guelph and Toronto sites. Preliminary toxicity tests with the aquatic macrophytes Myriophyllum sibiricum and Myriophyllum spicatum suggest that CDFA does not represent a risk of acute toxicity to these aquatic macrophytes at current environmental concentrations. A degradation study suggests that CDFA is recalcitrant to biotic and abiotic degradation relative to dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and may accumulate in the aquatic environment. On the basis of existing experimental data, the authors postulate that CDFA is a degradation product of CFC-113 and, to a lesser extent, HCFC-142b. If CFC-113 is a source, its ozone depletion potential may be lower than previously assumed. Further work is required to identify alternative atmospheric and terrestrial sources of CDFA.

  13. Correlation between precipitation and geographical location of the δ2H values of the fatty acids in milk and bulk milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehtesham, E.; Baisden, W. T.; Keller, E. D.; Hayman, A. R.; Van Hale, R.; Frew, R. D.

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) have become a tool for food traceability and authentication of agricultural products. The principle is that the isotopic composition of the produce is influenced by environmental and biological factors and hence exhibits a spatial differentiation of δ2H. This study investigates the variation in δ2H values of New Zealand milk, both in the bulk powder and individual fatty acids extracted from milk samples from dairy factories across New Zealand. Multivariate statistical analyses were used to test for relationships between δ2H of bulk milk powder, milk fatty acid and geographical location. Milk powder samples from different regions of New Zealand were found to exhibit patterns in isotopic composition similar to the corresponding regional precipitation associated with their origin. A model of δ2H in precipitation was developed based on measurements between 2007 and 2010 at 51 stations across New Zealand (Frew and Van Hale, 2011). The model uses multiple linear regressions to predict daily δ2H from 2 geographic and 5 rain-weighted climate variables from the 5 × 5 km New Zealand Virtual Climate Station Network (VCSN). To approximate collection radius for a drying facility the modelled values were aggregated within a 50 km radius of each dairy factory and compared to observed δ2H values of precipitation and bulk milk powder. Daily δ2H predictions for the period from August to December for the area surrounding the sample collection sites were highly correlated with the δ2H values of bulk milk powder. Therefore the δ2H value of milk fatty acids demonstrates promise as a tool for determining the provenance of milk powders and products where milk powder is an ingredient. Separation of milk powder origin to geographic sub-regions within New Zealand was achieved. Hydrogen isotope measurements could be used to complement traditional tracking systems in verifying point of origin.

  14. Selective precipitation of potassium in seawater samples for improving the sensitivity of plain γ-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrante, Marco De Angelis, Francesco; Nisi, Stefano Laubenstein, Matthias

    2015-08-17

    An analytical method is presented to reduce the amount of {sup 40}K in sea water samples, in order to lower its interference in γ-ray analysis below 1.4 MeV due to the Compton continuum. Sodium tetraphenylborate was used to successfully precipitate {sup 40}K in the samples. A custom procedure for precipitation of potassium was developed and it was evaluated for its selectivity, reproducibility and efficiency, using conventional analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This work has shown that the selective precipitation of potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate has led to a decrease of detection limit of radio nuclides such as {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 133}I, {sup 134}I, {sup 60}Co in γ-analysis. In particular, the detection limit for nuclides with emissions in the energy window energy below 1400 keV is improved by almost one order of magnitude.

  15. Comparison of Four Strong Acids on the Precipitation Potential of Gypsum in Brines During Distillation of Pretreated, Augmented Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Dean; Carrier, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three different mineral acids were substituted for sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the urine stabilizer solution to eliminate the excess of sulfate ions in pretreated urine and assess the impact on maximum water recovery to avoid precipitation of minerals during distillation. The study evaluated replacing 98% sulfuric acid with 85% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), 37% hydrochloric acid (HCl), or 70% nitric acid (HNO3). The effect of lowering the oxidizer concentration in the pretreatment formulation also was studied. This paper summarizes the test results, defines candidate formulations for further study, and specifies the injection masses required to stabilize urine and minimize the risk of mineral precipitation during distillation. In the first test with a brine ersatz acidified with different acids, the solubility of calcium in gypsum saturated solutions was measured. The solubility of gypsum was doubled in the brines acidified with the alternative acids compared to sulfuric acid. In a second series of tests, the alternative acid pretreatment concentrations were effective at preventing precipitation of gypsum and other minerals up to 85% water recovery from 95th-percentile pretreated, augmented urine. Based on test results, phosphoric acid is recommended as the safest alternative to sulfuric acid. It also is recommended that the injected mass concentration of chromium trioxide solution be reduced by 75% to minimize liquid resupply mass by about 50%, reduce toxicity of brines, and reduce the concentration of organic acids in distillate. The new stabilizer solution formulations and required doses to stabilize urine and prevent precipitation of minerals up to 85% water recovery are given. The formulations in this study were tested on a limited number of artificially augmented urine batches collected from employees at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). This study successfully demonstrated that the desired physical and chemical stability of pretreated urine and brines

  16. Geological and hydrochemical sensitivity of the eastern United States to acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrey, G.R.; Galloway, J.N.; Norton, S.A.; Schofield, C.L.; Shaffer, P.W.; Burns, D.A.

    1980-03-01

    A new analysis of bedrock geology maps of the eastern US constitutes a simple model for predicting areas which might be impacted by acid precipitation and it allows much greater resolution for detecting sensitivity than has previously been available for the region. Map accuracy has been verified by examining current alkalinities and pH's of waters in several test states, including Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Virginia and North Carolina. In regions predicted to be highly sensitive, alkalinities in upstream sites were generally low. Many areas of the eastern US are pinpointed in which some of the surface waters, especially upstream reaches, may be sensitive to acidification. Pre-1970 data were compared to post-1975 data, revealing marked declines in both alkalinity and pH of sensitive waters of two states tested, North Carolina, where pH and alkalinity have decreased in 80% of 38 streams and New Hampshire, where pH in 90% of 49 streams and lakes has decreased since 1949. These sites are predicted to be sensitive by the geological map on the basis of their earlier alkalinity values. The map is to be improved by the addition of a soils component.

  17. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, J.E.; Böhlke, J.K.; Mroczkowski, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO42- isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NO3- that introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that ??18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO42- and NO3- and the ??18O values of the H2O, NO3-, and SO42-. Typical ??18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1??? in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO 3-, which can cause similar errors in ?? 17O and ??17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO42- from NO 3-, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured ??18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO 3-. These procedures are demonstrated for SO 42- isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SO42- sources and reaction mechanisms.

  18. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from water samples.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Janet E; Böhlke, John Karl; Mroczkowski, Stanley J

    2008-12-01

    BaSO(4) precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO(4) (2-) isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H(2)O and NO(3) (-) that introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that delta(18)O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO(4) in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO(4) (2-) and NO(3) (-) and the delta(18)O values of the H(2)O, NO(3) (-), and SO(4) (2-). Typical delta(18)O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1 per thousand in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO(3) (-), which can cause similar errors in delta(17)O and Delta(17)O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO(4) (2-) from NO(3) (-), (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO(4) to minimize incorporation of H(2)O, (3) heating BaSO(4) under vacuum to remove H(2)O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured delta(18)O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H(2)O and NO(3) (-). These procedures are demonstrated for SO(4) (2-) isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SO(4) (2-) sources and reaction mechanisms. PMID:19021238

  19. Organic compounds in lunar samples: pyrolysis products, hydrocarbons, amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Drew, D M; Hamilton, P B; Modzeleski, V E; Murphy, M E; Scott, W M; Urey, H C; Young, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar fines and a chip from inside a rock pyrolyzed in helium at 700 degrees C gave methane, other gases, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene/methanol extracts of fines yielded traces of high molecular weight alkanes and sulfur. Traces of glycine, alanine, ethanolamine, and urea were found in aqueous extracts. Biological controls and a terrestrial rock, dunite, subjected to exhaust from the lunar module descent engine showed a different amino acid distribution. Interpretation of the origin of the carbon compounds requires extreme care, because of possible contamination acquired during initial sample processing. PMID:5410553

  20. Survival of Listeria innocua in rainbow trout protein recovered by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation with acetic and citric acids.

    PubMed

    Otto, R A; Paker, I; Bane, L; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-08-01

    During mechanical fish processing, a substantial amount of protein is discarded as by-products. Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a process that uses extreme pH shifts to solubilize and precipitate protein from by-products to recover previously discarded protein. Typically, strong acids are used for pH reduction, but these acids do not have a pasteurization effect (6 log reduction) on bacterial load; therefore, organic acids were used during ISP processing to test the impact on Listeria innocua concentrations. Headed and gutted rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were inoculated with L. innocua, homogenized, and brought to the target pH with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized for 10 min at 4°C, and insoluble components (e.g., skin and insoluble protein) were removed by centrifugation. The remaining solution was pH shifted to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with sodium hydroxide, and precipitated protein was separated from the water. Microbial cells for each component (proteins, insolubles, and water) were enumerated on modified Oxford agar (MOX) and tryptic soy agar with 6% yeast extract (TSAYE). The sums of the surviving cells from each component were compared with the initial inoculum levels. No significant differences were observed between results obtained from TSAYE and from MOX (P > 0.05). Significant reductions in microbial populations were detected, regardless of pH or acid type (P < 0.05). The greatest reduction was at pH 3.0 with glacial acetic acid, resulting in a mean reduction of 6.41 log CFU/g in the recovered protein and 5.88 log CFU/g in the combined components. These results demonstrate the antimicrobial potential of organic acids in ISP processing. PMID:21819665

  1. A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vet, Robert; Artz, Richard S.; Carou, Silvina; Shaw, Mike; Ro, Chul-Un; Aas, Wenche; Baker, Alex; Bowersox, Van C.; Dentener, Frank; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Hou, Amy; Pienaar, Jacobus J.; Gillett, Robert; Forti, M. Cristina; Gromov, Sergey; Hara, Hiroshi; Khodzher, Tamara; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Rao, P. S. P.; Reid, Neville W.

    2014-08-01

    A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition has been carried out under the direction of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Scientific Advisory Group for Precipitation Chemistry (SAG-PC). The assessment addressed three questions: (1) what do measurements and model estimates of precipitation chemistry and wet, dry and total deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity, and phosphorus show globally and regionally? (2) has the wet deposition of major ions changed since 2000 (and, where information and data are available, since 1990) and (3) what are the major gaps and uncertainties in our knowledge? To that end, regionally-representative measurements for two 3-year-averaging periods, 2000-2002 and 2005-2007, were compiled worldwide. Data from the 2000-2002 averaging period were combined with 2001 ensemble-mean modeling results from 21 global chemical transport models produced in Phase 1 of the Coordinated Model Studies Activities of the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP). The measurement data and modeling results were used to generate global and regional maps of major ion concentrations in precipitation and deposition. A major product of the assessment is a database of quality assured ion concentration and wet deposition data gathered from regional and national monitoring networks. The database is available for download from the World Data Centre for Precipitation Chemistry (http://wdcpc.org/)

  2. Comparison of inhibitory activity on calcium phosphate precipitation by acidic proline-rich proteins, statherin, and histatin-1.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, N; Tada, T; Morita, M; Watanabe, T

    2002-07-01

    This study quantitatively compares the inhibition of calcium phosphate (CaP) precipitation by the salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) statherin and histatin-1. Saliva and CaCl2 in 125 mM imidazole buffer (pH 7.0) were incubated with potassium phosphate and a hydroxyapatite (HAP) suspension, for 30 min at 25 degrees C, then filtered through nitrocellulose. The calcium (Ca) concentration in the filtrate was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, then deducted from that in the initial solution to determine the amount of CaP precipitation after 30 min. The values of the inhibitory activities on CaP precipitation relative to crude parotid saliva were 4.7, 4.9, 6.9, and 65.8 for histatin-1, large PRPs, small PRPs, and statherin, respectively. PMID:12060866

  3. Multi-element analysis of milk by ICP-oa-TOF-MS after precipitation of calcium and proteins by oxalic and nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Husáková, Lenka; Urbanová, Iva; Šrámková, Jitka; Konečná, Michaela; Bohuslavová, Jana

    2013-03-15

    In this work a simple technique employing oxalic and nitric acid to cow's milk samples prior to analysis by inductively coupled plasma orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ICP-oa-TOF-MS) was introduced. After the precipitation of calcium and proteins via oxalic and nitric acid, respectively, the resulting liquid phase was aspirated with a concentric glass nebulizer for ICP-TOF-MS determination of trace elements. Precipitation of proteins is essential for better separation of solid and liquid phase of modified samples. Separation of calcium as a precipitated non-soluble oxalate enables the elimination of spectral interferences originating from different calcium containing species like (40)Ca(35)Cl(+), (40)Ca(37)Cl(+), (43)Ca(16)O(+), (40)Ca(18)O(+), (44)Ca(16)O(+), (43)Ca(16)O(1)H(+) onto the determination of As, Se, Co and Ni whose assay is more difficult when using conventional quadrupole instruments. High detection capability is further an advantage as the approach enables the analysis without dilution. The methodology may serve, in addition, for a fast and sensitive determination of some other elements. After that, direct, reliable and simultaneous determination of 16 elements (Li, Be, B, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Ga, As, Se, Mo, Sn, Sb, Cs, Tl) at trace and ultra-trace levels in milk can be performed under optimum instrumental conditions and by using Rh as an internal standard. Accuracy and precision was assessed by measuring NCS ZC73015 milk powder control standard, yielding results in agreement with certified values and RSD <10%. The accuracy was also checked by comparison of the results of the proposed method with those found by a method based on a microwave-assisted digestion of real samples. PMID:23598096

  4. Interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation processes during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Patiño-López, Luis D.; Putnis, Christine V.; Geisler, Thorsten; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos M.; Putnis, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The chemical weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals on the Earth's surface controls important geochemical processes such as erosion rates and soil formation, ore genesis or climate evolution. The dissolution of most of these minerals is typically incongruent, and results in the formation of surface coatings (altered layers, also known as leached layers). These coatings may significantly affect mineral dissolution rates over geological timescales, and therefore a great deal of research has been conducted on them. However, the mechanism of leached layer formation is a matter of vigorous debate. Here we report on an in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and real-time Mach-Zehnder phase-shift interferometry (PSI) study of the dissolution of wollastonite, CaSiO3, and dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2, as an example of surface coating formation during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals. Our in situ results provide clear direct experimental evidence that leached layers are formed in a tight interface-coupled two-step process: stoichiometric dissolution of the pristine mineral surfaces and subsequent precipitation of a secondary phase (silica in the case of wollastonite, or hydrated magnesium carbonate in the case of dolomite) from a supersaturated boundary layer of fluid in contact with the mineral surface. This occurs despite the bulk solution remaining undersaturated with respect to the secondary phase. The validation of such a mechanism given by the results reported here completely changes the conceptual framework concerning the mechanism of chemical weathering, and differs significantly from the concept of preferential leaching of cations postulated by most currently accepted incongruent dissolution models.

  5. Potential effects of clean coal technologies on acid precipitation, greenhouse gases, and solid waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Blasing, T.J.; Miller, R.L.; McCold, L.N.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) was initially funded by Congress to demonstrate more efficient, economically feasible, and environmentally acceptable coal technologies. Although the environmental focus at first was on sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) because their relationship to acid precipitation, the CCTDP may also lead to reductions in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions and in the volume of solid waste produced, compared with conventional technologies. The environmental effects of clean coal technologies (CCTs) depend upon which (if any) specific technologies eventually achieve high acceptance in the marketplace. In general, the repowering technologies and a small group of retrofit technologies show the most promise for reducing C0{sub 2} emissions and solid waste. These technologies also compare favorably with other CCTs in terms of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} reductions. The upper bound for CO{sup 2} reductions in the year 2010 is only enough to reduce global ``greenhouse`` warming potential by about 1%. However, CO{sub 2} emissions come from such variety of sources around the globe that no single technological innovation or national policy change could realistically be expected to reduce these emissions by more than a few percent. Particular CCTs can lead to either increases or decreases in the amount of solid waste produced. However, even if decreases are not achieved, much of the solid waste from clean coal technologies would be dry and therefore easier to dispose of than scrubber sludge.

  6. An assessment of the isotopic (2H/18O) integrity of water samples collected and stored by unattended precipitation totalizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzer, Stefan; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Douence, Cedric; Araguas-Araguas, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The IAEA-WMO Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) provides worldwide δ18O and δ2H data for numerous hydrological and climatological studies. The traditional GNIP sample collection method relies on weather station operators to accumulate precipitation obtained from manual rain gauges. Over the past decades, widespread weather station automatization resulted in the increased use of unattended precipitation totalizers that accumulate and store the rainwater in the field for up to one month. Several low-tech measures were adopted to prevent in situ secondary evaporative isotopic enrichment (SEE) of totalized water samples (i.e. disequilibrium isotopic fractionation after precipitation is stored in the collection device). These include: (a) adding a 0.5-1 cm floating layer of paraffin oil to the totalizer bottle, (b) using an intake tube leading from the collection funnel and submerged to the bottom of the totalizer bottle, or (c) placing a table tennis ball in the funnel aiming to reduce evaporation of the collected water from the receiving bottle to the atmosphere. We assessed the isotopic integrity of stored rainwater samples for three totalizers under controlled settings: each aforementioned totalizer was filled with a 100 or 500 mL of isotopically known water and installed in the field with the intake funnels sheltered to prevent rainwater collection. Potential evapotranspiration (PET) was obtained from on-site meteorological recordings. Stored evaporative loss from each totalizer was evaluated on a monthly basis; gravimetrically and by analysing δ18O and δ2H of the stored water, for a period of 6 months and a cumulative PET of ˜500 mm. The gravimetric and isotope results revealed that for smaller water volumes (100 ml, corresponding to ca. 5 mm of monthly precipitation), negligible isotope enrichment (δ18O) was observed in the paraffin-oil based totalizer, whereas unacceptable evaporative isotope effects were observed for the ball

  7. Effects of Race and Precipitating Event on Suicide versus Nonsuicide Death Classification in a College Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rheeda L.; Flowers, Kelci C.

    2011-01-01

    Race group differences in suicide death classification in a sample of 109 Black and White university students were examined. Participants were randomly assigned to read three vignettes for which the vignette subjects' race (only) varied. The vignettes each described a circumstance (terminal illness, academic failure, or relationship difficulties)…

  8. Electrical conduction in macroscopically oriented deoxyribonucleic and hyaluronic acid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnjak, Zdravko; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Filipič, Cene; Podgornik, Rudolf; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Korolev, Nikolay; Rupprecht, Allan

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of the quasistatic and frequency dependent electrical conductivity below 1 MHz were carried out on wet-spun, macroscopically oriented, calf thymus deoxyribonucleic (DNA) and umbilical cord hyaluronic acid (HA) bulk samples. The frequency dependence of the electrical conductivity in the frequency range of approximately 10-3-106Hz of both materials is surprisingly rather similar. Temperature dependence of the quasistatic electrical conductivity above the low temperature saturation plateau can be well described by the activated Arrhenius law with the activation energy of ≈0.8eV for both DNA and HA. We discuss the meaning of these findings for the possible conduction mechanism in these particular charged polyelectrolytes.

  9. Searching for Amino Acids in Meteorites and Comet Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elsila

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry plays an important role in the interdisciplinary field of astrobiology, which strives to understand the origin, distribution, and evolution of life throughout the universe. Chemical techniques are used to search for and characterize the basic ingredients for life, from the elements through simple molecules and up to the more complex compounds that may serve as the ingredients for life. The Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory at NASA Goddard uses state-of-the-art laboratory analytical instrumentation in unconventional ways to examine extraterrestrial materials and tackle some of the big questions in astrobiology. This talk will discuss some of the instrumentation and techniques used for these unique samples, as well as some of our most interesting results. The talk will present two areas of particular interest in our laboratory: (1) the search for chiral excesses in meteoritic amino acids, which may help to explain the origin of homochirality in life on Earth; and (2) the detection of amino acids and amines in material returned by NASA's Stardust mission, which rendevouzed with a cornet and brought back cometary particles to the Earth.

  10. Stepwise ethanolic precipitation of sugar beet pectins from the acidic extract.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoming; Meng, Hecheng; Zhu, Siming; Tang, Qiang; Pan, Runquan; Yu, Shujuan

    2016-01-20

    A stepwise ethanol-precipitation (SEP) procedure was developed for the purification of sugar beet pectins (SBP) from a pectin-containing aqueous extract. Five fractions of different chemical and molecular characteristics were produced by stepwise elevating the alcohol concentration of the precipitation medium from 50% to 80% v/v. Comparison of chemical and macromolecular features between the obtained fractions indirectly suggested that the ability of pectin to solubilize in the ethanol-water binary mixture depended greatly on the polymer structure. Fractions rich in neutral sugars were precipitated at relatively high ethanol concentrations, probably due to the enhanced interactions generated between pectin side chains and solvent molecules. Furthermore, the obtained fractions displayed different surface activities. Results obtained in this work indicate that the SEP procedure is more selective with respect to pectin structural features and surface properties than the one-step ethanolic precipitation. PMID:26572361

  11. Advances in biotreatment of acid mine drainage and biorecovery of metals: 1. Metal precipitation for recovery and recycle.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Henry H; Scharp, Richard; Burckle, John; Kawahara, Fred K; Govind, Rakesh

    2003-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), an acidic metal-bearing wastewater, poses a severe pollution problem attributed to post mining activities. The metals usually encountered in AMD and considered of concern for risk assessment are arsenic, cadmium, iron, lead, manganese, zinc, copper and sulfate. The pollution generated by abandoned mining activities in the area of Butte, Montana has resulted in the designation of the Silver Bow Creek-Butte Area as the largest Superfund (National Priorities List) site in the U.S. This paper reports the results of bench-scale studies conducted to develop a resource recovery based remediation process for the clean up of the Berkeley Pit. The process utilizes selective, sequential precipitation (SSP) of metals as hydroxides and sulfides, such as copper, zinc, aluminum, iron and manganese, from the Berkeley Pit AMD for their removal from the water in a form suitable for additional processing into marketable precipitates and pigments. The metal biorecovery and recycle process is based on complete separation of the biological sulfate reduction step and the metal precipitation step. Hydrogen sulfide produced in the SRB bioreactor systems is used in the precipitation step to form insoluble metal sulfides. The average metal recoveries using the SSP process were as follows: aluminum (as hydroxide) 99.8%, cadmium (as sulfide) 99.7%, cobalt (as sulfide) 99.1% copper (as sulfide) 99.8%, ferrous iron (sulfide) 97.1%, manganese (as sulfide) 87.4%, nickel (as sulfide) 47.8%, and zinc (as sulfide) 100%. The average precipitate purity for metals, copper sulfide, ferric hydroxide, zinc sulfide, aluminum hydroxide and manganese sulfide were: 92.4, 81.5, 97.8, 95.6, 92.1 and 75.0%, respectively. The final produced water contained only calcium and magnesium and both sulfate and sulfide concentrations were below usable water limits. Water quality of this agriculturally usable water met the EPA's gold standard criterion. PMID:14669873

  12. Amino acid preservation in saline halite core samples: Analogs for Martian dry evaporitic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, J.; Aubrey, A.; Lowenstein, T.; Timofeeff, M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent data returned from several Mars spacecraft show substantial evidence for mineral precipitation from bodies of liquid water. Evaporitic minerals such as gypsum, kieserite and poly-hydrated magnesium sulfates have been detected remotely by orbiting spacecraft [1], jarosite has been detected in situ by the MER Opportunity [2], and chlorides are highly abundant upon the surface of Mars [3], often in correlation with siliclastic deposits [4]. Terrestrial environments can provide analogs for these systems identified on the Martian surface, and in-depth characterization of the terrestrial systems can provide valuable insights into processes that may have occurred on Mars during the late Noachian/early Hesperian. This is especially true in ancient playa or evaporative basin environments where deep core sampling offers a method of observing the geochemical diagenetic changes with time within a constrained environment. Deep coring can provide samples upwards of 200 ka within hundreds of meters of core [5]. The analysis of these sections can allow for the determination of preservation of various biosignatures from extinct microbial communities as well as their in situ diagenetic rates. Amino acids are powerful biomarkers that can be used to estimate biomass [6] and determine ages of extinct microbial communities [7]. Preliminary data for a core sample collected from Saline Valley, CA, shows the effect of time on amino acid biosignatures. The core has been dated by U-series: 35 feet, 20.9 ± 1.1 ka; 127 feet, 61.1 ±2.8 ka; 204 feet, 73.9 ±4.8 ka; and 310 feet, 150.3 ± 7.8 ka. The abundance of amino acids is observed to decrease drastically over the first 20 ka and then stabilize, although the overall composition changes. Acidic amino acids along with alanine and valine are the dominant amino acids. The enantiomeric (D/L) ratios generally increase with age because of in situ racemization, although the enantiomeric ratios for alanine and glutamic acid show a decrease

  13. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  14. Precipitation of iron, sodium, and potassium impurities from synthetic solutions modeling spent acid streams from a chemical coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.A.; Richardson, R.G.; Markuszewski, R. ); Levine, A.D. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents experiments on treating model spent acid streams from a chemical coal cleaning process by double salt precipitation which indicated that simple heating of solutions containing Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} caused jarosite (KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}) to form preferentially to natrojarosite (NaFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}), and precipitate yields were higher than when Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was the only alkali sulfate present. Virtually all of the K, about 90% of the Fe, and about 30% of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2 {minus}} could be precipitated at 95{degrees}C, while little or no Na was removed. However, simply heating Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution up to 95{degrees}C for {lt}12 hours did not produce adequate precipitate yields. When Na was the only alkali metal present, the Fe concentration in the solution had to be increased to avoid formation of undesirable iron compounds.

  15. Effects of airborne particulate matter on the acidity of precipitation in central Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Applin, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The pH of rainfall in central Missouri was monitored at four sites during the fall of 1983. Several pH values were well above 5.6, the theoretical pH of pure water in equilibrium with ambient levels of CO/sub 2/. Most of the higher pH's were measured on rainfall of short duration or rainfall collected during the first few hours of extended rainfall events. Furthermore, the rainfall associated with storm events lasting several days exhibited a trend of decreasing pH with time approaching values as low as 4.0 during the late stages of rainfall. Precipitation pH values above 5.6 apparently reflect neutralization reactions between wet precipitation and various components of airborne dust, especially clays and carbonates. During extended rainfalls, the neutralization effects gradually diminish as suspended dust is washed from the atmosphere yielding more accurate values of the wet precipitation pH. The results of this study suggest that airborne particulate matter generated from the dust bowl region of the US may affect the chemistry of precipitation in areas hundreds of kilometers downwind. Using date available in the literature, a direct relationship between precipitation pH and accumulated dustfall was found for data taken along a transect which represents the path of major storms crossing the US, i.e., from the south-central to northeastern regions.

  16. Influence of oxalic acid on the agglomeration process and total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, I.; Blec̆ić, D.; Blagojević, N.; Radmilović, V.; Kovac̆ević, K.

    2003-05-01

    Decomposition of caustic soda solutions is an important part of Bayer process for alumina production. The physico-chemical properties of precipitated Al(OH) 3 are dependent on several processes that take place simultaneously during the decomposition process and they are: nucleation, agglomeration and Al(OH) 3 crystals. An important industrial requirement is increase of Al(OH) 3 crystal grain size, and hence agglomeration and growth of Al(OH) 3 crystals become important processes and they enable increase of particle size. The influence of oxalic acid concentration on the agglomeration process and total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3 at different temperatures and caustic soda concentrations has been investigated. The results have shown that the agglomeration process is increased with increase of temperature and decrease of caustic soda concentration. Total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3 is changed in the same way. Besides, agglomeration process of Al(OH) 3 particles is favored in the presence of oxalic acid.

  17. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  18. Protein precipitation of diluted samples in SDS-containing buffer with acetone leads to higher protein recovery and reproducibility in comparison with TCA/acetone approach.

    PubMed

    Santa, Cátia; Anjo, Sandra I; Manadas, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Proteomic approaches are extremely valuable in many fields of research, where mass spectrometry methods have gained an increasing interest, especially because of the ability to perform quantitative analysis. Nonetheless, sample preparation prior to mass spectrometry analysis is of the utmost importance. In this work, two protein precipitation approaches, widely used for cleaning and concentrating protein samples, were tested and compared in very diluted samples solubilized in a strong buffer (containing SDS). The amount of protein recovered after acetone and TCA/acetone precipitation was assessed, as well as the protein identification and relative quantification by SWATH-MS yields were compared with the results from the same sample without precipitation. From this study, it was possible to conclude that in the case of diluted samples in denaturing buffers, the use of cold acetone as precipitation protocol is more favourable than the use of TCA/acetone in terms of reproducibility in protein recovery and number of identified and quantified proteins. Furthermore, the reproducibility in relative quantification of the proteins is even higher in samples precipitated with acetone compared with the original sample. PMID:27094026

  19. Adsorption and co-precipitation behavior of arsenate, chromate, selenate and boric acid with synthetic allophane-like materials.

    PubMed

    Opiso, Einstine; Sato, Tsutomu; Yoneda, Tetsuro

    2009-10-15

    Pollution caused by boric acid and toxic anions such as As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI) is hazardous to human health and environment. The sorption characteristics of these environmentally significant ionic species on allophane-like nanoparticles were investigated in order to determine whether allophane can reduce their mobility in the subsurface environment at circum-neutral pH condition. Solutions containing 100 or 150 mmol of AlCl(3)x6H(2)O were mixed to 100 mmol of Na(4)SiO(4) and the pH were adjusted to 6.4+/-0.3. The mineral suspensions were shaken for 1h and incubated at 80 degrees C for 5 days. Appropriate amounts of As, B, Cr and Se solutions were added separately during and after allophane precipitation. The results showed that As(V) and boric acid can be irreversibly fixed during co-precipitation in addition to surface adsorption. However, Cr(VI) and Se(VI) retention during and after allophane precipitation is mainly controlled by surface adsorption. The structurally fixed As(V) and boric acid were more resistant to release than those bound on the surface. The sorption characteristics of oxyanions and boric acid were also influenced by the final Si/Al molar ratio of allophane in which Al-rich allophane tend to have higher uptake capacity. The overall results of this study have demonstrated the role of allophane-like nanoparticles and the effect of its Si/Al ratio on As, B, Cr and Se transport processes in the subsurface environment. PMID:19493614

  20. Biogeochemical effects of forest vegetation on acid precipitation-related water chemistry: a case study in southwest China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Wei; Gao, Fang

    2010-10-01

    The elemental composition of rainwater, throughfall, and soil solutions of a forest ecosystem in the acid rain control region of southwest China was investigated during 2007-2008 to assess the acid buffering capacity of different forest covers. A possible seasonal distribution of wet deposition was identified. Sulfur was determined as the dominant acidification precursor in this region. The chemical composition of rainfall intercepted by the forest canopy was modified substantially; generally the ion concentrations were increased by dry deposition and foliar leaching. As an exception, the concentration of NH(4)(+) and NO(3)(-) decreased in throughfall, which was probably due to the absorption of nitrogen by the leaves. Elemental concentrations in soil solutions decreased with depth. The water conservation capacity of different forests was also evaluated. The most appropriate forest vegetation for water conservation and remediation of acid precipitation in this region was explored for the sake of ecosystem management, ecological restoration and economic development. PMID:20859590

  1. LC-MS/MS analysis of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A in serum after protein precipitation using an in-house synthesized deuterated internal standard.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-06-01

    An assay based on liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry is presented for the fast, precise and sensitive quantitation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA) in serum. THCA is the biogenetic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in cannabis and has aroused interest in the pharmacological and forensic field especially as a potential marker for recent cannabis use. After addition of deuterated THCA, synthesized from D(3)-THC as starting material, and protein precipitation, the analytes were separated using gradient elution on a Luna C18 column (150 × 2.0 mm × 5 µm) with 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid. Data acquisition was performed on a triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer in multiple reaction monitoring mode with negative electrospray ionization. After optimization, the following sample preparation procedure was used: 200 μL serum was spiked with internal standard solution and methanol and then precipitated 'in fractions' with 500 μL ice-cold acetonitrile. After storage and centrifugation, the supernatant was evaporated and the residue redissolved in mobile phase. The assay was fully validated according to international guidelines including, for the first time, the assessment of matrix effects and stability experiments. Limit of detection was 0.1 ng/mL, and limit of quantification was 1.0 ng/mL. The method was found to be selective and proved to be linear over a range of 1.0 to 100 ng/mL using a 1/x weighted calibration model with regression coefficients >0.9996. Accuracy and precision data were within the required limits (RSD ≤ 8.6%, bias: 2.4 to 11.4%), extractive yield was greater than 84%. The analytes were stable in serum samples after three freeze/thaw cycles and storage at -20 °C for one month. PMID:22707170

  2. The Consistency of Isotopologues of Ambient Atmospheric Nitric Acid in Passively Collected Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Padgett, P.; Allen, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen oxides have previously been shown to have distinctive isotopic signatures of oxygen and nitrogen. Nylon filters are currently used in passive sampling arrays to measure ambient atmospheric nitric acid concentrations and estimate deposition rates. This experiment measured the ability of nylon filters to consistently collect isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in the same ratios as they are present in the atmosphere. Samplers were deployed in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and at field sites across a nitrogen deposition gradient in Southern California. Filters were exposed over a four week period with individual filters being subjected to 1-4 week exposure times. Extracted nitric acid were measured for δ18O and δ15N ratios and compared for consistency based on length of exposure and amount of HNO3 collected. Filters within the CSTRs collected HNO3 at a consistent rate in both high and low concentration chambers. After two weeks of exposure, the mean δ18O values were within 0.5‰ of the δ18O of the source HNO3 solution. The mean of all weekly exposures were within 0.5‰ of the δ15N of the source solution, but after three weeks, the mean δ15N of adsorbed HNO3 was within 0.2‰. As the length of the exposure increased, the variability of measured delta values decreased for both elements. The field samplers collected HNO3 consistent with previously measured values along a deposition gradient. The mean δ18O at high deposition sites was 52.2‰ compared to 35.7‰ at the low deposition sites. Mean δ15N values were similar at all sites across the deposition gradient. Due to precipitation events occurring during the exposure period, the δ15N and δ18O of nitric acid were highly variable at all field sites. At single sites, changes in δ15N and δ18O were negatively correlated, consistent with two-sourcing mixing dynamics, but the slope of the regressions differed between high and low deposition sites. Anthropogenic

  3. Study of inlet materials for sampling atmospheric nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, J.A.; Huey, L.G.; Ryerson, T.B.; Fahey, D.W. |

    1999-04-01

    The adsorption of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) from a flowing gas stream is studied for a variety of wall materials to determine their suitability for use in atmospheric sampling instruments. Parts per billion level mixtures of HNO{sub 3} in synthetic air flow through tubes of different materials such that >80% of the molecules interact with the walls. A chemical ionization mass spectrometer with a fast time response and high sensitivity detects HNO{sub 3} that is not adsorbed on the tube walls. Less than 5% of available HNO{sub 3} is adsorbed on Teflon fluoropolymer tubing after 1 min of HNO{sub 3} exposure, whereas >70% is lost on walls made of stainless steel, glass, fused silica, aluminum, nylon, silica-steel, and silane-coated glass. Glass tubes exposed to HNO{sub 3} on the order of hours passivate with HNO{sub 3} adsorption dropping to zero. The adsorption of HNO{sub 3} on PFA Teflon tubing (PFA) is nearly temperature-independent from 10 to 80 C, but below {minus}10 C nearly all HNO{sub 3} that interacts with PFA is reversibly adsorbed. In ambient and synthetic air, humidity increases HNO{sub 3} adsorption. The results suggest that Teflon at temperatures above 10 C is an optimal choice for inlet surfaces used for in situ measurements of HNO{sub 3} in the ambient atmosphere.

  4. ACID PRECIPITATION PATTERNS AND TRENDS IN EASTERN NORTH AMERICA, 1980-1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using data compiled from seven nationwide precipitation chemistry networks in the U.S. and Canada, the spatial distribution of hydrogen, sulfate, and nitrate ions in North America is discussed. eographic patterns of concentration and deposition are characterized using isopleth ma...

  5. Precipitation of jarosite-type double salts from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.

    1990-09-21

    The precipitation of jarosite compounds to remove Na, K, Fe, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} impurities from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process was studied. Simple heating of model solutions containing Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} caused jarosite (KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}) to form preferentially to natrojarosite (NaFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}). Virtually all of the K, about 90% of the Fe, and about 30% of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} could be precipitated from those solutions at 95{degree}C, while little or no Na was removed. However, simple heating of model solutions containing only Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} up to 95{degree}C for {le}12 hours produced low yields of jarosite compounds, and the Fe concentration in the solution had to be increased to avoid the formation of undesirable Fe compounds. Precipitate yields could be increased dramatically in model solutions of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} containing excess Fe by using either CaCO{sub 3}, Ca(OH){sub 2}, or ZnO to neutralize H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} released during hydrolysis of the Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and during the precipitation reactions. Results obtained from the studies with model solutions were applied to spent acids produced during laboratory countercurrent washing of coal which had been leached with a molten NaOH/KOH mixture. Results indicated that jarosite compounds can be precipitated effectively from spent acid solutions by heating for 6 hours at 80{degree}C while maintaining a pH of about 1.5 using CaCO{sub 3}.

  6. Field enhancement sample stacking for analysis of organic acids in traditional Chinese medicine by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianqian; Xu, Xueqin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liangjun; Chen, Guonan

    2012-07-13

    A technique known as field enhancement sample stacking (FESS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation has been developed to analyze and detect organic acids in the three traditional Chinese medicines (such as Portulaca oleracea L., Crataegus pinnatifida and Aloe vera L.). In FESS, a reverse electrode polarity-stacking mode (REPSM) was applied as on-line preconcentration strategy. Under the optimized condition, the baseline separation of eight organic acids (linolenic acid, lauric acid, p-coumaric acid, ascorbic acid, benzoic acid, caffeic acid, succinic acid and fumaric acid) could be achieved within 20 min. Validation parameters of this method (such as detection limits, linearity and precision) were also evaluated. The detection limits ranged from 0.4 to 60 ng/mL. The results indicated that the proposed method was effective for the separation of mixtures of organic acids. Satisfactory recoveries were also obtained in the analysis of these organic acids in the above traditional Chinese medicine samples. PMID:22381886

  7. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  8. Simultaneous inhibition of carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a forest soil by simulated acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, T.M.; Novick, N.J.; Kreitinger, J.P.; Alexander, M.

    1984-06-01

    One method to simulate the long-term exposure of soil to acid rain involves the addition of single doses of concentrated acid. The inhibition of carbon mineralization accompanied by a stimulation of nitrogen mineralization may result from this severe, unnatural treatment. The present study was designed to determine whether the inhibition of carbon mineralization and the accompanying enhanced nitrogen mineralization would occur when soils are treated with more dilute acid for long periods of time, as takes place in nature.

  9. Molecularly imprinted polymer for chlorogenic acid by modified precipitation polymerization and its application to extraction of chlorogenic acid from Eucommia ulmodies leaves.

    PubMed

    Miura, Chitose; Li, Hui; Matsunaga, Hisami; Haginaka, Jun

    2015-10-10

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for chlorogenic acid (CGA) were prepared by modified precipitation polymerization using methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, divinylbenzene as a crosslinker and methanol or dimethylsulfoxide as a co-solvent. The prepared MIPs were microspheres with a narrow particle size distribution. Binding experiments and Scatchard analyses revealed that two classes of binding sites, high and low affinity sites, were formed on the MIP. The retention and molecular-recognition properties of the prepared MIP were evaluated using a mixture of water and acetonitrile as a mobile phase in hydrophilic interaction chromatography. With an increase of acetonitrile content, the retention factor of CGA was increased on the MIP. In addition to shape recognition, hydrophilic interactions seem to work for the recognition of CGA on the MIP. The MIP had a specific molecular-recognition ability for CGA, while other related compounds, such as caffeic acid, gallic acid, protocatechuic acid and vanillic acid, could not be recognized by the MIP. Furthermore, the MIP for CGA was successfully applied for extraction of CGA in the leaves of Eucommia ulmodies. PMID:26037163

  10. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  11. SAMPLING ARTIFACT ESTIMATES FOR ALKANES, HOPANES, AND ALIPHATIC CARBOXYLIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  12. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of organic amines and amino acids in saline and acidic samples using the Mars organic analyzer.

    PubMed

    Stockton, Amanda M; Chiesl, Thomas N; Lowenstein, Tim K; Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank; Mathies, Richard A

    2009-11-01

    The Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA) has enabled the sensitive detection of amino acid and amine biomarkers in laboratory standards and in a variety of field sample tests. However, the MOA is challenged when samples are extremely acidic and saline or contain polyvalent cations. Here, we have optimized the MOA analysis, sample labeling, and sample dilution buffers to handle such challenging samples more robustly. Higher ionic strength buffer systems with pK(a) values near pH 9 were developed to provide better buffering capacity and salt tolerance. The addition of ethylaminediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) ameliorates the negative effects of multivalent cations. The optimized protocol utilizes a 75 mM borate buffer (pH 9.5) for Pacific Blue labeling of amines and amino acids. After labeling, 50 mM (final concentration) EDTA is added to samples containing divalent cations to ameliorate their effects. This optimized protocol was used to successfully analyze amino acids in a saturated brine sample from Saline Valley, California, and a subcritical water extract of a highly acidic sample from the Río Tinto, Spain. This work expands the analytical capabilities of the MOA and increases its sensitivity and robustness for samples from extraterrestrial environments that may exhibit pH and salt extremes as well as metal ions. PMID:19968460

  13. Soluble species in the Arctic summer troposphere - Acidic gases, aerosols, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale spatial distribution from 0.15-to 6 km altitude in the North American Arctic troposphere of several soluble acidic gases and major aerosol species during the summertime is reported. The distribution is found to be compositionally consistent on a large spatial scale. The summertime troposphere is an acidic environment, with HCOOH and CH3COOH the principal acidic gases while acidic sulfate aerosols dominate the particulate phase. There appears to be a surface source of NH3 over the pack ice which may originate from decay of dead marine organisms on the ice surface, evolution from surface ocean waters in open ice leads, or release from rotting sea ice. At low altitude over the pack ice this NH34 appears to partially neutralize aerosol acidity. Over sub-Arctic tundra in southeastern Alaska, inputs of marine biogenic sulfur from the Bering Sea appear to be an important source of boundary layer aerosol SO4(2-). The rainwater acidity over the tundra is typical of remote regions.

  14. Generation of dose-response relationships to assess the effects of acidity in precipitation on growth and productivity of vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed with several plant species in natural environments as well in a greenhouse and/or tissue culture facilities to establish dose-response functions of plant responses to simulated acidic rain in order to determine environmental risk assessments to ambient levels of acidic rain. Response functions of foliar injury, biomass of leaves and seed of soybean and pinto beans, root yields of radishes and garden beets, and reproduction of bracken fern are considered. The dose-response function of soybean seed yields with the hydrogen ion concentration of simulated acidic rainfalls was expressed by the equation y = 21.06-1.01 log x where y = seed yield in grams per plant and x = the hydrogen concentration if ..mu..eq l/sup -1/. The correlation coefficient of this relationship was -0.90. A similar dose-response function was generated for percent fertilization of ferns in a forest understory. When percent fertilization is plotted on logarithmic scale with hydrogen ion concentration of the simulated rain solution, the Y intercept is 51.18, slope -0.041 with a correlation coefficient of -0.98. Other dose-response functions were generated that assist in a general knowledge as to which plant species and which physiological processes are most impacted by acidic precipitation. Some responses did not produce convenient dose-response relationships. In such cases the responses may be altered by other environmental factors or there may be no differences among treatment means.

  15. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  16. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1980, 1981 AND 1982 ANNUAL DATA SUMMARIES FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base for North American wet deposition data is used to provide an overview of the major North American monitoring networks: NADP, CANSAP, APN, MAP3S/PCN, EPRI/SURE, UAPSP and APIOS daily and cumulative. Individual site annual statistical summ...

  17. A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vet, Robert; Artz, Richard S.; Carou, Silvina

    2014-08-01

    Investigating and assessing the chemical composition of precipitation and atmospheric deposition is essential to understanding how atmospheric pollutants contribute to contemporary environmental concerns including ecosystem acidification and eutrophication, loss of biodiversity, air pollution and global climate change. Evidence of the link between atmospheric deposition and these environmental issues is well established. The state of scientific understanding of this link is that present levels of atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen adversely affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, putting forest sustainability and aquatic biodiversity at risk. Nitrogen and phosphorus loadings are linked to impacts on the diversity of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation through biological cycling, and atmospheric deposition plays a major role in the emission-transport-conversion-loss cycle of chemicals in the atmosphere as well as the formation of particulate matter and ozone in the troposphere. Evidence also shows that atmospheric constituents are changing the earth's climate through direct and indirect atmospheric processes. This Special Issue, comprising a single article titled "A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus", presents a recent comprehensive review of precipitation chemistry and atmospheric deposition at global and regional scales. The information in the Special Issue, including all supporting data sets and maps, is anticipated to be of great value not only to the atmospheric deposition community but also to other science communities including those that study ecosystem impacts, human health effects, nutrient processing, climate change, global and hemispheric modeling and biogeochemical cycling. Understanding and quantifying pollutant loss from the atmosphere is, and will remain, an important component of each of these scientific fields as they

  18. Investigation of differences between field and laboratory pH measurements of national atmospheric deposition program/national trends network precipitation samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latysh, N.; Gordon, J.

    2004-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate differences between laboratory and field pH measurements for precipitation samples collected from 135 weekly precipitation-monitoring sites in the National Trends Network from 12/30/1986 to 12/28/1999. Differences in pH between field and laboratory measurements occurred for 96% of samples collected during this time period. Differences between the two measurements were evaluated for precipitation samples collected before and after January 1994, when modifications to sample-handling protocol and elimination of the contaminating bucket o-ring used in sample shipment occurred. Median hydrogen-ion and pH differences between field and laboratory measurements declined from 3.9 ??eq L-1 or 0.10 pH units before the 1994 protocol change to 1.4 ??eq L-1 or 0.04 pH units after the 1994 protocol change. Hydrogen-ion differences between field and laboratory measurements had a high correlation with the sample pH determined in the field. The largest pH differences between the two measurements occurred for high-pH samples (>5.6), typical of precipitation collected in Western United States; however low- pH samples (<5.0) displayed the highest variability in hydrogen-ion differences between field and laboratory analyses. Properly screened field pH measurements are a useful alternative to laboratory pH values for trend analysis, particularly before 1994 when laboratory pH values were influenced by sample-collection equipment.

  19. Aquatic Activities for Middle School Children. A Focus on the Effects of Acid Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Minnesota Sea Grant Program.

    Basic water-related concepts and underlying principles of acid rain are described in this curriculum in a manner that young children can understand. The curriculum consists of activities presented in four units: Background Unit, Earth Science Unit, Life Science Unit, and Extension Unit. The first three units consist of several modules, each module…

  20. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer.

    PubMed

    Cánovas, C R; Macías, F; Pérez-López, R

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in

  1. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cánovas, C. R.; Macías, F.; Pérez-López, R.

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40 days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in

  2. Washout/rainout contribution in wet deposition estimated by 0.5 mm precipitation sampling/analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Masahide; Hiraki, Takatoshi

    A precipitation dataset collected on a 0.5 mm precipitation basis was studied. The parameters analyzed in this study were the pH (i.e., H + concentration), electric conductivity (EC), and SO42- and NO3- concentrations. The NO3- concentration clearly decayed with an increase of the precipitation amount, while a larger variation was observed in the SO42- concentration even when the precipitation amount increased. Assuming that the decaying NO3- concentration (0.70 μg ml -1) was the result of the rainout process, the estimates were: annual total deposition, 3252 mg m -2 yr -1; rainout process, 1092 mg m -2 yr -1; and rainout/total, 34%. The estimates for SO42- were: annual total deposition, 4687 mg m -2 yr -1; rainout process, 2096 mg m -2 yr -1; and rainout/total, 45%.

  3. Effect of alcohols and neutral salt on the thermal stability of soluble and precipitated acid-soluble collagen

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Allan E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of mono- and poly-hydric alcohols in the presence of KCl on the intrinsic stability of collagen molecules in dilute acid solution were compared with corresponding solvent and salt effects on the increased stability of the aggregated molecules in salt-precipitated fibrils. Salt addition decreased solubility and increased the thermal stability of fibrils, but progressively decreased the stability of collagen molecules in solution. In contrast, the alcohols enhanced solubility and decreased fibril stability, the effects increasing with solvent hydrocarbon chain length and with decreasing hydroxyl/methylene-group ratio. Molar destabilization of dissolved collagen by alcohols was lower than for fibrils, and at low salt concentration, both ethylene glycol and glycerol were structural stabilizers. Electron-micrograph studies indicated that salt-precipitated fibrils tended to adopt the native aggregation mode, and qualitatively similar solvent effects were observed in insoluble collagens. Implications of the experimental findings are discussed in terms of a model in which electrostatic and apolar interactions mainly govern the excess of stability in collagen fibrils whereas intrinsic stability of single molecules is a function of polar interactions and polypeptide-chain rigidity. PMID:4737319

  4. Production and characterization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) generated by Alcaligenes latus using lactose and whey after acid protein precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Berwig, Karina Hammel; Baldasso, Camila; Dettmer, Aline

    2016-10-01

    Whey after acid protein precipitation was used as substrate for PHB production in orbital shaker using Alcaligenes latus. Statistical analysis determined the most appropriate hydroxide for pH neutralization of whey after protein precipitation among NH4OH, KOH and NaOH 10%w/v. The results were compared to those of commercial lactose. A scale-up test in a 4L bioreactor was done at 35°C, 750rpm, 7L/min air flow, and 6.5 pH. The PHB was characterized through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. NH4OH provided the best results for productivity (p), 0.11g/L.h, and for polymer yield, (YP/S), 1.08g/g. The bioreactor experiment resulted in lower p and YP/S. PHB showed maximum degradation temperature (291°C), melting temperature (169°C), and chemical properties similar to those of standard PHB. The use of whey as a substrate for PHB production did not affect significantly the final product quality. PMID:27347795

  5. EFFECT OF SIMULATED ACID PRECIPITATION ON NITROGEN MINERALIZATION AND NITRIFICATION IN FOREST SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    After exposure of samples of three forest soils(pH 3.4 and 3.9) from the Adirondacks region of New York to 60, 230, or 400 cm of simulated rain of pH 3.5 or 5.6 in 4, 14 or 24 weeks, respectively, the soil samples were seperated into the 0 to 2 and 2 to 5 cm organic layers and fu...

  6. Red spruce germination and growth in soil-mediated regeneration microcosms under acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.

    1992-01-01

    In the past three decades, atmospheric pollution has caused substantial problems for the environment as well as for many biological processes. The objective of this study focuses on red spruce (Picea ruben Sarg.) regeneration potential and chemical change within the soil-water-plant continuum following simulated acid rain treatments. Inceptisols from three forests at 1735, 1920, and 2015 m at Mt. Mitchell, North Carolina had lower pH, bulk density, and higher organic matter, and base cations as altitude increased. Red spruce seeds were collected from two nearby standing trees at the 1735 m site. A strip-split-split plot experiment was constructed using soils from the two lower elevations, which support natural red spruce stands. Besides a control (pH 5.6, NO[sub 3]:SO[sub 4] ratio 0.10), eight treatments corresponding to two pHs (3.5 and 4.2) with four NO[sub 3]:SO[sub 4] ratios (0.20, 0.33, 0.40, and 0.67) each were used. Seedling emergence and growth, chemistry of soil. Soil leachate, and plant tissue were analyzed to test soil differences and treatment effects of acidity, nitrate, and sulfate. Temporal patterns of germination respond more to soil than to rain chemistry, but significant interactions were found. Besides higher survival, faster germinating seedlings in the 1735 m soil also produced more complex root system and more biomass. Lower root-to-shoot ratios at more acidic treatments suggest a negative effect of acidity on root growth. Canonical discriminant analysis revealed that factors controlling overall soil chemistry were dominated by soil origin, then by rain pH.

  7. SPECIAL SESSION: (H21) on Global Precipitation Mission for Hydrology and Hydrometeorology. Sampling-Error Considerations for GPM-Era Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The proposed Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) builds on the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), offering a constellation of microwave-sensor-equipped smaller satellites in addition to a larger, multiply-instrumented "mother" satellite that will include an improved precipitation radar system to which the precipitation estimates of the smaller satellites can be tuned. Coverage by the satellites will be nearly global rather than being confined as TRMM was to lower latitudes. It is hoped that the satellite constellation can provide observations at most places on the earth at least once every three hours, though practical considerations may force some compromises. The GPM system offers the possibility of providing precipitation maps with much better time resolution than the monthly averages around which TRMM was planned, and therefore opens up new possibilities for hydrology and data assimilation into models. In this talk, methods that were developed for estimating sampling error in the rainfall averages that TRMM is providing will be used to estimate sampling error levels for GPM-era configurations. Possible impacts on GPM products of compromises in the sampling frequency will be discussed.

  8. Recovery of nickel from spent NiO/Al2O3 catalyst through sulfuric acid leaching, precipitation and solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, M K; Rashchi, F

    2012-05-01

    Effective recovery of nickel (Ni) from spent NiO/Al(2)O(3) catalyst in a simple hydrometallurgical route is suggested. Nickel recovery of 99.5% was achieved with sulfuric acid leaching. The leach liquor was partly neutralized and nickel ammonium sulfate was precipitated by adding ammonia. The nickel in the supernatant was concentrated by solvent extraction using D2EHPA and subsequently stripped back into sulfuric acid and returned to the precipitation stage. Necessary counter current extraction and stripping stages were determined in McCabe-Thiele diagrams. The suggested method appears simple and very effective in recovering nickel from spent catalysts from the petrochemical industry. PMID:21930525

  9. Correlating Mineralogy and Amino Acid Contents of Milligram-Scale Murchison Carbonaceous Chondrite Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron, S.; Berger, Eve L.; Locke, Darren R.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, have been found to be indigenous in most of the carbonaceous chondrite groups. The abundances of amino acids, as well as their structural, enantiomeric and isotopic compositions differ significantly among meteorites of different groups and petrologic types. This suggests that there is a link between parent-body conditions, mineralogy and the synthesis and preservation of amino acids (and likely other organic molecules). However, elucidating specific causes for the observed differences in amino acid composition has proven extremely challenging because samples analyzed for amino acids are typically much larger ((is) approximately 100 mg powders) than the scale at which meteorite heterogeneity is observed (sub mm-scale differences, (is) approximately 1-mg or smaller samples). Thus, the effects of differences in mineralogy on amino acid abundances could not be easily discerned. Recent advances in the sensitivity of instrumentation have made possible the analysis of smaller samples for amino acids, enabling a new approach to investigate the link between mineralogical con-text and amino acid compositions/abundances in meteorites. Through coordinated mineral separation, mineral characterization and highly sensitive amino acid analyses, we have performed preliminary investigations into the relationship between meteorite mineralogy and amino acid composition. By linking amino acid data to mineralogy, we have started to identify amino acid-bearing mineral phases in different carbonaceous meteorites. The methodology and results of analyses performed on the Murchison meteorite are presented here.

  10. Acidity, nutrients, and minerals in atmospheric precipitation over Florida: deposition patterns, mechanisms and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brezonik, P.L.; Hendry, C.D. Jr.; Edgerton, E.S.; Schulze, R.L.; Crisman, T.L.

    1983-06-01

    A monitoring network of 21 bulk and 4 wet/dry collectors located throughout Florida measured spatial and temporal trends during a one-year period from May 1978 to April 1979. The project summary notes that statewide deposition rates of nitrogen and phosphorus were below the loading rates associated with eutrophication, although nutrient concentrations were higher during the summer. Overall, pH appears to have relatively small effects (in the range 4.7-6.8) on community structure in soft-water Florida lakes. More dramatic effects could occur under more acidic conditions in the future. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  11. The effect of random precipitation times on the scavenging rate for tropospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the effective scavenging rate of a soluble species has been developed. The model takes into account the possibility of positive as well as negative correlations between departures from the mean of the scavenging rate and species concentration. The model is demonstrated for the case of late afternoon rainout of nitric acid occurring just prior to the nighttime cessation of its chemical production. The calculations give effective scavenging rates which are about a factor of 2 to 3 greater than those calculated using the models of Rodhe and Grandell (1972) and Giorgi and Chameides (1985).

  12. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples. PMID:27245345

  13. Nickel recovery from spent Raneynickel catalyst through dilute sulfuric acid leaching and soda ash precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Rao, S Venkateswara; Kumar, B Nagaphani; Kang, Dong Jun; Reddy, B Ramachandra

    2010-04-15

    Pharmaceutical industry makes extensive use of Raneynickel catalyst for various organic drug intermediates/end products. Spent catalysts contain environmentally critical and economically valuable metals. In the present study, a simple hydrometallurgical process using dilute sulfuric acid leaching was described for the recovery of nickel from spent Raneynickel catalyst. Recovery of nickel varied with acid concentration and time, whereas temperature had negligible effect. Increase of S/L ratio to 30% (w/v) showed marginal effect on nickel (90%) recovery, whereas Al recovery decreased drastically to approximately 20%. Under the optimum conditions of leaching viz: 12 vol.% H(2)SO(4), 30 degrees C, 20% solid to liquid (S/L) ratio and 120 min reaction time, it was possible to recover 98.6% Ni along with 39.2% Al. Leach liquor [pH 0.7] containing 85.0 g/L Ni and 3.25 g/L Al was adjusted to pH 5.4 with 30 wt.% alkali for quantitative aluminum removal. Nickel loss was about 2% during this Al removal step. Nickel from the purified leach liquor was recovered as nickel carbonate by adding required amount of Na(2)CO(3). The purity of NiCO(3) product was found to be 100% with a Ni content of 48.6%. Na(2)SO(4) was recovered as a by-product with a purity of 99%. Complete process is presented. PMID:20018448

  14. Perfluoroalkyl Acid Concentrations in Blood Samples Subjected to Transportation and Processing Delay

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Cathrine Carlsen; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Bossi, Rossana; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Fuglsang, Jens; Olsen, Jørn; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    Background In studies of perfluoroalkyl acids, the validity and comparability of measured concentrations may be affected by differences in the handling of biospecimens. We aimed to investigate whether measured plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl acids differed between blood samples subjected to delay and transportation prior to processing and samples with immediate processing and freezing. Methods Pregnant women recruited at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, (n = 88) provided paired blood samples. For each pair of samples, one was immediately processed and plasma was frozen, and the other was delayed and transported as whole blood before processing and freezing of plasma (similar to the Danish National Birth Cohort). We measured 12 perfluoroalkyl acids and present results for compounds with more than 50% of samples above the lower limit of quantification. Results For samples taken in the winter, relative differences between the paired samples ranged between -77 and +38% for individual perfluoroalkyl acids. In most cases concentrations were lower in the delayed and transported samples, e.g. the relative difference was -29% (95% confidence interval -30; -27) for perfluorooctane sulfonate. For perfluorooctanoate there was no difference between the two setups [corresponding estimate 1% (0, 3)]. Differences were negligible in the summer for all compounds. Conclusions Transport of blood samples and processing delay, similar to conditions applied in some large, population-based studies, may affect measured perfluoroalkyl acid concentrations, mainly when outdoor temperatures are low. Attention to processing conditions is needed in studies of perfluoroalkyl acid exposure in humans. PMID:26356420

  15. LiCoO 2 sub-microns particles obtained from micro-precipitation in molten stearic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, S. M.; Montoro, L. A.; Rosolen, J. M.

    The present work reports a novel emulsion method for preparation of lithium cobalt oxide based on the micro-precipitation of lithium and cobalt salts in molten stearic acid. The precursors consist of micro-aggregated powders of CoOOH and CH 3(CH 2) 16COOLi whose formation depends on the concentration of stearic acid used in the synthesis. The micro-aggregated of CoOOH and CH 3(CH 2) 16COOLi when calcined at 800 °C yielded well-crystalline sub-microns particles of LiCoO 2 ( R-3 m) with a very uniform shape (quasi-hexagonal pellets), a very narrow grain size distribution ( d10=0.31, d50=3.14, d90=6.30 μm) and high specific surface area (7.4 m 2 g -1). The long life reversible specific capacity of the mp-LiCoO 2 composite electrode subsequently made was 110 mAh g -1 for initial deinsertion 165 mAh g -1.

  16. Adsorption compared with sulfide precipitation as metal removal processes from acid mine drainage in a constructed wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machemer, Steven D.; Wildeman, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Metal removal processes from acid mine drainage were studied in an experimental constructed wetland in the Idaho Springs-Central City mining district of Colorado. The wetland was designed to passively remove heavy metals from the mine drainage flowing from the Big Five Tunnel. Concurrent studies were performed in the field on the waters flowing from the wetland and in the laboratory on the wetland substrate. Both studies suggest that there is competition for organic adsorption sites among Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn. Iron and Cu appear to be more strongly adsorbed than Zn and Mn. The adsorption of metals varies with the fluctuation of pH in the outflow water. Also indicated by field and laboratory studies is the microbial reduction of sulfate with a corresponding increase in the sulfide concentration of the water. As sulfide is generated. Cu and Zn are completely removed. The field results suggest that upon start up of a constructed wetland, the adsorption of dissolved metals onto organic sites in the substrate material will be an important process. Over time, sulfide precipitation becomes the dominant process for metal removal from acid mine drainage.

  17. Biomass and production of amphipods in low alkalinity lakes affected by acid precipitation.

    PubMed

    France, R L

    1996-01-01

    Population biomass and production of the amphipod Hyalella azteca (Saussure) were found to be related to alkalinity (ranging from 0.2 to 58.1 mg liter(-1)) in 10 Canadian Shield lakes in south-central Ontario. Biomass and production of amphipods in the two lakes characterized by spring depressions of pH below 5.0 were found to be lower than those for populations inhabiting lakes that did not experience such acid pulses. The proportional biomass of amphipods in relation to the total littoral zoobenthos community was lower in lakes of low alkalinity than in circumneutral or hardwater lakes. Because production in these amphipod populations is known to depend closely on population abundance, the labour-intensive derivation of production rates yields relatively little information for biomonitoring that cannot be obtained from abundance data alone. PMID:15093505

  18. Jarosite Precipitation from Acidic Saline Waters in Kachchh, Gujarat, India: an Appropriate Martian Analogue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Gupta, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, S.; Chauhan, P.; Parthasarathy, G.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6] on the Martian surface has been an intriguing problem since the Mars Exploration Rover 'Opportunity' first revealed its presence at the Meridiani Planum on Mars. To explain its origin, several terrestrial analogue sites have been studied in different geographical zones. Although several models have been suggested, there is a consensus that only the prevalence of acidic and oxidizing aqueous environmental conditions are conducive to form jarosite. In the Kachchh region of Gujarat, western India, jarosite has been recently discovered from gorges dissecting the Paleocene Matanumadh Formation sediments, that overlie basalts of the Deccan Volcanic Province. This formation comprises pebble conglomerates, carbonaceous shales and purple sandstones capped by a laterite on top. Jarosite, in association with gypsum and goethite, has been detected through FTIR and VNIR spectrometry in almost all litho-units of the succession, albeit in different modes and concentrations. The occurrence of jarosite within black shale in other parts of the world, has been attributed to the oxidation of pyrites within the shale layers. However, in shales of the Matanumadh Formation, jarosite is restricted to fractures that cut across the bedding, while the overlying purple sandstone unit only preserves jarosite in shale clasts within the sandstone. Since the sandstone overlies the black shale layer, downward percolation of sulfate-bearing water from the oxidation of pyrite within the shale layer cannot explain jarosite formation in this unit. In addition, no jarosite is observed below or within pyrite-rich lignite bearing sections in other parts of Kachchh. Alternative suggestions, that jarosite developed in the immediate aftermath of Deccan volcanism as surface waters were rendered acidic by interaction with the final phase of volcanic effusives, are also unlikely as on-going studies suggest that jarosite is not restricted to the Matanumadh Formation. The

  19. Limestone characterization to model damage from acidic precipitation: Effect of pore structure on mass transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leith, S.D.; Reddy, M.M.; Irez, W.F.; Heymans, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The pore structure of Salem limestone is investigated, and conclusions regarding the effect of the pore geometry on modeling moisture and contaminant transport are discussed based on thin section petrography, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and nitrogen adsorption analyses. These investigations are compared to and shown to compliment permeability and capillary pressure measurements for this common building stone. Salem limestone exhibits a bimodal pore size distribution in which the larger pores provide routes for convective mass transfer of contaminants into the material and the smaller pores lead to high surface area adsorption and reaction sites. Relative permeability and capillary pressure measurements of the air/water system indicate that Salem limestone exhibits high capillarity end low effective permeability to water. Based on stone characterization, aqueous diffusion and convection are believed to be the primary transport mechanisms for pollutants in this stone. The extent of contaminant accumulation in the stone depends on the mechanism of partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. The described characterization techniques and modeling approach can be applied to many systems of interest such as acidic damage to limestone, mass transfer of contaminants in concrete and other porous building materials, and modeling pollutant transport in subsurface moisture zones.

  20. Assessment of the economic magnitude of environmental damage from acid precipitation in the Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    Menz, F.C.; Mullen, J.K.

    1983-05-01

    This research represents one of a few initial attempts to quantify economic damages resulting from increased acidification of lakes and ponds ostensibly due to acidic deposition. The focus of this research is the loss in economic welfare resulting from diminished recreational angling opportunities within the Adirondack fishery. An amended travel-cost model was applied to a survey of licensed anglers in New York State to determine the economic value of the fishery prior to the general acknowledgement of widespread acidification damages. Data pertaining to those water bodies that have become acidified were used together with the parameters of the empirical model to generate the change in visitation and economic value resulting from increased acidification. Annual losses in economic value due to the acidification-related reduction in recreational angling opportunities were estimated to be in the range of $1.6 to 3.2 million. These estimates should be interpreted as a lower bound of the actual social losses incurred annually from acidification damages to this freshwater ecosystem. 6 references.

  1. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  2. Purifying Nucleic Acids from Samples of Extremely Low Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Duc, Myron; Osman, Shariff; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2008-01-01

    A new method is able to circumvent the bias to which one commercial DNA extraction method falls prey with regard to the lysing of certain types of microbial cells, resulting in a truncated spectrum of microbial diversity. By prefacing the protocol with glass-bead-beating agitation (mechanically lysing a much more encompassing array of cell types and spores), the resulting microbial diversity detection is greatly enhanced. In preliminary studies, a commercially available automated DNA extraction method is effective at delivering total DNA yield, but only the non-hardy members of the bacterial bisque were represented in clone libraries, suggesting that this method was ineffective at lysing the hardier cell types. To circumvent such a bias in cells, yet another extraction method was devised. In this technique, samples are first subjected to a stringent bead-beating step, and then are processed via standard protocols. Prior to being loaded into extraction vials, samples are placed in micro-centrifuge bead tubes containing 50 micro-L of commercially produced lysis solution. After inverting several times, tubes are agitated at maximum speed for two minutes. Following agitation, tubes are centrifuged at 10,000 x g for one minute. At this time, the aqueous volumes are removed from the bead tubes and are loaded into extraction vials to be further processed via extraction regime. The new method couples two independent methodologies in such as way as to yield the highest concentration of PCR-amplifiable DNA with consistent and reproducible results and with the most accurate and encompassing report of species richness.

  3. Origin of observed acidic-alkaline rains in a wet-only precipitation study in a Mediterranean coastal site, Patras, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavas, Sotirios; Moschonas, Nektarios

    Major anions and cations were analyzed in a wet-only precipitation study for 16 months. The pH exhibited large variation, from 4.07 to 8.51 pH units. Twenty-eight percent of the observed rain volume had pH <5, whereas 42% of the rains had pH >6, as is usually observed in the Mediterranean. Comparison with our work of 15 years ago indicates a free acidity reduction by ˜18%, non-sea-salt sulfate ions reduction of ˜40% and nitrate ions reduction of 66%. Chloride and all cation concentrations were similar in the present work and that carried out in 1985-86 indicating similar sources, namely aerosol and crustal material as in MS. Calcium ions were the dominating neutralization ions. The annual wet-only deposition rates were calculated for the major species and were found to be comparable to those reported in past studies. Deposition of calcium ions dominates all deposited species, except sea salt, and indicates its significance in the neutralizing mechanisms of soils of the region, if neutralization is needed. Air mass back trajectories calculated for all analyzed samples, revealed four sectors of origin of air masses: NW to NE Europe, northern Africa, local and western Mediterranean, each with a specific chemistry. Cluster analysis and factor analysis also discriminated the samples by their sources. The main sources derived from the statistical analysis were: marine aerosols, alkalinity-acidity as inferred by the calcium ion concentrations from crustal sources and hydronium ions mainly from anthropogenic activities and ammonium salts of sulfate and nitrate also mainly from anthropogenic activities. These sources were closely correlated with the geographic sectors obtained from the air mass back trajectories.

  4. The search for and identification of amino acids, nucleobases and nucleosides in samples returned from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, Charles W.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril; Kuo, Kenneth C.; Stalling, David L.; Zumwalt, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the returned Mars samples for biologically important organic compounds, with emphasis on amino acid, the puring and pyrimidine bases, and nucleosides is proposed. These studies would be conducted on subsurface samples obtained by drilling past the surface oxidizing layer with emphasis on samples containing the larges quantities of organic carbon as determined by the rover gas chromatographic mass spectrometer (GCMS). Extraction of these molecules from the returned samples will be performed using the hydrothermal extraction technique described by Cheng and Ponnamperuma. More rigorous extraction methods will be developed and evaluated. For analysis of the extract for free amino acids or amino acids present in a bound or peptidic form, aliquots will be analyzed by capillary GCMS both before and after hydrolysis with 6N hydrochloric acid. Establishment of the presence of amino acids would then lead to the next logical step which would be the use of chiral stationary gas chromatography phases to determine the enatiomeic composition of the amino acids present, and thus potentially establish their biotic or abiotic origin. Confirmational analyses for amino acids would include ion-exchange and reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis. For analyses of the returned Mars samples for nucleobases and nucleosides, affinity and reversed-phase liquid chromatography would be utilized. This technology coupled with scanning UV detection for identification, presents a powerful tool for nucleobase and nucleoside analysis. Mass spectrometric analysis of these compounds would confirm their presence in samples returned form Mars.

  5. Comparison of experimental designs to determine effects of acidic precipitation on field-grown soybeans

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Lewin, K.F.; Patti, M.J.; Cunningham, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to determine changes in seed yields of soybeans grown under standard agronomic practices exposed to simulated acidic rain during the summer of 1981. Seed yields of soybeans exposed twice weekly to simulated rainfalls of pH 4.1, 3.3, and 2.7 were decreased 10.7, 16.8, and 22.9%, respectively, compared with plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 5.6. A treatment-response function of seed yield versus rainfall pH was y = 7.40 + 1.025 x and had a correlation coefficient of 0.997. In a second experiment, soybean plants were not shielded from ambient rainfalls (weighted mean hydrogen ion concentration equal to pH 4.04) and received only small volumes of simulated rainfalls three times weekly. Plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 4.1, 3.3, and 2.7 exhibited yield reductions of 2.7, 7.0, and 7.6, respectively, below yields of plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 5.6. By best fit analyses, the equation that fits this latter relationship is expressed by y = 9.68 + 0.318 x where y is seed mass per plant and x is the pH of the simulated rain. The correlation coefficient for this latter relationship was 0.97. The decrease in seed yield observed in both experiments was due to a decrease in number of pods per plant.

  6. Heterogeneous degradation of precipitated hexamine from wastewater by catalytic function of silicotungstic acid in the presence of H2O2 and H2O2/Fe2+.

    PubMed

    Taghdiri, Mehdi; Saadatjou, Naghi; Zamani, Navid; Farrokhi, Reyhaneh

    2013-02-15

    The industrial wastewater produced by hexamine plants is considered as a major environmental polluting factor due to resistance to biodegradation. So the treatment of such wastewater is required. In this work, the removal of hexamine from wastewater and its degradation have been studied. Hexamine was precipitated through formation of an insoluble and stable compound with silicotungstic acid. The oxidative heterogeneous degradation of precipitated hexamine was carried out with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) aqueous solution and H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+) under the catalysis of silicotungstic acid. The operating conditions including amount of precipitate, hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ion dosage, temperature, time and pH were optimized by evaluating the removal of total organic carbon from system. A total organic carbon conversion higher than 70% was achieved in the presence of H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+). The experimental results showed that hexamine can be effectively degraded with H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+) under the catalysis of silicotungstic acid. It was interesting that the solution of dissolved precipitate with H(2)O(2) can re-react with hexamine after the removal of excess hydrogen peroxide. This observation indicates the catalysis role of silicotungstic acid in the degradation of hexamine. A kinetic analysis based on total organic carbon reduction was carried out. The two steps mechanism was proposed for the degradation of hexamine. PMID:23313893

  7. On-line microdialysis sample cleanup for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of nucleic acid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Wu, Q.; Harms, A.C.; Smith, R.D.

    1996-09-15

    A major limitation of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for oligonucleotide analysis arises due to sodium adduction, a problem that increases with molecular weight. Sodium adduction can preclude useful measurements when limited sample sizes prevent off-line cleanup. A novel and generally useful on-line microdialysis technique is described for the rapid (nearly 1-5 min) DNA sample cleanup for ESI-MS. Mass spectra of oligonucleotides of different size and sequence showing no significant sodium adduct peaks were obtained using the on-line microdialysis system with sodium chloride concentrations as high as 250 mM. Signal-to-noise ratios were also greatly enhanced compared to direct infusion of the original samples. By using ammonium acetate as the dialysis buffer, it was also found that the noncovalent association of double-stranded oligonucleotides could be preserved during the microdialysis process, allowing analysis by ESI-MS. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Capillary gas chromatography determination of volatile organic acids in rain and fog samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1984-08-01

    A fused silica capillary gas chromatography technique is described for the determination of volatile acids (C/sub 1/-C/sub 7/) in rain samples using p-bromophenacyl esters. As the sensitivity of this method is high (GC detection limit is ca. 10 pmol), a small volume of rain (25-50 mL) or fog (1-2 mL) is needed. Spiked experiments showed that the measured concentrations of volatile acids in the spiked rain samples linearly increased with a slope of approx.1 in proportion to the concentrations of volatile acids added in the rainwater. Repeated analyses of rain samples showed that relative standard deviations are less than or equal to 18% for C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ acids, which are the major volatile acids.

  9. Methods for point-of-care detection of nucleic acid in a sample

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.

    2015-12-29

    Provided herein are methods and apparatus for detecting a target nucleic acid in a sample and related methods and apparatus for diagnosing a condition in an individual. The condition is associated with presence of nucleic acid produced by certain pathogens in the individual.

  10. Apparatus for point-of-care detection of nucleic acid in a sample

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.

    2016-04-19

    Provided herein are methods and apparatus for detecting a target nucleic acid in a sample and related methods and apparatus for diagnosing a condition in an individual. The condition is associated with presence of nucleic acid produced by certain pathogens in the individual.

  11. Evolution of pore-geometry and relative-permeability due to carbonate precipitation within natural rock sample: Insights from a coupled FVM-LBM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Jiang, F.

    2013-12-01

    To predict long-term CO2 behavior within the reservoir in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects, we usually use reservoir simulation. A key parameter in the reservoir simulation is 'relative permeability'. However, since the relative permeability is significantly influenced by mineral precipitation (e.g., change of pore space), we should consider the time evolution of relative permeability in reservoir simulation. To investigate the influence of carbonate precipitation to the relative permeability during CO2 storage, we develop numerical calculation method. Pore spaces of Berea sandstone were extracted by high-resolution micro-CT scanned images. The fluid velocity field within the 3D pore spaces was then calculated using the two-phase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The calcite deposition within the pore space was calculated by using an advection-reaction formulation solved by finite volume method; we modeled the precipitated rock by transferring the fluid node to solid node according to the calcium concentration level. To increase the computation efficiency, we applied the graphics processor unit (GPU) parallel computing technique. The relative permeability of the rock sample is finally calculated separately by a highly optimized two-phase LB model. The calculated permeability variation due to the carbonate precipitation demonstrates that evolution of pore structure significantly influences the absolute permeability, while it only affects the relative permeability of non-wettable phase at low water saturation conditions.

  12. Production and functional evaluation of a protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) by acid dissolution and isoelectric precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Elena Lugo-Sánchez, M; Gisela Carvallo-Ruiz, M; García-Sánchez, Guillermina

    2008-09-15

    A protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was produced under acidic conditions and its functional-technological capability evaluated in terms of its gel-forming ability, water holding capacity and colour attributes. Technological functionality of the concentrate was compared with that of squid muscle and a neutral concentrate. Protein-protein aggregates insoluble at high ionic strength (I=0.5M), were detected in the acidic concentrate as result of processing with no preclusion of its gel-forming ability during the sol-to-gel thermal transition. Even though washing under acidic condition promoted autolysis of the myosin heavy chain, the acidic concentrate displayed an outstanding ability to gel giving samples with a gel strength of 455 and 1160gcm at 75% and 90% compression respectively, and an AA folding test grade indicative of high gel strength, elasticity, and cohesiveness. The process proved to be a good alternative for obtaining a functional protein concentrate from giant squid muscle. PMID:26049243

  13. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters. PMID:26062529

  14. Susceptibility to acidic precipitation contributes to the decline of the terricolous lichens Cetraria aculeata and Cetraria islandica in central Europe.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus

    2008-04-01

    The effective quantum yield of photochemical energy conversion in photosystem II (Phi2) was shown to be reduced in the terricolous lichens Cetraria aculeata and Cetraria islandica by short-term exposure to aqueous SO2 at pH values occurring in the precipitation of areas with high SO2 pollution. Significant reduction of Phi2 was found at pHacid, a major lichen substance of C. islandica, increases the pollution tolerance in lichens. PMID:18053625

  15. The effects of acid precipitation runoff episodes on reservoir and tapwater quality in an Appalachian Mountain water supply.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, W E; DeWalle, D R

    1990-01-01

    The aluminum concentration and Ryznar Index increased and the pH decreased in a small Appalachian water supply reservoir following acid precipitation runoff episodes. Concomitant increases in tapwater aluminum and decreases in tapwater pH were also observed at two homes in the water distribution system. Lead concentrations in the tapwater of one home frequently exceeded recommended levels, although spatial and temporal variation in tapwater copper and lead concentrations was considerable. Since source water and reservoir water copper and lead concentrations were much lower, the increased copper and lead concentrations in tapwater were attributed to corrosion of household plumbing. Tapwater copper concentration correlated well with tapwater pH and tapwater temperature. Asbestos fibers were not detected in tapwater. The asbestos-cement pipe in the water distribution system was protected by a spontaneous metallic coating that inhibited fiber release from the pipe. Several simultaneous reactions were hypothesized to be taking place in the distribution system that involved corrosion of metallic components and coating of asbestos-cement pipe components in part with corrosion products and in part by cations of watershed origin. Greater water quality changes might be expected in areas of higher atmospheric deposition. Images FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. PMID:2088742

  16. Response of surface water chemistry to reduced levels of acid precipitation: comparison of trends in two regions of New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Douglas A.; McHale, Michael R.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Roy, Karen M.

    2006-04-01

    In light of recent reductions in sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions mandated by Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, temporal trends and trend coherence in precipitation (1984-2001 and 1992-2001) and surface water chemistry (1992-2001) were determined in two of the most acid-sensitive regions of North America, i.e. the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains of New York. Precipitation chemistry data from six sites located near these regions showed decreasing sulphate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-), and base cation (CB) concentrations and increasing pH during 1984-2001, but few significant trends during 1992-2001. Data from five Catskill streams and 12 Adirondack lakes showed decreasing trends in SO42- concentrations at all sites, and decreasing trends in NO3-, CB, and H+ concentrations and increasing trends in dissolved organic carbon at most sites. In contrast, acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) increased significantly at only about half the Adirondack lakes and in one of the Catskill streams. Flow correction prior to trend analysis did not change any trend directions and had little effect on SO42- trends, but it caused several significant non-flow-corrected trends in NO3- and ANC to become non-significant, suggesting that trend results for flow-sensitive constituents are affected by flow-related climate variation. SO42- concentrations showed high temporal coherence in precipitation, surface waters, and in precipitation-surface water comparisons, reflecting a strong link between S emissions, precipitation SO42- concentrations, and the processes that affect S cycling within these regions. NO3- and H+ concentrations and ANC generally showed weak coherence, especially in surface waters and in precipitation-surface water comparisons, indicating that variation in local-scale processes driven by factors such as climate are affecting trends in acid-base chemistry in these two regions.

  17. Response of surface water chemistry to reduced levels of acid precipitation: Comparison of trends in two regions of New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; McHale, M.R.; Driscoll, C.T.; Roy, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    In light of recent reductions in sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions mandated by Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, temporal trends and trend coherence in precipitation (1984-2001 and 1992-2001) and surface water chemistry (1992-2001) were determined in two of the most acid-sensitive regions of North America, i.e. the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains of New York. Precipitation chemistry data from six sites located near these regions showed decreasing sulphate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-), and base cation (CB) concentrations and increasing pH during 1984-2001, but few significant trends during 1992-2001. Data from five Catskill streams and 12 Adirondack lakes showed decreasing trends in SO42- concentrations at all sites, and decreasing trends in NO3-, CB, and H+ concentrations and increasing trends in dissolved organic carbon at most sites. In contrast, acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC increased significantly at only about half the Adirondack lakes and in one of the Catskill streams. Flow correction prior to trend analysis did not change any trend directions and had little effect on SO42- trends, but it caused several significant non-flow-corrected trends in NO3- and ANC to become non-significant, suggesting that trend results for flow-sensitive constituents are affected by flow-related climate variation. SO42- concentrations showed high temporal coherence in precipitation, surface waters, and in precipitation-surface water comparisons, reflecting a strong link between S emissions, precipitation SO42- concentrations, and the processes that affect S cycling within these regions. NO3- and H+ concentrations and ANC generally showed weak coherence, especially in surface waters and in precipitation-surface water comparisons, indicating that variation in local-scale processes driven by factors such as climate are affecting trends in acid-base chemistry in these two regions. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Selective Precipitation of Thorium lodate from a Tartaric Acid-Hydrogen Peroxide Medium Application to Rapid Spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium in Silicate Rocks and in Ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a selective iodate separation of thorium from nitric acid medium containing d-tartaric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is prevented by the use of 8quinolinol. A few micrograms of thorium are separated sufficiently clean from 30 mg. of such oxides as cerium, zirconium, titanium, niobium, tantalum, scandium, or iron with one iodate precipitation to allow an accurate determination of thorium with the thoronmesotartaric acid spectrophotometric method. The method is successful for the determination of 0.001% or more of thorium dioxide in silicate rocks and for 0.01% or more in black sand, monazite, thorite, thorianite, eschynite, euxenite, and zircon.

  19. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  20. Carbon Isotopic Measurements of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here, we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and e-aminocaproic acid (EACA), the two most abundant amino acids, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CAMS/IRMS).

  1. On the range of future Sahel precipitation projections and the selection of a sub-sample of CMIP5 models for impact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Boé, Julien

    2016-06-01

    The future evolution of the West African Monsoon is studied by analyzing 32 CMIP5 models under the rcp8.5 emission scenario. A hierarchical clustering method based on the simulated pattern of precipitation changes is used to classify the models. Four groups, which do not agree on the simple sign of future Sahel precipitation change, are obtained. We find that the inter-group differences are mainly associated with the large spread in (1) temperature increase over the Sahara and North Atlantic and in (2) the strengthening of low and mid-level winds. A wetter Sahel is associated with a strong increase in temperature over the Sahara (>6 °C), a northward shift of the monsoon system and a weakening of the African Easterly jet. A dryer Sahel is associated with subsidence anomalies, a strengthening of the 600 hPa wind speed, and a weaker warming over the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, the western (central) Sahel is projected to become dryer (wetter) during the first months (last months) of the rainy season in a majority of models. We propose several methods to select a sub-sample of models that captures both the ensemble mean pattern and/or the spread of precipitation changes from the full ensemble. This methodology is useful in all the situations for which it is not possible to deal with a large ensemble of models, and in particular most impact studies. We show that no relationship exists between the climatological mean biases in precipitation and temperature and the future changes in the monsoon intensity. This indicates that the mean bias is therefore not a reliable metric for the model selection. For this reason, we propose several methodologies, based on the projected precipitation changes: The "diversity" method, which consists in the selection of one model from each group is the most appropriate to capture the spread in precipitation change. The "pattern selection" method, which consists in the selection of models in a single group allows to select models for the

  2. Tank 12H Acidic Chemical Cleaning Sample Analysis And Material Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.; Reboul, S. H.; Wiersma, B. J.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-11-08

    A process of Bulk Oxalic Acid (BOA) chemical cleaning was performed for Tank 12H during June and July of 2013 to remove all or a portion of the approximately 4400 gallon sludge heel. Three strikes of oxalic acid (nominally 4 wt% or 2 wt%) were used at 55°C and tank volumes of 96- to 140-thousand gallons. This report details the sample analysis of a scrape sample taken prior to BOA cleaning and dip samples taken during BOA cleaning. It also documents a rudimentary material balance for the Tank 12H cleaning results.

  3. Amino acid analysis in micrograms of meteorite sample by nanoliquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael P; Martin, Mildred G; Burton, Aaron S; Glavin, Daniel P; Dworkin, Jason P

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids and their enantiomers in a 360 microgram sample of Murchison meteorite were unambiguously identified and quantified using chemical derivatization and nanoliquid chromatography coupled to nanoelectrospray ionization high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques. The distribution and abundance of amino acids were similar to past studies of Murchison meteorite but the samples used here were three orders of magnitude lower. The analytical method was also highly sensitive, and some amino acid reference standards were successfully detected at a level of ∼200 attomoles (on column). These results may open up the possibility for investigating other less studied, sample-limited extraterrestrial samples (e.g., micrometeorites, interplanetary dust particles, and cometary particles) for biologically-relevant organic molecules. PMID:24529954

  4. Multiple stable isotope characterization as a forensic tool to distinguish acid scavenger samples

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Carman, April J.; Wahl, Jon H.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    Acid scavengers are frequently used as stabilizer compounds in a variety of applications. When used to stabilize volatile compounds such as nerve agents, the lower volatility and higher stability of acid scavengers make them more persistent in a post-event forensic setting. We are employing compound-specific stable isotope analysis of the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen components of three acid scavenging compounds (N,N-diethylaniline, tributylamine, and triethylamine) as a tool for distinguishing between different samples of the stabilizers. Combined analysis of three stable isotopes in these samples improves the technique’s resolving potential, enhancing sample matching capabilities. The compound specific methods developed here can be applied to instances where these compounds are not pure, such as when mixed with an agent or when found as a residue at an event site. Effective sample matching can be crucial for linking compounds at multiple event sites or linking a supply inventory to an event.

  5. Applicability Comparison of Methods for Acid Generation Assessment of Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chamteut; Ji, Sangwoo; Yim, Giljae; Cheong, Youngwook

    2014-05-01

    Minerals including various forms of sulfur could generate AMD (Acid Mine Drainage) or ARD (Acid Rock Drainage), which can have serious effects on the ecosystem and even on human when exposed to air and/or water. To minimize the hazards by acid drainage, it is necessary to assess in advance the acid generation possibility of rocks and estimate the amount of acid generation. Because of its relatively simple and effective experiment procedure, the method of combining the results of ABA (Acid Base Accounting) and NAG (Net Acid Generation) tests have been commonly used in determining acid drainage conditions. The simplicity and effectiveness of the above method however, are derived from massive assumptions of simplified chemical reactions and this often leads to results of classifying the samples as UC (Uncertain) which would then require additional experimental or field data to reclassify them properly. This paper therefore, attempts to find the reasons that cause samples to be classified as UC and suggest new series of experiments where samples can be reclassified appropriately. Study precedents on evaluating potential acid generation and neutralization capacity were reviewed and as a result three individual experiments were selected in the light of applicability and compatibility of minimizing unnecessary influence among other experiments. The proposed experiments include sulfur speciation, ABCC (Acid Buffering Characteristic Curve), and Modified NAG which are all improved versions of existing experiments of Total S, ANC (Acid Neutralizing Capacity), and NAG respectively. To assure the applicability of the experiments, 36 samples from 19 sites with diverse geologies, field properties, and weathering conditions were collected. The samples were then subject to existing experiments and as a result, 14 samples which either were classified as UC or could be used as a comparison group had been selected. Afterwards, the selected samples were used to conduct the suggested

  6. A large-sample investigation of statistical procedures for radar-based short-term quantitative precipitation forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, M.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2000-12-01

    We present the results of an extensive evaluation of radar-based quantitative precipitation forecasting techniques. Using a large data set of radar observations from the Tulsa, Oklahoma, WSR-88D radar we evaluate several techniques, including persistence, advection, and neural-network-based schemes. The scope of our study is limited to very-short-term forecast lead-times of up to three hours. We consider several spatial resolutions ranging from 4×4 km2 to 32×32 km2. Performance of the schemes is evaluated using several popular criteria that include correlation coefficient, multiplicative bias, and probability of detection. We discuss the effects of average storm intensity and rainfall intensity integration on the predictability limits. The most significant conclusions from the study are: (1) advection is the most important physical process that impacts useful predictions; (2) larger and more intense storms are easier to forecast; and (3) both spatial and temporal integration significantly extends the predictability limits.

  7. Determination of the maleic acid in rat urine and serum samples by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with on-line solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Wu, Charlene; Wu, Kuen-Yuh

    2015-05-01

    A rapid and simple on-line solid-phase extraction coupled with isotope dilution-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-ID-LC-MS/MS) method was developed to quantitate maleic acid in serum and urine of SpragueDawley (SD) rats. The aforementioned biological samples were spiked with (13)C2-maleic acid, vigorously vortexed, added with acetonitrile to precipitate proteins, and then injected into the on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS system for quantification. Upon validation, this method demonstrated excellent feasibility and sensitivity: calibration curves for maleic acid in serum and urine display excellent linearity with the coefficient of determination (R(2)) greater than 0.999; the limits of detection and quantitation (LOD and LOQ) for maleic acid were determined at 0.2 and 0.5μg L(-1), respectively. Additionally, intra-day accuracy for maleic acid in serum and urine samples ranged from 94.0% to 100.2% and 101.3% to 104.4%, respectively. Furthermore, inter-day accuracy ranged from 93.6% to 101.0% and from 102.3% to 111.4% in serum and urine samples, respectively. Intra-day precision %RSD of maleic acid in serum and urine samples was 13.8% or less, whereas the inter-day precision was 6.1% or less. The matrix effects were not found to be statistically significant (p=0.9145 and p=0.5378, correspondingly) based on the calculations of recovery functions. The collected serum and urine samples were analyzed using SPE-ID-LC-MS/MS. Our results reveal trace levels of maleic acid in the control rats, demonstrating that this method is capable of analyzing background levels of contaminants in biofluids with excellent sensitivity and specificity at part-per-billion levels concentrations in complex matrices. PMID:25702978

  8. Determination of herbicides paraquat, glyphosate, and aminomethylphosphonic acid in marijuana samples by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lanaro, Rafael; Costa, José L; Cazenave, Silvia O S; Zanolli-Filho, Luiz A; Tavares, Marina F M; Chasin, Alice A M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, two methods were developed to determine herbicides paraquat, glyphosate, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in marijuana samples by capillary electrophoresis. For paraquat analysis, sample was extracted with aqueous acetic acid solution and analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis with direct UV detection. The running electrolyte was 50 mmol/L phosphate buffer (pH 2.50). For glyphosate and AMPA, indirect UV/VIS detection was used, as these substances do not present chromophoric groups. Samples were extracted with 5 mmol/L hydrochloric acid. The running electrolyte was 10 mmol/L gallic acid, 6 mmol/L TRIS, and 0.1 mmol/L CTAB (pH = 4.7). The methods presented good linearity, precision, accuracy, and recovery. Paraquat was detected in 12 samples (n = 130), ranging from 0.01 to 25.1 mg/g. Three samples were positive for glyphosate (0.15-0.75 mg/g), and one sample presented AMPA as well. Experimental studies are suggested to evaluate the risks of these concentrations to marijuana user. PMID:25413634

  9. Integrated sample-to-detection chip for nucleic acid test assays.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Pabbaraju, K; Wong, S; Tellier, R; Kaler, K V I S

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acid based diagnostic techniques are routinely used for the detection of infectious agents. Most of these assays rely on nucleic acid extraction platforms for the extraction and purification of nucleic acids and a separate real-time PCR platform for quantitative nucleic acid amplification tests (NATs). Several microfluidic lab on chip (LOC) technologies have been developed, where mechanical and chemical methods are used for the extraction and purification of nucleic acids. Microfluidic technologies have also been effectively utilized for chip based real-time PCR assays. However, there are few examples of microfluidic systems which have successfully integrated these two key processes. In this study, we have implemented an electro-actuation based LOC micro-device that leverages multi-frequency actuation of samples and reagents droplets for chip based nucleic acid extraction and real-time, reverse transcription (RT) PCR (qRT-PCR) amplification from clinical samples. Our prototype micro-device combines chemical lysis with electric field assisted isolation of nucleic acid in a four channel parallel processing scheme. Furthermore, a four channel parallel qRT-PCR amplification and detection assay is integrated to deliver the sample-to-detection NAT chip. The NAT chip combines dielectrophoresis and electrostatic/electrowetting actuation methods with resistive micro-heaters and temperature sensors to perform chip based integrated NATs. The two chip modules have been validated using different panels of clinical samples and their performance compared with standard platforms. This study has established that our integrated NAT chip system has a sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the standard platforms while providing up to 10 fold reduction in sample/reagent volumes. PMID:27165104

  10. Solid supported in situ derivatization extraction of acidic degradation products of nerve agents from aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay; Singh, Varoon; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak

    2014-09-12

    This study deals with the solid supported in situ derivatization extraction of acidic degradation products of nerve agents present in aqueous samples. Target analytes were alkyl alkylphosphonic acids and alkylphosphonic acids, which are important environmental signatures of nerve agents. The method involved tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane mediated in situ silylation of analytes on commercially available diatomaceous solid phase extraction cartridges. Various parameters such as derivatizing reagent, its concentration, reaction time, temperature and eluting solvent were optimized. Recoveries of the analytes were determined by GC-MS which ranged from 60% to 86%. The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) with selected analytes were achieved down to 78 and 213ngmL(-1) respectively, in selected ion monitoring mode. The successful applicability of method was also demonstrated on samples of biological origin such as plasma and to the samples received in 34th official proficiency test conducted by the Organization for Prohibition the of Chemical Weapons. PMID:25103280

  11. High concentrations of furan fatty acids in organic butter samples from the German market.

    PubMed

    Wendlinger, Christine; Vetter, Walter

    2014-08-27

    Furan fatty acids (F-acids) are valuable antioxidants containing a furan moiety in the central part of the molecule. They occur in the lipids of different foodstuffs and plants, with grass being the main source for their presence in milk fat and butter. Because cows from organic farming receive higher portions of grass-based feed, it was tested whether organic butter samples (n = 26) contain more F-acids than conventional ones (n = 25) in Germany. For this purpose, samples were melted, and the lipid phase was separated and transesterified into methyl esters, which were enriched using silver ion chromatography and analyzed by GC-EI/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Levels of F-acids in butter were higher in summer than in winter, and in both seasons, organic samples contained significantly higher levels of F-acids than conventional ones (one-way ANOVA: p < 0.001). Furthermore, the daily intake of F-acids via milk fat and other foodstuffs was calculated. PMID:25098958

  12. Synthesis of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles with the co-precipitation of iron ions in the presence of aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pušnik, Klementina; Goršak, Tanja; Drofenik, Miha; Makovec, Darko

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing demand for the production of large quantities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles. Amino acids are one possible type of inexpensive, nontoxic, and biocompatible molecules that can be used as the surfactants for the preparation of stable suspensions. This preparation can be conducted in a simple, one-step process based on the co-precipitation of Fe3+/Fe2+ ions in the presence of the amino acid. However, the presence of this amino acid changes the mechanism of the magnetic nanoparticles' formation. In this investigation we analyzed the influence of aspartic amino acid (Asp) on the formation of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation. The process of the nanoparticles' formation was followed using a combination of TEM, x-ray diffractometry, magnetic measurements, in-situ FT-IR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis, and compared with the formation of nanoparticles without the Asp. The Asp forms a coordination complex with the Fe3+ ions, which impedes the formation of the intermediate iron oxyhydroxide phase and suppresses the growth of the final magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles. Slower reaction kinetics can lead to the formation of nonmagnetic secondary phases. The aspartic-acid-absorbed nanoparticles can be dispersed to form relatively concentrated aqueous suspensions displaying a good colloidal stability at an increased pH.

  13. Effects of acidic precipitation on the water quality of streams in the Laurel Hill area, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, 1983-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, J.L.; Witt, E. C., III

    1990-01-01

    Five headwater streams in the Laurel Hill area in southwestern Pennsylvania were investigated from September 1983 through February 1986 to determine possible effects of acidic precipitation on water quality. Precipitation in the Laurel Hill area is among the most acidic in the Nation, with a mean volume-weighted pH of 4.06. Sulfate is the dominant acid-forming anion, averaging 3.6 milligrams per liter or about 50 kilograms per hectare in wet deposition alone. Nitrate averages about 2 milligrams per liter or 7 kilograms per hectare in the study area. Stream chemistry in the five streams is quite variable and apparently is influenced to a large degree by the bedrock geology and by small amounts of alkaline material in watershed soils. Three of the five streams with no or little acid-neutralizing capacity presently are devoid of fish because of low pH and elevated aluminum concentrations. Aluminum concentrations increase in the other two streams during rainfall and snowmelt despite comparatively higher base flow and acid-neutralizing capacities. Comparison of the chemistry of streamflow during 14 storm events at South Fork Bens Creek and North Fork Bens Creek reveals similar chemical responses when discharge suddenly increases. Concentrations of dissolved metals and sulfate increased during stormflow and snowmelt runoff, whereas concentrations of base cations, silica, and chloride decreased. Nitrate concentrations were not affected by rainfall runoff by tended to increase with snowmelt runoff.

  14. Determination of 15 isomers of chlorobenzoic acid in soil samples using accelerated sample extraction followed by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Křesinová, Zdena; Muzikář, Milan; Olšovská, Jana; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2011-05-30

    A study was conducted to elaborate a fast, simple and efficient method for determination of 15 isomers chlorobenzoic acids (CBAs) in soil using HPLC-UV. Artificially contaminated soil samples were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with 1% acetic acid in a mixture of hexane and acetone (1:1, V/V) under a pressure of 10.34 MPa and temperature of 150°C. The recovery of the ASE method was above 82%. The extracts were concentrated; dimethyl sulfoxide was used to prevent CBA volatilization and the final analysis was performed with a C18 XBridge HPLC column employing a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.1% trifluoracetic acid in water. A HPLC procedure with gradient elution and UV detection was developed and validated. The method exhibited a linear range for 2-CBA; 2,6-CBA; 3-CBA; 4-CBA; 2,3-CBA; 2,3,6-CBA; 2,5-CBA; and 2,4-CBA from 5 to 120 μg/mL with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 5 μg/mL, RSD from 2.42 to 9.42% and accuracy from 82 ± 2 to 103 ± 3%. The linear range of determination of 2,4,6-CBA, 3,4-CBA, 2,3,5,6-CBA, 3,5-CBA, 2,3,5-CBA, 2,3,4,5,6-CBA and 2,3,4,5-CBA was 10-120 μg/mL with LOQ 10 μg/mL, RSD from 0.74 to 5.84% and accuracy from 94 ± 1 to 114 ± 1%. The optimized analytical procedure was finally applied on two historically PCB contaminated soils and 9 CBAs were quantified in the samples. PMID:21530790

  15. PRECIPITATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1958-07-15

    An lmprovement in the separation of protactinium from aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. 1t covers the use of lead dioxide and tin dioxide as carrier precipitates for the protactinium. In carrying out the process, divalent lead or divalent tin is addcd to the solution and oxidized, causing formation of a carrier precipitate of lead dioxide or stannic oxide, respectively.

  16. Evaluation of the Goulden Large-Sample Extractor for acidic compounds in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Headley, J.V.; Dickson, L.C.; Swyngedouw, C.; Crosley, B.; Whitley, G.

    1996-11-01

    The Goulden Large-Sample Extractor has received extensive use for monitoring and surveillance surveys of natural waters impacted by pulp and paper mills and agricultural runoff water. However, there are concerns about whether this sampler, which was originally developed for extractions of hydrophobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and other organochlorines, is suitable for sampling polar acidic compounds. The sampler was evaluated for recovery of surrogates for resin acids, fatty acids, herbicide acids, and chlorophenols from natural waters. Performance tests conducted in this work indicated that three surrogate compounds with K{sub p} (C{sub DCM}/C{sub water pH 2}) values from 16,700 to 1,260 were extracted from pH 2-adjusted 20-L water samples with an average recovery of 83.6%. The surrogate compounds with K{sub p} values less than 1,000 were extracted with significantly lower recoveries. The variability ranged from 10 to 36% relative standard deviation. Specific performance criteria (percent recoveries {+-} standard deviation, number of determinations in parentheses) observed for the surrogates 2,4,6-tribromophenol, heptadecanoic acid, O-methylpodocarpic acid, dichlorophenylacetic acid, and 4-bromophenol were 89.5 {+-} 24.0 (17), 82.8 {+-} 21.7 (18), 78.4 {+-} 14.8 (18), 41.9 {+-} 8.5 (16), and 22.1 {+-} 8.1 (19), respectively. Low recoveries of the 4-bromophenol surrogate may be due in part to side reactions with diazomethane. As a result, 4-bromophenol is not recommended as a surrogate. These values can be used to provide guidelines for acceptable surrogate recoveries and validation of extractions of polar acidic compounds.

  17. A perspective of stepwise utilisation of Bayer red mud: Step two--Extracting and recovering Ti from Ti-enriched tailing with acid leaching and precipitate flotation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanfang; Chai, Wencui; Han, Guihong; Wang, Wenjuan; Yang, Shuzhen; Liu, Jiongtian

    2016-04-15

    The extraction and recovery of Ti from Ti-enriched tailing with acid leaching and precipitate flotation, as one of the critical steps, was proposed for the stepwise utilization of red mud. The factors influencing acid leaching and precipitate flotation were examined by factorial design. The leaching thermodynamics, kinetics of Ti(4+), Al(3+) and Fe(3+), and the mechanism of selectively Fe(3+) removal using [Hbet][Tf2N] as precipitating reagent were discussed. The extracting of Ti(4+), Al(3+) and Fe(3+) in concentrated H2SO4 is controlled by diffusion reactions, depending mainly upon leaching time and temperature. The maximum extracting efficiency of Ti(4+) is approximately 92.3%, whereas Al(3+) and Fe(3+) leaching are respectively 75.8% and 84.2%. [Hbet][Tf2N], as a precipitating reagent, operates through a coordination mechanism in flotation. The pH value is the key factor influencing the flotation recovery of Ti(4+), whereas the dosage of precipitating reagent is that for Al(3+) recovery. The maximum flotation recovery of Ti(4+) is 92.7%, whereas the maximum Al(3+) recovery is 93.5%. The total recovery rate for extracting and recovering titanium is 85.5%. The liquor with Ti(4+) of 15.5g/L, Al(3+) of 30.4g/L and Fe(3+) of 0.48g/L was obtained for the following hydrolysis step in the integrated process for red mud utilisation. PMID:26799223

  18. Rapid, quantitative analysis of americium, curium and plutonium isotopes in Hanford samples using extraction chromatography and precipitation plating

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, J.H.; Strebin, R.S.; Orr, R.D.

    1994-04-01

    Recently developed methods for the rapid, quantitative analysis of americium (Am), curium (Cm), and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in Hanford soil, sludge, and waste-tank samples are described. After dissolution, dilutions are made as necessary based on alpha-energy analysis of a small aliquot of the original solution. isotopic tracers are then added and Am-Cm and Pu are separated by extraction chromatography, coprecipitated with neodymium fluoride, and counted. Examples of alpha spectra are given, and results obtained for Hanford sludge samples are presented.

  19. Selective mineralization of microbes in Fe-rich precipitates (jarosite, hydrous ferric oxides) from acid hot springs in the Waiotapu geothermal area, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian; Renaut, Robin W.

    2007-01-01

    A group of small springs that are informally called "Orange Spring", located near Hakereteke Stream in the northern part of the Waiotapu geothermal area, feed hot (˜ 80 °C), acidic (pH: 2.1 - 2.4), As-rich sulfate waters into a discharge channel that is up to 25 cm deep. Submerged reddish-brown precipitates on the channel floor are formed largely of noncrystalline As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (HFO: mainly goethite), poorly crystalline lepidocrocite, and crystalline jarosite. Well-preserved coccoid and rod-shaped microbes are found in the As-rich HFO, but not in the lepidocrocite or jarosite. The jarosite was probably precipitated when the water had a low pH (< 3) and high SO 4 content, whereas the goethite and lepidocrocite were probably precipitated when the water had a slightly higher pH (> 4) and lower SO 4 content. The fluctuations in the pH and SO 4 content, which led to precipitation of the different mineral phases, may reflect mixing of the spring water with stream water that flowed through the channel when Hakereteke Stream was in flood stage. The goethite probably formed when coccoid and rod-shaped bacteria ( Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans?) mediated rapid oxidization of the Fe 2+ to Fe 3+ that was then immediately coprecipitated with the As. Such rapid precipitation promoted mineralization of the microbes. The lack of mineralized microbes and the lower As in the lepidocrocite and jarosite may reflect precipitation rates that were slower than the decay rates of the microbes, or ecological factors that limited their growth.

  20. Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) leachate chemistry data for solid mine-waste composite samples from southwestern New Mexico, and Leadville, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.; Briggs, Paul H.; Desborough, George A.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Theodorakos, Peter M.

    2000-01-01

    This report details chemistry data derived from leaching of mine-waste composite samples using a modification of E.P.A. Method 1312, Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP). In 1998, members of the U.S. Geological Survey Mine Waste Characterization Project collected four mine-waste composite samples from mining districts in southwestern New Mexico (CAR and PET) and near Leadville, Colorado (TUC and MII). Resulting leachate pH values for the four composites ranged from 5.45 to 8.84 and ranked in the following order: CAR < TUC < MII < PET. Specific conductivity values ranged from 85 uS/cm to 847 uS/cm in the following order: PET < MII < CAR < TUC. Geochemical data generated from this investigation reveal that leachate from the CAR composite contains the highest concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ni, Mn, Cu, Cd, and Al

  1. Acid digestion of geological and environmental samples using open-vessel focused microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Vivien F; Toms, Andrew; Longerich, Henry P

    2002-01-01

    The application of open vessel focused microwave acid digestion is described for the preparation of geological and environmental samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method is compared to conventional closed-vessel high pressure methods which are limited in the use of HF to break down silicates. Open-vessel acid digestion more conveniently enables the use of HF to remove Si from geological and plant samples as volatile SiF4, as well as evaporation-to-dryness and sequential acid addition during the procedure. Rock reference materials (G-2 granite, MRG-1 gabbros, SY-2 syenite, JA-1 andesite, and JB-2 and SRM-688 basalts) and plant reference materials (BCR and IAEA lichens, peach leaves, apple leaves, Durham wheat flour, and pine needles) were digested with results comparable to conventional hotplate digestion. The microwave digestion method gave poor results for granitic samples containing refractory minerals, however fusion was the preferred method of preparation for these samples. Sample preparation time was reduced from several days, using conventional hotplate digestion method, to one hour per sample using our microwave method. PMID:11936112

  2. Acetic Acid Detection Threshold in Synthetic Wine Samples of a Portable Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo; Chamizo, Juan Carlos Peguero

    2013-01-01

    Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v) we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP). To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L. PMID:23262483

  3. Photocatalytic removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide on copper oxide/titanium dioxide prepared by co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shu Chin; Hasan, Norhasnita; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    In this work, suppression of the charge recombination on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) was reported by the addition of copper oxide (CuO), which led to a higher activity of TiO2 for removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) herbicide. A series of CuO/TiO2 with CuO loadings of 0.1-1 wt% was prepared through a co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the presence of CuO could not be detected as the low loading amount of CuO might have good dispersion on the surface of TiO2. Diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra suggested that low loading amount of CuO did not influence the optical property of TiO2. Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that TiO2 possessed a dominant emission peak of 407 nm at an excitation wavelength of 218 nm. The increasing loading amount of CuO decreased the emission intensity of TiO2, suggesting the successful reduction of charge recombination. After irradiation under UV light for 1 h, CuO(0.1 wt%)/TiO2 gave the highest percentage removal of the herbicide among the samples. The optimum loading amount of CuOmight improve the charge separation and reduce the electron-hole recombination on TiO2 without blocking the active sites, thus leading to the improved photocatalytic activity. This work showed that CuO/TiO2 is a potential photocatalyst for environmental remediation.

  4. Co-precipitation of Ni, Cr, Mn, Pb and Zn in industrial wastewater and sediment samples with copper(II) cyclo-hexylmethyldithiocarbamate for their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Ipeaiyeda, Ayodele Rotimi; Odola, Adekunle Johnson

    2012-01-01

    A co-precipitation technique for nickel(II), chromium(II), manganese(II), lead(II) and zinc(II) with the aid of copper(II) cyclo-hexylmethyldithiocarbamate was established. The influences of some analytical parameters such as pH, sample volume, amounts of cyclo-hexylmethyldithiocarbamate and copper(II) on the recovery of metal ions were investigated. The heavy metals in the precipitate were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The range of detection limits for the heavy metals was 0.003-0.005 mg/L. The atomic spectrometric technique with co-precipitation procedure was successfully applied for the determination of Ni, Cr, Mn, Pb and Zn in industrial wastewater and sediment samples from Ladipo stream in Lagos, Nigeria. The mean concentrations for these metals using co-precipitation procedure were not significantly different from corresponding concentrations obtained using spectrometric techniques without co-precipitation procedure. PMID:22678206

  5. The role of Al in C-S-H: NMR, XRD, and compositional results for precipitated samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.K.; Young, J. Francis; Kirkpatrick, R. James . E-mail: kirkpat@uiuc.edu

    2006-01-15

    X-ray diffraction, compositional analysis, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectroscopy of Al-substituted tobermorite-type C-S-H made by precipitation from solution provide significant new insight into the structural mechanisms of Al-substitution in this important and complicated phase. Al occurs in 4-, 5-, and 6-coordination (Al[4], Al[5], and Al[6]) and plays multiple structural roles. Al[4] occurs on the bridging tetrahedra of the drierkette Al-silicate chains, and Al[5] and Al[6] occur in the interlayer and perhaps on particle surfaces. Al does not enter either the central Ca-O sheet or the pairing tetrahedra of the tobermorite-type layers. Al[4] occurs on three types of bridging sites, Q{sup 3} sites that bridge across the interlayer; Q{sup 2} sites that are charge balanced by interlayer Ca{sup +2}, Na{sup +}, or H{sup +}; and Q{sup 2} sites that are most likely charge balanced by interlayer or surface Al[5] and Al[6] through Al[4]-O-Al[5,6] linkages. Although the data presented here are for relatively well-crystallized tobermorite-type C-S-H with C/S ratios {<=} 1.2, comparable spectral features for hydrated white cement pastes in previously published papers [M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Incorporation of aluminum in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) of hydrated Portland cements: a high-field {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR investigation Inorg. Chem. 42 (2003) 2280-2287; M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Characterization of white Portland cement hydration and the C-S-H structure in the presence of sodium aliminate by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res. 43 (2004) 857-868; M.D. Andersen, H. J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, A new aluminum-hydrate phase in hydrated Portland cements characterized by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res., submitted for publication.] indicate the presence of similar structural environments in the C-S-H of such pastes, and by implication OPC pastes.

  6. DEVELOPMENTS IN THE SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION OF CHLOROPHENOXY ACID HERBICIDES FROM SOIL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extraction of chlorophenoxy acid herbicides from soil samples with supercritical carbon dioxide as extractant and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide and methyl iodide as derivatization agents was investigated. The extraction was carried out at 400 atm and 80 C for 15 min static, follow...

  7. Optimization of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler for the sampling of acidic and polar herbicides.

    PubMed

    Fauvelle, Vincent; Mazzella, Nicolas; Belles, Angel; Moreira, Aurélie; Allan, Ian J; Budzinski, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an optimization of the pharmaceutical Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS-200) under controlled laboratory conditions for the sampling of acidic (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), acetochlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA), acetochlor oxanilic acid, bentazon, dicamba, mesotrione, and metsulfuron) and polar (atrazine, diuron, and desisopropylatrazine) herbicides in water. Indeed, the conventional configuration of the POCIS-200 (46 cm(2) exposure window, 200 mg of Oasis® hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) receiving phase) is not appropriate for the sampling of very polar and acidic compounds because they rapidly reach a thermodynamic equilibrium with the Oasis HLB receiving phase. Thus, we investigated several ways to extend the initial linear accumulation. On the one hand, increasing the mass of sorbent to 600 mg resulted in sampling rates (R s s) twice as high as those observed with 200 mg (e.g., 287 vs. 157 mL day(-1) for acetochlor ESA). Although detection limits could thereby be reduced, most acidic analytes followed a biphasic uptake, proscribing the use of the conventional first-order model and preventing us from estimating time-weighted average concentrations. On the other hand, reducing the exposure window (3.1 vs. 46 cm(2)) allowed linear accumulations of all analytes over 35 days, but R s s were dramatically reduced (e.g., 157 vs. 11 mL day(-1) for acetochlor ESA). Otherwise, the observation of biphasic releases of performance reference compounds (PRC), though mirroring acidic herbicide biphasic uptake, might complicate the implementation of the PRC approach to correct for environmental exposure conditions. PMID:24691721

  8. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids for Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie; Elsila, Jamie E.; Stern J. C.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    Significant portions of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory , including amino acids, could have been delivered to the Earth's sur face by comets and their fragments. Analysis of comets via spectrosc opic observations has identified many organic molecules, including me thane, ethane, arnmonia, cyanic acid, formaldehyde, formamide, acetal ehyde, acetonitrile, and methanol. Reactions between these identifie d molecules could allow the formation of more complex organics such a s amino acids. Isotopic analysis could reveal whether an extraterrest rial signature is present in the Stardust-exposed amines and amino ac ids. Although bulk isotopic analysis would be dominated by the EACA contaminant's terrestrial signature, compoundspecific isotope analysi s (CSIA) could determine the signature of each of the other individua l amines. Here, we report on progress made towards CSIA of the amino acids glycine and EACA in Stardustreturned samples.

  9. Impact of the East Asian summer monsoon on long-term variations in the acidity of summer precipitation in Central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, B. Z.; Wang, Z. F.; Xu, X. B.; Tang, J.; He, Y. J.; Uno, I.; Ohara, T.

    2011-02-01

    The acidity of precipitation has been observed at stations of the Acid Rain Monitoring Network run by the China Meteorological Administration (CMA-ARMN) since 1992. Previous studies have shown that different long-term trends exist in different regions but detailed analysis of the causes of these is lacking. In this paper, we analyze summertime precipitation acidity data from the CMA-ARMN during 1992-2006 using EOFs and show that the summertime pH in China had different trends before and after 2000. The most significant decrease of pH is found in Central China. To investigate the causes of this decrease of pH in summer, we explore the relationship between changes in the pH value, the East Asian summer monsoon index, rainfall data, and pollutants emissions. We find that the East Asian summer monsoon can significantly affect the acidity of summer precipitation in Central China. In strong monsoon years, the pH in Central China is about 0.33 lower than that in weak monsoon years. Chemical transport model simulations using fixed emissions indicate that about 65% of the pH value difference (i.e., 0.22) is related to the summer monsoon, and constitutes 18-36% of the observed pH change (0.6∼1.2) in Central China during 1992-2006. Further studies reveal a relationship between the pH in Central China and the rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLYR), which can explain about 24% of the variance of pH in Central China. Simulations using an annually varying emission inventory show that at least 60% of the variation in precipitation acidity in Central China can be attributed to changes in pollutant emissions. Therefore, the increase in emissions of acidic species is the most important cause for the observed decrease of pH in Central China, and changes in meteorological factors, such as rainfall and other parameters related to the East Asian summer monsoon, play a less important but still significant role.

  10. Impact of the East Asian summer monsoon on long-term variations in the acidity of summer precipitation in Central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, B. Z.; Wang, Z. F.; Xu, X. B.; Tang, J.; He, Y. J.; Uno, I.; Ohara, T.

    2010-08-01

    The acidity of precipitation has been observed at stations of the Acid Rain Monitoring Network run by the China Meteorological Administration (CMA-ARMN) since 1992. Previous studies have shown that different long-term trends exist in different regions but detailed analysis of the causes of these is lacking. In this paper, we analyze summertime precipitation acidity data from the CMA-ARMN during 1992-2006 using EOFs and show that the summertime pH in China had different trends before and after 2000. The most significant decrease of pH is found in Central China. To investigate the causes of this decrease of pH in summer, we explore the relationship between changes in the pH value, the East Asian summer monsoon index, rainfall data, and pollutants emissions. We find that the East Asian summer monsoon can significantly affect the acidity of summer precipitation in Central China. In strong monsoon years, the pH in Central China is about 0.33 lower than that in weak monsoon years. Chemical transport model simulations using fixed emissions indicate that about 65% of the pH value difference (i.e., 0.22) is related to the summer monsoon, and constitutes 18-36% of the observed pH change (0.6-1.2) in Central China during 1992-2006. Further studies reveal a teleconnection between the pH in Central China and the rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLYR), which can explain about 24% of the variance of pH in Central China. Simulations using an annually varying emission inventory show that at least 60% of the variation in precipitation acidity in Central China can be attributed to changes in pollutant emissions. Therefore, the increase in emissions of acidic species is the most important cause for the observed decrease of pH in Central China, and changes in meteorological factors, such as rainfall and other parameters related to the East Asian summer monsoon, play a less important but still significant role.

  11. Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids in Methanolic Extracts, Infusions and Tinctures from Commercial Samples of Lemon Balm.

    PubMed

    Arceusz, Agnieszka; Wesolowski, Marek; Ulewicz-Magulska, Beata

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the levels of flavonoids (rutin, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol) and phenolic acids (gallic, p-coumaric, rosmarinic, syringic, caffeic, chlorogenic, ellagic, ferulic) in lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) commonly used as a culinary, aromatic and medicinal herb. A rapid and reliable HPLC procedure was developed to determine the phenolic compounds in methanolic extracts, infusions and tinctures prepared from lemon balm. Except for myricetin and quercetin, as well as ellagic, gallic and rosmarinic acids, higher levels of the analytes under study were determined in the methanolic extracts (up to 22 mg/g of dry weight, DW), than in infusions (up to 5 mg/g DW). Tinctures were the poorest in flavonoids and phenolic acids (below 550 μg/g DW), except for ellagic and rosmarinic acids, which were quantified in tinctures at higher levels (mg/g DW). To sum up, the flavonoids were extracted more effectively in the infusions and tinctures than the phenolic acids. Statistically significant correlations were found between phenolic acids, possibly owing to similar biochemical pathways of the compounds. The hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses have also shown that the samples of lemon balm could be differentiated based on the levels of flavonoids and phenolic acids. PMID:26197530

  12. Modeling Precipitation and Sorption of Al, U and Co-contaminants during Titration of Acidic Sediments in Recirculation Flow-Through Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Luo, Wensui; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Gu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    We conducted batch and recirculating column titration tests with contaminated acidic sediments with controlled CO2 in the headspace, and extended the geochemical model by Gu et al. (2003, GCA) to better understand and quantify the reactions governing trace metal fate in the subsurface. The sediment titration curve showed slow pH increase due to strong buffering by Al precipitation and CO2 uptake. Assuming precipitation of basaluminite at low saturation index (SI=-4), and decreasing cation exchange selectivity coefficient (kNa\\Al=0.3), the predictions are close to the observed pH and Al; and the model explains 1) the observed Ca, Mg, and Mn concentration decrease by cation exchange with sorbed Al, and 2) the decrease of U by surface complexation with Fe hydroxides at low pH, and precipitation as liebigite (Ca2UO2(CO3)3:10H2O) at pH>5.5. Without further adjustment geochemical parameters, the model describes reasonably well previous sediment and column titration tests without CO2 in the headspace, as well as the new large column test. The apparent inhibition of U and Ni decrease in the large column can be explained by formation of aqueous carbonate complexes and/or competition with carbonate for surface sites. These results indicated that ignoring labile solid phase Al would underestimate base requirement in titration of acidic aquifers.

  13. Morphology controls of GeO 2 particles precipitated by a facile acid-induced decomposition of germanate ions in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chengbin; Hou, Jinxia; Zhang, Yongheng

    2008-01-01

    GeO 2 single crystals with various morphologies were synthesized at room temperature by an acid-induced homogenous liquid phase precipitation technique without using any surfactants as studied previously. With addition of aqueous ammonia, the solubility of hexagonal GeO 2 in water was significantly increased by formation of soluble germanate ions as confirmed by IR spectra analyses. Supersaturated GeO 2 solution could be produced by adding acid into the GeO 2-ammonia solution through the acid-induced transformation of germinate ions into GeO 2. GeO 2 spheres were obtained with phosphoric acid addition. Truncated cubic-like and cubic-like GeO 2 single crystals could be produced in the solutions with hydrochloric acid and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) additions, respectively. The morphology developments of the GeO 2 particles induced by various acids were discussed and the growth mechanism conforms to BFDH and HP crystal growth models.

  14. Preparation of ellagic acid molecularly imprinted polymeric microspheres based on distillation-precipitation polymerization for the efficient purification of a crude extract.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Shangge; Zhang, Lu; Han, Bo; Yao, Xincheng; Chen, Wen; Hu, Yanli

    2016-08-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymeric microspheres with a high recognition ability toward the template molecule, ellagic acid, were synthesized based on distillation-precipitation polymerization. The as-obtained polymers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. Static, dynamic, and selective binding tests were adopted to study the binding properties and the molecular recognition ability of the prepared polymers for ellagic acid. The results indicated that the maximum static adsorption capacity of the prepared polymers toward ellagic acid was 37.07 mg/g and the adsorption equilibrium time was about 100 min when the concentration of ellagic acid was 40 mg/mL. Molecularly imprinted polymeric microspheres were also highly selective toward ellagic acid compared with its analogue quercetin. It was found that the content of ellagic acid in the pomegranate peel extract was enhanced from 23 to 86% after such molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction process. This work provides an efficient way for effective separation and enrichment of ellagic acid from complex matrix, which is especially valuable in industrial production. PMID:27311588

  15. Accurate analysis of taurine, anserine, carnosine and free amino acids in a cattle muscle biopsy sample.

    PubMed

    Imanari, Mai; Higuchi, Mikito; Shiba, Nobuya; Watanabe, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We have established an analysis method for some free amino acids (FAAs), as well as taurine (Tau), anserine (Ans) and carnosine (Car), in a fresh biopsy sample from cattle muscle. A series of model biopsy samples, corresponding to the mixtures of lean meat, fat and connective tissue, was prepared and showed high correlation coefficients between the compound concentration and the 3-methylhistidine (3-MeHis) content derived from hydrolysis of the biopsy sample (r = 0.74-0.95, P < 0.01). Interference from blood contamination could not be neglected, because the concentration of some FAAs in blood was comparable to that in muscle. However, it was possible to control the contamination of Tau, Ans, Car, glutamic acid, glutamine, asparatic acid and alanine to less than 5.0% when the blood contamination was controlled to less than 23%.These results suggest the necessity of measuring 3-MeHis as an index of lean meat and hemoglobin as an index of blood contamination when compounds in muscle biopsy samples are evaluated. We have carried out a series of these analyses using one biopsy sample and reveal differences in Tau, Ans, Car and some FAAs in beef muscle after different feeding regimes. PMID:20597895

  16. Comparative analysis of aspartic acid racemization methods using whole-tooth and dentin samples.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Ayaka; Ohtani, Susumu; Saitoh, Hisako; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2012-11-30

    One way to estimate biological age is to use the aspartic acid (Asp) racemization method. Although this method has been performed mostly using enamel and dentin, we investigated whether an entire tooth can be used for age estimation. This study used 12 pairs of canines extracted from both sides of the mandible of 12 individuals of known age. From each pair, one tooth was used as a dentin sample and the other as a whole-tooth sample. Amino acids were extracted from each sample, and the integrated peak areas of D-Asp and L-Asp were determined using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. Statistical analysis was performed using the D/L-Asp ratio. Furthermore, teeth from two unidentified bodies, later identified as Japanese and Brazilian, were examined in the same manner. Results showed that the D/L ratios of whole-tooth samples were higher overall than those of dentin samples. The correlation coefficient between the D/L ratios of dentin samples and their age was r=0.98, and that of the whole-tooth samples was r=0.93. The difference between estimated age and actual chronological age was -0.116 and -6.86 years in the Japanese and Brazilian cases, respectively. The use of whole teeth makes the racemization technique easier and can standardize the sampling site. Additionally, using only a few tooth samples per analysis made it possible to reanalyze known-age samples. Although the difficulty in obtaining a proper control sample has prevented racemization from being widely used, the method described here not only ensures the availability of a control tooth, but also enables the teeth to be used for other purposes such as DNA analysis. The use of a whole tooth will increase the application of the racemization technique for age determination. PMID:22989598

  17. Preserving ground water samples with hydrochloric acid does not result in the formation of chloroform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, Paul J.; Pankow, James F.; Barbash, Jack E.; Price, Curtis V.; Zogorski, John S.

    1999-01-01

    Water samples collected for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are often preserved with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to inhibit the biotransformation of the analytes of interest until the chemical analyses can he performed. However, it is theoretically possible that residual free chlorine in the HCl can react with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to form chloroform via the haloform reaction. Analyses of 1501 ground water samples preserved with HCl from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program indicate that chloroform was the most commonly detected VOC among 60 VOCs monitored. The DOC concentrations were not significantly larger in samples with detectable chloroform than in those with no delectable chloroform, nor was there any correlation between the concentrations of chloroform and DOC. Furthermore, chloroform was detected more frequently in shallow ground water in urban areas (28.5% of the wells sampled) than in agricultural areas (1.6% of the wells sampled), which indicates that its detection was more related to urban land-use activities than to sample acidification. These data provide strong evidence that acidification with HCl does not lead to the production of significant amounts of chloroform in ground water samples. To verify these results, an acidification study was designed to measure the concentrations of all trihalomethanes (THMs) that can form as a result of HCl preservation in ground water samples and to determine if ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) could inhibit this reaction if it did occur. This study showed that no THMs were formed as a result of HCl acidification, and that ascorbic acid had no discernible effect on the concentrations of THMs measured.

  18. Acidification of soil-water in low base-saturated sand soils of the superior uplands under acid and normal precipitation.

    PubMed

    Harris, A R

    1989-04-01

    Lakes and streams are acidified by direct precipitation and water channeled through nearby soils, but water in low base-saturation soils can produce highly acidic percolate after prolonged contact and subsequent degassing in surface waters. Theories advanced by Reuss (1983), Reuss and Johnson (1985), and Seip and Rustad (1984) suggest that soils with less than 15% base saturation are susceptible to soil-water pH depression of up to 0.4 unit, which is sufficient to cause negative alkalinity in soil solutions. High concentrations of mobile anions (notably sulfate) are responsible for the negative alkalinity and these solutions on CO2 degassing in surface waters can retain acidities equivalent to a pH value of 5.0 or less. This mechanism purports to explain why some lakes acidify when they are surrounded by acid soils and cation leaching is not required.Ambient precipitation set to pH 5.4 and pH 4.2 was applied to columns of low base-saturated, sand, soils, starting in 1985. The columns (15 cm diameter and 150 cm long) were collected from soils with base saturations falling into one of three groups (0-10, 10-20, and 20-40%) from national forests in the Superior Uplands area (includes Boundary Waters Canoe Area, Rainbow Lakes, Sylvania, Moquah Barrens, and other Wilderness and Natural areas). The soils were Haplorthods and Udipsamments mainly from outwash plains.The soil columns were instrumented and reburied around a subterranean structure used to collect leachate water and to maintain natural temperature, air, and light conditions. Three humus treatments were applied to soil column (none, northern hardwood, and jack pine) to measure the effect of natural acidification compared to acidification by acid precipitation. The cores were treated with precipitation buffered to pH 5.4 to simulate natural rain and pH 4.2 to simulate acid rain.Columns were treated in 1985 and 1986 with approximately 200 cm of buffered precipitation each year over the frost-free season. Data is

  19. Preparation of porous carboxymethyl chitosan grafted poly (acrylic acid) superabsorbent by solvent precipitation and its application as a hemostatic wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Fengju; Meng, Weiwei; Yang, Xinlin; Li, Peng; Jiang, Jianxin; Tan, Huimin; Zheng, Yongfa

    2016-06-01

    The volume phase transition of a hydrogel initiated by shrinking may result in complex patterns on its surface. Based on this unique property of hydrogel, we have developed a novel solvent precipitation method to prepare a kind of novel superabsorbent polymers with excellent hemostatic properties. A porous carboxymethyl chitosan grafted poly (acrylic acid) (CMCTS-g-PAA) superabsorbent polymer was prepared by precipitating CMCTS-g-PAA hydrogel with ethanol. Its potential application in hemostatic wound dressing was investigated. The results indicate that the modified superabsorbent polymer is non-cytotoxic. It showed a high swelling capacity and better hemostatic performance in the treatments of hemorrhage model of ear artery, arteria cruralis and spleen of the New Zealand white rabbit than the unmodified polymer and other commonly used clinic wound dressings. The hemostatic mechanism of the porous CMCTS-g-PAA polymer was also discussed. PMID:27040191

  20. Determination of carboxylic acids in oil samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.

    1981-03-01

    A combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method for measuring carboxylic acids in oil samples without first going through solvent extraction and group separation is reported. The carboxylic acids in oils are directly derivatized to their corresponding methyl esters via anion formation in tetramethylammonium hydroxide/methanol/methyl iodide/n-butyl acetate solutions prior to GC/MS analysis using a glass wall coated capillary column. The reaction is mild, selective, and rapid. It can usually be carried out at room temperature and completed in 10 to 15 min. Multiple ion detection techniques (MID) can be readily used to further resolve methyl esters from other compounds if necessary.

  1. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/− 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 104 and 108 CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  2. Interlaboratory evaluation of cellulosic acid-soluble internal air sampling capsules for multi-element analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Ronnee N; Feng, H Amy; Ashley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was carried out to evaluate the use of acid-soluble cellulosic air sampling capsules for their suitability in the measurement of trace elements in workplace atmospheric samples. These capsules are used as inserts to perform closed-face cassette sample collection for occupational exposure monitoring. The interlaboratory study was performed in accordance with NIOSH guidelines that describe statistical procedures for evaluating measurement accuracy of air monitoring methods. The performance evaluation materials used consisted of cellulose acetate capsules melded to mixed-cellulose ester filters that were dosed with multiple elements from commercial standard aqueous solutions. The cellulosic capsules were spiked with the following 33 elements of interest in workplace air monitoring: Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, In, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Te, Ti, Tl, V, W, Y, Zn, Zr. The elemental loading levels were certified by an accredited provider of certified reference materials. Triplicates of media blanks and multielement-spiked capsules at three different elemental loadings were sent to each participating laboratory; the elemental loading levels were not revealed to the laboratories. The volunteer participating laboratories were asked to prepare the samples by acid dissolution and to analyze aliquots of extracted samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in accordance with NIOSH methods. It was requested that the study participants report their analytical results in units of μg of each target element per internal capsule sample. For the majority of the elements investigated (30 out of 33), the study accuracy estimates obtained satisfied the NIOSH accuracy criterion (A < 25%). This investigation demonstrates the utility of acid-soluble internal sampling capsules for multielement analysis by atomic spectrometry. PMID:26308974

  3. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  4. Spectrophotometric method for the determination of sorbic acid in various food samples with iron(III) and 2-thiobarbituric acid as reagents.

    PubMed

    Lau, O W; Luk, S F; Lam, R K

    1989-02-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of sorbic acid in various food samples based on the oxidation of sorbic acid by iron(III) at 100 degrees C to malonaldehyde, which then reacts with 2-thiobarbituric acid to form a reddish brown product. The optimum experimental conditions for colour development have been assessed. Absorbance measurements were made at 529 nm in the presence of 0.4% m/V citric acid. The calibration graph was linear for 0-6 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid with a slope of 0.131 A micrograms-1 ml. The recoveries of sorbic acid at concentrations of 164-557 micrograms ml-1 ranged from 96 to 103%. The relative standard deviations of ten replicate determinations of sorbic acid in a synthetic cream soda sample spiked with 573 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid and in an onion juice sample containing 82 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid were 1.6 and 1.9%, respectively. Interferences from several common food additives can be minimised by extracting sorbic acid with diethyl ether and then back-extracting the acid with sodium hydrogen carbonate. The method has been applied successfully to the determination of sorbic acid in a wide range of food samples including beverages, cake, cake mate, garlic bread sprinkle, onion juice, oyster flavoured sauce and grenadine syrup. PMID:2712320

  5. Development of a gas phase source for perfluoroalkyl acids to examine atmospheric sampling methods.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, John J; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Young, Cora J

    2016-06-21

    An inability to produce environmentally relevant gaseous mixing ratios of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), ubiquitous global contaminants, limits the analytical reliability of atmospheric chemists to make accurate gas and particulate measurements that are demonstrably free of interferences due to sampling artefacts. A gas phase source for PFAAs based on the acid displacement mechanism using perfluoropropionate (PFPrA), perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been constructed. The displacement efficiency of gas phase perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is inversely related to chain length. Decreasing displacement efficiencies for PFPrA, PFBA, PFHxA, and PFOA were 90% ± 20%, 40% ± 10%, 40% ± 10%, 9% ± 4%, respectively. Generating detectable amounts of gas phase perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) was not possible. It is likely that lower vapour pressure and much higher acidity play a role in this lack of emission. PFCA emission rates were not elevated by increasing relative humidity (25%-75%), nor flow rate of carrier gas from 33-111 sccm. Overall, reproducible gaseous production of PFCAs was within the error of the production of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a displacing acid (±20%) and was accomplished using a dry nitrogen flow of 33 ± 2 sccm. A reproducible mass emission rate of 0.97 ± 0.10 ng min(-1) (n = 8) was observed for PFBA. This is equivalent to an atmospheric mixing ratio of 12 ppmv, which is easily diluted to environmentally relevant mixing ratios of PFBA. Conversely, generating gas phase perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) by sublimating the solid acid under the same conditions produced a mass emission rate of 2800 ng min(-1), which is equivalent to a mixing ratio of 18 ppthv and over a million times higher than suspected atmospheric levels. Thus, for analytical certification of atmospheric sampling methods, generating gas phase standards for PFCAs is best accomplished using acid displacement under dry conditions

  6. Realistic sampling of amino acid geometries for a multipolar polarizable force field

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy J.; Cardamone, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The Quantum Chemical Topological Force Field (QCTFF) uses the machine learning method kriging to map atomic multipole moments to the coordinates of all atoms in the molecular system. It is important that kriging operates on relevant and realistic training sets of molecular geometries. Therefore, we sampled single amino acid geometries directly from protein crystal structures stored in the Protein Databank (PDB). This sampling enhances the conformational realism (in terms of dihedral angles) of the training geometries. However, these geometries can be fraught with inaccurate bond lengths and valence angles due to artefacts of the refinement process of the X‐ray diffraction patterns, combined with experimentally invisible hydrogen atoms. This is why we developed a hybrid PDB/nonstationary normal modes (NM) sampling approach called PDB/NM. This method is superior over standard NM sampling, which captures only geometries optimized from the stationary points of single amino acids in the gas phase. Indeed, PDB/NM combines the sampling of relevant dihedral angles with chemically correct local geometries. Geometries sampled using PDB/NM were used to build kriging models for alanine and lysine, and their prediction accuracy was compared to models built from geometries sampled from three other sampling approaches. Bond length variation, as opposed to variation in dihedral angles, puts pressure on prediction accuracy, potentially lowering it. Hence, the larger coverage of dihedral angles of the PDB/NM method does not deteriorate the predictive accuracy of kriging models, compared to the NM sampling around local energetic minima used so far in the development of QCTFF. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235784

  7. Ascorbic Acid Determination in Commercial Fruit Juice Samples by Cyclic Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Pisoschi, Aurelia Magdalena; Danet, Andrei Florin; Kalinowski, Slawomir

    2008-01-01

    A method was developed for assessing ascorbic acid concentration in commercial fruit juice by cyclic voltammetry. The anodic oxidation peak for ascorbic acid occurs at about 490 mV on a Pt disc working electrode (versus SCE). The influence of the potential sweep speed on the peak height was studied. The obtained calibration graph shows a linear dependence between peak height and ascorbic acid concentration in the domain (0.1–10 mmol·L−1). The equation of the calibration graph was y = 6.391x + 0.1903 (where y represents the value of intensity measured for the anodic peak height, expressed as μA and x the analyte concentration, as mmol·L−1, r2 = 0.9995, r.s.d. = 1.14%, n = 10, Cascorbic acid = 2 mmol·L−1). The developed method was applied to ascorbic acid assessment in fruit juice. The ascorbic acid content determined ranged from 0.83 to 1.67 mmol·L−1 for orange juice, from 0.58 to 1.93 mmol·L−1 for lemon juice, and from 0.46 to 1.84 mmol·L−1 for grapefruit juice. Different ascorbic acid concentrations (from standard solutions) were added to the analysed samples, the degree of recovery being comprised between 94.35% and 104%. Ascorbic acid determination results obtained by cyclic voltammetry were compared with those obtained by the volumetric method with dichlorophenol indophenol. The results obtained by the two methods were in good agreement. PMID:19343183

  8. In vitro assessment of potential intestinal absorption of some phenolic families and carboxylic acids from commercial instant coffee samples.

    PubMed

    López-Froilán, R; Ramírez-Moreno, E; Podio, N S; Pérez-Rodríguez, M L; Cámara, M; Baroni, M V; Wunderlin, D A; Sánchez-Mata, M C

    2016-06-15

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, being a source of bioactive compounds as well as flavors. Hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols, and carboxylic acids have been studied in the samples of instant coffee commercialized in Spain. The studies about contents of food components should be complemented with either in vitro or in vivo bioaccessibility studies to know the amount of food components effectively available for functions in the human body. In this sense, a widely used in vitro model has been applied to assess the potential intestinal absorption of phenolic compounds and organic acids. The contents of hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonols were higher in instant regular coffee samples than in the decaffeinated ones. Bioaccessible phenolic compounds in most analyzed samples account for 20-25% of hydroxycinnamic acids and 17-26% of flavonols. This could mean that a great part of them can remain in the gut, acting as potential in situ antioxidants. Quinic, acetic, pyroglutamic, citric and fumaric acids were identified in commercial instant coffee samples. Succinic acid was found in the coffee blend containing chicory. All carboxylic acids showed a very high bioaccessibility. Particularly, acetic acid and quinic acid were found in higher contents in the samples treated with the in vitro simulation of gastrointestinal processes, compared to the original ones, which can be explained by their cleavage from chlorogenic acid during digestion. This is considered as a positive effect, since quinic acid is considered as an antioxidant inducer. PMID:27191052

  9. The effect of using citric or acetic acid on survival of Listeria monocytogenes during fish protein recovery by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Otto, R A; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-10-01

    Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a protein recovery process effective at reducing Listeria innocua, a nonpathogenic bacterium typically used as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes in recovered trout protein. The response of L. monocytogenes to ISP processing was determined and compared to the response of L. innocua. Headed and gutted rainbow trout were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (10.16 log CFU/g), homogenized, and pH-adjusted with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized and centrifugation was used to remove insoluble components (skin, insoluble protein, so on). The supernatant was returned to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with NaOH and centrifuged to remove precipitated protein. Microbial load was enumerated on both growth and selective media; recovery was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Surviving cells from each component (protein, insoluble, and water) were compared to initial inoculum numbers. Significant reductions were detected at all pH (P < 0.05). The greatest reductions were at pH 3.0 with acetic acid, with a mean log reduction of 3.03 in the combined components, and a 3.53 log reduction in the protein portion. Data were compared to results from a previous study using L. innocua. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in recovery were found between the 2 species at pH 2.0 and 3.0 with greater recovery of L. monocytogenes, regardless of processing pH or acid type. These results demonstrate the variability in resistance between species and indicate that L. innocua is not an appropriate surrogate for L. monocytogenes for ISP processing with organic acids. PMID:21913922

  10. Comparison of acid leaching and fusion techniques to determine uranium in soil samples by alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Abdullah; Şahin, Mihriban

    2016-03-01

    Dissolution of radionuclides of interest is an indispensable first step in the alpha spectrometric analysis of soil samples. In this study a uranium recovery method for the analysis of uranium isotopes in soil samples is presented. Two different soil sample dissolution techniques were used: digestion in open beaker and fusion. The results of these techniques were compared. Two proficiency test samples and one reference material prepared by the IAEA were analyzed. Better results were obtained by fusion dissolution technique but impurities were higher than with acid leaching. Results of two techniques were more or less similar within the uncertainty limits. The detection limit (a(#)) was evaluated as part of the quality control. PMID:26651172

  11. The First Observation of Domoic Acid in Plankton Net Samples from the Sea of Marmara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Fuat; Yurdun, Türkan; Ünlü, Selma

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the first evidence of domoic acid (DA), an algal neurotoxin produced by the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, from plankton net samples collected in the Sea of Marmara in December, 2010 and February, 2011. DA concentrations of plankton net samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), using the fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl fluorescence derivatization technique (detection limit 0.2 ng DA). The biotoxin concentrations in samples from coastal waters varied between 0.96 and 5.25 µg DA/mL. We also investigated possible correlations between physicochemical parameters and DA concentration. The DA levels appear to be correlated negatively with silica and nitrite concentrations for both sampling periods. These data may be used to evaluate the probability of finding similar conditions in coastal waters of the Sea of Marmara in order to determine the potential risks to local aquaculture and fisheries. PMID:26615530

  12. The use of variable temperature and magic-angle sample spinning in studies of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earl, W.L.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thorn, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Intensity distortions and poor signal to noise in the cross-polarization magic-angle sample spinning NMR of fulvic acids were investigated and attributed to molecular mobility in these ostensibly "solid" materials. We have shown that inefficiencies in cross polarization can be overcome by lowering the sample temperature to about -60??C. These difficulties can be generalized to many other synthetic and natural products. The use of variable temperature and cross-polarization intensity as a function of contact time can yield valuable qualitative information which can aid in the characterization of many materials. ?? 1987.

  13. Comparison of acid leachate and fusion methods to determine plutonium and americium in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.L.; Markun, F.; TenKate, T.

    1992-06-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory performs radiochemical analyses for a wide variety of sites within the Department of Energy complex. Since the chemical history of the samples may vary drastically from site to site, the effectiveness of any analytical technique may also vary. This study compares a potassium fluoride-pyrosulfate fusion technique with an acid leachate method. Both normal and high-fired soils and vegetation samples were analyzed for both americium and plutonium. Results show both methods work well, except for plutonium in high-fired soils. Here the fusion method provides higher accuracy.

  14. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    DOEpatents

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod L.

    2009-03-24

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  15. Evaluation of sampling methods for measuring exposure to volatile inorganic acids in workplace air. Part 1: sampling hydrochloric acid (HCl) and nitric acid (HNO₃) from a test gas atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Howe, Alan; Musgrove, Darren; Breuer, Dietmar; Gusbeth, Krista; Moritz, Andreas; Demange, Martine; Oury, Véronique; Rousset, Davy; Dorotte, Michel

    2011-08-01

    Historically, workplace exposure to the volatile inorganic acids hydrochloric acid (HCl) and nitric acid (HNO(3)) has been determined mostly by collection on silica gel sorbent tubes and analysis of the corresponding anions by ion chromatography (IC). However, HCl and HNO(3) can be present in workplace air in the form of mist as well as vapor, so it is important to sample the inhalable fraction of airborne particles. As sorbent tubes exhibit a low sampling efficiency for inhalable particles, a more suitable method was required. This is the first of two articles on "Evaluation of Sampling Methods for Measuring Exposure to Volatile Inorganic Acids in Workplace Air" and describes collaborative sampling exercises carried out to evaluate an alternative method for sampling HCl and HNO(3) using sodium carbonate-impregnated filters. The second article describes sampling capacity and breakthrough tests. The method was found to perform well and a quartz fiber filter impregnated with 500 μL of 1 M Na(2)CO(3) (10% (m/v) Na(2)CO(3)) was found to have sufficient sampling capacity for use in workplace air measurement. A pre-filter is required to remove particulate chlorides and nitrates that when present would otherwise result in a positive interference. A GSP sampler fitted with a plastic cone, a closed face cassette, or a plastic IOM sampler were all found to be suitable for mounting the pre-filter and sampling filter(s), but care has to be taken with the IOM sampler to ensure that the sampler is tightly closed to avoid leaks. HCl and HNO(3) can react with co-sampled particulate matter on the pre-filter, e.g., zinc oxide, leading to low results, and stronger acids can react with particulate chlorides and nitrates removed by the pre-filter to liberate HCl and HNO(3), which are subsequently collected on the sampling filter, leading to high results. However, although there is this potential for both positive and negative interferences in the measurement, these are unavoidable

  16. Effect of the quantity and duration of application of simulated acid precipitation on nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in a forest soil

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, T.M.; Alexander, M.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted of the influence of the rate of application of simulated acid rain on N mineralization and nitrification in a forest soil. The rates were varied by applying different quantities of simulated rain for varying periods of time. The soil was exposed in the laboratory to simulated rain at pH 3.5, 4.1,, or 5.6 at rates equivalent to 1.5, 2.3, 4.6, 7.1 or 15 times the average rate of precipitation in the field and then mineralization of soil N or oxidation of added ammonium was determined. The rates of N mineralization were inhibited by precipitation at pH 3.5 or 4.1 when applied for 27-234 days at rates 1.5 times greater than that which occurs in nature. N mineralization was not affected by simulated rain at pH 3.5 or 4.1 in soils exposed for 156 days at 2.3 times the natural rate of precipitation, for 27 or 81 days at 4.6 times the natural rate, for 54 days at 7.1 times the natural rate, or for 234 day at 15 times the natural rate. (Copyright (c) 1986 by D. Reidel Publishing Company).

  17. Fast derivatization of fatty acids in different meat samples for gas chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ingrid Lima; Claus, Thiago; Oliveira Santos Júnior, Oscar; Almeida, Vitor Cinque; Magon, Thiago; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergilio

    2016-07-22

    In order to analyze the composition of fatty acids employing gas chromatography as the separation method, a derivatization of lipids using esterification and transesterification reactions is needed. The methodologies currently available are time consuming and use large amounts of sample and reagents. Thus, this work proposes a new procedure to carry out the derivatization of fatty acids without the need for prior extraction of lipids. The use of small amounts of sample (100mg) allows the analysis to be performed in specific parts of animals, in most cases without having them slaughtered. Another benefit is the use of small amounts of reagents (only 2mL of NaOH/Methanol and H2SO4/Methanol). The use of an experimental design procedure (Design Expert software) allows the optimization of the alkaline and acid reaction times. The procedure was validated for five minutes in both steps. The method was validated for bovine fat, beef, chicken, pork, fish and shrimp meats. The results for the merit figures of accuracy (from 101.07% to 109.18%), precision (RSDintra-day (from 0.65 to 3.93%), RSDinter-day (from 1.57 to 5.22%)), linearity (R(2)=0.9864) and robustness confirmed that the new method is satisfactory within the linear range of 2-30% of lipids in the sample. Besides the benefits of minimizing the amount of samples and reagents, the procedure enables gas chromatography sample preparation in a very short time compared with traditional procedures. PMID:27320376

  18. ADVANCES IN BIOTREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND BIORECOVERY OF METALS: 1. METAL PRECIPITATION FOR RECOVERY AND RECYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) is a severe pollution problem attributed to past mining activities. AMD is an acidic, metal-bearing wastewater generated by the oxidation of metal sulfides to sulfates by Thiobacillus bacteria in both active and abandoned mining operations. The wastewater...

  19. Acid precipitation - (Part I). Hearings before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on Effects and Solutions to Combat Acid Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Part 1 of the record covers three days of hearings on effects of acid rain and possible solutions to combat it. The 24 witnesses include a panel of business representatives from the Adirondacks area of New York, spokesmen from four other states affected by acid rain, and representatives of the Northeast States, all of whom described the threat to animal life in the lakes and streams, to lumber, and to human life because of acidification.

  20. In vivo and in vitro microdialysis sampling of free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Signe Mølhøj; Hansen, Harald S; Johansen, Thue; Malmlöf, Kjell

    2007-04-11

    Microdialysis is a technique that allows continuous sampling of compounds from the interstitial fluid of different tissues with minimal influence on surrounding tissues and/or whole body function. In the present study, the feasibility of using microdialysis as a technique to sample free fatty acids (FFA) was investigated both in vitro and in vivo, by use of a high molecular weight (MW) cut-off membrane (3 MDa) and a push-pull system to avoid loss of perfusion fluid through the dialysis membrane. The relative recovery was examined in vitro for three different concentrations of radiolabelled oleic acid-BSA solutions (oleic acid:BSA molar ratio 1:1) and for various temperatures and flow rates. The recovery of oleic acid was found to be dependent on the concentration of analyte in the medium surrounding the membrane (17.3%, 29.0% and 30.6% for 50, 100 and 200 microM oleic acid-BSA solutions, respectively). Addition of 0.25% BSA to the perfusion fluid resulted, however, in a concentration-independent recovery of 31.4%, 28.1% and 28.1% for the 50, 100 and 200 microM solutions, respectively. The capability of the method to measure FFA together with glycerol was investigated in vivo in visceral adipose tissue of rats, before and after lipolytic treatment with the beta3-adrenergic agent, BRL37344. BRL37344 caused an increase in both dialysate FFA and glycerol, although the increase was markedly higher for glycerol, amounting to 24.5% and 329.2% increase from baseline, respectively. Subsequent in vitro test of probe performance revealed a decrease in the dialysing properties with regard to FFA, but not glycerol. This suggests that clogging of the membrane pores after 110 min prevented the measurement of the full FFA response in vivo. PMID:17240099

  1. Osteoinduction on acid and heat treated porous Ti metal samples in canine muscle.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Toshiyuki; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Pattanayak, Deepak K; Doi, Kenji; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Nakamura, Takashi; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Samples of porous Ti metal were subjected to different acid and heat treatments. Ectopic bone formation on specimens embedded in dog muscle was compared with the surface characteristics of the specimen. Treatment of the specimens by H2SO4/HCl and heating at 600 °C produced micrometer-scale roughness with surface layers composed of rutile phase of titanium dioxide. The acid- and heat-treated specimens induced ectopic bone formation within 6 months of implantation. A specimen treated using NaOH followed by HCl acid and then heat treatment produced nanometer-scale surface roughness with a surface layer composed of both rutile and anatase phases of titanium dioxide. These specimens also induced bone formation after 6 months of implantation. Both these specimens featured positive surface charge and good apatite-forming abilities in a simulated body fluid. The amount of the bone induced in the porous structure increased with apatite-forming ability and higher positive surface charge. Untreated porous Ti metal samples showed no bone formation even after 12 months. Specimens that were only heat treated featured a smooth surface composed of rutile. A mixed acid treatment produced specimens with micrometer-scale rough surfaces composed of titanium hydride. Both of them also showed no bone formation after 12 months. The specimens that showed no bone formation also featured almost zero surface charge and no apatite-forming ability. These results indicate that osteoinduction of these porous Ti metal samples is directly related to positive surface charge that facilitates formation of apatite on the metal surfaces in vitro. PMID:24520375

  2. Stable Isotope Analyses of Phosphate Oxygen From Micro-samples of Biological Apatite: A new Routine Procedure for Silverphosphate Micro-precipitation and the Removal of Organic Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann-Bidlack, F. B.; Colman, A. S.; Fogel, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses in bone and teeth of living and fossil animals are widely used for testing hypotheses about variability of diet and habitat. For the analysis of environmental or dietary changes in the past, tooth enamel has become the preferred study material, because its mineral content is higher than bone and dentine, and the relatively large size of the carbonato-apatite crystals of enamel make it more stable against post mortem diagenetic alteration than dentine or bone. Intra-tooth sampling of dental enamel is increasingly used for the investigation of seasonal climate variability, taking advantage of both the high correlation between an animal's drinking water and the δ 18O in its mineralized tissues and the incremental growth pattern of tooth enamel. The different oxygen-containing ions of bioapatite (phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl group) incorporate into the mineral lattice at different rates during enamel mineralization, and differ in their susceptibility against post mortem diagenetic alteration. In addition, it is difficult to account for the different reaction chemistries of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl group using isotope analysis techniques that include all oxygen contained in the enamel (e.g., laser ablation). These problems can be addressed analyzing phosphate oxygen only. However, two major factors limit the potential of δ 18O analyses in dental enamel: A) the starting sample size for isotope analyzes often precludes the use of small teeth or the intra-tooth sampling of a given tooth; B) Small amounts of biogenic organic material in tooth enamel (less than 1% by wt) can reduce the precision and lead to anomalous analytical results in δ 18O measurements on Ag3PO4 produced from tooth enamel. A new procedure was developed for the pre-treatment and δ 18O analysis of phosphate from small samples (500 μ g) of tooth enamel containing organic matter. Ag3PO{4} was precipitated quantitatively for analysis of δ 18Ophosphate using a

  3. Precipitation of Zn(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) at bench-scale using biogenic hydrogen sulfide from the utilization of volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maria Teresa; Crespo, Carla; Mattiasson, Bo

    2007-01-01

    Biological production of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has important potential within environmental biotechnology. The aim of this work was to study the possibility of using SRB for the treatment of an acid mine drainage (AMD) at bench-scale. This process involved three stages: the optimization of H(2)S production through the utilization of total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs) by SRB, the establishment of a biofilm reactor for sulfide production, and the precipitation of metals by using the biologically produced H(2)S. The substrates used for TVFAs production consisted of papaya, apple and banana. The H(2)S produced from the degradation of TVFAs was utilized for the precipitation of a metal-contaminated effluent collected from Bolivar mine (Oruro, Bolivia). The maximum concentration of H(2)S obtained was approximately 16mM. Removal efficiencies of ca. 100% for copper, above 94% for zinc, and above 92% for lead were achieved. PMID:16979215

  4. Fluorometric quantification of polyphosphate in environmental plankton samples: extraction protocols, matrix effects, and nucleic acid interference.

    PubMed

    Martin, Patrick; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2013-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a ubiquitous biochemical with many cellular functions and comprises an important environmental phosphorus pool. However, methodological challenges have hampered routine quantification of polyP in environmental samples. We tested 15 protocols to extract inorganic polyphosphate from natural marine samples and cultured cyanobacteria for fluorometric quantification with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) without prior purification. A combination of brief boiling and digestion with proteinase K was superior to all other protocols, including other enzymatic digestions and neutral or alkaline leaches. However, three successive extractions were required to extract all polyP. Standard addition revealed matrix effects that differed between sample types, causing polyP to be over- or underestimated by up to 50% in the samples tested here. Although previous studies judged that the presence of DNA would not complicate fluorometric quantification of polyP with DAPI, we show that RNA can cause significant interference at the wavelengths used to measure polyP. Importantly, treating samples with DNase and RNase before proteinase K digestion reduced fluorescence by up to 57%. We measured particulate polyP along a North Pacific coastal-to-open ocean transect and show that particulate polyP concentrations increased toward the open ocean. While our final method is optimized for marine particulate matter, different environmental sample types may need to be assessed for matrix effects, extraction efficiency, and nucleic acid interference. PMID:23104409

  5. Acid precipitation: Effects on fresh water ecosystems. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the effects of acidification on fresh water ecosystems. Algae and diatom distribution, survival and reproduction rates of specific fish species under acid lake conditions, and tolerance to stress caused by acidic conditions in fresh water ecosystems are studied. Effects of water pH on trace metal toxicity to fresh water organisms are briefly considered. Control and reduction of acidification are excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Development and validation of an ion-pair chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of trans- and cis-urocanic acid in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Zare, Davood; Muhammad, Kharidah; Bejo, Mohd Hair Bin; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2012-09-21

    Urocanic acid (UCA) has been reported to be a mast cell degranulator and has also been suggested as a complementary agent in implicated scombroid fish poisoning. In this research, a new method is described to extract, clean up and perform simultaneous ion-pair chromatographic analysis of trans- and cis-urocanic acid (UCA) in fish samples. UCA was extracted using 0.05 M HCl and protein was removed from the extract by precipitation with 10% trisodium citrate and 10% citric acid. The HPLC method that is developed showed a rapid, precise and sensitive method with short retention time for simultaneous separation of UCA isomers in fish samples. Estimation of trans- and cis-UCA in the muscle of Indian mackerel, tuna and sardine showed that, as expected, no cis-UCA existed in fish muscles and the highest concentration of trans-UCA was found in Indian mackerel with 118.8 mg kg(-1) while the highest concentrations of trans-UCA in tuna and sardine were 12.1 and 17.5 mg kg(-1), respectively. PMID:22885043

  7. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - PCR, Multiplex Assays and Sample Preparation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R.P.; Langlois, R.G.; Nasarabadi, S.; Benett, W.J.; Richards, J.B.; Hadley, D.R.; Miles, R.R.; Brown, S.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Milanovich, F.P.

    2001-04-20

    The objective of this project was to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction). This entailed not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This project had two principal deliverables: (1) design, construct, test and deliver a 24 chamber, multiplex capable suitcase sized PCR instrument, and (2) develop and reduce to practice a multiplex assay for the detection of PCR product by flow cytometry. In addition, significant resources were allocated to test and evaluation of the Hand-held Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). This project helps provide the signature and intelligence gathering community the ability to perform, on-site or remote, rapid analysis of environmental or like samples for the presence of a suite of biological warfare pathogens.

  8. Uptake of gamma-valerolactone--detection of gamma-hydroxyvaleric acid in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Andresen-Streichert, H; Jungen, H; Gehl, A; Müller, A; Iwersen-Bergmann, S

    2013-05-01

    Gamma-valerolactone (GVL) is reported to be a substance that can be used as a legal substitute for gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), which is currently a controlled substance in several countries. Unlike gamma-butyrolactone and 1,4-butanediol, GVL is not metabolized to GHB, which causes the effects after uptake of these two chemicals. In the case of GVL, the lactone ring is split to gamma-hydroxyvaleric acid (GHV or 4-methyl-GHB) by a lactonase. Because of its affinity for the GHB receptor, GHV reveals similar effects to GHB, although it is less potent. Intoxications with GVL, or its use as a date rape drug, are conceivable. Despite these facts, there are no publications in the literature regarding detections of GHV in human samples. This study reports three cases, including five urine samples, in which GHV could be detected in concentrations between 3 and 5.8 mg/L. In one of these cases, a drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) was assumed; four of these samples were from two people suspected of abusing GHB. The results indicate that GVL is used as an alternative to GHB and its precursors and should be taken seriously. GVL or GHV should be included in toxicological analysis, particularly in DFSA cases. More information is needed regarding the pharmacokinetics of GVL/GHV for the meaningful interpretation of positive or negative results. PMID:23486087

  9. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  10. Determination of uranium isotopes in environmental samples by anion exchange in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media.

    PubMed

    Popov, L

    2016-09-01

    Method for determination of uranium isotopes in various environmental samples is presented. The major advantages of the method are the low cost of the analysis, high radiochemical yields and good decontamination factors from the matrix elements, natural and man-made radionuclides. The separation and purification of uranium is attained by adsorption with strong base anion exchange resin in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media. Uranium is electrodeposited on a stainless steel disk and measured by alpha spectrometry. The analytical method has been applied for the determination of concentrations of uranium isotopes in mineral, spring and tap waters from Bulgaria. The analytical quality was checked by analyzing reference materials. PMID:27451111

  11. BEDAM Binding Free Energy Predictions for the SAMPL4 Octa-Acid Host Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Chen, Haoyuan; Chen, He; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gao, Yang; He, Peng; Kalyanikar, Malathi; Kao, Chuan; Lu, Beidi; Niu, Yijie; Pethe, Manasi; Zhu, Jie; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) protocol has been employed as part of the SAMPL4 blind challenge to predict the binding free energies of a set of octa-acid host-guest complexes. The resulting predictions were consistently judged as some of the most accurate predictions in this category of the SAMPL4 challenge in terms of quantitative accuracy and statistical correlation relative to the experimental values, which were not known at the time the predictions were made. The work has been conducted as part of a hands-on graduate class laboratory session. Collectively the students, aided by automated setup and analysis tools, performed the bulk of the calculations and the numerical and structural analysis. The success of the experiment confirms the reliability of the BEDAM methodology and it shows that physics-based atomistic binding free energy estimation models, when properly streamlined and automated, can be successfully employed by non-specialists. PMID:25726024

  12. Effect of hydrolysis conditions on hydrous TiO2 polymorphs precipitated from a titanyl sulfate and sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hao; Liang, Bin; Lü, Li; Wu, Pan; Li, Chun

    2012-07-01

    The relationship between hydrolysis conditions and hydrous titania polymorphs obtained in a titanyl sulfate and sulfuric acid solution was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results revealed that the feeding rate of the titanyl sulfate stock solution, the concentration of sulfuric acid, and the seed dosage of rutile crystal could significantly affect the hydrolysis rate, thus influencing the titania crystal phase. Hydrous TiO2 in the form of rutile, anatase, or the mixture of both could be obtained in solutions of low titanium concentrations and 2.5wt% to 15wt% sulfuric acid at 100°C. When the hydrolysis rate of titanium expressed by TiO2 was more than or equal to 0.04 g/(L·min), the hydrolysate was almost phase-pure anatase, while the main phase state was rutile when the hydrolysis rate was less than or equal to 0.01 g/(L·min). With the hydrolysis rate between 0.02 and 0.03 g/(L·min), the hydrolysate contained almost equal magnitude of rutile and anatase. It seems that although rutile phase is thermodynamically stable in very acidic solutions, anatase is a kinetically stable phase.

  13. Extent of sample loss on the sampling device and the resulting experimental biases when collecting volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in air using sorbent tubes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2013-08-20

    Not all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suitable for sampling from air onto sorbent tubes (ST) with subsequent analysis by thermal desorption (TD) with gas chromatography (GC). Some compounds (such as C2 hydrocarbons) are too volatile for quantitative retention by sorbents at ambient temperature, while others are too reactive - either for storage stability on the tubes (post-sampling) or for thermal desorption/GC analysis. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are one of the compound groups that present a challenge to sorbent tube sampling. In this study, we evaluated sample losses on the inner wall surface of the sorbent tube sampler. The sorptive losses of five VFA (acetic, propionic, n-butyric, i-valeric, and n-valeric acid) were tested using two types of tubes (stainless steel and quartz), each packed with three sorbent beds arranged in order of sorbent strength from the sampling end of the tube (Tenax TA, Carbopack B, and Carbopack X). It showed significantly higher losses of VFAs in both liquid phase and vapor phase when using stainless steel tube samplers. These losses were also seen if vapor-phase fatty acids were passed through empty stainless steel tubing and increased dramatically with increasing molecular weight, e.g., losses of 33.6% (acetic acid) to 97.5% (n-valeric acid). Similar losses of VFAs were also observed from headspace sampling of cheese products. Considering that stainless steel sampling tubes are still used extensively by many researchers, their replacement with quartz tubes is recommended to reduce systematic biases in collecting VFA samples or in their calibration. PMID:23869450

  14. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction.

    PubMed

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz

    2006-11-01

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 mug g(-1) and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. PMID:16896613

  15. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  16. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  17. Acid precipitation and food quality: Inhibition of growth and survival in black ducks and mallards by dietary aluminum, calcium and phosphorus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    In areas impacted by acid precipitation, water chemistry of acidic ponds and streams often changes, resulting in increased mobilization of aluminum and decreased concentration of calcium carbonate. Aluminum binds with phosphorus and inhibits its uptake by organisms. Thus, invertebrate food organisms used by waterfowl may have inadequate Ca and P or elevated Al for normal growth and development. Acid rain and its effects may be one of the factors negatively impacting American black ducks (Anas rubripes) in eastern North America. One-day old mallards (A. platyrhynchos) and black ducks were placed on one of three Ca:P regimens: low:low (LL), normal:normal (NN), and low:high (LH) with each regimen divided further into three or four Al levels for 10 weeks. Forty-five % of the black ducks died on nine different diets whereas only 28% of the mallards died on three different diets. Mortality was significantly related to diet in both species. Growth rates for body weight, culmens, wings, and tarsi of both species on control diets exceeded those on many treatment diets but the differences were less apparent for mallards than for black ducks. Differences among treatments were due to both Ca:P and Al levels.

  18. A high-performance direct transmethylation method for total fatty acids assessment in biological and foodstuff samples.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gómez, Pilar; Fontecha, Javier; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis M

    2014-10-01

    Isolation is the main bottleneck in the analysis of fatty acids in biological samples and foods. In the last few decades some methods described direct derivatization procedures bypassing these steps. They involve the utilization of methanolic HCL or BF3 as catalysts, but several evidences from previous works suggest these reagents are unstable, lead to the formation of artifacts and alter the distribution of specific compounds as hydroxy fatty acids or CLA. However, the main issue is that they are excellent esterification reagents but poor in transterification, being not suitable for the analysis of all lipid classes and leading to erroneous composition quantitations. The present research work is a comprehensive comparison of six general methylation protocols using base, acid or base/acid catalysts plus a proposed method in the analysis of total fatty acids in lipid standards mixtures, foodstuff and biological samples. The addition of aprotic solvents to the reaction mixture to avoid alterations was also tested. Results confirmed that procedures solely involving acid catalyst resulted in incomplete derivatizations and alteration of the fatty acid profile, partially corrected by addition of the aprotic solvent. The proposed method combining sodium methoxyde and sulfuric acid showed absence of alteration of the FAME profile and the best values for response factors (short chain fatty acids to PUFA), accuracy in the determination of total cholesterol and derivatization performance, thus showing a high reliability in the determination of the total fatty acid composition in biological samples and foods. PMID:25059195

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID BY ICP-MS AND IC-ESI-MS/MS IN RICE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, sulfur analogs of well known arsenicals have been identified in biological and dietary matrices. In this presentation, the detection and identification of dimethylthioarsinic acid (DMTA) will be reported in rice samples after an enzymatic extraction. The enzymatic ext...

  20. Multicommutated stepwise injection determination of ascorbic acid in medicinal plants and food samples by capillary zone electrophoresis ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Falkova, Marina T; Bulatov, Andrey V; Pushina, Maria O; Ekimov, Aleksey A; Alekseeva, Galina M; Moskvin, Leonid N

    2015-02-01

    An automation of the extraction of analytes from solid samples into the aqueous phase based on multicommutated stepwise injection analysis concept has been suggested. The feasibility of the approach has been demonstrated by determination of ascorbic acid as model analyte. The method includes automated extraction of ascorbic acid from solid sample into borate buffer solution pH 8 in mixing chamber during vigorous mixing by nitrogen stream, and subsequent detection by capillary zone electrophoresis at 254 nm. The method has a linear range of 0.1-5.0 mg g(-1) for ascorbic acid with the LOD of 0.03 mg g(-1). The sample throughput was 7 h(-1). This method was applied for determination of ascorbic acid in various medicinal plants and food samples. PMID:25435231

  1. Evaluation of sampling methods for measuring exposure to volatile inorganic acids in workplace air. Part 2: Sampling capacity and breakthrough tests for sodium carbonate-impregnated filters.

    PubMed

    Demange, Martine; Oury, Véronique; Rousset, Davy

    2011-11-01

    In France, the MétroPol 009 method used to measure workplace exposure to inorganic acids, such as HF, HCl, and HNO3, consists of a closed-face cassette fitted with a prefilter to collect particles, and two sodium carbonate-impregnated filters to collect acid vapor. This method was compared with other European methods during the development of a three-part standard (ISO 21438) on the determination of inorganic acids in workplace air by ion chromatography. Results of this work, presented in a companion paper, led to a need to go deeper into the performance of the MétroPol 009 method regarding evaluation of the breakthrough of the acids, both alone and in mixtures, interference from particulate salts, the amount of sodium carbonate required to impregnate the sampling filter, the influence of sampler components, and so on. Results enabled improvements to be made to the sampling device with respect to the required amount of sodium carbonate to sample high HCl or HNO3 concentrations (500 μL of 5% Na2CO3 on each of two impregnated filters). In addition, a PVC-A filter used as a prefilter in a sampling device showed a propensity to retain HNO3 vapor so a PTFE filter was considered more suitable for use as a prefilter. Neither the material of the sampling cassette (polystyrene or polypropylene) nor the sampling flowrate (1 L/min or 2 L/min) influenced the performance of the sampling device, as a recovery of about 100% was achieved in all experiments for HNO3, HCl, and HF, as well as HNO3+HF and HNO3+HCl mixtures, over a wide range of concentrations. However, this work points to the possibility of interference between an acid and salts of other acids. For instance, interference can occur through interaction of HNO3 with chloride salts: the stronger the acid, the greater the interference. Methods based on impregnated filters are reliable for quantitative recovery of inorganic volatile acids in workplace atmosphere but are valuable only in the absence of interferents. PMID

  2. Should South Africa Be Performing Nucleic Acid Testing on HIV Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay-Negative Samples?▿

    PubMed Central

    Gous, Natasha; Scott, Lesley; Perovic, Olga; Venter, Francios; Stevens, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The frequency of acute HIV infection (AHI) among HIV-1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-negative samples received from general hospital patient admissions was assessed. Of 3,005 samples pooled for nucleic acid testing, a prevalence of 0.13% was found. Pooled nucleic acid testing may be feasible for low-cost identification of AHI in high-prevalence settings. PMID:20610671

  3. Chemical alteration of limestone and marble samples exposed to acid rain and weathering in the eastern United States, 1984--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-06-01

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering of four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). A primary contribution of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been chemical analysis to determine changes in the samples caused by exposure to the environment. Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. On groundward-facing samples, sulfate concentrations increased linearly with exposure time, and values were proportional to atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at the site. Sulfate concentrations in groundward samples were much higher in limestone than in marble, because of the greater porosity of the limestone. A steep sulfate gradient was seen in both sample types from the surface to the interior. On skyward surfaces, material losses per rain event due to complete dissolution of accumulated sulfates were approximately equal to concentrations measured in runoff. Preexposed limestone samples had sulfate accumulations deep in their interiors, while fresh, unexposed limestone did not. No substantial changes in cation accumulations wee detected in either limestone or marble.

  4. Trace elements in atmospheric precipitation at Northern Jordan measured by ICP-MS: acidity and possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momani, I. F.

    Rainwater samples were collected in a rural region in Northern Jordan using 24-h sampling periods from December 1998 to April 2000. All samples were analyzed for major ions (Na +, K +, Ca 2+, H +, Mg 2+, NH 4+, Cl -, NO 3- and SO 42-) and trace metals (Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, Al, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sb and V). The majority of the rain samples collected had pH values higher than 5.6. The average pH was 6.4±0.9. High values of pH were attributed to the neutralization by natural alkaline local dusts which contain large fractions of calcite. The annual average SO 42--to-NO 3- ratio is 1.8, which is close to that observed in more polluted regions. Concentrations of measured species were lower than those reported for other rural sites worldwide. Elements of anthropogenic origins (Zn, Pb, As, Sb, Ag and Cd) were highly enriched with respect to crustal composition. Factor analysis permitted the identification of four source groups, namely crustal dust, sea-salt spray, road traffic and combustion and secondary aerosol formation processes.

  5. Sample introduction interface for on-chip nucleic acid-based analysis of Helicobacter pylori from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Mosley, O; Melling, L; Tarn, M D; Kemp, C; Esfahani, M M N; Pamme, N; Shaw, K J

    2016-05-24

    Despite recent advances in microfluidic-based integrated diagnostic systems, the sample introduction interface, especially with regards to large volume samples, has often been neglected. We present a sample introduction interface that allows direct on-chip processing of crude stool samples for the detection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The principle of IFAST (immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension) was adapted to include a large volume sample chamber with a septum-based interface for stool sample introduction. Solid chaotropic salt and dry superparamagnetic particles (PMPs) could be stored on-chip and reconstituted upon sample addition, simplifying the process of release of DNA from H. pylori cells and its binding to the PMPs. Finally, the PMPs were pulled via a magnet through a washing chamber containing an immiscible oil solution and into an elution chamber where the DNA was released into aqueous media for subsequent analysis. The entire process required only 7 min while enabling a 40-fold reduction in working volume from crude biological samples. The combination of a real-world interface and rapid DNA extraction offers the potential for the methodology to be used in point-of-care (POC) devices. PMID:27164181

  6. Growth of boric acid crystallites on the surface of boron-doped silicon carbide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Vassen, R.; Stoever, D.

    1996-06-01

    White crystallites were visually observed on fractured or polished surfaces of SiC samples (grain sizes below {approx}500 nm) during exposure to air at room temperature for several days. Characterization of the crystallites by scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction identified B(OH){sub 3} crystals with a strong (002) texture. The rate of boric acid formation was determined by a gravimetric experiment. The rate of weight gain increased significantly after an incubation period of 1 week. Nucleation is initially the rate-limiting process. Subsequently small B(OH){sub 3} crystals form on the surface, whose growth rate is determined by grain boundary diffusion of boron to the SiC surface. An estimated grain boundary boron to the SiC surface. An estimated grain boundary diffusion coefficient of boron in SiC was many orders of magnitude higher than extrapolated literature values.

  7. Minimization of sample requirement for delta18O in benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, William M; Jahren, A Hope

    2010-09-15

    The measurement of the oxygen stable isotope content in organic compounds has applications in many fields, ranging from paleoclimate reconstruction to forensics. Conventional High-Temperature Conversion (HTC) techniques require >20 microg of O for a single delta(18)O measurement. Here we describe a system that converts the CO produced by HTC into CO(2) via reduction within a Ni-furnace. This CO(2) is then concentrated cryogenically, and 'focused' into the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) source using a low-flow He carrier gas (6-8 mL/min). We report analyses of benzoic acid (C(7)H(6)O(2)) reference materials that yielded precise delta(18)O measurement down to 1.3 microg of O, suggesting that our system could be used to decrease sample requirement for delta(18)O by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:20740528

  8. Mechanism of alkane dehydrogenation catalyzed by acidic zeolites: Ab initio transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bučko, Tomáš; Benco, Lubomir; Dubay, Orest; Dellago, Christoph; Hafner, Jürgen

    2009-12-01

    The dehydrogenation of propane over acidic chabazite has been studied using ab initio density-functional simulations in combination with static transition-state searches and dynamic transition path sampling (TPS) methods at elevated temperatures. The acidic zeolite has been modeled both using a small cluster and a large periodic model consisting of two unit cells, the TPS simulations allow to account for the effect of temperature and entropy. In agreement with experimental observations we find propene as the dominant reaction product and that the barrier for the dehydrogenation of a methyl group is higher than that for a methylene group. However, whereas all studies based on small cluster models (including the present one) conclude that the reaction proceeds via the formation of an alkoxy intermediate, our TPS studies based on a large periodic model lead to the conclusion that propene formation occurs via the formation of various forms of propyl cations stabilized by entropy, while the formation of an alkoxy species is a relatively rare event. It was observed only in 15% of the reactive trajectories for methyl dehydrogenation and even in only 8% of the methylene dehydrogenation reactions. Our studies demonstrate the importance of entropic effects and the need to account for the structure and flexibility of the zeolitic framework by using large periodic models.

  9. Microchip Module for Blood Sample Preparation and Nucleic Acid Amplification Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Po Ki; Kricka, Larry J.; Fortina, Paolo; Panaro, Nicholas J.; Sakazume, Taku; Wilding, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A computer numerical control-machined plexiglas-based microchip module was designed and constructed for the integration of blood sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification reactions. The microchip module is comprised of a custom-made heater-cooler for thermal cycling, a series of 254 μm × 254 μm microchannels for transporting human whole blood and reagents in and out of an 8–9 μL dual-purpose (cell isolation and PCR) glass-silicon microchip. White blood cells were first isolated from a small volume of human whole blood (<3 μL) in an integrated cell isolation–PCR microchip containing a series of 3.5-μm feature-sized “weir-type” filters, formed by an etched silicon dam spanning the flow chamber. A genomic target, a region in the human coagulation Factor V gene (226-bp), was subsequently directly amplified by microchip-based PCR on DNA released from white blood cells isolated on the filter section of the microchip mounted onto the microchip module. The microchip module provides a convenient means to simplify nucleic acid analyses by integrating two key steps in genetic testing procedures, cell isolation and PCR and promises to be adaptable for additional types of integrated assays. PMID:11230164

  10. Verification of lewisite exposure: Quantification of chlorovinylarsonous acid in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, E.M.; Smith, J.R.; Logan, T.P.; Wiltshire, N.; Woodward, C.L.

    1993-05-13

    Lewisite (dichloro-2-chlorovinylarsine) is a chemical warfare vesicant which causes immediate pain and systemic arsenic poisoning. Under alkaline conditions, lewisite is rapidly converted to acetylene, chloride ion, and arsenic trioxide. These products can be monitored but are not necessarily specific for lewisite. In our opinion, a better marker of exposure can be found in lewisits acidic hydrolysis products which are chlorovinyl arsonous acid (CVAA) and HC1. CVAA preserves most of lewisite's structure and retains vesicant properties. There are major analytical problems with direct CVAA analysis because of its limited volatility and aqueous solubility. However, CVAA can be made volatile by derivatizing with 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT). The derivative, 2-(2-chlorovinyl)-1,3,2-dithiarsenoline, is rapidly formed using a three-fold molar excess of EDT and is relatively stable. Results indicated that CVAA can be derivatized directly in spiked urine or serum. Urine and serum samples spiked with CVAA and extracted with toluene were analyzed by gas chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode using phenylarsine oxide as the internal standard. Results indicated a linear relationship between the peak area ratio and concentration from 4000 to 20 ng/mL.

  11. Acid precipitation studies in Colorado and Wyoming: interim report of surveys of montane amphibians and water chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, Paul Stephen; Stolzenburg, William; Bury, R. Bruce

    1989-01-01

    Acid deposition may be detrimental or stressful to native populations of wildlife. Because many species of amphibians breed in shallow ponds created by spring rains or melting snow, they may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of acidification. From 1986 to 1988, we surveyed 105 locations in the central Rocky Mountains where amphibians had been recorded previously, and we found that two species of amphibians had experiences major losses. We found the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) at only 4 of 33 (12%) historically known localities, and the boreal toad (Bufo boreas) was present at 10 of 59 (17%) known localities. Three other species have not suffered region-wide declines. Tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum) and wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) were present at 45% and 69% of known localities respectively, and were observed at several localities were they had not been recorded previously. Chorus frogs (Pseudacris triseriata) suffered a catastrophic decline in population size in one population monitored since 1961, but regionally, this species was observed in 36 of 56 (64%) known localities and in another 19 localities where there were no previous records. Complete water chemistry was recorded for 41 localities, and pH was measured at 110 sites in total. Acid neutralizing capacity, pH, specific conductivity, and cation concentrations were negatively correlated with elevation. However, in mountain ponds and lakes, pH was rarely less than 6.0 during the amphibian breeding season. We tested the tolerance of embryos of the four species of frogs to low pH. The LC50 pH was 4.8 for chorus frogs, 4.4-4.7 for leopard frogs, 4.4-4.5 for boreal toads, and 4.2-4.3 for wood frogs. Survival of wood frog embryos declined when exposed to aluminum concentrations of 100 µg/L or greater, but boreal toad embryos survived exposure to aluminum concentrations of 400 µg/L. Acid deposition does not appear to be a major factor in the decline of leopard frogs and boreal toads

  12. Simple and Rapid Determination of Ferulic Acid Levels in Food and Cosmetic Samples Using Paper-Based Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Tee-ngam, Prinjaporn; Nunant, Namthip; Rattanarat, Poomrat; Siangproh, Weena; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2013-01-01

    Ferulic acid is an important phenolic antioxidant found in or added to diet supplements, beverages, and cosmetic creams. Two designs of paper-based platforms for the fast, simple and inexpensive evaluation of ferulic acid contents in food and pharmaceutical cosmetics were evaluated. The first, a paper-based electrochemical device, was developed for ferulic acid detection in uncomplicated matrix samples and was created by the photolithographic method. The second, a paper-based colorimetric device was preceded by thin layer chromatography (TLC) for the separation and detection of ferulic acid in complex samples using a silica plate stationary phase and an 85:15:1 (v/v/v) chloroform: methanol: formic acid mobile phase. After separation, ferulic acid containing section of the TLC plate was attached onto the patterned paper containing the colorimetric reagent and eluted with ethanol. The resulting color change was photographed and quantitatively converted to intensity. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection of ferulic acid was found to be 1 ppm and 7 ppm (S/N = 3) for first and second designs, respectively, with good agreement with the standard HPLC-UV detection method. Therefore, these methods can be used for the simple, rapid, inexpensive and sensitive quantification of ferulic acid in a variety of samples. PMID:24077320

  13. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  14. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  15. Denuder/filter sampling of organic acids and organosulfates at urban and boreal forest sites: Gas/particle distribution and possible sampling artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Bilde, Merete; Aalto, Pasi P.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Glasius, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    Carboxylic acids and organosulfates comprise an important fraction of atmospheric secondary organic aerosols formed from both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors. The partitioning of these compounds between the gas and particle phase is still unclear and further research is warranted to better understand the abundance and effect of organic acids and organosulfates on the formation and properties of atmospheric aerosols. This work compares atmospheric aerosols collected at an urban and a boreal forest site using two side-by-side sampling systems; a high volume sampler (HVS) and a low volume (LVS) denuder/filter sampling system allowing for separate collection of gas- and particle-phase organics. All particle filters and denuder samples were collected at H.C. Andersen Boulevard (HCAB), Copenhagen, Denmark in the summer of 2010, and at the remote boreal forest site at Hyytiälä forestry field station in Finland in the summer of 2012. The chemical composition of gas- and particle-phase secondary organic aerosol was investigated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS), with a focus on carboxylic acids and organosulfates. Results show gas-phase concentrations higher than those observed in the particle phase by a factor of 5-6 in HCAB 2010 and 50-80 in Hyytiälä 2012. Although abundant in the particle phase, no organosulfates were detected in the gas phase at either site. Through a comparison of samples collected by the HVS and the LVS denuder/filter sampling system we evaluate the potential artifacts associated with sampling of atmospheric aerosols. Such comparison shows that particle phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic acids obtained from the filters collected by HVS are more than two times higher than concentrations obtained from filters collected using LVS denuder/filter system. In most cases, higher concentrations of organosulfates are observed in particles

  16. Large-volume sample stacking for analysis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Lifeng; Marimuthu, Arun; Yang, Zhaoguang

    2002-09-01

    A simple, quick, and sensitive capillary electrophoretic technique-large volume stacking using the electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump (LVSEP) - has been developed for determining ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in drinking water for the first time. It is based on a precapillary complexation of EDTA with Fe(III) ions, followed by large-volume sample stacking and direct UV detection at 258 nm. The curve of peak response versus concentration was linear from 5.0 to 600.0 microg/L, and 0.7 to 30.0 mg/L. The regression coefficients were 0.9988 and 0.9990, respectively. The detection limit of the current technique for EDTA analysis was 0.2 microg/L with an additional 10-fold preconcentration procedure, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3. As opposed to the classical capillary zone electrophoresis (CE) method, the detection limit was improved about 1000-fold by using this LVSEP method. To the best of our knowledge, it represents the highest sensitivity for EDTA analysis via CE. Several drinking water samples were tested by this novel method with satisfactory results. PMID:12207295

  17. The search for an identification of amino acids, nucleobases and nucleosides in samples returned from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, Charles W.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril; Kuo, Kenneth C.; Stalling, David L.; Zumwalt, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The Mars Sample Return mission will provide us with a unique source of material from our solar system; material which could advance our knowledge of the processes of chemical evolution. As has been pointed out, Mars geological investigations based on the Viking datasets have shown that primordial Mars was in many biologically important ways similar to the primordial Earth; the presence of surface liquid water, moderate surface temperatures, and atmosphere of carbon dioxide and nitrogen, and high geothermal heat flow. Indeed, it would seem that conditions on Earth and Mars were fundamentally similar during the first one billion years or so. As has been pointed out, Mars may well contain the best preserved record of the events that transpired on the early planets. Examination of that early record will involve searching for many things, from microfossils to isotopic abundance data. We propose an investigation of the returned Mars samples for biologically important organic compounds, with emphases on amino acids, the purine and pyrimidine bases, and nucleosides.

  18. Improvement of short tandem repeat analysis of samples highly contaminated by humic acid.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung Bum; Jin, Hong Xuan; Lee, Hye Young; Ge, Jianye; King, Jonathan L; Lyoo, Sung Hee; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Soong Deok

    2013-10-01

    We investigated several methods for obtaining successful short tandem repeat (STR) results from high-humic acid (HA)-content samples. DNA purification efficiency was tested for QIAquick(®) PCR Purification, QIAamp(®) DNA Investigator and Prepfiler™ Forensic DNA Extraction kits. HA-removal capacity of Inhibitor Remover and InhibitEX(®) Tablet was tested. Experiments on overcoming HA effects on STR amplification were conducted using an AmpliTaq Gold(®) DNA Polymerase and a TaKaRa Ex Taq™ Hot Start Version (Ex Taq HS) with BSA addition. QIAquick kit was most efficient in HA removal and Ex Taq HS showed high resistance to HA. Increasing the amounts of Taq polymerases and BSA addition were shown to be efficient in overcoming PCR inhibition, but BSA addition was superior to the former method. Inhibitor Remover and InhibitEX(®) Tablet did not positively affect the STR results. This study will help achieve better STR results with high-HA-content samples. PMID:24112347

  19. Efficient capillary electrophoresis separation and determination of free amino acids in beer samples.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Zhang, Junfu; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Han, Yingzi; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous detection of various o-phthalaldehyde (OPA)-labeled amino acids (AAs) in food samples was reported based on CE separation. Ionic liquid was used for the first time for CE analysis of AAs with in-capillary derivatization. Several other additives, including SDS, α/β-CD, and ACN, as well as key parameters for CE separation (buffer pH value, separation voltage), were also investigated. Our results show that the multiple additive strategy exhibits good stable and repeatable character for CE analysis of OPA-labeled AAs, for either in-capillary derivatization or CE separation, and allows simultaneous quantification of different OPA-labeled AAs in a large concentration range of 50 μM to 3.0 mM with LOD down to 10 μM. Seventeen OPA-labeled AAs, except for two pairs of AAs (His/Gln and Phe/Leu), which were separated with resolutions of 1.1 and 1.2, respectively, were baseline separated and identified within 23 min using the present multiple additive strategy. The method was successfully applied for simultaneous analysis of AAs in seven beer samples and as many as eleven trace-amount AAs were detected and quantified, indicating the valuable potential application of the present method for food analysis. PMID:24339046

  20. Effects of acidic deposition on the erosion of carbonate stone - experimental results from the U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Reimann, K.J.; Sciammarella, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the goals of NAPAP-sponsored research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone has been to quantify the incremental effects of wet and dry deposition of hydrogen ion, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides on stone erosion. Test briquettes and slabs of freshly quarried Indiana limestone and Vermont marble have been exposed to ambient environmental conditions in a long-term exposure program. Physical measurements of the recession of test stones exposed to ambient conditions at an angle of 30?? to horizontal at the five NAPAP materials exposure sites range from ~15 to ~30?? ??m yr-1 for marble, and from ~25 to ~45 ??m yr -1 for limestone, and are approximately double the recession estimates based on the observed calcium content of run-off solutions from test slabs. The difference between the physical and chemical recession measurements is attributed to the loss of mineral grains from the stone surfaces that are not measured in the run-off experiments. The erosion due to grain loss does not appear to be influenced by rainfall acidity, however, preliminary evidence suggests that grain loss may be influenced by dry deposition of sulfur dioxide between rainfall events. Chemical analyses of the run-off solutions and associated rainfall blanks suggest that ~30% of erosion by dissolution can be attributed to the wet deposition of hydrogen ion and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid between rain events. The remaining ~70% of erosion by dissolution is accounted for by the solubility of carbonate stone in rain that is in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide ('clean rain'). These results are for marble and limestone slabs exposed at an angle of 30?? from horizontal. The relative contribution of sulfur dioxide to chemical erosion is significantly enhanced for stone slabs having an inclination of 60?? or 85??. The dry deposition of alkaline particulate material has a mitigating effect at the two urban field exposure sites at Washington, DC

  1. Developmental and anatomical changes in leaves of yellow birch and red kidney bean exposed to simulated acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Paparozzi, E.T.; Tukey, H.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Leaves of Betula alleghaniensis Britt. (yellow birch) and Phaseolus vulgaris L cv. Red Kidney (bean) were examined microscopically during development and after exposure to simulated rain of pH 5.5, 4.3, 3.2, and 2.8. Yellow birch leaves attained maximal leaf area, midvein length, and cuticle thickness at 21 days. Trichomes were either long, unicellular, or multicellular with caplike head and stalk. Epicuticular wax was a bumpy and amorphous layer. The 2nd trifoliolate leaf of red kidney bean attained maximal leaf area, midvein length, and cuticle thickness when the 3rd trifoliolate leaf was expanding. Trichomes present were long, with a unicellular head and a multicellular base; long, unicellular, and terminally hooked; and small and multicellular. Epicuticular wax was present as small irregular flakes. After 2 days of pH 2.8 and 4 days of pH 3.2 simulated acid rain, round yellow and small tan lesions appeared on birch and bean leaves, respectively. Most injury occurred on or between small veins. Most trichome types were uninjured. Lesions formed as a result of collapsed epidermal and highly plasmolyzed palisade cells. The cuticle was still present over injured epidermal cells and epicuticular waxes were unchanged. There was not statistical difference in mean cuticle thickness due to pH of simulated rain. 25 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Precipitation chemistry in central Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Talbot, R. W.; Berresheim, H.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Rain samples from three sites in central Amazonia were collected over a period of 6 weeks during the 1987 wet season and analyzed for ionic species and dissolved organic carbon. A continuous record of precipitation chemistry and amount was obtained at two of these sites, which were free from local or regional pollution, for a time period of over 1 month. The volume-weighted mean concentrations of most species were found to be about a factor of 5 lower during the wet season compared with previous results from the dry season. Only sodium, potassium, and chloride showed similar concentrations in both seasons. When the seasonal difference in rainfall amount is taken into consideration, the deposition fluxes are only slightly lower for most species during the wet season than during the dry season, again with the exception of chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium and chloride are present in the same ratio as in sea salt; rapid advection of air masses of marine origin to the central Amazon Basin during the wet season may be responsible for the observed higher deposition flux of these species. Statistical analysis suggests that sulfate is, to a large extent, of marine (sea salt and biogenic) origin, but that long-range transport of combustion-derived aerosols also makes a significant contribution to sulfate and nitrate levels in Amazonian rain. Organic acid concentrations in rain were responsible for a large fraction of the observed precipitation acidity; their concentration was strongly influenced by gas/liquid interactions.

  3. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING AN IODATE PRECIPITATE

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1960-02-23

    A method is given for separating plutonium from lanthanum in a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation process for the recovery of plutonium values from an aqueous solution. The carrier precipitation process includes the steps of forming a lanthanum fluoride precipi- . tate, thereby carrying plutonium out of solution, metathesizing the fluoride precipitate to a hydroxide precipitate, and then dissolving the hydroxide precipitate in nitric acid. In accordance with the invention, the nitric acid solution, which contains plutonium and lanthanum, is made 0.05 to 0.15 molar in potassium iodate. thereby precipitating plutonium as plutonous iodate and the plutonous iodate is separated from the lanthanum- containing supernatant solution.

  4. Characterization of citrus pectin samples extracted under different conditions: influence of acid type and pH of extraction

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Merve; Sousa, António G.; Crépeau, Marie-Jeanne; Sørensen, Susanne O.; Ralet, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Pectin is a complex macromolecule, the fine structure of which is influenced by many factors. It is used as a gelling, thickening and emulsifying agent in a wide range of applications, from food to pharmaceutical products. Current industrial pectin extraction processes are based on fruit peel, a waste product from the juicing industry, in which thousands of tons of citrus are processed worldwide every year. This study examines how pectin components vary in relation to the plant source (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit) and considers the influence of extraction conditions on the chemical and macromolecular characteristics of pectin samples. Methods Citrus peel (orange, lemon, lime and grapefruit) from a commercial supplier was used as raw material. Pectin samples were obtained on a bulk plant scale (kilograms; harsh nitric acid, mild nitric acid and harsh oxalic acid extraction) and on a laboratory scale (grams; mild oxalic acid extraction). Pectin composition (acidic and neutral sugars) and physicochemical properties (molar mass and intrinsic viscosity) were determined. Key Results Oxalic acid extraction allowed the recovery of pectin samples of high molecular weight. Mild oxalic acid-extracted pectins were rich in long homogalacturonan stretches and contained rhamnogalacturonan I stretches with conserved side chains. Nitric acid-extracted pectins exhibited lower molecular weights and contained rhamnogalacturonan I stretches encompassing few and/or short side chains. Grapefruit pectin was found to have short side chains compared with orange, lime and lemon. Orange and grapefruit pectin samples were both particularly rich in rhamnogalacturonan I backbones. Conclusions Structural, and hence macromolecular, variations within the different citrus pectin samples were mainly related to their rhamnogalacturonan I contents and integrity, and, to a lesser extent, to the length of their homogalacturonan domains. PMID:25081519

  5. Determination of the mode of occurrence of As, Cr, and Hg in three Chinese coal samples by sequential acid leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Li, W.; Wang, G.; Chen, H.; Li, B.

    2007-07-01

    Sequential acid leaching was used to leach minerals and the trace elements they contain. One-step leaching uses concentrated nitric acid as solvent, while three-step leaching uses 5M hydrochloric acid, concentrated hydrofluoric acid, and concentrated hydrochloric acid as solvents. The sequential acid leaching by three-and one-step leach was also examined. The results showed that one-step leaching could leach over 80% of arsenic from coal samples, and also could leach mercury to a certain degree. During one-step leaching, little chromium is removed, but it is available to leach by three-step leaching; and during the sequential acid leaching by three and one-step leaching, almost 98% ash is leached. The result of acid leaching could also give detailed information on mode of occurrence of As, Cr, and Hg, which could be classified into: silicate association, pyrite association, organic association, and carbonates and sulfates association. Over half of chromium in the three coals is associated with organic matters and the rest is associated with silicates. The mode of occurrence of arsenic and mercury is mainly associated with different mineral matters depending on the coal samples studied.

  6. Linoleic and docosahexaenoic acids in human milk have opposite relationships with cognitive test performance in a sample of 28 countries.

    PubMed

    Lassek, W D; Gaulin, S J C

    2014-11-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids play critical roles in brain development and function, and their levels in human breast milk closely reflect the long-term diet. The fatty acid contents of human milk samples from 28 countries were used to predict averaged 2009 and 2012 test scores in mathematics, reading, and science from the Program for International Student Assessment. All test scores were positively related to milk docosahexaenoic acid (r=0.48 to 0.55), and negatively related to linoleic acid (r=-0.28 to -0.56). Together, these two human milk fatty acids explained 46% to 48% of the variance in scores, with no improvement in predictive power when socioeconomic variables were added to the regression. The (log) ratio of linoleic to arachidonic acid was negatively related to scores (r=-0.45 to -0.48). Statistical effects were similar for the two sexes. In a separate US sample, estimated dietary linoleic was negatively related to the levels of all long-chain n-3 and n-6 plasma fatty acids. High levels of dietary linoleic may impair cognition by decreasing both docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids in the brain. PMID:25172360

  7. A semi-quantitative approach for the rapid screening and mass profiling of naphthenic acids directly in contaminated aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Kyle D; Letourneau, Dane R; Vandergrift, Gregory W; Jobst, Karl; Reiner, Eric; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    We report the use of a direct sampling, online analytical approach for the determination of acid extractable naphthenic acids in complex aqueous samples, known as condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS). The technique employs a capillary hollow fibre semi-permeable membrane probe configured for immersion into a pH adjusted sample. A continuously flowing methanol acceptor phase transfers naphthenic acids to an electrospray ionization source, operated in negative ion mode, whereupon they are analysed by mass spectrometry as [M-H](-) ions. High-resolution mass spectrometry is used to characterize the influence of sample pH on membrane transport of multiple components of complex naphthenic acid mixtures. We demonstrate the use of CP-MIMS for semi-quantitative analysis of real-world samples using selected ion monitoring and full scan mass spectra at unit mass resolution. The technique has also been employed to continuously monitor the temporal evolution in the mass profile and concentrations of individual naphthenic acid isomer classes in heterogeneous solutions during adsorption processes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26757071

  8. Elevated formic acid concentrations in putrefied post-mortem blood and urine samples.

    PubMed

    Viinamäki, Jenni; Rasanen, Ilpo; Vuori, Erkki; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2011-05-20

    Formic acid (FA) concentration was measured in post-mortem blood and urine samples as methyl formate using a headspace in-tube extraction gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry method. A total of 113 cases were analyzed, each including a blood and urine sample fortified with 1% sodium fluoride. The cases were divided into three groups: regular (n=59), putrefied (n=30), and methanol-positive (n=22) cases. There was no evidence of ante-mortem methanol consumption in the regular and putrefied cases. In regular cases, the mean (and median) FA concentrations were 0.04 g/l (0.04 g/l) and 0.06 g/l (0.04 g/l) in blood and urine, respectively. In putrefied cases, the mean (and median) FA concentrations were substantially higher, 0.24 g/l (0.22 g/l) and 0.25 g/l (0.15 g/l) in blood and urine, respectively. In three putrefied cases, FA concentration in blood exceeded 0.5 g/l, a level associated with fatal methanol poisoning. Ten putrefied cases were reanalyzed after 3-4 months storage, and no significant changes in FA concentrations were seen. These observations suggest that FA was formed by putrefaction during the post-mortem period, not during sample storage when sodium fluoride was added as a preservative. In methanol-positive cases, the mean (and median) FA concentrations were 0.80 g/l (0.88 g/l) and 3.4 g/l (3.3 g/l) in blood and urine, respectively, and the concentrations ranged from 0.19 to 1.0 g/l in blood and from 1.7 to 5.6 g/l in urine. The mean (and median) methanol concentrations in methanol-positive cases were 3.0 g/l (3.0 g/l) and 4.4 g/l (4.7 g/l) in blood and in urine, respectively. The highest methanol concentrations were 6.0 g/l and 8.7 g/l in blood and urine, respectively. No ethyl alcohol was found in the methanol-positive blood samples. Poor correlation was shown between blood and urine concentrations of FA. Poor correlations were also shown, in both blood and urine, between methanol and FA concentrations. PMID:21112705

  9. Synthesis of 2-Mercaptonicotinic Acid-Capped CdSe Quantum Dots and its Application to Spectrofluorometric Determination of Cr(VI) in Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Saeid; Khorashahi, Somayeh; Hosseini, Navid

    2016-05-01

    The CdSe quantum dots (QDs) capped with 2-mercaptonicotinic acid (H2MN) were prepared through a controllable process at 80 °C. The prepared QDs were characterized by XRD, TEM, IR, UV-Vis and fluorescence (FL) techniques. It was found that the QDs were nearly mono-disperse with the diameters in the range of 8-10 nm. These QDs are capable to exhibit strong FL even in concentrated acidic media. They exhibit an enhanced fluorescence in the presence of Cr(VI), which was used for the determination of Cr(VI) in water samples. The linear range was found to be 1 × 10(-7)-6.0 × 10(-6) M with the RSD and DL of 0.92 % and 5 × 10(-8) M, respectively. Except that Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) which can be eliminated through a simple precipitation process, the other co-existent ions present in natural water were not interfered. The recoveries obtained for the added amounts of Cr(VI) were in the range of 96.9-103.2 %, which denote on application of the method, satisfactorily. PMID:26825078

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid and dose optimization with limited sampling strategy in liver transplant children

    PubMed Central

    Barau, Caroline; Furlan, Valérie; Debray, Dominique; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie

    2012-01-01

    AIMS The aims were to estimate the mycophenolic acid (MPA) population pharmacokinetic parameters in paediatric liver transplant recipients, to identify the factors affecting MPA pharmacokinetics and to develop a limited sampling strategy to estimate individual MPA AUC(0,12 h). METHODS Twenty-eight children, 1.1 to 18.0 years old, received oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) therapy combined with either tacrolimus (n= 23) or ciclosporin (n= 5). The population parameters were estimated from a model-building set of 16 intensive pharmacokinetic datasets obtained from 16 children. The data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed effect modelling, using a one compartment model with first order absorption and first order elimination and random effects on the absorption rate (ka), the apparent volume of distribution (V/F) and apparent clearance (CL/F). RESULTS Two covariates, time since transplantation (≤ and >6 months) and age affected MPA pharmacokinetics. ka, estimated at 1.7 h−1 at age 8.7 years, exhibited large interindividual variability (308%). V/F, estimated at 64.7 l, increased about 2.3 times in children during the immediate post transplantation period. This increase was due to the increase in the unbound MPA fraction caused by the low albumin concentration. CL/F was estimated at 12.7 l h−1. To estimate individual AUC(0,12 h), the pharmacokinetic parameters obtained with the final model, including covariates, were coded in Adapt II® software, using the Bayesian approach. The AUC(0,12 h) estimated from concentrations measured 0, 1 and 4 h after administration of MMF did not differ from reference values. CONCLUSIONS This study allowed the estimation of the population pharmacokinetic MPA parameters. A simple sampling procedure is suggested to help to optimize pediatric patient care. PMID:22329639

  11. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Testing on Unplated and Electroless Gold-Plated Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2000-08-03

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) remediation requires that almost 40 kg of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) be converted to uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). In the process of this conversion, six moles of hydrofluoric acid (HF) are produced for each mole of UF{sub 6} converted. The entire conversion process can be summarized by the following reaction: UF{sub 6} + 3H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 3} + 6HF. (The UO{sub 3} is not stable at high temperatures and therefore decomposes to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). HF is well known for its ability to attack most metals and silica-containing compounds. It reacts rapidly to destroy protective films and can be fatal in very small quantities (e.g., 2% exposure of the body or 50 ppm in air). Because most of the conversion system is made of various metals, the sections that come in contact with HF must be able to withstand corrosion, high temperatures, elevated pressures, and radiation. Consequently, most of these sections will be plated with gold for increased protection of the metal. This report summarizes the results from the tests that were performed on the metal samples. Section 2 covers the approach to the tests, gives a general background of the sample preparation, and then reports the data from the tests. The final section presents a discussion of what was learned from the data and recommendations for uses of these metals in the MSRE conversion process.

  12. Sequential injection titration method using second-order signals: determination of acidity in plant oils and biodiesel samples.

    PubMed

    del Río, Vanessa; Larrechi, M Soledad; Callao, M Pilar

    2010-06-15

    A new concept of flow titration is proposed and demonstrated for the determination of total acidity in plant oils and biodiesel. We use sequential injection analysis (SIA) with a diode array spectrophotometric detector linked to chemometric tools such as multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). This system is based on the evolution of the basic specie of an acid-base indicator, alizarine, when it comes into contact with a sample that contains free fatty acids. The gradual pH change in the reactor coil due to diffusion and reaction phenomenona allows the sequential appearance of both species of the indicator in the detector coil, recording a data matrix for each sample. The SIA-MCR-ALS method helps to reduce the amounts of sample, the reagents and the time consumed. Each determination consumes 0.413ml of sample, 0.250ml of indicator and 3ml of carrier (ethanol) and generates 3.333ml of waste. The frequency of the analysis is high (12 samples h(-1) including all steps, i.e., cleaning, preparing and analysing). The utilized reagents are of common use in the laboratory and it is not necessary to use the reagents of perfect known concentration. The method was applied to determine acidity in plant oil and biodiesel samples. Results obtained by the proposed method compare well with those obtained by the official European Community method that is time consuming and uses large amounts of organic solvents. PMID:20441941

  13. Application of self-organising maps towards segmentation of soybean samples by determination of amino acids concentration.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lívia Ramazzoti Chanan; Angilelli, Karina Gomes; Cremasco, Hágata; Romagnoli, Érica Signori; Galão, Olívio Fernandes; Borsato, Dionisio; Moraes, Larissa Alexandra Cardoso; Mandarino, José Marcos Gontijo

    2016-09-01

    Soybeans are widely used both for human nutrition and animal feed, since they are an important source of protein, and they also provide components such as phytosterols, isoflavones, and amino acids. In this study, were determined the concentrations of the amino acids lysine, histidine, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glycine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine present in 14 samples of conventional soybeans and 6 transgenic, cultivated in two cities of the state of Paraná, Londrina and Ponta Grossa. The results were tabulated and presented to a self-organising map for segmentation according planting regions and conventional or transgenic varieties. A network with 7000 training epochs and a 10 × 10 topology was used, and it proved appropriate in the segmentation of the samples using the data analysed. The weight maps provided by the network, showed that all the amino acids were important in targeting the samples, especially isoleucine. Three clusters were formed, one with only Ponta Grossa samples (including transgenic (PGT) and common (PGC)), a second group with Londrina transgenic (LT) samples and the third with Londrina common (LC) samples. PMID:27213953

  14. High Sensitivity Quantitative Lipidomics Analysis of Fatty Acids in Biological Samples by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Oswald; Armando, Aaron M.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically considered to be simple membrane components serving as structural elements and energy storing entities, fatty acids are now increasingly recognized as potent signaling molecules involved in many metabolic processes. Quantitative determination of fatty acids and exploration of fatty acid profiles have become common place in lipid analysis. We present here a reliable and sensitive method for comprehensive analysis of free fatty acids and fatty acid composition of complex lipids in biological material. The separation and quantitation of fatty acids is achieved by capillary gas chromatography. The analytical method uses pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization and negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chromatographic procedure provides base line separation between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths as well as between most positional isomers. Fatty acids are extracted in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards for high quantitation accuracy. Mass spectrometer conditions are optimized for broad detection capacity and sensitivity capable of measuring trace amounts of fatty acids in complex biological samples. PMID:21787881

  15. Quantitative enantioseparation of amino acids by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography applied to non-terrestrial samples.

    PubMed

    Myrgorodska, Iuliia; Meinert, Cornelia; Martins, Zita; le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2016-02-12

    This work presents an improved analytical procedure for the resolution and quantification of amino acid enantiomers by multidimensional gas chromatography. The procedure contains a derivatization step, by which amino acids were transformed into N(O,S)-ethoxycarbonylheptafluorobutyl esters. It was optimized for the resolution of non-proteinogenic amino acids in the matrix of complex non-terrestrial samples. The procedure has proven to be highly sensitive and shows a wide linearity range with 0.005-3 pmol detection limits for quantitative determinations. The developed procedure was tested on a sample of the Murchison meteorite, for which obtained chromatograms show excellent peak resolution, minimal co-elution and peak overlap. We conclude that comprehensive two dimensional chromatography, in combination with the optimized derivatization method is a highly suitable technique for the analysis of samples with very limited quantities and containing potentially prebiotic molecules, such as interstellar ice analogs and meteorites. PMID:26803906

  16. An inlet/sampling duct for airborne OH and sulfuric acid measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisele, F. L.; Mauldin, R. L.; Tanner, D. J.; Fox, J. R.; Mouch, T.; Scully, T.

    1997-12-01

    An inlet assembly has been designed, tested, and used for the airborne measurements of OH and sulfuric acid. The inlet sampling duct, which incorporates a shroud connected to two nested, restricted flow ducts, slows air velocity by approximately a factor of 16 while maintaining a uniform and well-defined flow. Qualitative wind tunnel tests showed that an inlet shroud that incorporates a 3:1 inner surface and 4.5:1 outer elliptical front surface can straighten the airflow at angles of attack of up to 18°-20° with no visible signs of turbulence. Tests using a Pitot tube to scan the flow velocity profile of the restricted flow ducts showed that the shroud, coupled to inlet ducts, could slow the flow and provide a relatively flat average velocity profile across the central portion of the ducts at angles of attack up to 17°. Tests performed using a chemical tracer showed that at angles of attack where the Pitot tube measurements began to indicate slight flow instabilities (17°-24°), there was no mixing from the walls into the center of the inlet. The inlet assembly also possesses the ability to produce a fairly uniform concentration of OH in the relatively constant velocity portion of the inner duct for instrument calibration. Actual measurements of rapidly changing OH and H2SO4 provide both additional evidence of proper inlet operation and new insight into H2SO4 production and loss in and around clouds.

  17. Acid rains over semi-urban atmosphere at eastern Himalaya and near coast of Bay of Bengal and alkaline rains over typical urban atmosphere in India: A study on precipitation chemistry during monsoon, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arindam; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Sarkar, Chirantan; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji

    A study has been made on precipitation chemistry over three different atmosphere in India. Rain samples were collected during the entire period of monsoon (June-October) in the year of 2013 over Kolkata (22.6 (°) N, 89.4 (°) E), a mega city with typical urban atmosphere; Falta (22.3 (°) N, 88.1 (°) E), a rural atmosphere near eastern coast of Bay of Bengal and Darjeeling (27.01 (°) N, 88.15 (°) E), a high altitude (2200 m asl)hill station over eastern Himalaya in India. The major focus of the study is to investigate the composition of various types of aerosol ionic components scavenged and its effect on the acidity and how it differs between these three distinctly different atmospheres. The results showed that the sea-salt components were higher in Falta (140 mueqv/lit) followed by Kolkata (120 mueqv/lit) and minimum in Darjeeling (30 mueqv/lit). Over all the stations, Na (+) and Cl (-) showed strong correlations indicating common marine source. The marine air masses originated from Bay of Bengal (BoB) were found to significantly enrich sea-salt particles over Falta, the nearest station from BoB and having least effect on Darjeeling, the farthest station from BoB. Dust and anthropogenic aerosols particles were significantly higher over Kolkata compared to other two stations. Dust particles were found to scavenge more in the initial phase of monsoon and it gradually decreased as the monsoon progressed. The average pH of rain water over Kolkata was 6.0 indicating alkaline in nature. pH over Falta was 5.2 indicating slightly acidic in nature and the most important fact is that pH over Darjeeling was 4.6 indicating highly acidic in nature. It was found that Ca (2+) , Mg (2+) and NH _{4} (+) neutralized the acidity of rain water over all the stations with the maximum neutralizing factor for Ca (2+) . However, NH _{4} (+) played important role over Darjeeling in neutralizing rain water acidity. The major reason for high acidity of rain water was not due to high

  18. Thiomonas sp. CB2 is able to degrade urea and promote toxic metal precipitation in acid mine drainage waters supplemented with urea

    PubMed Central

    Farasin, Julien; Andres, Jérémy; Casiot, Corinne; Barbe, Valérie; Faerber, Jacques; Halter, David; Heintz, Dimitri; Koechler, Sandrine; Lièvremont, Didier; Lugan, Raphael; Marchal, Marie; Plewniak, Frédéric; Seby, Fabienne; Bertin, Philippe N.; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) in Carnoulès (France) is characterized by the presence of toxic metals such as arsenic. Several bacterial strains belonging to the Thiomonas genus, which were isolated from this AMD, are able to withstand these conditions. Their genomes carry several genomic islands (GEIs), which are known to be potentially advantageous in some particular ecological niches. This study focused on the role of the “urea island” present in the Thiomonas CB2 strain, which carry the genes involved in urea degradation processes. First, genomic comparisons showed that the genome of Thiomonas sp. CB2, which is able to degrade urea, contains a urea genomic island which is incomplete in the genome of other strains showing no urease activity. The urease activity of Thiomonas sp. CB2 enabled this bacterium to maintain a neutral pH in cell cultures in vitro and prevented the occurrence of cell death during the growth of the bacterium in a chemically defined medium. In AMD water supplemented with urea, the degradation of urea promotes iron, aluminum and arsenic precipitation. Our data show that ureC was expressed in situ, which suggests that the ability to degrade urea may be expressed in some Thiomonas strains in AMD, and that this urease activity may contribute to their survival in contaminated environments. PMID:26441922

  19. Acid precipitation and food quality: Effects of dietary Al, Ca and P on bone and liver characteristics in American black ducks and mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    American black ducks (Anas rubripes) and mallards (A. platyrhynchos) were fed diets varying in concentrations of aluminum (Al). calcium (Ca), and phosphorus (P) for 10 weeks to identify toxic effects of Al under conditions representative of areas with acid precipitation. Femur and liver tissues were analyzed for Al. Ca, and P concentrations and structural characteristics. At two weeks of age, both species demonstrated pronounced differences in femur Al and P concentrations and femur mass from dietary Al and interaction between Ca:P regimen and Al:Low Ca:Low P enhanced Al storage and decreased P and mass in femurs. Femur Ca was lowest in the Low Ca:Low P regimen but was not affected by dietary Al. At 10 weeks, femur and liver Al continued to vary with dietary Al. Elevated Al and reduced Ca lowered modulus of elasticity. Femur P increased with elevated dietary P in black ducks. Elevated dietary P negated some of the effects of dietary A! on femur mass in black ducks. Reduced Ca concentrations weakened bones of both species and lowered both Ca and P. An array of clinical signs including lameness, discoloration of the upper mandible, complete and greenstick fractures, and death were responses to elevated Al and Ca:P regimen. Black ducks seemed to display these signs over a wider range of diets than mallards. Diets of 1,000 mg/kg Al had toxic effects on both species, particularly when combined with diets low in Ca and P.

  20. Evaluation of commercial kits for the extraction and purification of viral nucleic acids from environmental and fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Iker, Brandon C; Bright, Kelly R; Pepper, Ian L; Gerba, Charles P; Kitajima, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    The extraction and purification of nucleic acids is a critical step in the molecular detection of enteric viruses from environmental or fecal samples. In the present study, the performance of three commercially available kits was assessed: the MO BIO PowerViral Environmental DNA/RNA Isolation kit, the Qiagen QIAamp Viral RNA Mini kit, and the Zymo ZR Virus DNA/RNA Extraction kit. Viral particles of adenovirus 2 (AdV), murine norovirus (MNV), and poliovirus type 1 (PV1) were spiked in molecular grade water and three different types of sample matrices (i.e., biosolids, feces, and surface water concentrates), extracted with the kits, and the yields of the nucleic acids were determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR). The MO BIO kit performed the best with the biosolids, which were considered to contain the highest level of inhibitors and provided the most consistent detection of spiked virus from all of the samples. A qPCR inhibition test using an internal control plasmid DNA and a nucleic acid purity test using an absorbance at 230 nm for the nucleic acid extracts demonstrated that the MO BIO kit was able to remove qPCR inhibitors more effectively than the Qiagen and Zymo kits. These results suggest that the MO BIO kit is appropriate for the extraction and purification of viral nucleic acids from environmental and clinical samples that contain high levels of inhibitors. PMID:23578704

  1. Catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in biological samples with oxalic acid-rhodamine B-potassium dichromate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Qing-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method was proposed for determining trace oxalic acid based on the catalytic effect of oxalate on the oxidation of potassium dichromate with rhodamin B in 0.10 M of sulfuric acid. Good linearity is obtained over the concentration range 0.40-6.0 μg/mL of oxalic acid. After the reactions of the catalytic and non-catalytic systems were terminated by using 2.00 mL of 4 M sodium hydroxide solution, they can be stable for 3 h at room temperature. The apparent activation energy of the catalytic reaction is 12.44 kJ/mol. The effect of 50 coexisting substances was observed. The method was used to determine trace oxalic acid in tea, spinach and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  2. Extraction and Separation of Vitisin D, Ampelopsin B and cis-Vitisin A from Iris lactea Pall. var. chinensis (Fisch.) Koidz by Alkaline Extraction-Acid Precipitation and High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huanhuan; Zhou, Wenna; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhenhua; Suo, Yourui; Wang, Honglun

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring oligostilbenes are receiving more attention because they exhibit several beneficial effects for health, including hepatoprotective, antitumor, anti-adipogenic, antioxidant, antiaging, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, antiviral, immunosuppressive and neuroprotective activities. Thus, they could be of some potentially therapeutic values for several diseases. In this study, we adopted the alkaline extraction-acid precipitation (AEAP) method for extraction of oligostilbenes from the seed kernel of Iris lactea Then, the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was used for preparative isolation and purification of oligostilbenes from the AEAP extracts. Finally, three oligostilbenes, namely vitisin D (73 mg), ampelopsin B (25 mg) and cis-vitisin A (16 mg), were successfully fractionated by HSCCC with a two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (2:5:3:6, v/v/v/v) from 300 mg of the AEAP extracts in ∼ 190 min. The purities of the three isolated oligostilbenes were all over 95.0% as analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. They all were isolated from I. lacteal for the first time.The method of AEAP for the preparation of the oligostilbene-enriched crude sample was simple, and the HSCCC technique for the isolation and purification of oligostilbenes was efficient. PMID:26847919

  3. A Rapid and Accurate Extraction Procedure for Analysing Free Amino Acids in Meat Samples by GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Miguel A.; Ruiz, Jorge; Antequera, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of a mixer mill as the homogenization tool for the extraction of free amino acids in meat samples, with the main goal of analyzing a large number of samples in the shortest time and minimizing sample amount and solvent volume. Ground samples (0.2 g) were mixed with 1.5 mL HCl 0.1 M and homogenized in the mixer mill. The final biphasic system was separated by centrifugation. The supernatant was deproteinized, derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography. This procedure showed a high extracting ability, especially in samples with high free amino acid content (recovery = 88.73–104.94%). It also showed a low limit of detection and quantification (3.8 · 10−4–6.6 · 10−4 μg μL−1 and 1.3 · 10−3–2.2 · 10−2 μg μL−1, resp.) for most amino acids, an adequate precision (2.15–20.15% for run-to-run), and a linear response for all amino acids (R2 = 0.741–0.998) in the range of 1–100 µg mL−1. Moreover, it takes less time and requires lower amount of sample and solvent than conventional techniques. Thus, this is a cost and time efficient tool for homogenizing in the extraction procedure of free amino acids from meat samples, being an adequate option for routine analysis. PMID:25873963

  4. Precipitation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  5. Single-step enantioselective amino acid flux analysis by capillary electrophoresis using on-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, Adam S; Tran, Lara; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2006-07-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) represents a versatile platform for integrating sample pretreatment with chemical analysis because of its ability to tune analyte electromigration and band dispersion properties in discontinuous electrolyte systems. In this article, a single-step method that combines on-line sample preconcentration with in-capillary chemical derivatization is developed for rapid, sensitive, and enantioselective analysis of micromolar levels of amino acids that lack intrinsic chromophores by CE with UV detection. Time-resolved electrophoretic studies revealed two distinct stages of amino acid band narrowing within the original long sample injection plug occurring both prior to and after in-capillary labeling via zone passing by ortho-phthalaldehyde/N-acetyl l-cysteine (OPA/NAC). This technique enabled direct analysis of d-amino acids in a 95% enantiomeric excess mixture with sub-micromolar detection limits and minimal sample handling, where the capillary functions as a preconcentrator, microreactor, and chiral selector. On-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization CE (SPCD-CE) was applied to study the enantioselective amino acid flux in Escherichia coli bacteria cultures, which demonstrated a unique l-Ala efflux into the extracellular medium. New strategies for high-throughput analyses of low-abundance metabolites are important for understanding fundamental physiological processes in bacteria required for screening the efficacy of new classes of antibiotics as well as altered metabolism in genetically modified mutant strains. PMID:16753129

  6. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methylphosponic and alkyl methylphosphonic acids determination in environmental samples after pre-column derivatization with p-bromophenacyl bromide.

    PubMed

    Baygildiev, T M; Rodin, I A; Stavrianidi, A N; Braun, A V; Lebedev, A T; Rybalchenko, I V; Shpigun, O A

    2016-04-15

    Once exposed to the environment organophosphate nerve agents readily degrade by rapid hydrolysis to the corresponding alkyl methylphosphonic acids which do not exist in nature. These alkyl methylphosphonic acids are finally slowly hydrolyzed to methylphosphonic acid. Methylphosphonic acid is the most stable hydrolysis product of organophosphate nerve agents, persisting in environment for a long time. A highly sensitive method of methylphosphonic acid and alkyl methylphosphonic acids detection in dust and ground mixed samples has been developed and validated. The fact that alkyl methylphosphonic acids unlike methylphosphonic acid did not react with p-bromophenacyl bromide under chosen conditions was discovered. This allowed simultaneous chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric detection of derivatized methylphosphonic acid and underivatized alkyl methylphosphonic acids using HILIC-MS/MS method. Very simple sample pretreatment with high recoveries for each analyte was developed. Methylphosphonic acid pre-column derivate and alkyl methylphosphonic acids were detected using tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization after hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography separation. The developed approach allows achieving ultra-low detection limits: 200 pg mL(-1) for methylphosphonic acid, 70 pg mL(-1) for ethyl methylphosphonic acid, 8 pg mL(-1) for i-propyl methylphosphonic acid, 8 pg mL(-1) for i-butyl methylphosphonic acid, 5 pg mL(-1) for pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid in the extracts of dust and ground mixed samples. This approach was successfully applied to the dust and ground mixed samples from decommissioned plant for the production of chemical weapons. PMID:26965649

  7. Porous media investigation before and after hydrochloric acid injection on a pre-salt carbonate coquinas sample.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Teles, A P; Pepin, A; Bize-Forest, N; Lima, I; Lopes, R T

    2016-04-01

    Porous space characterization of carbonate rocks is an important aid in petroleum exploration from carbonate reservoir. In this study, X-ray microtomography technique was applied to evaluate total porosity of a coquina sample extracted from pre-salt reservoir, in Brazil, before and after acid injection. Two image processing program were used in order to assess performance. The results showed that microtomography has potential to compute porosity of coquina samples and provides information about rock porous network. PMID:26794261

  8. Update and revisions for Open-File Report 98-624, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) leachate chemistry data for solid mine-waste composite samples from the Silverton and Leadville districts in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.; Desborough, George A.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Theodorakos, Peter M.

    2000-01-01

    This report supersedes, revises, and updates information and data previously released in Open-File Report 98-624 (Montour and others, 1998). Data for this report were derived from leaching of mine-waste composite samples using a modification of E.P. A. Method 1312, Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP). In 1997, members of the U.S. Geological Survey Mine Waste Characterization Project collected four mine-waste composite samples from mining districts near Silverton, Colorado (MAY and YUK), and near Leadville, Colorado (VEN and SUN). This report presents analytical results from these sites.

  9. Method and Apparatus for Automated Isolation of Nucleic Acids from Small Cell Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaram, Shivshankar; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Pant, Kapil; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    RNA isolation is a ubiquitous need, driven by current emphasis on microarrays and miniaturization. With commercial systems requiring 100,000 to 1,000,000 cells for successful isolation, there is a growing need for a small-footprint, easy-to-use device that can harvest nucleic acids from much smaller cell samples (1,000 to 10,000 cells). The process of extraction of RNA from cell cultures is a complex, multi-step one, and requires timed, asynchronous operations with multiple reagents/buffers. An added complexity is the fragility of RNA (subject to degradation) and its reactivity to surface. A novel, microfluidics-based, integrated cartridge has been developed that can fully automate the complex process of RNA isolation (lyse, capture, and elute RNA) from small cell culture samples. On-cartridge cell lysis is achieved using either reagents or high-strength electric fields made possible by the miniaturized format. Traditionally, silica-based, porous-membrane formats have been used for RNA capture, requiring slow perfusion for effective capture. In this design, high efficiency capture/elution are achieved using a microsphere-based "microfluidized" format. Electrokinetic phenomena are harnessed to actively mix microspheres with the cell lysate and capture/elution buffer, providing important advantages in extraction efficiency, processing time, and operational flexibility. Successful RNA isolation was demonstrated using both suspension (HL-60) and adherent (BHK-21) cells. Novel features associated with this development are twofold. First, novel designs that execute needed processes with improved speed and efficiency were developed. These primarily encompass electric-field-driven lysis of cells. The configurations include electrode-containing constructs, or an "electrode-less" chip design, which is easy to fabricate and mitigates fouling at the electrode surface; and the "fluidized" extraction format based on electrokinetically assisted mixing and contacting of microbeads

  10. Use of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column and propionic acid as an eluent in ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography of aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Kajiwara, Hiroe; Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We developed an ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography (IEAC) method employing a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (PS-WCX) column with propionic acid as the eluent for the simultaneous determination of multivalent aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples. The PS-WCX column well resolved mono-, di-, and trivalent carboxylic acids in the acidic eluent. Propionic acid as the eluent gave a higher signal-to-noise ratio, and enabled sensitive conductimetric detection of analyte acids. We found the optimal separation condition to be the combination of a PS-WCX column and 20-mM propionic acid. Practical applicability of the developed method was confirmed by using a short precolumn with a strongly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form connected before the separation column; this was to remove cations from food samples by converting them to hydrogen ions. Consequently, common carboxylic acids and ethanol in beer, wine, and soy sauce were successfully separated by the developed method. PMID:21558657

  11. Comparative Assessment of Automated Nucleic Acid Sample Extraction Equipment for Biothreat Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kalina, Warren Vincent; Douglas, Christina Elizabeth; Coyne, Susan Rajnik

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic beads offer superior impurity removal and nucleic acid selection over older extraction methods. The performances of nucleic acid extraction of biothreat agents in blood or buffer by easyMAG, MagNA Pure, EZ1 Advanced XL, and Nordiag Arrow were evaluated. All instruments showed excellent performance in blood; however, the easyMAG had the best precision and versatility. PMID:24452173

  12. Comparison of catalysts for direct transesterification of fatty acids in freeze-dried forage samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preparation of fatty acid methyl esters from forages comparing BF3 in CH3OH to HCl in CH3OH as a catalyst in single-step direct transesterification has not been reported. Our objective was to compare 1.09 M methanolic HCl to 7% BF3 in CH3OH as catalysts for direct transesterification of fatty acids ...

  13. Diffusion battery sampling of sulfuric acid aerosols formed in oleum spill experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I N; Wong, W T; Munkelwitz, H R

    1980-01-01

    Fuming sulfuric acid (oleum) is one of several hazardous chemicals routinely transported in bulk quantities on US waterways. In the event of a marine accident, a large amount of the cargo acid could suddenly be released into water, resulting in the formation of a dense sulfuric acid cloud. Experiments were carried out in the laboratory to study the factors controlling the extent of acid aerosol formation under conditions likely to occur in maritime spill accidents. A Sinclair-type diffusion battery was used for aerosol sizing. In this presentation, a brief discussion of an improved nonlinear iterative inversion method for the analysis of diffusion battery data is given. Experimental results obtained with monodisperse test aerosols and sulfuric acid aerosols formed during oleum spills are presented. It is shown that the diffusion battery, coupled with the inversion technique, is capable of sizing particles up to 0.8 ..mu..m in diameter.

  14. The Global Precipitation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott; Kummerow, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM), expected to begin around 2006, is a follow-up to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Unlike TRMM, which primarily samples the tropics, GPM will sample both the tropics and mid-latitudes. The primary, or core, satellite will be a single, enhanced TRMM satellite that can quantify the 3-D spatial distributions of precipitation and its associated latent heat release. The core satellite will be complemented by a constellation of very small and inexpensive drones with passive microwave instruments that will sample the rainfall with sufficient frequency to be not only of climate interest, but also have local, short-term impacts by providing global rainfall coverage at approx. 3 h intervals. The data is expected to have substantial impact upon quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation into global and mesoscale numerical models. Based upon previous studies of rainfall data assimilation, GPM is expected to lead to significant improvements in forecasts of extratropical and tropical cyclones. For example, GPM rainfall data can provide improved initialization of frontal systems over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The purpose of this talk is to provide information about GPM to the USWRP (U.S. Weather Research Program) community and to discuss impacts on quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation.

  15. Selective recovery of dissolved Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn in acid mine drainage based on modeling to predict precipitation pH.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Min; Yoo, Jong-Chan; Ji, Sang-Woo; Yang, Jung-Seok; Baek, Kitae

    2015-02-01

    Mining activities have caused serious environmental problems including acid mine drainage (AMD), the dispersion of mine tailings and dust, and extensive mine waste. In particular, AMD contaminates soil and water downstream of mines and generally contains mainly valuable metals such as Cu, Zn, and Ni as well as Fe and Al. In this study, we investigated the selective recovery of Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, and Ni from AMD. First, the speciation of Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, and Ni as a function of the equilibrium solution pH was simulated by Visual MINTEQ. Based on the simulation results, the predicted pHs for the selective precipitation of Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn/Ni were determined. And recovery yield of metals using simulation is over 99 %. Experiments using artificial AMD based on the simulation results confirmed the selective recovery of Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn/Ni, and the recovery yields of Fe/Al/Cu/Zn and Fe/Al/Cu/Ni mixtures using Na2CO3 were 99.6/86.8/71.9/77.0 % and 99.2/85.7/73.3/86.1 %, respectively. After then, the simulation results were applied to an actual AMD for the selective recovery of metals, and the recovery yields of Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn using NaOH were 97.2, 74.9, 66.9, and 89.7 %, respectively. Based on the results, it was concluded that selective recovery of dissolved metals from AMD is possible by adjusting the solution pH using NaOH or Na2CO3 as neutralizing agents. PMID:25231736

  16. Transcriptional profiling and genotyping of degraded nucleic acids from autopsy tissue samples after prolonged formalin fixation times

    PubMed Central

    Ferruelo, Antonio; El-Assar, Mariam; Lorente, José A; Nin, Nicolás; Peñuelas, Oscar; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Gonzalez, Constancio; Esteban, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Background: Samples used for genotyping and transcription studies are obtained and conserved in very specific conditions. The possibility to use autopsy tissue samples, which contain nucleic acids of very poor quality, would open new possibilities for genetic studies. Methods: We have used liver tissue samples from autopsy cases to (i) determine its quality; (ii) study gene expression of 13 genes involved in different cell processes, before and after cDNA pre-amplification (quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction); and (iii) analyze the presence of 2 common polymorphisms of relevance for illness (ACE I/D genotype by PCR amplification, and TNF-α promoter gene polymorphism, by DNA sequencing). Results: Samples were grouped according to different buffered formalin fixation times (group 1, <15 days; group 2, 60-90 days; group 3, 150-180 days; group 4, 240-270 days). Nucleic acids showed a time-dependent degradation. The expression of 13 genes could be studied in all cases from groups 1 and 2, only 7 from group 3 and none from group 4. cDNA preamplification allowed the study of all genes in all samples. DNA genotyping for ACE and TNF-α promoter region was possible in all cases. Conclusions: We conclude that nucleic acids extracted from autopsy specimens after prolonged periods of time in formalin were of sufficient quality to study gene expression and genotyping using currently available methodology and cDNA pre-amplification. PMID:21326810

  17. Isomers/enantiomers of perfluorocarboxylic acids: Method development and detection in environmental samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluoroalkyl substances are globally distributed in both urban and remote settings, and routinely are detected in wildlife, humans, and the environment. One of the most prominent and routinely detected perfluoroalkyl substances is perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been s...

  18. Analytical electron microscopy of a crack tip extracted from a stressed Alloy 800 sample exposed to an acid sulfate environment.

    PubMed

    Persaud, S Y; Carcea, A G; Huang, J; Korinek, A; Botton, G A; Newman, R C

    2014-06-01

    Alloy 800 (Fe-21Cr-33Ni) has been found susceptible to cracking in acid sulfate environments, but the mechanism is not well understood. Alloy 800 C-ring samples were exposed to an acid sulfate environment at 315°C and cracks were found with depths in excess of 300μm after 60h. Preparation of a TEM sample containing crack tips is challenging, but the ability to perform high-resolution microscopy at the crack tip would lend insight to the mechanism of acid sulfate stress corrosion cracking (AcSCC). The lift-out technique combined with a focused ion beam sample preparation was used to extract a crack tip along the cross-section of an acid sulfate crack in an Alloy 800 C-ring. TEM elemental analysis was done using EDS and EELS which identified a duplex oxide within the crack; an inner oxide consisting of a thin 3-4nm Cr-rich oxide and an outer oxide enriched in Fe and Cr. Preliminary conclusions and hypotheses resulted with respect to the mechanism of AcSCC in Alloy 800. PMID:24792448

  19. Alternative method for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    García-Villalba, Rocio; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; García-Conesa, Maria T; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Carlos Espín, Juan; Larrosa, Mar

    2012-08-01

    Short-chain fatty acids are the major end products of bacterial metabolism in the large bowel. They derive mostly from the bacterial breakdown of carbohydrates and are known to have positive health benefits. Due to the biological relevance of these compounds it is important to develop efficient, cheap, fast, and sensitive analytical methods that enable the identification and quantification of the short-chain fatty acids in a large number of biological samples. In this study, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples. These volatile compounds were extracted with ethyl acetate and 4-methyl valeric acid was used as an internal standard. No further cleanup, concentration, and derivatization steps were needed and the extract was directly injected onto the column. Recoveries ranged between 65 and 105%, and no matrix effects were observed. The proposed method has wide linear ranges, good inter- and intraday variability values (below 2.6 and 5.6%, respectively) and limits of detection between 0.49 μM (0.29 μg/g) and 4.31 μM (3.8 μg/g). The applicability of this analytical method was successfully tested in faecal samples from rats and humans. PMID:22865755

  20. Alternative method for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    García-Villalba, Rocio; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; García-Conesa, Maria T; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos; Larrosa, Mar

    2012-06-01

    Short-chain fatty acids are the major end products of bacterial metabolism in the large bowel. They derive mostly from the bacterial breakdown of carbohydrates and are known to have positive health benefits. Due to the biological relevance of these compounds it is important to develop efficient, cheap, fast, and sensitive analytical methods that enable the identification and quantification of the short-chain fatty acids in a large number of biological samples. In this study, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples. These volatile compounds were extracted with ethyl acetate and 4-methyl valeric acid was used as an internal standard. No further cleanup, concentration, and derivatization steps were needed and the extract was directly injected onto the column. Recoveries ranged between 65 and 105%, and no matrix effects were observed. The proposed method has wide linear ranges, good inter- and intraday variability values (below 2.6 and 5.6%, respectively) and limits of detection between 0.49 μM (0.29 μg/g) and 4.31 μM (3.8 μg/g). The applicability of this analytical method was successfully tested in faecal samples from rats and humans. PMID:22674825

  1. Investigation of humic acid samples from different sources by photon correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceci, Marco S.; Moulin, Valerie

    Photon correlation spectroscopy (dynamic light scattering) indicated that relatively large scatterers (50-200 nm diameter) are present in a number of soil, lake and groundwater humic and fulvic acids, as well as in natural waters of high humic content, but absent in synthetic humic acid. The influence of ionic strength, Ca(II), La(III), EDTA, fluoride ions, surfactants, and ultrasound on size and zeta potential of these scatterers has also been investigated.

  2. Acid-Soluble Internal Capsules for Closed-Face Cassette Elemental Sampling and Analysis of Workplace Air

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Martin; Ashley, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Airborne particles that are collected using closed-face filter cassettes (CFCs), which are used widely in the sampling of workplace aerosols, can deposit in places other than on the filter and thereby may not be included in the ensuing analysis. A technique for ensuring that internal non-filter deposits are included in the analysis is to collect airborne particles within an acid-soluble internal capsule that, following sampling, can be dissolved along with the filter for subsequent elemental analysis. An interlaboratory study (ILS) was carried out to evaluate the use of cellulosic CFC capsule inserts for their suitability in the determination of trace elements in airborne samples. The ILS was performed in accordance with an applicable ASTM International standard practice, ASTM E691, which describes statistical procedures for investigating interlaboratory precision. Performance evaluation materials consisted of prototype cellulose acetate capsules attached to mixed-cellulose ester filters. Batches of capsules were dosed with Pb-containing materials (standard aqueous solutions, and certified reference material soil and paint). Also, aerosol samples containing nine target analyte elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, and Ni) were generated using a multiport sampler; various concentrations and sampling times were employed to yield samples fortified at desired loading levels. Triplicates of spiked capsules at three different loadings were conveyed to each volunteer laboratory; loading levels were unknown to the participants. The laboratories were asked to prepare the samples by acid dissolution and to analyze aliquots of extracted samples by atomic spectrometry in accordance with applicable ASTM International Standards. Participants were asked to report their results in units of μg of each target element per sample. For the elements investigated, interlaboratory precision and recovery estimates from the participating laboratories demonstrated the utility of the

  3. Pulsed electromembrane extraction for analysis of derivatized amino acids: A powerful technique for determination of animal source of gelatin samples.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Aghaei, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Differentiation of animal sources of gelatin is required for many reasons such as some anxieties about bovine spongiform encephalopathy or a ban on consuming porcine gelatin in some religions. In the present work, an efficient method is introduced for determination of animal origin of gelatin samples. The basis of this procedure is the application of pulsed electric field for extraction, preconcentration, and analysis of derivatized amino acids in gelatin. To this end, after derivatization of amino acids of interest by means of o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) for enhancing their ultraviolet (UV) absorbance as well as increasing their lipophilicities, a 137V electric field was applied for 20min with 10min(-1) frequency to make the analytes migrate through a 200µm organic liquid membrane into an aqueous acceptor phase. Finally, the acceptor phase was analyzed by HPLC-UV. The proposed technique offered a high efficiency for analysis of amino acids, regarding 43% and 79% as extraction recoveries and 25ng mL(-1) and 50ng mL(-1) as limits of detection (LODs) for asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Therefore, due to sample cleanup ability of the proposed method and obtained preconcentration factors (29 and 53 for asparagine and glutamine, respectively), it could be carried out for differentiation of animal origins of gelatin samples, even if only small amounts of samples are available or in complicated media of foodstuffs and medicament. PMID:25703002

  4. Seasonal and rainfall-type variations in inorganic ions and dicarboxylic acids and acidity of wet deposition samples collected from subtropical East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Wu, Pei-Ling

    2011-07-01

    Rainfall samples were collected over a period of 3 years and 8 months in subtropical East Asia. They are categorized into different rainfall types and analyzed to assess the ionic composition and its effect on the acidity of wet deposition in southern Taiwan. Only 4% of samples had a pH of <5.0, indicating that the study area is not impacted significantly by acid rain. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) pH by rainfall type was Spring Rain 5.74, Typhoon Rain 5.56, Summer Rain 5.46, Typhoon Outer Circulation (TOC) Rain 5.45, Plum Rain 5.32 and Autumn-Winter Rain 5.29. Dilution effects were important to the equivalent ionic concentration of different rainfall types. HCO 3-, SO 42- and Cl - were detected as major anions whereas NH 4+, Na + and Ca 2+ were major cations. CO 2-derived HCO 3- was the major ionic species in all but Typhoon Rain and Spring Rain, in which the major species were Na + and Cl - and Ca 2+, respectively. Excluding HCO 3-, the major species were NH 4+, Na + and Ca 2+ in Plum Rain, the secondary photochemical products SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ in TOC Rain and Summer Rain, and Na + and Ca 2+ in Autumn-Winter Rain. Calculation of arithmetic means showed that dicarboxylic acids contributed between 0.25% and 0.53% of the total ionic concentration and of these, oxalic acid contributed the least (81.3% of the dicarboxylic acid) to TOC Rain and the most (96.1% of the dicarboxylic acid) to Spring Rain, suggestive of long-range transport in the latter. Differences in wet deposition composition were shown to be a result of differences in local emissions and long-range transport (hence of prevailing wind direction) during the period of rainfall and of the frequency and volume of rain that typifies each rainfall type. Principal component analysis (PCA) further revealed that traffic-related and industrial organic and inorganic pollutants, their secondary photochemical products, sea salts, and dust are important contributors to wet deposition. Moreover, the ratio of

  5. Quantitative and discriminative analysis of nucleic acid samples using luminometric nonspecific nanoparticle methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlasalo, S.; Mariani, L.; Härmä, H.

    2016-03-01

    Homogeneous simple assays utilizing luminescence quenching and time-resolved luminescence resonance energy transfer (TR-LRET) were developed for the quantification of nucleic acids without sequence information. Nucleic acids prevent the adsorption of a protein to europium nanoparticles which is detected as a luminescence quenching of europium nanoparticles with a soluble quencher or as a decrease of TR-LRET from europium nanoparticles to the acceptor dye. Contrary to the existing methods based on fluorescent dye binding to nucleic acids, equal sensitivities for both single- (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) were measured and a detection limit of 60 pg was calculated for the quenching assay. The average coefficient of variation was 5% for the quenching assay and 8% for the TR-LRET assay. The TR-LRET assay was also combined with a nucleic acid dye selective to dsDNA in a single tube assay to measure the total concentration of DNA and the ratio of ssDNA and dsDNA in the mixture. To our knowledge, such a multiplexed assay is not accomplished with commercially available assays.Homogeneous simple assays utilizing luminescence quenching and time-resolved luminescence resonance energy transfer (TR-LRET) were developed for the quantification of nucleic acids without sequence information. Nucleic acids prevent the adsorption of a protein to europium nanoparticles which is detected as a luminescence quenching of europium nanoparticles with a soluble quencher or as a decrease of TR-LRET from europium nanoparticles to the acceptor dye. Contrary to the existing methods based on fluorescent dye binding to nucleic acids, equal sensitivities for both single- (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) were measured and a detection limit of 60 pg was calculated for the quenching assay. The average coefficient of variation was 5% for the quenching assay and 8% for the TR-LRET assay. The TR-LRET assay was also combined with a nucleic acid dye selective to dsDNA in a single tube

  6. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  7. An integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for nucleic acid testing at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Li, XiuJun; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    With advances in point-of-care testing (POCT), lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been explored for nucleic acid detection. However, biological samples generally contain complex compositions and low amounts of target nucleic acids, and currently require laborious off-chip nucleic acid extraction and amplification processes (e.g., tube-based extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) prior to detection. To the best of our knowledge, even though the integration of DNA extraction and amplification into a paper-based biosensor has been reported, a combination of LFA with the aforementioned steps for simple colorimetric readout has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an integrated paper-based biosensor incorporating nucleic acid extraction, amplification and visual detection or quantification using a smartphone. A handheld battery-powered heating device was specially developed for nucleic acid amplification in POC settings, which is coupled with this simple assay for rapid target detection. The biosensor can successfully detect Escherichia coli (as a model analyte) in spiked drinking water, milk, blood, and spinach with a detection limit of as low as 10-1000 CFU mL(-1), and Streptococcus pneumonia in clinical blood samples, highlighting its potential use in medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. As compared to the lengthy conventional assay, which requires more than 5 hours for the entire sample-to-answer process, it takes about 1 hour for our integrated biosensor. The integrated biosensor holds great potential for detection of various target analytes for wide applications in the near future. PMID:26759062

  8. Quantification of 4'-geranyloxyferulic acid (GOFA) in honey samples of different origin by validated RP-HPLC-UV method.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Salvatore; Taddeo, Vito Alessandro; Fiorito, Serena; Epifano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Natural honey has been employed as a nutraceutical agent with benefits and therapeutic promises for humans for many centuries. It has been largely used as food and medicine by all generations, traditions, and civilizations, both ancient and modern. Several chemicals having beneficial effects for human health have been reported as components of natural honey and these include sugars, organic acids, aminoacids, minerals, and vitamins. Also some important phytochemicals have been described and these comprise tannins, flavonoids, terpenes, saponins, and alkaloids. In this note it is described the successful application of a RP HPLC-UV-vis method for the separation and quantification of 4'-geranyloxyferulic acid (GOFA) in four honey samples of different origin. Concentration values showed a great variation between the four samples tested, being chestnut honey the one richest in GOFA (7.87 mg/g). The findings described herein represent the first example reported in the literature of the characterization of an oxyprenylated phenylpropanoid in honey. PMID:26421962

  9. Improving qPCR efficiency in environmental samples by selective removal of humic acids with DAX-8.

    PubMed

    Schriewer, A; Wehlmann, A; Wuertz, S

    2011-04-01

    Quantitative PCR is becoming the method of choice for the detection of pathogenic microorganisms and other targets in the environment. A major obstacle when amplifying DNA is the presence of inhibiting substances like humic acids that decrease the efficiency of PCR. We combined the polymeric adsorbent Supelite™ DAX-8 with a large-volume (10 mL) nucleic acid extraction method to decrease the humic acid content prior to qPCR quantification in water samples. The method was tested by spiking with humic acid standards and the bacterial surrogate Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Improvements in qPCR detection of ADP1 after application of DAX-8 resin (5 and 10 w/v%) were compared with the effects of added bovine serum albumin (BSA) (50, 100 and 200 ng/μL). Both additions improved detection of ADP1 by counteracting inhibitory effects. There were no changes in mean cycle threshold difference (ΔC(T)) after application of DAX-8 compared to the control despite some loss of DNA, whereas significant increases occurred for BSA, irrespective of BSA concentration applied. The use of DAX-8 leads to an increase in qPCR amplification efficiency in contrast to BSA. The commonly used method to calculate genomic sample concentrations by comparing measured CT values relative to standard curves is only valid if amplification efficiencies of both are sufficiently similar. DAX-8 can provide this efficiency by removing humic acids permanently from nucleic acid extracts and has the potential to significantly increase the reliability of reported non-detects and measured results obtained by qPCR in environmental monitoring. PMID:21256890

  10. Determination of some hydroxybenzoic acids and catechins in white wine samples by liquid chromatography with luminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Rafael Carlos; Paz Aguilar-Caballos, María; Gómez-Hens, Agustina

    2006-12-01

    A liquid chromatographic method with luminescence detection for the determination of eight phenolic compounds is reported. The method involves postcolumn derivatization with terbium(III). This derivatization is based on the reaction between phenolics and terbium(III) to form luminescent chelates, which were determined at lamda ex 295 and lamda em 545 nm using the fluorescence mode. The long wavelength emission of lanthanide chelates can minimize interferences from background sample matrix, which usually emit at shorter wavelengths. Also, the chromatographic separation allows the individual determination of phenolics, which cannot be done using the direct measurement of the fluorescence of their corresponding terbium chelates. Dynamic ranges of the calibration graphs and detection limits, obtained with standard solutions of analytes were (microg/mL): gallic acid (0.9-40, 0.3), protocatechuic acid (0.05-7, 0.016), catechin (0.2-40, 0.07), vanillic acid (0.25-40, 0.08), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (0.8-40, 0.25), syringic acid (0.17-40, 0.05), epicatechin (0.3-40, 0.09) and salicylic acid (0.07-12, 0.02). The precision was established at two concentration levels of each analyte and expressed as the percentage of RSD with values ranging between 1.0 and 6.5%. The practical usefulness of the method was demonstrated by the analysis of white wine samples, which were diluted two-fold and directly injected into the chromatographic system. The recovery values obtained ranged between 93.3 and 108.0%. PMID:17305238

  11. Method for rapid screening analysis of Sr-90 in edible plant samples collected near Fukushima, Japan.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hikaru; Sakamoto, Hideaki; Shiga, Norikatsu; Suzuki, Kaori

    2016-06-01

    A screening method for measuring (90)Sr in edible plant samples by focusing on (90)Y in equilibrium with (90)Sr is reported. (90)Y was extracted from samples with acid, co-precipitated with iron hydroxide, and precipitated with oxalic acid. The dissolved oxalate precipitate was loaded on an extraction chromatography resin, and the (90)Y-enriched eluate was analyzed by Cherenkov counting with a TDCR liquid scintillation counter. (90)Sr ((90)Y) concentration was determined in plant samples collected near the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants with this method. PMID:27043171

  12. HYDROLYSIS OF MTBE IN GROUND WATER SAMPLES PRESERVED WITIH HYDROCHLORIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional sampling and analytical protocols have poor sensitivity for fuel oxygenates that are alcohols, such as TBA. Because alcohols tend to stay with the water samples, they are not efficiently transferred to the gas chromatograph for separation and analysis. A common tec...

  13. Quantitative and discriminative analysis of nucleic acid samples using luminometric nonspecific nanoparticle methods.

    PubMed

    Pihlasalo, S; Mariani, L; Härmä, H

    2016-03-21

    Homogeneous simple assays utilizing luminescence quenching and time-resolved luminescence resonance energy transfer (TR-LRET) were developed for the quantification of nucleic acids without sequence information. Nucleic acids prevent the adsorption of a protein to europium nanoparticles which is detected as a luminescence quenching of europium nanoparticles with a soluble quencher or as a decrease of TR-LRET from europium nanoparticles to the acceptor dye. Contrary to the existing methods based on fluorescent dye binding to nucleic acids, equal sensitivities for both single- (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) were measured and a detection limit of 60 pg was calculated for the quenching assay. The average coefficient of variation was 5% for the quenching assay and 8% for the TR-LRET assay. The TR-LRET assay was also combined with a nucleic acid dye selective to dsDNA in a single tube assay to measure the total concentration of DNA and the ratio of ssDNA and dsDNA in the mixture. To our knowledge, such a multiplexed assay is not accomplished with commercially available assays. PMID:26912463

  14. MAP3S/RAINE precipitation chemistry network: quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The participants of the precipitation chemistry network of the Multi-State Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study/Regional Acidity of Industrial Emissions (MAP3S/RAINE) have developed procedures for maintenance of high quality output from the network operation. The documented procedures-most of which were in place before the network began sampling in 1976-include those for site selection and verification, field equipment, laboratory and data handling, and external laboratory quality testing.

  15. Quantification of fatty acids as methyl esters and phospholipids in cheese samples after separation of triacylglycerides and phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Simone; Vetter, Walter

    2009-03-23

    Determination of the individual fatty acid composition of neutral- and phospholipids as well as the phospholipid content of dairy food and other foodstuffs are important tasks in life sciences. For these purposes, a method was developed for the separation of lipids (standards of triolein and diacylphosphatidylcholines as well as three cheese samples) by solid-phase extraction using a self-packed column filled with partly deactivated silica. Non-halogenated solvents were used for the elution of the lipid classes. Cyclohexane/ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v) served for the elution of neutral lipids, while polar lipids were eluted with three solvents (ethyl acetate/methanol, methanol, and methanol/water) into one fraction. The separated lipid fractions were transesterified and the individual fatty acids were quantified by using gas chromatography coupled to electron ionization mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The recovery rate for standard phosphatidylcholines was approximately 90% and cross-contamination from neutral lipids was negligible. The method was applied to cheese samples. Quantitative amounts of individual fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction were <0.002-0.29% of total lipids from camembert, <0.002-0.12% of total lipids from mozzarella, and <0.002-0.18% of total lipids in a goat cream cheese. Differences in the fatty acid pattern of neutral and polar lipids were detected. The quantity of the fatty acids determined in the phospholipid fraction was divided by the factor 0.7 in order to convert the fatty acid content into the phospholipid content of the cheese samples. This factor is based on the contribution of 16:0 to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The resulting DPPC equivalents (DPPC(eq)) were found to be representative for the average contribution of fatty acids to all classes of phospholipids in dairy products. Using this approach, the phospholipid content of lipids from mozzarella, camembert, and goat cream

  16. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA. PMID:21619278

  17. Carbon dioxide generated from carbonates and acids for sampling blood-feeding arthropods.

    PubMed

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Blosser, Erik M; Young, Ryan M; Toé, Laurent D; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2015-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is utilized to attract mosquitoes and other blood-feeding arthropods to traps around the world. Commercial forms of CO2 (e.g., dry ice and compressed gas) are often unavailable or extremely expensive in developing nations, where vector surveillance is essential to make life-saving decisions. We developed and tested inexpensive and reproducible methods of CO2 production from the combination of acids and carbonates, ranging from very basic (crushed seashells and vinegar) to relatively elaborate (a device that controls the timing of the acid-carbonate reaction and extends the reaction over several hours). When utilized with mosquito traps in Florida, USA and black fly traps in Region des Cascades, Burkina Faso, these carbonate-acid CO2 sources attracted significantly greater numbers of both vector groups, than did unbaited traps. CO2 was generated for more than four hours at levels sufficient to attract vectors over the entire period. The utility of this simple methodology in developing nations should be further evaluated. PMID:26103427

  18. Free and combined amino acids in size-segregated atmospheric aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Filippo, Patrizia; Pomata, Donatella; Riccardi, Carmela; Buiarelli, Francesca; Gallo, Valentina; Quaranta, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Concentrations of free and combined amino acids in an urban atmosphere and their distributions in size-segregated particles were investigated in the cold and warm seasons. In particular this article provides the first investigation of protein bioaerosol concentrations in ultrafine fraction (PM0.1) of particulate matter. In addition the present work provides amino acid and total proteinaceous material concentrations in NIST SRM 1649b, useful as reference values. The reference material was also used to build matrix matched calibration curves. Free amino acid total content in winter and summer PM0.1 was respectively 48.0 and 94.4 ng m-3, representing about 0.7 and 7.4% by weight of urban particulate matter in the two seasons. Total airborne protein and peptide concentrations in the same ultrafine fractions were 93.6 and 449.9 ng m-3 respectively in winter and in summer, representing 7.5 and 35.4% w/w of PM0.1, and demonstrating an exceptionally high percentage in summer ultrafine fraction. The significant potential adverse health effects of ultrafine particulate matter include allergies mainly caused by protein particles and we assumed that in summer 162 ng h-1 of proteinaceous material, by means of ultrafine particles, can penetrate from the lungs into the bloodstream.

  19. Global precipitation measurement (GPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Flaming, Gilbert M.; Adams, W. James; Smith, Eric A.

    2001-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying options for future space-based missions for the EOS Follow-on Era (post 2003), building upon the measurements made by Pre-EOS and EOS First Series Missions. One mission under consideration is the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), a cooperative venture of NASA, Japan, and other international partners. GPM will capitalize on the experience of the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). Its goal is to extend the measurement of rainfall to high latitudes with high temporal frequency, providing a global data set every three hours. A reference concept has been developed consisting of an improved TRMM-like primary satellite with precipitation radar and microwave radiometer to make detailed and accurate estimates of the precipitation structure and a constellation of small satellites flying compact microwave radiometers to provide the required temporal sampling of highly variable precipitation systems. Considering that DMSP spacecraft equipped with SSMIS microwave radiometers, successor NPOESS spacecraft equipped with CMIS microwave radiometers, and other relevant international systems are expected to be in operation during the timeframe of the reference concept, the total number of small satellites required to complete the constellation will be reduced. A nominal plan is to begin implementation in FY'03 with launches in 2007. NASA is presently engaged in advanced mission studies and advanced instrument technology development related to the mission.

  20. Separation and identification of carboxylic acids in MALT samples from the headspace gases in Hanford tank 103C

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Lucke, R.B.

    1993-08-01

    Samples of headspace gases from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) waste storage tank 103C were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry by Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff. The samples were obtained using a cryo-trap sampler designed by WHC and known as the Mobile Analytical Laboratory Trap (MALT). The samples, which were obtained in September 1989, were available in large amounts (200 mi). The specific targets for this analysis were n-butyric, i-butyric, n-valeric, and i-valeric organic acids. Of the acids targeted, only n-butyric was found, and only trace amounts of it were detected with a detection limit below 1 ppM in the extract. The levels found were so low as to cause difficulty in quantitation. All concentrations reported here are for the methanol extract solutions and not the concentrations in the headspace of tank 103C. To calculate concentrations in the headspace, the MALT sampling volume and the methanol rinse volume must be obtained from the MALT personnel at WHC.

  1. Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate and Perfluorooctanoic Acid in Fish Fillet Samples

    PubMed Central

    Paiano, Viviana; Fattore, Elena; Carrà, Andrea; Generoso, Caterina; Fanelli, Roberto; Bagnati, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic (PFOA) acid are persistent contaminants which can be found in environmental and biological samples. A new and fast analytical method is described here for the analysis of these compounds in the edible part of fish samples. The method uses a simple liquid extraction by sonication, followed by a direct determination using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The linearity of the instrumental response was good, with average regression coefficients of 0.9971 and 0.9979 for PFOS and PFOA, respectively, and the coefficients of variation (CV) of the method ranged from 8% to 20%. Limits of detection (LOD) were 0.04 ng/g for both the analytes and recoveries were 90% for PFOS and 76% for PFOA. The method was applied to samples of homogenized fillets of wild and farmed fish from the Mediterranean Sea. Most of the samples showed little or no contamination by perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid, and the highest concentrations detected among the fish species analyzed were, respectively, 5.96 ng/g and 1.89 ng/g. The developed analytical methodology can be used as a tool to monitor and to assess human exposure to perfluorinated compounds through sea food consumption. PMID:22567564

  2. [Microbial diversity and ammonia-oxidizing microorganism of a soil sample near an acid mine drainage lake].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Li-Hua; Hao, Chun-Bo; Li, Lu; Li, Si-Yuan; Feng, Chuan-Ping

    2014-06-01

    The main physicochemical parameters of the soil sample which was collected near an acid mine drainage reservoir in Anhui province was analyzed. The microbial diversity and community structure was studied through the construction of bacteria and archaea 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and ammonia monooxygenase gene clone library of archaea. The functional groups which were responsible for the process of ammonia oxidation were also discussed. The results indicated that the soil sample had extreme low pH value (pH < 3) and high ions concentration, which was influenced by the acid mine drainage (AMD). All the 16S rRNA gene sequences of bacteria clone library fell into 11 phyla, and Acidobacteria played the most significant role in the ecosystem followed by Verrucomicrobia. A great number of acidophilic bacteria existed in the soil sample, such as Candidatus Koribacter versatilis and Holophaga sp.. The archaea clone library consisted of 2 phyla (Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota). The abundance of Thaumarchaeota was remarkably higher than Euryarchaeota. The ammonia oxidation in the soil environment was probably driven by ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and new species of ammonia-oxidizing archaea existed in the soil sample. PMID:25158511

  3. A Study of a Sample of Merritt College Students: Reasons Precipitating Possible Withdrawal, and Attitude Toward Services and Instruction. Research Report No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axtell, Dayton; Coad, Alison

    An in-class survey of a representative sample of 298 students was conducted by Merritt College in March 1979 to determine: (1) the approximate number of students who were considering withdrawal from college; (2) the approximate number who had given withdrawal serious consideration in the past; and (3) the factors which students felt were decisive…

  4. Oxalic-acid leaching of rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples as an anomaly-accentuated technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alminas, Henry V.; Mosier, Elwin L.

    1976-01-01

    In many instances total-rock and sieved-soil and stream-sediment samples lack the sensitivity and contrast required for reconnaissance exploration and necessary in the search for blind ore deposits. Heavy-mineral concentrates incorporate the required sensitivity and contrast but are overly expensive for two reasons: time-consuming sample preparation is required to obtain them, and they cannot be easily derived from all bulk-sample types. Trace-metal-content comparisons of the oxalic-acid-leachable portions with heavy-mineral concentrates show that the leachates are equal to the heavy-mineral concentrates in sensitivity and contrast. Simplicity of preparation and the resultant cost savings are additional advantages of this proposed method.

  5. Mercapturic acids derived from toluene in rat urine samples: identification and measurement by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cosnier, Frédéric; Brochard, Céline; Burgart, Manuella; Cossec, Benoît

    2012-10-01

    Toluene is one of the most widely used CMR chemicals in industry. Worker exposure to this compound is regulated in France, but new, more sensitive methods are required to effectively monitor this exposure. A gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was developed and fully validated for the simultaneous determination of urinary toluene mercapturic acids derived from side chain and ring oxidation, i.e., benzylmercapturic acid and the three isomers o-, m- and p-toluylmercapturic acids, respectively. The method involves a simple and efficient two-step preparation procedure consisting of liquid-liquid extraction of the urinary acids followed by a microwave-assisted esterification of the isolated compounds using 2-propanol. The method meets all the required validation criteria: high selectivity, intra-day and inter-day precision ranges between 1.0 % and 12.4 %, with close to 100 % recovery. Linearity has been shown over the reduced concentration range 0.03-0.5 mg/L whereas a multiplicative model (ln-ln transformation) had to be used to describe the full range of concentrations 0.03-20 mg/L. The limits of detection for the four analytes, ranging from 2.8 to 5.5 μg/L, made the method suitable for their identification and quantification in urine from rats inhaling toluene in the 2 to 200 ppm concentration range. All urine samples from exposed rats contained measurable amounts of all metabolites. This is the first time that o- and m-toluylmercapturic acids have been shown to occur. Our results confirm the hypothesis that toluene mercapturic acids derived from ring oxidation exist in three forms. PMID:22829455

  6. Microbial profiling of South African acid mine water samples using next generation sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Kamika, I; Azizi, S; Tekere, M

    2016-07-01

    This study monitored changes in bacterial and fungal structure in a mine water in a monthly basis over 4 months. Over the 4-month study period, mine water samples contained more bacteria (91.06 %) compared to fungi (8.94 %). For bacteria, mine water samples were dominated by Proteobacteria (39.14 to 65.06 %) followed by Firmicutes (26.34 to 28.9 %) in summer, and Cyanobacteria (27.05 %) in winter. In the collected samples, 18 % of bacteria could not be assigned to a phylum and remained unclassified suggesting hitherto vast untapped microbial diversity especially during winter. The fungal domain was the sole eukaryotic microorganism found in the mine water samples with unclassified fungi (68.2 to 91 %) as the predominant group, followed by Basidiomycota (6.9 to 27.8 %). The time of collection, which was linked to the weather, had higher impact on bacterial community than fungal community. The bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) ranged from 865 to 4052 over the 4-month sampling period, while fungal OTUs varied from 73 to 249. The diversity indices suggested that the bacterial community inhabiting the mine water samples were more diverse than the fungal community. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) results highlighted that the bacterial community variance had the strongest relationship with water temperature, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO) content, as compared to fungi and water characteristics, had the greatest contribution to both bacterial and fungal community variance. The results provided the relationships between microbial community and environmental variables in the studied mining sites. PMID:26980100

  7. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  8. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  9. Two-stage sample-to-answer system based on nucleic acid amplification approach for detection of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Nam, Jeonghun; Kim, Sangho; Lim, Chwee Teck; Park, Mi Kyoung; Shin, Yong

    2016-08-15

    Rapid, early, and accurate diagnosis of malaria is essential for effective disease management and surveillance, and can reduce morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Although significant advances have been achieved for the diagnosis of malaria, these technologies are still far from ideal, being time consuming, complex and poorly sensitive as well as requiring separate assays for sample processing and detection. Therefore, the development of a fast and sensitive method that can integrate sample processing with detection of malarial infection is desirable. Here, we report a two-stage sample-to-answer system based on nucleic acid amplification approach for detection of malaria parasites. It combines the Dimethyl adipimidate (DMA)/Thin film Sample processing (DTS) technique as a first stage and the Mach-Zehnder Interferometer-Isothermal solid-phase DNA Amplification (MZI-IDA) sensing technique as a second stage. The system can extract DNA from malarial parasites using DTS technique in a closed system, not only reducing sample loss and contamination, but also facilitating the multiplexed malarial DNA detection using the fast and accurate MZI-IDA technique. Here, we demonstrated that this system can deliver results within 60min (including sample processing, amplification and detection) with high sensitivity (<1 parasite μL(-1)) in a label-free and real-time manner. The developed system would be of great potential for better diagnosis of malaria in low-resource settings. PMID:27031184

  10. CZE separation of amitrol and triazine herbicides in environmental water samples with acid-assisted on-column preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Alberto Sánchez; Moreno, Mónica; Bermejo, Esperanza; Zapardiel, Antonio; Chicharro, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical scheme for the detection and quantification of amitrol and triazine herbicides (atrazine, ametryn and atraton) and degradation product (2-hydroxyatrazine) in environmental water samples by CZE is reported. On-column preconcentration of analytes from untreated water samples (mineral, spring, tap and river water) is accomplished by introducing an acid plug (200 mM citrate of pH 2.0) after the sample and then proceeding with the CZE separation, using 100 mM formiate buffer of pH 3.5 as running buffer and 25.0 KV as separation voltage. UV detection at 200 nm provides LODs from 50 to 300 nM in untreated samples and they were lowered tenfold by sample preconcentration by evaporation. Calculated recoveries were typically higher than 90%. Minimal detectable concentration of the electroactive amitrol could be decreased about 20-fold when electrochemical detection was employed by monitoring the amperometric signal at +800 mV using a carbon paste electrode (LOD of 9.6 nM, 0.81 μg/L, versus 170 nM, 14.3 μg/L, using amperometric and UV detection, respectively) in untreated water samples. PMID:21254126

  11. Comparison of hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride and oxalic acid leaching of stream sediment and coated rock samples as anomaly enhancement techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filipek, L.H.; Chao, T.T.; Theobald, P.K., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride (H-Hxl) extraction in 25% acetic acid is compared with the commonly used oxalic acid extraction as a method of anomaly enhancement for Cu and Zn in samples from two very different metal deposits and climatic environments. Results obtained on minus-80-mesh stream sediments from an area near the Magruder massive sulfide deposit in Lincoln County, Georgia, where the climate is humid subtropical, indicate that H-Hxl enhances the anomaly for Cu by a factor of 2 and for Zn by a factor of 1.5, compared to the oxalic method. Analyses of Fe oxide-coated rock samples from outcrops overlying the North Silver Bell porphyry copper deposit near Tucson, Arizona, where the climate is semi-arid to arid, indicate that both techniques effectively outline the zones of hydrothermal alteration. The H-Hxl extraction can also perform well in high-carbonate or high-clay environments, where other workers have suggested that oxalic acid is not very effective. Therefore, the H-Hxl method is recommended for general exploration use. ?? 1982.

  12. Integrated, DC voltage-driven nucleic acid diagnostic platform for real sample analysis: Detection of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Slouka, Zdenek; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Shah, Sunny; Lawler, Robin; Shi, Zonggao; Stack, M Sharon; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2015-12-01

    We present an integrated and low-cost microfluidic platform capable of extraction of nucleic acids from real biological samples. We demonstrate the application of this platform in pathogen detection and cancer screening. The integrated platform consists of three units including a pretreatment unit for separation of nucleic acids from lysates, a preconcentration unit for concentration of isolated nucleic acids and a sensing unit localized at a designated position on the chip for specific detection of the target nucleic acid. The platform is based on various electrokinetic phenomena exhibited by ion exchange membranes in a DC electrical field that allow them to serve as molecular filters, analyte preconcentrators and sensors. In this manuscript, we describe each unit of the integrated chip separately and show specific detection of a microRNA (miRNA 146a) biomarker associated with oral cancer as a proof-of-concept experiment. This platform technology can easily be extended to other targets of interest by optimizing the properties of the ion exchange membranes and the specific probes functionalized onto the sensors. PMID:26459441

  13. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  14. HYDROLYSIS OF MTBE TO TBA IN GROUND WATER SAMPLES WITH HYDROCHLORIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional sampling and analytical protocols have poor sensitivity for fuel oxygenates that are alcohols, such as tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Because alcohols are miscible or highly soluble in water, alcohols are not efficiently transferred to the gas chromatograph for analysis....

  15. Influence of UV Light on Phenolic Acid Content of Broccoli Samples (Brassica oleracea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influence of environmental factors (such as rainfall, pests, soil, irrigation levels, and fertilization) on the phenolic composition of fruits and vegetables is well documented in the literature. We have evaluated the significance of ultraviolet light on the phenolic composition of broccoli samples....

  16. Aluminum colloid formation and its effect on co-precipitation of zinc during acid rock drainage remediation with clinoptilolite in a slurry bubble column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Li, L. Y.; Grace, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    Zinc and other metal ions were adsorbed in a laboratory slurry bubble column (SBC) by natural clinoptilolite sorbent particles. During the remediation process, significant white precipitates were sometimes observed. Both zinc and aluminum were detected in the colloidal mixtures. It is shown that Al leached from clinoptilolite during the agitation, contributing to the precipitate. As a result of the Al leaching and increase of pH during the remediation process, the formation of an Al colloid and zinc adsorption onto it could significantly improve ARD remediation, given the high adsorption capacity of the colloid. Sorption of cations increased with increasing colloid formation. Various conditions were tested to investigate their impact on (a) dealumination of clinoptilolite; (b) Al hydrolysis/colloid formation; and (c) adsorption onto the colloidal mixture. The test results indicate that dealumination contributes to the excess aluminum in the aqueous phase and to precipitates. The excess dealumination varies with pH and agitation time. Al hydrolysis occurs with increasing pH due to the neutralization effect of clinoptilolite. A significant proportion of zinc adsorbed onto the collectible aluminum precipitates.

  17. Electrocatalytic simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, uric acid and L-Cysteine in real samples using quercetin silver nanoparticles-graphene nanosheets modified glassy carbon electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Hamid R.; Jahangiri-Dehaghani, Fahime; Shekari, Zahra; Benvidi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    By immobilizing of quercetin at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with silver nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets (Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE) a new sensor has been fabricated. The cyclic voltammogram of Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE shows a stable redox couple with surface confined characteristics. Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE demonstrated a high catalytic activity for L-Cysteine (L-Cys) oxidation. Results indicated that L-Cys peak potential at Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE shifted to less positive values compared to GNs-GCE or AgNPs-GCE. Also, the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient,, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k‧, for the oxidation of L-Cys at the Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE surface were estimated. In differential pulse voltammetric determination, the detection limit of L-Cys was obtained 0.28 μM, and the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9-12.4 μM and 12.4-538.5 μM of L-Cys. Also, the proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), and L-Cys. Finally, this study has demonstrated the practical analytical utility of the sensor for determination of AA in vitamin C tablet, L-Cys in a milk sample and UA in a human urine sample.

  18. [Chemical characteristics of 3-year atmospheric precipitation in summer, Taiyuan].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-fang; Cui, Yang; Wang, Kai-yang; He, Qiu-sheng; Wang, Xin-ming

    2015-02-01

    The chemical characteristics of the precipitation in Taiyuan in summer of 2011-2013 were investigated. The results showed that the pH of precipitation varied from 4.63 to 8.02 with a volume-weighted mean of 5.19. The frequency of acid rain was 37.0%, 31.2% and 17.4%, respectively, in 2011-2013. SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were dominant anions in the precipitation, which accounted for 67.2% and 22.0% of the total anions, respectively. While Ca2+ and NH4+ were dominant cations in the precipitation, which accounted for 55.1% and 29.0% of the total cations, respectively. There were evident declining trends in the concentration of SO4(2-), NO3-, Ca2+ and NH4+ in the precipitation over the study period. The mean ratio of SO4(2-) to NO3(-) in summer precipitation was 3.02, indicating that the acid rain was of sulfuric-nitrous mixed type, however, NO3- was very important for the acidity of rain water. Neutralization factors (NF) were calculated to show that Ca2+ and NH4+ were the predominant neutralizers in rainwater samples, but Mg2+ could also not be negligible. The correlation analysis revealed that coal combustion was the dominant source of chemical composition of rainwater in summer of Taiyuan. The back trajectory analysis demonstrated that the air pollutants of Taiyuan were from the local plants and the coal coking plants in the southern Taiyuan basin. However, to improve the air quality in this city, both industrial emissions from thermal power plants and coal coking plants in Taiyuan basin need to be controlled. PMID:26031061

  19. Electrochemical determination of hydrochlorothiazide and folic acid in real samples using a modified graphene oxide sheet paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Beitollahi, Hadi; Hamzavi, Mozhdeh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    A new ferrocene-derivative compound, 2-chlorobenzoyl ferrocene, was synthesized and used to construct a modified graphene oxide sheet paste electrode. The electrooxidation of hydrochlorothiazide at the surface of the modified electrode was studied. Under optimized conditions, the square wave voltammetric (SWV) peak current of hydrochlorothiazide increased linearly with hydrochlorothiazide concentration in the range of 5.0 × 10(-8) to 2.0 × 10(-4) M and a detection limit of 20.0 nM was obtained for hydrochlorothiazide. The diffusion coefficient and kinetic parameters (such as electron transfer coefficient and the heterogeneous rate constant) for hydrochlorothiazide oxidation were also determined. The prepared modified electrode exhibits a very good resolution between the voltammetric peaks of hydrochlorothiazide and folic acid which makes it suitable for the detection of hydrochlorothiazide in the presence of folic acid in real samples. PMID:25953571

  20. An analytical method for the measurement of trace level acidic and basic AMC using liquid-free sample traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, Tyler M.; Zaloga, Emily C.; Chase, Katherine M.; Lobert, Jürgen M.

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of parts-per-trillion (ppt) level acidic and basic airborne molecular contamination (AMC) is essential for process protection and yield control in semiconductor photo-lithography and adjacent applications. Real-time monitoring solutions are highly desired, as they provide instantaneous and continuous measurement. However, even the most advanced monitors cannot achieve detection limits in the low parts-per-trillion (ppt) range and many restrictions apply for the detection of acidic AMC. High cost of ownership is another disadvantage. Discontinuous sampling with sample traps is capable of achieving ppt-level measurement, but the currently accepted methods use sample traps filled with de-ionized water (impingers) to capture soluble acidic and basic AMC. Several inherent disadvantages of these methods result in inconsistent data and increased detection limits. Some proprietary solid state solutions have been reported, but involve complex preparation, have high background signals and require 24-72 hour sample duration, or they are protected trade secrets that are not available as an industry standard. To eliminate these disadvantages, we developed a liquid-free sample trap that allows parts-per-quadrillion level (ppq) measurement of acidic and basic AMC within one work shift, typically a 4-6 hour sample period. The traps can easily be manufactured and prepared in small lab operations, are sealed and protected from the outside and operator handling in the field, have months of shelf life and show high capture efficiencies while minimizing reactions and artifacts. Capacity results for the liquid-free base trap using ammonia (NH3) as a test gas yielded more than 200 ppb-h at 100% capture efficiency without any moisture (simulating sampling of CDA or N2) and 350 ppb-h at 40% RH. The capacity results for sulfur dioxide (SO2) were highly dependent on moisture content of the sample gas and yielded 5 ppb-h at 90% capture efficiency and 0% RH, but increased

  1. Automated flow-through amperometric immunosensor for highly sensitive and on-line detection of okadaic acid in mussel sample.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Rocio B; Hayat, Akhtar; Sassolas, Audrey; Alonso, Gustavo A; Munoz, Roberto; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2012-09-15

    An electrochemical immunosensor for okadaic acid (OA) detection has been developed, and used in an indirect competitive immunoassay format under automated flow conditions. The biosensor was fabricated by injecting OA modified magnetic beads onto screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) in the flow system. The OA present in the sample competed with the immobilized OA to bind with anti-okadaic acid monoclonal antibody (anti-OA-MAb). The secondary alkaline phosphatase labeled antibody was used to perform electrochemical detection. The current response obtained from the labeled alkaline phosphatase to 1-naphthyl phosphate decreased proportionally to the concentration of free OA in the sample. The calculated limit of detection (LOD) was 0.15 μg/L with a linear range of 0.19-25 μg/L. The good recoveries percentages validated the immunosensor application for real mussel samples. The developed system automatically controlled the incubation, washing and current measurement steps, showing its potential use for OA determination in field analysis. PMID:22967546

  2. Plasma proteome coverage is increased by unique peptide recovery from sodium deoxycholate precipitate.

    PubMed

    Serra, Aida; Zhu, Hongbin; Gallart-Palau, Xavier; Park, Jung Eun; Ho, Hee Haw; Tam, James P; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2016-03-01

    The ionic detergent sodium deoxycholate (SDC) is compatible with in-solution tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS-based shotgun proteomics by virtue of being easy to separate from the peptide products via precipitation in acidic buffers. However, it remains unclear whether unique human peptides co-precipitate with SDC during acid treatment of complex biological samples. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that a large quantity of unique peptides in human blood plasma can be co-precipitated with SDC using an optimized sample preparation method prior to shotgun proteomic analysis. We show that the plasma peptides co-precipitated with SDC can be successfully recovered using a sequential re-solubilization and precipitation procedure, and that this approach is particularly efficient at the extraction of long peptides. Recovery of peptides from the SDC pellet dramatically increased overall proteome coverage (>60 %), thereby improving the identification of low-abundance proteins and enhancing the identification of protein components of membrane-bound organelles. In addition, when we analyzed the physiochemical properties of the co-precipitated peptides, we observed that SDC-based sample preparation improved the identification of mildly hydrophilic/hydrophobic proteins that would otherwise be lost upon discarding the pellet. These data demonstrate that the optimized SDC protocol is superior to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/urea treatment for identifying plasma biomarkers by shotgun proteomics. PMID:26804737

  3. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2010-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will provide enhanced space-based precipitation measurements with sufficient coverage, spatial resolution, temporal sampling, retrieval accuracy, and microphysical information to advance the understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle and to improve predictions of its climate, weather, and hydrometeorological processes. Such improvements will in turn improve decision support systems in broad societal applications (e.g. water resource management, agriculture, transportation, etc). GPM is a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), building upon their highly successful partnership on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The GPM architecture consists of NASA satellites operating in partnership with other earth-observing satellites and instruments to produce global precipitation science data. The current generation of multi-satellite global precipitation products based on microwave/infrared sensors from uncoordinated satellite missions has for its anchor the TRMM precipitation radar and the TRMM Microwave Imager measurements over the tropics and subtropics (+/- 35 degrees latitude), with a mean sampling time of approximately 17 hours. The GPM mission will deploy a spaceborne Core Observatory as a reference standard to unify a space constellation of research and operational microwave sensors aimed at providing uniformly calibrated precipitation measurements globally every 2-4 hours. The Core Observatory measurements will provide, for the first time, quantitative information on precipitation particle size distribution needed for improving the accuracy of precipitation estimates by microwave radiometers and radars. In addition, the GPM will also include a second microwave radiometer and a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) communications subsystem for near real time data relay for a future partner-provided constellation satellite. This second GPM Microwave Imager (GMI

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of copper(II) in pharmaceutical, biological and water samples by 4-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, E. Y.; Seleim, M. M.; El-Zohry, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    A highly sensitive method is proposed to determine copper(II) ions by forming a stable complex through their interaction with 4-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-salicylic acid (BTAS) at room temperature and pH of about 5.0. The complex gave a maximum absorption at λ = 485 nm with a molar absorptivity coefficient of 2.35·104 l/(mol·cm). The linear range for the copper determination is 0.63-5.04 mg/l. The method can be applied to determine copper ions in different biological specimens like some drugs and water samples.

  5. Mechanisms by which acid precipitation produces embryonic death in aquatic vertebrates. Technical completion report, 1 May 1977-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Pough, F.H.

    1981-03-01

    Fourteen species of amphibians show a general similarity in their tolerance of acid media during embryonic development. More than 85% mortality is produced by pHs of 3.7 to 3.9 and more than 50% mortality occurs at pHs of 4.0 or less. Similar values have been reported for fishes. The sensitivity of amphibian embryos to acidity is greater in late stages of their development than it is during the initial cleavage of the embryos. The teratogenic effects of acidity appear to be the result of damage to the superficial tissues of the embryo. A similar response occurs in fish embryos. Because of the similarity of sensitivity and response to acidity of fishes and amphibians, the latter animals are suitable experimental models for investigations of the details of acid resistance. Controlled breedings of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) indicated that the offspring of some pairs of parents were more resistant to acidity than those of other pairs. Wild populations of spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) breeding in some ponds in the Ithaca, New York, region have probably been exposed to increasingly acid conditions for the past three decades (10 or more generations). In the most acid ponds more than 70% of the embryos die before hatching. Despite the intensity and duration of this selection, it was not possible to demonstrate any difference in sensitivity to acidity between eggs collected from acidic and neutral breeding sites.

  6. DNA recognition by peptide nucleic acid-modified PCFs: from models to real samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selleri, S.; Coscelli, E.; Poli, F.; Passaro, D.; Cucinotta, A.; Lantano, C.; Corradini, R.; Marchelli, R.

    2010-04-01

    The increased concern, emerged in the last few years, on food products safety has stimulated the research on new techniques for traceability of raw food materials. DNA analysis is one of the most powerful tools for the certification of food quality, and it is presently performed through the polymerase chain reaction technique. Photonic crystal fibers, due to the presence of an array of air holes running along their length, can be exploited for performing DNA recognition by derivatizing hole surfaces and checking hybridization of complementary nucledotide chains in the sample. In this paper the application of a suspended core photonic crystal fiber in the recognition of DNA sequences is discussed. The fiber is characterized in terms of electromagnetic properties by means of a full-vector modal solver based on the finite element method. Then, the performances of the fiber in the recognition of mall synthetic oligonucleotides are discussed, together with a test of the possibility to extend this recognition to samples of DNA of applicative interest, such as olive leaves.

  7. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  8. Continuous analysis of δ¹⁸O and δD values of water by diffusion sampling cavity ring-down spectrometry: a novel sampling device for unattended field monitoring of precipitation, ground and surface waters.

    PubMed

    Munksgaard, Niels C; Wurster, Chris M; Bird, Michael I

    2011-12-30

    A novel sampling device suitable for continuous, unattended field monitoring of rapid isotopic changes in environmental waters is described. The device utilises diffusion through porous PTFE tubing to deliver water vapour continuously from a liquid water source for analysis of δ¹⁸O and δD values by Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometry (CRDS). Separation of the analysed water vapour from non-volatile dissolved and particulate contaminants in the liquid sample minimises spectral interferences associated with CRDS analyses of many aqueous samples. Comparison of isotopic data for a range of water samples analysed by Diffusion Sampling-CRDS (DS-CRDS) and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) shows significant linear correlations between the two methods allowing for accurate standardisation of DS-CRDS data. The internal precision for an integration period of 3 min (standard deviation (SD) = 0.1‰ and 0.3‰ for δ¹⁸O and δD values, respectively) is similar to analysis of water by CRDS using an autosampler to inject and evaporate discrete water samples. The isotopic effects of variable air temperature, water vapour concentration, water pumping rate and dissolved organic content were found to be either negligible or correctable by analysis of water standards. The DS-CRDS system was used to analyse the O and H isotope composition in short-lived rain events. Other applications where finely time resolved water isotope data may be of benefit include recharge/discharge in groundwater/river systems and infiltration-related changes in cave drip water. PMID:22468325

  9. Label-free imaging of fatty acid content within yeast samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, N.; Moger, J.

    2013-02-01

    Fungi have been found to be an underlying cause of 70% of all plant and animal extinctions caused by infectious diseases. Fungal infections are a growing problem affecting global health, food production and ecosystems. Lipid metabolism is a promising target for antifungal drugs and since effective treatment of fungal infections requires a better understanding of the effects of antifungal agents at the cellular level, new techniques are needed to investigate this problem. Recent advances in nonlinear microscopy allow chemically-specific contrast to be obtained non-invasively from intrinsic chemical bonds within live samples using advanced spectroscopy techniques probing Raman-active resonances. We present preliminary data using Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy as a means to visualise lipid droplets within individual living fungi by probing Raman resonances of the CH stretching region between 2825cm-1 and 3030cm-1.

  10. Chemical fingerprinting of naphthenic acids and oil sands process waters-A review of analytical methods for environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Headley, J V; Peru, K M; Mohamed, M H; Frank, R A; Martin, J W; Hazewinkel, R R O; Humphries, D; Gurprasad, N P; Hewitt, L M; Muir, D C G; Lindeman, D; Strub, R; Young, R F; Grewer, D M; Whittal, R M; Fedorak, P M; Birkholz, D A; Hindle, R; Reisdorph, R; Wang, X; Kasperski, K L; Hamilton, C; Woudneh, M; Wang, G; Loescher, B; Farwell, A; Dixon, D G; Ross, M; Pereira, A Dos Santos; King, E; Barrow, M P; Fahlman, B; Bailey, J; McMartin, D W; Borchers, C H; Ryan, C H; Toor, N S; Gillis, H M; Zuin, L; Bickerton, G; Mcmaster, M; Sverko, E; Shang, D; Wilson, L D; Wrona, F J

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a review of the routine methods currently utilized for total naphthenic acid analyses. There is a growing need to develop chemical methods that can selectively distinguish compounds found within industrially derived oil sands process affected waters (OSPW) from those derived from the natural weathering of oil sands deposits. Attention is thus given to the characterization of other OSPW components such as oil sands polar organic compounds, PAHs, and heavy metals along with characterization of chemical additives such as polyacrylamide polymers and trace levels of boron species. Environmental samples discussed cover the following matrices: OSPW containments, on-lease interceptor well systems, on- and off-lease groundwater, and river and lake surface waters. There are diverse ranges of methods available for analyses of total naphthenic acids. However, there is a need for inter-laboratory studies to compare their accuracy and precision for routine analyses. Recent advances in high- and medium-resolution mass spectrometry, concomitant with comprehensive mass spectrometry techniques following multi-dimensional chromatography or ion-mobility separations, have allowed for the speciation of monocarboxylic naphthenic acids along with a wide range of other species including humics. The distributions of oil sands polar organic compounds, particularly the sulphur containing species (i.e., OxS and OxS2) may allow for distinguishing sources of OSPW. The ratios of oxygen- (i.e., Ox) and nitrogen-containing species (i.e., NOx, and N2Ox) are useful for differentiating organic components derived from OSPW from natural components found within receiving waters. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy also provides a powerful screening technique capable of quickly detecting the presence of aromatic organic acids contained within oil sands naphthenic acid mixtures. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy provides diagnostic profiles for OSPW and potentially impacted

  11. Fast quantification of α-lipoic acid in biological samples and dietary supplements using batch injection analysis with amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Santos Pereira, Laise Nayra Dos; da Silva, Iranaldo Santos; Araújo, Thaylan Pinheiro; Tanaka, Auro Atsushi; Angnes, Lúcio

    2016-07-01

    Batch injection analysis (BIA) with amperometric detection, using a pyrolytic graphite electrode modified with cobalt phthalocyanine (PG/CoPc), was employed for determination of α-lipoic acid (ALA) in pharmaceutical product and in synthetic urine samples. The proposed BIA method is based on the application of a potential of +0.9V vs. Ag/AgCl, KCl sat, enabling quantification of ALA over a concentration range from 1.3×10(-6) to 1.0×10(-4)molL(-1), with a detection limit of 1.5×10(-8)molL(-1). A sampling rate of 180 injections per hour was attained and measurements of the reproducibility of successive injections (100µmolL(-1) ALA on the same electrode) showed a RSD of 2.11% for 40 successive injections. The new sensor was utilised for ALA quantification in a dietary pharmaceutical supplement and in synthetic urine and the results obtained for both samples were compared with parallel analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the method recommended by the United States Pharmacopeia. The results obtained were similar (at a 95% confidence level) and in the case of the synthetic urine sample (prepared with a known amount of ALA) the recovery was situated between 98.0% and 102.6%. PMID:27154671

  12. A Fully Integrated Paperfluidic Molecular Diagnostic Chip for the Extraction, Amplification, and Detection of Nucleic Acids from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Natalia M.; Wong, Winnie S.; Liu, Lena; Dewar, Rajan; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Paper diagnostics have successfully been employed to detect the presence of antigens or small molecules in clinical samples through immunoassays; however, the detection of many disease targets relies on the much higher sensitivity and specificity achieved via nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). The steps involved in NAAT have recently begun to be explored in paper matrices, and our group, among others, has reported on paper-based extraction, amplification, and detection of DNA and RNA targets. Here, we integrate these paper-based NAAT steps onto a single paperfluidic chip in a modular, foldable system that allows for fully integrated fluidic handling from sample to result. We showcase the functionality of the chip by combining nucleic acid isolation, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA directly from crude cervical specimens in under 1 hour for rapid, early detection of cervical cancer. The chip is made entirely of paper and adhesive sheets, making it low-cost, portable, and disposable, and offering the potential for a point-of-care molecular diagnostic platform even in remote and resource-limited settings. PMID:26785636

  13. Mass spectrometric behavior of phenolic acids standards and their analysis in the plant samples with LC/ESI/MS system.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Wojciech; Wojakowska, Anna; Grajzer, Magdalena; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2014-09-15

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) is one of analytical techniques to obtain accurate results of low molecular weight aromatic compounds in biological samples of different origin. The interpretations of mass spectra of these aromatic compounds in the negative spectra registered in the full scan MS mode may be uneasy due to presence of deprotonated molecules [M-H](-) from different co-eluting entities, fragment ions created after the break-up of precursor ions and also ions representing modified molecules clusters. Thus, the first aim of this study was to evaluate general parameters during analysis performed in the full scan MS or MS/MS mode. Secondly, to set general fragmentation rules for aromatic compounds and entities in a complex biological matrix. We established that different groups of low molecular weight phenolic acids form unique adduct ions and additionally registration LC/MS/MS spectra with two different collision energies may allow for differentiating isomeric or isobaric molecules. These findings together with some general fragmentation rules can facilitate identifications of aromatic acids as we outlined in the sample of cold-pressed rose-hip oil and lupine leaves extract. PMID:25063924

  14. Colorimetric detection of Bi (III) in water and drug samples using pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid modified silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Somayeh; Khayatian, Gholamreza

    2015-09-01

    A new selective, simple, fast and sensitive method is developed for sensing assay of Bi (III) using pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid or dipicolinic acid (DPA) modified silver nanoparticles (DPA-AgNPs). Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized by reducing silver nitrate (AgNO3) with sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in the presence of DPA. Bismuth detection is based on color change of nanoparticle solution from yellow to red that is induced in the presence of Bi (III). Aggregation of DPA-AgNPs has been confirmed with UV-vis absorption spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Under the optimized conditions, a good linear relationship (correlation coefficient r = 0.995) is obtained between the absorbance ratio (A525/A390) and the concentration of Bi (III) in the 0.40-8.00 μM range. This colorimetric probe allows Bi (III) to be rapidly quantified with a 0.01 μM limit of detection. The present method successfully applied to determine bismuth in real water and drug samples. Recoveries of water samples were in the range of 91.2-99.6%.

  15. Flow-Injection Determination of Thiabendazole Fungicide in Water Samples Using a Diperiodatocuprate(III)-Sulfuric Acid-Chemiluminescence System.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Mohammad; Yaqoob, Mohammad; Munawar, Nusrat; Nabi, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Chemiluminescence (CL) with a flow-injection method is reported for the determination of thiabendazole (TBZ) fungicide based on its enhancement effect on diperiodatocuprate(III) (DPC)-sulfuric acid-CL system. The calibration graph was linear in the concentration range of 1 - 2000 μg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9999, n = 8) with a limit of detection (S/N = 3) of 0.3 μg L(-1). The injection throughput was 160 h(-1) with relative standard deviations (RSD, n = 4) of 1.1 - 2.9% in the concentration range studied. The experimental variables e.g., reagents concentrations, flow rates, sample volume, and PMT voltage were optimized, and the potential interferences were investigated individually. The method was successfully applied to the determination of TBZ in water samples showing good agreement and recovery in the range of 92 ± 2.2 - 108 ± 3% (n = 3) using dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME). The possible CL reaction mechanism for DPC-sulfuric acid-TBZ is also discussed. PMID:26960615

  16. Application of a nanostructured platform and imprinted sol-gel film for determination of chlorogenic acid in food samples.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carla M; Miguel, Eliane M; Silva, Jonadab Dos S; Silva, Cristian B da; Goulart, Marília O F; Kubota, Lauro T; Gonzaga, Fabiano B; Santos, Wilney J R; Lima, Phabyanno R

    2016-08-15

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a polyphenol derivative that widely exists in higher plants like fruits, vegetables, black teas, and some traditional Chinese medicines. In this work, we have proposed a sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor for detection of CGA. The sensor was based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a functional platform by grafting vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and covered by a molecularly imprinted siloxane (MIS) film prepared using the sol-gel process. The VTMS was grafted onto the surface of the MWCNTs via in situ free radical polymerization. The MIS was obtained from the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis/condensation of a solution consisting of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), phenyltriethoxysilane (PTEOS), (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS), and CGA as a template molecule. The modification procedure was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under optimized operational conditions, a linear response was obtained covering a concentration ranging from 0.08μmolL(-1) to 500μmolL(-1) with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.032μmolL(-1). The proposed sensor was applied to CGA determination in coffee, tomato, and apple samples with recoveries ranging from 99.3% to 108.6%, showing a promising potential application in food samples. Additionally, the imprinted sensor showed a significantly higher affinity for target CGA than the non-imprinted siloxane (NIS) sensor. PMID:27260443

  17. A fully integrated paperfluidic molecular diagnostic chip for the extraction, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids from clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Natalia M; Wong, Winnie S; Liu, Lena; Dewar, Rajan; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2016-02-21

    Paper diagnostics have successfully been employed to detect the presence of antigens or small molecules in clinical samples through immunoassays; however, the detection of many disease targets relies on the much higher sensitivity and specificity achieved via nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). The steps involved in NAAT have recently begun to be explored in paper matrices, and our group, among others, has reported on paper-based extraction, amplification, and detection of DNA and RNA targets. Here, we integrate these paper-based NAAT steps into a single paperfluidic chip in a modular, foldable system that allows for fully integrated fluidic handling from sample to result. We showcase the functionality of the chip by combining nucleic acid isolation, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA directly from crude cervical specimens in less than 1 hour for rapid, early detection of cervical cancer. The chip is made entirely of paper and adhesive sheets, making it low-cost, portable, and disposable, and offering the potential for a point-of-care molecular diagnostic platform even in remote and resource-limited settings. PMID:26785636

  18. Colorimetric detection of Bi (III) in water and drug samples using pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid modified silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Somayeh; Khayatian, Gholamreza

    2015-09-01

    A new selective, simple, fast and sensitive method is developed for sensing assay of Bi (III) using pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid or dipicolinic acid (DPA) modified silver nanoparticles (DPA-AgNPs). Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized by reducing silver nitrate (AgNO3) with sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in the presence of DPA. Bismuth detection is based on color change of nanoparticle solution from yellow to red that is induced in the presence of Bi (III). Aggregation of DPA-AgNPs has been confirmed with UV-vis absorption spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Under the optimized conditions, a good linear relationship (correlation coefficient r=0.995) is obtained between the absorbance ratio (A525/A390) and the concentration of Bi (III) in the 0.40-8.00 μM range. This colorimetric probe allows Bi (III) to be rapidly quantified with a 0.01 μM limit of detection. The present method successfully applied to determine bismuth in real water and drug samples. Recoveries of water samples were in the range of 91.2-99.6%. PMID:25919329

  19. As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb pressurized liquid extraction with acetic acid from marine sediment and soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Alonso-Rodríguez, Elia; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2006-12-01

    Rapid leaching procedures by Pressurized Liquid Extraction (PLE) have been developed for As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb leaching from environmental matrices (marine sediment and soil samples). The Pressurized Liquid Extraction is completed after 16 min. The released elements by acetic acid Pressurized Liquid Extraction have been evaluated by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. The optimum multi-element leaching conditions when using 5.0 ml stainless steel extraction cells, were: acetic acid concentration 8.0 M, extraction temperature 100 °C, pressure 1500 psi, static time 5 min, flush solvent 60%, two extraction steps and 0.50 g of diatomaceous earth as dispersing agent (diatomaceous earth mass/sample mass ratio of 2). Results have showed that high acetic acid concentrations and high extraction temperatures increase the metal leaching efficiency. Limits of detection (between 0.12 and 0.5 μg g - 1 ) and repeatability of the over-all procedure (around 6.0%) were assessed. Finally, accuracy was studied by analyzing PACS-2 (marine sediment), GBW-07409 (soil), IRANT-12-1-07 (cambisol soil) and IRANT-12-1-08 (luvisol soil) certified reference materials (CRMs). These certified reference materials offer certified concentrations ranges between 2.9 and 26.2 μg g - 1 for As, from 0.068 to 2.85 μg g - 1 for Cd, between 26.4 and 90.7 μg g - 1 for Cr, from 9.3 to 40.0 μg g - 1 for Ni and between 16.3 and 183.0 μg g - 1 for Pb. Recoveries after analysis were between 95.7 and 105.1% for As, 96.2% for Cd, 95.2 and 100.6% for Cr, 95.7 and 103% for Ni and 94.2 and 105.5% for Pb.

  20. Ion balances of size-resolved tropospheric aerosol samples: implications for the acidity and atmospheric processing of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Hillamo, Risto; Teinilä, Kimmo; Pakkanen, Tuomo; Allegrini, Ivo; Sparapani, Roberto

    A large set of size-resolved aerosol samples was inspected with regard to their ion balance to shed light on how the aerosol acidity changes with particle size in the lower troposphere and what implications this might have for the atmospheric processing of aerosols. Quite different behaviour between the remote and more polluted environments could be observed. At the remote sites, practically the whole accumulation mode had cation-to-anion ratios clearly below unity, indicating that these particles were quite acidic. The supermicron size range was considerably less acidic and may in some cases have been close to neutral or even alkaline. An interesting feature common to the remote sites was a clear jump in the cation-to-anion ratio when going from the accumulation to the Aitken mode. The most likely reason for this was cloud processing which, via in-cloud sulphate production, makes the smallest accumulation-mode particles more acidic than the non-activated Aitken-mode particles. A direct consequence of the less acidic nature of the Aitken mode is that it can take up semi-volatile, water-soluble gases much easier than the accumulation mode. This feature may have significant implications for atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei production in remote environments. In rural and urban locations, the cation-to-anion ratio was close to unity over most of the accumulation mode, but increased significantly when going to either larger or smaller particle sizes. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the supermicron size range were ascribed to carbonate associated with mineral dust. The ubiquitous presence of carbonate in these particles indicates that they were neutral or alkaline, making them good sites for heterogeneous reactions involving acidic trace gases. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the Aitken mode suggest that these particles contained some water-soluble anions not detected by our chemical analysis. This is worth keeping in mind when investigating the hygroscopic

  1. Preconcentration and Determination of Mefenamic Acid in Pharmaceutical and Biological Fluid Samples by Polymer-grafted Silica Gel Solid-phase Extraction Following High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri Sadeghi, Hayedeh; Panahi, Homayon Ahmad; Mahabadi, Mahsa; Moniri, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Mefenamic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that has analgesic, anti-infammatory and antipyretic actions. It is used to relieve mild to moderate pains. Solid-phase extraction of mefenamic acid by a polymer grafted to silica gel is reported. Poly allyl glycidyl ether/iminodiacetic acid-co-N, N-dimethylacrylamide was synthesized and grafted to silica gel and was used as an adsorbent for extraction of trace mefenamic acid in pharmaceutical and biological samples. Different factors affecting the extraction method were investigated and optimum conditions were obtained. The optimum pH value for sorption of mefenamic acid was 4.0. The sorption capacity of grafted adsorbent was 7.0 mg/g. The best eluent solvent was found to be trifluoroacetic acid-acetic acid in methanol with a recovery of 99.6%. The equilibrium adsorption data of mefenamic acid by grafted silica gel was analyzed by Langmuir model. The conformation of obtained data to Langmuir isotherm model reveals the homogeneous binding sites of grafted silica gel surface. Kinetic study of the mefenamic acid sorption by grafted silica gel indicates the good accessibility of the active sites in the grafted polymer. The sorption rate of the investigated mefenamic acid on the grafted silica gel was less than 5 min. This novel synthesized adsorbent can be successfully applied for the extraction of trace mefenamic acid in human plasma, urine and pharmaceutical samples. PMID:26330865

  2. Hydrocarbonates in precipitation of Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Igor; Eremina, Iren; Aloyan, Artash; Arutunan, Vardan; Chubarova, Natalia; Yermakov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    According to monitoring of the atmospheric precipitation of Moscow a number of episodes is revealed, the content of hydrocarbonates in which repeatedly surpasses equilibrium level. Facts of their registration are linked to complex structure of precipitation which is caused by a different chemical composition of condensation nucleus. As a result on the underlying surface two groups of drops with acidity of the different nature are transferred. The acidity of the first, "metal" group of droplets, is determined by a carbonate equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 and with dissolved carbonates of alkali and alkaline earth metals. The acidity of the second, "ammonium" group droplets, is characterized by the balance between an ammonia absorbed from the air and atmospheric acids. Regulation of acidity of the deposits measured in a course of monitoring, occurs for this reason not only in the air, but also in the condensate receiver. A mixing "metal" and "ammonium" groups precipitation accompanied by only a partial transfer of hydrocarbonates in the dissolved CO2. The process is braked as a result of a practical stop of exit of CO2 into the atmosphere because of a mass transfer deceleration. In turn it leads to excess of equilibrium level of hydrocarbonates in the receiver. Estimates show that the acidity of "ammonia" component of precipitation should be much higher than the reported monitoring data. In other words, real acidity of rain drops can essentially exceed that is measured by standard procedures of monitoring of deposits, that it is necessary to take into consideration at calculations of so-called critical levels of acid loading on people and environment. In other words, the actual acidity of raindrops could greatly exceed that is measured by the standard procedures for monitoring rainfall, which should be taken into account when calculating the so-called critical levels of acid loads on people and the environment. It follows that the true level of hazard of acid rain

  3. In-capillary derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid for the simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate, benzoic acid, and sorbic acid in food samples via capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Aung, Hnin-Pwint; Pyell, Ute

    2016-06-01

    For the rapid simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate (MSG), benzoic acid (BA), and sorbic acid (SA) in canned food and other processed food samples, we developed a method that combines in-capillary derivatization with separation by capillary electrophoresis. This method employs the rapid derivatization of MSG with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) and enables the detection of the resulting OPA-MSG derivative and of non-derivatized BA and SA at 230nm. The composition of the background electrolyte and the parameters of derivatization and separation are as follows: 25mM borax containing 5mM OPA and 6mM 3-MPA, separation voltage 25mV, injection at 30mbar for 20s, and column temperature 25°C. Because of the high reaction rate and suitably adapted effective electrophoretic mobilities, band broadening due to the derivatization reaction at the start of the separation process is kept to a minimum. The optimized method is validated with respect to LOD, LOQ, linearity, recovery, and precision. This method can be applied to real samples such as soy, fish, oyster and sweet and sour chili sauces after application of appropriate clean-up steps. Mechanisms of zone broadening and zone focusing are discussed showing the validity of the employed theoretical approach regarding the dependence of the peak shape for OPA-MSG on the concentration of MSG in the sample. PMID:27156753

  4. Microscopic and mesoscopic structural features of an activated carbon sample, prepared from sorghum via activation by phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Temleitner, László; Pusztai, László; Rubio-Arroyo, Manuel F.; Aguilar-López, Sergio; Pizio, Orest

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation of a new activated carbon sample from sorghum. ► Characterization by adsorption/desorption methods. ► Determination of the structure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. ► The sample is amorphous and contains distorted graphene fragments. ► A characteristic nanoscale distance is established from the radial distribution function. -- Abstract: An acidic chemical activation procedure has been used for preparing activated carbon with a surface area exceeding 1000 m{sup 2}/g from sorghum. In order to reveal structural features, synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed. The structure of the material has been characterized by the total scattering structure factor and the radial distribution function describing short-range arrangement of atoms at distances of the order of a few atomic diameters as well as correlations at a longer scale, of the order of nanometers. The atomic arrangement has been found to be consistent with that of amorphous graphite-like carbon. As far as the mesoscopic structure is concerned, the presence of a characteristic distance is suggested on the basis of the clear nanometer scale oscillations of the radial distribution function, which distance may be assigned as the mesopore size in the material. It is suggested that the approach devized here may later be applied routinely for other activated carbon samples, too, for characterizing atomic and nanoscale order simultaneously.

  5. Development of a gas chromatographic test for the quantitation of the biomarker 2-butoxyacetic acid in urine samples.

    PubMed

    B'Hymer, C

    2007-08-01

    An accurate and precise method is developed and evaluated for the detection and quantitation of 2-butoxyacetic acid (2-BAA), a metabolite and biomarker for human exposure to 2-butoxyethanol. The solvent 2-butoxyethanol (2-BE) is extensively used in various industrial and domestic applications, and it is a health concern owing to its toxicity. Sample preparation consists of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of urine, then esterification of 2-BAA to produce the ethyl ester analog. The gas chromatographic conditions utilize a dimethyl polysiloxane phase (HP-1) capillary column and a mass spectrometer (MS) for detection of the analyte. Validation of this method includes a recovery study using fortified urine samples, which demonstrated good accuracy and precision; recovery varied between 100% and 102% of theory, with relative standard deviations of replicate samples at 2.8% and less. The detection limit of this method ranges from 0.005 to 0.015 microg/mL equivalent level of 2-BAA in urine. PMID:17725869

  6. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application: an ex vivo study in human skin.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N; Sorensen, J A; Brosen, K; Nielsen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin - dermal microdialysis (DMD) - is a unique technique for sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling of dermatological drug concentrations in the dermis. Debate has concerned the existence of a correlation between the depth of the sampling device - the probe - in the dermis and the amount of drug sampled following topical drug administration. This study evaluates the relation between probe depth and drug sampling using dermal DMD sampling ex vivo in human skin. We used superficial (<1 mm), intermediate (1-2 mm) and deep (>2 mm) positioning of the linear MD probe in the dermis of human abdominal skin, followed by topical application of 4 mg/ml of benzoic acid (BA) in skin chambers overlying the probes. Dialysate was sampled every hour for 12 h and analysed for BA content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial probes: 3,335 ± 1,094 μg·h/ml (mean ± SD); intermediate probes: 2,178 ± 1,068 μg·h/ml, and deep probes: 1,159 ± 306 μg·h/ml. AUC(0-12) sampled by the superficial probes was significantly higher than that of samples from the intermediate and deeply positioned probes (p value <0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between probe depth and AUC(0-12) sampled by the same probe (p value <0.001, r(2) value = 0.5). The mean extrapolated lag-times (±SD) for the superficial probes were 0.8 ± 0.1 h, for the intermediate probes 1.7 ± 0.5 h, and for the deep probes 2.7 ± 0.5 h, which were all significantly different from each other (p value <0.05). In conclusion, this paper demonstrates that there is an inverse relationship between the depth of the probe in the dermis

  7. Acid precipitation: effects on fresh-water ecosystems. January 1978-September 1988 (Citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for January 1978-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the effects of acidification of fresh-water ecosystems. Algae and diatom distribution, survival, and reproduction rates of specific fish species under acid-lake conditions, and tolerance to stress caused by acidic conditions in fresh water ecosystems are studied. Effects of water ph on trace metal toxicity to fresh water organisms is briefly considered. Control and reduction of acidification is excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 290 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  8. Assessment of metal loads in watersheds affected by acid mine drainage by using tracer injection and synoptic sampling: Cement Creek, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Runkel, R.L.; Walton-Day, K.; Bencala, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    Watersheds in mineralized zones may contain many mines, each of which can contribute to acidity and the metal load of a stream. In this study the authors delineate hydrogeologic characteristics determining the transport of metals from the watershed to the stream in the watershed of Cement Creek, Colorado. Combining the injection of a chemical tracer, to determine a discharge, with synoptic sampling, to obtain chemistry of major ions and metals, spatially detailed load profiles are quantified. Using the discharge and load profiles, the authors (1) identified sampled inflow sources which emanate from undisturbed as well as previously mined areas; (2) demonstrate, based on simple hydrologic balance, that unsampled, likely dispersed subsurface, inflows are significant; and (3) estimate attenuation. For example, along the 12-km study reach, 108 kg per day of Zn were added to Cement Creek. Almost half of this load came from 10 well-defined areas that included both mined and non-mined parts of the watershed. However, the combined effect of many smaller inflows also contributed a substantial load that could limit the effectiveness of remediation. Of the total Zn load, 58.3 kg/day came from stream segments with no visible inflow, indicating the importance of contributions from dispersed subsurface inflow. The subsurface inflow mostly occurred in areas with substantial fracturing of the bedrock or in areas downstream from tributaries with large alluvial fans. Despite a pH generally less than 4.5, there was 58.4 kg/day of Zn attenuation that occurred in mixing zones downstream from inflows with high pH. Mixing zones can have local areas of pH that are high enough for sorption and precipitation reactions to have an effect. Principal component analysis classified inflows into 7 groups with distinct chemical signatures that represent water-rock interaction with different mineral-alteration suites in the watershed. The present approach provides a detailed snapshot of metal load

  9. How accurate and precise are limited sampling strategies in estimating exposure to mycophenolic acid in people with autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Abd Rahman, Azrin N; Tett, Susan E; Staatz, Christine E

    2014-03-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a potent immunosuppressant agent, which is increasingly being used in the treatment of patients with various autoimmune diseases. Dosing to achieve a specific target MPA area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h post-dose (AUC12) is likely to lead to better treatment outcomes in patients with autoimmune disease than a standard fixed-dose strategy. This review summarizes the available published data around concentration monitoring strategies for MPA in patients with autoimmune disease and examines the accuracy and precision of methods reported to date using limited concentration-time points to estimate MPA AUC12. A total of 13 studies were identified that assessed the correlation between single time points and MPA AUC12 and/or examined the predictive performance of limited sampling strategies in estimating MPA AUC12. The majority of studies investigated mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) rather than the enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) formulation of MPA. Correlations between MPA trough concentrations and MPA AUC12 estimated by full concentration-time profiling ranged from 0.13 to 0.94 across ten studies, with the highest associations (r (2) = 0.90-0.94) observed in lupus nephritis patients. Correlations were generally higher in autoimmune disease patients compared with renal allograft recipients and higher after MMF compared with EC-MPS intake. Four studies investigated use of a limited sampling strategy to predict MPA AUC12 determined by full concentration-time profiling. Three studies used a limited sampling strategy consisting of a maximum combination of three sampling time points with the latest sample drawn 3-6 h after MMF intake, whereas the remaining study tested all combinations of sampling times. MPA AUC12 was best predicted when three samples were taken at pre-dose and at 1 and 3 h post-dose with a mean bias and imprecision of 0.8 and 22.6 % for multiple linear regression analysis and of -5.5 and 23.0 % for

  10. Influence of citric acid as chemical modifier for lead determination in dietary calcium supplement samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezar Paz de Mattos, Julio; Medeiros Nunes, Adriane; Figueiredo Martins, Ayrton; Luiz Dressler, Valderi; Marlon de Moraes Flores, Érico

    2005-06-01

    Citric acid was used as a chemical modifier for Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in dietary supplement samples (calcium carbonate, dolomite and oyster shell samples) and its efficiency was compared to the use of palladium. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were established without use of chemical modifier, with the addition of 20, 100 and 200 μg of citric acid, and with 3 μg of palladium. The citric acid modifier made possible the interference-free Pb determination in the presence of high concentrations of Ca and Mg nitrates. Acid sample digestion involving closed vessels (microwave-assisted and conventional heating) and acid attack using polypropylene vessels at room temperature were compared. All digestion procedures presented similar results for calcium carbonate and dolomite samples. However, for oyster shell samples accurate results were obtained only with the use of closed vessel systems. Analyte addition and matrix-matched standards were used for calibration. The characteristic mass for Pb using citric acid and palladium were 16 and 25 pg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was always less than 5% when citric acid was used. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.02 μg g - 1 and 8 pg with citric acid and 0.1 μg g - 1 and 44 pg with the Pd modifier, respectively ( n = 10, 3σ). The recovery of Pb in spiked calcium supplement samples (10 μg l - 1 ) was between 98% and 105%. With the use of 100 μg of citric acid as chemical modifier, problems such as high background absorption and high RSD values were minimized in comparison to the addition of 3 μg of palladium.

  11. Voltammetric determination of mixtures of caffeine and chlorogenic acid in beverage samples using a boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Yardım, Yavuz; Keskin, Ertugrul; Şentürk, Zühre

    2013-11-15

    Herein, a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode that is anodically pretreated was used for the simultaneous determination of caffeine (CAF) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) by cyclic and adsorptive stripping voltammetry. The dependence of peak current and potential on pH, scan rate, accumulation parameters and other experimental variables were studied. By using square-wave stripping mode after 60 s accumulation under open-circuit voltage, the BDD electrode was able to separate the oxidation peak potentials of CAF and CGA present in binary mixtures by about 0.4V in Britton-Robinson buffer at pH 1.0. The limits of detection were 0.107 µg mL(-1) (5.51×10(-7) M) for CAF, and 0.448 µg mL(-1) (1.26×10(-6) M) for CGA. The practical applicability of this methodology was tested in commercially available beverage samples. PMID:24148509

  12. Quantification of lipoic acid from skin samples by HPLC using ultraviolet, electrochemical and evaporative light scattering detectors.

    PubMed

    Campos, Patrícia Mazureki; Praça, Fabíola Silva Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra

    2016-04-15

    Lipoic acid (LA) is an endogenous organosulfur compound with potent antioxidant property. LA is often used as a drug for the treatment of skin disorders. For the accomplishment of topical applications of LA appropriate drug quantification methods are essential. Thus far, no HPLC methods have been reported for the measurement of LA extracted from skin. In this article we report on the development and validation of three sensitive and specific HPLC methods for LA and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) using ultraviolet (UV), electrochemical (EC) or evaporative light scattering (ELS) detection. These methods demonstrate different linearity ranges. The chromatographic separations were performed by RP-HPLC (250×4mm, 5μm) with isocratic elution using an acidic mobile phase for the three detection techniques. The lower limits of detection and quantification were 0.04 and 0.08ng LA, respectively, for HPLC coupled to ELS, an innovative detector for LA with high sensitivity. The extraction of LA from skin samples showed recoveries greater than 71%. The recovered LA concentrations from stratum corneum and epidermis+dermis layers were: 5.41±0.56 and 4.92±0.33μg/mL, respectively for HPLC/UV and 6.52±0.49 and 5.01±0.41μg/mL, respectively, for HPLC/EC for the added LA concentration (6.67μg/mL), and 8.88±0.46 and 8.95±0.08μg/mL, respectively, for HPLC/ELS for the added LA concentration (10μg/mL). These three optimized HPLC methods allowed for a simple, rapid and reliable determination of LA in human skin. They should be useful for the development of drug delivery systems for topical applications of LA. PMID:26307348

  13. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  14. An uncooked vegan diet shifts the profile of human fecal microflora: computerized analysis of direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography profiles of bacterial cellular fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, R; Ling, W H; Hänninen, O; Eerola, E

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an uncooked extreme vegan diet on fecal microflora was studied by direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of bacterial cellular fatty acids and by quantitative bacterial culture by using classical microbiological techniques of isolation, identification, and enumeration of different bacterial species. Eighteen volunteers were divided randomly into two groups. The test group received an uncooked vegan diet for 1 month and a conventional diet of mixed Western type for the other month of the study. The control group consumed a conventional diet throughout the study period. Stool samples were collected. Bacterial cellular fatty acids were extracted directly from the stool samples and measured by GLC. Computerized analysis of the resulting fatty acid profiles was performed. Such a profile represents all bacterial cellular fatty acids in a sample and thus reflects its microflora and can be used to detect changes, differences, or similarities of bacterial flora between individual samples or sample groups. GLC profiles changed significantly in the test group after the induction and discontinuation of the vegan diet but not in the control group at any time, whereas quantitative bacterial culture did not detect any significant change in fecal bacteriology in either of the groups. The results suggest that an uncooked extreme vegan diet alters the fecal bacterial flora significantly when it is measured by direct stool sample GLC of bacterial fatty acids. PMID:1482187

  15. Geographical distribution and temporal variation of rain acidity over China

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Xing Wang; Yan-Bo Pang; Guo-An Ding

    1996-12-31

    In recent decade, large areas of acid rain have appeared in China. With the increasing emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} year by year, the acidity of precipitation has increased, and the acid rain area is expanding. Presently, the acid rain in China has become the third largest area of acid rain in the world, next to Europe and North America. The Chinese government took action against acid rain and planned a five-year National Acid Deposition Research Project. The space-time distribution and variation of rain acidity described in this paper is a part of this project. China is a large country. The area is almost equal to that of Europe. Its climate varies greatly and spans the tropics, subtropics, temperate and frigid zone. There is a varied topography including mountain, hilly country, desert and plain, on the other hand the distribution of anthropogenic sources are not even. All of the human and natural factors caused different chemical composition in different parts of China, the acidity of precipitation varies also. The acidity of the precipitation is the most important parameter in the acid rain research. In order to obtain the regional representative distribution of rain acidity, National Acidic Deposition Research Monitoring Network with 261 monitoring sites was established in 1992. This paper summarizes the rain acidity of 21355 precipitation samples, and gave the annual, seasonal, and the monthly pH contours. Results show that the acid rain area has expanded from the south during winter. Regional differences of monthly acid precipitation exists, generally, the rain acidity level is higher during summer and fall and lower during winter and spring in the northern provinces. The 9 opposite is the case in the southern provinces. The central areas are in a transitional situation. The geographical distribution and temporal variation of rain acidity are quite different from North America and Europe.

  16. Relation of precipitation quality to storm type, and deposition of dissolved chemical constituents from precipitation in Massachusetts, 1983-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gay, F.B.; Melching, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Precipitation samples were collected for 83 storms at a rural inland site in Princeton, Mass., and 73 storms at a rural coastal site in Truro, Mass., to examine the quality of precipitation from storms and relate quality to three storm types (oceanic cyclone, continental cyclone, and cold front). At the inland site, Princeton, ranked-means of precipitation depth, storm duration, specific conductance, and concentrations and loads of hydrogen, sulfate, aluminum, bromide, and copper ions were affected by storm type. At the coastal site, Truro, ranked means of precipitation depth, storm duration, and concentrations and loads of calcium, chloride, magnesium, potassium, and sodium ions were affected by storm type. Precipitation chemistry at the coastal site was 85 percent oceanic in orgin, whereas precipitation 72 kilometers inland was 60 percent hydrogen, nitrate, and sulfate ions, reflecting fossil-fuel combustion. Concentrations and loads for specific conductance and 9 chemical constituents on an annual and seasonal basis were determined from National Atmospheric Deposition Program data for spring 1983 through winter 1985 at Quabbin (rural, inland), Waltham (suburban, inland) and Truro (rural, coastal), Massachusetts. Concentrations of magnesium, potassium, sodium, and chloride concentrations were highest at the coast and much lower inland, with very little difference between Waltham and Quabbin. Loads of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and hydrogen are highest at Quabbin and are about equal at Waltham and Truro. About twice as much nitrate and hydrogen and about 35 percent more sulfate is deposited at Quabbin than at Waltham or Truro; this pattern indicates that the interior of Massachusetts receives more acidic precipitation than do the eastern or the coastal areas of Massachusetts.

  17. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in blood, adipose tissue, intestine, and gall bladder samples using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Sirkku E; Kivilompolo, Maarit; Ohrnberg, Leena; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Nygren, Heli; Orešič, Matej; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia

    2014-12-01

    An ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method (UHPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the determination of 33 target and 28 unknown bile acids (BAs) in biological samples. Sixty-one BAs could be measured in 20 min using only a small amount of sample and with a simpl