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Sample records for acid primary amide

  1. Selective formation of secondary amides via the copper-catalyzed cross-coupling of alkylboronic acids with primary amides.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Steven A; Shimkin, Kirk W; Xu, Qun; Mori-Quiroz, Luis M; Watson, Donald A

    2013-05-01

    For the first time, a general catalytic procedure for the cross-coupling of primary amides and alkylboronic acids is demonstrated. The key to the success of this reaction was the identification of a mild base (NaOSiMe3) and oxidant (di-tert-butyl peroxide) to promote the copper-catalyzed reaction in high yield. This transformation provides a facile, high-yielding method for the monoalkylation of amides. PMID:23611591

  2. Primary fatty acid amide metabolism: conversion of fatty acids and an ethanolamine in N18TG2 and SCP cells.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Emma K; Chen, Yuden; Barazanji, Muna; Jeffries, Kristen A; Cameroamortegui, Felipe; Merkler, David J

    2012-02-01

    Primary fatty acid amides (PFAM) are important signaling molecules in the mammalian nervous system, binding to many drug receptors and demonstrating control over sleep, locomotion, angiogenesis, and many other processes. Oleamide is the best-studied of the primary fatty acid amides, whereas the other known PFAMs are significantly less studied. Herein, quantitative assays were used to examine the endogenous amounts of a panel of PFAMs, as well as the amounts produced after incubation of mouse neuroblastoma N(18)TG(2) and sheep choroid plexus (SCP) cells with the corresponding fatty acids or N-tridecanoylethanolamine. Although five endogenous primary amides were discovered in the N(18)TG(2) and SCP cells, a different pattern of relative amounts were found between the two cell lines. Higher amounts of primary amides were found in SCP cells, and the conversion of N-tridecanoylethanolamine to tridecanamide was observed in the two cell lines. The data reported here show that the N(18)TG(2) and SCP cells are excellent model systems for the study of PFAM metabolism. Furthermore, the data support a role for the N-acylethanolamines as precursors for the PFAMs and provide valuable new kinetic results useful in modeling the metabolic flux through the pathways for PFAM biosynthesis and degradation.

  3. Electrospray ionization and collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry of primary fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    Divito, Erin B; Davic, Andrew P; Johnson, Mitchell E; Cascio, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Primary fatty acid amides are a group of bioactive lipids that have been linked with a variety of biological processes such as sleep regulation and modulation of monoaminergic systems. As novel forms of these molecules continue to be discovered, more emphasis will be placed on selective, trace detection. Currently, there is no published experimental determination of collision induced dissociation of PFAMs. A select group of PFAM standards, 12 to 22 length carbon chains, were directly infused into an electrospray ionization source Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer. All standards were monitored in positive mode using the [M + H](+) peak. Mass Hunter Qualitative Analysis software was used to calculate empirical formulas of the product ions. All PFAMs showed losses of 14 m/z indicative of an acyl chain, while the monounsaturated group displayed neutral losses corresponding to H(2)O and NH(3). The resulting spectra were used to propose fragmentation mechanisms. Isotopically labeled PFAMs were used to validate the proposed mechanisms. Patterns of saturated versus unsaturated standards were distinctive, allowing for simple differentiation. This determination will allow for fast, qualitative identification of PFAMs. Additionally, it will provide a method development tool for selection of unique product ions when analyzed in multiple reaction monitoring mode.

  4. One-Carbon Homologation of Primary Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids, Esters, and Amides via Mitsunobu Reactions with MAC Reagents.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Natsuko; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Rawal, Viresh H

    2016-05-20

    A method is reported for the one-carbon homologation of an alcohol to the extended carboxylic acid, ester, or amide. The process involves the Mitsunobu reaction with an alkoxymalononitrile, followed by unmasking in the presence of a suitable nucleophile. The homologation and unmasking can even be performed in a one-pot process in high yield. PMID:27135854

  5. Diaminopimelic Acid Amidation in Corynebacteriales

    PubMed Central

    Levefaudes, Marjorie; Patin, Delphine; de Sousa-d'Auria, Célia; Chami, Mohamed; Blanot, Didier; Hervé, Mireille; Arthur, Michel; Houssin, Christine; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    A gene named ltsA was earlier identified in Rhodococcus and Corynebacterium species while screening for mutations leading to increased cell susceptibility to lysozyme. The encoded protein belonged to a huge family of glutamine amidotransferases whose members catalyze amide nitrogen transfer from glutamine to various specific acceptor substrates. We here describe detailed physiological and biochemical investigations demonstrating the specific role of LtsA protein from Corynebacterium glutamicum (LtsACg) in the modification by amidation of cell wall peptidoglycan diaminopimelic acid (DAP) residues. A morphologically altered but viable ΔltsA mutant was generated, which displays a high susceptibility to lysozyme and β-lactam antibiotics. Analysis of its peptidoglycan structure revealed a total loss of DAP amidation, a modification that was found in 80% of DAP residues in the wild-type polymer. The cell peptidoglycan content and cross-linking were otherwise not modified in the mutant. Heterologous expression of LtsACg in Escherichia coli yielded a massive and toxic incorporation of amidated DAP into the peptidoglycan that ultimately led to cell lysis. In vitro assays confirmed the amidotransferase activity of LtsACg and showed that this enzyme used the peptidoglycan lipid intermediates I and II but not, or only marginally, the UDP-MurNAc pentapeptide nucleotide precursor as acceptor substrates. As is generally the case for glutamine amidotransferases, either glutamine or NH4+ could serve as the donor substrate for LtsACg. The enzyme did not amidate tripeptide- and tetrapeptide-truncated versions of lipid I, indicating a strict specificity for a pentapeptide chain length. PMID:25847251

  6. Treatment of Bile Acid Amidation Defects with Glycocholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Heubi, James E.; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Jha, Pinky; Buckley, Donna; Zhang, Wujuan; Rosenthal, Philip; Potter, Carol; Horslen, Simon; Suskind, David

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid amidation defects were predicted to present with fat/fat soluble vitamin malabsorption with minimal cholestasis. We identified and treated 5 patients (1 male/4 females) from 4 families with defective bile acid amidation due to a genetically confirmed deficiency in bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyl transferase (BAAT) with the conjugated bile acid, glycocholic acid (GCA). Fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry analysis of urine and bile at baseline revealed predominantly unconjugated cholic acid and absence of the usual glycine and taurine conjugated primary bile acids. Treatment with 15 mg/kg GCA resulted in total duodenal bile acid concentrations of 23.3 ± 19.1 mmol/L (mean ± SD) and 63.5 ± 4.0% of the bile acids were secreted in bile in the conjugated form of which GCA represented 59.6 ± 9.3% of the total biliary bile acids. Unconjugated cholic acid continued to be present in high concentrations in bile because of partial intestinal deconjugation of orally administered GCA. Serum total bile acid concentrations did not significantly differ between pretreatment and post-treatment samples and serum contained predominantly unconjugated cholic acid. These findings confirmed efficient intestinal absorption, hepatic extraction and biliary secretion of the administered GCA. Oral tolerance tests for vitamin D2 (1000 IU vitamin D2/kg) and tocopherol (100 IU/kg tocopherol acetate) demonstrated improvement in fat-soluble vitamin absorption after GCA treatment. Growth improved in 3/3 growth-delayed prepubertal patients. Conclusions: Oral glycocholic acid therapy is safe and effective in improving growth and fat-soluble vitamin absorption in children and adolescents with inborn errors of bile acid metabolism due to amidation defects. PMID:25163551

  7. Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study long-chain fatty acid amide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Kristen A.; Dempsey, Daniel R.; Behari, Anita L.; Anderson, Ryan L.; Merkler, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acid amides are cell-signaling lipids identified in mammals and, recently, in invertebrates, as well. Many details regarding fatty acid amide metabolism remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for the study long-chain fatty acid amide metabolism as we have quantified the endogenous levels of N-acylglycines, N-acyldopamines, N-acylethanolamines, and primary fatty acid amides by LC/QTOF-MS. Growth of Drosophila melanogaster on media supplemented with [1-13C]-palmitate lead to a family of 13C-palmitate-labeled fatty acid amides in the fly heads. The [1-13C]-palmitate feeding studies provide insight into the biosynthesis of the fatty acid amides. PMID:24650760

  8. 40 CFR 721.10680 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10680... Substances § 721.10680 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMNs...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10686 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10686... Substances § 721.10686 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMNs...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10691 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10691... Substances § 721.10691 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-13-267) is...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10687 - Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10687 Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (PMNs P-13-201, P-13-203, P-13-204, P-13-205, P-13-206, P-13-207,...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10463 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10463... Substances § 721.10463 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10463 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10463... Substances § 721.10463 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10682 - Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10682 Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substances... fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (PMNs P-13-63, P-13-64, P-13-65, P-13-69, P-13-70, P-13-71, P-13-72,...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  20. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%).

  1. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%). PMID:11014298

  2. Novel inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Sit, S Y; Conway, Charlie; Bertekap, Robert; Xie, Kai; Bourin, Clotilde; Burris, Kevin; Deng, Hongfeng

    2007-06-15

    A class of bisarylimidazole derivatives are identified as potent inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Compound 17 (IC(50)=2 nM) dose-dependently (0.1-10mg/kg, iv) potentiates the effects of exogenous anandamide (1 mg/kg, iv) in a rat thermal escape test (Hargreaves test), and shows robust antinociceptive activity in animal models of persistent (formalin test) and neuropathic (Chung model) pain. Compound 17 (20 mg/kg, iv) demonstrates activity in the formalin test that is comparable to morphine (3mg/kg, iv), and is dose-dependently inhibited by the CB1 antagonist SR141716A. In the Chung model, compound 17 shows antineuropathic effects similar to high-dose (100 mg/kg) gabapentin. FAAH inhibition shows potential utility for the clinical treatment of persistent and neuropathic pain.

  3. Copper-catalyzed oxidative amidation of aldehydes with amine salts: synthesis of primary, secondary, and tertiary amides.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhash Chandra; Ngiam, Joyce S Y; Seayad, Abdul M; Tuan, Dang Thanh; Chai, Christina L L; Chen, Anqi

    2012-09-21

    A practical method for the amidation of aldehydes with economic ammonium chloride or amine hydrochloride salts has been developed for the synthesis of a wide variety of amides by using inexpensive copper sulfate or copper(I) oxide as a catalyst and aqueous tert-butyl hydroperoxide as an oxidant. This amidation reaction is operationally straightforward and provides primary, secondary, and tertiary amides in good to excellent yields for most cases utilizing inexpensive and readily available reagents under mild conditions. In situ formation of amine salts from free amines extends the substrate scope of the reaction. Chiral amides are also synthesized from their corresponding chiral amines without detectable racemization. The practicality of this amide formation reaction has been demonstrated in an efficient synthesis of the antiarrhythmic drug N-acetylprocainamide. PMID:22894712

  4. Acidizing using N-vinyl lactum/unsaturated amide copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, L.D.; Stahl, G.A.

    1987-09-01

    A process is described for acidizing a subterranean formation penetrated by at least one well comprising injecting into the formation, without a crosslinking agent, a water soluble thickened acid composition comprising: (1) water; (2) acid; and (3) a linear copolymer prepared from the monomers consisting of a N-vinyl lactam monomer and an alpha, beta-unsaturated amide monomer.

  5. Synthesis and antituberculosis activity of new fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    D'Oca, Caroline Da Ros Montes; Coelho, Tatiane; Marinho, Tamara Germani; Hack, Carolina Rosa Lopes; Duarte, Rodrigo da Costa; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes

    2010-09-01

    This work reports the synthesis of new fatty acid amides from C16:0, 18:0, 18:1, 18:1 (OH), and 18:2 fatty acids families with cyclic and acyclic amines and demonstrate for the first time the activity of these compounds as antituberculosis agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv, M. tuberculosis rifampicin resistance (ATCC 35338), and M. tuberculosis isoniazid resistance (ATCC 35822). The fatty acid amides derivate from ricinoleic acid were the most potent one among a series of tested compounds, with a MIC 6.25 microg/mL for resistance strains.

  6. New Umami Amides: Structure-Taste Relationship Studies of Cinnamic Acid Derived Amides and the Natural Occurrence of an Intense Umami Amide in Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Neirynck, Nathalie; Cayeux, Isabelle; Yuan, Yoyo Hui-Juan; Yuan, Yong-Ming

    2015-08-19

    A series of aromatic amides were synthesized from various acids and amines selected from naturally occurring structural frameworks. These synthetic amides were evaluated for umami taste in comparison with monosodium glutamate. The effect of the substitution pattern of both the acid and the amine parts on umami taste was investigated. The only intensely umami-tasting amides were those made from 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid. The amine part was more tolerant to structural changes. Amides bearing an alkyl- or alkoxy-substituted phenylethylamine residue displayed a clean umami taste as 20 ppm solutions in water. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with a high quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UPLC/MS) was subsequently used to show the natural occurrence of these amides. (E)-3-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(4-methoxyphenethyl)acrylamide was shown to occur in the roots and stems of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant of the family Rutaceae growing in Korea, Japan, and China.

  7. Advances in the chemistry of sulphenic acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval', I. V.

    1990-04-01

    Results of recent investigations in the area of sulphenic acid amides have been systematised and correlated in the review. Reactions of sulphenamides occurring with the generation of anions, radicals and nitrenes have been considered, as well as reactions accompanied by fussion of the S-N bond and oxidation of the sulphur atom. The bibliography contains 95 references.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10589 - Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10589 Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine... identified generically as unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine (PMN P-11-106)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10590 - Fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, amides with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10590 Fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (PMN P-11-107) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10589 - Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10589 Unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine... identified generically as unsaturated fatty acids, amides with polyethylenepolyamine (PMN P-11-106)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10590 - Fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, amides with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10590 Fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, amides with triethylentetramine (PMN P-11-107) is subject to reporting under...

  12. Retinobenzoic acids. 4. Conformation of aromatic amides with retinoidal activity. Importance of trans-amide structure for the activity.

    PubMed

    Kagechika, H; Himi, T; Kawachi, E; Shudo, K

    1989-10-01

    N-Methylation of two retinoidal amide compounds, 4-[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)carbamoyl]benz oic acid (3, Am80) and 4-[[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2- naphthalenyl)carbonyl]amino]benzoic acid (5, Am580), resulted in the disappearance of their potent differentiation-inducing activity on human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60. Studies with 1H NMR and UV spectroscopy indicated that large conformational differences exist between the active secondary amides and the inactive N-methyl amides. From a comparison of the spectroscopic results of these amides with those of stilbene derivatives, the conformations of the active amides are expected to resemble that of (E)-stilbene, whereas the inactive amides resemble the Z isomer: 3 (Am80) and 5 (Am580) have a trans-amide bond and their whole structures are elongated, while the N-methylated compounds [4 (Am90) and 6 (Am590)] have a cis-amide bond, resulting in the folding of the two benzene rings. These structures in the crystals were related to those in solution by 13C NMR spectroscopic comparison between the two phases (solid and solution).

  13. Simple Amides of Oleanolic Acid as Effective Penetration Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Bednarczyk-Cwynar, Barbara; Partyka, Danuta; Zaprutko, Lucjusz

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal transport is now becoming one of the most convenient and safe pathways for drug delivery. In some cases it is necessary to use skin penetration enhancers in order to allow for the transdermal transport of drugs that are otherwise insufficiently skin-permeable. A series of oleanolic acid amides as potential transdermal penetration enhancers was formed by multistep synthesis and the synthesis of all newly prepared compounds is presented. The synthetized amides of oleanolic acid were tested for their in vitro penetration promoter activity. The above activity was evaluated by means of using the Fürst method. The relationships between the chemical structure of the studied compounds and penetration activity are presented. PMID:26010090

  14. Accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acid amides in winter wheat under snow.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shigeki; Yoshida, Midori; Nakajima, Takashi; Murai, Akio

    2003-06-01

    It was found that the content of antifungal compounds p-coumaroylagmatine [1-(trans-4'-hydroxycinnamoylamino)-4-guanidinobutane] and p-coumaroyl-3-hydroxyagmatine [1-(trans-4'-hydroxycinnamoylamino)-3-hydroxy-4-guanidinobutane] in the crown of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Chihokukomugi) significantly increased under snow cover. This finding suggests that the accumulation of these hydroxycinnamic acid amides was caused by winter stress and related to protecting the plant against snow mold under snow cover.

  15. Toxocara canis: Larvicidal activity of fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, Taís; D'Oca, Caroline da Ros Montes; Mata-Santos, Hílton Antônio; Fenalti, Juliana; Pinto, Nitza; Coelho, Tatiane; Berne, Maria Elisabeth; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-02-01

    Considering the therapeutic potential of fatty acid amides, the present study aimed to evaluate their in vitro activity against Toxocara canis larvae and their cytotoxicity for the first time. Linoleylpyrrolidilamide was the most potent, with a minimal larvicidal concentration (MLC) of 0.05 mg/mL and 27% cytotoxicity against murine peritoneal macrophages C57BL/6 mice, as assessed by the MTT assay. PMID:26783180

  16. Chemoselective esterification and amidation of carboxylic acids with imidazole carbamates and ureas.

    PubMed

    Heller, Stephen T; Sarpong, Richmond

    2010-10-15

    Imidazole carbamates and ureas were found to be chemoselective esterification and amidation reagents. A wide variety of carboxylic acids were converted to their ester or amide analogues by a simple synthetic procedure in high yields.

  17. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer.

  18. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Dobritzsch, Melanie; Lübken, Tilo; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Blum, Elke; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Dräger, Birgit; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  19. Instability of Amide Bond Comprising the 2-Aminotropone Moiety: Cleavable under Mild Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Chenikkayala; Sharma, Nagendra K

    2015-08-21

    An unusual hydrolysis/solvolysis of the classical acyclic amide bond, derived from N-troponylaminoethylglycine (Traeg) and α-amino acids, is described under mild acidic conditions. The reactivity of this amide bond is possibly owed to the protonation of the troponyl carbonyl functional group. The results suggest that the Traeg amino acid is a potential candidate for protecting and caging of the amine functional group of bioactive molecules via a cleavable amide bond.

  20. Iodine-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Amidation of β,γ-Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids with Chloramine Salts Leading to Allylic Amides.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Kojima, Takumi; Hishikawa, Yusuke; Minakata, Satoshi

    2015-10-26

    The iodine-catalyzed decarboxylative amidation of β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids with chloramine salts is described. This method enables the regioselective synthesis of allylic amides from various types of β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids containing substituents at the α- and β-positions. In the reaction, N-iodo-N-chloroamides, generated by the reaction of a chloramine salt with I2 , function as a key active species. The reaction provides an attractive alternative to existing methods for the synthesis of useful secondary allylic amine derivatives. PMID:26493878

  1. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of fatty acid amide (erucamide) using fatty acid and urea.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neeraj Praphulla; Singh, R P

    2007-01-01

    Ammonolysis of fatty acids to the corresponding fatty acid amides is efficiently catalysed by Candida antartica lipase (Novozym 435). In the present paper lipase-catalysed synthesis of erucamide by ammonolysis of erucic acid and urea in organic solvent medium was studied and optimal conditions for fatty amides synthesis were established. In this process erucic acid gave 88.74 % pure erucamide after 48 hour and 250 rpm at 60 degrees C with 1:4 molar ratio of erucic acid and urea, the organic solvent media is 50 ml tert-butyl alcohol (2-methyl-2-propanol). This process for synthesis is economical as we used urea in place of ammonia or other amidation reactant at atmospheric pressure. The amount of catalyst used is 3 %.

  2. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of fatty acid amide (erucamide) using fatty acid and urea.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neeraj Praphulla; Singh, R P

    2007-01-01

    Ammonolysis of fatty acids to the corresponding fatty acid amides is efficiently catalysed by Candida antartica lipase (Novozym 435). In the present paper lipase-catalysed synthesis of erucamide by ammonolysis of erucic acid and urea in organic solvent medium was studied and optimal conditions for fatty amides synthesis were established. In this process erucic acid gave 88.74 % pure erucamide after 48 hour and 250 rpm at 60 degrees C with 1:4 molar ratio of erucic acid and urea, the organic solvent media is 50 ml tert-butyl alcohol (2-methyl-2-propanol). This process for synthesis is economical as we used urea in place of ammonia or other amidation reactant at atmospheric pressure. The amount of catalyst used is 3 %. PMID:17898456

  3. Metal amides as the simplest acid/base catalysts for stereoselective carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, new possibilities for metal amides are described. Although typical metal amides are recognized as strong stoichiometric bases for deprotonation of inert or less acidic hydrogen atoms, transition-metal amides, namely silver and copper amides, show interesting abilities as one of the simplest acid/base catalysts in stereoselective carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

  4. Poly(ester amide)s based on (L)-lactic acid oligomers and α-amino acids: influence of the α-amino acid side chain in the poly(ester amide)s properties.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana C; Coelho, Jorge F J; Valente, Joana F A; Correia, Tiago R; Correia, Ilídio J; Gil, Maria H; Simões, Pedro N

    2013-01-01

    Novel biodegradable and low cytotoxic poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) based on α-amino acids and (L)-lactic acid (L-LA) oligomers were successfully synthesized by interfacial polymerization. The chemical structure of the new polymers was confirmed by spectroscopic analyses. Further characterization suggests that the α-amino acid plays a critical role on the final properties of the PEA. L-phenylalanine provides PEAs with higher glass transition temperature, whereas glycine enhances the crystallinity. The hydrolytic degradation in PBS (pH = 7.4) at 37 °C also depends on the α-amino acid, being faster for glycine-based PEAs. The cytotoxic profiles using fibroblast human cells indicate that the PEAs did not elicit an acute cytotoxic effect. The strategy presented in this work opens the possibility of synthesizing biodegradable PEAs with low citotoxicity by an easy and fast method. It is worth to mention also that the properties of these materials can be fine-tuned only by changing the α-amino acid.

  5. [Activated Sludge Bacteria Transforming Cyanopyridines and Amides of Pyridinecarboxylic Acids].

    PubMed

    Demakov, V A; Vasil'ev, D M; Maksimova, Yu G; Pavlova, Yu A; Ovechkina, G V; Maksimov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Species diversity of bacteria from the activated sludge of Perm biological waste treatment facilities capable of transformation of cyanopyridines and amides of pyridinecarboxylic acids was investigated. Enrichment cultures in mineral media with 3-cyanopyridine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were used to obtain 32 clones of gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria exhibiting moderate growth on solid and liquid media with 3- and 4-cyanopyridine. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the clones with homology of at least 99% belonged to the genera Acinetobacte, Alcaligenes, Delftia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthobacter. PCR analysis showed that 13 out of 32 isolates contained the sequences (-1070 bp) homologous to the nitrilase genes reported previously in Alcaligenes faecalis JM3 (GenBank, D13419.1). Nine clones were capable of nitrile and amide transformation in minimal salt medium. Acinetobacter sp. 11 h and Alcaligenes sp. osv transformed 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinamide, while most of the clones possessed amidase activity (0.5 to 46.3 mmol/(g h) for acetamide and 0.1 to 5.6 mmol/(g h) for nicotinamide). Nicotinamide utilization by strain A. faecalis 2 was shown to result in excretion of a secondary metabolite, which was identified as dodecyl acrylate at 91% probability. PMID:26263697

  6. One-pot synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acid amides with anti-proliferative properties.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Hugo; St-Georges, Catherine; Legault, Marc-André; Morin, Caroline; Fortin, Samuel; Marsault, Eric

    2014-12-15

    A one-pot environmentally friendly transamidation of ω-3 fatty acid ethyl esters to amides and mono- or diacylglycerols was investigated via the use of a polymer-supported lipase. The method was used to synthesize a library of fatty acid monoglyceryl esters and amides. These new derivatives were found to have potent growth inhibition effects against A549 lung cancer cells.

  7. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  12. Sulfonyl Fluoride Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Alapafuja, Shakiru O.; Nikas, Spyros P.; Bharatan, Indu; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Nasr, Mahmoud L.; Bowman, Anna L.; Zvonok, Nikolai; Li, Jing; Shi, Xiaomeng; Engen, John R.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonyl fluorides are known to inhibit esterases. Early work from our laboratory has identified hexadecyl sulfonylfluoride (AM374) as a potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We now report on later generation sulfonyl fluoride analogs that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of FAAH. Using recombinant rat and human FAAH we show that 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)pentanesulfonyl fluoride (AM3506) has similar inhibitory activity for both the rat and the human enzyme, while rapid dilution assays and mass spectrometry analysis suggest that the compound is a covalent modifier for FAAH and inhibits its action in an irreversible manner. Our SAR results are highlighted by molecular docking of key analogs. PMID:23083016

  13. Synthesis and structural characterisation of amides from picolinic acid and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Prarthana; Barry, Sarah M.; Houlihan, Kate M.; Murphy, Michael J.; Turner, Peter; Jensen, Paul; Rutledge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Coupling picolinic acid (pyridine-2-carboxylic acid) and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid with N-alkylanilines affords a range of mono- and bis-amides in good to moderate yields. These amides are of interest for potential applications in catalysis, coordination chemistry and molecular devices. The reaction of picolinic acid with thionyl chloride to generate the acid chloride in situ leads not only to the N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides as expected but also the corresponding 4-chloro-N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides in the one pot. The two products are readily separated by column chromatography. Chlorinated products are not observed from the corresponding reactions of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. X-Ray crystal structures for six of these compounds are described. These structures reveal a general preference for cis amide geometry in which the aromatic groups (N-phenyl and pyridyl) are cis to each other and the pyridine nitrogen anti to the carbonyl oxygen. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments provide a window on amide bond isomerisation in solution. PMID:25954918

  14. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J.

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label ‘amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  15. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label 'amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  16. Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to processes for converting amino acids and amides to desirable conversion products including pyrrolidines, pyrrolidinones, and other N-substituted products. L-glutamic acid and L-pyroglutamic acid provide general reaction pathways to numerous and valuable selective conversion products with varied potential industrial uses.

  17. Pharmaceuticals and Surfactants from Alga-Derived Feedstock: Amidation of Fatty Acids and Their Derivatives with Amino Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Tkacheva, Anastasia; Dosmagambetova, Inkar; Chapellier, Yann; Mäki-Arvela, Päivi; Hachemi, Imane; Savela, Risto; Leino, Reko; Viegas, Carolina; Kumar, Narendra; Eränen, Kari; Hemming, Jarl; Smeds, Annika; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2015-08-24

    Amidation of renewable feedstocks, such as fatty acids, esters, and Chlorella alga based biodiesel, was demonstrated with zeolites and mesoporous materials as catalysts and ethanolamine, alaninol, and leucinol. The last two can be derived from amino acids present in alga. The main products were fatty alkanol amides and the corresponding ester amines, as confirmed by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Thermal amidation of technical-grade oleic acid and stearic acid at 180 °C with ethanolamine were non-negligible; both gave 61% conversion. In the amidation of stearic acid with ethanolamine, the conversion over H-Beta-150 was 80% after 3 h, whereas only 63% conversion was achieved for oleic acid; this shows that a microporous catalyst is not suitable for this acid and exhibits a wrinkled conformation. The highest selectivity to stearoyl ethanolamide of 92% was achieved with mildly acidic H-MCM-41 at 70% conversion in 3 h at 180 °C. Highly acidic catalysts favored the formation of the ester amine, whereas the amide was obtained with a catalyst that exhibited an optimum acidity. The conversion levels achieved with different fatty acids in the range C12-C18 were similar; this shows that the fatty acid length does not affect the amidation rate. The amidation of methyl palmitate and biodiesel gave low conversions over an acidic catalyst, which suggested that the reaction mechanism in the amidation of esters was different.

  18. Pharmaceuticals and Surfactants from Alga-Derived Feedstock: Amidation of Fatty Acids and Their Derivatives with Amino Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Tkacheva, Anastasia; Dosmagambetova, Inkar; Chapellier, Yann; Mäki-Arvela, Päivi; Hachemi, Imane; Savela, Risto; Leino, Reko; Viegas, Carolina; Kumar, Narendra; Eränen, Kari; Hemming, Jarl; Smeds, Annika; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2015-08-24

    Amidation of renewable feedstocks, such as fatty acids, esters, and Chlorella alga based biodiesel, was demonstrated with zeolites and mesoporous materials as catalysts and ethanolamine, alaninol, and leucinol. The last two can be derived from amino acids present in alga. The main products were fatty alkanol amides and the corresponding ester amines, as confirmed by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Thermal amidation of technical-grade oleic acid and stearic acid at 180 °C with ethanolamine were non-negligible; both gave 61% conversion. In the amidation of stearic acid with ethanolamine, the conversion over H-Beta-150 was 80% after 3 h, whereas only 63% conversion was achieved for oleic acid; this shows that a microporous catalyst is not suitable for this acid and exhibits a wrinkled conformation. The highest selectivity to stearoyl ethanolamide of 92% was achieved with mildly acidic H-MCM-41 at 70% conversion in 3 h at 180 °C. Highly acidic catalysts favored the formation of the ester amine, whereas the amide was obtained with a catalyst that exhibited an optimum acidity. The conversion levels achieved with different fatty acids in the range C12-C18 were similar; this shows that the fatty acid length does not affect the amidation rate. The amidation of methyl palmitate and biodiesel gave low conversions over an acidic catalyst, which suggested that the reaction mechanism in the amidation of esters was different. PMID:26197759

  19. A Simple Primary Amide for the Selective Recovery of Gold from Secondary Resources.

    PubMed

    Doidge, Euan D; Carson, Innis; Tasker, Peter A; Ellis, Ross J; Morrison, Carole A; Love, Jason B

    2016-09-26

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) such as mobile phones contains a plethora of metals of which gold is by far the most valuable. Herein a simple primary amide is described that achieves the selective separation of gold from a mixture of metals typically found in mobile phones by extraction into toluene from an aqueous HCl solution; unlike current processes, reverse phase transfer is achieved simply using water. Phase transfer occurs by dynamic assembly of protonated and neutral amides with [AuCl4 ](-) ions through hydrogen bonding in the organic phase, as shown by EXAFS, mass spectrometry measurements, and computational calculations, and supported by distribution coefficient analysis. The fundamental chemical understanding gained herein should be integral to the development of metal-recovery processes, in particular through the use of dynamic assembly processes to build complexity from simplicity.

  20. A Simple Primary Amide for the Selective Recovery of Gold from Secondary Resources.

    PubMed

    Doidge, Euan D; Carson, Innis; Tasker, Peter A; Ellis, Ross J; Morrison, Carole A; Love, Jason B

    2016-09-26

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) such as mobile phones contains a plethora of metals of which gold is by far the most valuable. Herein a simple primary amide is described that achieves the selective separation of gold from a mixture of metals typically found in mobile phones by extraction into toluene from an aqueous HCl solution; unlike current processes, reverse phase transfer is achieved simply using water. Phase transfer occurs by dynamic assembly of protonated and neutral amides with [AuCl4 ](-) ions through hydrogen bonding in the organic phase, as shown by EXAFS, mass spectrometry measurements, and computational calculations, and supported by distribution coefficient analysis. The fundamental chemical understanding gained herein should be integral to the development of metal-recovery processes, in particular through the use of dynamic assembly processes to build complexity from simplicity. PMID:27554437

  1. A simple primary amide for the selective recovery of gold from secondary resources

    DOE PAGES

    Doidge, Euan D.; Carson, Innis; Tasker, Peter A.; Ellis, Ross J.; Morrison, Carole A.; Love, Jason B.

    2016-08-24

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) such as mobile phones contains a plethora of metals of which gold is by far the most valuable. Herein a simple primary amide is described that achieves the selective separation of gold from a mixture of metals typically found in mobile phones by extraction into toluene from an aqueous HCl solution; unlike current processes, reverse phase transfer is achieved simply using water. Phase transfer occurs by dynamic assembly of protonated and neutral amides with [AuCl4]– ions through hydrogen bonding in the organic phase, as shown by EXAFS, mass spectrometry measurements, and computational calculations, andmore » supported by distribution coefficient analysis. In conclusion, the fundamental chemical understanding gained herein should be integral to the development of metal-recovery processes, in particular through the use of dynamic assembly processes to build complexity from simplicity.« less

  2. Fuel and lubricant additives from acid treated mixtures of vegetable oil derived amides and esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, B.R.; Devault, A.N.

    1981-05-26

    Vegetable oils such as corn oil, peanut oil, and soy oil are reacted with polyamines to form a mixture containing amides, imides, half esters, and glycerol with subsequent treatment with a strong acid such as sulfonic acid to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels and lubricants.

  3. N-glycosides of amino acid amides from Hemerocallis fulva var. sempervirens.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yuko; Konishi, Tenji

    2009-10-01

    As part of our search for sedative substances from natural sources, we isolated two novel amino acid amides connected with the fructopyranose, kwansonine A (1) and kwansonine B (2), together with three known amino acid amides, longitubanine A (3), longitubanine B (4), and pinnatanine (5), from Hemerocallis fulva L. var. sempervirens (ARAKI) M. HOTTA. The structures of 1 and 2 have been determined on the spectroscopic evidences as N(2)-(1-beta-D-fructopyranosyl)-N(5)-(2',5'-dihydro-2'-furyl-3'-hydroxymethyl)-gamma-hydroxyglutamine and N(2)-(1-beta-D-fructopyranosyl)-N(5)-(2-hydroxymethylbutadienyl)-gamma-hydroxyglutamine. This is the first report on the isolation of amino acid amide N-furctoside from Hemerocallis genus plant. PMID:19801868

  4. Choline Chloride Catalyzed Amidation of Fatty Acid Ester to Monoethanolamide: A Green Approach.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pramod; Pratap, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Choline chloride catalyzed efficient method for amidation of fatty acid methyl ester to monoethanolamide respectively. This is a solvent free, ecofriendly, 100% chemo selective and economically viable path for alkanolamide synthesis. The Kinetics of amidation of methyl ester were studied and found to be first order with respect to the concentration of ethanolamine. The activation energy (Ea) for the amidation of lauric acid methyl ester catalyzed by choline chloride was found to be 50.20 KJ mol(-1). The 98% conversion of lauric acid monoethanolamide was obtained at 110°C in 1 h with 6% weight of catalyst and 1:1.5 molar ratio of methyl ester to ethanolamine under nitrogen atmosphere. PMID:26666271

  5. A comparative study of the complexation of uranium(VI) withoxydiacetic acid and its amide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2005-05-01

    There has been significant interest in recent years in the studies of alkyl-substituted amides as extractants for actinide separation because the products of radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of amides are less detrimental to separation processes than those of organophosphorus compounds traditionally used in actinide separations. Stripping of actinides from the amide-containing organic solvents is relatively easy. In addition, the amide ligands are completely incinerable so that the amount of secondary wastes generated in nuclear waste treatment could be significantly reduced. One group of alkyl-substituted oxa-diamides have been shown to be promising in the separation of actinides from nuclear wastes. For example, tetraoctyl-3-oxa-glutaramide and tetraisobutyl-oxa-glutaramide form actinide complexes that can be effectively extracted from nitric acid solutions. To understand the thermodynamic principles governing the complexation of actinides with oxa-diamides, we have studied the complexation of U(VI) with dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DMOGA) and tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA) in aqueous solutions, in comparison with oxydiacetic acid (ODA) (Figure 1). Previous studies have indicated that the complexation of U(VI) with ODA is strong and entropy-driven. Comparing the results for DMOGA and TMOGA with those for ODA could provide insight into the energetics of amide complexation with U(VI) and the relationship between the thermodynamic properties and the ligand structure.

  6. Complexation of di-amides of dipicolinic acid with neodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Lapka, J.L.; Paulenova, A.

    2013-07-01

    Di-amides have undergone significant studies as possible ligands for use in the partitioning of trivalent minor actinides and lanthanides. The binding affinities of three isomeric ligands with neodymium in acetonitrile solution have been investigated. The stability constants of the metal-ligand complexes formed between different isomers of N,N'-diethyl-N,N'- ditolyl-di-picolinamide (EtTDPA) and trivalent neodymium in acetonitrile have been determined by spectrophotometric and calorimetric methods. Each isomer of EtTDPA has been found to be capable of forming three complexes with trivalent neodymium, Nd(EtTDPA), Nd(EtTDPA){sub 2}, and Nd(EtTDPA){sub 3}. Values from spectrophotometric and calorimetric titrations are within reasonable agreement with each other. The order of stability constants for each metal:ligand complex decreases in the order Et(m)TDPA > Et(p)TDPA > Et(o)TDPA. The obtained values are comparable to other di-amidic ligands obtained under similar system conditions and mirror previously obtained solvent extraction data for EtTDPA at low ionic strengths. (authors.

  7. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L; Luongo, Carl A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-10-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  8. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  9. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors. PMID:27318096

  10. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors.

  11. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluations of (+)-isocampholenic acid-derived amides.

    PubMed

    Grošelj, Uroš; Golobič, Amalija; Knez, Damijan; Hrast, Martina; Gobec, Stanislav; Ričko, Sebastijan; Svete, Jurij

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of two novel (+)-isocampholenic acid-derived amines has been realized starting from commercially available (1S)-(+)-10-camphorsulfonic acid. The novel amines as well as (+)-isocampholenic acid have been used as building blocks in the construction of a library of amides using various aliphatic, aromatic, and amino acid-derived coupling partners using BPC and CDI as activating agents. Amide derivatives have been assayed against several enzymes that hold potential for the development of new drugs to battle bacterial infections and Alzheimer's disease. Compounds 20c and 20e showed promising selective sub-micromolar inhibition of human butyrylcholinesterase [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text] values [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively). PMID:27017352

  12. Crystal structures and spectroscopic properties of ester amide and diamide of squaric acid with prolinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tsonko; Seidel, Rüdiger W.; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Spiteller, Michael; Sheldrick, William S.; Koleva, Bojidarka B.

    2009-04-01

    We report the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural elucidation of two prolinamide derivatives of squaric acid, i.e. prolinamide ester amide of squaric acid ethyl ester ( 1) and prolinamide diamide of squaric acid dihydrate ( 2). Both compounds crystallize in non-centrosymmetric space groups, monoclinic P2 1 ( 1) and orthorhombic P2 12 12 1 ( 2), respectively. For first time in the literature the crystal structure of homodiamide of amino acid amide of squaric acid is reported. The data for heterodiamides is also absent. Supramolecular zig-zag chains by hydrogen bonds of H 2N-C dbnd O⋯HNH (3.020 Å) and HNH⋯O dbnd C (Sq) (2.972 Å) types with the participation of amide and squaric acid (Sq) fragments, -C dbnd O-NH 2 and O dbnd C (Sq) are refined in ( 1). A helix supramolecular structure is formed in ( 2) by moderate intermolecular HNH⋯O dbnd C(NH 2) hydrogen bond with length of 2.947 Å. The two crystallographical non-equivalent water molecules stabilized the helix by interactions of types HOH⋯O dbnd C (Sq) (2.917 Å), HOH⋯O dbnd C(NH 2) (2.899 Å), H 2O⋯NH 2(C dbnd O) (2.972 Å), respectively. Optical and magnetic properties are investigated with a view to explain the correlation structure-properties of the newly synthesized molecules.

  13. Infrared spectroscopic study of the amidation reaction of aminophenyl modified Au surfaces and p-nitrobenzoic acid as model system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Sun, Guoguang; Hinrichs, Karsten; Janietz, Silvia; Rappich, Joerg

    2010-10-21

    We have investigated the fundamental amidation reaction by a model system consisting of an electrochemically functionalised Au surface by aminophenyl and 4-nitrobenzoic acid activated by EEDQ. The development of the NO(2) related stretching vibrations with time reveals that the amidation process is very slow at Au surfaces and is completed after about 2 days.

  14. vir-Gene-inducing activities of hydroxycinnamic acid amides in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, K; Buret, D; Guerin, B; Delay, D; Negrel, J; Delmotte, F M

    1998-11-20

    Expression of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes and transformation of dicots by this organism are dependent upon host plant phenolic compounds. Several alkylsyringamides have recently been shown to be powerful inducers of these vir-genes. These synthetic amides, and especially ethylsyringamide, are much stronger inducers than syringic acid. In this work, four alkylamides derived from ferulic or sinapic acids were synthesized by a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide method and tested for their potential to induce vir-gene expression on A. tumefaciens strains harbouring virB::lacZ or virE::lacZ fusion plasmids. Their effectiveness was compared to that of ethylsyringamide and tyraminylferulamide, a naturally occurring amide in plants. Whatever the amine moiety of the amide (ethylamine, propylamine, tyramine or beta-alanine ethyl ester) conjugation of the acid functional group clearly diminished the toxicity to the bacteria of the respective acid at high concentration and thereby increased the vir-inducing potential. However, none of the inducers tested exhibited higher activity than acetosyringone, the reference compound for vir-gene induction, with the exception of ethylsyringamide at concentrations above 1mM. When tested on Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A348(pSM243cd), ethylferulamide and ethylsinapamide were more efficient than the corresponding phenolic acids but only above 100 microM. PMID:11711062

  15. Synthesis, Properties and Applications of Biodegradable Polymers Derived from Diols and Dicarboxylic Acids: From Polyesters to Poly(ester amide)s

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Angélica; Katsarava, Ramaz; Puiggalí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Poly(alkylene dicarboxylate)s constitute a family of biodegradable polymers with increasing interest for both commodity and speciality applications. Most of these polymers can be prepared from biobased diols and dicarboxylic acids such as 1,4-butanediol, succinic acid and carbohydrates. This review provides a current status report concerning synthesis, biodegradation and applications of a series of polymers that cover a wide range of properties, namely, materials from elastomeric to rigid characteristics that are suitable for applications such as hydrogels, soft tissue engineering, drug delivery systems and liquid crystals. Finally, the incorporation of aromatic units and α-amino acids is considered since stiffness of molecular chains and intermolecular interactions can be drastically changed. In fact, poly(ester amide)s derived from naturally occurring amino acids offer great possibilities as biodegradable materials for biomedical applications which are also extensively discussed. PMID:24776758

  16. Composition of the epicuticular waxes coating the adaxial side of Phyllostachys aurea leaves: Identification of very-long-chain primary amides.

    PubMed

    Racovita, Radu C; Jetter, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    The present study presents comprehensive chemical analyses of cuticular wax mixtures of the bamboo Phyllostachys aurea. The epicuticular and intracuticular waxes were sampled selectively from the adaxial side of leaves on young and old plants and investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection. The epi- and intracuticular layers on young and old leaves had wax loads ranging from 1.7 μg/cm(2) to 1.9 μg/cm(2). Typical very-long-chain aliphatic wax constituents were found with characteristic chain length patterns, including alkyl esters (primarily C48), alkanes (primarily C29), fatty acids (primarily C28 and C16), primary alcohols (primarily C28) and aldehydes (primarily C30). Alicyclic wax components were identified as tocopherols and triterpenoids, including substantial amounts of triterpenoid esters. Alkyl esters, alkanes, fatty acids and aldehydes were found in greater amounts in the epicuticular layer, while primary alcohols and most terpenoids accumulated more in the intracuticular wax. Alkyl esters occurred as mixtures of metamers, combining C20 alcohol with various acids into shorter ester homologs (C36C40), and a wide range of alcohols with C22 and C24 acids into longer esters (C42C52). Primary amides were identified, with a characteristic chain length profile peaking at C30. The amides were present exclusively in the epicuticular layer and thus at or near the surface, where they may affect plant-herbivore or plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27402630

  17. Investigation of the complex reaction coordinate of acid catalyzed amide hydrolysis from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-05-01

    The rate-determining step of acid catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the carbon atom of the amide group. Therein the addition of the hydroxyl group to the amide carbon atom involves the association of a water molecule transferring one of its protons to an adjacent water molecule. The protonation of the amide nitrogen atom follows as a separate reaction step. Since the nucleophilic attack involves the breaking and formation of several bonds, the underlying reaction coordinate is rather complex. We investigate this reaction step from path sampling Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. This approach does not require the predefinition of reaction coordinates and is thus particularly suited for investigating reaction mechanisms. From our simulations the most relevant components of the reaction coordinate are elaborated. Though the C⋯O distance of the oxygen atom of the water molecule performing the nucleophilic attack and the corresponding amide carbon atom is a descriptor of the reaction progress, a complete picture of the reaction coordinate must include all three molecules taking part in the reaction. Moreover, the proton transfer is found to depend on favorable solvent configurations. Thus, also the arrangement of non-reacting, i.e. solvent water molecules needs to be considered in the reaction coordinate.

  18. /sup 17/O NMR spectroscopy: torsion angle relationships in aryl carboxylic esters, acids, and amides

    SciTech Connect

    Baumstark, A.L.; Balakrishnan, P.; Dotrong, M.; McCloskey, C.J.; Oakley, M.G.; Boykin, D.W.

    1987-02-18

    /sup 1/ /sup 7/O NMR spectroscopic data (natural abundance in acetonitrile at 75/sup 0/C) were obtained for the following series of electronically similar, sterically hindered compounds: aromatic methyl esters, aromatic carboxylic acids, and aromatic amides. Torsional angles were calculated by the molecular mechanics (MM2) method. Linear regression analysis of the estimated torsion angles and the /sup 17/O chemical shift data for each series yielded the following results (series, slope delta/degree, correlation coefficient): esters (C=O), 0.70, 0.997; esters (-0-), 0.43, 0.992; acids (-CO/sub 2/H), 0.56, 0.994; amides (C=O), 0.84, 0.942; N,N-dimethylamides (C=O), 0.6, 0.991. The results are discussed in terms of minimization of repulsive van der Waals interactions by rotation of the functional group out of the plane of the aromatic ring.

  19. Preparation and biological assessment of hydroxycinnamic acid amides of polyamines.

    PubMed

    Fixon-Owoo, Solomon; Levasseur, Frédéric; Williams, Keith; Sabado, Thomas N; Lowe, Mike; Klose, Markus; Joffre Mercier, A; Fields, Paul; Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2003-06-01

    Many plants contain hydroxycinnamic acid conjugates of polyamines that are remarkably similar in general structure to the acylated polyamines found in spider and wasp toxins. In an effort to determine whether these compounds might play a role in the chemical defense of plants against arthropod pests we synthesized a variety of analogues of the coumaric (4-hydroxycinnamic) acid conjugates of di-, tri-, and tetraamines using common protection and acylation strategies. N(1)- and N(8)-coumaroyl spermidine were tested in feeding trials with insect larvae including the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis), the tobacco budworm (Heliothis verescens) and the oblique banded leaf roller (Choristoneura rosaceana). Antifeedant assays with the rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae were also performed. Neither the naturally occurring coumaric acid conjugates of polyamines nor their analogues showed notable toxicity towards insects, despite precautions to maintain these easily oxidized materials in the wet diet. However, more direct bioassays of these compounds on glutamate dependent neuroreceptors including the deep abdominal extensor muscles of crayfish, or mammalian NMDA, delta2, and AMPA receptors, clearly showed that these compounds were inhibitory. N(1)-Coumaoryl spermine, a dodecyl and a cyclohexyl analogue were especially active at NMDA NR1/NR2B receptors. The latter had an IC(50) of 300 microM in the crayfish. N(1)-Coumaroyl spermine had an IC(50) in the crayfish preparation of 70-300 microM and against the mammalian NR1/NR2B receptor of 38 nM. Structure-activity variations show similar trends of length and hydrophobicity as has been seen previously with analogues of spider toxins. We conclude from this work that while the coumaric acid polyamine conjugates are active when directly applied to neuroreceptors, they show no overt toxicity when ingested by insect larvae.

  20. Antimycobacterial activity generated by the amide coupling of (-)-fenchone derived aminoalcohol with cinnamic acids and analogues.

    PubMed

    Slavchev, Ivaylo; Dobrikov, Georgi M; Valcheva, Violeta; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia; Dimitrov, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    Aminoethyl substituted 2-endo-fenchol prepared from (-)-fenchone was used as scaffold for the synthesis of series of 31 amide structures by N-acylation applying cinnamic acids and analogues. The evaluation of their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv showed for some of them promising activity-up to 0.2 μg/ml, combined with relatively low cytotoxicity of the selected active compounds.

  1. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  2. K2CO3-promoted formation of aryl esters from primary aryl amides by the acyl-acyl exchange process.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yongjun; Qu, Xingyu

    2016-04-28

    A new acyl-acyl exchange reaction has been developed for the formation of aryl esters from primary aryl amides. The reaction could occur under mild reaction conditions with catalytic quantities of K2CO3, and could afford moderate to good yields of the desired products. PMID:27035611

  3. Synthesis, biological activity, and bioavailability of moschamine, a safflomide-type phenylpropenoic acid amide found in Centaurea cyanus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moschamine is a safflomide-type phenylpropenoic acid amide originally isolated from Centaurea cyanus. This paper describes the synthesis, detection of serotoninergic and COX inhibitory activities, and bioavailability of moschamine. Moschamine was chemically synthesized and identified using NMR spect...

  4. Sulfonated reduced graphene oxide as a highly efficient catalyst for direct amidation of carboxylic acids with amines using ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mirza-Aghayan, Maryam; Tavana, Mahdieh Molaee; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-03-01

    Sulfonated reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (rGO-SO3H) were prepared by grafting sulfonic acid-containing aryl radicals onto chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) under sonochemical conditions. rGO-SO3H catalyst was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). rGO-SO3H catalyst was successfully applied as a reusable solid acid catalyst for the direct amidation of carboxylic acids with amines into the corresponding amides under ultrasonic irradiation. The direct sonochemical amidation of carboxylic acid takes place under mild conditions affording in good to high yields (56-95%) the corresponding amides in short reaction times.

  5. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of caffeic acid amides as synergists to sensitize fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Zang, Chengxu; Tian, Shujuan; Liu, Wei; Tan, Shanlun; Cai, Zhan; Ni, Tingjunhong; An, Maomao; Li, Ran; Gao, Yue; Zhang, Dazhi; Jiang, Yuanying

    2015-01-01

    A series of caffeic acid amides were designed, synthesized, and their synergistic activity with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans was evaluated in vitro. The title caffeic acid amides 3-30 except 26 exhibited potent activity, and the subsequent SAR study was conducted. Compound 3, 5, 21, and 34c, at a concentration of 1.0 μg/ml, decreased the MIC₈₀ of fluconazole from 128.0 μg/ml to 1.0-0.5 μg/ml against the fluconazole-resistant C. albicans. This result suggests that the caffeic acid amides, as synergists, can sensitize drug-resistant fungi to fluconazole. The SAR study indicated that the dihydroxyl groups and the amido groups linking to phenyl or heterocyclic rings are the important pharmacophores of the caffeic acid amides.

  6. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed. PMID:26189442

  7. Complexation of amidated pectin with poly(itaconic acid) as a polycarboxylic polymer model compound.

    PubMed

    Nesic, Aleksandra R; Trifunovic, Snezana S; Grujic, Aleksandar S; Velickovic, Sava J; Antonovic, Dusan G

    2011-11-01

    Complexes based on amidated pectin (AP) and poly(itaconic acid) (PIA) were prepared by casting films from solutions of AP and PIA in different ratios with the pectin amount ranging from 10% to 90% by mass. The complexes were investigated by elemental analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermogravimetry (TG). In all investigated ratios of AP/PIA glassy transparent films with a uniform structure were obtained. The results of elemental analysis confirmed the composition of the complexes, and FTIR spectroscopy has shown carboxylic and amide peak shifting, indicating complex formation between AP and PIA. Comparison of thermograms of AP/PIA films with different ratios of AP indicated that the increase of the amount of AP increases the thermal stability of the films by retarding the onset of the main degradation processes. PMID:21943549

  8. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed.

  9. Phenotypic assessment of THC discriminative stimulus properties in fatty acid amide hydrolase knockout and wildtype mice.

    PubMed

    Walentiny, D Matthew; Vann, Robert E; Wiley, Jenny L

    2015-06-01

    A number of studies have examined the ability of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide to elicit Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-like subjective effects, as modeled through the THC discrimination paradigm. In the present study, we compared transgenic mice lacking fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme primarily responsible for anandamide catabolism, to wildtype counterparts in a THC discrimination procedure. THC (5.6 mg/kg) served as a discriminative stimulus in both genotypes, with similar THC dose-response curves between groups. Anandamide fully substituted for THC in FAAH knockout, but not wildtype, mice. Conversely, the metabolically stable anandamide analog O-1812 fully substituted in both groups, but was more potent in knockouts. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant dose-dependently attenuated THC generalization in both groups and anandamide substitution in FAAH knockouts. Pharmacological inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), with JZL184 resulted in full substitution for THC in FAAH knockout mice and nearly full substitution in wildtypes. Quantification of brain endocannabinoid levels revealed expected elevations in anandamide in FAAH knockout mice compared to wildtypes and equipotent dose-dependent elevations in 2-AG following JZL184 administration. Dual inhibition of FAAH and MAGL with JZL195 resulted in roughly equipotent increases in THC-appropriate responding in both groups. While the notable similarity in THC's discriminative stimulus effects across genotype suggests that the increased baseline brain anandamide levels (as seen in FAAH knockout mice) do not alter THC's subjective effects, FAAH knockout mice are more sensitive to the THC-like effects of pharmacologically induced increases in anandamide and MAGL inhibition (e.g., JZL184).

  10. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  11. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed.

  12. Immunomodulatory lipids in plants: plant fatty acid amides and the human endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jürg

    2008-05-01

    Since the discovery that endogenous lipid mediators show similar cannabimimetic effects as phytocannabinoids from CANNABIS SATIVA, our knowledge about the endocannabinoid system has rapidly expanded. Today, endocannabinoid action is known to be involved in various diseases, including inflammation and pain. As a consequence, the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoid transport, as well as endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes represent targets to block or enhance cannabinoid receptor-mediated signalling for therapeutic intervention. Based on the finding that certain endocannabinoid-like fatty acid N-alkylamides from purple coneflower ( ECHINACEA spp.) potently activate CB2 cannabinoid receptors we have focused our interest on plant fatty acid amides (FAAs) and their overall cannabinomodulatory effects. Certain FAAs are also able to partially inhibit the action of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which controls the breakdown of endocannabinoids. Intriguingly, plants lack CB receptors and do not synthesize endocannabinoids, but express FAAH homologues capable of metabolizing plant endogenous N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). While the site of action of these NAEs in plants is unknown, endogenous NAEs and arachidonic acid glycerols in animals interact with distinct physiological lipid receptors, including cannabinoid receptors. There is increasing evidence that also plant FAAs other than NAEs can pharmacologically modulate the action of these endogenous lipid signals. The interference of plant FAAs with the animal endocannabinoid system could thus be a fortunate evolutionary cross point with yet unexplored therapeutic potential.

  13. Synthesis, Anti-HCV, Antioxidant and Reduction of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species Generation of a Chlorogenic Acid Analogue with an Amide Bond Replacing the Ester Bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Na; Wang, Wei; Hattori, Masao; Daneshtalab, Mohsen; Ma, Chao-Mei

    2016-06-08

    Chlorogenic acid is a well known natural product with important bioactivities. It contains an ester bond formed between the COOH of caffeic acid and the 3-OH of quinic acid. We synthesized a chlorogenic acid analogue, 3α-caffeoylquinic acid amide, using caffeic and quinic acids as starting materials. The caffeoylquinc acid amide was found to be much more stable than chlorogenic acid and showed anti-Hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) activity with a potency similar to chlorogenic acid. The caffeoylquinc acid amide potently protected HepG2 cells against oxidative stress induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide.

  14. Synthesis, Anti-HCV, Antioxidant and Reduction of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species Generation of a Chlorogenic Acid Analogue with an Amide Bond Replacing the Ester Bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Na; Wang, Wei; Hattori, Masao; Daneshtalab, Mohsen; Ma, Chao-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid is a well known natural product with important bioactivities. It contains an ester bond formed between the COOH of caffeic acid and the 3-OH of quinic acid. We synthesized a chlorogenic acid analogue, 3α-caffeoylquinic acid amide, using caffeic and quinic acids as starting materials. The caffeoylquinc acid amide was found to be much more stable than chlorogenic acid and showed anti-Hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) activity with a potency similar to chlorogenic acid. The caffeoylquinc acid amide potently protected HepG2 cells against oxidative stress induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. PMID:27338318

  15. Bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides as potent, selective, and functionally active CCR4 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cyrille F; Bazin, Marc; Philippe, Laurence; Zhang, Jiansu; Tylaska, Laurie; Miret, Juan; Bauer, Paul H

    2007-09-01

    A cell-based assay for the chemokine G-protein-coupled receptor CCR4 was developed, and used to screen a small-molecule compound collection in a multiplex format. A series of bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides amenable to parallel chemistry were derived that were potent and selective antagonists of CCR4. One prototype compound was shown to be active in a functional model of chemotaxis, making it a useful chemical tool to explore the role of CCR4 in asthma, allergy, diabetes, and cancer.

  16. Fatty acid amide supplementation decreases impulsivity in young adult heavy drinkers.

    PubMed

    van Kooten, Maria J; Veldhuizen, Maria G; de Araujo, Ivan E; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Small, Dana M

    2016-03-01

    Compromised dopamine signaling in the striatum has been associated with the expression of impulsive behaviors in addiction, obesity and alcoholism. In rodents, intragastric infusion of the fatty acid amide oleoylethanolamide increases striatal extracellular dopamine levels via vagal afferent signaling. Here we tested whether supplementation with PhosphoLean™, a dietary supplement that contains the precursor of the fatty acid amide oleoylethanolamide (N-oleyl-phosphatidylethanolamine), would reduce impulsive responding and alcohol use in heavy drinking young adults. Twenty-two individuals were assigned to a three-week supplementation regimen with PhosphoLean™ or placebo. Impulsivity was assessed with self-report questionnaires and behavioral tasks pre- and post-supplementation. Although self-report measures of impulsivity did not change, supplementation with PhosphoLean™, but not placebo, significantly reduced false alarm rate on a Go/No-Go task. In addition, an association was found between improved sensitivity on the Go/No-Go task and reduced alcohol intake. These findings provide preliminary evidence that promoting fatty acid derived gut-brain dopamine communication may have therapeutic potential for reducing impulsivity in heavy drinkers.

  17. Electrostatic interaction of pi-acidic amides with hydrogen-bond acceptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Snyder, Lawrence B; Langley, David R

    2003-10-01

    Interactions between N-methylacetamide (NMA) and N-methylated derivatives of uracil, isocyanurate and barbituric acid have been studied using ab initio methods at the local MP2/6-31G** level of theory. The results were compared to similar interactions between the oxygen atom of NMA and the pi-clouds of perfluorobenzene, quinone and trimethyltriazine. The pi-acidic amides of isocyanurate and barbituric acid were found to interact with a hydrogen bond acceptor primarily through electrostatic attractions. These groups may be used as alternatives of a hydrogen bond donor to complement a hydrogen bond acceptor or an anion in molecular recognition and drug design. Examples of such interactions were identified through a search of the CSD database.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of piperic acid amides as free radical scavengers and α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takao, Koichi; Miyashiro, Takaki; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of piperic acid amides (4-24, 29, 30) were synthesized and their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated. Among the synthesized compounds, the amides 11, 13 and 15, which contain o-methoxyphenol, catechol or 5-hydroxyindole moieties, showed potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity (11: EC50 140 µM; 13: EC50 28 µM; 15: EC50 20 µM). The amides 10, 18 and 23 showed higher inhibitory activity of α-glucosidase (10: IC50 21 µM; 18: IC50 21 µM; 23: IC50 12 µM). These data suggest that the hydrophobicity of the conjugated amines is an important determinant of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. In addition, the amides 13 and 15 showed both potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (13: IC50 46 µM; 15: IC50 46 µM). This is the first report identifying the DPPH free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of piperic acid amides and suggests that these amides may serve as lead compounds for the development of novel α-glucosidase inhibitors with antioxidant activity.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of piperic acid amides as free radical scavengers and α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takao, Koichi; Miyashiro, Takaki; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of piperic acid amides (4-24, 29, 30) were synthesized and their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated. Among the synthesized compounds, the amides 11, 13 and 15, which contain o-methoxyphenol, catechol or 5-hydroxyindole moieties, showed potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity (11: EC50 140 µM; 13: EC50 28 µM; 15: EC50 20 µM). The amides 10, 18 and 23 showed higher inhibitory activity of α-glucosidase (10: IC50 21 µM; 18: IC50 21 µM; 23: IC50 12 µM). These data suggest that the hydrophobicity of the conjugated amines is an important determinant of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. In addition, the amides 13 and 15 showed both potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (13: IC50 46 µM; 15: IC50 46 µM). This is the first report identifying the DPPH free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of piperic acid amides and suggests that these amides may serve as lead compounds for the development of novel α-glucosidase inhibitors with antioxidant activity. PMID:25948326

  20. Cinnamic acid amides from Tribulus terrestris displaying uncompetitive α-glucosidase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Song, Yeong Hun; Kim, Dae Wook; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Park, Chanin; Son, Minky; Kim, Jeong Yoon; Yuk, Heung Joo; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Ki Hun

    2016-05-23

    The α-glucosidase inhibitory potential of Tribulus terrestris extracts has been reported but as yet the active ingredients are unknown. This study attempted to isolate the responsible metabolites and elucidate their inhibition mechanism of α-glucosidase. By fractionating T. terristris extracts, three cinnamic acid amide derivatives (1-3) were ascertained to be active components against α-glucosidase. The lead structure, N-trans-coumaroyltyramine 1, showed significant inhibition of α-glucosidase (IC50 = 0.42 μM). Moreover, all active compounds displayed uncompetitive inhibition mechanisms that have rarely been reported for α-glucosidase inhibitors. This kinetic behavior was fully demonstrated by showing a decrease of both Km and Vmax, and Kik/Kiv ratio ranging between 1.029 and 1.053. We progressed to study how chemical modifications to the lead structure 1 may impact inhibition. An α, β-unsaturation carbonyl group and hydroxyl group in A-ring of cinnamic acid amide emerged to be critical functionalities for α-glucosidase inhibition. The molecular modeling study revealed that the inhibitory activities are tightly related to π-π interaction as well as hydrogen bond interaction between enzyme and inhibitors.

  1. Computational insights into function and inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Cavalli, Andrea; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-02-16

    The Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme is a membrane-bound serine hydrolase responsible for the deactivating hydrolysis of a family of naturally occurring fatty acid amides. FAAH is a critical enzyme of the endocannabinoid system, being mainly responsible for regulating the level of its main cannabinoid substrate anandamide. For this reason, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH, which increases the level of endogenous anandamide, is a promising strategy to cure a variety of diseases including pain, inflammation, and cancer. Much structural, mutagenesis, and kinetic data on FAAH has been generated over the last couple of decades. This has prompted several informative computational investigations to elucidate, at the atomic-level, mechanistic details on catalysis and inhibition of this pharmaceutically relevant enzyme. Here, we review how these computational studies - based on classical molecular dynamics, full quantum mechanics, and hybrid QM/MM methods - have clarified the binding and reactivity of some relevant substrates and inhibitors of FAAH. We also discuss the experimental implications of these computational insights, which have provided a thoughtful elucidation of the complex physical and chemical steps of the enzymatic mechanism of FAAH. Finally, we discuss how computations have been helpful for building structure-activity relationships of potent FAAH inhibitors. PMID:25240419

  2. An Investigation of Solid-State Amidization and Imidization Reactions in Vapor Deposited Poly (amic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Anthamatten, M; Letts, S A; Day, K; Cook, R C; Gies, A P; Hamilton, T P; Nonidez, W K

    2004-06-28

    The condensation polymerization reaction of 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) with pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) to form poly(amic acid) and the subsequent imidization reaction to form polyimide were investigated for films prepared using vapor deposition polymerization techniques. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of films at different temperatures indicate that additional solid-state polymerization occurs prior to imidization reactions. Experiments reveal that, upon vapor deposition, poly(amic acid) oligomers form that have a number-average molecular weight of about 1500 Daltons. Between 100 - 130 C these chains undergo additional condensation reaction to form slightly higher molecular weight oligomers. Calorimetry measurements show that this reaction is exothermic ({Delta}H {approx} -30 J/g) with an activation energy of about 120 kJ/mol. Experimental reaction enthalpies are compared to results from ab initio molecular modeling calculations to estimate the number of amide groups formed. At higher temperatures (150 - 300 C) imidization of amide linkages occurs as an endothermic reaction ({Delta}H {approx} +120 J/g) with an activation energy of about 130 kJ/mol. Solid-state kinetics were found to depend on reaction conversion as well as the processing conditions used to deposit films.

  3. Modular Synthesis of Arylacetic Acid Esters, Thioesters, and Amides from Aryl Ethers via Rh(II)-Catalyzed Diazo Arylation.

    PubMed

    Best, Daniel; Jean, Mickaël; van de Weghe, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    One-pot formation of arylacetic acid esters, thioesters, and amides via Rh(II)-catalyzed arylation of a Meldrum's acid-derived diazo reagent with electron-rich arenes is described. The methodology was used to efficiently synthesize an anticancer compound. PMID:27465907

  4. 40 CFR 721.10410 - Polyether ester acid compound with a polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polyether ester acid compound with a polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). 721.10410 Section 721.10410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10410 Polyether ester acid compound with...

  5. The effect of pH on the toxicity of fatty acids and fatty acid amides to rainbow trout gill cells.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Matthew J; Voronca, Delia C; Chapman, Robert W; Moeller, Peter D R

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) expose aquatic organisms to multiple physical and chemical stressors during an acute time period. Algal toxins themselves may be altered by water chemistry parameters affecting their bioavailability and resultant toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two abiotic parameters (pH, inorganic metal salts) on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids, two classes of lipids produced by harmful algae, including the golden alga, Prymnesium parvum, that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Rainbow trout gill cells were used as a model of the fish gill and exposed to single compounds and mixtures of compounds along with variations in pH level and concentration of inorganic metal salts. We employed artificial neural networks (ANNs) and standard ANOVA statistical analysis to examine and predict the effects of these abiotic parameters on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that increasing pH levels increases the toxicity of fatty acid amides and inhibits the toxicity of fatty acids. This phenomenon is reversed at lower pH levels. Exposing gill cells to complex mixtures of chemical factors resulted in dramatic increases in toxicity compared to tests of single compounds for both the fatty acid amides and fatty acids. These findings highlight the potential of physicochemical factors to affect the toxicity of chemicals released during algal blooms and demonstrate drastic differences in the effect of pH on fatty acid amides and fatty acids. PMID:24240104

  6. Increasing human Th17 differentiation through activation of orphan nuclear receptor retinoid acid-related orphan receptor γ (RORγ) by a class of aryl amide compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Fang, Leiping; Zhou, Ling; Wang, Shuai; Xiang, Zhijun; Li, Yuan; Wisely, Bruce; Zhang, Guifeng; An, Gang; Wang, Yonghui; Leung, Stewart; Zhong, Zhong

    2012-10-01

    In a screen for small-molecule inhibitors of retinoid acid-related orphan receptor γ (RORγ), we fortuitously discovered that a class of aryl amide compounds behaved as functional activators of the interleukin 17 (IL-17) reporter in Jurkat cells. Three of these compounds were selected for further analysis and found to activate the IL-17 reporter with potencies of ∼0.1 μM measured by EC₅₀. These compounds were shown to directly bind to RORγ by circular dichroism-based thermal stability experiments. Furthermore, they can enhance an in vitro Th17 differentiation process in human primary T cells. As RORγ remains an orphan nuclear receptor, discovery of these aryl amide compounds as functional agonists will now provide pharmacological tools for us to dissect functions of RORγ and facilitate drug discovery efforts for immune-modulating therapies.

  7. Catalytic synthesis of amides via aldoximes rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Pascale; Cadierno, Victorio

    2015-02-14

    Amide bond formation reactions are among the most important transformations in organic chemistry because of the widespread occurrence of amides in pharmaceuticals, natural products and biologically active compounds. The Beckmann rearrangement is a well-known method to generate secondary amides from ketoximes. However, under the acidic conditions commonly employed, aldoximes RHC=NOH rarely rearrange into the corresponding primary amides RC(=O)NH2. In recent years, it was demonstrated that this atom-economical transformation can be carried out efficiently and selectively with the help of metal catalysts. Several homogeneous and heterogenous systems have been described. In addition, protocols offering the option to generate the aldoximes in situ from the corresponding aldehydes and hydroxylamine, or even from alcohols, have also been developed, as well as a series of tandem processes allowing the access to N-substituted amide products. In this Feature article a comprehensive overview of the advances achieved in this particular research area is presented.

  8. Enzymatically and reductively degradable α-amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s: synthesis, cell compatibility, and intracellular anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huanli; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Dias, Aylvin A; Hendriks, Marc; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-02-01

    A novel and versatile family of enzymatically and reductively degradable α-amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s (SS-PEAs) were developed from solution polycondensation of disulfide-containing di-p-toluenesulfonic acid salts of bis-l-phenylalanine diesters (SS-Phe-2TsOH) with di-p-nitrophenyl adipate (NA) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). SS-PEAs with Mn ranging from 16.6 to 23.6 kg/mol were obtained, depending on NA/SS-Phe-2TsOH molar ratios. The chemical structures of SS-PEAs were confirmed by (1)H NMR and FTIR spectra. Thermal analyses showed that the obtained SS-PEAs were amorphous with a glass transition temperature (Tg) in the range of 35.2-39.5 °C. The in vitro degradation studies of SS-PEA films revealed that SS-PEAs underwent surface erosion in the presence of 0.1 mg/mL α-chymotrypsin and bulk degradation under a reductive environment containing 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). The preliminary cell culture studies displayed that SS-PEA films could well support adhesion and proliferation of L929 fibroblast cells, indicating that SS-PEAs have excellent cell compatibility. The nanoparticles prepared from SS-PEA with PVA as a surfactant had an average size of 167 nm in phosphate buffer (PB, 10 mM, pH 7.4). SS-PEA nanoparticles while stable under physiological environment undergo rapid disintegration under an enzymatic or reductive condition. The in vitro drug release studies showed that DOX release was accelerated in the presence of 0.1 mg/mL α-chymotrypsin or 10 mM DTT. Confocal microscopy observation displayed that SS-PEA nanoparticles effectively transported DOX into both drug-sensitive and -resistant MCF-7 cells. MTT assays revealed that DOX-loaded SS-PEA nanoparticles had a high antitumor activity approaching that of free DOX in drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells, while more than 10 times higher than free DOX in drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. These enzymatically and reductively degradable α-amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s have provided an appealing platform for

  9. Accelerated Amidization of Branched Poly(ethylenimine)/Poly(acrylic acid) Multilayer Films by Microwave Heating.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kehua; Gu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Huan; Qiang, Zhe; Vogt, Bryan D; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-09-13

    Chemical cross-linking of layer-by-layer assembled films promotes mechanical stability and robustness in a wide variety of environments, which can be a challenge for polyelectrolyte multilayers in saline environments or for multilayers made from weak polyelectrolytes in environments with extreme pHs. Heating branched poly(ethylenimine)/poly(acrylic acid) (BPEI/PAA) multilayers at sufficiently high temperatures drives amidization and dehydration to covalently cross-link the film, but this reaction is rather slow, typically requiring heating for hours for appreciable cross-linking to occur. Here, a more than one order of magnitude increase in the amidization kinetics is realized through microwave heating of BPEI/PAA multilayers on indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass substrates. The cross-linking reaction is tracked using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry to monitor the development of the cross-linking products. For thick films (∼1500 nm), gradients in cross-link density can be readily identified by infrared ellipsometry. Such gradients in cross-link density are driven by the temperature gradient developed by the localized heating of ITO by microwaves. This significant acceleration of reactions using microwaves to generate a well-defined cross-link network as well as being a simple method for developing graded materials should open new applications for these polymer films and coatings. PMID:27548626

  10. Discovery and molecular basis of potent noncovalent inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)

    PubMed Central

    Min, Xiaoshan; Thibault, Stephen T.; Porter, Amy C.; Gustin, Darin J.; Carlson, Timothy J.; Xu, Haoda; Lindstrom, Michelle; Xu, Guifen; Uyeda, Craig; Ma, Zhihua; Li, Yihong; Kayser, Frank; Walker, Nigel P. C.; Wang, Zhulun

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an amidase-signature family member, is an integral membrane enzyme that degrades lipid amides including the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and the sleep-inducing molecule oleamide. Both genetic knock out and pharmacological administration of FAAH inhibitors in rodent models result in analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes. Targeting FAAH activity, therefore, presents a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain and other neurological-related or inflammatory disorders. Nearly all FAAH inhibitors known to date attain their binding potency through a reversible or irreversible covalent modification of the nucleophile Ser241 in the unusual Ser-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. Here, we report the discovery and mechanism of action of a series of ketobenzimidazoles as unique and potent noncovalent FAAH inhibitors. Compound 2, a representative of these ketobenzimidazoles, was designed from a series of ureas that were identified from high-throughput screening. While urea compound 1 is characterized as an irreversible covalent inhibitor, the cocrystal structure of FAAH complexed with compound 2 reveals that these ketobenzimidazoles, though containing a carbonyl moiety, do not covalently modify Ser241. These inhibitors achieve potent inhibition of FAAH activity primarily from shape complementarity to the active site and through numerous hydrophobic interactions. These noncovalent compounds exhibit excellent selectivity and good pharmacokinetic properties. The discovery of this distinctive class of inhibitors opens a new avenue for modulating FAAH activity through nonmechanism-based inhibition. PMID:21502526

  11. Efficient Gene Silencing by Self-Assembled Complexes of siRNA and Symmetrical Fatty Acid Amides of Spermine

    PubMed Central

    Metwally, Abdelkader A.; Pourzand, Charareh; Blagbrough, Ian S.

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing by siRNA (synthetic dsRNA of 21-25 nucleotides) is a well established biological tool in gene expression studies and has a promising therapeutic potential for difficult-to-treat diseases. Five fatty acids of various chain length and oxidation state (C12:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2, C22:1) were conjugated to the naturally occurring polyamine, spermine, and evaluated for siRNA delivery and gene knock-down. siRNA delivery could not be related directly to gene silencing efficiency as N4,N9-dierucoyl spermine resulted in higher siRNA delivery compared to N4,N9-dioleoyl spermine. GFP silencing in HeLa cells showed that the unsaturated fatty acid amides are more efficient than saturated fatty acid amides, with N4,N9-dioleoyl spermine resulting in the most efficient gene silencing in the presence of serum. The alamarBlue cell viability assay showed that fatty acid amides of spermine have good viability (75%–85% compared to control) except N4,N9-dilauroyl spermine which resulted in low cell viability. These results prove that unsaturated fatty acid amides of spermine are efficient, non-toxic, non-viral vectors for siRNA mediated gene silencing. PMID:24310492

  12. A spectrophotometric assay for fatty acid amide hydrolase suitable for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    De Bank, Paul A; Kendall, David A; Alexander, Stephen P H

    2005-04-15

    Signalling via the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol appears to be terminated largely through the action of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In this report, we describe a simple spectrophotometric assay to detect FAAH activity in vitro using the ability of the enzyme to hydrolyze oleamide and measuring the resultant production of ammonia with a NADH/NAD+-coupled enzyme reaction. This dual-enzyme assay was used to determine Km and Vmax values of 104 microM and 5.7 nmol/min/mgprotein, respectively, for rat liver FAAH-catalyzed oleamide hydrolysis. Inhibitor potency was determined with the resultant rank order of methyl arachidonyl fluorophosphonate>phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride>anandamide. This assay system was also adapted for use in microtiter plates and its ability to detect a known inhibitor of FAAH demonstrated, highlighting its potential for use in high-throughput screening.

  13. Targeting leukemic side population cells by isatin derivatives of nicotinic acid amide.

    PubMed

    Naglah, A M; Shinwari, Z; Bhat, M A; Al-Tahhan, M; Al-Omar, M A; Al-Dhfyan, A

    2016-01-01

    Side population (SP) cells mediate chemoresistance in leukemia. However, chemical inhibition approach to target SP cells has been poorly studied. Herein, we report the discovery of isatin derivatives of nicotinic acid amide as potent side population cell inhibitors. The selected derivatives showed superior potency over the reference drug verapamil. Furthermore, the treatment increased chemosensitivity and inhibited the cell proliferation on three different leukemic cell lines, K562, THP-1 and U937, suggesting that both SP and the bulk of leukemic cells are affected. Moreover, treatment with the most potent compound Nic9 reduced the expression of ABCG2, demonstrating that side population inhibition effect of the target derivatives is at least via ABCG2 inhibition. Importantly, the target derivatives induced erythrocyte/dendritic differentiation to leukemic cells mainly through Musashi/Numb pathway modulation. PMID:27358121

  14. Inhibition of fatty-acid amide hydrolase accelerates acquisition and extinction rates in a spatial memory task.

    PubMed

    Varvel, Stephen A; Wise, Laura E; Niyuhire, Floride; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that disruption of CB(1) receptor signaling impairs extinction of learned responses in conditioned fear and Morris water maze paradigms. Here, we test the hypothesis that elevating brain levels of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide through either genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of its primary catabolic enzyme fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) will potentiate extinction in a fixed platform water maze task. FAAH (-/-) mice and mice treated with the FAAH inhibitor OL-135, did not display any memory impairment or motor disruption, but did exhibit a significant increase in the rate of extinction. Unexpectedly, FAAH-compromised mice also exhibited a significant increase in acquisition rate. The CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant) when given alone had no effects on acquisition, but disrupted extinction. Additionally, SR141716 blocked the effects of OL-135 on both acquisition and extinction. Collectively, these results indicate that endogenous anandamide plays a facilitatory role in extinction through a CB(1) receptor mechanism of action. In contrast, the primary psychoactive constituent of marijuana, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, failed to affect extinction rates, suggesting that FAAH is a more effective target than a direct acting CB(1) receptor agonist in facilitating extinction. More generally, these findings suggest that FAAH inhibition represents a promising pharmacological approach to treat psychopathologies hallmarked by an inability to extinguish maladaptive behaviors, such as post-traumatic stress syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  15. Poly(ortho ester amides): Acid-labile Temperature-responsive Copolymers for Potential Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rupei; Palumbo, R. Noelle; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2009-01-01

    A new, convenient pathway is developed to synthesize highly hydrolytically labile poly(ortho ester amide) (POEA) copolymers that overcomes some of the major weaknesses of the traditional methods of synthesizing poly(ortho esters) and their derivatives. A diamine monomer containing a built-in, stabilized ortho ester group was synthesized and was used for polycondensation with diacid esters, giving rise to a series of POEA copolymers with unique stimuli-responsive properties. The POEA undergoes temperature-responsive, reversible sol-gel phase transition in water. Phase diagrams of the POEA/H2O mixture reveal the concentration-dependent existence of different phases, including hydrogel and opaque or clear solution. Such behavior may be attributed to the temperature-dependent hydrogen-bonding involving the amide groups in the POEA backbone and hydrophobic interactions between POEA chains, and it is tunable by selecting diacid monomers with different chemical structures. The kinetics of POEA mass loss in physiological aqueous buffers and release of a model macromolecular drug, fluorescently labeled dextran, are nearly zero-order, suggesting predominantly surface-restricted polymer erosion. The rates of polymer erosion and drug release are much faster at pH 5.0 than pH 7.4. No cytotoxicity was found for the polymer extracts and the polymer degradation products at concentrations as high as 1 mg/ml. The normal morphology of fibroblasts cultured directly in contact with POEA films was not altered. These novel acid-labile temperature-responsive POEA copolymers may be potentially useful for a wide range of biomedical applications such as minimal invasive delivery of controlled-release drug formulations that respond to biological temperature and acidic-pH environments in cells and tissues. PMID:19281150

  16. GC AND LC CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND EI, CE, +/- CI, AND ES MASS SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SALTS AND AMIDES OF PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1976, fluorine in human blood serum was thought to be present as perfluorooctanic acid; however, in the 1990s it was correctly identified by LC/MS as perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). PFOS was both a commercial product and an end-stage metabolite of numerous substituted amides ...

  17. Structure-activity relationships of fatty acid amide ligands in activating and desensitizing G protein-coupled receptor 119

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pritesh; Kumar, Akhilesh; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to apply a high throughput assay to investigate the structure-activity relationships of fatty acid amides for activating and desensitizing G protein-coupled receptor 119, a promising therapeutic target for both type 2 diabetes and obesity. A cell-based, homogenous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) method for measuring G protein-coupled receptor 119-mediated increase of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels was validated and applied in this study. Using novel fatty acid amides and detailed potency and efficacy analyses, we have demonstrated that degree of saturation in acyl chain and charged head groups of fatty acid amides have profound effects on the ability of these compounds to activate G protein-coupled receptor 119. In addition, we have demonstrated for the first time that pretreatments with G protein-coupled receptor 119 agonists desensitize the receptor and the degrees of desensitization caused by fatty acid amides correlate well with their structure-activity relationships in activating the receptor. PMID:24184668

  18. Lipase-catalyzed production of a bioactive fatty amide derivative of 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty amides are of considerable interest due to their wide ranging industrial applications in detergents, shampoo, cosmetics and surfactant formulations. They are produced commercially from fatty acids by reacting with anhydrous ammonia at approximately 200 deg C and 345-690 KPa pressure. We inve...

  19. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  20. Rapid, Structure-Based Exploration of Pipecolic Acid Amides as Novel Selective Antagonists of the FK506-Binding Protein 51.

    PubMed

    Gaali, Steffen; Feng, Xixi; Hähle, Andreas; Sippel, Claudia; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2016-03-24

    The FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is a key regulator of stress hormone receptors and an established risk factor for stress-related disorders. Drug development for FKBP51 has been impaired by the structurally similar but functionally opposing homologue FKBP52. High selectivity between FKBP51 and FKBP52 can be achieved by ligands that stabilize a recently discovered FKBP51-favoring conformation. However, drug-like parameters for these ligands remained unfavorable. In the present study, we replaced the potentially labile pipecolic ester group of previous FKBP51 ligands by various low molecular weight amides. This resulted in the first series of pipecolic acid amides, which had much lower molecular weights without affecting FKBP51 selectivity. We discovered a geminally substituted cyclopentyl amide as a preferred FKBP51-binding motif and elucidated its binding mode to provide a new lead structure for future drug optimization. PMID:26954324

  1. Genetic engineering activates biosynthesis of aromatic fumaric acid amides in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Daniel; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Lackner, Gerald; Scharf, Daniel H; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Brakhage, Axel A; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2015-03-01

    The Aspergillus fumigatus nonribosomal peptide synthetase FtpA is among the few of this species whose natural product has remained unknown. Both FtpA adenylation domains were characterized in vitro. Fumaric acid was identified as preferred substrate of the first and both l-tyrosine and l-phenylalanine as preferred substrates of the second adenylation domain. Genetically engineered A. fumigatus strains expressed either ftpA or the regulator gene ftpR, encoded in the same cluster of genes, under the control of the doxycycline-inducible tetracycline-induced transcriptional activation (tet-on) cassette. These strains produced fumaryl-l-tyrosine and fumaryl-l-phenylalanine which were identified by liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Modeling of the first adenylation domain in silico provided insight into the structural requirements to bind fumaric acid as peptide synthetase substrate. This work adds aromatic fumaric acid amides to the secondary metabolome of the important human pathogen A. fumigatus which was previously not known as a producer of these compounds.

  2. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D.; Convertino, Marino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The design of multitarget‐directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget‐directed ligand named ARN2508 (2‐[3‐fluoro‐4‐[3‐(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2‐arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti‐inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX. PMID:26593700

  3. Genetic Engineering Activates Biosynthesis of Aromatic Fumaric Acid Amides in the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Daniel; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Lackner, Gerald; Scharf, Daniel H.; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus fumigatus nonribosomal peptide synthetase FtpA is among the few of this species whose natural product has remained unknown. Both FtpA adenylation domains were characterized in vitro. Fumaric acid was identified as preferred substrate of the first and both l-tyrosine and l-phenylalanine as preferred substrates of the second adenylation domain. Genetically engineered A. fumigatus strains expressed either ftpA or the regulator gene ftpR, encoded in the same cluster of genes, under the control of the doxycycline-inducible tetracycline-induced transcriptional activation (tet-on) cassette. These strains produced fumaryl-l-tyrosine and fumaryl-l-phenylalanine which were identified by liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Modeling of the first adenylation domain in silico provided insight into the structural requirements to bind fumaric acid as peptide synthetase substrate. This work adds aromatic fumaric acid amides to the secondary metabolome of the important human pathogen A. fumigatus which was previously not known as a producer of these compounds. PMID:25527545

  4. Acid-promoted chemoselective introduction of amide functionality onto aromatic compounds mediated by an isocyanate cation generated from carbamate.

    PubMed

    Sumita, Akinari; Kurouchi, Hiroaki; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2014-10-01

    Carbamates have been used as precursors of isocyanates, but heating in the presence of strong acids is required because cleavage of the C-O bond in carbamates is energy-demanding even in acid media. Direct amidation of aromatic compounds by isocyanate cations generated at room temperature from carbamoyl salicylates in trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TfOH) was examined. Carbamates with ortho-salicylate as an ether group (carbamoyl salicylates) showed dramatically accelerated O-C bond dissociation in TfOH, which resulted in facile generation of the isocyanate cation. These chemoselective intermolecular aromatic amidation reactions proceeded even at room temperature and showed good compatibility with other electrophilic functionalities and high discrimination between N-monosubstituted carbamate and N,N-disubstituted carbamate. The reaction rates of secondary and tertiary amide formation were markedly different, and this difference was utilized to achieve successive (tandem) amidation reactions of molecules with an N-monosubstituted carbamate and an N,N-disubstituted carbamate with two kinds of aromatic compounds.

  5. Wound-Inducible Biosynthesis of Phytoalexin Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides of Tyramine in Tryptophan and Tyrosine Decarboxylase Transgenic Tobacco Lines1

    PubMed Central

    Guillet, Gabriel; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    The wound-activated biosynthesis of phytoalexin hydroxycinnamic acid amides of tyramine was compared in untransformed and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lines that express tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), tyrosine decarboxylase (TYDC), or both activities. Transgenic in vitro-grown tobacco lines expressing TDC activity accumulated high levels of tryptamine but not hydroxycinnamic amides of tryptamine. In contrast, transgenic tobacco lines expressing TYDC accumulated tyramine as well as p-coumaroyltyramine and feruloyltyramine. The MeOH-soluble and cell wall fractions showed higher concentrations of wound-inducible p-coumaroyltyramine and feruloyltyramine, especially at and around wound sites, in TYDC and TDC ×TYDC tobacco lines compared to wild-type or TDC lines. All the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of hydroxycinnamic acid amides of tyramine were found to be similarly wound inducible in all tobacco genotypes investigated. These results provide experimental evidence that, under some circumstances, TYDC activity can exert a rate-limiting control over the carbon flux allocated to the biosynthesis of hydroxycinnamic acid amides of tyramine. PMID:15665252

  6. Evaluation of physicochemical properties, skin permeation and accumulation profiles of salicylic acid amide prodrugs as sunscreen agent.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi-Dong; Sung, Jun Ho; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Jung Sun; Jeon, Eun-Mi; Kim, Dae-Duk; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Jong Oh; Piao, Ming Guan; Li, Dong Xun; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han Gon

    2011-10-31

    Various amide prodrugs of salicylic acid were synthesised, and their physicochemical properties including lipophilicity, chemical stability and enzymatic hydrolysis were investigated. In vivo skin permeation and accumulation profiles were also evaluated using a combination of common permeation enhancing techniques such as the use of a supersaturated solution of permeants in an enhancer vehicle, a lipophilic receptor solution, removal of the stratum corneum and delipidisation of skin. Their capacity factor values were proportional to the degree of carbon-carbon saturation in the side chain. All these amides were highly stable in acetonitrile and glycerine. Amide prodrugs were converted to salicylic acid both in hairless mouse liver and skin homogenates. N-dodecyl salicylamide (C12SM) showed the lowest permeation of salicylic acid in skin compared to the other prodrugs, probably due to its low aqueous solubility. It had a high affinity for the stratum corneum and its accumulation was restricted to only the uppermost layer of skin. Thus, this amide prodrug could be a safer topical sunscreen agent with minimum potential for systemic absorption.

  7. Complex investigation of the effects of lambertianic acid amide in female mice under conditions of social discomfort.

    PubMed

    Avgustinovich, D F; Fomina, M K; Sorokina, I V; Tolstikova, T G

    2014-09-01

    The effects of chronic administration of a new substance lambertianic acid amide and previously synthesized methyl ester of this acid were compared in female mice living under conditions of social discomfort. For modeling social discomfort, female mouse was housed for 30 days in a cage with aggressive male mouse kept behind a transparent perforated partition and observed its confrontations with another male mouse daily placed to the cage. The new agent more effectively than lambertianic acid methyl ester improved communicativeness and motor activity of animals, reduced hypertrophy of the adrenal glands, and enhanced catalase activity in the blood. These changes suggest that lambertianic acid amide produces a pronounced stress-protective effect under conditions of social discomfort.

  8. Synthesis of biaryl imino/keto carboxylic acids via aryl amide directed C-H activation reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nana; Yu, Qingzhen; Chen, Ruixue; Huang, Jianhui; Xia, Yeqing; Zhao, Kang

    2013-10-21

    A novel Pd-catalysed C-H activation reaction for the synthesis of biaryl imino/keto carboxylic acids is developed. This reaction underwent aryl amide directed C-H activation ortho-acylation followed by ring closing and ring opening processes to give a range of biaryl imino/keto carboxylic acids. Our methodology features the utilization of a cheap and green oxidant (TBHP) as well as readily available aldehydes.

  9. Cu(I)-catalyzed (11)C carboxylation of boronic acid esters: a rapid and convenient entry to (11)C-labeled carboxylic acids, esters, and amides.

    PubMed

    Riss, Patrick J; Lu, Shuiyu; Telu, Sanjay; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Pike, Victor W

    2012-03-12

    Rapid and direct: the carboxylation of boronic acid esters with (11)CO(2) provides [(11)C]carboxylic acids as a convenient entry into [(11)C]esters and [(11)C]amides. This conversion of boronates is tolerant to diverse functional groups (e.g., halo, nitro, or carbonyl). PMID:22308017

  10. A pro-nociceptive phenotype unmasked in mice lacking fatty-acid amide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Lawrence M; Slivicki, Richard A; Leishman, Emma; Cornett, Ben; Mackie, Ken; Bradshaw, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is the major enzyme responsible for degradation of anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of FAAH (FAAH KO) produces antinociception in preclinical pain models that is largely attributed to anandamide-induced activation of cannabinoid receptors. However, FAAH metabolizes a wide range of structurally related, biologically active lipid signaling molecules whose functions remain largely unknown. Some of these endogenous lipids, including anandamide itself, may exert pro-nociceptive effects under certain conditions. In our study, FAAH KO mice exhibited a characteristic analgesic phenotype in the tail flick test and in both formalin and carrageenan models of inflammatory nociception. Nonetheless, intradermal injection of the transient receptor potential channel V1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin increased nocifensive behavior as well as mechanical and heat hypersensitivity in FAAH KO relative to wild-type mice. This pro-nociceptive phenotype was accompanied by increases in capsaicin-evoked Fos-like immunoreactive (FLI) cells in spinal dorsal horn regions implicated in nociceptive processing and was attenuated by CB1 (AM251) and TRPV1 (AMG9810) antagonists. When central sensitization was established, FAAH KO mice displayed elevated levels of anandamide, other fatty-acid amides, and endogenous TRPV1 agonists in both paw skin and lumbar spinal cord relative to wild-type mice. Capsaicin decreased spinal cord 2-AG levels and increased arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 levels in both spinal cord and paw skin irrespective of genotype. Our studies identify a previously unrecognized pro-nociceptive phenotype in FAAH KO mice that was unmasked by capsaicin challenge. The heightened nociceptive response was mediated by CB1 and TRPV1 receptors and accompanied by enhanced spinal neuronal activation. Moreover, genetic deletion of FAAH has a profound impact on the peripheral and central lipidome. Thus, genetic

  11. Synthesis and application of acid labile anchor groups for the synthesis of peptide amides by Fmoc-solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Breipohl, G; Knolle, J; Stüber, W

    1989-10-01

    The preparation and application of a new linker for the synthesis of peptide amides using a modified Fmoc-method is described. The new anchor group was developed based on our experience with 4,4'-dimethoxybenzhydryl (Mbh)-protecting group for amides. Lability towards acid treatment was increased dramatically and results in an easy cleavage procedure for the preparation of peptide amides. The synthesis of N-9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl- ([5-carboxylatoethyl-2.4-dimethoxyphenyl)- 4'-methoxyphenyl]-methylamin is reported in detail. This linker was coupled to a commercially available aminomethyl polystyrene resin. Peptide synthesis proceeded smoothly using HOOBt esters of Fmoc-amino acids. Release of the peptide amide and final cleavage of the side chain protecting groups was accomplished by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid-dichloromethane mixtures in the presence of scavengers. The synthesis of peptide amides such as LHRH and C-terminal hexapeptide of secretin are given as examples.

  12. Pd-Catalyzed Coupling of γ-C(sp(3))-H Bonds of Oxalyl Amide-Protected Amino Acids with Heteroaryl and Aryl Iodides.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian; Zheng, Yongxiang; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Yan; Huang, Zhi-Bin; Shi, Da-Qing; Zeng, Runsheng; Zhao, Yingsheng

    2016-07-01

    Pd-catalyzed regioselective coupling of γ-C(sp(3))-H bonds of oxalyl amide-protected amino acids with heteroaryl and aryl iodides is reported. A wide variety of iodides are tolerated, giving the corresponding products in moderate to good yields. Various oxalyl amide-protected amino acids were compatible in this C-H transformation, thus representing a practical method for constructing non-natural amino acid derivatives. PMID:27286881

  13. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase: New Targets for Future Antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shintaro; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis and analogs of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol have been used for therapeutic purposes, but their therapeutic use remains limited because of various adverse effects. Endogenous cannabinoids have been discovered, and dysregulation of endocannabinoid signaling is implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Recently, endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) have become new therapeutic targets in the treatment of MDD. Several FAAH or MAGL inhibitors are reported to have no cannabimimetic side effects and, therefore, are new potential therapeutic options for patients with MDD who are resistant to first-line antidepressants (selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). In this review, we focus on the possible relationships between MDD and the endocannabinoid system as well as the inhibitors' therapeutic potential. MAGL inhibitors may reduce inflammatory responses through activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2. In the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, repeated FAAH inhibitor administration may be beneficial for reducing circulating glucocorticoid levels. Both FAAH and MAGL inhibitors may contribute to dopaminergic system regulation. Recently, several new inhibitors have been developed with strong potency and selectivity. FAAH inhibitor, MAGL inhibitor, or dual blocker use would be promising new treatments for MDD. Further pre-clinical studies and clinical trials using these inhibitors are warranted. PMID:26630956

  14. Effect of beta-adrenoceptors on the behaviour induced by the neuropeptide glutamic acid isoleucine amide.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela E; Attademo, Andrés; Baiardi, Gustavo; Celis, María Ester

    2007-07-30

    Excessive grooming behaviour is induced by intracerebroventricular injections of the neuropeptide glutamic acid isoleucine amide (neuropeptide-EI), via the activation of A-10 dopaminergic neurons and the noradrenergic system. Our object was to study the latter system involved in these behaviours, using male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g with i.c.v. implants. The results show that all the adrenoceptor antagonists "per se" do not affect excessive grooming behaviour or motor activity. Intracerebroventricular administration of propranolol, a general beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, before neuropeptide-EI, inhibited the induced excessive grooming behaviour in a dose dependent manner. Metoprolol, a beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, also blocked this behaviour. However, intracerebroventricular injections of phentolamine, an alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, and ((+/-)-1-[2,3-(Dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol), a beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, had no effect on the behaviour induced by neuropeptide-EI induced behaviour for any of the doses tested. On the other hand, isoproterenol, a general beta-adrenoceptor agonist and dobutamine, a beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist, both elicited similar behaviours as those induced by neuropeptide-EI. These results support the hypothesis that a relationship exists between neuropeptide-EI and beta-adrenoceptors, more specifically the beta(1)-adrenoceptor, as found with other similar endogenous peptides such as neurotensin, cholecystin, substance P and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. Hence, neuropeptide-EI could probably be exerting a neuromodulating effect on the central nervous system.

  15. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase: New Targets for Future Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Shintaro; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis and analogs of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol have been used for therapeutic purposes, but their therapeutic use remains limited because of various adverse effects. Endogenous cannabinoids have been discovered, and dysregulation of endocannabinoid signaling is implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Recently, endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) have become new therapeutic targets in the treatment of MDD. Several FAAH or MAGL inhibitors are reported to have no cannabimimetic side effects and, therefore, are new potential therapeutic options for patients with MDD who are resistant to first-line antidepressants (selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). In this review, we focus on the possible relationships between MDD and the endocannabinoid system as well as the inhibitors’ therapeutic potential. MAGL inhibitors may reduce inflammatory responses through activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2. In the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, repeated FAAH inhibitor administration may be beneficial for reducing circulating glucocorticoid levels. Both FAAH and MAGL inhibitors may contribute to dopaminergic system regulation. Recently, several new inhibitors have been developed with strong potency and selectivity. FAAH inhibitor, MAGL inhibitor, or dual blocker use would be promising new treatments for MDD. Further pre-clinical studies and clinical trials using these inhibitors are warranted. PMID:26630956

  16. Amide-conjugated indole-3-acetic acid and adventitious root formation in mung bean cuttings

    SciTech Connect

    Norcini, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate further the relationship between amide-conjugated auxin and adventitious root formation. Indoleacetylaspartic acid (IAA-aspartate) was positively identified as the predominant conjugate isolated from mung bean cuttings after the cuttings has been treated with 10/sup -3/ M IAA. In cuttings treated with (1-/sup 14/C)IAA immediately after excision (0 hr), the percent of extractable /sup 14/C in IAA-aspartate in the hypocotyl sharply increased until 36 hr, then steadily declined. (/sup 14/C)IAA was completely metabolized between 12 and 24 hr. The rooting activities of IAA-L-aspartate, IAA-L-alanine, and IAA-glycine were determined at various stages of root formation; some cuttings were pretreated with 10/sup -3/ M IAA at 0 hr. Pretreated cuttings that were treated with IAA-glycine at 12, 24, 36 hr exhibited the greatest consistency between replications, the greatest number of long roots, and the longest roots. The conjugates did not stimulate rooting as effectively as IAA, yet like IAA, generally enhanced rooting the greatest when applied before the first cell division (24 hr).

  17. Fatty-acid amide hydrolase polymorphisms and post-traumatic stress disorder after penetrating brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pardini, M; Krueger, F; Koenigs, M; Raymont, V; Hodgkinson, C; Zoubak, S; Goldman, D; Grafman, J

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have seen an increase in the clinical awareness of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), one of the most disabling and least understood behavioral disorders. Although the biological bases of PTSD are poorly understood, fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity has been linked with arousability and aversive-memories extinction, that is, two key features of PTSD. In this study, we investigated the association between the FAAH genetic polymorphisms and PTSD development and maintenance. We assessed PTSD frequency in a group of male Vietnam war veterans who suffered combat-related penetrating traumatic brain injury, that is, a relatively homogeneous population regarding the nature of the events that led to PTSD. We showed that rs2295633, a single-nucleotide polymorphism of FAAH, was significantly associated with PTSD diagnosis in subjects without lesions in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, the presence of the C allele was associated with more severe re-experiencing of trauma and more negative reported childhood experiences. In conclusion, our data suggest that FAAH has an important role in PTSD through modulation of aversive memories and point to both a novel therapeutic target and a possible risk marker for this condition. PMID:22832737

  18. Attenuation of Cystitis and Pain Sensation in Mice Lacking Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zun-Yi; Wang, Peiqing; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Bjorling, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids, such as N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA, also called anandamide), exert potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is primarily responsible for degradation of AEA, and deletion of FAAH increases AEA content in various tissues. Since FAAH has been shown to be present in the bladder of various species, we compared bladder function, severity of experimental cystitis, and cystitis-associated referred hyperalgesia in male wild type (WT) and FAAH knock-out (KO) mice. Basal concentrations of AEA were greater, and the severity of cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced cystitis was reduced in bladders from FAAH KO compared to WT mice. Cystitis-associated increased peripheral sensitivity to mechanical stimuli and enhanced bladder activity (as reflected by increased voiding frequency) were attenuated in FAAH KO compared to WT mice. Further, abundances of mRNA for several pro-inflammatory compounds were increased in bladder mucosa after CYP treatment of WT mice, and this increase was inhibited in FAAH KO mice. These data indicate that endogenous substrates of FAAH, including the cannabinoid AEA, play an inhibitory role in bladder inflammation and subsequent changes in pain perception. Therefore, FAAH could be a therapeutic target to treat clinical symptoms of painful inflammatory bladder diseases. PMID:25374388

  19. Yakushinamides, Polyoxygenated Fatty Acid Amides That Inhibit HDACs and SIRTs, from the Marine Sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kentaro; Imae, Yasufumi; Ise, Yuji; Ohtsuka, Susumu; Ito, Akihiro; Okada, Shigeru; Yoshida, Minoru; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2016-09-23

    Yakushinamides A (1) and B (2), prolyl amides of polyoxygenated fatty acids, have been isolated from the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei as inhibitors of HDACs and SIRTs. Their planar structures were determined by interpretation of the NMR data of the intact molecules and tandem FABMS data of the methanolysis products. For the assignment of the relative configurations of the three contiguous oxymethine carbons in 1 and 2, Kishi's universal NMR database was applied to the methanolysis products. During the assignments of relative configurations of the isolated 1-hydroxy-3-methyl moiety in 1 and the isolated 1-hydroxy-2-methyl moiety in 2, we found diagnostic NMR features to distinguish each pair of diastereomers. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were determined by a combination of the modified Mosher's method and Marfey's method. Although the modified Mosher's method was successfully applied to the methanolysis product of 1, this method gave an ambiguous result at C-20 when applied to the methanolysis product of 2, even after oxidative cleavage of the C-14 and C-15 bond. PMID:27548648

  20. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and cyclooxygenase by the N-(3-methylpyridin-2-yl)amide derivatives of flurbiprofen and naproxen.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Mariateresa; Björklund, Emmelie; Wilson, Alan A; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Fowler, Christopher J

    2013-11-15

    Inhibitors of the metabolism of the endogenous cannabinoid ligand anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) reduce the gastric damage produced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and synergise with them in experimental pain models. This motivates the design of compounds with joint FAAH/cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitory activity. Here we present data on the N-(3-methylpyridin-2-yl)amide derivatives of flurbiprofen and naproxen (Flu-AM1 and Nap-AM1, respectively) with respect to their properties towards these two enzymes. Flu-AM1 and Nap-AM1 inhibited FAAH-catalysed hydrolysis of [(3)H]anandamide by rat brain homogenates with IC50 values of 0.44 and 0.74 µM. The corresponding values for flurbiprofen and naproxen were 29 and >100 µM, respectively. The inhibition by Flu-AM1 was reversible, mixed-type, with K(i)slope and K(i)intercept values of 0.21 and 1.4 µM, respectively. Flurbiprofen and Flu-AM1 both inhibited COX in the same manner with the order of potencies COX-2 vs. 2-arachidonoylglycerol>COX-1 vs. arachidonic acid>COX-2 vs. arachidonic acid with flurbiprofen being approximately 2-3 fold more potent than Flu-AM1 in the assays. Nap-AM1 was a less potent inhibitor of COX. Flu-AM1 at low micromolar concentrations inhibited the FAAH-driven uptake of [(3)H]anandamide into RBL2H3 basophilic leukaemia cells in vitro, but did not penetrate the brain in vivo sufficiently to block the binding of [(18)F]DOPP to brain FAAH. It is concluded that Flu-AM1 is a dual-action inhibitor of FAAH and COX that may be useful in exploring the optimal balance of effects on these two enzyme systems in producing peripheral alleviation of pain and inflammation in experimental models.

  1. Changes in Pool Sizes of Free Amino Acids and Amides in Leaves and Plastids of Zea mays during Leaf Development.

    PubMed

    Chapman, D J; Leech, R M

    1979-03-01

    The concentrations of free amino acids and amides within isolated maize (Zea mays L.) plastids were determined and compared with concentrations in the leaf tissue. The concentrations were different for each individual amino acid and varied between 1 and 10 millimolar. At five different developmental stages concentrations in the plastids were greater than those in the intact leaf tissue. During development, from the proplastid stage to the mature chloroplast, the amount of each amino acid per plastid remained relatively constant, but there were decreases in concentrations of plastid amino acids resulting from the developmental increase in plastid volume. In proplastids, the free amino acids were present in greater concentrations than those previously found to inhibit partially amino acid-synthesizing enzymes located in chloroplasts. In the chloroplasts, the molarities of the free amino acids were within the range known to inhibit amino acid-synthesizing enzymes.

  2. Melonoside A: An ω-Glycosylated Fatty Acid Amide from the Far Eastern Marine Sponge Melonanchora kobjakovae.

    PubMed

    Guzii, Alla G; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Denisenko, Vladimir A; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Kuzmich, Aleksandra S; Dyshlovoy, Sergey A; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Stonik, Valentin A

    2016-07-15

    Melonoside A (1), the first representative of a new class of ω-glycosylated fatty acid amides, was isolated from the Far Eastern marine sponge Melonanchora kobjakovae. The structure of 1, including absolute configuration, was established using detailed analysis of 1D and 2D NMR, CD, and mass spectra as well as chemical transformations. Compound 1 induces autophagy of human cisplatin-resistant germinal tumor cells NCCIT-R. PMID:27358020

  3. Identification in pituitary tissue of a peptide alpha-amidation activity that acts on glycine-extended peptides and requires molecular oxygen, copper, and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Eipper, B A; Mains, R E; Glembotski, C C

    1983-08-01

    An enzymatic activity capable of producing an alpha-amidated peptide product from its glycine-extended precursor has been identified in secretory granules of rat anterior, intermediate, and neural pituitary and bovine intermediate pituitary. High levels of endogenous inhibitors of this alpha-amidation activity have also been found in tissue homogenates. The alpha-amidation activity is totally inhibited by addition of divalent metal ion chelators such as diethyldithiocarbamate, o-phenanthroline, and EDTA; alpha-amidation activity is restored to above control levels upon addition of copper. The alpha-amidation reaction requires the presence of molecular oxygen. Of the various cofactors tested, ascorbic acid was the most potent stimulator of alpha-amidation. The alpha-amidation activity has a neutral pH optimum and is primarily soluble following several cycles of freezing and thawing. Kinetic studies with the bovine intermediate pituitary granule-associated activity demonstrated a linear Lineweaver-Burk plot when D-Tyr-Val-Gly was the varied substrate; the apparent Km and Vmax varied with the concentration of ascorbic acid. The substrate specificity of the alpha-amidation activity appears to be quite broad; the conversion of D-Tyr-Val-Gly into D-Tyr-Val-NH2 is inhibited by the addition of a variety of glycine-extended peptides.

  4. Analysis of lysergic acid amide in human serum and urine after ingestion of Argyreia nervosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Paulke, Alexander; Kremer, Christian; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2012-08-01

    The ergot alkaloid lysergic acid amide (LSA) is a secondary plant constituent in a number of plants, but it is mainly present in considerable amounts in Convolvulaceae, like Argyreia nervosa. Due to its close structural similarity to lysergic acid diethylamide, LSA is considered as psychedelic and therefore promoted as so-called "legal high" in various internet forums. During a human behavioral study with orally administered seeds of A. nervosa, blood and urine samples were obtained. The present study describes the validation of a sensitive and robust high performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection, which was applied to the study samples. The limit of detection (LOD) and lower limit of quantification in human serum were 0.05 and 0.17 ng/mL, respectively, and in urine, the LOD was 0.15 ng/mL. Intra- and interday precision and accuracy were below 15 % relative standard deviation with a bias better than ±15 %. No conversion of LSA to its epimer iso-LSA was noted during analyses. The LSA concentrations in the authentic human serum samples were in the range of 0.66 to 3.15 ng/mL approximately 2 h after ingestion. In urine, LSA could be found 1-24 h after ingestion; after 48 h, no LSA could be detected. The LSA epimer iso-LSA was also detected in serum and urine in varying ratios. In conclusion, LSA serum levels in the low nanogram per milliliter range correlated with severe vegetative adverse effects (nausea, weakness, fatigue, tremor, blood pressure elevation) and a psychosis-like state, which led to study termination.

  5. Analgesic effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Richardson, Denise; Kendall, David A; Barrett, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2006-12-20

    Cannabinoid-based medicines have therapeutic potential for the treatment of pain. Augmentation of levels of endocannabinoids with inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is analgesic in models of acute and inflammatory pain states. The aim of this study was to determine whether local inhibition of FAAH alters nociceptive responses of spinal neurons in the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain. Electrophysiological studies were performed 14-18 d after spinal nerve ligation or sham surgery, and the effects of the FAAH inhibitor cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3-carbamoyl biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB597) on mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons and levels of endocannabinoids were determined. Intraplantar URB597 (25 microg in 50 microl) significantly (p < 0.01) attenuated mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons in sham-operated rats. Effects of URB597 were blocked by the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) antagonist AM251 [N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] (30 microg in 50 microl) and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. URB597 treatment increased levels of anandamide, 2-arachidonyl glycerol, and oleoyl ethanolamide in the ipsilateral hindpaw of sham-operated rats. Intraplantar URB597 (25 microg in 50 microl) did not, however, alter mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons in spinal nerve ligated (SNL) rats or hindpaw levels of endocannabinoids. Intraplantar injection of a higher dose of URB597 (100 microg in 50 microl) significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated evoked responses of spinal neurons in SNL rats but did not alter hindpaw levels of endocannabinoids. Spinal administration of URB597 attenuated evoked responses of spinal neurons and elevated levels of endocannabinoids in sham-operated and SNL rats. These data suggest that peripheral FAAH activity may be altered or that alternative pathways of metabolism have greater importance in SNL rats.

  6. Poly(carbonate–amide)s Derived from Bio-Based Resources: Poly(ferulic acid-co-tyrosine)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a bio-based resource found in fruits and vegetables, was coupled with a hydroxyl-amino acid to generate a new class of monomers to afford poly(carbonate–amide)s with potential to degrade into natural products. l-Serine was first selected as the hydroxyl-amino partner for FA, from which the activated p-nitrophenyl carbonate monomer was synthesized. Unfortunately, polymerizations were unsuccessful, and the elimination product was systematically obtained. To avoid elimination, we revised our strategy and used l-tyrosine ethyl ester, which lacks an acidic proton on the α position of the ethyl ester. Four new monomers were synthesized and converted into the corresponding poly(carbonate–amide)s with specific regioselectivities. The polymers were fully characterized through thermal and spectroscopic analyses. Preliminary fluorescent studies revealed interesting photophysical properties for the monomers and their corresponding poly(carbonate–amide)s, beyond the fluorescence characteristics of l-tyrosine and FA, making these materials potentially viable for sensing and/or imaging applications, in addition to their attractiveness as engineering materials derived from renewable resources. PMID:24839309

  7. N-Methyltaurine N-acyl amidated bile acids and deoxycholic acid in the bile of angelfish (Pomacanthidae): a novel bile acid profile in Perciform fish.

    PubMed

    Satoh Née Okihara, Rika; Saito, Tetsuya; Ogata, Hiroaki; Ohsaki, Ayumi; Iida, Takashi; Asahina, Kiyoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Hofmann, Alan F; Hagey, Lee R

    2014-02-01

    Two novel N-acyl amidated bile acids, N-methyltaurine conjugated cholic acid and N-methyltaurine conjugated deoxycholic acid, were found to be major biliary bile acids in two species of angelfish the regal (Pygoplites diacanthus) and the blue-girdled (Pomacanthus navarchus) angelfish. The identification was based on their having MS and NMR spectra identical to those of synthetic standards. A survey of biliary bile acids of 10 additional species of angelfish found 7 with N-methyltaurine conjugation. In all 12 species, conjugated deoxycholic acid (known to be formed by bacterial 7-dehydroxylation of cholic acid) was a major bile acid. In all previous studies of biliary bile acids in fish, deoxycholic acid has been present in only trace proportions. In addition, bile acid conjugation with N-methyltaurine has not been detected previously in any known vertebrate. N-methyltaurine conjugated bile acids are resistant to bacterial deconjugation and dehydroxylation, and such resistance to bacterial enzymes should aid in the maintenance of high concentrations of bile acids during lipid digestion. Our findings suggest that these species of angelfish have a novel microbiome in their intestine containing anaerobic bacteria, and describe the presence of N-methyltaurine conjugated bile acids that are resistant to bacterial attack.

  8. A comparison of the effects of amide and acid groups at the C-terminus on the collision-induced dissociation of deprotonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Bokatzian-Johnson, Samantha S; Stover, Michele L; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2012-09-01

    The dissociative behavior of peptide amides and free acids was explored using low-energy collision-induced dissociation and high level computational theory. Both positive and negative ion modes were utilized, but the most profound differences were observed for the deprotonated species. Deprotonated peptide amides produce a characteristic c(m-2)(-) product ion (where m is the number of residues in the peptide) that is either absent or in low abundance in the analogous peptide acid spectrum. Peptide acids show an enhanced formation of c(m-3)(-); however, this is not generally as pronounced as c(m-2)(-) production from amides. The most notable occurrence of an amide-specific product ion is for laminin amide (YIGSR-NH(2)) and this case was investigated using several modified peptides. Mechanisms involving 6- and 9-membered ring formation were proposed, and their energetic properties were investigated using G3(MP2) molecular orbital theory calculations. For example, with C-terminal deprotonation of pentaglycine amide, formation of c(m-2)(-) and a 6-membered ring diketopiperazine neutral requires >31.6 kcal/mol, which is 26.1 kcal/mol less than the analogous process involving the peptide acid. The end group specific fragmentation of peptide amides in the negative ion mode may be useful for identifying such groups in proteomic applications.

  9. A Comparison of the Effects of Amide and Acid Groups at the C-Terminus on the Collision-Induced Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokatzian-Johnson, Samantha S.; Stover, Michele L.; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2012-09-01

    The dissociative behavior of peptide amides and free acids was explored using low-energy collision-induced dissociation and high level computational theory. Both positive and negative ion modes were utilized, but the most profound differences were observed for the deprotonated species. Deprotonated peptide amides produce a characteristic cm-2 - product ion (where m is the number of residues in the peptide) that is either absent or in low abundance in the analogous peptide acid spectrum. Peptide acids show an enhanced formation of cm-3 -; however, this is not generally as pronounced as cm-2 - production from amides. The most notable occurrence of an amide-specific product ion is for laminin amide (YIGSR-NH2) and this case was investigated using several modified peptides. Mechanisms involving 6- and 9-membered ring formation were proposed, and their energetic properties were investigated using G3(MP2) molecular orbital theory calculations. For example, with C-terminal deprotonation of pentaglycine amide, formation of cm-2 - and a 6-membered ring diketopiperazine neutral requires >31.6 kcal/mol, which is 26.1 kcal/mol less than the analogous process involving the peptide acid. The end group specific fragmentation of peptide amides in the negative ion mode may be useful for identifying such groups in proteomic applications.

  10. Synthesis and structural studies of amino amide salts derived from 2-(aminomethyl)benzimidazole and α-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Montiel, Concepción; Tapia-Benavides, Antonio R.; Falcón-León, Martha; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Tlahuext, Hugo; Tlahuextl, Margarita

    2015-11-01

    2-{[(Ammoniumacetyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 4, 2-{[(2-ammoniumpropanoyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 5, and 2-{[(2-ammonium-3-phenylpropanoyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 6 amino amides were synthesized via condensation of 2AMBZ dihydrochloride with the corresponding amino acid. Compounds 7-12 were obtained by replacing chloride ions (in salts 4-6) with nitrate or tetrachlorozincate ions. The results of X-ray diffraction crystallographic studies indicated that the geometries, charges and sizes of the anions are essential for the formation of the strong hydrogen bond interactions of compounds 4, 5, 9-12. Moreover, in most cases, the presence of water and solvent molecules stabilizes the supramolecular structures of these compounds. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy indicated that the presence of chloride or tetrachlorozincate anions increases the acidity of the benzimidazolic and amide groups more significantly than the presence of nitrate anions. However, Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) computations of the crystal structures demonstrate that amino amides interact more strongly with NO3- than with Cl- and ZnCl42- anions; this difference explains the spectroscopic results.

  11. Analogs of cinnamic acid benzyl amide as nonclassical inhibitors of activated JAK2 kinase.

    PubMed

    Mielecki, Marcin; Milner-Krawczyk, Małgorzata; Grzelak, Krystyna; Mielecki, Damian; Krzysko, Krystiana A; Lesyng, Bogdan; Priebe, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Scaffold-based analogs of cinnamic acid benzyl amide (CABA) exhibit pleiotropic effects in cancer cells, and their exact molecular mechanism of action is under investigation. The present study is part of our systemic analysis of interactions of CABA analogs with their molecular targets. These compounds were shown to inhibit Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling and thus are attractive scaffolds for anticancer drug design. To identify the potential mechanisms of action of this class of compounds, direct interactions of the selected CABA analogs with JAK2 kinase were examined. Inhibition of JAK2 enzymatic activity was assessed, and molecular modeling studies of selected compounds-(E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1-phenylethyl]-3-(pyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1065), (E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1-phenylbutyl]- 3-(3-bromopyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1130), and (E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1,4-diphenylbutyl]-3-(3-bromopyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1702)-in the JAK2 kinase domain were used to support interpretation of the experimental data. Our results indicated that the tested CABA analogs are nonclassical inhibitors of activated (phosphorylated) JAK2, although markedly weaker than clinically tested ATP-competitive JAK2 inhibitors. Relatively small structural changes in the studied compounds affected interactions with JAK2, and their mode of action ranged from allosteric-noncompetitive to bisubstratecompetitive. These results demonstrated that direct inhibition of JAK2 enzymatic activity by the WP1065 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC₅₀] = 14.8 µM), WP1130 (IC₅₀ = 3.8 µM), and WP1702 (IC₅₀ = 2.9 µM) potentially contributes, albeit minimally, to suppression of the JAK2/STAT signaling pathways in cancer cells and that additional specific structural modifications may amplify JAK2-inhibitory effects.

  12. Acute Neurologic Disorder from an Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kerbrat, Anne; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Fillatre, Pierre; Ronzière, Thomas; Vannier, Stéphane; Carsin-Nicol, Béatrice; Lavoué, Sylvain; Vérin, Marc; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Le Tulzo, Yves; Edan, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    Background A decrease in fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity increases the levels of endogenous analogues of cannabinoids, or endocannabinoids. FAAH inhibitors have shown analgesic and antiinflammatory activity in animal models, and some have been tested in phase 1 and 2 studies. In a phase 1 study, BIA 10-2474, an orally administered reversible FAAH inhibitor, was given to healthy volunteers to assess safety. Methods Single doses (0.25 to 100 mg) and repeated oral doses (2.5 to 20 mg for 10 days) of BIA 10-2474 had been administered to 84 healthy volunteers in sequential cohorts; no severe adverse events had been reported. Another cohort of participants was then assigned to placebo (2 participants) or 50 mg of BIA 10-2474 per day (6 participants). This report focuses on neurologic adverse events in participants in this final cohort. A total of 4 of the 6 participants who received active treatment consented to have their clinical and radiologic data included in this report. Results An acute and rapidly progressive neurologic syndrome developed in three of the four participants starting on the fifth day of drug administration. The main clinical features were headache, a cerebellar syndrome, memory impairment, and altered consciousness. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral and symmetric cerebral lesions, including microhemorrhages and hyperintensities on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging sequences predominantly involving the pons and hippocampi. One patient became brain dead; the condition of two patients subsequently improved, but one patient had residual memory impairment, and the other patient had a residual cerebellar syndrome. One patient remained asymptomatic. Conclusions An unanticipated severe neurologic disorder occurred after ingestion of BIA 10-2474 at the highest dose level used in a phase 1 trial. The underlying mechanism of this toxic cerebral syndrome remains unknown.

  13. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors confer anti-invasive and antimetastatic effects on lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Katrin; Ramer, Robert; Dithmer, Sophie; Ivanov, Igor; Merkord, Jutta; Hinz, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation has been suggested as tool for activation of endogenous tumor defense. One of these strategies lies in blockade of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine [OEA], N-palmitoylethanolamine [PEA]). This study addressed the impact of two FAAH inhibitors (arachidonoyl serotonin [AA-5HT], URB597) on A549 lung cancer cell metastasis and invasion. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of FAAH substrates (AEA, 2-AG, OEA, PEA) in cells incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. In athymic nude mice FAAH inhibitors were shown to elicit a dose-dependent antimetastatic action yielding a 67% and 62% inhibition of metastatic lung nodules following repeated administration of 15 mg/kg AA-5HT and 5 mg/kg URB597, respectively. In vitro, a concentration-dependent anti-invasive action of either FAAH inhibitor was demonstrated, accompanied with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Using siRNA approaches, a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of FAAH inhibitors was confirmed. Moreover, knockdown of FAAH by siRNA was shown to confer decreased cancer cell invasiveness and increased TIMP-1 expression. Inhibitor experiments point toward a role of CB2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in conferring anti-invasive effects of FAAH inhibitors and FAAH siRNA. Finally, antimetastatic and anti-invasive effects were confirmed for all FAAH substrates with AEA and OEA causing a TIMP-1-dependent anti-invasive action. Collectively, the present study provides first-time proof for an antimetastatic action of FAAH inhibitors. As mechanism of its anti-invasive properties an upregulation of TIMP-1 was identified. PMID:26930716

  14. Disruption of fatty acid amide hydrolase activity prevents the effects of chronic stress on anxiety and amygdalar microstructure.

    PubMed

    Hill, M N; Kumar, S A; Filipski, S B; Iverson, M; Stuhr, K L; Keith, J M; Cravatt, B F; Hillard, C J; Chattarji, S; McEwen, B S

    2013-10-01

    Hyperactivation of the amygdala following chronic stress is believed to be one of the primary mechanisms underlying the increased propensity for anxiety-like behaviors and pathological states; however, the mechanisms by which chronic stress modulates amygdalar function are not well characterized. The aim of the current study was to determine the extent to which the endocannabinoid (eCB) system, which is known to regulate emotional behavior and neuroplasticity, contributes to changes in amygdalar structure and function following chronic stress. To examine the hypothesis, we have exposed C57/Bl6 mice to chronic restraint stress, which results in an increase in fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity and a reduction in the concentration of the eCB N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) within the amygdala. Chronic restraint stress also increased dendritic arborization, complexity and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) and increased anxiety-like behavior in wild-type mice. All of the stress-induced changes in amygdalar structure and function were absent in mice deficient in FAAH. Further, the anti-anxiety effect of FAAH deletion was recapitulated in rats treated orally with a novel pharmacological inhibitor of FAAH, JNJ5003 (50 mg per kg per day), during exposure to chronic stress. These studies suggest that FAAH is required for chronic stress to induce hyperactivity and structural remodeling of the amygdala. Collectively, these studies indicate that FAAH-mediated decreases in AEA occur following chronic stress and that this loss of AEA signaling is functionally relevant to the effects of chronic stress. These data support the hypothesis that inhibition of FAAH has therapeutic potential in the treatment of anxiety disorders, possibly by maintaining normal amygdalar function in the face of chronic stress.

  15. Disruption of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Activity Prevents the Effects of Chronic Stress on Anxiety and Amygdalar Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Matthew N.; Kumar, Shobha Anil; Filipski, Sarah B.; Iverson, Moriah; Stuhr, Kara L.; Keith, John M.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Chattarji, Sumantra; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivation of the amygdala following chronic stress is believed to be one of the primary mechanisms underlying the increased propensity for anxiety-like behaviors and pathological states; however, the mechanisms by which chronic stress modulates amygdalar function are not well characterized. The aim of the current study was to determine the extent to which the endocannabinoid system, which is known to regulate emotional behavior and neuroplasticity, contributes to changes in amygdalar structure and function following chronic stress. To examine the hypothesis, we have exposed C57/Bl6 mice to chronic restraint stress which results in an increase in fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity and a reduction in the concentration of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) within the amygdala. Chronic restraint stress also increased dendritic arborization, complexity and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) and increased anxiety-like behavior in wild-type mice. All of the stress-induced changes in amygdalar structure and function were absent in mice deficient in FAAH. Further, the anti-anxiety effect of FAAH deletion was recapitulated in rats treated orally with a novel pharmacological inhibitor of FAAH, JNJ5003 (50 mg/kg/day), during exposure to chronic stress. These studies suggest that FAAH is required for chronic stress to induce hyperactivity and structural remodeling of the amygdala. Collectively, these studies indicate that FAAH-mediated decreases in AEA occur following chronic stress and that this loss of AEA signaling is functionally relevant to the effects of chronic stress. These data support the hypothesis that inhibition of FAAH has therapeutic potential in the treatment of anxiety disorders, possibly by maintaining normal amygdalar function in the face of chronic stress. PMID:22776900

  16. Synergistic effects in solvent-extraction systems based on alkylsalicylic acids. I. Extraction of trivalent rare-earth metals in the presence of aliphatic amides

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, J.S.; Preez, A.C. du

    1995-07-01

    Aliphatic carboxylic acid amides were found to cause synergistic shifts in the pH{sub 50} values for the extraction of the trivalent rare-earth metals from chloride media by solutions of alkylsalicylic acids in xylene. For the different types of amide examined, the synergistic shifts for the extraction of neodymium by 3,5-diisopropylsalicylic acid (DIPSA) generally decrease in the order: R.CO.NR{sub 2}` > R.CO.NHR` > R.CO.NH{sub 2}, where R and R` are alkyl groups. With the N,N-dialkyl amides (R.CO.NR{sub 2}`) and the N-alkyl amides (R.CO.NHR`), the extent of the synergistic effect decreases with increasing chain-branching in either of the alkyl groups R and R`. For additions to 0.25 M alkylsalicylic acid, the synergistic effect increases with concentrations of up to 0.1 M amide, and decreases with higher concentrations. The extent of the synergistic shift produced by a given amide, as well as the separation in pH{sub 50} values from lanthanum to lutetium, increases with increasing steric bulk of the alkylsalicylic acid used. The separations between adjacent lanthanides are too small to be of any practical interest, however. Measurement of the solubility of salicylic acids (HA) in xylene containing various amounts of N,N-dialkyl amide (L) indicate that essentially complete formation of the HA.L adduct takes place. Treatment of metal-distribution data by slope analysis, and measurement of the solubility of the neodymium-DIPSA complex in xylene in the presence of amide suggest that the mixed-ligand complex has the stoichiometry NdA{sub 3}L{sub 2}. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 refs.

  17. Reaction between drug substances and pharmaceutical excipients: formation of citric acid esters and amides of carvedilol in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jesper; Cornett, Claus; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W; Hansen, Steen H

    2009-01-15

    The reactivity of citric acid towards drug substances in the solid state was examined using the beta-blocker carvedilol as a model compound. The reaction mixtures were analysed by LC-MS, the reaction products were isolated by preparative HPLC, and the structures were elucidated by microprobe NMR spectroscopy. Heating a mixture of solid carvedilol and solid citric acid monohydrate for 96 h at 50 degrees C resulted in the formation of about 3% of a symmetrical ester as well as of a number of other reaction products in smaller amounts. Formation of the symmetrical ester was also observed at room temperature. At 70 degrees C, the amounts of three isomeric esters formed reached 6-8%. The minor reaction products were citric acid amides, O-acetylcarvedilol, and esters of itaconic acid.

  18. Quantification and enzyme targets of fatty acid amides from duckweed root exudates involved in the stimulation of denitrification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Lu, Yufang; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid amides from plant root exudates, such as oleamide and erucamide, have the ability to participate in strong plant-microbe interactions, stimulating nitrogen metabolism in rhizospheric bacteria. However, mechanisms of secretion of such fatty acid amides, and the nature of their stimulatory activities on microbial metabolism, have not been examined. In the present study, collection, pre-treatment, and determination methods of oleamide and erucamide in duckweed root exudates are compared. The detection limits of oleamide and erucamide by gas chromatography (GC) (10.3ngmL(-1) and 16.1ngmL(-1), respectively) are shown to be much lower than those by liquid chromatography (LC) (1.7 and 5.0μgmL(-1), respectively). Quantitative GC analysis yielded five times larger amounts of oleamide and erucamide in root exudates of Spirodela polyrrhiza when using a continuous collection method (50.20±4.32 and 76.79±13.92μgkg(-1) FW day(-1)), compared to static collection (10.88±0.66 and 15.27±0.58μgkg(-1) FW day(-1)). Furthermore, fatty acid amide secretion was significantly enhanced under elevated nitrogen conditions (>300mgL(-1)), and was negatively correlated with the relative growth rate of duckweed. Mechanistic assays were conducted to show that erucamide stimulates nitrogen removal by enhancing denitrification, targeting two key denitrifying enzymes, nitrate and nitrite reductases, in bacteria. Our findings significantly contribute to our understanding of the regulation of nitrogen dynamics by plant root exudates in natural ecosystems. PMID:27152459

  19. Quantification and enzyme targets of fatty acid amides from duckweed root exudates involved in the stimulation of denitrification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Lu, Yufang; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid amides from plant root exudates, such as oleamide and erucamide, have the ability to participate in strong plant-microbe interactions, stimulating nitrogen metabolism in rhizospheric bacteria. However, mechanisms of secretion of such fatty acid amides, and the nature of their stimulatory activities on microbial metabolism, have not been examined. In the present study, collection, pre-treatment, and determination methods of oleamide and erucamide in duckweed root exudates are compared. The detection limits of oleamide and erucamide by gas chromatography (GC) (10.3ngmL(-1) and 16.1ngmL(-1), respectively) are shown to be much lower than those by liquid chromatography (LC) (1.7 and 5.0μgmL(-1), respectively). Quantitative GC analysis yielded five times larger amounts of oleamide and erucamide in root exudates of Spirodela polyrrhiza when using a continuous collection method (50.20±4.32 and 76.79±13.92μgkg(-1) FW day(-1)), compared to static collection (10.88±0.66 and 15.27±0.58μgkg(-1) FW day(-1)). Furthermore, fatty acid amide secretion was significantly enhanced under elevated nitrogen conditions (>300mgL(-1)), and was negatively correlated with the relative growth rate of duckweed. Mechanistic assays were conducted to show that erucamide stimulates nitrogen removal by enhancing denitrification, targeting two key denitrifying enzymes, nitrate and nitrite reductases, in bacteria. Our findings significantly contribute to our understanding of the regulation of nitrogen dynamics by plant root exudates in natural ecosystems.

  20. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of aromatic amines and amides using deuterated trifluoroacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Richard; Lee, Amy; Jung, Erica; Kang, Aaron; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    The H-D exchange of aromatic amines and amides, including pharmaceutically relevant compounds such as acetaminophen and diclofenac, was investigated using CF3COOD as both the sole reaction solvent and source of deuterium label. The described method is amenable to efficient deuterium incorporation for a wide variety of substrates possessing both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents. Best results were seen with less basic anilines and highly activated acetanilides, reflecting the likelihood of different mechanistic pathways. PMID:25641994

  1. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Regiospecific Cross-Dehydrative Coupling Reaction of 2-Furylcarbinols with β-Keto Amides or 4-Hydroxycoumarins: A Route to Furyl Enols.

    PubMed

    Miao, Maozhong; Luo, Yi; Li, Hongli; Xu, Xin; Chen, Zhengkai; Xu, Jianfeng; Ren, Hongjun

    2016-06-17

    Lewis acid catalyzed directly dehydrative carbon-carbon bond formation reaction of 2-furylcarbinols with β-keto amides provides a straightforward method for regioselective synthesis of (Z)-furyl enols. Moreover, this Lewis acid catalyzed cross-coupling reaction can be extended to an interesting heterocyclic version featuring a functionalized 3-furyl-4-hydroxycoumarin synthesis. PMID:27224045

  2. Palladium-catalyzed C–N and C–O bond formation of N-substituted 4-bromo-7-azaindoles with amides, amines, amino acid esters and phenols

    PubMed Central

    Surasani, Rajendra; Rao, A V Dhanunjaya; Chandrasekhar, K B

    2012-01-01

    Summary Simple and efficient procedures for palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of N-substituted 4-bromo-7-azaindole (1H-pyrrole[2,3-b]pyridine), with amides, amines, amino acid esters and phenols through C–N and C–O bond formation have been developed. The C–N cross-coupling reaction of amides, amines and amino acid esters takes place rapidly by using the combination of Xantphos, Cs2CO3, dioxane and palladium catalyst precursors Pd(OAc)2/Pd2(dba)3. The combination of Pd(OAc)2, Xantphos, K2CO3 and dioxane was found to be crucial for the C–O cross-coupling reaction. This is the first report on coupling of amides, amino acid esters and phenols with N-protected 4-bromo-7-azaindole derivatives. PMID:23209536

  3. Metal cation dependence of interactions with amino acids: bond dissociation energies of Rb(+) and Cs(+) to the acidic amino acids and their amide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, P B; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-04-24

    Metal cation-amino acid interactions are key components controlling the secondary structure and biological function of proteins, enzymes, and macromolecular complexes comprising these species. Determination of pairwise interactions of alkali metal cations with amino acids provides a thermodynamic vocabulary that begins to quantify these fundamental processes. In the present work, we expand a systematic study of such interactions by examining rubidium and cesium cations binding with the acidic amino acids (AA), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu), and their amide derivatives, asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln). These eight complexes are formed using electrospray ionization and their bond dissociation energies (BDEs) are determined experimentally using threshold collision-induced dissociation with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy-dependent cross sections include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of the reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. Quantum chemical calculations are conducted at the B3LYP, MP2(full), and M06 levels of theory using def2-TZVPPD basis sets, with results showing reasonable agreement with experiment. At 0 and 298 K, most levels of theory predict that the ground-state conformers for M(+)(Asp) and M(+)(Asn) involve tridentate binding of the metal cation to the backbone carbonyl, amino, and side-chain carbonyl groups, although tridentate binding to the carboxylic acid group and side-chain carbonyl is competitive for M(+)(Asn). For the two longer side-chain amino acids, Glu and Gln, multiple structures are competitive. A comparison of these results to those for the smaller alkali cations, Na(+) and K(+), provides insight into the trends in binding energies associated with the molecular polarizability and dipole moment of the side chain. For all four metal cations, the BDEs are inversely correlated with the size of the metal cation and follow the order Asp < Glu

  4. 40 CFR 721.10410 - Polyether ester acid compound with a polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). 721.10410 Section 721.10410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting... amide (PMN P-05-714) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10410 - Polyether ester acid compound with a polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). 721.10410 Section 721.10410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... polyamine amide (generic) (P-05-714). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting... amide (PMN P-05-714) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  6. Intracellular Self-Assembly of Cyclic d-Luciferin Nanoparticles for Persistent Bioluminescence Imaging of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Wang, Fuqiang; Tang, Wei; Ding, Zhanling; Wang, Lin; Liang, Lili; Zheng, Zhen; Zhang, Huafeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-07-26

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) overexpression induces several disorder symptoms in nerve systems, and therefore long-term tracing of FAAH activity in vivo is of high importance but remains challenging. Current bioluminescence (BL) methods are limited in detecting FAAH activity within 5 h. Herein, by rational design of a latent BL probe (d-Cys-Lys-CBT)2 (1), we developed a "smart" method of intracellular reduction-controlled self-assembly and FAAH-directed disassembly of its cyclic d-luciferin-based nanoparticles (i.e., 1-NPs) for persistent BL imaging of FAAH activity in vitro, in cells, and in vivo. Using aminoluciferin methyl amide (AMA), Lys-amino-d-luciferin (Lys-Luc), and amino-d-luciferin (NH2-Luc) as control BL probes, we validated that the persistent BL of 1 from luciferase-expressing cells or tumors was controlled by the activity of intracellular FAAH. With the property of long-term tracing of FAAH activity in vivo of 1, we envision that our BL precursor 1 could probably be applied for in vivo screening of FAAH inhibitors and the diagnosis of their related diseases (or disorders) in the future. PMID:27348334

  7. Fatty acid amide hydrolase as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of pain and CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kay; Johnson, Douglas S.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is an integral membrane enzyme that hydrolyzes the endocannabinoid anandamide and related amidated signaling lipids. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of FAAH produces analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anxiolytic, and antidepressant phenotypes without showing the undesirable side effects of direct cannabinoid receptor agonists, indicating that FAAH may be a promising therapeutic target. Objectives This review highlights advances in the development of FAAH inhibitors of different mechanistic classes and their in vivo efficacy. Also highlighted are advances in technology for the in vitro and in vivo selectivity assessment of FAAH inhibitors employing activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and click chemistry-ABPP, respectively. Recent reports on structure-based drug design for human FAAH generated by protein engineering using interspecies active site conversion are also discussed. Methods: The literature searches of Medline and SciFinder databases were used. Conclusions There has been tremendous progress in our understanding in FAAH and development of FAAH inhibitors with in vivo efficacy, selectivity, and drug like pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:20544003

  8. Intracellular Self-Assembly of Cyclic d-Luciferin Nanoparticles for Persistent Bioluminescence Imaging of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Wang, Fuqiang; Tang, Wei; Ding, Zhanling; Wang, Lin; Liang, Lili; Zheng, Zhen; Zhang, Huafeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-07-26

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) overexpression induces several disorder symptoms in nerve systems, and therefore long-term tracing of FAAH activity in vivo is of high importance but remains challenging. Current bioluminescence (BL) methods are limited in detecting FAAH activity within 5 h. Herein, by rational design of a latent BL probe (d-Cys-Lys-CBT)2 (1), we developed a "smart" method of intracellular reduction-controlled self-assembly and FAAH-directed disassembly of its cyclic d-luciferin-based nanoparticles (i.e., 1-NPs) for persistent BL imaging of FAAH activity in vitro, in cells, and in vivo. Using aminoluciferin methyl amide (AMA), Lys-amino-d-luciferin (Lys-Luc), and amino-d-luciferin (NH2-Luc) as control BL probes, we validated that the persistent BL of 1 from luciferase-expressing cells or tumors was controlled by the activity of intracellular FAAH. With the property of long-term tracing of FAAH activity in vivo of 1, we envision that our BL precursor 1 could probably be applied for in vivo screening of FAAH inhibitors and the diagnosis of their related diseases (or disorders) in the future.

  9. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of fatty acid amide hydrolase reactivation distinguishes substrate from irreversible covalent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lodola, Alessio; Capoferri, Luigi; Rivara, Silvia; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele; Mulholland, Adrian; Mor, Marco

    2013-03-28

    Carbamate and urea derivatives are important classes of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors that carbamoylate the active-site nucleophile Ser241. In the present work, the reactivation mechanism of carbamoylated FAAH is investigated by means of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The potential energy surfaces for decarbamoylation of FAAH covalent adducts, derived from the O-aryl carbamate URB597 and from the N-piperazinylurea JNJ1661610, were calculated and compared to that for deacylation of FAAH acylated by the substrate oleamide. Calculations show that a carbamic group bound to Ser241 prevents efficient stabilization of transition states of hydrolysis, leading to large increments in the activation barrier. Moreover, the energy barrier for the piperazine carboxylate was significantly lower than that for the cyclohexyl carbamate derived from URB597. This is consistent with experimental data showing slowly reversible FAAH inhibition for the N-piperazinylurea inhibitor and irreversible inhibition for URB597.

  10. Potential inhibitors of L-asparagine biosynthesis. 5. Electrophilic amide analogues of (S)-2,3-diaminopropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Mokotoff, M; Logue, L W

    1981-05-01

    Three electrophilic amide analogues of (S)-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (1, DAP) have been prepared as potential inhibitors of L-asparagine synthetase (ASase, from Novikoff hepatoma, EC 6.3.5.4). DAP was selectively blocked by the carbobenzoxy (Cbz) group to give 3-N-Cbz-DAP (2a). Esterification of 2a with isobutylene afforded tert-butyl 3-N-carbobenzoxy-(S)-2,3-diaminopropionate (3a), which was then blocked at the 2 position with the tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc) group to give tert-butyl 2-[(S)-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)amino]-3-[(carbobenzoxy)amino]propionate (4). Selective cleavage of the Cbz group by H2/Pd gave the key intermediate tert-butyl 2-N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-(S)-2,3-diaminopropionate (5), which was acylated, via the N-hydroxysuccinimide esters, with bromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, and fumaric acid monoethyl ester to give tert-butyl 2-[(S)-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-amino]-3-(2-bromoacetamido)propionate (6a), tert-butyl 2-[(S)-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)amino]-3-(2,2-dichloroacetamido)propionate (6b), and tert-butyl 2-[(S)-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)amino]-3-(ethoxycarbonyl)acrylamido]-propionate (6c), respectively. Deblocking of 6a-c gave the corresponding amino acids (S)-2-amino-3-(2-bromoacetamido)propionic acid hydrobromide (7a), (S)-2-amino-3-(2,2-dichloroacetamido)propionic acid (7b), and ethyl N-[(S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]fumarate (7c). By a slightly different procedure, 5 was converted in two steps to (S)-2-amino-3-acetamidopropionic acid hydrobromide (7d). The inhibition of ASase by 7a-c at 1 mM was 93, 19, and 37%, respectively, while 7d was without inhibition at 2 mM. Compounds 7a-c failed to increase the life span of mice infected with B16 melanoma.

  11. Synthesis and QSAR of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitors: Modulation at the N-Portion of Biphenyl-3-yl Alkylcarbamates

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Marco; Lodola, Alessio; Rivara, Silvia; Vacondio, Federica; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Sanchini, Silvano; Piersanti, Giovanni; Clapper, Jason R.; King, Alvin R.; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Alkylcarbamic acid biphenyl-3-yl esters are a class of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors that comprises cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3′-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester (URB597), a compound with analgesic, anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like properties in rat and mouse models. Here, we extended the structure-activity relationships (SARs) for this class of compounds by replacing the cyclohexyl ring of the parent compound cyclohexylcarbamic acid biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB524) (IC50, for FAAH = 63 nM) with a selected set of substituents of different size, shape, flexibility and lipophilicity. Docking experiments and Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) calculations indicated that the N-terminal group of O-arylcarbamates fits within the lipophilic region of the substrate-binding site, mimicking the arachidonoyl chain of anandamide. Significant potency improvements were observed for the β-naphthylmethyl derivative 4q (IC50 = 5.3 nM) and its 3′-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester 4z (URB880, IC50 = 0.63 nM), indicating that shape complementarity and hydrogen bonds are crucial to obtain highly potent inhibitors. PMID:18507372

  12. 1-Aryl-2-((6-aryl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)ethanols as competitive inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Keith, John M; Hawryluk, Natalie; Apodaca, Richard L; Chambers, Allison; Pierce, Joan M; Seierstad, Mark; Palmer, James A; Webb, Michael; Karbarz, Mark J; Scott, Brian P; Wilson, Sandy J; Luo, Lin; Wennerholm, Michelle L; Chang, Leon; Rizzolio, Michele; Chaplan, Sandra R; Breitenbucher, J Guy

    2014-03-01

    A series of 1-aryl-2-(((6-aryl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)ethanols have been found to be competitive inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). One member of this class, JNJ-40413269, was found to have excellent pharmacokinetic properties, demonstrated robust central target engagement, and was efficacious in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

  13. Catalyst-Free Three-Component Tandem CDC Cyclization: Convenient Access to Isoindolinones from Aromatic Acid, Amides, and DMSO by a Pummerer-Type Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Min; Pu, Fan; Liu, Ke-Yan; Li, Chao-Jun; Liu, Zhong-Wen; Shi, Xian-Ying; Fan, Juan; Yang, Ming-Yu; Wei, Jun-Fa

    2016-04-25

    A catalyst-free multicomponent CDC reaction is rarely reported, especially for the intermolecular tandem CDC cyclization, which represents an important strategy for constructing cyclic compounds. Herein, a three-component tandem CDC cyclization by a Pummerer-type rearrangement to afford biologically relevant isoindolinones from aromatic acids, amides, and DMSO, is described. This intermolecular tandem reaction undergoes a C(sp(2) )-H/C(sp(3) )-H cross-dehydrogenative coupling, C-N bond formation, and intramolecular amidation. A notable feature of this novel protocol is avoiding a catalyst and additive (apart from oxidant).

  14. Catalyst-Free Three-Component Tandem CDC Cyclization: Convenient Access to Isoindolinones from Aromatic Acid, Amides, and DMSO by a Pummerer-Type Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Min; Pu, Fan; Liu, Ke-Yan; Li, Chao-Jun; Liu, Zhong-Wen; Shi, Xian-Ying; Fan, Juan; Yang, Ming-Yu; Wei, Jun-Fa

    2016-04-25

    A catalyst-free multicomponent CDC reaction is rarely reported, especially for the intermolecular tandem CDC cyclization, which represents an important strategy for constructing cyclic compounds. Herein, a three-component tandem CDC cyclization by a Pummerer-type rearrangement to afford biologically relevant isoindolinones from aromatic acids, amides, and DMSO, is described. This intermolecular tandem reaction undergoes a C(sp(2) )-H/C(sp(3) )-H cross-dehydrogenative coupling, C-N bond formation, and intramolecular amidation. A notable feature of this novel protocol is avoiding a catalyst and additive (apart from oxidant). PMID:26998754

  15. Detection and qualitative analysis of fatty acid amides in the urine of alcoholics using HPLC-QTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Dabur, Rajesh; Mittal, Ashwani

    2016-05-01

    Fatty acid amides (FAAs) in alcoholism lead to liver diseases. These amides have been reported in plasma and in other organs of the body, while their detection or presence in the urine is still unknown. Therefore, the focus of the current study was to detect and analyze FAAs qualitatively in urine samples of alcoholics. Furthermore, the effects of Tinospora cordifolia (hepatoprotective medicinal plant) intervention on FAA levels in moderate alcoholics were also analyzed. In the study, asymptomatic chronic alcoholics (n = 22) without chronic liver disease and nonalcoholic healthy volunteers (n = 24) with a mean age of 39 ± 2.0 years were selected. The first-pass urine and fasting blood samples were collected in the morning on day 0 and day 14 after T. cordifolia water extract (TCE) treatment and analyzed using automated biochemistry analyzer and HPLC-QTOF-MS. Results indicated the increased levels of serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and liver function enzymes in alcoholic subjects, which were significantly down-regulated by TCE intervention. Multivariate discrimination analysis of QTOF-MS data showed increased urinary levels of oleoamide (2.55-fold), palmitamide (5.6-fold), and erucamide (1.6-fold) in alcoholics as compared to control subjects. Levels of oleamide (1.8-fold), palmitamide (1.7-fold), and linoleamide (1.5-fold) were found to be increased in plasma. Treatment with TCE in alcoholics (3.0 g lyophilized water extract/day) significantly decreased the plasma and urinary levels of all FAAs except linoleamide. The HPLC-QTOF-MS approach for FAAs analysis in both urinary and plasma samples of alcoholics worked very well. Moreover, findings (i.e., increased levels of FAAs in urine and in plasma) further support other findings that these amides play a very important role in alcoholism. Further, like our previous findings, TCE proved its hepatoprotective effect against alcoholism not only by lowering the levels of these detected FAAs, but also by decreasing the

  16. HPLC/ELSD analysis of amidated bile acids: an effective and rapid way to assist continuous flow chemistry processes.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Roccaldo; Gioiello, Antimo; Ianni, Federica; Venturoni, Francesco; Natalini, Benedetto

    2012-10-15

    The employment of the flow N-acyl amidation of natural bile acids (BAs) required the in-line connection with suitable analytical tools enabling the determination of reaction yields as well as of the purity grade of the synthesized glyco- and tauro-conjugated derivatives. In this framework, a unique HPLC method was successfully established and validated for ursodeoxycholic (UDCA), chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), deoxycholic (DCA) and cholic (CA) acids, as well as the corresponding glyco- and tauro-conjugated forms. Because of the shared absence of relevant chromophoric moieties in the sample structure, an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was profitably utilized for the analysis of such steroidal species. For each of the investigated compounds, all the runs were contemporarily carried out on the acidic free and the two relative conjugated variants. The different ELSD response of the free and the corresponding conjugated BAs, imposed to build-up separate calibration curves. In all the cases, very good precision (RSD% values ranging from 1.04 to 6.40% in the long-period) and accuracy (Recovery% values ranging from 96.03 to 111.14% in the long-period) values along with appreciably low LOD and LOQ values (the former being within the range 1-27 ng mL(-1) and the latter within the range 2-44 ng mL(-1)) turned out. PMID:23141350

  17. Physical Nature of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Interactions with Its Inhibitors: Testing a Simple Nonempirical Scoring Model.

    PubMed

    Giedroyć-Piasecka, Wiktoria; Dyguda-Kazimierowicz, Edyta; Beker, Wiktor; Mor, Marco; Lodola, Alessio; Sokalski, W Andrzej

    2014-12-26

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is an enzyme responsible for the deactivating hydrolysis of fatty acid ethanolamide neuromodulators. FAAH inhibitors have gained considerable interest due to their possible application in the treatment of anxiety, inflammation, and pain. In the context of inhibitor design, the availability of reliable computational tools for predicting binding affinity is still a challenging task, and it is now well understood that empirical scoring functions have several limitations that in principle could be overcome by quantum mechanics. Herein, systematic ab initio analyses of FAAH interactions with a series of inhibitors belonging to the class of the N-alkylcarbamic acid aryl esters have been performed. In contrast to our earlier studies of other classes of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, reasonable correlation with experimental results required us to consider correlation effects along with electrostatic term. Therefore, the simplest comprehensive nonempirical model allowing for qualitative predictions of binding affinities for FAAH ligands consists of electrostatic multipole and second-order dispersion terms. Such a model has been validated against the relative stabilities of the benchmark S66 set of biomolecular complexes. As it does not involve parameters fitted to experimentally derived data, this model offers a unique opportunity for generally applicable inhibitor design and virtual screening. PMID:25420234

  18. Application of computational methods to the design of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors based on a carbamic template structure.

    PubMed

    Lodola, Alessio; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided approaches are widely used in modern medicinal chemistry to improve the efficiency of the discovery phase. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a key component of the endocannabinoid system and a potential drug target for several therapeutic applications. During the past decade, different chemical classes of inhibitors, with different mechanisms of action, had been developed. Among them, alkyl carbamic acid biphenyl-3-yl esters represent a prototypical class of active site-directed inhibitors, which allowed detailed pharmacological characterization of FAAH inhibition. Both ligand- and structure-based drug design approaches have been applied to rationalize structure-activity relationships and to drive the optimization of the inhibitory potency for this class of compounds. In this chapter, we review our contribution to the discovery and optimization of therapeutically promising FAAH inhibitors, based on a carbamic template structure, which block FAAH in an irreversible manner exerting analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anxiolytic effects in animal models. The peculiar catalytic mechanism of FAAH, and the covalent interaction with carbamate-based inhibitors, prompted the application of different computer-aided tools, ranging from ligand-based approaches to docking procedures and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid techniques. Latest advancements in the field are also reported.

  19. Application of cyanuric chloride-based six new chiral derivatizing reagents having amino acids and amino acid amides as chiral auxiliaries for enantioresolution of proteinogenic amino acids by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Ravi; Dixit, Shuchi

    2012-04-01

    Six dichloro-s-triazine (DCT) reagents having L-Leu, D-Phg, L-Val, L-Met, L-Ala and L-Met-NH(2) as chiral auxiliaries in cyanuric chloride were introduced for enantioseparation of 13 proteinogenic amino acids. Four other DCTs and six monochloro-s-triazine (MCT) reagents having amino acid amides as chiral auxiliaries were also synthesized. These 16 chiral derivatizing reagents (CDRs) were used for synthesis of diastereomers of all the 13 analytes using microwave irradiation, which were resolved by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using C18 column and gradient eluting mixture of aqueous TFA and acetonitrile with UV detection at 230 nm. It required only 60-90 s for derivatization using microwave irradiation. Better resolution and lower retention times were observed for the diastereomers prepared with CDRs having amino acids as chiral auxiliaries as compared to counterparts prepared with reagents having amino acid amides as chiral auxiliaries. As the best resolution of all the 13 analytes was observed for their diastereomers prepared using the DCT reagent having L-Leu as chiral auxiliary, this CDR was further employed for derivatization of Lys, Tyr, His and Arg followed by RP-HPLC analysis of resulting diastereomers. The results are discussed in light of acid and amide groups of chiral auxiliaries constituting CDRs, electronegativities of the atoms of achiral moieties constituting CDRs and hydrophobicities of side chains of amino acids constituting CDRs and analytes.

  20. Cardioprotective effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB694, in a rodent model of trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, Luca; Vacondio, Federica; Rossi, Stefano; Macchi, Emilio; Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Neumann, Inga D; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2015-12-14

    In humans, chronic anxiety represents an independent risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. Here we evaluate in male Wistar rats bred for high (HAB) and low (LAB) anxiety-related behavior, as well as non-selected (NAB) animals, the relationship between trait anxiety and cardiac electrical instability and investigate whether pharmacological augmentation of endocannabinoid anandamide-mediated signaling exerts anxiolytic-like and cardioprotective effects. HAB rats displayed (i) a higher incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias induced by isoproterenol, and (ii) a larger spatial dispersion of ventricular refractoriness assessed by means of an epicardial mapping protocol. In HAB rats, acute pharmacological inhibition of the anandamide-degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), with URB694 (0.3 mg/kg), (i) decreased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze, (ii) increased anandamide levels in the heart, (iii) reduced isoproterenol-induced occurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and (iv) corrected alterations of ventricular refractoriness. The anti-arrhythmic effect of URB694 was prevented by pharmacological blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1), but not of the CB2, receptor. These findings suggest that URB694 exerts anxiolytic-like and cardioprotective effects in HAB rats, the latter via anandamide-mediated activation of CB1 receptors. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH might be a viable pharmacological strategy for the treatment of anxiety-related cardiac dysfunction.

  1. Potent and Selective α-Ketoheterocycle-Based Inhibitors of the Anandamide and Oleamide Catabolizing Enzyme, Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F. Anthony; Du, Wu; Hwang, Inkyu; Rayl, Thomas J.; Kimball, F. Scott; Leung, Donmienne; Hoover, Heather S.; Apodaca, Richard L.; Breitenbucher, J. Guy; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Boger, Dale L.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the structure–activity relationships (SAR) of 2f (OL-135), a potent inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), is detailed targeting the 5-position of the oxazole. Examination of a series of substituted benzene derivatives (12–14) revealed that the optimal position for substitution was the meta-position with selected members approaching or exceeding the potency of 2f. Concurrent with these studies, the effect of substitution on the pyridine ring of 2f was also examined. A series of small, non-aromatic C5-substituents was also explored and revealed that the Ki follows a well-defined correlation with the Hammett σp constant (ρ = 3.01, R2 = 0.91) in which electron-withdrawing substituents enhance potency leading to inhibitors with Ki’s as low as 400 pM (20n). Proteomic-wide screening of the inhibitors revealed that most are exquisitely selective for FAAH over all other mammalian proteases reversing the 100-fold preference of 20a (C5 substituent = H) for the enzyme TGH. PMID:17279740

  2. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of two diastereomeric lignan amides serving as dimeric caffeic acid-l-DOPA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Magoulas, George E; Rigopoulos, Andreas; Piperigkou, Zoi; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K; Takis, Panteleimon G; Troganis, Anastassios N; Chrissanthopoulos, Athanassios; Maroulis, George; Papaioannou, Dionissios

    2016-06-01

    Two new diastereomeric lignan amides (4 and 5) serving as dimeric caffeic acid-l-DOPA hybrids were synthesized. The synthesis involved the FeCl3-mediated phenol oxidative coupling of methyl caffeate to afford trans-diester 1a as a mixture of enantiomers, protection of the catechol units, regioselective saponification, coupling with a suitably protected l-DOPA derivative, separation of the two diastereomers thus obtained by flash column chromatography and finally global chemoselective deprotection of the catechol units. The effect of hybrids 4 and 5 and related compounds on the proliferation of two breast cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential and estrogen receptor status (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and of one epithelial lung cancer cell line, namely A-549, was evaluated for concentrations ranging from 1 to 256μM and periods of treatment of 24, 48 and 72h. Both hybrids showed interesting and almost equipotent antiproliferative activities (IC50 64-70μM) for the MDA-MB-231 cell line after 24-48h of treatment, but they were more selective and much more potent (IC50 4-16μM) for the MCF-7 cells after 48h of treatment. The highest activity for both hybrids and both breast cancer lines was observed after 72h of treatment (IC50 1-2μM), probably as the result of slow hydrolysis of their methyl ester functions. PMID:27155809

  3. The macamide N-3-methoxybenzyl-linoleamide is a time-dependent fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Almukadi, Haifa; Wu, Hui; Böhlke, Mark; Kelley, Charles J; Maher, Timothy J; Pino-Figueroa, Alejandro

    2013-10-01

    The Peruvian plant Lepidium meyenii (Maca) has been shown to possess neuroprotective activity both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have also demonstrated the activity of the pentane extract and its macamides, the most representative lipophilic constituents of Maca, in the endocannabinoid system as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors. One of the most active macamides, N-3-methoxybenzyl-linoleamide, was studied to determine its mechanism of interaction with FAAH and whether it has inhibitory activity on mono-acyl glycerol lipase (MAGL), the second enzyme responsible for endocannabinoid degradation. Macamide concentrations from 1 to 100 μM were tested using FAAH and MAGL inhibitor assay methods and showed no effect on MAGL. Tests with other conditions were performed in order to characterize the inhibitory mechanism of FAAH inhibition. N-3-methoxybenzyl-linoleamide displayed significant time-dependent and dose-dependent FAAH inhibitory activity. The mechanism of inhibition was most likely irreversible or slowly reversible. These results suggest the potential application of macamides isolated from Maca as FAAH inhibitors, as they might act on the central nervous system to provide analgesic, anti-inflammatory, or neuroprotective effects, by modulating the release of neurotransmitters. PMID:23853040

  4. A Computational Study of Cytotoxicity of Substituted Amides of Pyrazine- 2-carboxylic acids Using QSAR and DFT Based Molecular Surface Electrostatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Sharieh; Monajjemi, Majid; Rajaeian, Elahe; Haghgu, Mohammad; Salari, Aliakbar; Gholami, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Pyrazine derivatives are important class of compounds with diverse biological and cytotoxic activities and clinical applications. In this study, B3 p 86 / 6 – 31 + + G * was used to compute and map the molecular surface electrostatic potentials of a group of substituted amides of pyrazine-2-carboxylic acids to identify common features related to their subsequent cytotoxicities. Several statistical properties including potentials extrema (Vs ,min,Vs ,max), the average of positive electrostatic potential on the surface (Vs+), the average of V(r) over the surface (Vs) and the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) and system cytotoxicities were computed. Statistically, the most significant correlation is a five -parameter equation with correlation coefficient, R² values of 0.922 and R²adj = 0.879. The obtained models allowed us to reveal cytotoxic activity of substituted amides of Pyrazine2- carboxcylic acid. PMID:24523754

  5. Dianthosaponins G-I, triterpene saponins, an anthranilic acid amide glucoside and a flavonoid glycoside from the aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Yuka; Kawakami, Susumu; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    Extensive isolation work on the 1-BuOH-soluble fraction of a MeOH extract of the aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus afforded three further triterpene glycosyl estsers, termed dianthosaponins G-I, an anthranilic acid amide glucoside and a C-glycosyl flavonoid along with one known triterpene saponin. Their structures were elucidated from spectroscopic evidence. The cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds toward A549 cells was evaluated.

  6. Possible Evidence of Amide Bond Formation Between Sinapinic Acid and Lysine-Containing Bacterial Proteins by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagerquist, Clifton K.; Sultan, Omar; Carter, Michelle Q.

    2012-12-01

    We previously reported the apparent formation of matrix adducts of 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid (sinapinic acid or SA) via covalent attachment to disulfide bond-containing proteins (HdeA, Hde, and YbgS) from bacterial cell lysates ionized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (TOF-TOF-MS/MS) and post-source decay (PSD). We also reported the absence of adduct formation when using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) matrix. Further mass spectrometric analysis of disulfide-intact and disulfide-reduced over-expressed HdeA and HdeB proteins from lysates of gene-inserted E. coli plasmids suggests covalent attachment of SA occurs not at cysteine residues but at lysine residues. In this revised hypothesis, the attachment of SA is preceded by formation of a solid phase ammonium carboxylate salt between SA and accessible lysine residues of the protein during sample preparation under acidic conditions. Laser irradiation at 355 nm of the dried sample spot results in equilibrium retrogradation followed by nucleophilic attack by the amine group of lysine at the carbonyl group of SA and subsequent amide bond formation and loss of water. The absence of CHCA adducts suggests that the electron-withdrawing effect of the α-cyano group of this matrix may inhibit salt formation and/or amide bond formation. This revised hypothesis is supported by dissociative loss of SA (-224 Da) and the amide-bound SA (-206 Da) from SA-adducted HdeA and HdeB ions by MS/MS (PSD). It is proposed that cleavage of the amide-bound SA from the lysine side-chain occurs via rearrangement involving a pentacyclic transition state followed by hydrogen abstraction/migration and loss of 3-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)prop-2-ynal (-206 Da).

  7. Dianthosaponins G-I, triterpene saponins, an anthranilic acid amide glucoside and a flavonoid glycoside from the aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Yuka; Kawakami, Susumu; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    Extensive isolation work on the 1-BuOH-soluble fraction of a MeOH extract of the aerial parts of Dianthus japonicus afforded three further triterpene glycosyl estsers, termed dianthosaponins G-I, an anthranilic acid amide glucoside and a C-glycosyl flavonoid along with one known triterpene saponin. Their structures were elucidated from spectroscopic evidence. The cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds toward A549 cells was evaluated. PMID:27351981

  8. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the “membrane-access” and the “acyl chain-binding” pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH’s mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  9. Impaired neurogenesis by HIV-1-Gp120 is rescued by genetic deletion of fatty acid amide hydrolase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, H K; Jiang, S; Fu, Y; Rockenstein, E; Makriyannis, A; Wood, J; Wang, L; Masliah, E; Avraham, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The HIV-envelope glycoprotein Gp120 is involved in neuronal injury and is associated with neuro-AIDS pathogenesis in the brain. Endocannabinoids are important lipid ligands in the CNS regulating neural functions, and their degeneration is controlled by hydrolysing enzymes such as the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Here, we examined whether in vivo genetic deletion of Faah gene prevents HIV-1 Gp120-mediated effects on neurogenesis. Experimental Approach We generated new GFAP/Gp120 transgenic (Tg) mice that have genetic deletion of Faah gene by mating glial fribillary acidic protein (GFAP)/Gp120 Tg mice with Faah−/− mice. Neurogenesis and cell death were assessed by immunocytochemical analysis. Key Results Endocannabinoid levels in the brain of the double GFAP/Gp120//Faah−/− mice were similar to those observed in Faah−/− mice. However, unlike the impaired neurogenesis observed in GFAP/Gp120 Tg mice and Faah−/− mice, these GFAP/Gp120//Faah-/ mice showed significantly improved neurogenesis in the hippocampus, indicated by a significant increase in neuroblasts and neuronal cells, an increase in BrdU+ cells and doublecortin positive cells (DCX+), and an increase in the number of PCNA. Furthermore, a significant decrease in astrogliosis and gliogenesis was observed in GFAP/Gp120//Faah−/−mice and neurogenesis was stimulated by neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and/or the newly formed NPC niches characterized by increased COX-2 expression and elevated levels of PGE2. Conclusions and Implications In vivo genetic ablation of Faah, resulted in enhanced neurogenesis through modulation of the newly generated NPC niches in GFAP/Gp120//Faah−/− mice. This suggests a novel approach of using FAAH inhibitors to enhance neurogenesis in HIV-1 infected brain. PMID:24571443

  10. The fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 does not affect triacylglycerol hydrolysis in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Clapper, Jason R; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Mor, Marco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2006-11-01

    The O-arylcarbamate URB597 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester; also referred to as KDS-4103) is a potent inhibitor of fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an intracellular serine hydrolase responsible for the inactivation of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide. URB597 demonstrates a remarkable degree of selectivity for FAAH over other serine hydrolases (e.g. cholinesterases) or other components of the endocannabinoid system (e.g. cannabinoid receptors). However, in a proteomic-based selectivity screen based on the displacement of fluorophosphonate-rhodamine (FPR) from mouse brain proteins, it was recently shown that URB597 prevents FPR binding to triacylglycerol hydrolase (TGH) with a median inhibitory concentration of 192nM. To determine whether this effect correlates with inhibition of TGH activity, we investigated the ability of URB597 to inhibit triolein hydrolysis in rat liver and heart tissues, which are rich in TGH, as well as white adipose tissue (WAT), which is rich in adipose triacylglycerol lipase (TGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase. The results show that URB597 does not affect triolein hydrolysis in any of these tissues at concentrations as high as 10microM, whereas it inhibits FAAH activity at low nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of URB597 at doses that maximally inhibit FAAH in vivo (0.3-3mgkg(-1)) exerts no effect on triolein hydrolysis and tissue triacylglycerol (TAG) levels in rat liver, heart or WAT. The results indicate that URB597, while potent at inhibiting FAAH, does not affect TGH and TGL activities in rat tissues.

  11. Effects of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibitors in Non-Human Primate Models of Nicotine Reward and Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Panlilio, Leigh V; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Redhi, Godfrey H; Auber, Alessia; Secci, Maria E; Mascia, Paola; Bandiera, Tiziano; Armirotti, Andrea; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Chefer, Svetlana I; Barnes, Chanel; Yasar, Sevil; Piomelli, Daniele; Goldberg, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) counteracts reward-related effects of nicotine in rats, but it has not been tested for this purpose in non-human primates. Therefore, we studied the effects of the first- and second-generation O-arylcarbamate-based FAAH inhibitors, URB597 (cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-3-yl ester) and URB694 (6-hydroxy-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl-cyclohexylcarbamate), in squirrel monkeys. Both FAAH inhibitors: (1) blocked FAAH activity in brain and liver, increasing levels of endogenous ligands for cannabinoid and α-type peroxisome proliferator-activated (PPAR-α) receptors; (2) shifted nicotine self-administration dose–response functions in a manner consistent with reduced nicotine reward; (3) blocked reinstatement of nicotine seeking induced by reexposure to either nicotine priming or nicotine-associated cues; and (4) had no effect on cocaine or food self-administration. The effects of FAAH inhibition on nicotine self-administration and nicotine priming-induced reinstatement were reversed by the PPAR-α antagonist, MK886. Unlike URB597, which was not self-administered by monkeys in an earlier study, URB694 was self-administered at a moderate rate. URB694 self-administration was blocked by pretreatment with an antagonist for either PPAR-α (MK886) or cannabinoid CB1 receptors (rimonabant). In additional experiments in rats, URB694 was devoid of THC-like or nicotine-like interoceptive effects under drug-discrimination procedures, and neither of the FAAH inhibitors induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell—consistent with their lack of robust reinforcing effects in monkeys. Overall, both URB597 and URB694 show promise for the initialization and maintenance of smoking cessation because of their ability to block the rewarding effects of nicotine and prevent nicotine priming-induced and cue-induced reinstatement. PMID:25754762

  12. A novel PPARα agonist propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide inhibits inflammation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Yan, Lu; Luo, Xiu-Mei; Peng, Lu; Guo, Han; Jing, Zuo; Yang, Li-Chao; Hu, Rong; Wang, Xuan; Huang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yi-Qing; Jin, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Our group synthesized propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide (N15), a novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist. Because PPARα activation is associated with inflammation control, we hypothesize that N15 may have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the effect of N15 on the regulation of inflammation in THP-1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In particular, we assessed the production of chemokines, adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines, three important types of cytokines that are released from monocytes and are involved in the development of atherosclerosis. The results showed that N15 remarkably reduced the mRNA expression of chemokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 or CCL2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). N15 also decreased the protein expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9. The reduction in the expression of cytokine mRNAs observed following N15 treatment was abrogated in THP-1 cells treated with PPARα siRNA, indicating that the anti-inflammatory effects of N15 are dependent on PPARα activation. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibition, which are dependent on PPARα activation, were also involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of N15. In conclusion, the novel PPARα agonist, N15, exerts notable anti-inflammatory effects, which are mediated via PPARα activation and TLR4/NF-κB and STAT3 inhibition, in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. In our study, N15 exhibits promise for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  13. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase activates Nrf2 signalling and induces heme oxygenase 1 transcription in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Wood, J T; Whitten, K M; Vadivel, S K; Seng, S; Makriyannis, A; Avraham, H K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Endocannabinoids such as anandamide (AEA) are important lipid ligands regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Their levels are regulated by hydrolase enzymes, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). Here, we investigated whether FAAH or AEA are involved in NF (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant responsive element (ARE) pathway. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of AEA or FAAH inhibition by the URB597 inhibitor or FAAH/siRNA on the activation of Nrf2-ARE signalling pathway and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction and transcription. KEY RESULTS Endogenous AEA was detected in the immortalized human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells (0.034 ng per 106 cells) but not in MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Because breast tumour cells express FAAH abundantly, we examined the effects of FAAH on Nrf2/antioxidant pathway. We found that inhibition of FAAH by the URB597 inhibitor induced antioxidant HO-1 in breast cancer cells and MCF-10A cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of FAAH or treatment with AEA-activated ARE-containing reporter induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, independent of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1, CB2 or TRPV1. Furthermore, URB597, AEA and siRNA-FAAH treatments induced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2, while siRNA-Nrf2 treatment and Keap1 expression blocked AEA, URB597 and si-FAAH from activation of ARE reporter and HO-1 induction. siRNA-HO-1 treatment decreased the viability of breast cancer cells and MCF-10A cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data uncovered a novel mechanism by which inhibition of FAAH or exposure to AEA induced HO-1 transcripts and implicating AEA and FAAH as direct modifiers in signalling mediated activation of Nrf2-HO-1 pathway, independent of cannabinoid receptors. PMID:23347118

  14. A novel PPARα agonist propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide inhibits inflammation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Yan, Lu; Luo, Xiu-Mei; Peng, Lu; Guo, Han; Jing, Zuo; Yang, Li-Chao; Hu, Rong; Wang, Xuan; Huang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yi-Qing; Jin, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Our group synthesized propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide (N15), a novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist. Because PPARα activation is associated with inflammation control, we hypothesize that N15 may have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the effect of N15 on the regulation of inflammation in THP-1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In particular, we assessed the production of chemokines, adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines, three important types of cytokines that are released from monocytes and are involved in the development of atherosclerosis. The results showed that N15 remarkably reduced the mRNA expression of chemokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 or CCL2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). N15 also decreased the protein expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9. The reduction in the expression of cytokine mRNAs observed following N15 treatment was abrogated in THP-1 cells treated with PPARα siRNA, indicating that the anti-inflammatory effects of N15 are dependent on PPARα activation. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibition, which are dependent on PPARα activation, were also involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of N15. In conclusion, the novel PPARα agonist, N15, exerts notable anti-inflammatory effects, which are mediated via PPARα activation and TLR4/NF-κB and STAT3 inhibition, in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. In our study, N15 exhibits promise for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27318324

  15. Full Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibition Combined with Partial Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition: Augmented and Sustained Antinociceptive Effects with Reduced Cannabimimetic Side Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Kinsey, Steven G.; Liu, Qing-song; Hruba, Lenka; McMahon, Lance R.; Grim, Travis W.; Merritt, Christina R.; Wise, Laura E.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Selley, Dana E.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary hydrolytic enzymes for the respective endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), produces antinociception but with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Although selective inhibitors of either enzyme often show partial efficacy in various nociceptive models, their combined blockade elicits augmented antinociceptive effects, but side effects emerge. Moreover, complete and prolonged MAGL blockade leads to cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor functional tolerance, which represents another challenge in this potential therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the present study tested whether full FAAH inhibition combined with partial MAGL inhibition would produce sustained antinociceptive effects with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Accordingly, we tested a high dose of the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (N-​3-​pyridinyl-​4-​[[3-​[[5-​(trifluoromethyl)-​2-​pyridinyl]oxy]phenyl]methyl]-​1-​piperidinecarboxamide; 10 mg/kg) given in combination with a low dose of the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 [4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate] (4 mg/kg) in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This combination of inhibitors elicited profound increases in brain AEA levels (>10-fold) but only 2- to 3-fold increases in brain 2-AG levels. This combination produced significantly greater antinociceptive effects than single enzyme inhibition and did not elicit common cannabimimetic effects (e.g., catalepsy, hypomotility, hypothermia, and substitution for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the drug-discrimination assay), although these side effects emerged with high-dose JZL184 (i.e., 100 mg/kg). Finally, repeated administration of this combination did not lead to tolerance to its antiallodynic actions in the carrageenan assay or CB1 receptor functional tolerance. Thus, full FAAH inhibition combined

  16. Full Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibition Combined with Partial Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition: Augmented and Sustained Antinociceptive Effects with Reduced Cannabimimetic Side Effects in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Kinsey, Steven G; Liu, Qing-Song; Hruba, Lenka; McMahon, Lance R; Grim, Travis W; Merritt, Christina R; Wise, Laura E; Abdullah, Rehab A; Selley, Dana E; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary hydrolytic enzymes for the respective endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), produces antinociception but with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Although selective inhibitors of either enzyme often show partial efficacy in various nociceptive models, their combined blockade elicits augmented antinociceptive effects, but side effects emerge. Moreover, complete and prolonged MAGL blockade leads to cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor functional tolerance, which represents another challenge in this potential therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the present study tested whether full FAAH inhibition combined with partial MAGL inhibition would produce sustained antinociceptive effects with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Accordingly, we tested a high dose of the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (N-​3-​pyridinyl-​4-​[[3-​[[5-​(trifluoromethyl)-​2-​pyridinyl]oxy]phenyl]methyl]-​1-​piperidinecarboxamide; 10 mg/kg) given in combination with a low dose of the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 [4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate] (4 mg/kg) in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This combination of inhibitors elicited profound increases in brain AEA levels (>10-fold) but only 2- to 3-fold increases in brain 2-AG levels. This combination produced significantly greater antinociceptive effects than single enzyme inhibition and did not elicit common cannabimimetic effects (e.g., catalepsy, hypomotility, hypothermia, and substitution for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the drug-discrimination assay), although these side effects emerged with high-dose JZL184 (i.e., 100 mg/kg). Finally, repeated administration of this combination did not lead to tolerance to its antiallodynic actions in the carrageenan assay or CB1 receptor functional tolerance. Thus, full FAAH inhibition

  17. Structures of D-amino-acid amidase complexed with L-phenylalanine and with L-phenylalanine amide: insight into the D-stereospecificity of D-amino-acid amidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi SV3.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Seiji; Suzuki, Atsuo; Mizushima, Tsunehiro; Komeda, Hidenobu; Asano, Yasuhisa; Yamane, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    The crystal structures of D-amino-acid amidase (DAA) from Ochrobactrum anthropi SV3 in complex with L-phenylalanine and with L-phenylalanine amide were determined at 2.3 and 2.2 A resolution, respectively. Comparison of the L-phenylalanine amide complex with the D-phenylalanine complex reveals that the D-stereospecificity of DAA might be achieved as a consequence of three structural factors: (i) the hydrophobic cavity in the region in which the hydrophobic side chain of the substrate is held, (ii) the spatial arrangement of Gln310 O and Glu114 O epsilon2 that fixes the amino N atom of the substrate and (iii) the existence of two cavities that keep the carboxyl/amide group of the substrate near or apart from Ser60 O gamma.

  18. Caffeic acid phenethyl amide ameliorates ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiac dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been shown to protect the heart against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by various mechanisms including its antioxidant effect. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of a CAPE analog with more structural stability in plasma, caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA), on I/R injury in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Methods Type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by a single intravenous injection of 60 mg/kg STZ. To produce the I/R injury, the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 45 minutes, followed by 2 hours of reperfusion. CAPA was pretreated intraperitoneally 30 minutes before reperfusion. An analog devoid of the antioxidant property of CAPA, dimethoxyl CAPA (dmCAPA), and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester [l-NAME]) were used to evaluate the mechanism involved in the reduction of the infarct size following CAPA-treatment. Finally, the cardioprotective effect of chronic treatment of CAPA was analyzed in diabetic rats. Results Compared to the control group, CAPA administration (3 and 15 mg/kg) significantly reduced the myocardial infarct size after I/R, while dmCAPA (15 mg/kg) had no cardioprotective effect. Interestingly, pretreatment with a NOS inhibitor, (l-NAME, 3 mg/kg) eliminated the effect of CAPA on myocardial infarction. Additionally, a 4-week CAPA treatment (1 mg/kg, orally, once daily) started 4 weeks after STZ-induction could effectively decrease the infarct size and ameliorate the cardiac dysfunction by pressure-volume loop analysis in STZ-induced diabetic animals. Conclusions CAPA, which is structurally similar to CAPE, exerts cardioprotective activity in I/R injury through its antioxidant property and by preserving nitric oxide levels. On the other hand, chronic CAPA treatment could also ameliorate cardiac dysfunction in diabetic animals. PMID:24923878

  19. Zinc(II) complexes with heterocyclic ether, acid and amide. Crystal structure, spectral, thermal and antibacterial activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabłońska-Wawrzycka, Agnieszka; Rogala, Patrycja; Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Hodorowicz, Maciej; Stadnicka, Katarzyna

    2016-02-01

    The reaction of zinc salts with heterocyclic ether (1-ethoxymethyl-2-methylimidazole (1-ExMe-2-MeIm)), acid (pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (2,3-pydcH2)) and amide (3,5-dimethylpyrazole-1-carboxamide (3,5-DMePzCONH2)) yielded three new zinc complexes formulated as [Zn(1-ExMe-2-MeIm)2Cl2] 1, fac-[Zn(H2O)6][Zn(2,3-pydcH)3]22 and [Zn(3,5-DMePz)2(NCO)2] 3. Complexes of 1 and 3 are four-coordinated with a tetrahedron as coordination polyhedron. However, compound 2 forms an octahedral cation-anion complex. The complex 3 was prepared by eliminating of the carboxamide group from the ligand and then the 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (3,5-DMePz) and isocyanates formed were employed as new ligands. The IR and X-ray studies have confirmed a bidentate fashion of coordination of the 2,3-pydcH and monodentate fashion of coordination of the 1-ExMe-2-MeIm and 3,5-DMePz to the Zn(II) ions. The crystal packing of Zn(II) complexes are stabilized by intermolecular classical hydrogen bonds of O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O types. The most interesting feature of the supramolecular architecture of complexes is the existence of C-H⋯O, C-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯π interactions and π⋯π stacking, which also contributes to structural stabilisation. The correlation between crystal structure and thermal stability of zinc complexes is observed. In all compounds the fragments of ligands donor-atom containing go in the last steps. Additionally, antimicrobial activities of compounds were carried out against certain Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and counts of CFU (colony forming units) were also determined. The achieved results confirmed a significant antibacterial activity of some tested zinc complexes. On the basis of the Δ log CFU values the antibacterial activity of zinc complexes follows the order: 3 > 2 > 1. Influence a number of N-donor atoms in zinc environment on antibacterial activity is also observed.

  20. Fine-Tuning of Lewis Acidity: The Case of Borenium Hydride Complexes Derived from Bis(phosphinimino)amide Boron Precursors.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Kuldeep; Prashanth, Billa; Singh, Sanjay

    2016-07-25

    Reactions of bis(phosphinimino)amines LH and L'H with Me2 S⋅BH2 Cl afforded chloroborane complexes LBHCl (1) and L'BHCl (2), and the reaction of L'H with BH3 ⋅Me2 S gave a dihydridoborane complex L'BH2 (3) (LH=[{(2,4,6-Me3 C6 H2 N)P(Ph2 )}2 N]H and L'H=[{(2,6-iPr2 C6 H3 N)P(Ph2 )}2 N]H). Furthermore, abstraction of a hydride ion from L'BH2 (3) and LBH2 (4) mediated by Lewis acid B(C6 F5 )3 or the weakly coordinating ion pair [Ph3 C][B(C6 F5 )4 ] smoothly yielded a series of borenium hydride cations: [L'BH](+) [HB(C6 F5 )3 ](-) (5), [L'BH](+) [B(C6 F5 )4 ](-) (6), [LBH](+) [HB(C6 F5 )3 ](-) (7), and [LBH](+) [B(C6 F5 )4 ](-) (8). Synthesis of a chloroborenium species [LBCl](+) [BCl4 ](-) (9) without involvement of a weakly coordinating anion was also demonstrated from a reaction of LBH2 (4) with three equivalents of BCl3 . It is clear from this study that the sterically bulky strong donor bis(phosphinimino)amide ligand plays a crucial role in facilitating the synthesis and stabilization of these three-coordinated cationic species of boron. Therefore, the present synthetic approach is not dependent on the requirement of weakly coordinating anions; even simple BCl4 (-) can act as a counteranion with borenium cations. The high Lewis acidity of the boron atom in complex 8 enables the formation of an adduct with 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), [LBH⋅(DMAP)](+) [B(C6 F5 )4 ](-) (10). The solid-state structures of complexes 1, 5, and 9 were investigated by means of single-crystal X-ray structural analysis. PMID:27351275

  1. Caffeic acid phenethyl amide improves glucose homeostasis and attenuates the progression of vascular dysfunction in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose intolerance and cardiovascular complications are major symptoms in patients with diabetes. Many therapies have proven beneficial in treating diabetes in animals by protecting the cardiovascular system and increasing glucose utilization. In this study, we evaluated the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) on glucose homeostasis and vascular function in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes (blood glucose levels > 350 mg/dL), was induced in Wistar rats by a single intravenous injection of 60 mg/kg STZ. Hypoglycemic effects were then assessed in normal and type 1 diabetic rats. In addition, coronary blood flow in Langendorff-perfused hearts was evaluated in the presence or absence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. The thoracic aorta was used to measure vascular response to phenylephrine. Finally, the effect of chronic treatment of CAPA and insulin on coronary artery flow and vascular response to phenylephrine were analyzed in diabetic rats. Results Oral administration of 0.1 mg/kg CAPA decreased plasma glucose in normal (32.9 ± 2.3% decrease, P < 0.05) and diabetic rats (11.8 ± 5.5% decrease, P < 0.05). In normal and diabetic rat hearts, 1–10 μM CAPA increased coronary flow rate, and this increase was abolished by 10 μM NOS inhibitor. In the thoracic aorta, the concentration/response curve of phenylephrine was right-shifted by administration of 100 μM CAPA. Coronary flow rate was reduced to 7.2 ± 0.2 mL/min at 8 weeks after STZ-induction. However, 4 weeks of treatment with CAPA (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, twice daily) started at 4 weeks after STZ induction increased flow rate to 11.2 ± 0.5 mL/min (P < 0.05). In addition, the contractile response induced by 1 μM phenylephrine increased from 6.8 ± 0.6 mN to 11.4 ± 0.4 mN (P < 0.05) and 14.9 ± 1.4 mN (P < 0.05) by insulin (1 IU/kg, intraperitoneal) or CAPA treatment, respectively. Conclusions CAPA induced hypoglycemic activity, increased

  2. (E)-4-aryl-4-oxo-2-butenoic acid amides, chalcone–aroylacrylic acid chimeras: Design, antiproliferative activity and inhibition of tubulin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Vitorović-Todorović, Maja D.; Erić-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Kolundžija, Branka; Hamel, Ernest; Ristić, Slavica; Juranić, Ivan O.; Drakulić, Branko J.

    2013-01-01

    Antiproliferative activity of twenty-nine (E)-4-aryl-4-oxo-2-butenoic acid amides against three human tumor cell lines (HeLa, FemX, and K562) is reported. Compounds showed antiproliferative activity in one-digit micromolar to submicromolar concentrations. The most active derivatives toward all the cell lines tested bear alkyl substituents on the aroyl moiety of the molecules. Fourteen compounds showed tubulin assembly inhibition at concentrations <20 μM. The most potent inhibitor of tubulin assembly was unsubstituted compound 1, with IC50 = 2.9 μM. Compound 23 had an oral LD50 in vivo of 45 mg/kg in mice. Cell cycle analysis on K562 cells showed that compounds 1, 2 and 23 caused accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase, but inhibition of microtubule polymerization is not the principal mode of action of the compounds. Nevertheless, they may be useful leads for the design of a new class of antitubulin agents. PMID:23353745

  3. Anandamide Externally Added to Lipid Vesicles Containing-Trapped Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Is Readily Hydrolyzed in a Sterol-Modulated Fashion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We show that anandamide (AEA) externally added to model membrane vesicles containing trapped fatty acid amide hydrolyase (FAAH) can be readily hydrolyzed, demonstrating facile, rapid anandamide movement across the lipid bilayer. The rate of hydrolysis is significantly facilitated by cholesterol and coprostanol, but not by cholesterol sulfate. The effects of sterol upon hydrolysis by FAAH bound to the outer surface of the bilayer were much smaller, although they followed the same pattern. We propose the facilitation of hydrolysis is a combination of the effects of sterol on accessibility of membrane-inserted endocannabinoids to surface protein, and on the rate of endocannabinod transport across the membrane bilayer. PMID:22860204

  4. [Synthetic transformations of higher terpenoids. XXX. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of betulonic acid amides with a piperidine or pyrrolidine nitroxide moiety].

    PubMed

    Antimonova, A N; Petrenko, N I; Shults, E E; Polienko, Iu F; Shakirov, M M; Irtegova, I G; Pokrovskiĭ, M A; Sherman, K M; Grigor'ev, I A; Pokrovskiĭ, A G; Tolstikov, G A

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of betulonic acid chloride with 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpeperidine-1-oxyl, 3-amino-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl and 3-aminomethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl gave corresponding triterpenoid amides. It was found that new derivatives exhibit cytotoxic activity against tumor cells CEM-13, U-937, MT-4. CCID50 value for most activity compound--N-[3-oxolup-20(29)-en-30-yl]-(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-4-yl)-1-oxyl--was 5.7-33.1 microM.

  5. Synthesis and Structure-activity Relationship Studies of O-Biphenyl-3-yl Carbamates as Peripherally Restricted Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Duranti, Andrea; Melzig, Laurin; Fiorelli, Claudio; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Colombano, Giampiero; Mestichelli, Paola; Sanchini, Silvano; Tontini, Andrea; Mor, Marco; Bandiera, Tiziano; Scarpelli, Rita; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The peripherally restricted fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB937 (3, cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3’-carbamoyl-6-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester) is extruded from the brain and spinal cord by the Abcg2 efflux transporter. Despite its inability to enter the central nervous system (CNS), 3 exerts profound antinociceptive effects in mice and rats, which result from the inhibition of FAAH in peripheral tissues and the consequent enhancement of anandamide signaling at CB1 cannabinoid receptors localized on sensory nerve endings. In the present study, we examined the structure-activity relationships (SAR) for the biphenyl region of compound 3, focusing on the carbamoyl and hydroxyl groups in the distal and proximal phenyl rings. Our SAR studies generated a new series of peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitors and identified compound 35 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3’-carbamoyl-5-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester) as the most potent brain-impermeant FAAH inhibitor disclosed to date. PMID:23822179

  6. Transesterification and amide cis-trans isomerization in Zn and Cd complexes of the chelating amino acid ligand Boc-Asp(Dpa)-OBzl.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Nicole; Zahl, Achim; Alsfasser, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The amino acid derivative Boc-Asp-OBzl (Boc=N-butyloxycarbonyl; Asp=aspartic acid; Bzl=benzyl) was functionalized by coupling its carboxylate side chain to dipicolylamine. This yielded the tridentate nitrogen donor ligand Boc-Asp(Dpa)-OBzl (-OBzl). The compound -OBzl contains three different carbonyl groups: a tertiary amide linkage between Asp and Dpa, a C-terminal benzyl ester function, and an N-terminal urethane protecting group. NMR spectra were used to compare the reactivity of these moieties. The Boc protecting group gives rise to two isomers, (E, 9%) and (Z, 91%). Coordination of Cd(NO3)2 and Zn(NO3)2 yielded the complexes and. These compounds have significantly reduced barriers to rotation about the tertiary amide C-N bond compared with the free ligand (-OBzl:18.5 kcal mol-1 in CDBr3;: 12.9 kcal mol-1 in (CD3)2CO;: 13.8 kcal mol-1 in (CD3)2CO). Both complexes readily undergo transesterification in methanol or CD3OD. Experimental pseudo-first order rate constants were determined in CD3OD and (CD3)2CO:CD3OD (3:1;). It was found that the zinc complex (k=(2.28+/-0.02)x10(-4) s-1) is significantly more reactive than the cadmium complex (k=(1.41+/-0.03)x10(-6) s-1). In order to study their tertiary amide cis-trans isomerization, the cadmium complex [(-OCH3)Cd(NO3)2] was synthesized, and the zinc complex [(-OCD3)Zn(NO3)2] was generated in situ in (CD3)2CO:CD3OD (3:1). The barriers to rotation were determined (:14.1 kcal mol-1 in CD3OD;: 13.4 kcal mol-1 in (CD3)2CO:CD3OD (3:1)). Our results show that the stronger Lewis-acid zinc(II) is significantly more active than cadmium(II) in the acceleration of the transesterification. This is in marked contrast to the tertiary amide bond rotation which is comparably fast with both metal ions. PMID:17160185

  7. Synthesis, insecticidal activities, and SAR studies of novel pyridylpyrazole acid derivatives based on amide bridge modification of anthranilic diamide insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Lei; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yi; Xiong, Li-Xia; Li, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Ji-Feng; Chen, You-Wei; Zhou, Sha; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2013-06-12

    Anthranilic diamides are one of the most important classes of modern agricultural insecticides. To discover new structure-modified compounds with high activity, series of novel carbonyl thioureas, carbonyl ureas, oxadiazoles, carbonyl thiophosphorylureas, oxadiazole-containing amides, and thiazoline-containing amides were designed through the modification of the amide bridge based on the structure of chlorantraniliprole and were synthesized, and bioassays were carried out. The compounds were characterized and confirmed by melting point, IR, (1)H NMR, and elemental analyses or HRMS. Preliminary bioassays indicated that some compounds exhibited significant insecticidal activities against oriental armyworm, diamondback moth, beet armyworm, corn borer, and mosquito. Among them, trifluoroethoxyl-containing carbonyl thiourea 20a showed best larvicidal activity against oriental armyworm, with LC50 and LC95 values of 0.1812 and 0.7767 mg/L, respectively. Meanwhile, 20c and 20e showed 86 and 57% death rates against diamondback moth at 0.005 mg/L, and the LC50 values of the two compounds were 0.0017 and 0.0023 mg/L, respectively, which were lower than that of the control chlorantraniliprole. The relationship between structure and insecticidal activity was discussed, and the HF calculation results indicated that the carbonyl thiourea moiety plays an important role in the insecticidal activity. The present work demonstrated that the trifluoroethoxyl-containing carbonyl thioureas can be used as lead compounds for further development of novel insecticides.

  8. A two-step approach to achieve secondary amide transamidation enabled by nickel catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma L.; Yamano, Michael M.; Zhou, Yujing; Anthony, Sarah M.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing challenge in synthetic chemistry is the development of the transamidation reaction. This process, which involves the conversion of one amide to another, is typically plagued by unfavourable kinetic and thermodynamic factors. Although some advances have been made with regard to the transamidation of primary amide substrates, secondary amide transamidation has remained elusive. Here we present a simple two-step approach that allows for the elusive overall transformation to take place using non-precious metal catalysis. The methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions and is tolerant of amino-acid-derived nucleophiles. In addition to overcoming the classic problem of secondary amide transamidation, our studies expand the growing repertoire of new transformations mediated by base metal catalysis. PMID:27199089

  9. Tris(2-aminoethyl)amine-based α-branched fatty acid amides - Synthesis of lipids and comparative study of transfection efficiency of their lipid formulations.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Nicole; Wölk, Christian; Schulze, Ingo; Janich, Christopher; Folz, Manuela; Drescher, Simon; Dittrich, Matthias; Meister, Annette; Vogel, Jürgen; Groth, Thomas; Dobner, Bodo; Langner, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of a new class of cationic lipids, tris(2-aminoethyl)amine-based α-branched fatty acid amides, is described resulting in a series of lipids with specific variations in the lipophilic as well as the hydrophilic part of the lipids. In-vitro structure/transfection relationships were established by application of complexes of these lipids with plasmid DNA (pDNA) to different cell lines. The α-branched fatty acid amide bearing two tetradecyl chains and two lysine molecules (T14diLys) in mixture with the co-lipid 1,2-di-[(9Z)-octadec-9-enoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) (1/2, n/n) exhibits effective pDNA transfer in three different cell lines, namely Hep-G2, A549, and COS-7. The presence of 10% serum during lipoplex incubation of the cells did not affect the transfection efficiency. Based on that, detailed investigations of the complexation of pDNA with the lipid formulation T14diLys/DOPE 1/2 (n/n) were carried out with respect to particle size and charge using dynamic light scattering (DLS), ζ-potential measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Additionally, the lipoplex uptake was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Overall, lipoplexes prepared from T14diLys/DOPE 1/2 (n/n) offer large potential as lipid-based polynucleotide carriers and further justify advanced examinations.

  10. Elutriated acid fermentation of municipal primary sludge.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Young Ho; Speece, Richard E

    2006-06-01

    The performance of a novel fermentation process, adopting a sludge blanket type configuration, for higher hydrolysis/acidogenesis of the municipal primary sludge was investigated under batch and semi-continuous conditions with varying pH and temperature. This acid elutriation slurry reactor provided higher system performance with a short HRT (5d) and higher acidogenic effluent quality under pH 9 and thermophilic (55 degrees C) conditions. The hydrolysis of the sludge was revealed to be significantly dependent on seasonal effects for sludge characteristics but with little impact on acidogenesis. Based on the rainy season at the optimal conditions, VFA production and recovery fraction (VFA(COD)/COD) were 0.18 g VFA(COD)/g VSS(COD) and 63%. As byproducts, nitrogen and phosphorus release were measured at 0.006 g N/g VSS(COD) and 0.003 g P/g VSS(COD), respectively. For the mass balance in a full-scale plant (Q=158,880 m(3)/d) based on the rainy season, the VFA and non-VFA (as COD) production were 3110 kg VFA(COD)/d and 1800 kg COD/d, resulting in an increase of organics of 31 mg COD/L and 20mg VFA(COD)/L and nutrients of 0.7 mg N/L and 0.3 mg P/L in the influent sewage. The economical benefit from this process application was estimated to be about 67 dollars per 1000 m(3) of sewage except for energy requirements and also, better benefits can be expected during the dry season. Moreover, the results revealed that the process has various additional advantages such as pathogen-free stabilized solids production, excellent solids control and economical benefits.

  11. Amino acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for improving compatibility with chiral poly(amide-ester-imide) containing L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolmaleki, Amir; Mallakpour, Shadpour; Borandeh, Sedigheh

    2013-12-01

    Amino acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs)/poly(amide-ester-imide) (PAEI) composites were fabricated by solution mixing method. Proper functionalization and mixing strategy of MWCNTs provides the best opportunity for better distribution and bonding of nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. MWCNTs have been chemically modified with L-phenylalanine to improve their compatibility with L-phenylalanine based PAEI. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs of composite revealed that f-MWCNTs made a good interaction with polymer chains by wrapping the polymer around them, and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed well dispersion with nano size of f-MWCNTs in the polymer matrix. In addition, thermal analysis showed good enhancement in thermal properties of composites compared to pure polymer. Thermal stability of the composites containing f-MWCNTs was enhanced due to their good dispersion and improved interfacial interaction between the amino acid based PAEI matrix and f-MWCNTs.

  12. Occurrence of N-phenylpropenoyl-L-amino acid amides in different herbal drugs and their influence on human keratinocytes, on human liver cells and on adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to the human stomach.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Deters, A M; Müller, G; Stark, T; Wittschier, N; Hofmann, T

    2007-02-01

    Thirty commonly used medicinal plants were screened by a selective and specific LC-MS/MS method for the occurrence of N-phenylpropenoyl- L-amino acid amides, a new homologous class of secondary products. In 15 plants, one or more of the respective derivatives (1 to 12) were found and quantitated. Especially roots from Angelica archangelica, fruits of Cassia angustifolia, C. senna, Coriandrum sativum, leaves from Hedera helix, flowers from Lavandula spec. and from Sambucus nigra contained high amounts (1 to 11 microg/g) of mixtures of the different amides 1 to 12. For functional investigations on potential activity in cellular physiology, two amides with an aliphatic (8) and an aromatic amino acid residue (5) were used. N-(E)-Caffeic acid L-aspartic acid amide (8) and N-(E)-caffeic acid L-tryptophan amide (5) stimulated mitochondrial activity as well as the proliferation rate of human liver cells (HepG2) at 10 microg/mL significantly. When monitoring the influence of selected phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, both compounds did not influence CYP3A4 gene expression, but stimulated CYP1A2 gene expression and inhibited GST expression. Also, the proliferation of human keratinocytes (NHK) was increased up to 150% by both amides 5 and 8; this stimulation was also detectable on the level of gene expression by an up-regulation of the transcription factor STAT6. The aliphatic aspartic compound 8 showed strong antiadhesive properties on the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human stomach tissue. PMID:17295182

  13. Synthesis of amphiphilic poly(ether-amide) dendrimer endcapped with poly(ethylene glycol) grafts and its solubilization to salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Zhang, Wenquan; Liu, Jianhua; Shi, Wenfang

    2007-04-01

    An amphiphilic dendrimer (DPEA-PEG) grafting polyethylene glycol at the terminals was prepared by endcapping of dendritic poly(ether-amide) (DPEA) with isocyanate terminated linear polyethylene glycol (PEG-NCO). The molecular structure was verified by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), (1)H NMR and FT-IR. The micelle characteristic of DPEA-PEG in water was investigated. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was determined by a fluorescence technique to be 55.5 mg/L. The hydrodynamic radius of micelles was measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) to be 76.2 nm. The UV-vis spectrum showed that the solubility of salicylic acid increased from 1.91 to 2.78 mg/L when the concentration of DPEA-PEG attained 5 mg/mL in an aqueous solution.

  14. Reactivity of a Nickel(II) Bis(amidate) Complex with meta-Chloroperbenzoic Acid: Formation of a Potent Oxidizing Species.

    PubMed

    Corona, Teresa; Pfaff, Florian F; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Draksharapu, Apparao; Whiteoak, Christopher J; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Browne, Wesley R; Ray, Kallol; Company, Anna

    2015-10-12

    Herein, we report the formation of a highly reactive nickel-oxygen species that has been trapped following reaction of a Ni(II) precursor bearing a macrocyclic bis(amidate) ligand with meta-chloroperbenzoic acid (HmCPBA). This compound is only detectable at temperatures below 250 K and is much more reactive toward organic substrates (i.e., C-H bonds, C=C bonds, and sulfides) than previously reported well-defined nickel-oxygen species. Remarkably, this species is formed by heterolytic O-O bond cleavage of a Ni-HmCPBA precursor, which is concluded from experimental and computational data. On the basis of spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this reactive species is proposed to be a Ni(III) -oxyl compound.

  15. Reactivity of a Nickel(II) Bis(amidate) Complex with meta-Chloroperbenzoic Acid: Formation of a Potent Oxidizing Species.

    PubMed

    Corona, Teresa; Pfaff, Florian F; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Draksharapu, Apparao; Whiteoak, Christopher J; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Browne, Wesley R; Ray, Kallol; Company, Anna

    2015-10-12

    Herein, we report the formation of a highly reactive nickel-oxygen species that has been trapped following reaction of a Ni(II) precursor bearing a macrocyclic bis(amidate) ligand with meta-chloroperbenzoic acid (HmCPBA). This compound is only detectable at temperatures below 250 K and is much more reactive toward organic substrates (i.e., C-H bonds, C=C bonds, and sulfides) than previously reported well-defined nickel-oxygen species. Remarkably, this species is formed by heterolytic O-O bond cleavage of a Ni-HmCPBA precursor, which is concluded from experimental and computational data. On the basis of spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this reactive species is proposed to be a Ni(III) -oxyl compound. PMID:26311073

  16. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Oscar; Migliore, Marco; Habrant, Damien; Armirotti, Andrea; Albani, Clara; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to inhibit cyclooxygenase (Cox)-1 and Cox-2 underlies the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs, as well as their propensity to damage the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium. This toxic action greatly limits the use of NSAIDs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic pathologies. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades the endocannabinoid anandamide, which attenuates inflammation and promotes GI healing. Here, we describe the first class of systemically active agents that simultaneously inhibit FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 with high potency and selectivity. The class prototype 4 (ARN2508) is potent at inhibiting FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 (median inhibitory concentration: FAAH, 0.031 ± 0.002 µM; Cox-1, 0.012 ± 0.002 µM; and Cox-2, 0.43 ± 0.025 µM) but does not significantly interact with a panel of >100 off targets. After oral administration in mice, ARN2508 engages its intended targets and exerts profound therapeutic effects in models of intestinal inflammation. Unlike NSAIDs, ARN2508 causes no gastric damage and indeed protects the GI from NSAID-induced damage through a mechanism that requires FAAH inhibition. Multitarget FAAH/Cox blockade may provide a transformative approach to IBD and other pathologies in which FAAH and Cox are overactive.—Sasso, O., Migliore, M., Habrant, D., Armirotti, A., Albani, C., Summa, M., Moreno-Sanz, G., Scarpelli, R., Piomelli, D. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage. PMID:25757568

  17. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B): Importance of steric and electronic effects on the unusual cyclization of the sulfenic acid intermediate to a sulfenyl amide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Bani Kanta

    2013-09-01

    The redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) via the unusual transformation of its sulfenic acid (PTP1B-SOH) to a cyclic sulfenyl amide intermediate is studied by using small molecule chemical models. These studies suggest that the sulfenic acids derived from the H2O2-mediated reactions o-amido thiophenols do not efficiently cyclize to sulfenyl amides and the sulfenic acids produced in situ can be trapped by using methyl iodide. Theoretical calculations suggest that the most stable conformer of such sulfenic acids are stabilized by nO → σ*S-OH orbital interactions, which force the -OH group to adopt a position trans to the S⋯O interaction, leading to an almost linear arrangement of the O⋯S-O moiety and this may be the reason for the slow cyclization of such sulfenic acids to their corresponding sulfenyl amides. On the other hand, additional substituents at the 6-position of o-amido phenylsulfenic acids that can induce steric environment and alter the electronic properties around the sulfenic acid moiety by S⋯N or S⋯O nonbonded interactions destabilize the sulfenic acids by inducing strain in the molecule. This may lead to efficient the cyclization of such sulfenic acids. This model study suggests that the amino acid residues in the close proximity of the sulfenic acid moiety in PTP1B may play an important role in the cyclization of PTP1B-SOH to produce the corresponding sulfenyl amide.

  18. Copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylthiolation of primary and secondary alkylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xinxin; Liu, Tianfei; Lu, Long; Shen, Qilong

    2014-09-19

    A Cu-catalyzed trifluoromethylthiolation of primary and secondary alkylboronic acids with an electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolating reagent is described. Tolerance for a variety of functional groups was observed. PMID:25198142

  19. [Rh(III)(Cp*)]-catalyzed ortho-selective direct C(sp(2))-H bond amidation/amination of benzoic acids by N-chlorocarbamates and N-chloromorpholines. A versatile synthesis of functionalized anthranilic acids.

    PubMed

    Ng, Fo-Ning; Zhou, Zhongyuan; Yu, Wing-Yiu

    2014-04-01

    A Rh(III) -catalyzed direct ortho-CH amidation/amination of benzoic acids with N-chlorocarbamates/N-chloromorpholines was achieved, giving anthranilic acids in up to 85 % yields with excellent ortho-selectivity and functional-group tolerance. Successful benzoic acid aminations were achieved with carbamates bearing various amide groups including NHCO2 Me, NHCbz, and NHTroc (Cbz=carbobenzyloxy; Troc=trichloroethylchloroformate), as well as secondary amines, such as morpholines, piperizines, and piperidines, furnishing highly functionalized anthranilic acids. A stoichiometric reaction of a cyclometallated rhodium(III) complex of benzo[h]quinoline with a silver salt of N-chlorocarbamate afforded an amido-rhodium(III) complex, which was isolated and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. This finding confirmed that the CN bond formation results from the cross-coupling of N-chlorocarbamate with the aryl-rhodium(III) complex. Yet, the mechanistic details regarding the CN bond formation remain unclear; pathways involving 1,2-aryl migration and rhodium(V)- nitrene are plausible. PMID:24596116

  20. Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationships of N-(2-Oxo-3-oxetanyl)amides as N-Acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing Acid Amidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Solorzano, Carlos; Antonietti, Francesca; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Rivara, Silvia; Lodola, Alessio; Vacondio, Federica; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele; Mor, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) are a family of bioactive lipid mediators that include the endogenous agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). FAEs are hydrolyzed intracellularly by either fatty acid amide hydrolase or N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA). Selective inhibition of NAAA by (S)-N-(2-oxo-3-oxetanyl)-3-phenylpropionamide [(S)-OOPP, 7a] prevents PEA degradation in mouse leukocytes and attenuates responses to proinflammatory stimuli. Starting from the structure of 7a a series of β-lactones was prepared and tested on recombinant rat NAAA to explore structure-activity relationships (SARs) for this class of inhibitors and improve their in vitro potency. Following the hypothesis that these compounds inhibit NAAA by acylation of the catalytic cysteine, we identified several requirements for recognition at the active site and obtained new potent inhibitors. In particular, (S)-N-(2-oxo-3-oxetanyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (7h) was more potent than 7a at inhibiting recombinant rat NAAA activity (7a, IC50 = 420 nM; 7h, IC50 = 115 nM) in vitro and at reducing carrageenan-induced leukocyte infiltration in vivo. PMID:20604568

  1. Copper-promoted trifluoromethylation of primary and secondary alkylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Xiao, Bin; Xie, Chuan-Qi; Luo, Dong-Fen; Liu, Lei; Fu, Yao

    2012-12-01

    New couple: The Cu-promoted trifluoromethylation of primary and secondary alkylboronic acids with TMSCF(3) extends the scope of transition-metal-catalyzed trifluoromethylation reactions to sp(3)-hybridized carbon centers. It also represents one of the first examples for Cu-catalyzed C-C cross-coupling reactions of alkylboronic acid derivatives. PMID:23143929

  2. Dissolving Carboxylic Acids and Primary Amines on the Overhead Projector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Sally D.; Rutkowsky, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid carboxylic acids (or primary amines) with limited solubility in water are dissolved by addition of aqueous sodium hydroxide (or hydrochloric acid) on the stage of an overhead projector using simple glassware and very small quantities of chemicals. This effective and colorful demonstration can be used to accompany discussions of the…

  3. Effect of propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide on the expression of adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cai-Xia; Yang, Li-Chao; Xu, Xu-Dong; Wei, Xiao; Gai, Ya-Ting; Peng, Lu; Guo, Han; Hao-Zhou; Wang, Yi-Qing; Jin, Xin

    2015-06-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), an endogenous agonist of PPARα, has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic properties. However, OEA can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to oleic acid and ethanolamine and, thus, is not expected to be orally active. In the present study, we designed and synthesized an OEA analog, propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide (N15), which is resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of N15 on the expression of adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results showed that N15 inhibited TNFα-induced production of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and the adhesion of monocytes to TNFα-induced HUVECs. Furthermore, the protective effect of N15 on inflammation is dependent upon a PPAR-α/γ-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, N15 protects against TNFα-induced vascular endothelial inflammation. This anti-inflammatory effect of N15 is dependent on PPAR-α/γ dual targets.

  4. Biphenyl-3-yl alkylcarbamates as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors: Steric effects of N-alkyl chain on rat plasma and liver stability

    PubMed Central

    Vacondio, Federica; Silva, Claudia; Lodola, Alessio; Carmi, Caterina; Rivara, Silvia; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Sanchini, Silvano; Clapper, Jason R.; Piomelli, Daniele; Tarzia, Giorgio; Mor, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Secondary alkylcarbamic acid biphenyl-3-yl esters are a class of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors, which include the reference compounds URB597 and URB694. Given the intrinsic reactivity of the carbamate group, the in vivo potency of these molecules in rats is strongly affected by their hydrolysis in plasma or hepatic metabolism. In the present study, in vitro chemical and metabolic stability assays (rat plasma and rat liver S9 fraction) were used to investigate the structure-property relationships (SPRs) for a focused series of title compounds, where lipophilicity and steric hindrance of the carbamate N-substituent had been modulated. The resulting degradation rates indicate that a secondary or tertiary alkyl group at the carbamate nitrogen atom increases hydrolytic stability towards rat plasma esterases. The calculated solvent accessible surface area (SASA) of the carbamate fragment was employed to describe the differences observed in rate constants of hydrolysis in rat plasma (log kplasma), suggesting that stability in plasma increases if the substituent exerts a shielding effect on the carbamate carbonyl. Stability in rat liver S9 fraction is increased when a tertiary carbon is bound to the carbamate nitrogen atom, while other steric effects showed complex relationships with degradation rates. The SPRs here described may be applied at the pharmacokinetic optimization of other classes of carbamate FAAH inhibitors. PMID:21820769

  5. Chiral bio-nanocomposites based on thermally stable poly(amide-imide) having phenylalanine linkages and reactive organoclay containing tyrosine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Dinari, Mohammad

    2013-03-01

    Montmorillonite clay modified with the bio-active trifunctional L-tyrosine amino acid salt was used as a reactive organoclay (OC) for the preparation of poly(amide-imide) (PAI)/OC hybrid films. One of the functional groups of the L-tyrosine as the swelling agent formed an ionic bond with the negatively charged silicates, whereas the remaining functional groups were available for further reaction with polymer matrix. The soluble PAI with amine end groups including phenylalanine amino acid was synthesised under green condition using molten tetra-butylammonium bromide by direct polymerization reaction of chiral diacid and 2-(3,5-diaminophenyl)benzimidazole. PAI/OC bio-nanocomposites films containing different contents of OC were prepared via solution intercalation method through blending of OC with the PAI solution. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the dispersion of silicate layers in the PAI created an exfoliated structure as a result of using the trifunctional groups of the swelling agent. The structure and thermal behavior of the synthesised materials were characterized by a range of methods, including X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, (1)H-NMR, electron microscopy, elemental and thermogravimetric analysis techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis results indicated that the addition of OC into the PAI matrix was increased in the thermal decomposition temperatures of the resulted bio-nanocomposites.

  6. Experimental colitis in mice is attenuated by changes in the levels of endocannabinoid metabolites induced by selective inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)

    PubMed Central

    Sałaga, M; Mokrowiecka, A; Zakrzewski, P K; Cygankiewicz, A; Leishman, E; Sobczak, M; Zatorski, H; Małecka-Panas, E; Kordek, R; Storr, M; Krajewska, W M; Bradshaw, H B; Fichna, J

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Pharmacological treatment and/or maintenance of remission in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is currently one of the biggest challenge in the field of gastroenterology. Available therapies are mostly limited to overcoming the symptoms, but not the cause of the disease. Recently, the endocannabinoid system has been proposed as a novel target in the treatment of IBD. Here we aimed to assess the anti-inflammatory action of the novel fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor PF-3845 and its effect on the endocannabinoid and related lipid metabolism during the course of experimental colitis. Methods We used two models of experimental colitis in mice (TNBS- and DSS-induced) and additionally, we employed LC/MS/MS spectrometry to determine the changes in biolipid levels in the mouse colon during inflammation. Results We showed that the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 reduced experimental TNBS-induced colitis in mice and its anti-inflammatory action is associated with altering the levels of selected biolipids (arachidonic and oleic acid derivatives, prostaglandins and biolipids containing glycine in the mouse colon). Conclusions We show that FAAH is a promising pharmacological target and the FAAH-dependent biolipids play a major role in colitis. Our results highlight and promote therapeutic strategy based on targeting FAAH-dependent metabolic pathways in order to alleviate intestinal inflammation. PMID:24530133

  7. Enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy amides via Umpolung amide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leighty, Matthew W; Shen, Bo; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2012-09-19

    α-Oxy amides are prepared through enantioselective synthesis using a sequence beginning with a Henry addition of bromonitromethane to aldehydes and finishing with Umpolung Amide Synthesis (UmAS). Key to high enantioselection is the finding that ortho-iodo benzoic acid salts of the chiral copper(II) bis(oxazoline) catalyst deliver both diastereomers of the Henry adduct with high enantiomeric excess, homochiral at the oxygen-bearing carbon. Overall, this approach to α-oxy amides provides an innovative complement to alternatives that focus almost entirely on the enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy carboxylic acids. PMID:22967461

  8. A novel primary bile acid in the Shoebill stork and herons and its phylogenetic significance.

    PubMed

    Hagey, L R; Schteingart, C D; Ton-Nu, H-T; Hofmann, A F

    2002-05-01

    The Shoebill stork, an enigma phylogenetically, was found to contain as its dominant biliary bile acid 16alpha-hydroxychenodeoxycholic acid, a heretofore undescribed bile acid. The bile acid occurred as its taurine N-acyl amidate; structure was established by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). A search for this novel bile acid in other Ciconiiformes showed that it constituted >92% of biliary bile acids in five of nine herons in the Ardidae, but was absent in all other families (Ciconiidae, Threskiornithidae, Scopidae, Phoenicopteridae). The presence of this biochemical trait in the Shoebill stork and certain herons suggests that these birds are closely related.

  9. RNA Bound to a Solid Phase can Select an Amino Acid and Facilitate Subsequent Amide Bond Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellersh, Anthony; Wilkinson, Alan-Shaun

    2000-01-01

    Polyadenylic acid (Poly A) immobilised on silica gel stereoselectively binds L-lysine from dilute aqueous solution. When the resulting complex is suspended in an organic solvent and liquid ammonia added, lysinamide is formed.

  10. Characterisation of (R)-2-(2-Fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-N-(3-Methylpyridin-2-yl)Propanamide as a Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase: Cyclooxygenase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Karlsson, Jessica; Deplano, Alessandro; Hashemian, Sanaz; Svensson, Mona; Fredriksson Sundbom, Marcus; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased endocannabinoid tonus by dual-action fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and substrate selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors is a promising approach for pain-relief. One such compound with this profile is 2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-N-(3-methylpyridin-2-yl)propanamide (Flu-AM1). These activities are shown by Flu-AM1 racemate, but it is not known whether its two single enantiomers behave differently, as is the case towards COX-2 for the parent flurbiprofen enantiomers. Further, the effects of the compound upon COX-2-derived lipids in intact cells are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings COX inhibition was determined using an oxygraphic method with arachidonic acid and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) as substrates. FAAH was assayed in mouse brain homogenates using anandamide (AEA) as substrate. Lipidomic analysis was conducted in unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Both enantiomers inhibited COX-2 in a substrate-selective and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values in the absence of a preincubation phase of: (R)-Flu-AM1, COX-1 (arachidonic acid) 6 μM; COX-2 (arachidonic acid) 20 μM; COX-2 (2-AG) 1 μM; (S)-Flu-AM1, COX-1 (arachidonic acid) 3 μM; COX-2 (arachidonic acid) 10 μM; COX-2 (2-AG) 0.7 μM. The compounds showed no enantiomeric selectivity in their FAAH inhibitory properties. (R)-Flu-AM1 (10 μM) greatly inhibited the production of prostaglandin D2 and E2 in both unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Levels of 2-AG were not affected either by (R)-Flu-AM1 or by 10 μM flurbiprofen, either alone or in combination with the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (1 μM). Conclusions/Significance Both enantiomers of Flu-AM1 are more potent inhibitors of 2-AG compared to arachidonic acid oxygenation by COX-2. Inhibition of COX in lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 cells is insufficient to affect 2-AG levels despite the

  11. A 2:1 co-crystal of p-nitro­benzoic acid and N,N′-bis­(pyridin-3-ylmeth­yl)ethanedi­amide: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Sabrina; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Jotani, Mukesh M.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2016-01-01

    The title 2:1 co-crystal, 2C7H5NO4·C14H14N4O2, in which the complete di­amide mol­ecule is generated by crystallographic inversion symmetry, features a three-mol­ecule aggregate sustained by hydroxyl-O—H⋯N(pyrid­yl) hydrogen bonds. The p-nitro­benzoic acid mol­ecule is non-planar, exhibiting twists of both the carb­oxy­lic acid and nitro groups, which form dihedral angles of 10.16 (9) and 4.24 (4)°, respectively, with the benzene ring. The di­amide mol­ecule has a conformation approximating to a Z shape, with the pyridyl rings lying to either side of the central, almost planar di­amide residue (r.m.s. deviation of the eight atoms being 0.025 Å), and forming dihedral angles of 77.22 (6)° with it. In the crystal, three-mol­ecule aggregates are linked into a linear supra­molecular ladder sustained by amide-N—H⋯O(nitro) hydrogen bonds and orientated along [10-4]. The ladders are connected into a double layer via pyridyl- and benzene-C—H⋯O(amide) inter­actions, which, in turn, are connected into a three-dimensional architecture via π–π stacking inter­actions between pyridyl and benzene rings [inter-centroid distance = 3.6947 (8) Å]. An evaluation of the Hirshfeld surfaces confirm the importance of inter­molecular inter­actions involving oxygen atoms as well as the π–π inter­actions. PMID:26870591

  12. A 2:1 co-crystal of p-nitro-benzoic acid and N,N'-bis-(pyridin-3-ylmeth-yl)ethanedi-amide: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sabrina; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Jotani, Mukesh M; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-01-01

    The title 2:1 co-crystal, 2C7H5NO4·C14H14N4O2, in which the complete di-amide mol-ecule is generated by crystallographic inversion symmetry, features a three-mol-ecule aggregate sustained by hydroxyl-O-H⋯N(pyrid-yl) hydrogen bonds. The p-nitro-benzoic acid mol-ecule is non-planar, exhibiting twists of both the carb-oxy-lic acid and nitro groups, which form dihedral angles of 10.16 (9) and 4.24 (4)°, respectively, with the benzene ring. The di-amide mol-ecule has a conformation approximating to a Z shape, with the pyridyl rings lying to either side of the central, almost planar di-amide residue (r.m.s. deviation of the eight atoms being 0.025 Å), and forming dihedral angles of 77.22 (6)° with it. In the crystal, three-mol-ecule aggregates are linked into a linear supra-molecular ladder sustained by amide-N-H⋯O(nitro) hydrogen bonds and orientated along [10-4]. The ladders are connected into a double layer via pyridyl- and benzene-C-H⋯O(amide) inter-actions, which, in turn, are connected into a three-dimensional architecture via π-π stacking inter-actions between pyridyl and benzene rings [inter-centroid distance = 3.6947 (8) Å]. An evaluation of the Hirshfeld surfaces confirm the importance of inter-molecular inter-actions involving oxygen atoms as well as the π-π inter-actions. PMID:26870591

  13. Barriers to rotation adjacent to double bonds. 3. The C-O barrier in formic acid, methyl formate, acetic acid, and methyl acetate. The origin of ester and amide resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, K.B.; Laidig, K.E.

    1987-09-30

    The structures of the rotamers about the C-O bonds of formic acid, methyl formate, acetic acid, and methyl acetate were calculated by using the 6-31G* basis set and complete geometrical relaxation. Large basis sets (6-311+G**) and correction for electron correlation were needed in order to obtain calculated barriers that were in good agreement with the available experimental data. The factors that control the geometry at a carbonyl group are considered, and it is shown that an analysis in terms of bond path angles leads to a direct connection with electronegativity. The nature of the interaction between an amino group and a carbonyl, as in an amide, is examined and shown not to involve charge transfer from the nitrogen to the carbonyl oxygen, but rather it involves charge transfer between carbon and nitrogen. The origin of the rotational barrier in esters and of the difference in energy between the E and Z conformers is discussed.

  14. Reversible competitive α-ketoheterocycle inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase containing additional conformational constraints in the acyl side chain: orally active, long-acting analgesics.

    PubMed

    Ezzili, Cyrine; Mileni, Mauro; McGlinchey, Nicholas; Long, Jonathan Z; Kinsey, Steven G; Hochstatter, Dustin G; Stevens, Raymond C; Lichtman, Aron H; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Bilsky, Edward J; Boger, Dale L

    2011-04-28

    A series of α-ketooxazoles containing conformational constraints in the C2 acyl side chain of 2 (OL-135) were examined as inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Only one of the two possible enantiomers displayed potent FAAH inhibition (S vs R enantiomer), and their potency is comparable or improved relative to 2, indicating that the conformational restriction in the C2 acyl side chain is achievable. A cocrystal X-ray structure of the α-ketoheterocycle 12 bound to a humanized variant of rat FAAH revealed its binding details, confirmed that the (S)-enantiomer is the bound active inhibitor, shed light on the origin of the enantiomeric selectivity, and confirmed that the catalytic Ser241 is covalently bound to the electrophilic carbonyl as a deprotonated hemiketal. Preliminary in vivo characterization of the inhibitors 12 and 14 is reported demonstrating that they raise brain anandamide levels following either intraperitoneal (ip) or oral (po) administration indicative of effective in vivo FAAH inhibition. Significantly, the oral administration of 12 caused dramatic accumulation of anandamide in the brain, with peak levels achieved between 1.5 and 3 h, and these elevations were maintained over 9 h. Additional studies of these two representative members of the series (12 and 14) in models of thermal hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain are reported, including the demonstration that 12 administered orally significantly attenuated mechanical (>6 h) and cold (>9 h) allodynia for sustained periods consistent with its long-acting effects in raising the endogenous concentration of anandamide.

  15. Arachidonoyl ethanolamide (AEA)-induced Apoptosis is Mediated by J-series Prostaglandins and is Enhanced by Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Kuc, Christian; Jenkins, Audrey; Van Dross, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The endocannabinoid arachidonoyl ethanolamide (AEA) is a potent inducer of tumor cell apoptosis however its mechanism of cytotoxicity is unclear. A previous report from our laboratory showed that AEA induced cell death in a COX-2-dependent manner and in this report our data indicate that AEA-induced apoptosis is mediated by COX-2 metabolic products of the J-series. In experiments conducted with JWF2 keratinocytes which overexpress COX-2, AEA caused a concentration-regulated increase in J-series prostaglandin production and apoptosis. Similarly, cell treatment with exogenously added J-series prostaglandins (15-deoxy, Δ12,14 PGJ2 and PGJ2) induced apoptosis. AEA-induced apoptosis was inhibited by the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine, indicating that reactive oxygen species generation was required for apoptosis. Using antagonists of cannabinoid receptor 1, cannabinoid receptor 2, or TRPV1, it was observed that cannabinoid receptor inhibition did not block AEA-mediated cell death. In contrast, an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) potentiated AEA-induced J-series PG synthesis and apoptosis. These results suggest that the metabolism of AEA to J-series PGs regulates the induction of apoptosis in cells with elevated COX-2 levels. Our data further indicate that the proapoptotic activity of AEA can be enhanced by combining it with an inhibitor of FAAH. As such, AEA may be an effective agent to eliminate tumor cells that overexpress COX-2. PMID:21432910

  16. The case for the development of novel analgesic agents targeting both fatty acid amide hydrolase and either cyclooxygenase or TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, CJ; Naidu, PS; Lichtman, A; Onnis, V

    2009-01-01

    Although the dominant approach to drug development is the design of compounds selective for a given target, compounds targeting more than one biological process may have superior efficacy, or alternatively a better safety profile than standard selective compounds. Here, this possibility has been explored with respect to the endocannabinoid system and pain. Compounds inhibiting the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), by increasing local endocannabinoid tone, produce potentially useful effects in models of inflammatory and possibly neuropathic pain. Local increases in levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide potentiate the actions of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, raising the possibility that compounds inhibiting both FAAH and cyclooxygenase can be as effective as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but with a reduced cyclooxygenase inhibitory ‘load’. An ibuprofen analogue active in models of visceral pain and with FAAH and cyclooxygenase inhibitory properties has been identified. Another approach, built in to the experimental analgesic compound N-arachidonoylserotonin, is the combination of FAAH inhibitory and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 antagonist properties. Although finding the right balance of actions upon the two targets is a key to success, it is hoped that dual-action compounds of the types illustrated in this review will prove to be useful analgesic drugs. PMID:19226258

  17. Self-reinforcement and hydrolytic degradation of amorphous lactic acid based poly(ester-amide), and of its composite with sol-gel derived fibers.

    PubMed

    Haltia, Anna-Maija; Lähteenkorva, Kimmo; Törmälä, Pertti; Helminen, Antti; Tuominen, Jukka; Seppälä, Jukka; Veittola, Sinikka; Ahvenlammi, Jarno

    2002-10-01

    The self-reinforcing and hydrolytic degradation of an amorphous poly(ester-amide) (PEA) based on lactic acid have been studied and compared with those of poly-L-lactide (PLLA). The studied PEA-rods were self-reinforced (SR) by solid-state die drawing resulting double shear strength. The hydrolytic degradation of PEA was studied during exposure to phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4 and at 37 degrees C for 18 weeks. The degradation and mechanical properties of PEA were also followed in a self-reinforced composite structure consisting of PEA and sol-gel derived SiO(2)-fibers (SGF, 8 wt %). The hydrolytic degradation of the SR-PEA-rods with and without SG-fibers was significantly faster than that of SR-PLLA-rods. The weight average molecular weight (Mw) of PEA decreased by 90% from the initial Mw during the first 6 weeks in hydrolysis, when the Mw of the PLLA decreased by 10%. PMID:15348182

  18. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Oscar; Migliore, Marco; Habrant, Damien; Armirotti, Andrea; Albani, Clara; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-06-01

    The ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to inhibit cyclooxygenase (Cox)-1 and Cox-2 underlies the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs, as well as their propensity to damage the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium. This toxic action greatly limits the use of NSAIDs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic pathologies. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades the endocannabinoid anandamide, which attenuates inflammation and promotes GI healing. Here, we describe the first class of systemically active agents that simultaneously inhibit FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 with high potency and selectivity. The class prototype 4: (ARN2508) is potent at inhibiting FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 (median inhibitory concentration: FAAH, 0.031 ± 0.002 µM; Cox-1, 0.012 ± 0.002 µM; and Cox-2, 0.43 ± 0.025 µM) but does not significantly interact with a panel of >100 off targets. After oral administration in mice, ARN2508 engages its intended targets and exerts profound therapeutic effects in models of intestinal inflammation. Unlike NSAIDs, ARN2508 causes no gastric damage and indeed protects the GI from NSAID-induced damage through a mechanism that requires FAAH inhibition. Multitarget FAAH/Cox blockade may provide a transformative approach to IBD and other pathologies in which FAAH and Cox are overactive.

  19. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic analysis of CNS-active constitutional isomers of valnoctamide and sec-butylpropylacetamide--Amide derivatives of valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Mawasi, Hafiz; Shekh-Ahmad, Tawfeeq; Finnell, Richard H; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Bialer, Meir

    2015-05-01

    Valnoctamide (VCD) and sec-butylpropylacetamide (SPD) are CNS-active closely related amide derivatives of valproic acid with unique anticonvulsant activity. This study evaluated how small chemical changes affect the pharmacodynamics (PD; anticonvulsant activity and teratogenicity) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of three constitutional isomers of SPD [sec-butylisopropylacetamide (SID) and tert-butylisopropylacetamide (TID)] and of VCD [tert-butylethylacetamide (TED)]. The anticonvulsant activity of SID, TID, and TED was comparatively evaluated in several rodent anticonvulsant models. The PK-PD relationship of SID, TID, and TED was evaluated in rats, and their teratogenicity was evaluated in a mouse strain highly susceptible to teratogen-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). sec-Butylisopropylacetamide and TID have a similar PK profile to SPD which may contribute to their similar anticonvulsant activity. tert-Butylethylacetamide had a better PK profile than VCD (and SPD); however, this did not lead to a superior anticonvulsant activity. sec-Butylisopropylacetamide and TED did not cause NTDs at doses 4-7 times higher than their anticonvulsant ED50 values. In rats, SID, TID (ip), and TED exhibited a broad spectrum of anticonvulsant activity. However, combined anticonvulsant analysis in mice and rats shows SID as the most potent compound with similar activity to that of SPD, demonstrating that substitution of the isobutyl moiety in the SPD or VCD molecule by tert-butyl as well as a propyl-to-isopropyl replacement in the SPD molecule did not majorly affect the anticonvulsant activity.

  20. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase by URB597 attenuates the anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen in the mouse elevated plus-maze test.

    PubMed

    Zaitone, Sawsan A; El-Wakeil, Ahmed F; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H

    2012-08-01

    Acetaminophen is the most widely used analgesic/antipyretic drug. It is metabolized into N-arachidonoylphenolamine (AM404), which inhibits the reuptake of anandamide. In view of the role of endocannabinoids in the effect of acetaminophen, we tested its anxiolytic-like effect by observing the behavior of mice using the elevated plus-maze test. The results indicated that acetaminophen [100 and 200 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)] exerted an anxiolytic-like effect that was represented by higher percentage open-arm time, percentage open-arm entries, and total number of head dips compared with the vehicle control (P<0.05). Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase, an enzyme involved in the cerebral metabolism of acetaminophen into AM404, using URB597 (0.07 mg/kg, i.p.), attenuated the anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen. Pretreatment with the cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonized the effect of acetaminophen. Remarkably, the selected doses of rimonabant or URB597 did not themselves induce any anxiolytic-like effect. Furthermore, the selected doses of acetaminophen (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) did not significantly alter the locomotor activity of mice in the open-field test. In conclusion, these findings confirmed that acetaminophen shows an anxiolytic-like effect in mice that involves, at least in part, AM404-mediated accumulation of anandamide in the brain and consequent activation of cannabinoid type-1 receptors.

  1. Fear-induced suppression of nociceptive behaviour and activation of Akt signalling in the rat periaqueductal grey: role of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ryan K; Ford, Gemma K; Hogan, Michelle; Roche, Michelle; Doyle, Karen M; Kelly, John P; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria; Finn, David P

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system regulates nociception and aversion and mediates fear-conditioned analgesia (FCA). We investigated the effects of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which inhibits the catabolism of the endocannabinoid anandamide and related N-acylethanolamines, on expression of FCA and fear and pain related behaviour per se in rats. We also examined associated alterations in the expression of the signal transduction molecule phospho-Akt in the periaqueductal grey (PAG) by immunoblotting. FCA was modelled by assessing formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour in an arena previously paired with footshock. URB597 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) enhanced FCA and increased fear-related behaviour in formalin-treated rats. Conditioned fear per se in non-formalin-treated rats was associated with increased expression of phospho-Akt in the PAG. URB597 reduced the expression of fear-related behaviour in the early part of the trial, an effect that was accompanied by attenuation of the fear-induced increase in phospho-Akt expression in the PAG. Intra-plantar injection of formalin also reduced the fear-induced increase in phospho-Akt expression. These data provide evidence for a role of FAAH in FCA, fear responding in the presence or absence of nociceptive tone, and fear-evoked increases in PAG phospho-Akt expression. In addition, the results suggest that fear-evoked activation of Akt signalling in the PAG is abolished in the presence of nociceptive tone.

  2. Concerted Amidation of Activated Esters: Reaction Path and Origins of Selectivity in the Kinetic Resolution of Cyclic Amines via N-Heterocyclic Carbenes and Hydroxamic Acid Cocatalyzed Acyl Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-heterocyclic carbene and hydroxamic acid cocatalyzed kinetic resolution of cyclic amines generates enantioenriched amines and amides with selectivity factors up to 127. In this report, a quantum mechanical study of the reaction mechanism indicates that the selectivity-determining aminolysis step occurs via a novel concerted pathway in which the hydroxamic acid plays a key role in directing proton transfer from the incoming amine. This modality was found to be general in amide bond formation from a number of activated esters including those generated from HOBt and HOAt, reagents that are broadly used in peptide coupling. For the kinetic resolution, the proposed model accurately predicts the faster reacting enantiomer. A breakdown of the steric and electronic control elements shows that a gearing effect in the transition state is responsible for the observed selectivity. PMID:25050843

  3. Recognition of the folded conformation of plant hormone (auxin, IAA) conjugates with glutamic and aspartic acids and their amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolić, S.; Kveder, M.; Klaić, B.; Magnus, V.; Kojić-Prodić, B.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular structure of the endogenous plant hormone (auxin) conjugate, N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-glutamic acid, is deduced by comparison with N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)glutamine (IAA-Gln), N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)asparagine (IAA-Asn) and N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-aspartic acid using X-ray structure analysis, 1H-NMR spectroscopy (NOE measurements) and molecular modelling. The significance of the overall molecular shape, and of the resulting amphiphilic properties, of the compounds studied are discussed in terms of possible implications for trafficking between cell compartments. Both in the solid state and in solution, the molecules are in the hair-pin (folded) conformation in which the side chain is folded over the indole ring. While extended conformations can be detected by molecular dynamics simulations, they are so short-lived that any major influence on the biological properties of the compounds studied is unlikely.

  4. Ecological effects of acid precipitation on primary producers

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, H.L.; Hendrey, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    Non-acidic, oligotrophic lakes are typically dominated by golden-brown algae, diatoms and green algae. With increasing acidity, the number of species decrease and the species composition changes to dinoflagellates and golden-brown algae, with blue-green algae dominating in some cases. For macrophytic plants, dense stands of Sphagnum and Utricularia are found in some acidic lakes which may reduce nutrient availability and benthic regeneration. Hydrogen ion concentration does not appear to be as important as inorganic phosphorus in controlling primary production and biomass in acidic lakes. In acidic, oligotrophic lakes, benthic plants may have a competitive advantage over pelagic algae because of the high concentrations of inorganic carbon and phosphorus available to them in the sediment.

  5. Poly(ester amide)s from Soybean Oil for Modulated Release and Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Janeni; Dasgupta, Queeny; Shetty, Shreya N; Sarkar, Kishor; Madras, Giridhar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-09-28

    Designing biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration that are also capable of eluting drugs is challenging. Poly(ester amide)s are known for their commendable mechanical properties, degradation, and cellular response. In this regard, development of new poly(ester amide)s becomes imperative to improve the quality of lives of people affected by bone disorders. In this framework, a family of novel soybean oil based biodegradable poly(ester amide)s was synthesized based on facile catalyst-free melt-condensation reaction. The structure of the polymers was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H -NMR, which indicated the formation of the ester and amide bonds along the polymer backbone. Thermal analysis revealed the amorphous nature of the polymers. Contact angle and swelling studies proved that the hydrophobic nature increased with increase in chain length of the diacids and decreased with increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. Mechanical studies proved that Young's modulus decreased with decrease in chain lengths of the diacids and increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. The in vitro hydrolytic degradation and dye release demonstrated that the degradation and release decreased with increase in chain lengths of the diacids and increased with increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. The degradation followed first order kinetics and dye release followed Higuchi kinetics. In vitro cell studies showed no toxic effects of the polymers. Osteogenesis studies revealed that the polymers can be remarkably efficient because more than twice the amount of minerals were deposited on the polymer surfaces than on the tissue culture polystyrene surfaces. Thus, a family of novel poly(ester amide)s has been synthesized, characterized for controlled release and tissue engineering applications wherein the physical, degradation, and release kinetics can be tuned by varying the monomers and their molar ratios. PMID:27599306

  6. A 2:1 co-crystal of 2-methyl­benzoic acid and N,N′-bis­(pyridin-4-ylmeth­yl)ethanedi­amide: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Sabrina; Jotani, Mukesh M.; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title 2:1 co-crystal, 2C8H8O2·C14H14N4O2, comprises an acid mol­ecule in a general position and half a di­amide mol­ecule, the latter being located about a centre of inversion. In the acid, the carb­oxy­lic acid group is twisted out of the plane of the benzene ring to which it is attached [dihedral angle = 28.51 (8)°] and the carbonyl O atom and methyl group lie approximately to the same side of the mol­ecule [hy­droxy-O—C—C—C(H) torsion angle = −27.92 (17)°]. In the di­amide, the central C4N2O2 core is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.031 Å), and the pyridyl rings are perpendicular, lying to either side of the central plane [central residue/pyridyl dihedral angle = 88.60 (5)°]. In the mol­ecular packing, three-mol­ecule aggregates are formed via hy­droxy-O—H⋯N(pyrid­yl) hydrogen bonds. These are connected into a supra­molecular layer parallel to (12) via amide-N—H⋯O(carbon­yl) hydrogen bonds, as well as methyl­ene-C—H⋯O(amide) inter­actions. Significant π–π inter­actions occur between benzene/benzene, pyrid­yl/benzene and pyrid­yl/pyridyl rings within and between layers to consolidate the three-dimensional packing. PMID:27006815

  7. A 2:1 co-crystal of 2-methyl-benzoic acid and N,N'-bis-(pyridin-4-ylmeth-yl)ethanedi-amide: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sabrina; Jotani, Mukesh M; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-03-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title 2:1 co-crystal, 2C8H8O2·C14H14N4O2, comprises an acid mol-ecule in a general position and half a di-amide mol-ecule, the latter being located about a centre of inversion. In the acid, the carb-oxy-lic acid group is twisted out of the plane of the benzene ring to which it is attached [dihedral angle = 28.51 (8)°] and the carbonyl O atom and methyl group lie approximately to the same side of the mol-ecule [hy-droxy-O-C-C-C(H) torsion angle = -27.92 (17)°]. In the di-amide, the central C4N2O2 core is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.031 Å), and the pyridyl rings are perpendicular, lying to either side of the central plane [central residue/pyridyl dihedral angle = 88.60 (5)°]. In the mol-ecular packing, three-mol-ecule aggregates are formed via hy-droxy-O-H⋯N(pyrid-yl) hydrogen bonds. These are connected into a supra-molecular layer parallel to (12[Formula: see text]) via amide-N-H⋯O(carbon-yl) hydrogen bonds, as well as methyl-ene-C-H⋯O(amide) inter-actions. Significant π-π inter-actions occur between benzene/benzene, pyrid-yl/benzene and pyrid-yl/pyridyl rings within and between layers to consolidate the three-dimensional packing. PMID:27006815

  8. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Amidation of Unactivated Alkyl Bromides.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Eloisa; Martin, Ruben

    2016-09-01

    A user-friendly, nickel-catalyzed reductive amidation of unactivated primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl bromides with isocyanates is described. This catalytic strategy offers an efficient synthesis of a wide range of aliphatic amides under mild conditions and with an excellent chemoselectivity profile while avoiding the use of stoichiometric and sensitive organometallic reagents. PMID:27357076

  9. Fuel additives from SO/sub 2/ treated mixtures of amides and esters derived from vegetable oil, tall oil acid, or aralkyl acid

    SciTech Connect

    Efner, H. F.; Schiff, S.

    1985-03-12

    Vegetable oils, particularly soybean oil, tall oil acid, or aralkyl acids, particularly phenylstearic acid, are reacted with multiamines, particularly tetraethylenepentamine, to form a product mixture for subsequent reaction with SO/sub 2/ to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels.

  10. [Is ursodeoxycholic acid effective in primary biliary cirrhosis?].

    PubMed

    Rada, Gabriel; Mac-Namara, Macarena

    2014-09-24

    Ursodeoxycholic acid is considered as first line treatment in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Its mechanism of action in this disease is unknown and there is controversy about its clinical impact. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 19 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 16 studies. We combined the evidence using tables with summary of findings following the GRADE approach and concluded ursodeoxycholic acid may not have any effect on pruritus, and there is uncertainty about its effect on mortality, need for liver transplantation or on any other important outcome for the patient.

  11. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  12. Antidepressant-like activity and cardioprotective effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB694 in socially stressed Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, Luca; Vacondio, Federica; Rossi, Stefano; Callegari, Sergio; Macchi, Emilio; Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    In humans, depression is often triggered by prolonged exposure to psychosocial stressors and is often associated with cardiovascular comorbidity. Mounting evidence suggests a role for endocannabinoid signaling in the regulation of both emotional behavior and cardiovascular function. Here, we examined cardiac activity in a rodent model of social stress-induced depression and investigated whether pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which terminates signaling of the endocannabinoid anandamide, exerts antidepressant-like and cardioprotective effects. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were exposed to five weeks of repeated social stress or control procedure. Starting from the third week, they received daily administration of the selective FAAH inhibitor URB694 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle. Cardiac electrical activity was recorded by radiotelemetry. Repeated social stress triggered biological and behavioral changes that mirror symptoms of human depression, such as (i) reductions in body weight gain and sucrose solution preference, (ii) hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and (iii) increased immobility in the forced swim test. Moreover, stressed rats showed (i) alterations in heart rate daily rhythm and cardiac autonomic neural regulation, (ii) a larger incidence of spontaneous arrhythmias, and (iii) signs of cardiac hypertrophy. Daily treatment with URB694 (i) increased central and peripheral anandamide levels, (ii) corrected stress-induced alterations of biological and behavioral parameters, and (iii) protected the heart against the adverse effects of social stress. Repeated social stress in Wistar Kyoto rats reproduces aspects of human depression/cardiovascular comorbidity. Pharmacological enhancement of anandamide signaling might be a promising strategy for the treatment of these comorbid conditions.

  13. A multi-target approach for pain treatment: dual inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and TRPV1 in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Malek, Natalia; Mrugala, Monika; Makuch, Wioletta; Kolosowska, Natalia; Przewlocka, Barbara; Binkowski, Marcin; Czaja, Martyna; Morera, Enrico; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) attenuates pain in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) but has failed in clinical trials. This may have occurred because AEA also activates transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), which contributes to pain development. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of the dual FAAH-TRPV1 blocker OMDM-198 in an MIA-model of osteoarthritic pain. We first investigated the MIA-induced model of OA by (1) characterizing the pain phenotype and degenerative changes within the joint using X-ray microtomography and (2) evaluating nerve injury and inflammation marker (ATF-3 and IL-6) expression in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia of osteoarthritic rats and differences in gene and protein expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptors FAAH and TRPV1. Furthermore, we compared OMDM-198 with compounds acting exclusively on FAAH or TRPV1. Osteoarthritis was accompanied by the fragmentation of bone microstructure and destroyed cartilage. An increase of the mRNA levels of ATF3 and IL-6 and an upregulation of AEA receptors and FAAH in the dorsal root ganglia were observed. OMDM-198 showed antihyperalgesic effects in the OA model, which were comparable with those of a selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB-366,791, and a selective FAAH inhibitor, URB-597. The effect of OMDM-198 was attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM-251, and by the nonpungent TRPV1 agonist, olvanil, suggesting its action as an "indirect" CB1 agonist and TRPV1 antagonist. These results suggest an innovative strategy for the treatment of OA, which may yield more satisfactory results than those obtained so far with selective FAAH inhibitors in human OA.

  14. Pharmacological blockade of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) alters neural proliferation, apoptosis and gliosis in the rat hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum in a negative energy context

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Patricia; Bindila, Laura; Pastor, Antoni; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; de la Torre, Rafael; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids participate in the control of neurogenesis, neural cell death and gliosis. The pharmacological effect of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which limits the endocannabinoid degradation, was investigated in the present study. Cell proliferation (phospho-H3+ or BrdU+ cells) of the main adult neurogenic zones as well as apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3+), astroglia (GFAP+), and microglia (Iba1+ cells) were analyzed in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum of rats intraperitoneally treated with URB597 (0.3 mg/kg/day) at one dose/4-days resting or 5 doses (1 dose/day). Repeated URB597 treatment increased the plasma levels of the N-acylethanolamines oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide and arachidonoylethanolamine, reduced the plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, and induced a transitory body weight decrease. The hippocampi of repeated URB597-treated rats showed a reduced number of phospho-H3+ and BrdU+ subgranular cells as well as GFAP+, Iba1+ and cleaved caspase-3+ cells, which was accompanied with decreased hippocampal expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene Cnr1 and Faah. In the hypothalami of these rats, the number of phospho-H3+, GFAP+ and 3-weeks-old BrdU+ cells was specifically decreased. The reduced striatal expression of CB1 receptor in repeated URB597-treated rats was only associated with a reduced apoptosis. In contrast, the striatum of acute URB597-treated rats showed an increased number of subventricular proliferative, astroglial and apoptotic cells, which was accompanied with increased Faah expression. Main results indicated that FAAH inhibitor URB597 decreased neural proliferation, glia and apoptosis in a brain region-dependent manner, which were coupled to local changes in Faah and/or Cnr1 expression and a negative energy context. PMID:25870539

  15. Influence of the degree of unsaturation of the acyl side chain upon the interaction of analogues of 1-arachidonoylglycerol with monoacylglycerol lipase and fatty acid amide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Vandevoorde, Severine; Saha, Bijali; Mahadevan, Anu; Razdan, Raj K.; Pertwee, Roger G.; Martin, Billy R.; Fowler, Christopher J. . E-mail: cf@pharm.umu.se

    2005-11-11

    Little is known as to the structural requirements of the acyl side chain for interaction of acylglycerols with monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the enzyme chiefly responsible for the metabolism of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the brain. In the present study, a series of twelve analogues of 1-AG (the more stable regioisomer of 2-AG) were investigated with respect to their ability to inhibit the metabolism of 2-oleoylglycerol by cytosolic and membrane-bound MAGL. In addition, the ability of the compounds to inhibit the hydrolysis of anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) was investigated. For cytosolic MAGL, compounds with 20 carbon atoms in the acyl chain and 2-5 unsaturated bonds inhibited the hydrolysis of 2-oleoylglycerol with similar potencies (IC{sub 50} values in the range 5.1-8.2 {mu}M), whereas the two compounds with a single unsaturated bond were less potent (IC{sub 50} values 19 and 21 {mu}M). The fully saturated analogue 1-monoarachidin did not inhibit the enzyme, whereas the lower side chain analogues 1-monopalmitin and 1-monomyristin inhibited the enzyme with IC{sub 50} values of 12 and 32 {mu}M, respectively. The 22-carbon chain analogue of 1-AG was also potent (IC{sub 50} value 4.5 {mu}M). Introduction of an {alpha}-methyl group for the C20:4, C20:3, and C22:4 compounds did not affect potency in a consistent manner. For the FAAH and the membrane-bound MAGL, there was no obvious relationship between the degree of unsaturation of the acyl side chain and the ability to inhibit the enzymes. It is concluded that increasing the number of unsaturated bonds on the acyl side chain of 1-AG from 1 to 5 has little effect on the affinity of acylglycerols for cytosolic MAGL.

  16. Involvement of endocannabinoids in alcohol “binge” drinking: studies of mice with human fatty acid amide hydrolase genetic variation and after CB1 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Huang, Ted; Lee, Francis; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has been found to play an important role in modulating alcohol intake. Inhibition or genetic deletion of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, a key catabolic enzyme for endocannabinoids) leads to increased alcohol consumption and preference in rodent models. A common human single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; C385A, rs324420) in the FAAH gene is associated with decreased enzymatic activity of FAAH, resulting in increased anandamide levels in both humans and FAAH C385A knock-in mice. Methods As this FAAH SNP has been reported to be associated with altered alcohol abuse, the present study used these genetic knock-in mice containing the human SNP C385A to determine the impact of variant FAAH gene on alcohol “binge” drinking in the drinking-in-the-dark (DID) model. Results We found that the FAAHA/A mice had greater alcohol intake and preference than the wild-type FAAHC/C mice, suggesting that increased endocannabinoid signaling in FAAHA/A mice led to increased alcohol “binge” consumption. The specificity on alcohol vulnerability was suggested by the lack of any FAAH genotype difference on sucrose or saccharin intake. Using the “binge” DID model, we confirmed that selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 reduced alcohol intake in the wild-type mice. Conclusions These data suggest that there is direct and selective involvement of the human FAAH C385A SNP and CB1 receptors in alcohol “binge” drinking. PMID:26857901

  17. Antidepressant-like activity and cardioprotective effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB694 in socially stressed Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, Luca; Vacondio, Federica; Rossi, Stefano; Callegari, Sergio; Macchi, Emilio; Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    In humans, depression is often triggered by prolonged exposure to psychosocial stressors and is often associated with cardiovascular comorbidity. Mounting evidence suggests a role for endocannabinoid signaling in the regulation of both emotional behavior and cardiovascular function. Here, we examined cardiac activity in a rodent model of social stress-induced depression and investigated whether pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which terminates signaling of the endocannabinoid anandamide, exerts antidepressant-like and cardioprotective effects. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were exposed to five weeks of repeated social stress or control procedure. Starting from the third week, they received daily administration of the selective FAAH inhibitor URB694 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle. Cardiac electrical activity was recorded by radiotelemetry. Repeated social stress triggered biological and behavioral changes that mirror symptoms of human depression, such as (i) reductions in body weight gain and sucrose solution preference, (ii) hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and (iii) increased immobility in the forced swim test. Moreover, stressed rats showed (i) alterations in heart rate daily rhythm and cardiac autonomic neural regulation, (ii) a larger incidence of spontaneous arrhythmias, and (iii) signs of cardiac hypertrophy. Daily treatment with URB694 (i) increased central and peripheral anandamide levels, (ii) corrected stress-induced alterations of biological and behavioral parameters, and (iii) protected the heart against the adverse effects of social stress. Repeated social stress in Wistar Kyoto rats reproduces aspects of human depression/cardiovascular comorbidity. Pharmacological enhancement of anandamide signaling might be a promising strategy for the treatment of these comorbid conditions. PMID:26391492

  18. Assessing the Risk That Phytophthora melonis Can Develop a Point Mutation (V1109L) in CesA3 Conferring Resistance to Carboxylic Acid Amide Fungicides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zhu, Shusheng; Lu, Xiaohong; Pang, Zhili; Cai, Meng; Liu, Xili

    2012-01-01

    The risk that the plant pathogen Phytophthora melonis develops resistance to carboxylic acid amide (CAA) fungicides was determined by measuring baseline sensitivities of field isolates, generating resistant mutants, and measuring the fitness of the resistant mutants. The baseline sensitivities of 80 isolates to flumorph, dimethomorph and iprovalicarb were described by unimodal curves, with mean EC50 values of 0.986 (±0.245), 0.284 (±0.060) and 0.327 (±0.068) µg/ml, respectively. Seven isolates with different genetic background (as indicated by RAPD markers) were selected to generate CAA-resistance. Fifty-five resistant mutants were obtained from three out of seven isolates by spontaneous selection and UV-mutagenesis with frequencies of 1×10−7 and 1×10−6, respectively. CAA-resistance was stable for all mutants. The resistance factors of these mutants ranged from 7 to 601. The compound fitness index (CFI  =  mycelial growth × zoospore production × pathogenicity) was often lower for the CAA-resistant isolates than for wild-type isolates, suggesting that the risk of P. melonis developing resistance to CAA fungicides is low to moderate. Among the CAA-resistant isolates, a negative correlation between EC50 values was found for iprovalicarb vs. flumorph and for iprovalicarb vs. dimethomorph. Comparison of the full-length cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) between wild-type and CAA-resistant isolates revealed only one point mutation at codon position 1109: a valine residue (codon GTG in wild-type isolates) was converted to leucine (codon CTG in resistant mutants). This represents a novel point mutation with respect to mutations in CesA3 conferring resistance to CAA fungicides. Based on this mutation, an efficient allelic-specific PCR (AS-PCR) method was developed for rapid detection of CAA-resistance in P. melonis populations. PMID:22848705

  19. Benzoisothiazolone Organo/Copper-Cocatalyzed Redox Dehydrative Construction of Amides and Peptides from Carboxylic Acids using (EtO)3P as the Reductant and O2 in Air as the Terminal Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, Lanny S; Gangireddy, Pavankumar; Lindale, Matthew G

    2016-06-01

    Carboxylic acids and amine/amino acid reactants can be converted to amides and peptides at neutral pH within 5-36 h at 50 °C using catalytic quantities of a redox-active benzoisothiazolone and a copper complex. These catalytic "oxidation-reduction condensation" reactions are carried out open to dry air using O2 as the terminal oxidant and a slight excess of triethyl phosphite as the reductant. Triethyl phosphate is the easily removed byproduct. These simple-to-run catalytic reactions provide practical and economical procedures for the acylative construction of C-N bonds. PMID:27175892

  20. Plasma Concentrations of Endocannabinoids and Related Primary Fatty Acid Amides in Patients with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; Gola, Hannah; Campolongo, Patrizia; Morath, Julia; Roozendaal, Benno; Hamuni, Gilava; Karabatsiakis, Alexander; Atsak, Piray; Vogeser, Michael; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Background Endocannabinoids (ECs) and related N-acyl-ethanolamides (NAEs) play important roles in stress response regulation, anxiety and traumatic memories. In view of the evidence that circulating EC levels are elevated under acute mild stressful conditions in humans, we hypothesized that individuals with traumatic stress exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an anxiety disorder characterized by the inappropriate persistence and uncontrolled retrieval of traumatic memories, show measurable alterations in plasma EC and NAE concentrations. Methods We determined plasma concentrations of the ECs anandamide (ANA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and the NAEs palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), oleoylethanolamide (OEA), stearoylethanolamine (SEA), and N-oleoyldopamine (OLDA) by HPLC-MS-MS in patients with PTSD (n = 10), trauma-exposed individuals without evidence of PTSD (n = 9) and in healthy control subjects (n = 29). PTSD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria by administering the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), which also assesses traumatic events. Results Individuals with PTSD showed significantly higher plasma concentrations of ANA (0.48±0.11 vs. 0.36±0.14 ng/ml, p = 0.01), 2-AG (8.93±3.20 vs. 6.26±2.10 ng/ml, p<0.01), OEA (5.90±2.10 vs. 3.88±1.85 ng/ml, p<0.01), SEA (2.70±3.37 vs. 0.83±0.47, ng/ml, p<0.05) and significantly lower plasma levels of OLDA (0.12±0.05 vs. 0.45±0.59 ng/ml, p<0.05) than healthy controls. Moreover, PTSD patients had higher 2-AG plasma levels (8.93±3.20 vs. 6.01±1.32 ng/ml, p = 0.03) and also higher plasma concentrations of PEA (4.06±1.87 vs. 2.63±1.34 ng/ml, p<0.05) than trauma-exposed individuals without evidence of PTSD. CAPS scores in trauma-exposed individuals with and without PTSD (n = 19) correlated positively with PEA (r = 0.55, p = 0.02) and negatively with OLDA plasma levels (r = −0.68, p<0.01). CAPS subscores for intrusions (r = −0.65, p<0.01), avoidance (r = −0.60, p<0.01) and hyperarousal (r = −0.66, p<0.01) were all negatively related to OLDA plasma concentrations. Conclusions PTSD appears to be associated with changes in plasma EC/NAE concentrations. This may have pathophysiological and diagnostic consequences but will need to be reproduced in larger cohorts. PMID:23667516

  1. Incorporation of hydrogen atoms from deuterated water and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled nicotin amide nucleotides into fatty acids with the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthetase system.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S; Seyama, Y; Yamakawa, T

    1980-05-28

    The mechanism of hydrogen incorporation into fatty acids was investigated with intact Escherichia coli cells, a crude enzyme preparation and purified reductases of fatty acid synthetase system. The distributions of deuterium atoms incorporated into fatty acids from 2H2O and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled NADPH or NADH were determined by mass spectrometry. When E. coli was grown in 2H2O, almost every hydrogen atom of cellular fatty acids was incorporated from the medium. When fatty acids were synthesized from acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and NADPH in the presence of a crude enzyme preparation of either E. coli or Bacillus subtilis, almost every hydrogen atom was also incorporated from the medium. In contrast to these results, purified beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier reductase directly transferred the HB hydrogen of NADPH to beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein, and purified enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase also transferred the HB hydrogen of NADPH and NADH directly to enoyl acyl carrier protein. In the crude enzyme preparation of E. coli, we found high activities which exchanged the HB hydrogen of NADPH with the deuterium of 2h2o. the conflicting results of the origin of hydrogen atoms of fatty acids mentioned above are explained by the presence of enzymes, which catalyzed the rapid exchange of NADPH with the deterium of 2H2O prior to the reaction of fatty acid synthetase. PMID:6990992

  2. Strong Bonds Made Weak: Towards the General Utility of Amides as Synthetic Modules.

    PubMed

    Ruider, Stefan A; Maulide, Nuno

    2015-11-16

    Breaking good: The amide bond is widely recognized as the strongest bond among the carboxylic acid derivatives. Therefore, the potential of amides to serve as synthetic building blocks has remained mostly untapped thus far. This Highlight describes a recent breakthrough that enables the catalytic conversion of amides into esters for the first time. PMID:26460213

  3. Enzymes utilizing glutamine as an amide donor.

    PubMed

    Zalkin, H; Smith, J L

    1998-01-01

    Amide nitrogen from glutamine is a major source of nitrogen atoms incorporated biosynthetically into other amino acids, purine and pyrimidine bases, amino-sugars, and coenzymes. A family comprised of at least sixteen amidotransferases are known to catalyze amide nitrogen transfer from glutamine to their acceptor substrates. Recent fine structural advances, largely as a result of X-ray crystallography, now provide structure-based mechanisms that help to explain fundamental aspects of the catalytic and regulatory interactions of several of these aminotransferases. This chapter provides an overview of this recent progress made on the characterization of amidotransferase structure and mechanism. PMID:9559052

  4. Conformation-Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of the Amino Acid Glutamine: Amide-Stacking and Hydrogen Bonding in AN Important Residue in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Dean, Jacob C.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease (HD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). An intriguing aspect of the structure of glutamine is its incorporation of an amide group in its side chain, thereby opening up the possibility of forming amide-amide H-bonds between the peptide backbone and side chain. In this study the conformational preferences of two capped gluatamines Z(carboxybenzyl)-Glutamine-X (X=OH, NHMe) are studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase in order to unlock the intrinsic structural motifs that are favored by this flexible sidechain. Conformational assignments are made by comparing the hydride stretch ( 3100-3700 cm-1) and amide I and II ( 1400-1800 cm-1) resonant ion-dip infrared spectra with predictions from harmonic frequency calculations. Assigned structures will be compared to previously published results on both natural and unnatural residues. Particular emphasis will be placed on the comparison between glutamine and unconstrained γ-peptides due to the similar three-carbon spacing between backbone and side chain in glutamine to the backbone spacing in γ-peptides. The ability of the glutamine side-chain to form amide stacked conformations will be a main focus, along with the prevalence of extended backbone type structures. W. H. James, III, C W. Müller, E. G. Buchanan, M. G. D. Nix, L. Guo, L. Roskop, M. S. Gordon, L. V. Slipchenko, S. H. Gellman, and T. S. Zwier, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131(40), 14243-14245.

  5. The blockade of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 and fatty acid amide hydrolase decreases symptoms and central sequelae in the medial prefrontal cortex of neuropathic rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain is a chronic disease resulting from dysfunction within the "pain matrix". The basolateral amygdala (BLA) can modulate cortical functions and interactions between this structure and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are important for integrating emotionally salient information. In this study, we have investigated the involvement of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and the catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the morphofunctional changes occurring in the pre-limbic/infra-limbic (PL/IL) cortex in neuropathic rats. Results The effect of N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT), a hybrid FAAH inhibitor and TPRV1 channel antagonist, was tested on nociceptive behaviour associated with neuropathic pain as well as on some phenotypic changes occurring on PL/IL cortex pyramidal neurons. Those neurons were identified as belonging to the BLA-mPFC pathway by electrical stimulation of the BLA followed by hind-paw pressoceptive stimulus application. Changes in their spontaneous and evoked activity were studied in sham or spared nerve injury (SNI) rats before or after repeated treatment with AA-5-HT. Consistently with the SNI-induced changes in PL/IL cortex neurons which underwent profound phenotypic reorganization, suggesting a profound imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory responses in the mPFC neurons, we found an increase in extracellular glutamate levels, as well as the up-regulation of FAAH and TRPV1 in the PL/IL cortex of SNI rats. Daily treatment with AA-5-HT restored cortical neuronal activity, normalizing the electrophysiological changes associated with the peripheral injury of the sciatic nerve. Finally, a single acute intra-PL/IL cortex microinjection of AA-5-HT transiently decreased allodynia more effectively than URB597 or I-RTX, a selective FAAH inhibitor or a TRPV1 blocker, respectively. Conclusion These data suggest a possible involvement of endovanilloids in the cortical plastic changes

  6. Ultrasound-assisted direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols catalyzed by graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Mirza-Aghayan, Maryam; Ganjbakhsh, Nahid; Molaee Tavana, Mahdieh; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound irradiation was successfully applied for the direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols with amines into the corresponding amides using graphite oxide (GO) as an oxidative and reusable solid acid catalyst in acetonitrile as solvent at 50°C under air atmosphere. The direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols takes place under mild conditions yielding the corresponding amides in good to high yields (69-95%) and short reaction times under metal-free conditions.

  7. Ultrasound-assisted direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols catalyzed by graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Mirza-Aghayan, Maryam; Ganjbakhsh, Nahid; Molaee Tavana, Mahdieh; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound irradiation was successfully applied for the direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols with amines into the corresponding amides using graphite oxide (GO) as an oxidative and reusable solid acid catalyst in acetonitrile as solvent at 50°C under air atmosphere. The direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols takes place under mild conditions yielding the corresponding amides in good to high yields (69-95%) and short reaction times under metal-free conditions. PMID:27150743

  8. [Folic acid: Primary prevention of neural tube defects. Literature Review].

    PubMed

    Llamas Centeno, M J; Miguélez Lago, C

    2016-03-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are the most common congenital malformations of the nervous system, they have a multifactorial etiology, are caused by exposure to chemical, physical or biological toxic agents, factors deficiency, diabetes, obesity, hyperthermia, genetic alterations and unknown causes. Some of these factors are associated with malnutrition by interfering with the folic acid metabolic pathway, the vitamin responsible for neural tube closure. Its deficit produce anomalies that can cause abortions, stillbirths or newborn serious injuries that cause disability, impaired quality of life and require expensive treatments to try to alleviate in some way the alterations produced in the embryo. Folic acid deficiency is considered the ultimate cause of the production of neural tube defects, it is clear the reduction in the incidence of Espina Bifida after administration of folic acid before conception, this leads us to want to further study the action of folic acid and its application in the primary prevention of neural tube defects. More than 40 countries have made the fortification of flour with folate, achieving encouraging data of decrease in the prevalence of neural tube defects. This paper attempts to make a literature review, which clarify the current situation and future of the prevention of neural tube defects.

  9. A New Derivative of Valproic Acid Amide Possesses a Broad-spectrum Antiseizure Profile and Unique Activity Against Status Epilepticus and Organophosphate Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    White, H. Steve; Alex, Anitha B.; Pollock, Amanda; Hen, Naama; Shekh-Ahmad, Tawfeeq; Wilcox, Karen S.; McDonough, John H.; Stables, James P.; Kaufmann, Dan; Yagen, Boris; Bialer, Meir

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose sec-Butyl-propylacetamide (SPD) is a one-carbon homologue of valnoctamide (VCD), a CNS-active amide derivative of valproic acid (VPA) currently in phase II clinical trials. The current study evaluated the anticonvulsant activity of SPD in a battery of rodent seizure and epilepsy models and assessed its efficacy in rat and guinea pig models of status epilepticus (SE) and neuroprotection in an organotypic hippocampal slice model of excitotoxic cell death. Methods SPD’s anticonvulsant activity was evaluated in several rodent seizure and epilepsy models including: maximal electroshock (MES), 6Hz psychomotor, subcutaneous (s.c.) metrazol-, s.c., picrotoxin, s.c. bicuculline, audiogenic and corneal and hippocampal kindled seizures following intraperitoneal administration. Results obtained with SPD are discussed in relationship to those obtained with VPA and VCD. SPD was also evaluated for its ability to block benzodiazepine-resistant SE induced by pilocarpine (rats) and soman (rats and guinea pigs) following intraperitoneal administration. SPD was tested for its ability to block excitotoxic cell death induced by the glutamate agonists N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid (KA) using organotypic hippocampal slices and SE-induced hippocampal cell death using FluoroJade B staining. The cognitive function of SPD-treated rats that were protected against pilocarpine-induced convulsive SE was examined 10-14 days post SE using the Morris water maze (MWM). The relationship between the pharmacokinetic profile of SPD and its efficacy against soman-induced SE was evaluated in two parallel studies following SPD (60 mg/kg, i.p.) administration in the soman SE rat model. Key Findings SPD was highly effective and displayed a wide protective index (PI=TD50/ED50) in the standardized seizure and epilepsy models employed. SPD’s wide PI values demonstrate that it is effective at doses well below those that produce behavioral impairment. Unlike VCD, SPD also

  10. Cathode catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Alkylation or carbon Vulcan XC-72, the support carbon, was shown to provide the most stable bond type for linking cobalt dehydrodibenzo tetraazannulene (CoTAA) to the surface of the carbon; this result is based on data obtained by cyclic voltammetry, pulse voltammetry and by release of 14C from bonded CoTAA. Half-cell tests at 100 C in 85% phosphoric acid showed that CoTAA bonded to the surface of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) via an alkylation procedure is a more active catalyst than is platinum based on a factor of two improvement in Tafel slope; dimeric CoTAA had catalytic activity equal to platinum. Half-cell tests also showed that bonded CoTAA catalysts do not suffer a loss in potential when air is used as a fuel rather than oxygen. Commercially available polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) was shown to be unstable in the fuel cell environment with degradation occurring in 2000 hours or less. The PTFE was stressed at 200 C in concentrated phosphoric acid as well as electrochemically stressed in 150 C concentrated phosphoric acid; the surface chemistry of PTFE was observed to change significantly. Radiolabeled PTFE was prepared and used to verify that such chemical changes also occur in the primary fuel cell environment.

  11. Prolonged treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Crippa, G; Cagnoni, C; Castelli, A; Concesi, C; Girometta, S; Pancotti, D; Sverzellati, E; Tacchini, G; Pierfranceschi, M G; Carrara, G C

    1995-05-01

    Eighteen patients affected with biopsy-proved primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) (histological stage III and IV) received ursodeoxicholic acid (UDCA) 600 mg for 1 year. Signs and symptoms and biochemical tests (glutamic and oxalcetic transaminase, glutamic and pyruvic transaminase, bilirubine, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase, bile acids, plasma proteins electrophoresis, immunoglubulins A, G and M) and antimitochondrial antibodies were evaluated before the treatment and every four months during the treatment. The results were compared with those obtained in 8 untreated patients affected PBC. The control group of patients were comparable (as far as age, histological stage, biochemical tests are concerned) to the group who received UDCA. Bilirubine, ALP, gamma-GT and LAP decreased during the treatment with UDCA and remained lower than baseline values until the end of the observation (12 months), while no changes occurred in the untreated patients. Both in the treated and untreated group plasma protein electrophoresis, serum immunoglubulins A, G and M remained unchanged, as well as anti-mitochondrial antibody. A moderate reduction of transaminases and bile acids was observed in the group of patients receiving UDCA but it did not reach statistical significance. In 16 out of the 18 treated patients pruritus disappeared and resulted diminished in the remaining 2 patients. No significant amelioration of pruritus was observed in the patients who did not receive UDCA. In conclusion, our data show that prolonged treatment with UDCA drastically reduces pruritus and improves cholestasis biochemical tests in patients affected with symptomatic PBC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Folic acid and primary prevention of birth defects.

    PubMed

    Taruscio, Domenica; Carbone, Pietro; Granata, Orietta; Baldi, Francesca; Mantovani, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Birth defects (BDs) are an important public health problem, due to their overall incidence, occurring in 2-3% of live births in European Union. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among major NTDs, due to their severity and relatively high incidence; in the meanwhile NTDs are also the most effectively preventable BDs to date. In particular, an adequate folic acid (FA) intake reduces both the occurrence and the recurrence of NTDs; FA is the synthetic form of folates, naturally occurring vitamins in a number of foods, especially vegetables. The daily intake of 0.4 mg of FA should be recommended to all women of childbearing age who plan to become pregnant. The Italian Network for Primary Prevention of BDs through FA Promotion has achieved a significant improvement in FA awareness and use in the periconceptional period. Nevertheless, primary prevention of BDs needs to make further progress; the Italian National Centre for Rare Diseases participates in european sureveillance of congenital anomalies (EUROCAT) Joint Action as coordinator of activities on the effectiveness of BDs prevention. Mandatory food fortification with FA has not been introduced in any European country. The health benefits of FA in reducing the risk of NTDs are undisputed; however mechanistic and animal studies suggest a relationship between high FA intakes and increased cancer promotion, while human studies are still inconsistent and inconclusive. A Working Group organized by the European Food Safety Authority pointed out significant uncertainties about fortification safety and the need for more studies; currently, FA intake from fortified foods and supplements should not exceed 1 mg/day in adults. In conclusion, based on up-to-date scientific evidence, the Italian Network strategy pivots on periconceptional supplementation integrated with promotion of healthy eating habits, support to health education, enhancing the role of women in managing life choices about their health and pregnancy and increasing

  13. Ferric Hydrogensulfate [Fe(HSO4)3] As a Reusable Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Synthesis of 5-Substituted-1H-Tetrazoles and Amides

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Hossein; Seyedi, Seyed Mohammad; Zarei, Elaheh Rahimi

    2011-01-01

    Ferric hydrogensulfate catalyzed the synthesis of 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles via [2 + 3] cycloaddition of nitriles and sodium azide. This method has the advantages of high yields, simple methodology, and easy workup. The catalyst can be recovered by simple filtration and reused delivering good yields. Also, ferric hydrogensulfate catalyzed the hydrolysis of nitriles to primary amides under aqueous conditions. Various aliphatic and aromatic nitriles converted to the corresponding amides in good yields without any contamination with carboxylic acids. PMID:24052817

  14. Preparation and characterization of amidated pectin based hydrogels for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mishra, R K; Datt, M; Pal, K; Banthia, A K

    2008-06-01

    In the current studies attempts were made to prepare hydrogels by chemical modification of pectin with ethanolamine (EA) in different proportions. Chemically modified pectin products were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde reagent for preparing hydrogels. The hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), organic elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction studies (XRD), swelling studies, biocompatibility and hemocompatibility studies. Mechanical properties of the prepared hydrogels were evaluated by tensile test. The hydrogels were loaded with salicylic acid (used as a model drug) and drug release studies were done in a modified Franz's diffusion cell. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of primary and secondary amide absorption bands. XRD studies indicated increase in crystallinity in the hydrogels as compared to unmodified pectin. The degree of amidation (DA) and molar and mass reaction yields (YM and YN) was calculated based on the results of organic elemental analysis. The hydrogels showed good water holding properties and were found to be compatible with B-16 melanoma cells & human blood.

  15. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. I - Six carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Gandy, W. E.; Pizzarello, S.

    1981-01-01

    Six of the seven chain isomers of six-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids (leucine isomers) have been either identified or confirmed in hot-water extracts of the Murchison meteorite using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion exchange chromatography. 2-Amino-2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyric acid, pseudoleucine, and 2-methylnorvaline were positively identified by GC-MS. These amino acids have not been previously reported to occur in natural materials and may be uniquely meteoritic in origin. The presence of leucine and isoleucine (including the diastereoisomer, alloisoleucine) was confirmed. Peaks corresponding to norleucine were seen by ion-exchange and gas chromatography but characteristic mass spectra were not obtained. The alpha-branched chain isomers in this series are quantitatively the most significant. These results are compared with literature data on amino acid synthesis by electrical discharge and Fischer-Tropsch-type catalysis. Neither model system produces an amino acid suite that is completely comparable to that found in the Murchison meteorite.

  16. Enzymic measurement of primary bile acids and the primary bile acid ratio in serum with the IL-Multistat III Fluorescence Light-Scattering Centrifugal Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou-Diamandi, A; Diamandis, E P; Soldin, S J

    1984-08-01

    Enzymic fluorimetric methods are described for the determination of primary bile acids and of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDC) and cholic acid (C) in serum. Bile acids are extracted from 0.3 mL of serum in a simple 5-min step with use of Sep-Pak C cartridges. Total primary bile acids are measured by an equilibrium technique after reaction with beta-NAD in the presence of 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Chenodeoxycholic acid (and its conjugates) is measured by a reaction-rate technique employing the same reaction as above but under different experimental conditions. A small contribution of cholic acid (and its conjugates) to the reaction rate is eliminated by simple calculations. Cholic acid is calculated by difference of the two determinations. In both assays NADH fluorescence is measured with the Multistat centrifugal analyzer. Absolute recovery of bile acids from serum was about 87%. Day-to-day standard deviations for CDC and C were 1.6 and 2.0 mumol/L at serum concentrations of 22.1 and 24.1 mumol/L respectively. Comparison data with a cholylglycine RIA procedure gave the following correlation coefficients (x = RIA, y = proposed method): r = 0.980 (RIA vs total primary bile acids), r = 0.918 (RIA vs CDC) and r = 0.989 (RIA vs C). The methods described appear more practical for use on a routine basis than methods in the literature for the calculation of the primary bile acid ratio. PMID:6090040

  17. Supramolecular chirality in organo-, hydro-, and metallogels derived from bis-amides of L-(+)-tartaric acid: formation of highly aligned 1D silica fibers and evidence of 5-c net SnS topology in a metallogel network.

    PubMed

    Das, Uttam Kumar; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2012-10-01

    A series of bis-amides derived from L-(+)-tartaric acid was synthesized as potential low-molecular-weight gelators. Out of 14 bis-amides synthesized, 13 displayed organo-, hydro-, and ambidextrous gelation behavior. The gels were characterized by methods including circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, optical and electron microscopy, and rheology. One of the gels derived from di-3-pyridyltartaramide (D-3-PyTA) displayed intriguing nanotubular morphology of the gel network, which was exploited as a template to generate highly aligned 1D silica fibers. The gelator D-3-PyTA was also exploited to generate metallogels by treatment with various Cu(II) /Zn(II) salts under suitable conditions. A structure-property correlation on the basis of single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction data was attempted to gain insight into the structures of the gel networks in both organo- and metallogels. Such study led to the determination of the gel-network structure of the Cu(II) coordination-polymer-based metallogel, which displayed a 2D sheet architecture made of a chloride-bridged double helix that resembled a 5-c net SnS topology.

  18. Primary beneficiation of tantalite using magnetic separation and acid leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nete, M.; Koko, F.; Theron, T.; Purcell, W.; Nel, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Primary beneficiation was successfully performed prior to dissolution of manganotantalite (sample A) and ferrotantalite (sample C) samples obtained from two different mines in the Naquissupa area, Mozambique. Magnetic separation removed the majority of iron and titanium, whereas H2SO4 leaching removed a large portion of thorium and uranium in these samples. Analytical results indicated that 64.14wt% and 72.04wt% of the total Fe and Ti, respectively, and ˜2wt% each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample C (ferrotantalite) using the magnetic separation method, whereas only 9.64wt% and 8.66wt% of total Fe2O3 and TiO2, respectively, and ˜2wt% each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample A (manganotantalite). A temperature of 50°C and a leaching time of 3 h in the presence of concentrated H2SO4 were observed to be the most appropriate leaching conditions for removal of radioactive elements from the tantalite ores. The results obtained for sample A under these conditions indicated that 64.14wt% U3O8 and 60.77wt% ThO2 were leached into the acidic solution, along with 4.45wt% and 0.99wt% of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5, respectively.

  19. Synthesis of a novel biologically active amide ester of 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecanoic acid (DOD) using lipase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) are known to have industrial potential because of their special properties such as high viscosity and reactivity. Among the hydroxy fatty acids, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid (DOD) was successfully produced from oleic acid and lipid containing oleic acid by a bacter...

  20. The Importance of Hydrogen Bonding and Aromatic Stacking to the Affinity and Efficacy of Cannabinoid Receptor CB2 Antagonist, 5-(4-Chloro-3-methyl-phenyl)-1-(4-methyl-benzyl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid (1,3,3-trimethyl-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl)-amide (SR144528)

    PubMed Central

    Kotsikorou, Evangelia; Navas, Frank; Roche, Michael J.; Gilliam, Anne F.; Thomas, Brian; Seltzman, Herbert H.; Kumar, Pritesh; Song, Zhao-Hui; Hurst, Dow P.; Lynch, Diane L.; Reggio, Patricia H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the therapeutic promise of the sub-nanomolar affinity cannabinoid CB2 antagonist, N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan2-yl]-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-[(4-methylphenyl)methyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528, 1), little is known about its binding site interactions and no primary interaction site for 1 at CB2 has been identified. We report here the results of Glide docking studies in our cannabinoid CB2 inactive state model that were then tested via compound synthesis, binding and functional assays. Our results show that the amide functional group of 1 is critical to its CB2 affinity and efficacy and that aromatic stacking interactions in the TMH5/6 aromatic cluster of CB2 are also important. Molecular modifications that increased the positive electrostatic potential in the region between the fenchyl and aromatic rings led to more efficacious compounds. This result is consistent with the EC-3 loop negatively charged amino acid, D275 (identified via Glide docking studies) acting as the primary interaction site for 1 and its analogs. PMID:23855811

  1. Characterization of an amidated form of pancreatic polypeptide from the daddy sculpin (Cottus scorpius).

    PubMed

    Conlon, J M; Schmidt, W E; Gallwitz, B; Falkmer, S; Thim, L

    1986-12-30

    The primary structure of pancreatic polypeptide from the teleostean fish, Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin) was established as: YPPQPESPGGNASPEDWAKYHAAVRHYVNLITRQRYNH2 The presence of a COOH-terminally alpha-amidated amino acid was established using an HPLC method of general applicability. Although the peptide shows strong homology towards anglerfish pancreatic polypeptide (86%), homology towards porcine peptide YY (PYY) (61%) and porcine neuropeptide Y (NPY) (61%) was greater than towards porcine pancreatic polypeptide (PP) (47%). This result supports suggestions that the gene duplication events which led to PP, NPY and PYY formation took place after the time of divergence of fish and mammals. PMID:3562898

  2. Murine elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is posttranslationally modified by novel amide-linked ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol moieties. Addition of ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol to specific glutamic acid residues on EF-1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteheart, S.W.; Shenbagamurthi, P.; Chen, L.; Cotter, R.J.; Hart, G.W. )

    1989-08-25

    Elongation Factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha), an important eukaryotic translation factor, transports charged aminoacyl-tRNA from the cytosol to the ribosomes during poly-peptide synthesis. Metabolic radiolabeling with ({sup 3}H) ethanolamine shows that, in all cells examined, EF-1 alpha is the major radiolabeled protein. Radiolabeled EF-1 alpha has an apparent Mr = 53,000 and a basic isoelectric point. It is cytosolic and does not contain N-linked oligosaccharides. Trypsin digestion of murine EF-1 alpha generated two major ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine-labeled peptides. Three peptides were sequenced and were identical to two distinct regions of the human EF-1 alpha protein. Blank sequencing cycles coinciding with glutamic acid in the human cDNA-derived sequence were also found to release ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine, and compositional analysis of these peptides confirmed the presence of glutamic acid. Dansylation analysis demonstrates that the amine group of the ethanolamine is blocked. These results indicate that EF-1 alpha is posttranslationally modified by the covalent attachment of ethanolamine via an amide bond to at least two specific glutamic acid residues (Glu-301 and Glu-374). The hydroxyl group of the attached ethanolamine was shown by mass spectrometry and compositional analysis, to be further modified by the addition of a phosphoglycerol unit. This novel posttranslational modification may represent an important alteration of EF-1 alpha, comparable to the regulatory effects of posttranslational methylation of EF-1 alpha lysine residues.

  3. Unexpected dehomologation of primary alcohols to one-carbon shorter carboxylic acids using o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX).

    PubMed

    Xu, Shu; Itto, Kaori; Satoh, Masahide; Arimoto, Hirokazu

    2014-03-14

    A novel and efficient transformation of primary alcohols to one-carbon shorter carboxylic acids using IBX is reported. Mechanistic studies revealed that the combination of IBX and molecular iodine produces a different active hypervalent iodine species.

  4. 1-Heteroaryl-3-phenoxypropan-2-ones as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A₂α and fatty acid amide hydrolase: Effect of the replacement of the ether oxygen with sulfur and nitrogen moieties on enzyme inhibition and metabolic stability.

    PubMed

    Sundermann, Tom; Fabian, Jörg; Hanekamp, Walburga; Lehr, Matthias

    2015-05-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are enzymes, which have emerged as attractive targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs. We recently reported that certain 3-phenoxy-substituted 1-heteroarylpropan-2-ones are inhibitors of cPLA2α and/or FAAH. Starting from 1-[2-oxo-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propyl]indole-5-carboxylic acid (3) and 1-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propan-2-one (4), the effect of the replacement of the oxygen in position 3 of the propan-2-one scaffold by sulfur and nitrogen containing moieties on inhibition of cPLA2α and fatty acid amide hydrolase as well as on metabolic stability in rat liver S9 fractions was investigated. As a result of these structure-activity relationship studies it was found that the ether oxygen is of great importance for enzyme inhibitory potency. Replacement by sulfur led to an about 100-fold decrease of enzyme inhibition, nitrogen and substituted nitrogen atoms at this position even resulted in inactivity of the compounds. The effect of the structural variations performed on metabolic stability of the important ketone pharmacophore was partly different in the two series of compounds. While introduction of SO and SO2 significantly increased stability of the ketone against reduction in case of the indole-5-carboxylic acid 3, it had no effect in case of the benzotriazole 4. Further analysis of the metabolism of 3 and 4 in rat liver S9 fractions revealed that the major metabolite of 3 was the alcohol 53 formed by reduction of the keto group. In contrast, in case of 4 beside keto reduction an excessive hydroxylation of the terminal phenoxy group occurred leading to the dihydroxy compound 50. Experiments with enzyme inhibitors showed that the phenylhydroxylation of 4 was catalyzed by tranylcypromine sensitive cytochrome P450 isoforms, while the reduction of the ketone function of 3 and 4 was mainly caused by cytosolic short chain dehydrogenases

  5. Experimental and theoretical understanding of the gas phase oxidation of atmospheric amides with OH radicals: kinetics, products, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Borduas, Nadine; da Silva, Gabriel; Murphy, Jennifer G; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-05-14

    Atmospheric amides have primary and secondary sources and are present in ambient air at low pptv levels. To better assess the fate of amides in the atmosphere, the room temperature (298 ± 3 K) rate coefficients of five different amides with OH radicals were determined in a 1 m(3) smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Formamide, the simplest amide, has a rate coefficient of (4.44 ± 0.46) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) against OH, translating to an atmospheric lifetime of ∼1 day. N-methylformamide, N-methylacetamide and propanamide, alkyl versions of formamide, have rate coefficients of (10.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-12), (5.42 ± 0.19) × 10(-12), and (1.78 ± 0.43) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1), respectively. Acetamide was also investigated, but due to its slow oxidation kinetics, we report a range of (0.4-1.1) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) for its rate coefficient with OH radicals. Oxidation products were monitored and quantified and their time traces were fitted using a simple kinetic box model. To further probe the mechanism, ab initio calculations are used to identify the initial radical products of the amide reactions with OH. Our results indicate that N-H abstractions are negligible in all cases, in contrast to what is predicted by structure-activity relationships. Instead, the reactions proceed via C-H abstraction from alkyl groups and from formyl C(O)-H bonds when available. The latter process leads to radicals that can readily react with O2 to form isocyanates, explaining the detection of toxic compounds such as isocyanic acid (HNCO) and methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO). These contaminants of significant interest are primary oxidation products in the photochemical oxidation of formamide and N-methylformamide, respectively.

  6. Mechanism of fluorescence quenching of tyrosine derivatives by amide group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiczk, Wiesław; Rzeska, Alicja; Łukomska, Joanna; Stachowiak, Krystyna; Karolczak, Jerzy; Malicka, Joanna; Łankiewicz, Leszek

    2001-06-01

    The difference between fluorescence lifetimes of the following amino acids: phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), ( O-methyl)tyrosine (Tyr(Me)), (3-hydroxy)tyrosine (Dopa), (3,4-dimethoxy)phenylalanine (Dopa(Me) 2) and their amides was used to testify the mechanism of fluorescence quenching of aromatic amino acids by the amide group. On the basis of the Marcus theory of photoinduced electron transfer parabolic relationships between ln kET and ionization potentials reduced by energy of excitation ( IP-E ∗0,0) for the above-mentioned amino acids were obtained. This finding indicates the occurrence of photoinduced electron transfer from the excited chromophore group to the amide group.

  7. Hydroxylation, conjugation and sulfation of bile acids in primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Princen, H.M.; Meijer, P.

    1988-08-15

    Hydroxylation of lithocholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic and cholic acids was studied in monolayers of rat hepatocytes cultured for 76 h. The majority of added lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids was metabolized to beta-muricholic acid (56-76%). A small part of these bile acids (9%), however, and a considerable amount of deoxycholic and cholic acids (21%) were converted into metabolites more polar than cholic acid in the first culture period. Formation of these compounds decreased during the last day of culture. Bile acids synthesized after addition of (4-/sup 14/C)-cholesterol were almost entirely (97%) sulfated and/or conjugated, predominantly with taurine (54-66%), during culture. Sulfated bile acids were mainly composed of free bile acids. The ability of hepatocytes to sulfurylate bile acids declined with culture age. Thus, rat hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture are capable to sulfurylate bile acids and to hydroxylate trihydroxylated bile acids, suggesting formation of polyhydroxylated metabolites.

  8. Possible evidence of amide bond formation between sinapinic acid and lysine-containing bacterial proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) at 355 nm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported the apparent formation of matrix adducts of 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid (sinapinic acid or SA) via covalent attachment to disulfide bond-containing proteins (HdeA, HdeB and YbgS) from bacterial cell lysates ionized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALD...

  9. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and structural elucidation of 5-amino-2-methoxypyridine ester amide of squaric acid ethyl ester: A new material with an infinite pseudo-layered structure and manifested NLO application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tsonko; Koleva, Bojidarka B.; Spassov, Tony; Cherneva, Emilya; Spiteller, Michael; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Sheldrick, William S.

    2008-03-01

    The novel squaric acid derivative, 5-amino-2-methoxypyridin ester amide of squaric acid ethyl ester with second order NLO application in solution and in the bulk has been synthesized and is structure and properties elucidated in detail spectroscopic, thermally and structurally, using single crystal X-ray diffraction, linear-polarized solid state IR-spectroscopy, UV-spectroscopy, and TGA, DSC, DTA, MS and SHG methods. Quantum chemical calculations were used for obtain in the electronic structure, vibrational data and NLO properties. At room temperature the studied compound crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric space group Cc and exhibits a pseudo-layer structure (solid phase 1) with molecules linked by NH⋯O dbnd C intermolecular hydrogen bonds with length of 2.955 Å and NH⋯O angle of 153.41°, respectively. At 200 °C a phase transition is observed, with the solid phase 2 exhibiting new intermolecular NH⋯N interactions, as elucidated by IR-spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The obtained large powder SHG efficiency of 609 times urea proves the NLO application of studied compound in the bulk.

  10. Synergistic inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid on prostaglandin E2 release in primary rat microglia.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, Bernd L; Lieb, Klaus; Kammerer, Norbert; Hüll, Michael

    2003-07-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has been suggested to protect cerebral tissue in a variety of pathophysiological situations such as head trauma, ischemia or Alzheimer's disease. Most of these protective actions have been attributed to the antioxidative capacity of ascorbic acid. Besides the presence of elevated levels of oxygen radicals, prostaglandins produced by neurones and microglial cells seem to play an important role in prolonged tissue damage. We investigated whether ascorbic acid alone inhibits prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and may augment the inhibitory effect of acetylsalicylic acid on prostaglandin synthesis. Ascorbic acid dose-dependently inhibited PGE2 synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-treated primary rat microglial cells (IC50 = 3.70 micro m). In combination with acetylsalicylic acid (IC50 = 1.85 micro m), ascorbic acid augmented the inhibitory effect of acetylsalicylic acid on PGE2 synthesis (IC50 = 0.25 micro m in combination with 100 micro m ascorbic acid). Ascorbic acid alone or in combination with acetylsalicylic acid did not inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein synthesis but inhibited COX-2 enzyme activity. Our results show that ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid act synergistically in inhibiting PGE2 synthesis, which may help to explain a possible protective effect of ascorbic acid in various brain diseases.

  11. Tandem dissolution of UO 3 in amide-based acidic ionic liquid and in situ electrodeposition of UO 2 with regeneration of the ionic liquid: a closed cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Wanigasekara, Eranda; Freiderich, John W.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Meisner, Roberta A.; Luo, Huimin; Delmau, Lætitia H.; Dai, Sheng; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2016-05-19

    A closed cycle is demonstrated for the tandem dissolution and electroreduction of UO3 to UO2 with regeneration of the acidic ionic liquid. The dissolution is achieved by use of the acidic ionic liquid N,N-dimethylacetimidium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) serving as the diluent. Bulk electrolysis performed at 1.0 V vs. Ag reference yields a dark brown-black uranium deposit (UO2) on the cathode. Anodic oxidation of water in the presence of dimethylacetamide regenerates the acidic ionic liquid. We have demonstrated the individual steps in the cycle together with a sequential dissolution, electroreduction, and regeneration cycle.

  12. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  13. Ascorbic acid transport into cultured pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, E.I.; May, V.; Eipper, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    An amidating enzyme designated peptidyl-glycine ..cap alpha..-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) has been studied in a variety of tissues and is dependent on molecular oxygen and stimulated by copper and ascorbic acid. To continue investigating the relationship among cellular ascorbic acid concentrations, amidating ability, and PAM activity, the authors studied ascorbic acid transport in three cell preparations that contain PAM and produce amidated peptides: primary cultures of rat anterior and intermediate pituitary and mouse AtT-20 tumor cells. When incubated in 50 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid all three cell preparations concentrated ascorbic acid 20- to 40-fold, producing intracellular ascorbate concentrations of 1 to 2 mM, based on experimentally determined cell volumes. All three cell preparations displayed saturable ascorbic acid uptake with half-maximal initial rates occurring between 9 and 18 ..mu..M ascorbate. Replacing NaCl in the uptake buffer with choline chloride significantly diminished ascorbate uptake in all three preparations. Ascorbic acid efflux from these cells was slow, displaying half-lives of 7 hours. Unlike systems that transport dehydroascorbic acid, the transport system for ascorbic acid in these cells was not inhibited by glucose. Thus, ascorbate is transported into pituitary cells by a sodium-dependent, active transport system.

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong; Lu, Lei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Min; Li, Xianchi; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing dramatically especially in developing countries like India. CVD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There has been a growing awareness of the role of nutrients in the prevention of CVD. One specific recommendation in the battle against CVD is the increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids, which are polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies have reported inverse associations of CVD with dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids supplementation might exert protective effects on CVD. They exert their cardioprotective effect through multiple mechanisms. Omega-3 fatty acid therapy has shown promise as a useful tool in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD. This review briefly summarizes the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in primary and secondary prevention of CVD.

  15. The metabolism of primary, 7-oxo, and 7 beta-hydroxy bile acids by Clostridium absonum.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J D; Macdonald, I A

    1982-07-01

    Clostridium absonum was shown to metabolize primary bile acids to give rise to both 7-oxo bile acids and 7 beta-hydroxy (urso) bile acids. At relatively low redox potential (Eh) values, high yields of urso bile acids were achieved (60-75%). If, however, the Eh value of the culture was allowed to rise above approximately -100 mv, the 7-oxo bile acid would tend to predominate (more than 75%) and the "death phase" was accelerated. Growth of C. absonum in sterile graduated cylinders instead of in conventional Erlenmeyer flasks was effective in delaying the rise in Eh value with time (which appears largely due to diffusion of atmospheric oxygen into the medium) and in preserving a higher viable count of organisms. It is proposed that the formation of excess amounts of 7-oxo bile acid is a manifestation of oxygen toxicity and that it could be mediated by an increasing intracellular NADP:NADPH ratio. Additionally, the reaction: primary bile acid in equilibrium oxo bile acid in equilibrium urso bile acid was shown to be partially reversible. When the organisms were grown with [24-(14)C]chenodeoxycholic, -cholic, or -7-keto-lithocholic acid, this reaction could be clearly demonstrated. The addition of an equimolar concentration of deoxycholic acid (which itself is not metabolized) effectively enhanced the rate of bioconversion of cholate and 7-keto-lithocholic, but not chenodeoxycholate (whose rate of bioconversion was the fastest of the three). When the organisms were grown with urso bile acids (ursocholic or ursodeoxycholic) or with 7-keto-deoxycholic acid, very little metabolism occurred unless deoxycholic acid was added which induced formation of primary and keto bile acids. In all cases, formation of oxo bile acid from primary or urso bile acid occurred as the Eh value of the medium rose with time and could thus be delayed by the use of a cylinder instead of a flask for growing the culture. These results were rationalized by demonstrating that induction of 7 alpha- and

  16. Uprooting an abscisic acid paradigm: Shoots are the primary source.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Manzi, Matías; Ross, John J; Brodribb, Timothy J; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2016-06-01

    In the past, a conventional wisdom has been that abscisic acid (ABA) is a xylem-transported hormone that is synthesized in the roots, while acting in the shoot to close stomata in response to a decrease in plant water status. Now, however, evidence from two studies, which we have conducted independently, challenges this root-sourced ABA paradigm. We show that foliage-derived ABA has a major influence over root development and that leaves are the predominant location for ABA biosynthesis during drought stress. PMID:27031537

  17. Succinic acid monoethyl ester, a novel insulinotropic agent: effect on lipid composition and lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-nicotin-amide induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Ramalingam; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2007-02-01

    Succinic acid monoethyl ester (EMS) is recently proposed as an insulinotropic agent for the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a contributory factor in the development and complications of diabetes. In the present study the effect of EMS and Metformin on plasma glucose, insulin, serum and tissue lipid profile, lipoproteins and lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced type 2 diabetic model was investigated. The carboxylic nutrient EMS was administered intraperitonially (8 micromol/g body weight) to streptozotocin diabetic rats for 30 days. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxides in liver and kidney and serum and tissue lipids [cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and free fatty acids] and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), were significantly increased in diabetic rats, whereas the levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and antiatherogenic index (AAI) (ratio of HDL to total cholesterol) were significantly decreased. The effect of EMS was compared with metformin, a reference drug. Treatment with EMS and metformin resulted in a significant reduction of plasma glucose with increase plasma insulin in diabetic rats. EMS also resulted in a significant decrease in serum and tissue lipids and lipid peroxidation products. These biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of liver and kidney section. Our results suggest the possible antihyperlipidemic and antiperoxidative effect of EMS apart from its antidiabetic effect. PMID:17006620

  18. Boric acid: a highly efficient catalyst for transamidation of carboxamides with amines.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Sorres, Jonathan; Tran, Minh Quan; Ermolenko, Ludmila; Al-Mourabit, Ali

    2012-06-15

    A novel method of transamidation of carboxamides with amines using catalytic amounts of readily available boric acid under solvent-free conditions has been developed. The scope of the methodology has been demonstrated with (i) primary, secondary, and tertiary amides and phthalimide and (ii) aliphatic, aromatic, cyclic, acyclic, primary, and secondary amines.

  19. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-01-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  20. Intrinsic propensities of amino acid residues in GxG peptides inferred from amide I' band profiles and NMR scalar coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Hagarman, Andrew; Measey, Thomas J; Mathieu, Daniel; Schwalbe, Harald; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2010-01-20

    A reliable intrinsic propensity scale of amino acid residues is indispensable for an assessment of how local conformational distributions in the unfolded state can affect the folding of peptides and proteins. Short host-guest peptides, such as GxG tripeptides, are suitable tools for probing such propensities. To explore the conformational distributions sampled by the central amino acid residue in these motifs, we combined vibrational (IR, Raman, and VCD) with NMR spectroscopy. The data were analyzed in terms of a superposition of two-dimensional Gaussian distribution functions in the Ramachandran space pertaining to subensembles of polyproline II, beta-strand, right- and left-handed helical, and gamma-turn-like conformations. The intrinsic propensities of eight amino acid residues (x = A, V, F, L, S, E, K, and M) in GxG peptides were determined as mole fractions of these subensembles. Our results show that alanine adopts primarily (approximately 80%) a PPII-like conformation, while valine and phenylalanine were found to sample PPII and beta-strand-like conformations equally. The centers of the respective beta-strand distributions generally do not coincide with canonical values of dihedral angles of residues in parallel or antiparallel beta-strands. In fact, the distributions for most residues found in the beta-region significantly overlap the PPII-region. A comparison with earlier reported results for trivaline reveals that the terminal valines increase the beta-strand propensity of the central valine residue even further. Of the remaining investigated amino acids, methionine preferred PPII the most (0.64), and E, S, L, and K exhibit moderate (0.56-0.45) PPII propensities. Residues V, F, S, E, and L sample, to a significant extent, a region between the canonical PPII and (antiparallel) beta-strand conformations. This region coincides with the sampling reported for L and V using theoretical predictions (Tran et al. Biochemistry 2005, 44, 11369). The distributions of

  1. Amidation of Bioactive Peptides: The Structure of the Lyase Domain of the Amidating Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chufan, E.; De, M; Eipper, B; Mains, R; Amzel, L

    2009-01-01

    Many neuropeptides and peptide hormones require amidation of their carboxy terminal for full biological activity. The enzyme peptidyl-{alpha}-hydroxyglycine {alpha}-amidating lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.2.5) catalyzes the second and last step of this reaction, N-dealkylation of the peptidyl-{alpha}-hydroxyglycine to generate the {alpha}-amidated peptide and glyoxylate. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the PAL catalytic core (PALcc) alone and in complex with the nonpeptidic substrate {alpha}-hydroxyhippuric acid. The structures show that PAL folds as a six-bladed {Beta}-propeller. The active site is formed by a Zn(II) ion coordinated by three histidine residues; the substrate binds to this site with its {alpha}-hydroxyl group coordinated to the Zn(II) ion. The structures also reveal a tyrosine residue (Tyr{sup 654}) at the active site as the catalytic base for hydroxyl deprotonation, an unusual role for tyrosine. A reaction mechanism is proposed based on this structural data and validated by biochemical analysis of site-directed PALcc mutants.

  2. Copoly(imide-amides) containing hexafluoroisopropylidene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvin, David J.; Cassidy, Patrick E.; Cameron, Mitch L.

    1990-01-01

    The incorporation of the hexafluoroisopropylidene (HFIP or 6F) group into polymer backbones brings about important and useful changes in properties. These differences include increased thermal and environmental resistance and solubility and decreased dielectric constant and color. Several types of backbones have been substrates for the inclusion of HFIP and all results have reflected impressive property benefits. This project involved the incorporation of 6F groups into a poly(imide-amide) backbone by the condensation of a 6F-containing dianhydride with 4-aminobenzoic acid to yield a diimide terminated with two carboxylic acid groups. This diacid trimer was then polymerized with various diamines. The polymers were obtained in yields of 86-94 percent and with viscosities of 0.90-2.26 dL/g. They were stable to above 500 C and clear, colorless films could be cast from DMAc.

  3. Optimized Reaction Conditions for Amide Bond Formation in DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Libraries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizhou; Gabriele, Elena; Samain, Florent; Favalli, Nicholas; Sladojevich, Filippo; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2016-08-01

    DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries are increasingly being used as tools for the discovery of small organic binding molecules to proteins of biological or pharmaceutical interest. In the majority of cases, synthetic procedures for the formation of DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries incorporate at least one step of amide bond formation between amino-modified DNA and a carboxylic acid. We investigated reaction conditions and established a methodology by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide, 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole and N,N'-diisopropylethylamine (EDC/HOAt/DIPEA) in combination, which provided conversions greater than 75% for 423/543 (78%) of the carboxylic acids tested. These reaction conditions were efficient with a variety of primary and secondary amines, as well as with various types of amino-modified oligonucleotides. The reaction conditions, which also worked efficiently over a broad range of DNA concentrations and reaction scales, should facilitate the synthesis of novel DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries.

  4. Preparation of a new chiral stationary phase for HPLC based on the (R)- 1-phenyl-2-(4-methylphenyl)ethylamine amide derivative of (S)-valine and 2-chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid: enantioseparation of amino acid derivatives and pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xulin; Hou, Shicong; Jiang, Jingli; Wang, Min

    2007-08-01

    A novel chiral stationary phase (CSP) for HPLC was prepared by bonding (R)-1-phenyl-2-(4-methylphenyl)ethylamine amide derivative of (S)-valine to aminopropyl silica gel through a 2-amino-3,5-dinitro-1-carboxamido-benzene unit. The CSP was used for the separation of some amino acid derivatives and pyrethroid insecticides by chiral HPLC. Satisfactory baseline separation required optimization of the variables of mobile phase composition. Use of dichloromethane as modifier in the mobile phase gave baseline separations of amino acid derivatives. The two enantiomers of fenpropathrin and four stereoisomers of fenvalerate were baseline separated using hexane-dichloromethane-ethanol as mobile phase. The results show that the enantioselectivity of the new CSP is better than Pirkle type 1-A column for these compounds. Only partial separations were observed for the stereoisomers of cypermethrin and cyfluthrin, which gave even and eight peaks, respectively.

  5. Cleavage kinetics and anchor linked intermediates in solid phase peptide amide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dürr, H; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Schnorrenberg, G; Rapp, W; Jung, G

    1991-08-01

    Kinetics and cleavage conditions of peptide amide synthesis were studied using the anchor molecules 5-(4'-aminomethyl-3',5'-dimethoxyphenoxy)valeric acid (4-ADPV-OH) and 5-(2'-aminomethyl-3'-5'-dimethoxyphenoxy) valeric acid (2-ADPV-OH). Unexpectedly the anchor amide alanyl-4-ADPV-NH2 was isolated and characterized as an intermediate during the cleavage with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) of alanyl-4-ADPV-alanyl-aminomethyl-polystyrene to yield the alanine amide. As a matter of fact the NH--CH alpha bond of the alanyl spacer has to be cleaved to form this intermediate. Using TFA-dichloromethane (1:9) alanyl-4-ADPV-NH2 was obtained as a cleavage product in 50% yield within 60 min, whereas the isomeric alanyl-2-ADPV-NH2 was formed more slowly under these mild conditions. At high TFA concentration no difference between the 2- and 4-ADPV anchor was observed in the rate of formation of the free alanine amide. The presence of tryptophan amide in the cleavage mixture resulted in an anchor alkylated tryptophan amide, which remains stable in acidic solution but disappears rapidly in the presence of the resin. A low TFA/high TFA cleavage procedure is recommended for peptide amid synthesis applying the ADPV anchor.

  6. Synthesis of an Acyltrifluoroborate and its Fusion with Azides to Form Amides

    PubMed Central

    Raushel, Jessica; Ellis, Noel M.

    2010-01-01

    A uniquely stable acyl potassium trifluoroborate, potassium (2-phenylacetyl) trifluoroborate, has been synthesized and isolated. In the presence of an activating Lewis acid, this reagent reacts with azides to form amides in good yields. PMID:20481486

  7. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic separation of diastereomers of (R,S)-mexiletine prepared by microwave irradiation with four new chiral derivatizing reagents based on trichloro-s-triazine having amino acids as chiral auxiliaries and 10 others having amino acid amides.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Ravi; Dixit, Shuchi

    2010-12-01

    A new series of chiral derivatizing reagents (CDRs) consisting of four dichloro-s-triazine reagents was synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of one chlorine atom in trichloro-s-triazine with amino acids, namely L-Leu, D-Phg, L-Val and L-Ala as chiral auxiliaries. Two other sets of CDRs consisting of four dichloro-s-triazine (DCT) and six monochloro-s-triazine (MCT) reagents were also prepared by nucleophilic substitution of chlorine atom(s) with different amino acid amides as chiral auxiliaries in trichloro-s-triazine and its 6-methoxy derivative, respectively. These 14 CDRs were used for the synthesis of diastereomers of (R,S)-mexiletine under microwave irradiation (i.e. 60s and 90 s at 85% power (of 800 W) using DCT and MCT reagents, respectively), which were resolved by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using C18 column and gradient eluting mixtures of methanol with aqueous trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) with UV detection at 230 nm. The resolution (R(s)), difference between retention times of resolved diastereomers (Δt) and retention factors (k) obtained for the three sets of diastereomers were compared among themselves and among the three groups. Explanations have been offered for longer retention times and better resolution of diastereomers prepared with DCT reagents in comparison of their MCT counterparts and, for the influence of hydrophobicity of the side chain R of the amino acid in the CDRs on retention times and resolution. The newly synthesized CDRs were observed to be superior as compared to their amide counterparts in terms of providing better resolution and cost effectiveness. The method was validated for limit of detection, linearity, accuracy and precision. PMID:21035811

  8. Polymer Amide as an Early Topology

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, Julie E. M.; McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA) could have been one of the first normal density materials to accrete in space. We present ab initio calculations of the energetics of amino acid polymerization via gas phase collisions. The initial hydrogen-bonded di-peptide is sufficiently stable to proceed in many cases via a transition state into a di-peptide with an associated bound water molecule of condensation. The energetics of polymerization are only favorable when the water remains bound. Further polymerization leads to a hydrophobic surface that is phase-separated from, but hydrogen bonded to, a small bulk water complex. The kinetics of the collision and subsequent polymerization are discussed for the low-density conditions of a molecular cloud. This polymer in the gas phase has the properties to make a topology, viz. hydrophobicity allowing phase separation from bulk water, capability to withstand large temperature ranges, versatility of form and charge separation. Its flexible tetrahedral carbon atoms that alternate with more rigid amide groups allow it to deform and reform in hazardous conditions and its density of hydrogen bonds provides adhesion that would support accretion to it of silicon and metal elements to form a stellar dust material. PMID:25048204

  9. Bile Acid-Induced Necrosis in Primary Human Hepatocytes and in Patients with Obstructive Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. PMID:25636263

  10. Fluoride-Mediated Capture of a Noncovalent Bound State of a Reversible Covalent Enzyme Inhibitor: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Exceptionally Potent [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-11-02

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (K{sub i} = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same 'in action' state with the three catalytic residues Ser241-Ser217-Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of {alpha}-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed.

  11. Cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 and fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 may protect against cognitive impairment in rats of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via PI3K/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, Shao-Hua; Wang, Yue-Qing; Wu, Yi-Fang; Wang, Da-Peng; Lin, Qi; Hai, Jian

    2016-10-15

    The present study further investigated the protective effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597 (URB) on chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH)-induced cognitive impairment in rats. Spatial learning and memory were assessed with the Morris water maze and by measuring Long-term potentiation. The expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP)-2, growth-associated protein-43 (GAP)-43, synaptophysin, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), FAAH, N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D(NAPE-PLD) and monoacyl glycerol lipase (MGL) as well as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway molecules and downstream targets including AKT, phosphorylated (p-)AKT, cyclic AMP response element- binding protein (CREB), p-CREB, Bcl-2-associated death protein (BAD), p-BAD, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, p-GSK-3β, forkhead box protein (FOXO) 3A and p-FOXO3A was determined by western blotting. WIN and URB treatment improved learning and memory performance, effects that were abolished by co-administration of the PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, WIN and URB reversed the decreases in MAP-2 and synaptophysin expression resulting from CCH, and stimulated BDNF and CB1 expression as well as CREB, FOXO3A, GSK-3β, and BAD phosphorylation, confirming that WIN and URB mediate neuroprotection by preventing neuronal apoptosis and improving cognition via PI3K/AKT signaling. These findings suggest that WIN and URB are promising agents for therapeutic management of CCH. PMID:27424778

  12. Cellular Inhibition of Checkpoint Kinase 2 (Chk2) and Potentiation of Camptothecins and Radiation by the Novel Chk2 Inhibitor PV1019 [7-Nitro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid {4-[1-(guanidinohydrazone)-ethyl]-phenyl}-amide

    SciTech Connect

    Jobson, Andrew G.; Lountos, George T.; Lorenzi, Philip L.; Llamas, Jenny; Connelly, John; Cerna, David; Tropea, Joseph E.; Onda, Akikazu; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Kondapaka, Sudhir; Zhang, Guangtao; Caplen, Natasha J.; Cardellina, II, John H.; Yoo, Stephen S.; Monks, Anne; Self, Christopher; Waugh, David S.; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Pommier, Yves

    2010-04-05

    Chk2 is a checkpoint kinase involved in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated pathway, which is activated by genomic instability and DNA damage, leading to either cell death (apoptosis) or cell cycle arrest. Chk2 provides an unexplored therapeutic target against cancer cells. We recently reported 4,4'-diacetyldiphenylurea-bis(guanylhydrazone) (NSC 109555) as a novel chemotype Chk2 inhibitor. We have now synthesized a derivative of NSC 109555, PV1019 (NSC 744039) [7-nitro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid {l_brace}4-[1-(guanidinohydrazone)-ethyl]-phenyl{r_brace}-amide], which is a selective submicromolar inhibitor of Chk2 in vitro. The cocrystal structure of PV1019 bound in the ATP binding pocket of Chk2 confirmed enzymatic/biochemical observations that PV1019 acts as a competitive inhibitor of Chk2 with respect to ATP. PV1019 was found to inhibit Chk2 in cells. It inhibits Chk2 autophosphorylation (which represents the cellular kinase activation of Chk2), Cdc25C phosphorylation, and HDMX degradation in response to DNA damage. PV1019 also protects normal mouse thymocytes against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and it shows synergistic antiproliferative activity with topotecan, camptothecin, and radiation in human tumor cell lines. We also show that PV1019 and Chk2 small interfering RNAs can exert antiproliferative activity themselves in the cancer cells with high Chk2 expression in the NCI-60 screen. These data indicate that PV1019 is a potent and selective inhibitor of Chk2 with chemotherapeutic and radiosensitization potential.

  13. N-(3,4-Dimethylisoxazol-5-yl)piperazine-4-[4-(2-fluoro-4-[(11)C]methylphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-carboxamide: A promising positron emission tomography ligand for fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoko; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Hatori, Akiko; Yui, Joji; Zhang, Yiding; Nengaki, Nobuki; Kurihara, Yusuke; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Ishii, Hideki; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2016-02-15

    To visualize fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in brain in vivo, we developed a novel positron emission tomography (PET) ligand N-(3,4-dimethylisoxazol-5-yl)piperazine-4-[4-(2-fluoro-4-[(11)C]methylphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-carboxamide ([(11)C]DFMC, [(11)C]1). DFMC (1) was shown to have high binding affinity (IC50: 6.1nM) for FAAH. [(11)C]1 was synthesized by C-(11)C coupling reaction of arylboronic ester 2 with [(11)C]methyl iodide in the presence of Pd catalyst. At the end of synthesis, [(11)C]1 was obtained with a radiochemical yield of 20±10% (based on [(11)C]CO2, decay-corrected, n=5) and specific activity of 48-166GBq/μmol. After the injection of [(11)C]1 in mice, high uptake of radioactivity (>2% ID/g) was distributed in the lung, liver, kidney, and brain, organs with high FAAH expression. PET images of rat brains for [(11)C]1 revealed high uptakes in the cerebellar nucleus (SUV=2.4) and frontal cortex (SUV=2.0), two known brain regions with high FAAH expression. Pretreatment with the FAAH-selective inhibitor URB597 reduced the brain uptake. Higher than 90% of the total radioactivity in the rat brain was irreversible at 30min after the radioligand injection. The present results indicate that [(11)C]1 is a promising PET ligand for imaging of FAAH in living brain. PMID:26740152

  14. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and cyclooxygenase-2 increases levels of endocannabinoid related molecules and produces analgesia via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha in a model of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Richardson, Denise; Robinson, Ian; Garle, Michael J; Patel, Annie; Sun, Yan; Sagar, Devi R; Bennett, Andrew J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David A; Barrett, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2008-07-01

    The antinociceptive effects of the endocannabinoids (ECs) are enhanced by inhibiting catabolic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The physiological relevance of the metabolism of ECs by other pathways, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) is less clear. To address this question we compared the effects of local inhibition of FAAH versus COX2 (URB597 and nimesulide, respectively) on inflammatory hyperalgesia and levels of endocannabinoids and related molecules in the hindpaw. Inflammatory hyperalgesia was measured following intraplantar injection of carrageenan. Effects of intraplantar injection of URB597 (25 microg and 100 microg) or nimesulide (50 microg) on hyperalgesia and hindpaw levels of anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2AG) and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) were determined. Although both doses of URB597 increased levels of AEA and 2AG in the carrageenan inflamed hindpaw, only the lower dose of URB597 attenuated hyperalgesia (P<0.05). Nimesulide attenuated both hyperalgesia and hindpaw oedema (P<0.001, P<0.01, respectively) and increased levels of PEA (P<0.05) in the hindpaw. Since both AEA and PEA are ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha), the effects of the PPARalpha antagonist GW6471 on nimesulide- and URB597-mediated effects were studied. GW6471, but not a PPARgamma antagonist, blocked the inhibitory effects of nimesulide and URB597 on hyperalgesia. Our data suggest that both COX2 and FAAH play a role in the metabolism of endocannabinoids and related molecules. The finding that PPARalpha antagonism blocked the inhibitory effects of nimesulide and URB597 suggests that PPARalpha contributes to their antinociceptive effects in the carrageenan model of inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  15. Pharmacology and antitussive efficacy of 4-(3-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-amide (JNJ17203212), a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Scott, Brian P; Nasser, Nadia; Ao, Hong; Maher, Michael P; Dubin, Adrienne E; Swanson, Devin M; Shankley, Nigel P; Wickenden, Alan D; Chaplan, Sandra R

    2007-11-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) plays an integral role in modulating the cough reflex, and it is an attractive antitussive drug target. The purpose of this study was to characterize a TRPV1 antagonist, 4-(3-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-amide (JNJ17203212), against the guinea pig TRPV1 receptor in vitro followed by a proof-of-principle study in an acid-induced model of cough. The affinity of JNJ17203212 for the recombinant guinea pig TRPV1 receptor was estimated by radioligand binding, and it was functionally characterized by antagonism of low-pH and capsaicin-induced activation of the ion channel (fluorometric imaging plate reader and electrophysiology). The nature of antagonism was further tested against the native channel in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. Following pharmacokinetic characterization of JNJ17203212 in guinea pigs, pharmacodynamic and efficacy studies were undertaken to establish the antitussive efficacy of the TRPV1 antagonist. The pK(i) of JNJ17203212 for recombinant guinea pig TRPV1 was 7.14 +/- 0.06. JNJ17203212 inhibited both pH (pIC(50) of 7.23 +/- 0.05) and capsaicin (pIC(50) of 6.32 +/- 0.06)-induced channel activation. In whole-cell patch clamp, the pIC(50) for inhibition of guinea pig TRPV1 was 7.3 +/- 0.01. JNJ17203212 demonstrated surmountable antagonism in isolated trachea, with a pK(B) value of 6.2 +/- 0.1. Intraperitoneal administration of 20 mg/kg JNJ17203212 achieved a maximal plasma exposure of 8.0 +/- 0.4 microM, and it attenuated capsaicin evoked coughs with similar efficacy to codeine (25 mg/kg). Last, JNJ17203212 dose-dependently produced antitussive efficacy in citric acid-induced experimental cough in guinea pigs. Our data provide preclinical support for developing TRPV1 antagonists for the treatment of cough.

  16. Abscisic acid is not necessary for gravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of Zea mays L. cv. Tx 5855 treated with fluridone are strongly graviresponsive, but have undetectable levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Primary roots of the carotenoid-deficient w-3, vp-5, and vp-7 mutants of Z. mays are also graviresponsive despite having undetectable amounts of ABA. Graviresponsive roots of untreated and wild-type seedlings contain 286 to 317 ng ABA g-1 f. wt, respectively. These results indicate that ABA is not necessary for root gravicurvature.

  17. Oleic acid stimulates system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblast cells mediated by toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Gaccioli, Francesca; Ramirez, Vanessa I; Jones, Helen N; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-03-01

    Obese women have an increased risk to deliver large babies. However, the mechanisms underlying fetal overgrowth in these pregnancies are not well understood. Obese pregnant women typically have elevated circulating lipid levels. We tested the hypothesis that fatty acids stimulate placental amino acid transport, mediated via toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Circulating NEFA levels and placental TLR4 expression were assessed in women with varying prepregnancy body mass index (BMI). The effects of oleic acid on system A and system L amino acid transport, and on the activation of the mTOR (4EBP1, S6K1, rpS6), TLR4 (IĸB, JNK, p38 MAPK), and STAT3 signaling pathways were determined in cultured primary human trophoblast cells. Maternal circulating NEFAs (n = 33), but not placental TLR4 mRNA expression (n = 16), correlated positively with BMI (P < 0.05). Oleic acid increased trophoblast JNK and STAT3 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), whereas mTOR activity was unaffected. Furthermore, oleic acid doubled trophoblast system A activity (P < 0.05), without affecting system L activity. siRNA-mediated silencing of TLR4 expression prevented the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on system A activity. Our data suggest that maternal fatty acids can increase placental nutrient transport via TLR4, thereby potentially affecting fetal growth.

  18. Synthesis of amide-functionalized cellulose esters by olefin cross-metathesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangtao; Edgar, Kevin J

    2015-11-01

    Cellulose esters with amide functionalities were synthesized by cross-metathesis (CM) reaction of terminally olefinic esters with different acrylamides, catalyzed by Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation catalyst. Chelation by amides of the catalyst ruthenium center caused low conversions using conventional solvents. The effects of both solvent and structure of acrylamide on reaction conversion were investigated. While the inherent tendency of acrylamides to chelate Ru is governed by the acrylamide N-substituents, employing acetic acid as a solvent significantly improved the conversion of certain acrylamides, from 50% to up to 99%. Homogeneous hydrogenation using p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide successfully eliminated the α,β-unsaturation of the CM products to give stable amide-functionalized cellulose esters. The amide-functionalized product showed higher Tg than its starting terminally olefinic counterpart, which may have resulted from strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the amide functional groups.

  19. Synthesis of amide-functionalized cellulose esters by olefin cross-metathesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangtao; Edgar, Kevin J

    2015-11-01

    Cellulose esters with amide functionalities were synthesized by cross-metathesis (CM) reaction of terminally olefinic esters with different acrylamides, catalyzed by Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation catalyst. Chelation by amides of the catalyst ruthenium center caused low conversions using conventional solvents. The effects of both solvent and structure of acrylamide on reaction conversion were investigated. While the inherent tendency of acrylamides to chelate Ru is governed by the acrylamide N-substituents, employing acetic acid as a solvent significantly improved the conversion of certain acrylamides, from 50% to up to 99%. Homogeneous hydrogenation using p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide successfully eliminated the α,β-unsaturation of the CM products to give stable amide-functionalized cellulose esters. The amide-functionalized product showed higher Tg than its starting terminally olefinic counterpart, which may have resulted from strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the amide functional groups. PMID:26256383

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural perspective of new ferrocenyl amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, Martin; Nigar, Asifa; Ali, Naveed Zafar; Akhter, Zareen; Dinnebier, Robert E.

    2016-05-01

    Two new ferrocene derivatives with amide linkages were synthesized by the condensation of 4-ferrocenylaniline with n-alkyl acid chloride derivatives as pristine orange solids in good yields. FTIR and 1H/13C NMR studies have confirmed the basic structure of the molecules with the involvement of intermolecular H-bonding, which together with the ferrocene-like packing ensures the stability of the crystal structure. Crystal structures for both compounds were solved by Rietveld refinements of high resolution X-ray powder diffraction data. The XRD results show that both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/c. The primary feature of the crystal structure is a double layer of ferrocenyl groups stretched out in the b-c -plane perpendicular to the a-axis, with packing of the ferrocenyl groups occurring in a manner similar to that of pure ferrocene. Despite the close structural similarity, both compounds differ in the optimized geometry of respective Ferrocene conformers. The Cp rings are eclipsed for one Ferrocene conformer and close to staggered for the other, owing to the low energy barrier for the rotation of a cyclopentadienyl ring relative to the rest of the molecule.

  1. Blood Loss and Transfusion After Topical Tranexamic Acid Administration in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shen, Bin; Zeng, Yi

    2015-11-01

    There has been much debate and controversy about the safety and efficacy of the topical use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate whether there is less blood loss and lower rates of transfusion after topical tranexamic acid administration in primary TKA. A systematic review of the electronic databases PubMed, CENTRAL, Web of Science, and Embase was undertaken. All randomized, controlled trials and prospective cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of topical tranexamic acid during primary TKA were included. The focus of the analysis was on the outcomes of blood loss results, transfusion rate, and thromboembolic complications. Subgroup analysis was performed when possible. Of 387 studies identified, 16 comprising 1421 patients (1481 knees) were eligible for data extraction and meta-analysis. This study indicated that when compared with the control group, topical application of tranexamic acid significantly reduced total drain output (mean difference, -227.20; 95% confidence interval, -347.11 to -107.30; P<.00001), total blood loss (mean difference, -311.28; 95% confidence interval, -404.94 to -217.62; P<.00001), maximum postoperative hemoglobin decrease (mean difference, -0.73; 95% confidence interval, -0.96 to -0.50; P<.00001), and blood transfusion requirements (risk ratios, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.24 to 0.43; P=.14). The authors found a statistically significant reduction in blood loss and transfusion rates when using topical tranexamic acid in primary TKA. Furthermore, the currently available evidence does not support an increased risk of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism due to tranexamic acid administration. Topical tranexamic acid was effective for reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements without increasing the prevalence of thromboembolic complications. PMID:26558665

  2. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-07-16

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group.

  3. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group. PMID:26193245

  4. The Influence of a Collaborative Learning Environment on Primary Students' Conceptions about Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Stavridou, Heleni

    2002-01-01

    Investigates primary students' conceptions of acid rain formation and its consequences to people and the environment before and after a 10-hour constructivist teaching intervention. Reports improvement in conceptions of physical and chemical phenomena among the experimental group participants. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  5. [Nimesulide in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. Comparative clinical evaluation with mefenamic acid and fentiazac].

    PubMed

    López Rosales, C; Cisneros Lugo, J H; Romo Enciso, L J; García Sandoval, M G

    1989-07-01

    Sixty patients with primary dismenorrhea were treated: 20 with nimesulide, 20 with fentiazac and 20 with mefenamic acid during three consecutive cycles under double blind design. The doses used in each group were: nimesulide or fentiazac 100 mg, every 12 hrs., mefenamic acid 500 mg. every 8 hrs. in all cases during 5 days, beginning a day before the beginning, of the menstruation. The pain evolution and the symptoms were evaluated three times a day using a scale from 0 to 10, so measure its intensity. Concluding, the nimesulide is useful in the treatment of pain associated with primary dismenorrhea, answering with little statistical advantage over the fentiazac and with bigger statistical advantage over the mefenamic acid. The tolerance was excellent with the three drugs studied.

  6. Sterically-controlled intermolecular Friedel-Crafts acylation with twisted amides via selective N-C cleavage under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmei; Meng, Guangrong; Liu, Ruzhang; Szostak, Michal

    2016-05-21

    Highly chemoselective Friedel-Crafts acylation with twisted amides under mild conditions is reported for the first time. The reaction shows high functional group tolerance, obviating the need for preformed sensitive organometallic reagents and expensive transition metal catalysts. The high reactivity of amides is switched on by ground-state steric distortion to disrupt the amide bond nN→πCO* resonance as a critical design feature. Conceptually, this new acid-promoted mechanism of twisted amides provides direct access to bench-stable acylating reagents under mild, metal-free conditions. PMID:27139813

  7. Condensation Reactions and Formation of Amides, Esters, and Nitriles Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2004-06-01

    Hydrothermal pyrolysis experiments were performed to assess condensation (dehydration) reactions to amide, ester, and nitrile functionalities from lipid precursors. Beside product formation, organic compound alteration and stability were also evaluated. Mixtures of nonadecanoic acid, hexadecanedioic acid, or hexadecanamide with water, ammonium bicarbonate, and oxalic acid were heated at 300°C for 72 h. In addition, mixtures of ammonium bicarbonate and oxalic acid solutions were used to test the abiotic formation of organic nitrogen compounds at the same temperature. The resulting products were condensation compounds such as amides, nitriles, and minor quantities of N-methylalkyl amides, alkanols, and esters. Mixtures of alkyl amide in water or oxalic acid yielded mainly hydrolysis and dehydration products, and with ammonium bicarbonate and oxalic acid the yield of condensation products was enhanced. The synthesis experiments with oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate solutions yielded homologous series of alkyl amides, alkyl amines, alkanes, and alkanoic acids, all with no carbon number predominances. These organic nitrogen compounds are stable and survive under the elevated temperatures of hydrothermal fluids.

  8. Fermentation of municipal primary sludge: effect of SRT and solids concentration on volatile fatty acid production.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, A; Gabaldón, C; Marzal, P; Penya-Roja, J M; Seco, A

    2002-08-01

    Laboratory bench-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of primary sludge fermentation for volatile fatty acids production. Primary sludges from two major wastewater treatment plants located in Valencia (Pinedo and Carraixet) were used. Experiments were performed at solids retention times between 4 and 10 days, and total volatile solids concentrations between 0.6% and 2.8%. Operation at two temperatures (20 degrees C and 30 degrees C) was also checked. Results indicated the importance of feed sludge characteristics on volatile fatty acids yields, being approximately double for the Carraixet wastewater treatment plant sludge than for the Pinedo plant. In both cases, higher volatile fatty acids yields were observed at higher total volatile solids concentrations. Solids retention times above 6 days scarcely improve volatile fatty acids yields, while experiments conducted at 4 days of solids retention times show an important decrease in volatile fatty acids yields. On raising temperature an increase in volatile fatty acids yields was observed, mainly due to an improvement in the hydrolysis of particulate organic matter.

  9. Bifunctional Brønsted Base Catalyzes Direct Asymmetric Aldol Reaction of α-Keto Amides.

    PubMed

    Echave, Haizea; López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    The first enantioselective direct cross-aldol reaction of α-keto amides with aldehydes, mediated by a bifunctional ureidopeptide-based Brønsted base catalyst, is described. The appropriate combination of a tertiary amine base and an aminal, and urea hydrogen-bond donor groups in the catalyst structure promoted the exclusive generation of the α-keto amide enolate which reacted with either non-enolizable or enolizable aldehydes to produce highly enantioenriched polyoxygenated aldol adducts without side-products resulting from dehydration, α-keto amide self-condensation, aldehyde enolization, and isotetronic acid formation.

  10. Bifunctional Brønsted Base Catalyzes Direct Asymmetric Aldol Reaction of α-Keto Amides.

    PubMed

    Echave, Haizea; López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    The first enantioselective direct cross-aldol reaction of α-keto amides with aldehydes, mediated by a bifunctional ureidopeptide-based Brønsted base catalyst, is described. The appropriate combination of a tertiary amine base and an aminal, and urea hydrogen-bond donor groups in the catalyst structure promoted the exclusive generation of the α-keto amide enolate which reacted with either non-enolizable or enolizable aldehydes to produce highly enantioenriched polyoxygenated aldol adducts without side-products resulting from dehydration, α-keto amide self-condensation, aldehyde enolization, and isotetronic acid formation. PMID:26835655

  11. Practical Synthesis of Amides via Copper/ABNO-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidative Coupling of Alcohols and Amines.

    PubMed

    Zultanski, Susan L; Zhao, Jingyi; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-05-25

    A modular Cu/ABNO catalyst system has been identified that enables efficient aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols and amines to amides. All four permutations of benzylic/aliphatic alcohols and primary/secondary amines are viable in this reaction, enabling broad access to secondary and tertiary amides. The reactions exhibit excellent functional group compatibility and are complete within 30 min-3 h at rt. All components of the catalyst system are commercially available. PMID:27171973

  12. Universal mechanism for breaking amide bonds by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phillip S.; Cook, Peter L.; Liu, Xiaosong; Yang, Wanli; Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2011-07-01

    The photodissociation of the amide bond by UV light and soft x-rays is investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the C, N, and O 1s edges. Irradiation leaves a clear and universal signature for a wide variety of amides, ranging from oligopeptides to large proteins and synthetic polyamides, such as nylon. As the π* peak of the amide bond shrinks, two new π* peaks appear at the N 1s edge with a characteristic splitting of 1.1 eV. An additional characteristic is the overall intensity reduction of both the π* and σ* features at the O 1s edge, which indicates loss of oxygen. The spectroscopic results are consistent with the release of the O atom from the amide bond, followed by the migration of the H atom from the N to one of its two C neighbors. Migration to the carbonyl C leads to an imine, and migration to the Cα of the amino acid residue leads to a nitrile. Imine and nitrile produce the two characteristic π* transitions at the N 1s edge. A variety of other models is considered and tested against the N 1s spectra of reference compounds.

  13. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  14. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  15. Activation of amide N-H bonds by organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schaad, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    This research was aimed at developing new homogeneous transition metal hydroamination catalysts, specifically for hydroamination reactions involving the addition of amides to olefins. New iron-, ruthenium-, palladium- and platinum-amido complexes were formed via amide N-H bond activation reactions to zerovalent and divalent organotransition metal complexes. Complexes of the general formula trans-MW(amido) (diphosphine)[sub 2] were synthesized by reaction of amides with FeH(C[sub 6]H[sub 4]PPhCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]PPh[sub 2]) (dppe) and cis-RuHNp(dmpe)[sub 2]. Photolysis of cis-FeH[sub 2](dmpe)[sub 2] or Pt(C[sub 2]O[sub 4] (PEt[sub 3])[sub 2] in the presence of amides yielded trans-FeH(amido)(dmple)[sub 2] and trans-PtH (amido) IPEt[sub 3]) products. Reactions of amides with cis-M(PEtt[sub 3])[sub 2]Me[sub 2] yielded compounds with the general formula M(amido)Me(PEt[sub 3])[sub 2] (M = Pd, Pt). The reaction of M(diphosphine)Me[sub 2] complexes with amides produced compounds with the general formula M(amido)Me(diphosphine) (M = Pd, Pt). Reaction of amides with PtMe[sub 2](COD) yielded complexes with the general formula PtMe(amido)(COD). The compounds were characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. The reactions were proposed to occur by two routes: oxidative addition of the amid eN-H bond to the metal complex or direct protonation of the metal complex by the N-H bond of the amide. The rate of formation and the stability of the metal-amido products depended on the nature of the metal complex and the amide employed. Only acidic amides reacted with the iron complexes. For the thermal reactions of amides with the metal complexes, the reactions proceeded to completion faster as the acidity of the amide was increased. The new iron-, ruthenium-, palladium- and platinum-amido complexes were inert to further reaction.

  16. Effect of the sodium hypochlorite and citric acid association on smear layer removal of primary molars.

    PubMed

    Götze, Gabriela da Rosa; Cunha, Cristiane Beatriz Costa Sales; Primo, Laura Salignac de Souza Guimarães; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the capacity of a sodium hypochlorite and citric acid (CA) association (the latter at different concentrations) in removing coronal smear layer (SL) of primary teeth. For this purpose, the pulp chamber roof and floor of 28 primary molars were removed to obtain enamel and dentine disks. SL was produced on the internal walls of the disks using high-speed drills. The disks were irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite and citric acid at different concentrations (CA-4%, CA-6%, CA-8% and CA-10%), and with 0.9% sodium chloride. The samples were split and observed under SEM. Scores were attributed to the obtained photomicrographs, according to the amount of SL present. It was noted that all the tested concentrations of citric acid used after the sodium hypochlorite were capable of removing SL. The results were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test, and there was no significant statistical difference among the scores of the groups tested. However, it was observed that CA-8% and CA-10% caused peritubular dentine destruction, and that CA-4% presented a larger number of samples with dense SL. Based on these results, 6.0% citric acid in association with 1% sodium hypochlorite is suggested as auxiliary chemical substances for primary teeth irrigation.

  17. T. thermophila group I introns that cleave amide bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to nucleic acid enzymes or enzymatic RNA molecules that are capable of cleaving a variety of bonds, including phosphodiester bonds and amide bonds, in a variety of substrates. Thus, the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecules are capable of functioning as nucleases and/or peptidases. The present invention also relates to compositions containing the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecule and to methods of making, selecting, and using such enzymes and compositions.

  18. Growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Zea mays seedlings deficient in abscisic acid and gibberellic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Dickey, K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if gibberellic acid (GA) and/or abscisic acid (ABA) are necessary for graviresponsiveness by primary roots of Zea mays. To accomplish this objective we measured the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of seedlings in which the synthesis of ABA and GA was inhibited collectively and individually by genetic and chemical means. Roots of seedlings treated with Fluridone (an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) and Ancymidol (an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) were characterized by slower growth rates but not significantly different gravicultures as compared to untreated controls. Gravicurvatures of primary roots of d-5 mutants (having undetectable levels of GA) and vp-9 mutants (having undectable levels of ABA) were not significantly different from those of wild-type seedlings. Roots of seedlings in which the biosynthesis of ABA and GA was collectively inhibited were characterized by gravicurvatures not significantly different for those of controls. These results (1) indicate that drastic reductions in the amount of ABA and GA in Z. mays seedlings do not significantly alter root graviresponsiveness, (2) suggest that neither ABA nor GA is necessary for root gravicurvature, and (3) indicate that root gravicurvature is not necessarily proportional to root elongation.

  19. The synthesis of sterically hindered amides.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Gabriel; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Amide bond formation is one of the most important reactions due to the ubiquity of the amide functional group in pharmaceuticals and biologically active compounds. However, even the best existing methods reach their limits when it comes to the synthesis of sterically hindered amides. In this article we summarize our research in the formation of sterically hindered amides. We show that the direct coupling of Grignard reagents to isocyanates provides a facile and robust solution to this long-standing challenge and hope that this methodology will find widespread application in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and materials. PMID:24983609

  20. Actinide-lanthanide separation with solvents on the base of amides of heterocyclic diacids

    SciTech Connect

    Babain, V.A.; Alyapyshev, M.Y.; Tkachenko, L.I.

    2013-07-01

    The separation of actinides from lanthanides with a particular emphasis on Am(III) from Eu(III) with amides of heterocyclic dicarboxylic diacids was reviewed. It was shown that the di-amides of the 2,2'-dipyridyl-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid are the most promising ligands for the simultaneous selective recovery of actinides from HLLW (high level radioactive liquid waste) within the GANEX concept. (author)

  1. Experimental and theoretical understanding of the gas phase oxidation of atmospheric amides with OH radicals: kinetics, products, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Borduas, Nadine; da Silva, Gabriel; Murphy, Jennifer G; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-05-14

    Atmospheric amides have primary and secondary sources and are present in ambient air at low pptv levels. To better assess the fate of amides in the atmosphere, the room temperature (298 ± 3 K) rate coefficients of five different amides with OH radicals were determined in a 1 m(3) smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Formamide, the simplest amide, has a rate coefficient of (4.44 ± 0.46) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) against OH, translating to an atmospheric lifetime of ∼1 day. N-methylformamide, N-methylacetamide and propanamide, alkyl versions of formamide, have rate coefficients of (10.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-12), (5.42 ± 0.19) × 10(-12), and (1.78 ± 0.43) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1), respectively. Acetamide was also investigated, but due to its slow oxidation kinetics, we report a range of (0.4-1.1) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) for its rate coefficient with OH radicals. Oxidation products were monitored and quantified and their time traces were fitted using a simple kinetic box model. To further probe the mechanism, ab initio calculations are used to identify the initial radical products of the amide reactions with OH. Our results indicate that N-H abstractions are negligible in all cases, in contrast to what is predicted by structure-activity relationships. Instead, the reactions proceed via C-H abstraction from alkyl groups and from formyl C(O)-H bonds when available. The latter process leads to radicals that can readily react with O2 to form isocyanates, explaining the detection of toxic compounds such as isocyanic acid (HNCO) and methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO). These contaminants of significant interest are primary oxidation products in the photochemical oxidation of formamide and N-methylformamide, respectively. PMID:25019427

  2. Poly(amide-graft-acrylate) interfacial compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Michael Perez

    Graft copolymers with segments of dissimilar chemistries have been shown to be useful in a variety of applications as surfactants, compatibilizers, impact modifiers, and surface modifiers. The most common route to well defined graft copolymers is through the use of macromonomers, polymers containing a reactive functionality and thus capable of further polymerization. However, the majority of the studies thus far have focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of reacting with vinyl monomers to form graft copolymers. This study focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of participating in condensation polymerizations. A chain transfer functionalization method was utilized. Cysteine was evaluated as a chain transfer agent for the synthesis of amino acid functionalized poly(acrylate) and poly(methacrylate) macromonomers. Low molar mass, functionalized macromonomers were produced. These macromonomers were proven to be capable of reacting with amide precursors to form poly(amide-g-acrylate) graft copolymers. Macromonomers and graft copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis (EA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The second part of this research involved poly(dimethacrylate) dental restorative materials. Volumetric shrinkage during the cure of these resins results in a poor interface between the resin and the remaining tooth structure, limiting the lifetime of these materials. Cyclic anhydrides were incorporated into common monomer compositions used in dental applications. Volume expansion from the ring opening hydrolysis of these anhydrides was shown to be feasible. The modified dental resins were characterized by swelling, extraction and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and density measurements. Linear poLymers designed to model the crosslinked dental resins were

  3. Primary and secondary genetic responses after folic acid-induced acute renal injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Calvet, J P; Chadwick, L J

    1994-12-01

    Folic acid-induced acute renal injury results in dramatic changes in gene expression. Among the genes affected by folic acid treatment are the primary response genes, c-fos and c-myc, which are thought to function to initiate cell cycle events. In this report, changes in the expression of three other genes in response to folic acid injury have been investigated: ornithine decarboxylase, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2). Renal injury was found to cause a rapid decrease in EGF mRNA, which remained absent for several days after the initial injury, gradually returning to normal levels over an approximately 3-wk regeneration and recovery period. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA showed a similar decrease. In contrast, folic acid caused a rapid increase in SGP-2 mRNA, which peaked several days after treatment, decreasing to normal levels over the 3-wk period. The mRNAs for the primary response genes were superinduced in the injured kidneys in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In contrast, the changes in EGF and SGP-2 mRNA levels were blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that these responses required new protein synthesis during the first few hours after folic acid injury. The opposite but parallel responses in the expression of the EGF and SGP-2 genes suggest that their regulation is coupled to the initial injury-induced dedifferentiation and subsequent return to the fully differentiated state.

  4. Characterisation of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis responding to long term ursodeoxycholic acid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Leuschner, M; Dietrich, C; You, T; Seidl, C; Raedle, J; Herrmann, G; Ackermann, H; Leuschner, U

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In some patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, ursodeoxycholic acid causes full biochemical normalisation of laboratory data; in others, indexes improve but do not become normal.
AIMS—To characterise complete and incomplete responders.
METHODS—Seventy patients with primary biliary cirrhosis were treated with ursodeoxycholic acid 10-15 mg/kg/day and followed up for 6-13 years.
RESULTS—In 23 patients (33%) with mainly stage I or II disease, cholestasis indexes and aminotransferases normalised within 1-5 years, except for antimitochondrial antibodies. Histological findings improved. Indexes were not normalised in 47 patients (67%) although the improvement of their biochemical functions parallelled the trend in the first group. In these incomplete responders histological findings improved to a lesser extent. The only difference between the two groups before treatment was higher levels of alkaline phosphatase and γ glutamyl transpeptidase in the incomplete responders. At onset of treatment the discriminant value separating responders from incomplete responders was 660 U/l for alkaline phosphatase and 131 U/l for γ glutamyl transpeptidase. One year later it was 239 and 27 U/l (overall predictive value for responders 92%, for incomplete responders 81%). There were no differences between the two groups concerning immune status, antimitochondrial antibody subtypes, liver histology, or any other data. HLA-B39, DRB1*08, DQB1*04 dominated in both groups.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients with mainly early stages of primary biliary cirrhosis, higher values of alkaline phosphatase and γ glutamyl transpeptidase are the only biochemical indexes which allow discrimination between patients who will completely or incompletely respond to ursodeoxycholic acid treatment.


Keywords: primary biliary cirrhosis; prognostic indexes; full response to ursodeoxycholic acid; incomplete responders; anti-p53 autoantibodies; HLA typing PMID:10601067

  5. Pyroglutamic acid stimulates DNA synthesis in rat primary hepatocytes through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinjiro; Okita, Yoichi; de Toledo, Andreia; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Eiichi; Morinaga, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    We purified pyroglutamic acid from human placental extract and identified it as a potent stimulator of rat primary hepatocyte DNA synthesis. Pyroglutamic acid dose-dependently stimulated DNA synthesis, and this effect was inhibited by PD98059, a dual specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MAP2K1) inhibitor. Therefore, pyroglutamic acid stimulated DNA synthesis in rat primary hepatocytes via MAPK signaling.

  6. Yttrium (amidate) complexes for catalytic C-N bond formation. Rapid, room temperature amidation of aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jaclyn A; Schafer, Laurel L

    2012-07-14

    Yttrium (amidate) precatalysts are highly active for the mild amidation of aldehydes with amines. Reactions occur at room temperature within 5 min in up to 98% isolated yield. These rare-earth systems are effective for this transformation in the absence of supplementary heat, light, base, or oxidants. The reaction proceeds with functionalized amines and/or aldehydes. A comparison of various amidate precatalysts in combination with reaction monitoring suggests that the targeted amide products formed during the reaction promote the formation of alternative catalytically active amidate species in situ.

  7. Determination of Fatty Acid Oxidation and Lipogenesis in Mouse Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Akie, Thomas E; Cooper, Marcus P

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in liver is complex. In addition to importing and exporting lipid via lipoproteins, hepatocytes can oxidize lipid via fatty acid oxidation, or alternatively, synthesize new lipid via de novo lipogenesis. The net sum of these pathways is dictated by a number of factors, which in certain disease states leads to fatty liver disease. Excess hepatic lipid accumulation is associated with whole body insulin resistance and coronary heart disease. Tools to study lipid metabolism in hepatocytes are useful to understand the role of hepatic lipid metabolism in certain metabolic disorders. In the liver, hepatocytes regulate the breakdown and synthesis of fatty acids via β-fatty oxidation and de novo lipogenesis, respectively. Quantifying metabolism in these pathways provides insight into hepatic lipid handling. Unlike in vitro quantification, using primary hepatocytes, making measurements in vivo is technically challenging and resource intensive. Hence, quantifying β-fatty acid oxidation and de novo lipogenesis in cultured mouse hepatocytes provides a straight forward method to assess hepatocyte lipid handling. Here we describe a method for the isolation of primary mouse hepatocytes, and we demonstrate quantification of β-fatty acid oxidation and de novo lipogenesis, using radiolabeled substrates. PMID:26382148

  8. A Systems Model for Ursodeoxycholic Acid Metabolism in Healthy and Patients With Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, RL; O'Connor‐Semmes, RL; Young, MA

    2016-01-01

    A systems model was developed to describe the metabolism and disposition of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its conjugates in healthy subjects based on pharmacokinetic (PK) data from published studies in order to study the distribution of oral UDCA and potential interactions influencing therapeutic effects upon interruption of its enterohepatic recirculation. The base model was empirically adapted to patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) based on current understanding of disease pathophysiology and clinical measurements. Simulations were performed for patients with PBC under two competing hypotheses: one for inhibition of ileal absorption of both UDCA and conjugates and the other only of conjugates. The simulations predicted distinctly different bile acid distribution patterns in plasma and bile. The UDCA model adapted to patients with PBC provides a platform to investigate a complex therapeutic drug interaction among UDCA, UDCA conjugates, and inhibition of ileal bile acid transport in this rare disease population. PMID:27537780

  9. Isotope-enriched protein standards for computational amide I spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, Mike; Roy, Anish R.; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-03-28

    We present a systematic isotope labeling study of the protein G mutant NuG2b as a step toward the production of reliable, structurally stable, experimental standards for amide I infrared spectroscopic simulations. By introducing isotope enriched amino acids into a minimal growth medium during bacterial expression, we induce uniform labeling of the amide bonds following specific amino acids, avoiding the need for chemical peptide synthesis. We use experimental data to test several common amide I frequency maps and explore the influence of various factors on map performance. Comparison of the predicted absorption frequencies for the four maps tested with empirical assignments to our experimental spectra yields a root-mean-square error of 6-12 cm{sup −1}, with outliers of at least 12 cm{sup −1} in all models. This means that the predictions may be useful for predicting general trends such as changes in hydrogen bonding configuration; however, for finer structural constraints or absolute frequency assignments, the models are unreliable. The results indicate the need for careful testing of existing literature maps and shed light on possible next steps for the development of quantitative spectral maps.

  10. Synthesis of Carfentanil Amide Opioids Using the Ugi Multicomponent Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Váradi, András; Palmer, Travis C.; Haselton, Nathan; Afonin, Daniel; Subrath, Joan J.; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Hunkele, Amanda; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Marrone, Gina F.; Borics, Attila; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel approach to synthesize carfentanil amide analogues utilizing the isocyanide-based four-component Ugi multicomponent reaction. A small library of bis-amide analogues of carfentanil was created using N-alkylpiperidones, aniline, propionic acid, and various aliphatic isocyanides. Our lead compound showed high affinity for mu (MOR) and delta opioid receptors (DOR) with no appreciable affinity for kappa (KOR) receptors in radioligand binding assays. The compound was found to be a mixed MOR agonist/partial DOR agonist in [35S]GTPγS functional assays, and it showed moderate analgesic potency in vivo. The compound showed no visible signs of physical dependence or constipation in mice. In addition, it produced less respiratory depression than morphine. Most mixed MOR/DOR opioids reported in the literature are peptides and thereby systemically inactive. Our approach utilizing a multicomponent reaction has the promise to deliver potent and efficacious small-molecule analgesics with potential clinical utility. PMID:26148793

  11. Production of R-(-)-Ketoprofen from an Amide Compound by Comamonas acidovorans KPO-2771-4

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K.; Otsubo, K.; Matsuo, A.; Hayashi, T.; Fujimatsu, I.; Komatsu, K.

    1996-01-01

    R-(-)-2-(3(prm1)-Benzoylphenyl)propionic acid [R-(-)-ketoprofen] was produced from racemic 2-(3(prm1)-benzoylphenyl)propionamide (keto-amide) by the isolated bacterial strain Comamonas acidovorans KPO-2771-4. Sodium fumarate as the carbon source and 2-azacyclononanone or isobutyronitrile as the enhancer in the culture medium were effective for bacterial growth and the enhancement of R-(-)-ketoprofen-producing activity. R-(-)-Ketoprofen produced from the keto-amide by resting cells was present in 99% enantiomeric exess. C. acidovorans KPO-2771-4 has an R-enantioselective amidase for keto-amide because the purified amidase from the bacterium hydrolyzed keto-amide, producing optically pure R-ketoprofen and ammonia. PMID:16535206

  12. Synthesis and structure assignments of amide protected nucleosides and their use as phosphoramidites in deoxyoligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Mag, M; Engels, J W

    1988-01-01

    The syntheses of several amide protected deoxyguanosine- as well as thymidine nucleosides are described. These compounds were synthesized according to the Mitsunobu reaction and Michael addition. In contradiction to previous studies we have discovered that the Michael addition gives only products derived from N-alkylation. The occurrence of N- or O-alkylation was assigned by means of two dimensional 1H, 1 3 C-COLOC-NMR spectroscopy. Further, we have found that the Mitsunobu reaction used for the protection of the amide function of dG is limited to alcohols without acidic hydrogen atoms. Amide protected phosphormidites (15, 16) were used for the preparation of deoxyoligonucleotides with a large number of guanine and thymine bases using two different coupling times. We have shown that there is no experimentally detectable difference in the quality of the products if the starting monomer is amide protected or not. Images PMID:3375062

  13. Synthesis and structure assignments of amide protected nucleosides and their use as phosphoramidites in deoxyoligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mag, M; Engels, J W

    1988-04-25

    The syntheses of several amide protected deoxyguanosine- as well as thymidine nucleosides are described. These compounds were synthesized according to the Mitsunobu reaction and Michael addition. In contradiction to previous studies we have discovered that the Michael addition gives only products derived from N-alkylation. The occurrence of N- or O-alkylation was assigned by means of two dimensional 1H, 1 3 C-COLOC-NMR spectroscopy. Further, we have found that the Mitsunobu reaction used for the protection of the amide function of dG is limited to alcohols without acidic hydrogen atoms. Amide protected phosphormidites (15, 16) were used for the preparation of deoxyoligonucleotides with a large number of guanine and thymine bases using two different coupling times. We have shown that there is no experimentally detectable difference in the quality of the products if the starting monomer is amide protected or not. PMID:3375062

  14. Propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis and increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Degerman, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibers by colonic microbiota generates short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g., propionic acid and butyric acid, which have been described to have "anti-obesity properties" by ameliorating fasting glycaemia, body weight and insulin tolerance in animal models. In the present study, we therefore investigate if propionic acid and butyric acid have effects on lipolysis, de novo lipogenesis and glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes. We show that both propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit isoproterenol- and adenosine deaminase-stimulated lipolysis as well as isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis in the presence of a phosphodiesterase (PDE3) inhibitor. In addition, we show that propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit basal and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis, which is associated with increased phosphorylation and thus inhibition of acetyl CoA carboxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid synthesis. Furthermore, we show that propionic acid and butyric acid increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. To conclude, our study shows that SCFAs have effects on fat storage and mobilization as well as glucose uptake in rat primary adipocytes. Thus, the SCFAs might contribute to healthier adipocytes and subsequently also to improved energy metabolism with for example less circulating free fatty acids, which is beneficial in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26167409

  15. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  16. Dissecting Hofmeister Effects: Direct Anion-Amide Interactions Are Weaker than Cation-Amide Binding.

    PubMed

    Balos, Vasileios; Kim, Heejae; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Whereas there is increasing evidence for ion-induced protein destabilization through direct ion-protein interactions, the strength of the binding of anions to proteins relative to cation-protein binding has remained elusive. In this work, the rotational mobility of a model amide in aqueous solution was used as a reporter for the interactions of different anions with the amide group. Protein-stabilizing salts such as KCl and KNO3 do not affect the rotational mobility of the amide. Conversely, protein denaturants such as KSCN and KI markedly reduce the orientational freedom of the amide group. Thus these results provide evidence for a direct denaturation mechanism through ion-protein interactions. Comparing the present findings with results for cations shows that in contrast to common belief, anion-amide binding is weaker than cation-amide binding. PMID:27237055

  17. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of ester and amide derivatives of titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Trchová, Miroslava; Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav

    2013-06-15

    A set of layered ester and amide derivatives of titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate was prepared by solvothermal treatment of amorphous titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate with corresponding 1-alkanols, 1,ω-alkanediols, 1-aminoalkanes, 1,ω-diaminoalkanes and 1,ω-amino alcohols and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Whereas alkyl chains with one functional group form bilayers tilted to the layers, 1,ω-diaminoalkanes and most of 1,ω-alkanediols form bridges connecting the adjacent layers. In the case of amino alcohols, the alkyl chains form bilayer and either hydroxyl or amino group is used for bonding. This simple method for the synthesis of ester and amide derivatives does not require preparation of acid chloride derivative as a precursor or pre-intercalation with alkylamines and can be used also for the preparation of ester and amide derivatives of titanium carboxyethylphosphonate and zirconium carboxymethylphosphonate. - Graphical abstract: Ester and amide derivatives of layered titanium carboxymethylphosphonate were prepared by solvothermal treatment of amorphous solid with alkanol or alkylamine. - Highlights: • Ester and amide derivatives of titanium carboxymethylphosphonate. • Solvothermal treatment of amorphous solid with alkanol or alkylamine. • Ester and amide formation confirmed by IR spectroscopy.

  19. Oligonuclear ferrocene amides: mixed-valent peptides and potential redox-switchable foldamers.

    PubMed

    Siebler, Daniel; Linseis, Michael; Gasi, Teuta; Carrella, Luca M; Winter, Rainer F; Förster, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2011-04-11

    Trinuclear ferrocene tris-amides were synthesized from an Fmoc- or Boc-protected ferrocene amino acid, and hydrogen-bonded zigzag conformations were determined by NMR spectroscopy, molecular modelling, and X-ray diffraction. In these ordered secondary structures orientation of the individual amide dipole moments approximately in the same direction results in a macrodipole moment similar to that of α-helices composed of α-amino acids. Unlike ordinary α-amino acids, the building blocks in these ferrocene amides with defined secondary structure can be sequentially oxidized to mono-, di-, and trications. Singly and doubly charged mixed-valent cations were probed experimentally by Vis/NIR, paramagnetic ¹H NMR and Mössbauer spectroscopy and investigated theoretically by DFT calculations. According to the appearance of intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) bands in solution, the ferrocene/ferrocenium amides are described as Robin-Day class II mixed-valent systems. Mössbauer spectroscopy indicates trapped valences in the solid state. The secondary structure of trinuclear ferrocene tris-amides remains intact (coiled form) upon oxidation to mono- and dications according to DFT calculations, while oxidation to the trication should break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and unfold the ferrocene peptide (uncoiled form).

  20. Amide functionalized MWNT/SPEEK composite membrane for better electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlot, Swati; Sharma, Prem P.; Kulshrestha, Vaibhav

    2016-05-01

    Nanocomposite membranes based on multiwalled carbon nanotube /SPEEK (sulfonated poly ether ether ketone) have been synthesized via simple solution casting. Prior to use CNT have been purified and grafted with carboxylic acid groups onto its walls by means of sulfuric and nitric acid. Afterwards, amidation of carboxylated CNTs (c-CNT) has been done. Amidated CNT (a-CNT) is then incorporated in SPEEK polymer matrix to synthesize nanocomposite membranes. Physicochemical, structural, thermal and mechanical characterizations are done through the respective techniques. Electric and ionic conductivities have also been evaluated. Composites membranes show the enhanced electrochemical performance with higher electric conductivity.

  1. Quantum entanglement between amide-I and amide-site in Davydov-Scott model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Fan, Heng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly derive non-Markovian operator Langevin equations of the Davydov monomer in its environment. Next, we replace the equations with the c-number quantum general Langevin equations (QGLEs) by calculating statistical and quantum averages of the operator Langevin equations. Then, by using the c-number QGLEs we investigate the evolutions of the subsystems amide-I and amide-site. The evolution of a parameter θ describing quantum entanglement of the coupling subsystems with continuous variable Hamiltonian has also been investigated. It is shown that there is certain entanglement between the amide-I and amide-site in the Davydov-Scott monomer.

  2. Effects of chronic administration of valproic acid to epileptic patients on coagulation tests and primary hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Zighetti, Maddalena L; Fontana, Gessica; Lussana, Federico; Chiesa, Valentina; Vignoli, Aglaia; Canevini, Maria Paola; Cattaneo, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic drug that has been associated with impaired hemostasis and increased risk for postsurgical bleeding. However, the published reports provide controversial results. We measured parameters of primary hemostasis in VPA-treated patients with epilepsy, focusing on adenosine nucleotide-dependent platelet responses, which play a central role in primary hemostasis. We enrolled 20 cases (epileptic patients receiving treatment with VPA) and 20 controls (12 epileptic patients receiving treatment with drugs different from VPA and 8 healthy subjects). Measurements included prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), platelet count, platelet function analyzer (PFA)-100 closure times, plasma von Willebrand factor levels, platelet content of ADP, ATP, and serotonin (all stored in platelet dense granules), and platelet shape change and aggregation induced by ADP and other platelet agonists, including the ATP analog α,β-methylene-ATP. The plasma concentration of VPA was in the therapeutic range in 17 patients and slightly above the upper limit in 3 patients. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the studied parameters in cases versus controls. Our thorough controlled study failed to show that chronic treatment with VPA induces significant abnormalities of coagulation and primary hemostasis. Therefore, VPA, when present in the circulation in the therapeutic range, does not impair hemostasis.

  3. Polymer amide in the Allende and Murchison meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Julie E. M.; McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2015-11-01

    It has been proposed that exothermic gas phase polymerization of amino acids can occur in the conditions of a warm dense molecular cloud to form hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA) (McGeoch and McGeoch 2014). In a search for evidence of this presolar chemistry Allende and Murchison meteorites and a volcano control were diamond burr-etched and Folch extracted for potential HPA yielding 85 unique peaks in the meteorite samples via matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/MS). The amino acids after acid hydrolysis in Allende were below the level of detection but many of the Allende peaks via the more sensitive MALDI/TOF analysis could be fitted to a polymer combination of glycine, alanine, and alpha-hydroxyglycine with high statistical significance. A similar significant fit using these three amino acids could not be applied to the Murchison data indicating more complex polymer chemistry.

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hepatic Steatosis Involving ER Stress Response in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinying; Peng, Chuan; Ai, Yanbiao; Wang, Heng; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Li, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    The increase in fructose consumption is considered to be a risk factor for developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on hepatic lipid metabolism in fructose-treated primary mouse hepatocytes, and the changes of Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to DHA treatment. The hepatocytes were treated with fructose, DHA, fructose plus DHA, tunicamycin (TM) or fructose plus 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 24 h. Intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation was assessed by Oil Red O staining. The mRNA expression levels and protein levels related to lipid metabolism and ER stress response were determined by real-time PCR and Western blot. Fructose treatment led to obvious TG accumulation in primary hepatocytes through increasing expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), two key enzymes in hepatic de novo lipogenesis. DHA ameliorates fructose-induced TG accumulation by upregulating the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT-1α) and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1). DHA treatment or pretreatment with the ER stress inhibitor PBA significantly decreased TG accumulation and reduced the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), total inositol-requiring kinase 1 (IRE1α) and p-IRE1α. The present results suggest that DHA protects against high fructose-induced hepatocellular lipid accumulation. The current findings also suggest that alleviating the ER stress response seems to play a role in the prevention of fructose-induced hepatic steatosis by DHA. PMID:26805874

  5. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N–H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N–H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion. PMID:26195754

  6. Palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides by carbon-nitrogen cleavage: general strategy for amide N-C bond activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-15

    The first palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of amides with boronic acids for the synthesis of ketones by sterically-controlled N-C bond activation is reported. The transformation is characterized by operational simplicity using bench-stable, commercial reagents and catalysts, and a broad substrate scope, including substrates with electron-donating and withdrawing groups on both coupling partners, steric-hindrance, heterocycles, halides, esters and ketones. The scope and limitations are presented in the synthesis of >60 functionalized ketones. Mechanistic studies provide insight into the catalytic cycle of the cross-coupling, including the first experimental evidence for Pd insertion into the amide N-C bond. The synthetic utility is showcased by a gram-scale cross-coupling and cross-coupling at room temperature. Most importantly, this process provides a blueprint for the development of a plethora of metal catalyzed reactions of typically inert amide bonds via acyl-metal intermediates. A unified strategy for amide bond activation to enable metal insertion into N-C amide bond is outlined ().

  7. Palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides by carbon-nitrogen cleavage: general strategy for amide N-C bond activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-15

    The first palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of amides with boronic acids for the synthesis of ketones by sterically-controlled N-C bond activation is reported. The transformation is characterized by operational simplicity using bench-stable, commercial reagents and catalysts, and a broad substrate scope, including substrates with electron-donating and withdrawing groups on both coupling partners, steric-hindrance, heterocycles, halides, esters and ketones. The scope and limitations are presented in the synthesis of >60 functionalized ketones. Mechanistic studies provide insight into the catalytic cycle of the cross-coupling, including the first experimental evidence for Pd insertion into the amide N-C bond. The synthetic utility is showcased by a gram-scale cross-coupling and cross-coupling at room temperature. Most importantly, this process provides a blueprint for the development of a plethora of metal catalyzed reactions of typically inert amide bonds via acyl-metal intermediates. A unified strategy for amide bond activation to enable metal insertion into N-C amide bond is outlined (). PMID:26864384

  8. Amide derivatives of sulfonamides and isoniazid: synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, various amide derivatives of sulfanilamide, sulfamethoxazole, sulfadiazine, dapsone and isoniazid have been synthesized by condensing them with appropriate 4-oxo-4-(4-substituted phenyl)butanoic acid moiety. The compounds have been evaluated for their antiinflammatory, ulcerogenic and antibacterial activities. Their structures were established on the basis of elemental analysis, 1H NMR and mass spectral data. Some of the compounds were found to have significant antiinflammatory and antibacterial activities. Additionally, these derivatives were low in their ulcerogenic action, which is the main side effect of commonly used NSAIDs. PMID:19894647

  9. Cloning of a Novel Arylamidase Gene from Paracoccus sp. Strain FLN-7 That Hydrolyzes Amide Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Yin, Jin-Gang; Hang, Bao-Jian; Cai, Shu; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial isolate Paracoccus sp. strain FLN-7 hydrolyzes amide pesticides such as diflubenzuron, propanil, chlorpropham, and dimethoate through amide bond cleavage. A gene, ampA, encoding a novel arylamidase that catalyzes the amide bond cleavage in the amide pesticides was cloned from the strain. ampA contains a 1,395-bp open reading frame that encodes a 465-amino-acid protein. AmpA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and homogenously purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. AmpA is a homodimer with an isoelectric point of 5.4. AmpA displays maximum enzymatic activity at 40°C and a pH of between 7.5 and 8.0, and it is very stable at pHs ranging from 5.5 to 10.0 and at temperatures up to 50°C. AmpA efficiently hydrolyzes a variety of secondary amine compounds such as propanil, 4-acetaminophenol, propham, chlorpropham, dimethoate, and omethoate. The most suitable substrate is propanil, with Km and kcat values of 29.5 μM and 49.2 s−1, respectively. The benzoylurea insecticides (diflubenzuron and hexaflumuron) are also hydrolyzed but at low efficiencies. No cofactor is needed for the hydrolysis activity. AmpA shares low identities with reported arylamidases (less than 23%), forms a distinct lineage from closely related arylamidases in the phylogenetic tree, and has different biochemical characteristics and catalytic kinetics with related arylamidases. The results in the present study suggest that AmpA is a good candidate for the study of the mechanism for amide pesticide hydrolysis, genetic engineering of amide herbicide-resistant crops, and bioremediation of amide pesticide-contaminated environments. PMID:22544249

  10. Peptide backbone cleavage by α-amidation is enhanced at methionine residues.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Löbmann, Katja; Orywol, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Cleavage reactions at backbone loci are one of the consequences of oxidation of proteins and peptides. During α-amidation, the Cα -N bond in the backbone is cleaved under formation of an N-terminal peptide amide and a C-terminal keto acyl peptide. On the basis of earlier works, a facilitation of α-amidation by the thioether group of adjacent methionine side chains was proposed. This reaction was characterized by using benzoyl methionine and benzoyl alanyl methionine as peptide models. The decomposition of benzoylated amino acids (benzoyl-methionine, benzoyl-alanine, and benzoyl-methionine sulfoxide) to benzamide in the presence of different carbohydrate compounds (reducing sugars, Amadori products, and reductones) was studied during incubation for up to 48 h at 80 °C in acetate-buffered solution (pH 6.0). Small amounts of benzamide (0.3-1.5 mol%) were formed in the presence of all sugars and from all benzoylated species. However, benzamide formation was strongly enhanced, when benzoyl methionine was incubated in the presence of reductones and Amadori compounds (3.5-4.2 mol%). The reaction was found to be intramolecular, because α-amidation of a similar 4-methylbenzoylated amino acid was not enhanced in the presence of benzoyl-methionine and carbohydrate compounds. In the peptide benzoyl-alanyl-methionine, α-amidation at the methionine residue is preferred over α-amidation at the benzoyl peptide bond. We propose here a mechanism for the enhancement of α-amidation at methionine residues.

  11. Structures of Highly Twisted Amides Relevant to Amide N-C Cross-Coupling: Evidence for Ground-State Amide Destabilization.

    PubMed

    Pace, Vittorio; Holzer, Wolfgang; Meng, Guangrong; Shi, Shicheng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Roman; Szostak, Michal

    2016-10-01

    Herein, we show that acyclic amides that have recently enabled a series of elusive transition-metal-catalyzed N-C activation/cross-coupling reactions are highly twisted around the N-C(O) axis by a new destabilization mechanism of the amide bond. A unique effect of the N-glutarimide substituent, leading to uniformly high twist (ca. 90°) irrespective of the steric effect at the carbon side of the amide bond has been found. This represents the first example of a twisted amide that does not bear significant steric hindrance at the α-carbon atom. The (15) N NMR data show linear correlations between electron density at nitrogen and amide bond twist. This study strongly supports the concept of amide bond ground-state twist as a blueprint for activation of amides toward N-C bond cleavage. The new mechanism offers considerable opportunities for organic synthesis and biological processes involving non-planar amide bonds.

  12. A novel and orally active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, KR-33889 [2-[methoxycarbonyl(4-methoxyphenyl) methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide], attenuates injury in in vitro model of cell death and in vivo model of cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Sunkyung; Yi, Kyu Yang; Seo, Ho Won; Koo, Hyun-Na; Lee, Byung Ho

    2009-01-01

    Blocking of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 has been expected to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. We have recently identified a novel and orally active PARP-1 inhibitor, KR-33889 [2-[methoxycarbonyl(4-methoxyphenyl)-methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide], and its major metabolite, KR-34285 [2-[carboxy(4-methoxyphenyl)methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide]. KR-33889 potently inhibited PARP-1 activity with an IC(50) value of 0.52 +/- 0.10 microM. In H9c2 myocardial cells, KR-33889 (0.03-30 microM) showed a resistance to hydrogen peroxide (2 mM)-mediated oxidative insult and significantly attenuated activation of intracellular PARP-1. In anesthetized rats subjected to 30 min of coronary occlusion and 3 h of reperfusion, KR-33889 (0.3-3 mg/kg i.v.) dose-dependently reduced myocardial infarct size. KR-34285, a major metabolite of KR-33889, exerted similar patterns to the parent compound with equi- or weaker potency in the same studies described above. In separate experiments for the therapeutic time window study, KR-33889 (3 mg/kg i.v.) given at preischemia, at reperfusion or in both, in rat models also significantly reduced the myocardial infarction compared with their respective vehicle-treated group. Furthermore, the oral administration of KR-33889 (1-10 mg/kg p.o.) at 1 h before occlusion significantly reduced myocardial injury. The ability of KR-33889 to inhibit PARP in the rat model of ischemic heart was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection of poly(ADP-ribose) activation. These results indicate that the novel PARP inhibitor KR-33889 exerts its cardioprotective effect in in vitro and in vivo studies of myocardial ischemia via potent PARP inhibition and also suggest that KR-33889 could be an attractive therapeutic candidate with oral activity for several cardiovascular disorders, including myocardial infarction.

  13. Newly Identified Targets of Aspirin and Its Primary Metabolite, Salicylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Klessig, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant hormone, which influences several physiological processes, and is a critical modulator of multiple levels of immunity in plants. Several high-throughput screens, which were developed to identify SA-binding proteins through which SA mediates its many physiological effects in plants, uncovered several novel targets of aspirin and its primary metabolite, SA, in humans. These include glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), two proteins associated with some of the most prevalent and devastating human diseases. In addition, natural and synthetic SA derivatives were discovered, which are much more potent than SA at inhibiting the disease-associated activities of these targets. PMID:26954428

  14. Newly Identified Targets of Aspirin and Its Primary Metabolite, Salicylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Klessig, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant hormone, which influences several physiological processes, and is a critical modulator of multiple levels of immunity in plants. Several high-throughput screens, which were developed to identify SA-binding proteins through which SA mediates its many physiological effects in plants, uncovered several novel targets of aspirin and its primary metabolite, SA, in humans. These include glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), two proteins associated with some of the most prevalent and devastating human diseases. In addition, natural and synthetic SA derivatives were discovered, which are much more potent than SA at inhibiting the disease-associated activities of these targets.

  15. [Zoledronic Acid Administration is Effective for Hematopoiesis Management in a Patient with Primary Myelofibrosis].

    PubMed

    Sugama, Yusuke; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Sato, Ken; Yamada, Michiko; Hamaguchi, Kohta; Nakamura, Hajime; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Koguma, Masato; Koguma, Tetsuhiko; Kato, Junji

    2016-09-01

    An 80-year-old man received a diagnosis of anemia and a decreased platelet count from his physician in 2008, and was referred to our department where primary myelofibrosis was diagnosed.The patient was classified into the lower risk group according to the International Prognostic Scoring System(IPSS), and was followed up without treatment.In June 2010, pancytopenia progressed, and the patient was reclassified into the higher risk group.Blood count did not increase with metenolone treatment, but increased with zoledronic acid(ZA)that he started receiving from January 2012. After ZA treatment, circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF)and transforming growth factor-b(TGF-b)decreased, and bone marrow biopsy showed an absence of reticular fibers and collagen fibers.In the present case, we observed that the blood count increased because of ZA-induced improvements in myelofibrosis. PMID:27628559

  16. Effects of abscisic acid and xanthoxin on elongation and gravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Mulkey, T. J.; Yang, R. L.; Evans, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    We examined the involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) and xanthoxin (Xan) in maize root gravitropism by (1) testing the ability of ABA to allow positive gravitropism in dark-grown seedlings of the maize cultivar LG11, a cultivar known to require light for positive gravitropism of the primary root, (2) comparing curvature in roots in which half of the cap had been excised and replaced with agar containing either ABA or indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), (3) measuring gravitropism in roots of seedlings submerged in oxygenated solutions of ABA or IAA and (4) testing the effect of Xan on root elongation. Using a variety of methods of applying ABA to the root, we found that ABA did not cause horizontally-oriented primary roots of dark-grown seedlings to become positively gravitropic. Replacing half of the root cap of vertically oriented roots with an agar block containing ABA had little or no effect on curvature relative to that of controls in which the half cap was replaced by a plain agar block. Replacement of the removed half cap with IAA either canceled or reversed the curvature displayed by controls. When light-grown seedlings were submerged in ABA they responded strongly to gravistimulation while those in IAA did not. Xan (up to 0.1 mM) did not affect root elongation. The results indicate that ABA is not a likely mediator of root gravitropism and that the putative ABA precursor, Xan, lacks the appropriate growth-inhibiting properties to serve as a mediator of root gravitropism.

  17. Lead-acid bipolar battery assembled with primary chemically formed positive pasted electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, H.; Shamsipur, M.; Ghasemi, S.; Mousavi, M. F.

    Primary chemically formed lead dioxide (PbO 2) was used as positive electrode in preparation of lead-acid bipolar batteries. Chemical oxidation was carried out by both mixing and dipping methods using an optimized amount of ammonium persulfate as a suitable oxidizing agent. X-ray diffraction studies showed that the weight ratio of β-PbO 2 to α-PbO 2 is more for mixing method before electrochemical forming. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate charge transfer resistance of the lead dioxide obtained by mixing and dipping methods before and after electrochemical forming. Four types of bipolar lead-acid batteries were produced with: (1) lead substrate and conventional electroforming; (2) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with conventional electroforming; (3) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with chemical forming after curing and drying steps in oxidant bath, followed by electrochemical forming, and (4) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with primary chemical oxidation in mixing step, followed by conventional electroforming. The capacity and cycle-life tests of the prepared bipolar batteries were performed by a home-made battery tester and using the pulsed current method. The prepared batteries showed low weight, high capacity, high energy density and high power density. The first capacities of bipolar batteries of type 1-4 were found to be 152, 150, 180 and 198 mAh g -1, respectively. The experimental results showed that the prepared 6 V bipolar batteries of type 1-4 have power density (per cell unit) of 59.7, 57.4, 78.46 and 83.30 mW g -1 (W kg -1), respectively.

  18. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage study in primary amenorrhea by comet assay and karyotyping

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, Sarah; Chand, Parkash; Chaturvedula, Latha; Rao, K. Ramachandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: This study aims at evaluating the chromosomal abnormalities and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in cases with primary amenorrhea by karyotyping and comet assay. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 30 cases of primary amenorrhea were recruited. Secondary sexual characters were assessed by Tanner staging. Chromosomal analysis was performed by conventional phytohemagglutinin stimulated lymphocyte cell culture technique. Alkaline version of comet assay was used to evaluate DNA damage. RESULTS: The chromosomal pattern of 20 subjects (66.7%) was found to be normal (46,XX). Two subjects had 46,XY pattern and eight subjects had Turner syndrome (45,X or 45,X/46,XX). The comet parameters were found to be increased among subjects with 45,X monosomy, when compared to the rest of the study group and also in subjects with Tanner stage 1 when compared to stage 2. CONCLUSION: Comet assay revealed increased DNA damage in cases with 45,X monosomy, compared with subjects with 46,XX and 46,XY karyotype, which correlated with clinical features. PMID:24497702

  19. Molecular cloning and primary structure of human glial fibrillary acidic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, S.A.; Helman, L.J.; Allison, A.; Israel, M.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate-filament (IF) protein that is highly specific for cells of astroglial lineage, although its tissue-specific role is speculative. Determination of the primary structure of this protein should be of importance for understanding the functional role it plays in astroglia. Therefore, the authors isolated a cDNA clone encoding this protein and determined its nucleotide sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence indicates that GFAP shares structural similarities-particularly in the central rod domain and to a lesser degree in the carboxyl-terminal domain-with other IF proteins found in nonepithelial cell types. Considerable sequence divergence in the amino-terminal region of GFAP suggests that the tissue-specific functions of this IF protein might be mediated through this region of the molecule. In contrast, conservation of structural characteristics and a moderate degree of sequence conservation in the carboxyl-terminal region suggest functional similarities. Blot hybridization analysis using the GFAP cDNA as a probe failed to detect GFAP mRNA in both normal and neoplastic human tissues in which IF proteins other than GFAP are known to be expressed.

  20. Reactivity of molybdovanadophosphoric acids: Influence of the presence of vanadium in the primary and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casarini, D.; Centi, G.; Lena, V.; Tvaruzkova, Z. ); Jiru, P. )

    1993-10-01

    The catalytic behavior in butadiene and n-butane oxidation of molybdovanadophosphoric acids with vanadium localized inside the primary (oxoanion) and/or the secondary structure is reported. The samples are characterized by infrared, [sup 31]P-NMR, [sup 51]V-NMR, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopies in order to obtain information on the nature and localization of vanadium in the samples before reaction and the possible changes occurring during the course of the catalytic reaction. In particular, it is shown that vanadium localized initially in the secondary structure can exchange with the molybdenum atoms of the oxoanion during the catalytic reaction. Introduction of vanadium in the molybdophosphoric acid structure enhances the selective formation of maleic anhydride from the butadiene when vanadium is present both inside the oxoanion or localized in the secondary structure (before the catalytic tests), but the maximum in catalytic performance is found for different amounts of vanadium, depending on where the vanadium is localized initially. However, when present in the secondary structure, vanadium also has a negative influence on the activity of the heteropoly acid. On the contrary, in n-butane oxidation, the presence of vanadium enhances the rate of alkane activation due to the different rate-determining step. The presence of V ions also affects the maximum selectivity and yield to maleic anhydride from butane. V ions in the secondary structure are more selective at low conversion, while V ions inside the oxoanion are more selective at higher conversions and thus allow better maximum yields to maleic anhydride. 40 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A novel aromatic carbocation-based coupling reagent for esterification and amidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh V; Lyons, Demelza J M

    2015-02-21

    A novel tropylium-based coupling reagent has been developed to facilitate the synthesis of a series of esters, amides, lactones and peptides under mild reaction conditions. Remarkably, this reagent can be used in catalytic amounts in conjunction with a sacrificial reagent, offering a new and efficient method for nucleophilic coupling reactions of carboxylic acids.

  2. The formation of lipid hydroperoxide-derived amide-type lysine adducts on proteins: a review of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation is an important biological reaction. In particular, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) can be oxidized easily. Peroxidized lipids often react with other amines accompanied by the formation of various covalent adducts. Novel amide-type lipid-lysine adducts have been identified from an in vitro reaction mixture of lipid hydroperoxide with a protein, biological tissues exposed to conditions of oxidative stress and human urine from a healthy person. In this chapter, the current knowledge of amide type adducts is reviewed with a focus on the evaluation of functional foods and diseases with a history of discovery of hexanoyl-lysine (HEL). Although there is extensive research on HEL and other amide-type adducts, the mechanism of generation of the amide bond remains unclear. We have found that the decomposed aldehyde plus peroxide combined with a lysine moiety does not fully explain the formation of the amide-type lipid-lysine adduct that is generated by lipid hydroperoxide. Singlet oxygen or an excited state of the ketone generated from the lipid hydroperoxide may also contribute to the formation of the amide linkage. The amide-adducts may prove useful not only for the detection of oxidative stress induced by disease but also for the estimation of damage caused by an excess intake of PUFA. PMID:24374915

  3. One-Pot Amide Bond Formation from Aldehydes and Amines via a Photoorganocatalytic Activation of Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Giorgos N; Kokotos, Christoforos G

    2016-08-19

    A mild, one-pot, and environmentally friendly synthesis of amides from aldehydes and amines is described. Initially, a photoorganocatalytic reaction of aldehydes with di-isopropyl azodicarboxylate leads to an intermediate carbonyl imide, which can react with a variety of amines to afford the desired amides. The initial visible light-mediated activation of a variety of monosubstituted or disubstituted aldehydes is usually fast, occurring in a few hours. Following the photocatalytic reaction, addition of the primary amine at room temperature or the secondary amine at elevated temperatures leads to the corresponding amide from moderate to excellent yields without epimerization. This methodology was applied in the synthesis of Moclobemide, a drug against depression and social anxiety. PMID:27227271

  4. Polyimides Containing Amide And Perfluoroisopropyl Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezem, James F.

    1993-01-01

    New polyimides synthesized from reactions of aromatic hexafluoroisopropyl dianhydrides with asymmetric amide diamines. Soluble to extent of at least 10 percent by weight at temperature of about 25 degrees C in common amide solvents such as N-methylpyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Polyimides form tough, flexible films, coatings, and moldings. Glass-transition temperatures ranged from 300 to 365 degrees C, and crystalline melting temperatures observed between 543 and 603 degrees C. Display excellent physical, chemical, and electrical properties. Useful as adhesives, laminating resins, fibers, coatings for electrical and decorative purposes, films, wire enamels, and molding compounds.

  5. Cu(I) complexes of phosphorous amides

    SciTech Connect

    Nifant'ev, E.E.; Antipin, M.Y.; Blokhin, V.I.; Teleshev, A.T.

    1985-11-01

    The authors prepare and investigate copper complexes of phosphorous amides. The IR spectra of the systems investigated contain an absorption band at 920-940 cm/sup -1/ corresponding to P-N vibrations. The coordinates of the nonhydrogen atoms and their isotropic equivalent temperature factors are given with bond lengths and angles. The general form of the molecule of (IId) with the numbering of atoms, which are represented as probability ellipsoids of the thermal vibrations is shown. Copper complexes of phosphorus amides are phosphorylating agents for mono- and di-hydric alcohols.

  6. Catalytic asymmetric direct-type 1,4-addition reactions of simple amides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirotsugu; Sato, Io; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-04-01

    The development of catalytic asymmetric direct-type reactions of less acidic carbonyl compounds such as amides and esters has been a challenging theme in organic chemistry for decades. Here we describe the asymmetric direct 1,4-addition reactions of simple amides with α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds using a catalytic amount of a novel chiral catalyst consisting of a potassium base and a macrocyclic chiral crown ether. The desired 1,5-dicarbonyl compounds were obtained in high yields with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. This is the first example of a highly enantioselective catalytic direct-type reaction of simple amides. In addition, the structure of the chiral potassium catalyst has been investigated by X-ray crystallographic, dynamic (1)H NMR, and MALDI-TOF MS analyses.

  7. Solvent and conformation dependence of amide I vibrations in peptides and proteins containing proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Santanu; Lessing, Joshua; Meisl, Georg; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2011-12-01

    We present a mixed quantum-classical model for studying the amide I vibrational dynamics (predominantly CO stretching) in peptides and proteins containing proline. There are existing models developed for determining frequencies of and couplings between the secondary amide units. However, these are not applicable to proline because this amino acid has a tertiary amide unit. Therefore, a new parametrization is required for infrared-spectroscopic studies of proteins that contain proline, such as collagen, the most abundant protein in humans and animals. Here, we construct the electrostatic and dihedral maps accounting for solvent and conformation effects on frequency and coupling for the proline unit. We examine the quality and the applicability of these maps by carrying out spectral simulations of a number of peptides with proline in D2O and compare with experimental observations.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ester and amide derivatives of titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Trchová, Miroslava; Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav

    2013-06-01

    A set of layered ester and amide derivatives of titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate was prepared by solvothermal treatment of amorphous titanium(IV) carboxymethylphosphonate with corresponding 1-alkanols, 1,ω-alkanediols, 1-aminoalkanes, 1,ω-diaminoalkanes and 1,ω-amino alcohols and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Whereas alkyl chains with one functional group form bilayers tilted to the layers, 1,ω-diaminoalkanes and most of 1,ω-alkanediols form bridges connecting the adjacent layers. In the case of amino alcohols, the alkyl chains form bilayer and either hydroxyl or amino group is used for bonding. This simple method for the synthesis of ester and amide derivatives does not require preparation of acid chloride derivative as a precursor or pre-intercalation with alkylamines and can be used also for the preparation of ester and amide derivatives of titanium carboxyethylphosphonate and zirconium carboxymethylphosphonate.

  9. Calyculin and okadaic acid promote perilipin phosphorylation and increase lipolysis in primary rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    He, Jinhan; Jiang, Hongfeng; Tansey, John T; Tang, Chaoshu; Pu, Shenshen; Xu, Guoheng

    2006-02-01

    Lipolysis is primarily regulated by protein kinase A (PKA), which phosphorylates perilipin and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and causes translocation of HSL from cytosol to lipid droplets in adipocytes. Perilipin coats lipid droplet surface and assumes to prevent lipase access to triacylglycerols, thus inhibiting basal lipolysis; phosphorylated perilipin facilitates lipolysis on PKA activation. Here, we induced lipolysis in primary rat adipocytes by inhibiting protein serine/threonine phosphatase with specific inhibitors, okadaic acid and calyculin. The incubation with calyculin promotes incorporation of 32Pi into perilipins, thus, confirming that perilipin is hyperphosphorylated. The lipolysis response to calyculin is gradually accompanied by increased accumulation of phosphorylated perilipin A in a concentration- and time-responsive manner. When perilipin phosphorylation is abrogated by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide, lipolysis ceases. Different from a considerable translocation of HSL upon PKA activation with isoproterenol, calyculin does not alter HSL redistribution in primary or differentiated adipocytes, as confirmed by both immunostaining and immunoblotting. Thus, we suggest that inhibition of the phosphatase by calyculin activates lipolysis via promoting perilipin phosphorylation rather than eliciting HSL translocation in adipocytes. Further, we show that when the endogenous phosphatase is inhibited by calyculin, simultaneous PKA activation with isoproterenol converts most of the perilipin to the hyperphosphorylated species, and induces enhanced lipolysis. Apparently, as PKA phosphorylates perilipin and stimulates lipolysis, the phosphatase acts to dephosphorylate perilipin and attenuate lipolysis. This suggests a two-step strategy governed by a kinase and a phosphatase to modulate the steady state of perilipin phosphorylation and hence the lipolysis response to hormonal stimulation. PMID:16545598

  10. Inhibition of cytochrome P450s enhances (+)-usnic acid cytotoxicity in primary cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiang; Greenhaw, James; Salminen, William F

    2014-08-01

    (+)-Usnic acid (UA) is consumed as a dietary supplement to promote weight loss; however, dietary supplements containing UA have been associated with clinical cases of severe liver injury. UA has been shown to be hepatotoxic in rats and is extensively metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450s (CYPs); therefore, we examined if UA metabolism results in the formation of cytotoxic metabolites or if metabolism is a detoxification process in primary rat hepatocytes. When CYP activity was suppressed by the non-isoenzyme-selective inhibitor SKF-525A (20 μM), or the CYP1A inhibitor alpha-naphthoflavone (10 μM), or the CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (25 μM), the cytotoxicity of UA at 3~6 μM after 3~20 h of exposure was significantly increased as measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. At 2 h after UA exposure, an earlier time point prior to LDH release, these CYP inhibitors potentiated UA-induced inhibition of cellular respiration as determined by the Clark type oxygen electrode. Cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion by UA was also exacerbated by these CYP inhibitors. The CYP2B/2C inhibitor, ticlopidine at 20 μM, showed no effects in parallel experiments. These data demonstrate that UA is bio-transformed to less toxic metabolites in rat primary hepatocytes, probably mainly by CYP1A and 3A, but not 2B/2C. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Using Two-Tier Test to Identify Primary Students' Conceptual Understanding and Alternative Conceptions in Acid Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayrak, Beyza Karadeniz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify primary students' conceptual understanding and alternative conceptions in acid-base. For this reason, a 15 items two-tier multiple choice test administered 56 eighth grade students in spring semester 2009-2010. Data for this study were collected using a conceptual understanding scale prepared to include…

  12. Altered Plasma Lysophosphatidylcholines and Amides in Non-Obese and Non-Diabetic Subjects with Borderline-To-Moderate Hypertriglyceridemia: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Saem; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated alterations in plasma metabolites associated with borderline-to-moderate HTG (triglycerides (TG) 150-500 mg/dL). Using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis, the metabolomics profiles of 111 non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG were compared with those of 111 age- and sex-matched controls with normotriglyceridemia (NTG, TG <150 mg/dL). When compared to the NTG control group, the HTG group exhibited higher plasma levels of lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs), including C14:0 (q = 0.001) and C16:0 (q = 1.8E-05), and several amides, including N-ethyldodecanamide (q = 2.9E-05), N-propyldodecanamide (q = 3.5E-05), palmitoleamide (q = 2.9E-06), and palmitic amide (q = 0.019). The metabolomic profiles of the HTG group also exhibited lower plasma levels of cis-4-octenedioic acid (q<1.0E-9) and docosanamide (q = 0.002) compared with those of the NTG controls. LysoPC 16:0 and palmitoleamide emerged as the primary metabolites able to discriminate the HTG group from the NTG group in a partial least-squares discriminant analysis and were positively associated with the fasting triglyceride levels. We identified alterations in lysoPCs, amides, and cis-4-octenedioic acid among non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG. These results provide novel insights into the metabolic alterations that occur in the early metabolic stages of HTG. This information may facilitate the design of early interventions to prevent disease progression. PMID:25856314

  13. Effect of foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel after erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis de; Scatena, Camila; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of industrialised foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel previously eroded with hydrochloric acid (HCl). The crowns of one hundred two specimens were subjected to an erosive challenge with HCl and randomly divided into six groups (n = 17): Chocolate Milk (Toddynho® - Pepsico) - negative control; Petit Suisse Yogurt (Danoninho® - Danone); Strawberry Yogurt (Vigor); Apple puree (Nestlé); Fermented Milk (Yakult® - Yakult); and Home Squeezed Style Orange Juice (del Valle) - positive control. The 28-day immersion cycles for the test products were performed twice daily and were interspersed with exposure of the test substrate to artificial saliva. Measurements of enamel surface microhardness (SMH) were performed initially, after immersion in HCl and at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of experimentation. A two-way ANOVA, according to a split-plot design, followed by the sum of squares decomposition and Tukey's test, revealed a significant effect for the interaction between Foods and Drinks and Length of Exposure (p < 0.00001). Orange juice resulted in greater mineral loss of enamel after 28 days. None of the test products was associated with recovery of tooth enamel microhardness. PMID:26247516

  14. Optimum design and operation of primary sludge fermentation schemes for volatile fatty acids production.

    PubMed

    Chanona, J; Ribes, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a model-knowledge based algorithm for optimising the primary sludge fermentation process design and operation. This is a recently used method to obtain the volatile fatty acids (VFA), needed to improve biological nutrient removal processes, directly from the raw wastewater. The proposed algorithm consists in a heuristic reasoning algorithm based on the expert knowledge of the process. Only effluent VFA and the sludge blanket height (SBH) have to be set as design criteria, and the optimisation algorithm obtains the minimum return sludge and waste sludge flow rates which fulfil those design criteria. A pilot plant fed with municipal raw wastewater was operated in order to obtain experimental results supporting the developed algorithm groundwork. The experimental results indicate that when SBH was increased, higher solids retention time was obtained in the settler and VFA production increased. Higher recirculation flow-rates resulted in higher VFA production too. Finally, the developed algorithm has been tested by simulating different design conditions with very good results. It has been able to find the optimal operation conditions in all cases on which preset design conditions could be achieved. Furthermore, this is a general algorithm that can be applied to any fermentation-elutriation scheme with or without fermentation reactor.

  15. A decline of LAMP- 2 predicts ursodeoxycholic acid response in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Guo, Guan-ya; Wang, Jing-bo; Zhou, Xin-min; Yang, Qiong; Han, Zhe-yi; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Jing-wen; Cai, Yun; Ren, Xiao-li; Zhou, Xia; Chen, Rui-rui; Shi, Yong-quan; Han, Ying; Fan, Dai-ming

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical response to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is variable. We have previously reported that augmented expression of lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) was correlated with the severity of PBC. This study aimed to determine whether serum LAMP-2 could serve as a predictor of biochemical response to UDCA. The efficiency of serum LAMP-2 to predict biochemical response was assessed after 1 year of UDCA treatment in PBC patients by a retrospective analysis. We found that the basal serum LAMP-2 level was increased in PBC, especially in patients with stage III-IV (p = 0.010) or TBIL > 1 mg/dL (p = 0.014). Baseline serum LAMP-2 was higher in non-responders than that in responders, but the difference was statistically insignificant. However, after UDCA treatment, serum LAMP-2 level decreased prominently in the first 3 months, which was more obvious in responders. Further studies showed that the 35% decline of LAMP-2 after treatment for 3 months could be stated as an indicator of UDCA response with the sensitivity of 62.9% and specificity of 75.0% by Paris criteria. Meanwhile the specificity and sensitivity were identified as 63.5% and 64.1% by Barcelona criteria. Together, a decline in LAMP-2 might help to predict the response to UDCA. PMID:25894308

  16. Aqueous acidities of primary benzenesulfonamides: Quantum chemical predictions based on density functional theory and SMD.

    PubMed

    Aidas, Kęstutis; Lanevskij, Kiril; Kubilius, Rytis; Juška, Liutauras; Petkevičius, Daumantas; Japertas, Pranas

    2015-11-01

    Aqueous pK(a) of selected primary benzenesulfonamides are predicted in a systematic manner using density functional theory methods and the SMD solvent model together with direct and proton exchange thermodynamic cycles. Some test calculations were also performed using high-level composite CBS-QB3 approach. The direct scheme generally does not yield a satisfactory agreement between calculated and measured acidities due to a severe overestimation of the Gibbs free energy changes of the gas-phase deprotonation reaction by the used exchange-correlation functionals. The relative pK(a) values calculated using proton exchange method compare to experimental data very well in both qualitative and quantitative terms, with a mean absolute error of about 0.4 pK(a) units. To achieve this accuracy, we find it mandatory to perform geometry optimization of the neutral and anionic species in the gas and solution phases separately, because different conformations are stabilized in these two cases. We have attempted to evaluate the effect of the conformer-averaged free energies in the pK(a) predictions, and the general conclusion is that this procedure is highly too costly as compared with the very small improvement we have gained.

  17. Effect of foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel after erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis de; Scatena, Camila; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of industrialised foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel previously eroded with hydrochloric acid (HCl). The crowns of one hundred two specimens were subjected to an erosive challenge with HCl and randomly divided into six groups (n = 17): Chocolate Milk (Toddynho® - Pepsico) - negative control; Petit Suisse Yogurt (Danoninho® - Danone); Strawberry Yogurt (Vigor); Apple puree (Nestlé); Fermented Milk (Yakult® - Yakult); and Home Squeezed Style Orange Juice (del Valle) - positive control. The 28-day immersion cycles for the test products were performed twice daily and were interspersed with exposure of the test substrate to artificial saliva. Measurements of enamel surface microhardness (SMH) were performed initially, after immersion in HCl and at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of experimentation. A two-way ANOVA, according to a split-plot design, followed by the sum of squares decomposition and Tukey's test, revealed a significant effect for the interaction between Foods and Drinks and Length of Exposure (p < 0.00001). Orange juice resulted in greater mineral loss of enamel after 28 days. None of the test products was associated with recovery of tooth enamel microhardness.

  18. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin's Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C; Snyder, Solomon H; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA's multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson's drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death.

  19. A Lewis acid-promoted Pinner reaction

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Dominik; Nemecek, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Summary Carbonitriles and alcohols react in a Lewis acid-promoted Pinner reaction to carboxylic esters. Best results are obtained with two equivalents of trimethylsilyl triflate as Lewis acid. Good yields are achieved with primary alcohols and aliphatic or benzylic carbonitriles, but the straightforward synthesis of acrylates and benzoates starting with acrylonitrile and benzonitrile, respectively, is similarly possible. Phenols are not acylated under these reaction conditions. The method has been used for the first total synthesis of the natural product monaspilosin. In the reaction of benzyl alcohols variable amounts of amides are formed in a Ritter-type side reaction. PMID:23946857

  20. Locations of the three primary binding sites for long-chain fatty acids on bovine serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.A.; Era, S.; Bhamidipati, S.P. ); Reed, R.G. )

    1991-03-15

    Binding of {sup 13}C-enriched oleic acid to bovine serum albumin and to three large proteolytic fragments of albumin - two complementary fragments corresponding to the two halved of albumin and one fragment corresponding to the carboxyl-terminal domain - yielded unique patterns of NMR resonances (chemical shifts and relative intensities) that were used to identify the locations of binding of the first 5 mol of oleic acid to the multidomain albumin molecule. The first 3 mol of oleic acid added to intact albumin generated three distinct NMR resonances as a result of simultaneous binding of oleic acid to three heterogeneous sites (primary sites). This distribution suggests albumin to be a less symmetrical binding molecule than theoretical models predict. This work also demonstrates the power of NMR for the study of microenvironments of individual fatty acid binding sites in specific domain.

  1. Amidated pectin based hydrogels: synthesis, characterization and cytocompatibility study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, R K; Singhal, J P; Datt, M; Banthia, A K

    2007-01-01

    The design and development of pectin-based hydrogels were attempted through the chemical modification of pectin with diethanolamine (DA). Diethanolamine modified pectin (DAMP) was synthesized by the chemical modification of pectin with varying concentrations of DA (1:1,1:2,1:3 and 1:4) at 5 oC in methanol. The modified product was used for the preparation of the hydrogel with glutaraldehyde (GA) reagent. The prepared hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy; organic elemental analysis, and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and swelling, hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility studies of the prepared hydrogels were also done. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of primary and secondary amide absorption bands. The XRD pattern of the DAMP hydrogel clearly indicated that there was a considerable increase in crystallinity as compared to parent pectin. The degree of amidation (DA) and molar and mass reaction yields (Ym and Yn) was calculated based on the results of organic elemental analysis. Drug release studies from the hydrogel membranes were also evaluated in a Franz's diffusion cell. The hydrogels demonstrated good water holding properties and were found to be compatible with B-16 melanoma cells and human blood.

  2. Formation of amides, their intramolecular reactions for the synthesis of N-heterocycles, and preparation of a marketed drug, sildenafil: a comprehensive coverage.

    PubMed

    Laha, Joydev K; Patel, Ketul V; Tummalapalli, K S Satyanarayana; Dayal, Neetu

    2016-08-11

    A unified approach to the tandem preparation of diverse nitrogen heterocycles via decarboxylative acylation of ortho-substituted amines with α-oxocarboxylic acids and subsequent intramolecular cyclizations has been developed. The key features of this work include: the first example of transition-metal-free decarboxylative amidation of α-oxocarboxylic acids with ortho-substituted amines, realization of intramolecular cyclization of amides employing nucleophiles that have previously been unexplored, mechanistic investigation of an unprecedented K2S2O8 promoted amide formation and its subsequent intramolecular cyclizations, and application to the synthesis of a best-selling marketed drug. PMID:27430326

  3. Photolysis of nitrous acid as a primary source of OH radicals indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Alvarez, E.; Amedro, D.; Afif, C.; Gligorovski, S.; Schoemacker, C.; Fittschen, C. M.; Doussin, J.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    reactions, potentially more hazardous than the primary pollutants in the indoor air. This calculation indicates that, since the levels of concentration of OH radicals found in this study are one order of magnitude higher than predicted before, reactivity with OH becomes relevant as these reactions take place during a smaller time scale than typical air exchange rates indoors. Gómez Alvarez, E.; Amedro, D.; Afif, C. ; Gligorovski, S.; Schoemacker , C.; Fittschen, C. ; Doussin, J. F.; Wortham, H. (2013) Unexpectedly high indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations associated with nitrous acid. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Accepted.

  4. Effects of indole amides on lettuce and onion germination and growth.

    PubMed

    Borgati, Thiago F; Boaventura, Maria Amelia D

    2011-01-01

    Auxins, such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), are important in plant germination and growth, while physiological polyamines, such as putrescine, are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, and their concentrations increase during germination. In this work, novel indole amides were synthesized in good yields by monoacylation of morpholine and unprotected symmetrical diamines with indole-3-carboxylic acid, a putative metabolite of IAA, possessing no auxin-like activity. These amides were tested for their effects on seed germination and growth of the radicles and shoots of Lactuca sativa (lettuce) and Allium cepa (onion) seedlings, at 100.0, 1.0, and 0.01 microM concentrations. Germination was generally stimulated, with the exception of amide 3, derived from morpholine, at 100 microM. On radicle and shoot growth, the effect of these compounds was predominantly inhibitory. Compound 3 was the best inhibitor of growth of lettuce and onion, at the highest concentration. Amides, such as propanil, among others, are described as having herbicidal activity.

  5. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin’s Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M.; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA’s multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson’s drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death. PMID:26606248

  6. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin's Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C; Snyder, Solomon H; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA's multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson's drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death. PMID:26606248

  7. Mutational Characterization of the Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Hov, Johannes R.; Keitel, Verena; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Spomer, Lina; Ellinghaus, Eva; ElSharawy, Abdou; Melum, Espen; Boberg, Kirsten M.; Manke, Thomas; Balschun, Tobias; Schramm, Christoph; Bergquist, Annika; Weismüller, Tobias; Gotthardt, Daniel; Rust, Christian; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Onnie, Clive M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Sterneck, Martina; Teufel, Andreas; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Vatn, Morten H.; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Vermeire, Severine; Mathew, Christopher G.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Beuers, Ulrich; Manns, Michael P.; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrumpf, Erik; Häussinger, Dieter; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2010-01-01

    Background TGR5, the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1), has been linked to inflammatory pathways as well as bile homeostasis, and could therefore be involved in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) a chronic inflammatory bile duct disease. We aimed to extensively investigate TGR5 sequence variation in PSC, as well as functionally characterize detected variants. Methodology/Principal Findings Complete resequencing of TGR5 was performed in 267 PSC patients and 274 healthy controls. Six nonsynonymous mutations were identified in addition to 16 other novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms. To investigate the impact from the nonsynonymous variants on TGR5, we created a receptor model, and introduced mutated TGR5 constructs into human epithelial cell lines. By using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and a cAMP-sensitive luciferase assay, five of the nonsynonymous mutations (W83R, V178M, A217P, S272G and Q296X) were found to reduce or abolish TGR5 function. Fine-mapping of the previously reported PSC and UC associated locus at chromosome 2q35 in large patient panels revealed an overall association between the TGR5 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs11554825 and PSC (odds ratio  = 1.14, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.26, p = 0.010) and UC (odds ratio  = 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.27, p = 8.5×10−7), but strong linkage disequilibrium precluded demarcation of TGR5 from neighboring genes. Conclusions/Significance Resequencing of TGR5 along with functional investigations of novel variants provided unique insight into an important candidate gene for several inflammatory and metabolic conditions. While significant TGR5 associations were detected in both UC and PSC, further studies are needed to conclusively define the role of TGR5 variation in these diseases. PMID:20811628

  8. Promoting extracellular matrix remodeling via ascorbic acid enhances the survival of primary ovarian follicles encapsulated in alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Tagler, David; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Tu, Tao; Bernabé, Beatriz Peñalver; Lee, Raymond; Zhu, Jie; Kniazeva, Ekaterina; Hornick, Jessica E; Woodruff, Teresa K; Shea, Lonnie D

    2014-07-01

    The in vitro growth of ovarian follicles is an emerging technology for fertility preservation. Various strategies support the culture of secondary and multilayer follicles from various species including mice, non-human primate, and human; however, the culture of early stage (primary and primordial) follicles, which are more abundant in the ovary and survive cryopreservation, has been limited. Hydrogel-encapsulating follicle culture systems that employed feeder cells, such as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), stimulated the growth of primary follicles (70-80 µm); yet, survival was low and smaller follicles (<70 µm) rapidly lost structure and degenerated. These morphologic changes were associated with a breakdown of the follicular basement membrane; hence, this study investigated ascorbic acid based on its role in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition/remodeling for other applications. The selection of ascorbic acid was further supported by a microarray analysis that suggested a decrease in mRNA levels of enzymes within the ascorbate pathway between primordial, primary, and secondary follicles. The supplementation of ascorbic acid (50 µg/mL) significantly enhanced the survival of primary follicles (<80 µm) cultured in alginate hydrogels, which coincided with improved structural integrity. Follicles developed antral cavities and increased to diameters exceeding 250 µm. Consistent with improved structural integrity, the gene/protein expression of ECM and cell adhesion molecules was significantly changed. This research supports the notion that modifying the culture environment (medium components) can substantially enhance the survival and growth of early stage follicles.

  9. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples. PMID:27175784

  10. Nitrosation and nitration of fulvic acid, peat and coal with nitric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  11. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  12. Threonine deprivation rapidly activates the system A amino acid transporter in primary cultures of rat neurons from the essential amino acid sensor in the anterior piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Blais, Anne; Huneau, Jean-François; Magrum, Linda J; Koehnle, Thomas J; Sharp, James W; Tomé, Daniel; Gietzen, Dorothy W

    2003-07-01

    Omnivores show recognition of essential (indispensable) amino acid deficiency by changing their feeding behavior within 20 min, yet the cellular mechanisms of amino acid sensation in eukaryotes are poorly understood. The anterior piriform cortex (APC) of the brain in rats or its analog in birds likely houses the in vivo amino acid chemosensor. Because amino acid transporters adapt rapidly to essential amino acid deficiency in several cell models, we hypothesized that activation of electrogenic amino acid transport in APC neurons might contribute to the function of the amino acid sensor. We evaluated transport systems in primary cultures of neurons from the APC, hippocampus and cerebellum, or glia, incubated in complete or threonine-devoid (deficient) medium. After 10 min in deficient medium, uptake of threonine or a system A-selective substrate, methyl amino-isobutyric acid, was increased 60% in APC neurons only (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated upregulation of system A, an electrogenic amino acid-sodium symporter. This depletion-induced activation required sodium, intact intracellular trafficking, and phosphorylation of signal transduction-related kinases. Efflux studies showed that other transporter types were functional in the APC; they appeared to be altered dynamically in threonine-deficient cells in response to rapid increases in system A activity. The present data provided support for the chemical sensitivity of the APC and its role as the brain area housing the indispensable amino acid chemosensor. They also showed a region-specific, phosphorylation-dependent activation of the system A transporter in the brain in response to threonine deficiency.

  13. Ester-Mediated Amide Bond Formation Driven by Wet-Dry Cycles: A Possible Path to Polypeptides on the Prebiotic Earth.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Jay G; Yu, Sheng-Sheng; Mamajanov, Irena; Grover, Martha A; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Fernández, Facundo M; Hud, Nicholas V

    2015-08-17

    Although it is generally accepted that amino acids were present on the prebiotic Earth, the mechanism by which α-amino acids were condensed into polypeptides before the emergence of enzymes remains unsolved. Here, we demonstrate a prebiotically plausible mechanism for peptide (amide) bond formation that is enabled by α-hydroxy acids, which were likely present along with amino acids on the early Earth. Together, α-hydroxy acids and α-amino acids form depsipeptides-oligomers with a combination of ester and amide linkages-in model prebiotic reactions that are driven by wet-cool/dry-hot cycles. Through a combination of ester-amide bond exchange and ester bond hydrolysis, depsipeptides are enriched with amino acids over time. These results support a long-standing hypothesis that peptides might have arisen from ester-based precursors.

  14. Ester-Mediated Amide Bond Formation Driven by Wet-Dry Cycles: A Possible Path to Polypeptides on the Prebiotic Earth.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Jay G; Yu, Sheng-Sheng; Mamajanov, Irena; Grover, Martha A; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Fernández, Facundo M; Hud, Nicholas V

    2015-08-17

    Although it is generally accepted that amino acids were present on the prebiotic Earth, the mechanism by which α-amino acids were condensed into polypeptides before the emergence of enzymes remains unsolved. Here, we demonstrate a prebiotically plausible mechanism for peptide (amide) bond formation that is enabled by α-hydroxy acids, which were likely present along with amino acids on the early Earth. Together, α-hydroxy acids and α-amino acids form depsipeptides-oligomers with a combination of ester and amide linkages-in model prebiotic reactions that are driven by wet-cool/dry-hot cycles. Through a combination of ester-amide bond exchange and ester bond hydrolysis, depsipeptides are enriched with amino acids over time. These results support a long-standing hypothesis that peptides might have arisen from ester-based precursors. PMID:26201989

  15. Chlorination of N-methylacetamide and amide-containing pharmaceuticals. Quantum-chemical study of the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Šakić, Davor; Šonjić, Pavica; Tandarić, Tana; Vrček, Valerije

    2014-03-27

    Chlorination of amides is of utmost importance in biochemistry and environmental chemistry. Despite the huge body of data, the mechanism of reaction between amides and hypochlorous acid in aqueous environment remains unclear. In this work, the three different reaction pathways for chlorination of N-methylacetamide by HOCl have been considered: the one-step N-chlorination of the amide, the chlorination via O-chlorinated intermediate, and the N-chlorination of the iminol intermediate. The high-level quantum chemical G3B3 composite procedure, double-hybrid B2-PLYPD, B2K-PLYP methods, and global hybrid M06-2X and BMK methods have been employed. The calculated energy barriers have been compared to the experimental value of ΔG(#)298 ≈ 87 kJ/mol, which corresponds to reaction rate constant k(r) ≈ 0.0036 M(-1) s(-1). Only the mechanism in which the iminol form of N-methylacetamide reacts with HOCl is consistent (ΔG(#)298 = 87.3 kJ/mol at G3B3 level) with experimental results. The analogous reaction mechanism has been calculated as the most favorable pathway in the chlorination of small-sized amides and amide-containing pharmaceuticals: carbamazepine, acetaminophen, and phenytoin. We conclude that the formation of the iminol intermediate followed by its reaction with HOCl is the general mechanism of N-chlorination for a vast array of amides.

  16. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid.

  17. Polyimides containing amide and perfluoroisopropylidene connecting groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    New, thermooxidatively stable polyimides were prepared from the reaction of aromatic dianhydrides containing isopropylidene bridging groups with aromatic diamines containing amide connecting groups between the rings. Several of these polyimides were shown to be semi-crystalline as evidenced by wide angle x ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. Most of the polyimides form tough, flexible films with high tensile properties. These polyimide films exhibit enhanced solubility in organic solvents.

  18. Chromatographically separable rotamers of an unhindered amide

    PubMed Central

    Geffe, Mario; Andernach, Lars; Trapp, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Summary Surprisingly stable formamide rotamers were encountered in the tetrahydroisoquinoline and morphinan series of alkaloids. We investigated the hindered rotation around the amide bond by dynamic high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and kinetic measurements of the interconversion of the rotamers which can readily be separated by HPLC as well as TLC. The experimental results of the different methods were compared to each other as well as to results obtained by DFT calculations. PMID:24778722

  19. Regulation of primary metabolic pathways in oyster mushroom mycelia induced by blue light stimulation: accumulation of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masanobu; Kimura, Ninako; Miura, Ryuhei

    2015-02-27

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate in the aromatic amino acid pathway as well as an important starting material for the synthesis of Tamiflu, a potent and selective inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of influenza viruses A and B. Here we report that in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia cultivated in the dark, stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes induces the accumulation of shikimic acid. An integrated analysis of primary metabolites, gene expression and protein expression suggests that the accumulation of shikimic acid caused by blue light stimulation is due to an increase in 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS, EC2.5.1.54), the rate-determining enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway, as well as phosphofructokinase (PFK, EC2.7.1.11) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC1.1.1.49), the rate-determining enzymes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. This stimulation results in increased levels of phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP) and erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P), the starting materials of shikimic acid biosynthesis.

  20. Regulation of primary metabolic pathways in oyster mushroom mycelia induced by blue light stimulation: accumulation of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masanobu; Kimura, Ninako; Miura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate in the aromatic amino acid pathway as well as an important starting material for the synthesis of Tamiflu, a potent and selective inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of influenza viruses A and B. Here we report that in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia cultivated in the dark, stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes induces the accumulation of shikimic acid. An integrated analysis of primary metabolites, gene expression and protein expression suggests that the accumulation of shikimic acid caused by blue light stimulation is due to an increase in 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS, EC2.5.1.54), the rate-determining enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway, as well as phosphofructokinase (PFK, EC2.7.1.11) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC1.1.1.49), the rate-determining enzymes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. This stimulation results in increased levels of phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP) and erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P), the starting materials of shikimic acid biosynthesis. PMID:25721093

  1. Regulation of Primary Metabolic Pathways in Oyster Mushroom Mycelia Induced by Blue Light Stimulation: Accumulation of Shikimic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Masanobu; Kimura, Ninako; Miura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate in the aromatic amino acid pathway as well as an important starting material for the synthesis of Tamiflu, a potent and selective inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of influenza viruses A and B. Here we report that in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia cultivated in the dark, stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes induces the accumulation of shikimic acid. An integrated analysis of primary metabolites, gene expression and protein expression suggests that the accumulation of shikimic acid caused by blue light stimulation is due to an increase in 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS, EC2.5.1.54), the rate-determining enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway, as well as phosphofructokinase (PFK, EC2.7.1.11) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC1.1.1.49), the rate-determining enzymes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. This stimulation results in increased levels of phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP) and erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P), the starting materials of shikimic acid biosynthesis. PMID:25721093

  2. Spatial Patterns and Temperature Predictions of Tuna Fatty Acids: Tracing Essential Nutrients and Changes in Primary Producers

    PubMed Central

    Pethybridge, Heidi R.; Parrish, Christopher C.; Morrongiello, John; Young, Jock W.; Farley, Jessica H.; Gunasekera, Rasanthi M.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are among the least understood nutrients in marine environments, despite their profile as key energy components of food webs and that they are essential to all life forms. Presented here is a novel approach to predict the spatial-temporal distributions of fatty acids in marine resources using generalized additive mixed models. Fatty acid tracers (FAT) of key primary producers, nutritional condition indices and concentrations of two essential long-chain (≥C20) omega-3 fatty acids (EFA) measured in muscle of albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, sampled in the south-west Pacific Ocean were response variables. Predictive variables were: location, time, sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a (Chla), and phytoplankton biomass at time of catch and curved fork length. The best model fit for all fatty acid parameters included fish length and SST. The first oceanographic contour maps of EFA and FAT (FATscapes) were produced and demonstrated clear geographical gradients in the study region. Predicted changes in all fatty acid parameters reflected shifts in the size-structure of dominant primary producers. Model projections show that the supply and availability of EFA are likely to be negatively affected by increases in SST especially in temperate waters where a 12% reduction in both total fatty acid content and EFA proportions are predicted. Such changes will have large implications for the availability of energy and associated health benefits to high-order consumers. Results convey new concerns on impacts of projected climate change on fish-derived EFA in marine systems. PMID:26135308

  3. Visual Inspection after Acetic Acid (VIA) Is Highly Heterogeneous in Primary Cervical Screening in Amazonian Peru

    PubMed Central

    Almonte, Maribel; Ferreccio, Catterina; Luciani, Silvana; Gonzales, Miguel; Delgado, Jose M.; Santos, Carlos; Alvarez, Manuel; Cuzick, Jack; Sasieni, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional cytology (Pap) and visual inspection after the application of acetic acid (VIA) are currently used in primary screening in Peru. Studies suggest that the quality of VIA is highly variable. Over 36 000 women were screened with Pap and VIA in the TATI (Tamizaje y Tratamiento Inmediato de Lesiones Cervico-uterinas) project conducted in Amazonian Peru. Within a nested study to compare several screening techniques (C-TATI), a total of 5435 women were additionally screened with liquid-based cytology (LBC) and high-risk human papillomavirus testing (HR-HPV). We investigate the variation of positivity rates of VIA, Pap, LBC and HR-HPV in C-TATI and of VIA in the full TATI intervention. Methods At the screening visit, midwives collected three cervical samples for Pap, LBC and HC2 before performing VIA. The dispersion factor “D” (D = Pearson chi-square value/degrees-of-freedom) was used to measure the variability of tests results. Within C-TATI, the variability of positivity rates of VIA, Pap, LBC and HR-HPV was also graphically assessed with box- and scatter plots by midwife and month of screening. Funnel plots and smoothed scatter plots were used to correlate the variation of VIA by the number of examinations performed by each midwife over the full TATI intervention. Results Consistently over TATI, VIA results were highly variable, independently of the examiner, the time when the test was performed and the number of tests the examiner performed (D>6, p-values<0.001). In C-TATI, VIA results varied the most while those of HR-HPV varied the least (Ds>25, p-values<0.001 for VIA, Ds<1.6, p-values>0.05 for HR-HPV). No evidence for correlation between the number of VIAs done per midwife and the variability of VIA results was observed. Conclusion The lack of over-dispersion for HR-HPV detection suggests that the variable VIA results do not reflect true variation in underlying disease, but a lack of consistency in human judgement. PMID:25635965

  4. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin signalling modulates amino acid uptake by regulating transporter cell surface abundance in primary human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Abnormal fetal growth increases the risk for perinatal complications and predisposes for the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Emerging evidence suggests that changes in placental amino acid transport directly contribute to altered fetal growth. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating placental amino acid transport are largely unknown. Here we combined small interfering (si) RNA-mediated silencing approaches with protein expression/localization and functional studies in cultured primary human trophoblast cells to test the hypothesis that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and 2 (mTORC2) regulate amino acid transporters by post-translational mechanisms. Silencing raptor (inhibits mTORC1) or rictor (inhibits mTORC2) markedly decreased basal System A and System L amino acid transport activity but had no effect on growth factor-stimulated amino acid uptake. Simultaneous inhibition of mTORC1 and 2 completely inhibited both basal and growth factor-stimulated amino acid transport activity. In contrast, mTOR inhibition had no effect on serotonin transport. mTORC1 or mTORC2 silencing markedly decreased the plasma membrane expression of specific System A (SNAT2, SLC38A2) and System L (LAT1, SLC7A5) transporter isoforms without affecting global protein expression. In conclusion, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate human trophoblast amino acid transporters by modulating the cell surface abundance of specific transporter isoforms. This is the first report showing regulation of amino acid transport by mTORC2. Because placental mTOR activity and amino acid transport are decreased in human intrauterine growth restriction our data are consistent with the possibility that dysregulation of placental mTOR plays an important role in the development of abnormal fetal growth.

  6. Bowel Functions, Fecal Unconjugated Primary and Secondary Bile Acids, and Colonic Transit in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrea; Camilleri, Michael; Vijayvargiya, Priya; Busciglio, Irene; Burton, Duane; Ryks, Michael; Rhoten, Deborah; Lueke, Alan; Saenger, Amy; Girtman, Adam; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims There is an unclear relationship among bowel symptoms, excretion of unconjugated fecal bile acid (UBA), and colonic transit in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We measured total and main individual UBA in fecal samples of patients with IBS, and assessed relationships among stool frequency or consistency, fecal UBA (total and individual), and colonic transit. Methods In a study of 30 healthy volunteers (controls), 31 subjects with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), and 30 with IBS with constipation (IBS-C) were placed on 4-day diets containing 100 g fat; we measured stool characteristics, total fecal UBA and fat levels, and overall colonic transit. We assessed univariate associations of total and individual levels of fecal UBA with phenotype (controls, IBS-D, IBS-C) using the Kruskal-Wallis test; associations between endpoints were assessed using Spearman correlations. With response surface regression models, we assessed relationships between stool, colonic transit, and fecal total and secretory UBA. Results There was a significant association between total fecal UBA and phenotype (P=.029); the association was greater for IBS-D than IBS-C, compared with controls. Fecal levels of primary UBAs (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) were higher in subjects with IBS-D, compared with controls (both P<.01). Levels of fecal secretory UBAs (chenodeoxycholic acids, P=.019; deoxycholic acid, P=.025) were lower in subjects with IBS-C compared with controls, whereas levels of the nonsecretory UBA, lithocholic acid, were higher (P=.020). There were significant univariate associations between stool number and form and total fecal UBA (including percentages of lithocholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acids, and cholic acid), fecal fat, and colonic transit at 24 and 48 h after eating. In the regression models, the relative contribution of colonic transit was consistently greater, and largely independent of the contribution of bile acids. Conclusions Measurements of individual UBAs

  7. Obeticholic acid for the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis in adult patients: clinical utility and patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Bowlus, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary “cirrhosis”, is a rare autoimmune liver disease characterized by the hallmark autoantibodies to mitochondrial antigens and immune-mediated destruction of small bile duct epithelial cells leading to cholestasis and cirrhosis. Surprisingly, while immune modulators have not been effective in the treatment of PBC, supplementation with the hydrophilic bile acid (BA) ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been demonstrated to slow the disease progression. However, a significant minority of PBC patients do not have a complete response to UDCA and remain at risk of continued disease progression. Although the mechanisms of action are not well understood, UDCA provided proof of concept for BA therapy in PBC. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a novel derivative of the human BA chenodeoxycholic acid, is a potent agonist of the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor, which regulates BA synthesis and transport. A series of clinical trials of OCA in PBC, primarily in combination with UDCA, have established that OCA leads to significant reductions in serum alkaline phosphatase that are predicted to lead to improved clinical outcomes, while dose-dependent pruritus has been the most common adverse effect. On the basis of these studies, OCA was given conditional approval by the US Food and Drug Administration with plans to establish the long-term clinical efficacy of OCA in patients with advanced PBC. PMID:27621676

  8. Obeticholic acid for the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis in adult patients: clinical utility and patient selection.

    PubMed

    Bowlus, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary "cirrhosis", is a rare autoimmune liver disease characterized by the hallmark autoantibodies to mitochondrial antigens and immune-mediated destruction of small bile duct epithelial cells leading to cholestasis and cirrhosis. Surprisingly, while immune modulators have not been effective in the treatment of PBC, supplementation with the hydrophilic bile acid (BA) ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been demonstrated to slow the disease progression. However, a significant minority of PBC patients do not have a complete response to UDCA and remain at risk of continued disease progression. Although the mechanisms of action are not well understood, UDCA provided proof of concept for BA therapy in PBC. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a novel derivative of the human BA chenodeoxycholic acid, is a potent agonist of the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor, which regulates BA synthesis and transport. A series of clinical trials of OCA in PBC, primarily in combination with UDCA, have established that OCA leads to significant reductions in serum alkaline phosphatase that are predicted to lead to improved clinical outcomes, while dose-dependent pruritus has been the most common adverse effect. On the basis of these studies, OCA was given conditional approval by the US Food and Drug Administration with plans to establish the long-term clinical efficacy of OCA in patients with advanced PBC. PMID:27621676

  9. Obeticholic acid for the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis in adult patients: clinical utility and patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Bowlus, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary “cirrhosis”, is a rare autoimmune liver disease characterized by the hallmark autoantibodies to mitochondrial antigens and immune-mediated destruction of small bile duct epithelial cells leading to cholestasis and cirrhosis. Surprisingly, while immune modulators have not been effective in the treatment of PBC, supplementation with the hydrophilic bile acid (BA) ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been demonstrated to slow the disease progression. However, a significant minority of PBC patients do not have a complete response to UDCA and remain at risk of continued disease progression. Although the mechanisms of action are not well understood, UDCA provided proof of concept for BA therapy in PBC. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a novel derivative of the human BA chenodeoxycholic acid, is a potent agonist of the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor, which regulates BA synthesis and transport. A series of clinical trials of OCA in PBC, primarily in combination with UDCA, have established that OCA leads to significant reductions in serum alkaline phosphatase that are predicted to lead to improved clinical outcomes, while dose-dependent pruritus has been the most common adverse effect. On the basis of these studies, OCA was given conditional approval by the US Food and Drug Administration with plans to establish the long-term clinical efficacy of OCA in patients with advanced PBC.

  10. Solvent extraction of Sr2+ and Cs+ using protic amide-based ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Huang, Jing-Fang; Luo, Huimin

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen protic amide-based ionic liquids (ILs) derived from N,N-dimethylformamide and other protophilic amide derivatives with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide or bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide as conjugated anions were synthesized in a one-pot reaction with very high yields. All sixteen of these protic ionic liquids (PILs) were characterized by NMR spectra, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. These protic amide-based ionic liquids were tested as extraction solvents using dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) as an extractant for separation of Sr2+ and Cs+ from aqueous solutions. The extraction efficiencies were studied in comparison with those derived from both imidazolium-based and ammonium-based IL extraction systems. Excellent extraction efficiencies were found for a number of these ILs using DCH18C6 as an extractant. Unlike findings for imidazolium-based and ammonium-based ILs, the observed enhancement trend for the extraction efficiency associated with our amide-based ILs is not directly correlated with the enhanced hydrophilicity of the corresponding cations of the PIL system. The effects on extraction efficiencies of solution acidities, anions, and alkyl chain lengths in the cations of ILs were also investigated and reported.

  11. Evaluation of Perfluoroalkyl Acid Activity Using Primary Mouse and Human Hepatocytes.

    EPA Science Inventory

    While perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been studied at length, less is known about the biological activity of other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment. Using a transient transfection assay developed in COS-1 cells, our group h...

  12. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROALKYL ACID ACTIVITY USING PRIMARY MOUSE AND HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    While perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been studied at length, less is know about the biological activity of other environmental perfluoroalkyl acids (pFAAs). Using a transient transfection assay developed in COS-l cells, our group has previ...

  13. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds.

    PubMed

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F; Shah, Tejas K; Baker, Emma L; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K N; Garg, Neil K

    2015-08-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis. PMID:26200342

  14. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-08-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis.

  15. [Study on ionic composition of rainwater at Guangzhou and the primary factors of rainwater acidity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-feng; Song, Zhi-guang; Xu, Tao

    2006-10-01

    All rainwater samples were collected during the period Oct. 2003 to Sep. 2004 and analysed in terms of pH values, major cation, anion composition and soluble organic carbon (DOC). The measurement of pH values shows that 85% of these rain events were acid rain. The ionic composition analysis indicates that NO3-, SO4(2-), NH4+ and Ca2+ are dominant ions in the rainwater. DOC approximately consisted of 24.0% of total chemical components. Although SO4(2-) remains the dominant acidic ion in term of concentration, NO3- has become very important to the acidity of rainwater and as well as the organic acids. Furthermore, dust sourced Ca2+ appears to play significant role in neutralizing the acidity in rainwater.

  16. [Primary research on anti-tumor activity of panaxadiol fatty acid esters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Lian-Xue; Li, Xiang-Gao; Gao, Yu-Gang; Liu, Ya-Jing

    2006-11-01

    For making use of Ginseng resources and finding new anti-tumor drugs, the anti-tumor activity of three kinds of new panaxadiol fatty acid ester derivates: 3beta-acetoxy panaxadiol (I), 3beta-palmitic acid aceloxy panaxadiol (II), 3beta-octadecanoic acid aceloxy panaxadiol (Ill) and panaxaiol were compared through the method of cell stain and counting. Tumor cell was Vero cell line. Positive control was 5-FU. Blank was RPM11640 culture medium. Negative control was RPM11640 culture medium and the solvent for subjected drugs. The result showed that compound I had the strongest anti-tumor activity, second was panaxadiol, II and III had the same and the weakest antitumor activity. Furthermore, the anti-tumor activities of panaxadiol fatty acid ester derivates showed positive correlation with subjects' concentrations, but no relationship with molecular weight of fatty acid. PMID:17228662

  17. Genotoxic and clastogenic effects of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa F; Hoyos-Giraldo, Luz Stella; Londoño-Velasco, Elizabeth; Reyes-Carvajal, Ingrid; Saavedra-Trujillo, Diana; Carvajal-Varona, Silvio; Sánchez-Gómez, Adalberto; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-06-15

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second-most prevalent class of drinking water disinfection by-products formed by chemical disinfectants. Previous studies have determined DNA damage and repair of HAA-induced lesions in mammalian and human cell lines; however, little is known of the genomic DNA and chromosome damage induced by these compounds in primary human cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and clastogenic effects of the monoHAA disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes. All monoHAAs were genotoxic in primary human lymphocytes, the rank order of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity was IAA > BAA > CAA. After 6 h of repair time, only 50% of the DNA damage (maximum decrease in DNA damage) was repaired compared to the control. This demonstrates that primary human lymphocytes are less efficient in repairing the induced damage by monoHAAs than previous studies with mammalian cell lines. In addition, the monoHAAs induced an increase in the chromosome aberration frequency as a measurement of the clastogenic effect of these compounds. These results coupled with genomic technologies in primary human cells and other mammalian non-cancerous cell lines may lead to the identification of biomarkers that may be employed in feedback loops to aid water chemists and engineers in the overall goal of producing safer drinking water.

  18. Effect of an acid mine drainage effluent on phytoplankton biomass and primary production at Britannia Beach, Howe Sound, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Levings, C D; Varela, D E; Mehlenbacher, N M; Barry, K L; Piercey, G E; Guo, M; Harrison, P J

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the effect of acid mine drainage (AMD) from an abandoned copper mine at Britannia Beach (Howe Sound, BC, Canada) on primary productivity and chlorophyll a levels in the receiving waters of Howe Sound before, during, and after freshet from the Squamish River. Elevated concentrations of copper (integrated average through the water column >0.050 mgl(-1)) in nearshore waters indicated that under some conditions a small gyre near the mouth of Britannia Creek may have retained the AMD from Britannia Creek and from a 30-m deep water outfall close to shore. Regression and correlation analyses indicated that copper negatively affected primary productivity during April (pre-freshet) and November (post-freshet). Negative effects of copper on primary productivity were not supported statistically for July (freshet), possibly because of additional effects such as turbidity from the Squamish River. Depth-integrated average and surface chlorophyll a were correlated to copper concentrations in April. During this short study we demonstrated that copper concentrations from the AMD discharge can negatively affect both primary productivity and the standing stock of primary producers in Howe Sound. PMID:16038945

  19. Phenazinium salt-catalyzed aerobic oxidative amidation of aromatic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Leow, Dasheng

    2014-11-01

    Amides are prevalent in organic synthesis. Developing an efficient synthesis that avoids expensive oxidants and heating is highly desirable. Here the oxidative amidation of aromatic aldehydes is reported using an inexpensive metal-free visible light photocatalyst, phenazine ethosulfate, at low catalytic loading (1-2 mol %). The reaction proceeds at ambient temperature and uses air as the sole oxidant. The operationally easy procedure provides an economical, green, and mild alternative for the formation of amide bonds.

  20. Amide-Substituted Titanocenes in Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Jakoby, Verena; Stainer, Katharina; Schmer, Alexander; Klare, Sven; Bauer, Mirko; Grimme, Stefan; Cuerva, Juan Manuel; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    Two new catalytic systems for hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) catalysis involving the N-H bonds of titanocene(III) complexes with pendant amide ligands are reported. In a monometallic system, a bifunctional catalyst for radical generation and reduction through HAT catalysis depending on the coordination of the amide ligand is employed. The pendant amide ligand is used to activate Crabtree's catalyst to yield an efficient bimetallic system for radical generation and HAT catalysis. PMID:26636435

  1. A new cytotoxic amide from the stem wood of Hibiscus tiliaceus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jih-Jung; Huang, Shi-Yu; Duh, Chang-Yih; Chen, Ih-Sheng; Wang, Tai-Chi; Fang, Hui-Yu

    2006-08-01

    A new coumarin, hibiscusin, and a new amide, hibiscusamide, together with eleven known compounds including vanillic acid, P-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, P-hydroxybenzaldehyde, scopoletin, N- trans-feruloyltyramine, N-cis-feruloyltyramine, a mixture of beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol, a mixture of beta-sitostenone and stigmasta-4,22-dien-3-one were isolated from the stem wood of Hibiscus tiliaceus. The structures of these new compounds were determined through spectral analyses. Among the isolates, three compounds exhibited cytotoxicity (IC (50) values < 4 microg/mL) against P-388 and/or HT-29 cell lines in vitro.

  2. Concentrations of unmetabolized folic acid and primary folate forms in plasma after folic acid treatment in older adults.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rima; Kirsch, Susanne H; Kasoha, Mariz; Eckert, Rudolf; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    Folate deficiency can cause age-related disease. Folic acid (FA) has been used in studies aiming at disease prevention. Recently, unmetabolized FA in plasma raised public health concerns; but numerous studies used FA for disease prevention. Concentrations of the folate forms FA, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), and tetrahydrofolate (THF) were measured before and after 3-week placebo or FA 5 mg, vitamin B6 40 mg, and cyanocobalamin 2 mg per day administrated to 74 older adults (median age, 82 years). Concentrations of 5-MTHF and total homocysteine (tHcy) (r = -0.392) and S-adenosylmethionine (r = 0.329) were correlated at baseline. Twenty-six percent of the elderly subjects had unmetabolized FA in plasma at the start, and concentrations of FA were increased after 3 weeks of FA treatment (median FA = 0.08 nmol/L at baseline and 15.3 nmol/L at the end of the treatment in the vitamin group). Folic acid caused a 10- and a 5-fold increase in 5-MTHF and THF, respectively, and lowered tHcy (median tHcy = 17.2 μmol/L at baseline vs 9.0 μmol/L after treatment). Concentrations of unmetabolized FA were positively related to those of 5-MTHF and THF. People showed wide variations in folate forms at baseline, but these were reduced after FA treatment. Folic acid given to older adults is mostly converted to THF and 5-MTHF and lowered concentrations of tHcy, but caused a substantial increase in unmetabolized FA in the plasma.

  3. Enantioselective Synthesis of α-Hydroxy Amides and β-Amino Alcohols from α-Keto Amides.

    PubMed

    Mamillapalli, N Chary; Sekar, Govindasamy

    2015-12-14

    Synthesis of enantiomerically enriched α-hydroxy amides and β-amino alcohols has been accomplished by enantioselective reduction of α-keto amides with hydrosilanes. A series of α-keto amides were reduced in the presence of chiral Cu(II)/(S)-DTBM-SEGPHOS catalyst to give the corresponding optically active α-hydroxy amides with excellent enantioselectivities by using (EtO)3SiH as a reducing agent. Furthermore, a one-pot complete reduction of both ketone and amide groups of α-keto amides has been achieved using the same chiral copper catalyst followed by tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride (TBAF) catalyst in presence of (EtO)3SiH to afford the corresponding chiral β-amino alcohol derivatives. PMID:26503887

  4. AMID: autonomous modeler of intragenic duplication.

    PubMed

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Weiss, Anthony S; Fekete, Alan; Jermiin, Lars S

    2003-01-01

    Intragenic duplication is an evolutionary process where segments of a gene become duplicated. While there has been much research into whole-gene or domain duplication, there have been very few studies of non-tandem intragenic duplication. The identification of intragenically replicated sequences may provide insight into the evolution of proteins, helping to link sequence data with structure and function. This paper describes a tool for autonomously modelling intragenic duplication. AMID provides: identification of modularly repetitive genes; an algorithm for identifying repeated modules; and a scoring system for evaluating the modules' similarity. An evaluation of the algorithms and use cases are presented.

  5. Role of an amide bond for self-assembly of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Romain; Tropsch, Juergen; Holmberg, Krister

    2010-03-01

    Self-assembly in solution and adsorption at the air-water interface and at solid surfaces were investigated for two amino-acid-based surfactants with conductimetry, NMR, tensiometry, quartz crystal microbalance with monitoring of the dissipation (QCM-D), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The surfactants studied were sodium N-lauroylglycinate and sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate, differing only in a methyl group on the amide nitrogen for the sarcosinate. Thus, the glycinate but not the sarcosinate surfactant is capable of forming intermolecular hydrogen bonds via the amide group. It was found that the amide bond, N-methylated or not, gave a substantial contribution to the hydrophilicity of the amphiphile. The ability to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds led to tighter packing at the air-water interface and at a hydrophobic surface. It also increased the tendency for precipitation as an acid-soap pair on addition of acid. Adsorption of the surfactants at a gold surface was also investigated and gave unexpected results. The sarcosine-based surfactant seemed to give bilayer adsorption, while the glycine derivative adsorbed as a monolayer.

  6. Immobilization of lysozyme-cellulose amide-linked conjugates on cellulose i and ii cotton nanocrystalline preparations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme was attached through an amide linkage between some of the protein’s aspartate and glutamate residues to amino-glycine-cellulose (AGC), which was prepared by esterification of glycine to preparations of cotton nanocrystals (CNC). The nanocrystalline preparations were produced through acid h...

  7. Immobilization of lysozyme-cellulose amide-linked conjugates on cellulose I and II cotton nanocrystalline preparations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme was attached through an amide linkage between protein aspartate and glutamate residues to amino-glycine-cellulose (AGC), which was prepared by esterification of glycine to preparations of cotton nanocrystals (CNC). The nanocrystalline preparations were produced through acid hydrolysis and ...

  8. Conversion of Amides to Esters by the Nickel-Catalyzed Activation of Amide C–N Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been well studied for more than a century.1 They serve as the key building blocks of proteins and are present in an broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to resonance stability of the amide bond.1,2 Whereas Nature can easily cleave amides through the action of enzymes, such as proteases,3 the ability to selectively break the C–N bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry is quite difficult. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that amide C–N bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We have used this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of this unusual transformation. Our results provide a new strategy to harness amide functional groups as synthons and are expected fuel the further use of amides for the construction of carbon–heteroatom or carbon–carbon bonds using non-precious metal catalysis. PMID:26200342

  9. Cloning and primary structure of a human islet isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase from chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, A.E.; Hagopian, W.A.; Grubin, C.E.; Dube, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Adler, D.A.; Baermeier, H.; Lernmark, A. ); Mathewes, S.; Grant, F.J.; Foster, D. )

    1991-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase which catalyzes formation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamic acid, is detectable in different isoforms with distinct electrophoretic and kinetic characteristics. GAD has also been implicated as an autoantigen in the vastly differing autoimmune disease stiff-man syndrome and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Despite the differing GAD isoforms, only one type of GAD cDNA (GAD-1), localized to a syntenic region of chromosome 2, has been isolated from rat, mouse, and cat. Using sequence information from GAD-1 to screen a human pancreatic islet cDNA library, the authors describe the isolation of an additional GAD cDNA (GAD-2), which was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 10. Genomic Southern blotting with GAD-2 demonstrated a hybridization pattern different form that detected by GAD-1. GAD-2 recognizes a 5.6-kilobase transcript in both islets and brain, in contrast to GAD-1, which detects a 3.7-kilobase transcript in brain only. The deduced 585-amino acid sequence coded for by GAD-2 shows < 65% identify to previously published, highly conserved GAD-1 brain sequences, which show > 96% deduced amino acid sequence homology among the three species.

  10. Plasma and intestinal concentrations of GIP and GLP-1 (7-36) amide during suckling and after weaning in pigs.

    PubMed

    Knapper, J M; Morgan, L M; Fletcher, J M; Marks, V

    1995-11-01

    Plasma concentrations of glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1[7-36]amide) were measured after milk ingestion in 15-18 day old piglets and after weaning diet ingestion in 33 day old piglets weaned at 21 days. Intestinal concentrations of these two hormones were also measured in unsuckled piglets of less than 24 h of age, and piglets whose ages corresponded with those used for plasma measurements. Suckling piglets showed a moderate glycaemic and insulinaemic response to milk ingestion. Plasma GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide levels were significantly elevated at 1 and 3-h post-prandially. Weaned piglets showed a much more marked glucose and insulin response to meal ingestion. Plasma GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide levels were again significantly elevated at 1 and 3 h in these animals. The mean plasma GIP response was greater in the weaned animals compared with the suckling animals at the time points investigated. The plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide response in contrast was significantly greater at 1 h in the suckling animals. In comparison, GIP concentrations in acid ethanol extracts of the small intestine were significantly higher during suckling and GLP-1(7-36)amide concentrations significantly higher after weaning. The circulating levels of both hormones seen during suckling and after weaning were far higher than those previously reported in humans. We conclude that both milk ingestion and the weaning diet are capable of stimulating GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide in piglets and suggest that the levels of both hormones seen in this study may be important in adipose tissue metabolism at this time.

  11. Structures of Plutonium(IV) and Uranium(VI) with N,N-Dialkyl Amides from Crystallography, X-ray Absorption Spectra, and Theoretical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Acher, Eléonor; Hacene Cherkaski, Yanis; Dumas, Thomas; Tamain, Christelle; Guillaumont, Dominique; Boubals, Nathalie; Javierre, Guilhem; Hennig, Christoph; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Charbonnel, Marie-Christine

    2016-06-01

    The structures of plutonium(IV) and uranium(VI) ions with a series of N,N-dialkyl amides ligands with linear and branched alkyl chains were elucidated from single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and theoretical calculations. In the field of nuclear fuel reprocessing, N,N-dialkyl amides are alternative organic ligands to achieve the separation of uranium(VI) and plutonium(IV) from highly concentrated nitric acid solution. EXAFS analysis combined with XRD shows that the coordination structure of U(VI) is identical in the solution and in the solid state and is independent of the alkyl chain: two amide ligands and four bidentate nitrate ions coordinate the uranyl ion. With linear alkyl chain amides, Pu(IV) also adopt identical structures in the solid state and in solution with two amides and four bidentate nitrate ions. With branched alkyl chain amides, the coordination structure of Pu(IV) was more difficult to establish unambiguously from EXAFS. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were consequently performed on a series of structures with different coordination modes. Structural parameters and Debye-Waller factors derived from the DFT calculations were used to compute EXAFS spectra without using fitting parameters. By using this methodology, it was possible to show that the branched alkyl chain amides form partly outer-sphere complexes with protonated ligands hydrogen bonded to nitrate ions. PMID:27171842

  12. Presence and characterization of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide receptors in solubilized membranes of rat adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Mérida, E; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1993-01-01

    Specific binding of [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide ([125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide) to solubilized rat adipose tissue membranes was found to be dependent on temperature, time, and membrane protein concentration and readily dissociated. GLP-1(1-36)amide, GLP-2, or glucagon (10(-6) M) did not compete with [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide binding. Half-maximal binding was achieved with 8 x 10(-10) M unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)amide, and the Scatchard plot revealed the presence of high and low affinity binding sites with Kd values of approximately 0.6 and 20 nM, respectively. The binding capacity of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide was about 3 times higher than that of [125I]glucagon, while the high affinity Kd and the half-maximal binding of the two peptides were similar. The presence and abundance of GLP-1(7-36)amide receptors in fat tissue together with the previous findings that the peptide stimulates glycerol and cAMP production in rat adipocytes and stimulates fatty acid synthesis in explants of rat adipose tissue open the possibility that this insulinotropic intestinal peptide may also be involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism in health and disease.

  13. Dynamics of amino acid metabolism of primary human liver cells in 3D bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Zeilinger, K.; Sickinger, S.; Schmidt-Heck, W.; Buentemeyer, H.; Iding, K.; Lehmann, J.; Pfaff, M.; Pless, G.; Gerlach, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of 18 amino acids, ammonia (NH3) and urea (UREA) in 18 liver cell bioreactor runs were analyzed and simulated by a two-compartment model consisting of a system of 42 differential equations. The model parameters, most of them representing enzymatic activities, were identified and their values discussed with respect to the different liver cell bioreactor performance levels. The nitrogen balance based model was used as a tool to quantify the variability of runs and to describe different kinetic patterns of the amino acid metabolism, in particular with respect to glutamate (GLU) and aspartate (ASP). PMID:16550345

  14. Alkyl amides in two organic-rich anoxic sediments: A possible new abiotic route for N sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Georgina A.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2010-11-01

    Fixed nitrogen (N) plays an integral role in global cycling; while most is recycled to refuel primary productivity, a small fraction escapes to be preserved and stabilised in sediments. Despite decades of research, the functionality and reactivity of this sequestered organic N has been poorly understood. This study was undertaken to shed light on this problem by characterising the bulk sediment organic matter using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), followed by molecular level analysis using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). We studied two organic-rich anaerobic sediments, one from a freshwater system and another from a marine paralic basin. Mangrove Lake, Bermuda (marine) and Mud Lake, Florida (freshwater) have been shown in past studies to contain high levels of N-containing organic matter. Our resulting multidimensional NMR data suggests the existence of a new type of amide functionality in both these lake sediments, and we investigated this further using FT-ICR-MS and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). FT-ICR-MS confirmed the existence of homologous series of CHNO containing compounds, whose structures are verified using GC-MS as alkyl amides. Model reactions involving naturally occurring esters and ammonia suggest the source of alkyl amides to be amidation of esters with sedimentary ammonia derived from anaerobic degradation of organic matter. This expands upon previous hypotheses for preservation of amide containing compounds that call upon biological/abiological protection of proteins and peptides or the formation of refractory nitrogenous adducts.

  15. An orally active cathepsin K inhibitor, furan-2-carboxylic acid, 1-{1-[4-fluoro-2-(2-oxo-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-phenyl]-3-oxo-piperidin-4-ylcarbamoyl}-cyclohexyl)-amide (OST-4077), inhibits osteoclast activity in vitro and bone loss in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, M K; Kim, H D; Park, J H; Lim, J I; Yang, J S; Kwak, W Y; Sung, S Y; Kim, H J; Kim, S H; Lee, C H; Shim, J Y; Bae, M H; Shin, Y A; Huh, Y; Han, T D; Chong, W; Choi, H; Ahn, B N; Yang, S O; Son, M H

    2006-08-01

    Human cathepsin K, a cysteine proteinase of the papain family, has been recognized as a potential drug target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The predominant expression of cathepsin K in osteoclasts has rendered the enzyme into a major target for the development of novel antiresorptive drugs. Now, we report the pharmacological properties of OST-4077 [furan-2-carboxylic acid (1-{1-[4-fluoro-2-(2-oxo-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-phenyl]-3-oxo-piperidin-4-ylcarbamoyl}-cyclohexyl)-amide] as a novel selective cathepsin K inhibitor. Human and rat cathepsin K were inhibited in vitro by OST-4077 with the IC50 values of 11 and 427 nM, respectively. OST-4077 suppressed bone resorption induced by rabbit osteoclasts (IC50, 37 nM) but did not affect bone mineralization or cellular alkaline phosphatase activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. Parathyroid hormone-induced bone resorption was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in thyroparathyroidectomized rats gavaged with a single dose of OST-4077 (ED50, 69 mg/kg). When given orally twice daily for 4 weeks to 3-month-old ovariectomized (OVX) rats, OST-4077 dose-dependently prevented bone loss, as monitored by bone densitometry, ash content, and urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline. No change in serum osteocalcin in the OVX rats by OST-4077 suggested that bone formation might not be affected by the agent. In summary, OST-4077 selectively inhibited bone resorbing activities of osteoclasts and prevented bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency but did not affect bone formation. OST-4077, an orally active selective human cathepsin K inhibitor, may have the therapeutic potential for the treatment of diseases characterized by excessive bone loss including osteoporosis.

  16. Anandamide hydrolysis in FAAH reveals a dual strategy for efficient enzyme-assisted amide bond cleavage via nitrogen inversion.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-22

    Herein, we combined classical molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to unravel the whole catalytic cycle of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in complex with anandamide, the main neurotransmitters involved in the control of pain. While microsecond MD simulations of FAAH in a realistic membrane/water environment provided a solid model for the reactant state of the enzymatic complex (Palermo et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013, 9, 1202-1213.), QM/MM simulations depict now a highly concerted two-step catalytic mechanism characterized by (1) acyl-enzyme formation after hydrolysis of the substrate amide bond and (2) deacylation reaction with restoration of the catalytic machinery. We found that a crucial event for anandamide hydrolysis is the inversion of the reactive nitrogen of the scissile amide bond, which occurs during the acylation rate-limiting step. We show that FAAH uses an exquisite catalytic strategy to induce amide bond distortion, reactive nitrogen inversion, and amide bond hydrolysis, promoting catalysis to completion. This new strategy is likely to be of general applicability to other amidases/peptidases that show similar catalytic site architectures, providing crucial insights for de novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts.

  17. Manganese accumulation in membrane fractions of primary astrocytes is associated with decreased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake, and is exacerbated by oleic acid and palmitate.

    PubMed

    Fordahl, Steve C; Erikson, Keith M

    2014-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) exposure interferes with GABA uptake; however, the effects of Mn on GABA transport proteins (GATs) have not been identified. We sought to characterize how Mn impairs GAT function in primary rat astrocytes. Astrocytes exposed to Mn (500 μM) had significantly reduced (3)H-GABA uptake despite no change in membrane or cytosolic GAT3 protein levels. Co-treatment with 100 μM oleic or palmitic acids (both known to be elevated in Mn neurotoxicity), exacerbated the Mn-induced decline in (3)H-GABA uptake. Mn accumulation in the membrane fraction of astrocytes was enhanced with fatty acid administration, and was negatively correlated with (3)H-GABA uptake. Furthermore, control cells exposed to Mn only during the experimental uptake had significantly reduced (3)H-GABA uptake, and the addition of GABA (50 μM) blunted cytosolic Mn accumulation. These data indicate that reduced GAT function in astrocytes is influenced by Mn and fatty acids accumulating at or interacting with the plasma membrane.

  18. Titanocene(III)-Catalyzed Three-Component Reaction of Secondary Amides, Aldehydes, and Electrophilic Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao; He, Jiang; Li, Heng-Hui; Wang, Ao; Dai, Xi-Jie; Wang, Ai-E; Huang, Pei-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    An umpolung Mannich-type reaction of secondary amides, aliphatic aldehydes, and electrophilic alkenes has been disclosed. This reaction features the one-pot formation of C-N and C-C bonds by a titanocene-catalyzed radical coupling of the condensation products, from secondary amides and aldehydes, with electrophilic alkenes. N-substituted γ-amido-acid derivatives and γ-amido ketones can be efficiently prepared by the current method. Extension to the reaction between ketoamides and electrophilic alkenes allows rapid assembly of piperidine skeletons with α-amino quaternary carbon centers. Its synthetic utility has been demonstrated by a facile construction of the tricyclic core of marine alkaloids such as cylindricine C and polycitorol A.

  19. Reaction of arenesulfinimidic acid derivatives with thiophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Pel'kis, N.P.; Levchenko, E.S.

    1986-07-20

    The amides and esters of N-substituted arenesulfinimidic acids are reduced by the action of thiophenols primarily to N-substituted arenesulfenamides, while the thiophenols are oxidized to the corresponding derivatives of the arenesulfinic acids.

  20. TNF-α stimulates System A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblast cells mediated by p38 MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Aye, Irving L M H; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2015-10-01

    Maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increase the risk of delivering infants that are large for gestational age with greater adiposity, who are prone to the development of metabolic disease in childhood and beyond. These maternal conditions are also associated with increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in maternal tissues and the placenta. Recent evidence suggests that changes in placental amino acid transport contribute to altered fetal growth. TNF-α was previously shown to stimulate System A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs), however the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TNF-α regulates amino acid uptake in cultured PHTs by a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanism. Treatment of PHTs with TNF-α significantly increased System A amino acid transport, as well as Erk and p38 MAPK signaling. Pharmacological antagonism of p38, but not Erk MAPK activity, inhibited TNF-α stimulated System A activity. Silencing of p38 MAPK using siRNA transfections prevented TNF-α stimulated System A transport in PHTs. TNF-α significantly increased the protein expression of System A transporters SNAT1 and SNAT2, but did not affect their mRNA expression. The effects of TNF-α on SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein expression were reversed by p38 MAPK siRNA silencing. In conclusion, TNF-α regulates System A activity through increased SNAT1 and SNAT2 transporter protein expression in PHTs. These findings suggest that p38 MAPK may represent a critical mechanistic link between elevated proinflammatory cytokines and increased placental amino acid transport in obese and GDM pregnancies associated with fetal overgrowth.

  1. TNF-α stimulates System A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblast cells mediated by p38 MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Aye, Irving L M H; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2015-10-01

    Maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increase the risk of delivering infants that are large for gestational age with greater adiposity, who are prone to the development of metabolic disease in childhood and beyond. These maternal conditions are also associated with increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in maternal tissues and the placenta. Recent evidence suggests that changes in placental amino acid transport contribute to altered fetal growth. TNF-α was previously shown to stimulate System A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs), however the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TNF-α regulates amino acid uptake in cultured PHTs by a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanism. Treatment of PHTs with TNF-α significantly increased System A amino acid transport, as well as Erk and p38 MAPK signaling. Pharmacological antagonism of p38, but not Erk MAPK activity, inhibited TNF-α stimulated System A activity. Silencing of p38 MAPK using siRNA transfections prevented TNF-α stimulated System A transport in PHTs. TNF-α significantly increased the protein expression of System A transporters SNAT1 and SNAT2, but did not affect their mRNA expression. The effects of TNF-α on SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein expression were reversed by p38 MAPK siRNA silencing. In conclusion, TNF-α regulates System A activity through increased SNAT1 and SNAT2 transporter protein expression in PHTs. These findings suggest that p38 MAPK may represent a critical mechanistic link between elevated proinflammatory cytokines and increased placental amino acid transport in obese and GDM pregnancies associated with fetal overgrowth. PMID:26508738

  2. Kinetic analyses of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase from pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Noe, B D; Katopodis, A G; May, S W

    1991-08-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) plays an important role in the post-translational processing of bioactive neuropeptides by participating in C-terminal amidation. We have examined PAM activity in the pancreatic islets of the anglerfish (AF), Lophius americanus. It was previously demonstrated that the cofactor requirements and pH optimum for the fish PAM are essentially identical to PAM obtained from other tissues and species. The present study was performed to examine the enzymatic characteristics of the fish islet PAM in more detail. One of the questions addressed was the suitability of the AF islet neuropeptide Y-like peptide, aPY-Gly, as a substrate for the islet PAM. Partially purified PAM from AF islet secretory granules was incubated with [125I] aPY-Gly and the resulting products were analyzed by HPLC. The islet PAM readily mediated the formation of aPY-amide from aPY-Gly. PAM purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin granules also catalyzed the amidation of [125I] aPY-Gly. The kinetic parameters of the islet PAM were examined using trinitrophenylated-D-Tyr-Val-Gly (TNP-D-YVG) and 4-nitrohippuric acid (4-NHA). The Km of the islet PAM was 25 +/- 5 microM for TNP-D-YVG and 3.4 +/- 1 mM for 4-NHA. The competitive inhibitor of mammalian PAM activity, 4-methoxybenzoxyacetic acid, proved to be a potent inhibitor of the islet PAM as well, with an apparent KI of 0.06 mM. These results demonstrate that the AF islet PAM exhibits substrate compatibility, kinetic parameters, and inhibitor susceptibility quite similar to the characteristics of PAM from other tissues and species. PMID:1916206

  3. Surface and subsurface erosion of primary enamel by acid beverages over time.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina Paes; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Gomes-Silva, Jaciara Miranda; Rizóli, Fátima Aparecida; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a cola-type soft drink and a soy-based orange juice on the surface and subsurface erosion of primary enamel, as a function of the exposure time. Seventy-five primary incisors were divided for microhardness test (n=45) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis (n=30). The specimens were randomly assigned to 3 groups: 1 - artificial saliva (control); 2 - cola-type soft drink; and 3 - soy-based orange juice. Immersion cycles in the beverages were undertaken under agitation for 5 min, 3 times a day, during 60 days. Surface microhardness was measured at 7, 15, 30, 45 and 60 days. After 60 days, specimens were bisected and subsurface microhardness was measured at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 200 µm from the surface exposed. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05). Groups 2 and 3 presented similar decrease of surface microhardness. Regarding subsurface microhardness, group 2 presented the lowest values. SEM images revealed that after 60 days the surfaces clearly exhibited structural loss, unlike those immersed in artificial saliva. It may be concluded that erosion of the surfaces exposed to the cola-type soft drink was more accentuated and directly proportional to the exposure time.

  4. Recyclable hypervalent iodine(III) reagent iodosodilactone as an efficient coupling reagent for direct esterification, amidation, and peptide coupling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Gao, Wen-Chao; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Chi

    2012-06-15

    A hypervalent iodine(III) reagent plays a novel role as an efficient coupling reagent to promote the direct condensation between carboxylic acids and alcohols or amines to provide esters, macrocyclic lactones, amides, as well as peptides without racemization. The regeneration of iodosodilactone (1) can also be readily achieved. The intermediate acyloxyphosphonium ion C from the activation of a carboxylic acid is thought to be involved in the present esterification reaction.

  5. Side chain dependence of intensity and wavenumber position of amide I' in IR and visible Raman spectra of XA and AX dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Measey, Thomas; Hagarman, Andrew; Eker, Fatma; Griebenow, Kai; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2005-04-28

    A series of AX and XA dipeptides in D2O have been investigated by FTIR, isotropic, and anisotropic Raman spectroscopy at acidic, neutral, and alkaline pD, to probe the influence of amino acid side chains on the amide I' band. We obtained a set of spectral parameters for each peptide, including intensities, wavenumbers, half-widths, and dipole moments, and found that these amide I' parameters are indeed dependent on the side chain. Side chains with similar characteristic properties were found to have similar effects on the amide I'. For example, dipeptides with aliphatic side chains were found to exhibit a downshift of the amide I' wavenumber, while those containing polar side chains experienced an increase in wavenumber. The N-terminal charge causes a substantial upshift of amide I', whereas the C-terminal charge causes a moderate decrease of the transition dipole moment. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the investigated dipeptides in vacuo yielded different correlations between theoretically and experimentally obtained wavenumbers for aliphatic/aromatic and polar/charged side chains, respectively. This might be indicative of a role of the hydration shell in transferring side chain-backbone interactions. For Raman bands, we found a correlation between amide I' depolarization ratio and wavenumber which reflects that some side chains (valine, histidine) have a significant influence on the Raman tensor. Altogether, the obtained data are of utmost importance for utilizing amide I as a tool for secondary structure analysis of polypeptides and proteins and providing an experimental basis for theoretical modeling of this important backbone mode. This is demonstrated by a rather accurate modeling for the amide I' band profiles of the IR, isotropic Raman, and anisotropic Raman spectra of the beta-amyloid fragment Abeta(1-82).

  6. A role for lipid rafts in the protection afforded by docosahexaenoic acid against ethanol toxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aliche-Djoudi, Fatiha; Podechard, Normand; Collin, Aurore; Chevanne, Martine; Provost, Emilie; Poul, Martine; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid enhanced ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death in primary rat hepatocytes via an increase in membrane fluidity and lipid raft clustering. In this context, another n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), was tested with a special emphasis on physical and chemical alteration of lipid rafts. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with DHA reduced significantly ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death. DHA protection could be related to an alteration of lipid rafts. Indeed, rafts exhibited a marked increase in membrane fluidity and packing defects leading to the exclusion of a raft protein marker, flotillin. Furthermore, DHA strongly inhibited disulfide bridge formation, even in control cells, thus suggesting a disruption of protein-protein interactions inside lipid rafts. This particular spatial organization of lipid rafts due to DHA subsequently prevented the ethanol-induced lipid raft clustering. Such a prevention was then responsible for the inhibition of phospholipase C-γ translocation into rafts, and consequently of both lysosome accumulation and elevation in cellular low-molecular-weight iron content, a prooxidant factor. In total, the present study suggests that DHA supplementation could represent a new preventive approach for patients with alcoholic liver disease based upon modulation of the membrane structures.

  7. A Metal and Base-Free Chemoselective Primary Amination of Boronic Acids Using Cyanamidyl/Arylcyanamidyl Radical as Aminating Species: Synthesis and Mechanistic Studies by Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nachiketa; Arfeen, Minhajul; Bharatam, Prasad V; Goswami, Avijit

    2016-06-17

    An efficient, metal and base-free, chemoselective synthesis of aryl-, heteroaryl-, and alkyl primary amines from the corresponding boronic acids has been achieved at ambient temperature mediated by [bis(trifluoroacetoxy)iodo]benzene (PIFA) and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) using cyanamidyl/arylcyanamidyl radicals as the aminating species. The primary amine compounds were initially obtained as their corresponding ammonium trifluoroacetate salts which, on treatment with aq NaOH, provide the free amines. Finally, the primary amines were isolated through column chromatography over silica-gel using hexane-EtOAc solvent system as the eluent. The reactions are sufficiently fast, completing within 1 h. Quantum chemical calculations in combination with experimental observations validate that the ipso amination of substituted boronic acids involves the formation of cyanamidyl/arylcyanamidyl radical, followed by regiospecific interaction of its nitrile-N center with boron atom of the boronic acids, leading to chemoselective primary amination.

  8. Polycyclic Aromatic Acids Are Primary Metabolites of Alkyl-PAHs-A Case Study with Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Linus M V; Selck, Henriette; Jørgensen, Kåre B; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-05-01

    Although concentrations of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (alkyl-PAHs) in oil-contaminated sediments are higher than those of unsubstituted PAHs, only little attention has been given to metabolism and ecotoxicity of alkyl-PAHs. In this study we demonstrated that metabolism of alkyl-PAHs primarily forms polycyclic aromatic acids (PAAs). We generalize this to other alkyl-PAHs, based on literature and the present study of the metabolism of 1-methylphenanthrene, 3,6-dimethylphenanthrene, and 1-, 2-, 3-, and 6-methylchrysene related to their unsubstituted parent PAHs. Also, we observed that body burdens and production of PAAs was related to the position of the methyl group, showing the same isomer specific preferences as for microbial degradation of alkyl-PAHs. We detected a high production of PAAs, and larger metabolism of alkyl-PAHs than their unsubstituted parent PAHs. We therefore propose that carboxylic acid metabolites of alkyl-PAHs have the potential of constituting a new class of contaminants in marine waters that needs attention in relation to ecological risk assessments.

  9. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with...

  14. Culturing primary human osteoblasts on electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/nanohydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Wenwen; Sun, Jiashu; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wang, Jidong; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Wenfu; Huang, Deyong; Di, Shiyu; Long, Yun-Ze; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-07-10

    In this work, we fabricated polymeric fibrous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering using primary human osteoblasts (HOB) as the model cell. By employing one simple approach, electrospinning, we produced poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds with different topographies including microspheres, beaded fibers, and uniform fibers, as well as the PLGA/nanohydroxyapatite (nano-HA) composite scaffold. The bone-bonding ability of electrospun scaffolds was investigated by using simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, and the nano-HA in PLGA/nano-HA composite scaffold can significantly enhance the formation of the bonelike apatites. Furthermore, we carried out in vitro experiments to test the performance of electrospun scaffolds by utilizing both mouse preosteoblast cell line (MC 3T3 E1) and HOB. Results including cell viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and osteocalcin concentration demonstrated that the PLGA/nano-HA fibers can promote the proliferation of HOB efficiently, indicating that it is a promising scaffold for human bone repair.

  15. Chemical attributes of some clouds amid a forest ecosystem's trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous physical and chemical characteristics of clouds amid and above the trees of a montane forest, located about 3.3 km southwest of Mt. Mitchell, NC, were collected between 13 and 22 June 1993. This paper summarizes the chemical characteristics of the cloud droplets amid the trees. The ionic composition and pH of the analyzed amid-canopy cloud water samples are generally consistent with those of previous above-canopy cloud water samples obtained at this site. Magnesium, sodium, and calcium are highly correlated to each other amid the canopy as compared to above the canopy. Above-canopy and amid-canopy cloud-only episodes, with concurrent event-averaged cloud water pH values at or below 3.1, generally contain more magnesium, sodium, and calcium in the amid-canopy cloud water samples compared to concurrent above-canopy cloud water samples. The observed chemical differences between the amid-canopy cloud and the above- canopy cloud suggest an unhealthier environment for the tree canopy when the cloud water traversing this site has a pH value at or below 3.1. The predominant ion deposition fluxes were calculated to provide preliminary data for studies designed to explicitly quantify how the chemical composition of cloud water affects tree health. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Response to flavone acetic acid (NSC 347512) of primary and metastatic human colorectal carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Giavazzi, R.; Garofalo, A.; Damia, G.; Garattini, S.; D'Incalci, M.

    1988-01-01

    The antitumour activity of flavone acetic acid (FAA) was evaluated against two human colorectal carcinoma (HCC) lines, HCC-P2988 and HCC-M1410, transplanted into nude mice. On repeated i.v. injection of 200 mg kg-1 every 4 days FAA was moderately active against the s.c. growing HCC-P2988. HCC-M1410 transplanted s.c. was almost unresponsive in the same experimental conditions. In contrast, FAA (200 mg kg-1 i.v. every 4 days, repeated three times) significantly reduced liver tumour colonies produced by the HCC-M1410 cells injected intrasplenically into nude mice. These findings suggest that FAA has potential activity against human colorectal carcinoma, particularly against liver metastases. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3355765

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) 18:1 transcriptional regulation of primary human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cerutis, D Roselyn; Weston, Michael D; Ogunleye, Afolabi O; McVaney, Timothy P; Miyamoto, Takanari

    2014-12-01

    The pleiotropic, bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid [(LPA), 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate] exerts critical regulatory actions in physiology and pathophysiology in many systems. It is present in normal bodily fluids, and is elevated in pathology (1). In vivo, "LPA" exists as distinct molecular species, each having a single fatty acid of varying chain length and degree of unsaturation covalently attached to the glycerol backbone via an acyl, alkyl, or alkenyl link. These species differ in affinities for the individual LPA receptors [(LPARs), LPA1-6] and coupling to G proteins (2). However, LPA 18:1 has been and continues to be the most commonly utilized species in reported studies. The actions of "LPA" remain poorly defined in oral biology and pathophysiology. Our laboratory has addressed this knowledge gap by studying in vitro the actions of the major human salivary LPA species [18:1, 18:0, and 16:0 (3)] in human oral cells (4-7). This includes gingival fibroblasts (GF), which our flow cytometry data from multiple donors found that they express LPA1-5 (6). We have also reported that these species are ten-fold elevated to pharmacologic levels in the saliva and gingival crevicular fluid obtained from patients with moderate-severe periodontitis (8). As the potential of LPA to regulate transcriptional activity had not been examined in the oral system, this study used whole human genome microarray analysis to test the hypothesis that LPA 18:1-treated human GF would show significant changes in gene transcripts relevant to their biology, wound-healing, and inflammatory responses. LPA 18:1 was found to significantly regulate a large, complex set of genes critical to GF biology in these categories and to periodontal disease. The raw data has been deposited at NCBI's GEO database as record GSE57496. PMID:26484133

  18. New organic semiconductors with imide/amide-containing molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Cai, Zhengxu; Chen, Xin; Luo, Hewei; Li, Yonghai; Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-10-29

    Due to their high electron affinities, chemical and thermal stabilities, π-conjugated molecules with imide/amide frameworks have received considerable attentions as promising candidates for high-performance optoelectronic materials, particularly for organic semiconductors with high carrier mobilities. The purpose of this Research News is to give an overview of recent advances in development of high performance imide/amide based organic semiconductors for field-effect transistors. It covers naphthalene diimide-, perylene diimide- and amide-based conjugated molecules and polymers for organic semiconductors. PMID:24633804

  19. New organic semiconductors with imide/amide-containing molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Cai, Zhengxu; Chen, Xin; Luo, Hewei; Li, Yonghai; Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-10-29

    Due to their high electron affinities, chemical and thermal stabilities, π-conjugated molecules with imide/amide frameworks have received considerable attentions as promising candidates for high-performance optoelectronic materials, particularly for organic semiconductors with high carrier mobilities. The purpose of this Research News is to give an overview of recent advances in development of high performance imide/amide based organic semiconductors for field-effect transistors. It covers naphthalene diimide-, perylene diimide- and amide-based conjugated molecules and polymers for organic semiconductors.

  20. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amidation and Imidation of Unactivated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C–H bonds over tertiary C–H bonds and even occur at primary C–H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from β-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C–H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C–H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product

  1. Weekly iron and folic acid supplementation as a tool to reduce anemia among primary school children in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Longfils, Philippe; Heang, Ung Kim; Soeng, Hay; Sinuon, Muth

    2005-12-01

    The prevalence of anemia decreased from 62% to 12% and from 57% to 26% in children 5 to 11 years of age in two rural primary schools in Kampot Province, Cambodia, after oral weekly supplementation with iron-folic acid tablets for 20 weeks and with vitamin A and mebendazole twice per year. In 12- to 15-year-old children, success was less marked. The prevalence of hookworm infestation did not change, but the number of eggs in the stool decreased drastically. The intervention had no significant influence on stunting and wasting. An integrated community approach including mass deworming, health education, and multi-micronutrient supplementation was very effective in reducing anemia in Cambodian schoolchildren and should be adopted on a larger scale. PMID:16466090

  2. Trophic resource use by macrozoobenthic primary consumers within a semi-enclosed coastal ecosystem: Stable isotope and fatty acid assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Sophie; Blanchet, Hugues; Garcia, Aurélie; Massé, Marjorie; Galois, Robert; Grémare, Antoine; Charlier, Karine; Guillou, Gaël; Richard, Pierre; Savoye, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    The diet of different macrozoobenthic trophic groups was investigated in the Arcachon Bay-a semi-enclosed macrotidal ecosystem that shelters the largest Zostera noltei seagrass meadow in Europe-in early spring and late summer 2009, using stable isotopes and fatty acids. Fatty acid profiles and literature information about the biology and physiology of benthic consumers were combined to identify the main organic matter sources for the benthic primary consumers. An isotope mixing model was then run to evaluate the contribution of each organic matter source to each identified trophic group (suspension feeders, sub-surface deposit feeders, micro-and macrograzers, suspension-oriented interface feeders and deposit-oriented interface feeders). Variations in organism' diets with respect to both habitats (intertidal seagrass meadows, intertidal bare sediments and subtidal bare sediments) and study periods were also investigated. At the scale of this study, it appeared that the diet of macrozoobenthos primary consumers was based exclusively on autochthonous material (no use of terrestrial organic matter): mainly microphytobenthos, seagrasses and their epiphytes, and phytoplankton. In addition, the different trophic groups relied on different organic matter pools: for instance, suspension feeders mainly fed on microphytobenthos and phytoplankton, whereas subsurface deposit feeders fed on microphytobenthos, decayed seagrasses and bacteria, and grazers mainly fed on microphytobenthos, and seagrasses and their epiphytes. The same pattern was observed in both early spring and late summer, indicating a stability of the benthic system at a six-month time scale. Finally our results showed that, in Arcachon Bay, the seagrass meadow directly or indirectly (through detritus) plays a significant role in the diet of most benthic consumers.

  3. Artificial primary marine aerosol production: a laboratory study with varying water temperature, salinity, and succinic acid concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zábori, J.; Matisāns, M.; Krejci, R.; Nilsson, E. D.; Ström, J.

    2012-11-01

    Primary marine aerosols are an important component of the climate system, especially in the remote marine environment. With diminishing sea-ice cover, better understanding of the role of sea spray aerosol on climate in the polar regions is required. As for Arctic Ocean water, laboratory experiments with NaCl water confirm that a few degrees change in the water temperature (Tw) gives a large change in the number of primary particles. Small particles with a dry diameter between 0.01 μm and 0.25 μm dominate the aerosol number density, but their relative dominance decreases with increasing water temperature from 0 °C where they represent 85-90% of the total aerosol number to 10 °C, where they represent 60-70% of the total aerosol number. This effect is most likely related to a change in physical properties and not to modification of sea water chemistry. A change of salinity between 15 g kg-1 and 35 g kg-1 did not influence the shape of a particle number size distribution. Although the magnitude of the size distribution for a water temperature change between 0 °C and 16 °C changed, the shape did not. An experiment where succinic acid was added to a NaCl water solution showed, that the number concentration of particles with 0.010 μm < Dp < 4.5 μm decreased on average by 10% when the succinic acid concentration in NaCl water at a water temperature of 0 °C was increased from 0 μmol L-1 to 94 μmol L-1. A shift to larger sizes in the particle number size distribution is observed from pure NaCl water to Arctic Ocean water. This is likely a consequence of organics and different inorganic salts present in Arctic Ocean water in addition to the NaCl.

  4. Stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism in primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells by hormones and drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Feyen, J.H.; van der Wilt, G.; Moonen, P.; Di Bon, A.; Nijweide, P.J.

    1984-12-01

    The effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH), dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2 D3), thrombin, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (PMA) on the biosynthesis and release of arachidonic acid metabolites were studied in primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells isolated from 18-day-old chick embryo calvaria. Cells were labelled with (/sup 14/C)-arachidonic acid for 30 h. The radioactive eicosanoids were extracted from the cell culture media after a further 30 h stimulation period and analysed on a PRP-1 column by HPLC. The radioactive products were characterized by co-elution of (/sup 3/H) standard prostanoids. Osteoblasts showed a basal release of the prostanoids 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, TXB2, PGF2 alpha, PGE2, PGD2 and PGB2, the latter being the most abundant one. Indomethacin (10(-5) M) effectively inhibited the basal release, but not that of an as yet unidentified compound. The release of prostanoids was stimulated by PTH (2 U/ml), thrombin (0.4 NIH/ml), EGF (50 ng/ml) and PMA (25 ng/ml), the latter being by far the most potent one. 1,25-(OH)2D3 was found to slightly inhibit the prostanoid release. These results indicate: (1) primary cultures of osteoblasts synthesize several prostaglandins, thromboxane B2 and one unidentified product. (2) the action on bone of PTH and the various drugs tested may be, at least partly, mediated by an increased prostaglandin production by osteoblasts. Clearly this does not apply to 1,25-(OH)2D3.

  5. Mechanotransduction in primary human osteoarthritic chondrocytes is mediated by metabolism of energy, lipids, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zignego, Donald L; Hilmer, Jonathan K; June, Ronald K

    2015-12-16

    Chondrocytes are the sole cell type found in articular cartilage and are repeatedly subjected to mechanical loading in vivo. We hypothesized that physiological dynamic compression results in changes in energy metabolism to produce proteins for maintenance of the pericellular and extracellular matrices. The objective of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding for the short term (<30min) chondrocyte response to sub-injurious, physiological compression by analyzing metabolomic profiles for human chondrocytes harvested from femoral heads of osteoarthritic donors. Cell-seeded agarose constructs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, and dynamic compression was applied for 0, 15, or 30min. Following dynamic compression, metabolites were extracted and detected by HPLC-MS. Untargeted analyzes examined changes in global metabolomics profiles and targeted analysis examined the expression of specific metabolites related to central energy metabolism. We identified hundreds of metabolites that were regulated by applied compression, and we report the detection of 16 molecules not found in existing metabolite databases. We observed patient-specific mechanotransduction with aging dependence. Targeted studies found a transient increase in the ratio of NADP+ to NADPH and an initial decrease in the ratio of GDP to GTP, suggesting a flux of energy into the TCA cycle. By characterizing metabolomics profiles of primary chondrocytes in response to applied dynamic compression, this study provides insight into how OA chondrocytes respond to mechanical load. These results are consistent with increases in glycolytic energy utilization by mechanically induced signaling, and add substantial new data to a complex picture of how chondrocytes transduce mechanical loads.

  6. Primary acute myeloid leukemia cells with overexpression of EVI-1 are sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Han J M P; Smit, Marjon A; Rutten, Arjo; Denkers, Fedor; Poddighe, Pino J; Merle, Pauline A; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Smit, Linda

    2016-01-28

    Enhanced expression of ecotropic viral integration site 1 (EVI-1) occurs in ∼10% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and is associated with a very poor disease outcome. Patients with EVI-1-positive AML have poor initial responses to chemotherapy and high relapse rates, indicating an urgent need for alternative treatment strategies improving clinical outcome for these patients. Because treatment of acute promyelocytic patients with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has improved the survival of these patients substantially, we investigated whether ATRA might also be effective for the subgroup of AML patients with EVI-1 overexpression. Here, we show that a substantial part of the EVI-1-positive AML cases respond to ATRA by induction of differentiation and decreased clonogenic capacity of myeloid blasts. Most importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo treatment of primary EVI-1-positive AML with ATRA leads to a significant reduction in leukemic engraftment. Altogether, our results show that a considerable part of the EVI-1-positive primary AML cases are sensitive to ATRA, suggesting that combining ATRA with the currently used conventional chemotherapy might be a promising treatment strategy decreasing relapse rates and enhancing complete remissions in this poor prognostic subgroup of AML patients.

  7. On the primary emission of formic acid from light duty gasoline vehicles and ocean-going vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, Timia A.; Brady, James M.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Collier, Sonya; Forestieri, Sara D.; Kleeman, Michael J.; Kuwayama, Toshihiro; Lerner, Brian M.; Williams, Eric J.; Zhang, Qi; Bertram, Timothy H.

    2014-12-01

    We present determinations of fuel-based emission factors for formic acid (EFHCOOH) from light duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) and in-use ocean-going vessels. Emission ratios, from which the emission factors were derived, were determined from LDGVs through measurement of HCOOH and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the exhaust of a fleet of eight LDGVs driven under the California Unified Cycle at the California Air Resources Board's Haagen-Smit Laboratory. Emission ratios from in-use ocean-going vessels were determined through direct measurement of HCOOH and CO2 in ship plumes intercepted by the R/V Atlantis during the 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign within 24 nautical miles of the California coast. The eight car fleet average EFHCOOH was 0.94 ± 0.32 (1σ) and 0.57 ± 0.18 mg (kg fuel)-1 for the cold start and hot running phases of the drive cycle, respectively. This difference suggests that catalytic converter performance and the air/fuel equivalence ratio are important metrics contributing to EFHCOOH. EFHCOOH was determined to be 1.94 ± 1.06 mg (kg fuel)-1 for a single diesel vehicle driven under highway driving conditions, higher on average than any individual LDGV tested. In comparison, HCOOH primary emissions from in-use ocean-going vessels were substantially larger, averaging 20.89 ± 8.50 mg (kg fuel)-1. On a global scale, HCOOH primary emissions from fossil fuel combustion are likely to be insignificant relative to secondary production mechanisms, however primary emissions may contribute more significantly on a finer, regional scale in urban locations.

  8. Disinfection efficiency of peracetic acid, UV and ozone after enhanced primary treatment of municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gehr, Ronald; Wagner, Monika; Veerasubramanian, Priya; Payment, Pierre

    2003-11-01

    The City of Montreal Wastewater Treatment Plant uses enhanced physicochemical processes (ferric and/or alum coagulation) for suspended solids and phosphorus removal. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of peracetic acid (PAA), UV, or ozone to inactivate the indicator organisms fecal coliforms, Enterococci, MS-2 coliphage, or Clostridium perfringens in the effluent from this plant. PAA doses to reach the target fecal coliform level of 9000 CFU/100mL exceeded 6 mg/L; similar results were obtained for enterococci, and no inactivation of Clostridium perfringens was observed. However a 1-log reduction of MS-2 occurred at PAA doses of 1.5 mg/L and higher. It was expected that this effluent would have a high ozone demand, and would require relatively high UV fluences, because of relatively high effluent COD, iron and suspended solids concentrations, and low UV transmittance. This was confirmed herein. For UV, the inactivation curve for fecal coliforms showed the typical two-stage shape, with the target of 1000 CFU/100 mL (to account for photoreactivation) occurring in the asymptote zone at fluences >20 mJ/cm(2). In contrast, inactivation curves for MS-2 and Clostridium perfringens were linear. Clostridium perfringens was the most resistant organism. For ozone, inactivation was already observed before any residuals could be measured. The transferred ozone doses to reach target fecal coliform levels ( approximately 2-log reduction) were 30-50 mg/L. MS-2 was less resistant, but Clostridium perfringens was more resistant than fecal coliforms. The different behaviour of the four indicator organisms studied, depending on the disinfectant, suggests that a single indicator organism might not be appropriate. The required dose of any of the disinfectants is unlikely to be economically viable, and upstream changes to the plant will be needed. PMID:14568042

  9. Patterns of auxin and abscisic acid movement in the tips of gravistimulated primary roots of maize.

    PubMed

    Young, L M; Evans, M L

    1996-01-01

    Because both abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin (IAA) have been suggested as possible chemical mediators of differential growth during root gravitropism, we compared with redistribution of label from applied 3H-IAA and 3H-ABA during maize root gravitropism and examined the relative basipetal movement of 3H-IAA and 3H-ABA applied to the caps of vertical roots. Lateral movement of 3H-ABA across the tips of vertical roots was non-polar and about 2-fold greater than lateral movement of 3H-IAA (also non-polar). The greater movement of ABA was not due to enhanced uptake since the uptake of 3H-IAA was greater than that of 3H-ABA. Basipetal movement of label from 3H-IAA or 3H-ABA applied to the root cap was determined by measuring radioactivity in successive 1 mm sections behind the tip 90 minutes after application. ABA remained largely in the first mm (point of application) whereas IAA was concentrated in the region 2-4 mm from the tip with substantial levels found 7-8 mm from the tip. Pretreatment with inhibitors of polar auxin transport decreased both gravicurvature and the basipetal movement of IAA. When roots were placed horizontally, the movement of 3H-IAA from top to bottom across the cap was enhanced relative to movement from bottom to top whereas the pattern of movement of label from 3H-ABA was unaffected. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that IAA plays a role in root gravitropism but contrary to the idea that gravi-induced asymmetric distribution of ABA contributes to the response. PMID:11540494

  10. Disinfection efficiency of peracetic acid, UV and ozone after enhanced primary treatment of municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gehr, Ronald; Wagner, Monika; Veerasubramanian, Priya; Payment, Pierre

    2003-11-01

    The City of Montreal Wastewater Treatment Plant uses enhanced physicochemical processes (ferric and/or alum coagulation) for suspended solids and phosphorus removal. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of peracetic acid (PAA), UV, or ozone to inactivate the indicator organisms fecal coliforms, Enterococci, MS-2 coliphage, or Clostridium perfringens in the effluent from this plant. PAA doses to reach the target fecal coliform level of 9000 CFU/100mL exceeded 6 mg/L; similar results were obtained for enterococci, and no inactivation of Clostridium perfringens was observed. However a 1-log reduction of MS-2 occurred at PAA doses of 1.5 mg/L and higher. It was expected that this effluent would have a high ozone demand, and would require relatively high UV fluences, because of relatively high effluent COD, iron and suspended solids concentrations, and low UV transmittance. This was confirmed herein. For UV, the inactivation curve for fecal coliforms showed the typical two-stage shape, with the target of 1000 CFU/100 mL (to account for photoreactivation) occurring in the asymptote zone at fluences >20 mJ/cm(2). In contrast, inactivation curves for MS-2 and Clostridium perfringens were linear. Clostridium perfringens was the most resistant organism. For ozone, inactivation was already observed before any residuals could be measured. The transferred ozone doses to reach target fecal coliform levels ( approximately 2-log reduction) were 30-50 mg/L. MS-2 was less resistant, but Clostridium perfringens was more resistant than fecal coliforms. The different behaviour of the four indicator organisms studied, depending on the disinfectant, suggests that a single indicator organism might not be appropriate. The required dose of any of the disinfectants is unlikely to be economically viable, and upstream changes to the plant will be needed.

  11. Patterns of auxin and abscisic acid movement in the tips of gravistimulated primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    Because both abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin (IAA) have been suggested as possible chemical mediators of differential growth during root gravitropism, we compared with redistribution of label from applied 3H-IAA and 3H-ABA during maize root gravitropism and examined the relative basipetal movement of 3H-IAA and 3H-ABA applied to the caps of vertical roots. Lateral movement of 3H-ABA across the tips of vertical roots was non-polar and about 2-fold greater than lateral movement of 3H-IAA (also non-polar). The greater movement of ABA was not due to enhanced uptake since the uptake of 3H-IAA was greater than that of 3H-ABA. Basipetal movement of label from 3H-IAA or 3H-ABA applied to the root cap was determined by measuring radioactivity in successive 1 mm sections behind the tip 90 minutes after application. ABA remained largely in the first mm (point of application) whereas IAA was concentrated in the region 2-4 mm from the tip with substantial levels found 7-8 mm from the tip. Pretreatment with inhibitors of polar auxin transport decreased both gravicurvature and the basipetal movement of IAA. When roots were placed horizontally, the movement of 3H-IAA from top to bottom across the cap was enhanced relative to movement from bottom to top whereas the pattern of movement of label from 3H-ABA was unaffected. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that IAA plays a role in root gravitropism but contrary to the idea that gravi-induced asymmetric distribution of ABA contributes to the response.

  12. Amide Link Scission in the Polyamide Active Layers of Thin-Film Composite Membranes upon Exposure to Free Chlorine: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2015-10-20

    The volume-averaged amide link scission in the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine was quantified at a variety of free chlorine exposure times, concentrations, and pH and rinsing conditions. The results showed that (i) hydroxyl ions are needed for scission to occur, (ii) hydroxide-induced amide link scission is a strong function of exposure to hypochlorous acid, (iii) the ratio between amide links broken and chlorine atoms taken up increased with the chlorination pH and reached a maximum of ∼25%, (iv) polyamide disintegration occurs when high free chlorine concentrations, alkaline conditions, and high exposure times are combined, (v) amide link scission promotes further chlorine uptake, and (vi) scission at the membrane surface is unrepresentative of volume-averaged scission in the active layer. Our observations are consistent with previously proposed mechanisms describing amide link scission as a result of the hydrolysis of the N-chlorinated amidic N-C bond due to nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ions. This study increases the understanding of the physicochemical changes that could occur for membranes in treatment plants using chlorine as an upstream disinfectant and the extent and rate at which those changes would occur. PMID:26394532

  13. Amide Link Scission in the Polyamide Active Layers of Thin-Film Composite Membranes upon Exposure to Free Chlorine: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2015-10-20

    The volume-averaged amide link scission in the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine was quantified at a variety of free chlorine exposure times, concentrations, and pH and rinsing conditions. The results showed that (i) hydroxyl ions are needed for scission to occur, (ii) hydroxide-induced amide link scission is a strong function of exposure to hypochlorous acid, (iii) the ratio between amide links broken and chlorine atoms taken up increased with the chlorination pH and reached a maximum of ∼25%, (iv) polyamide disintegration occurs when high free chlorine concentrations, alkaline conditions, and high exposure times are combined, (v) amide link scission promotes further chlorine uptake, and (vi) scission at the membrane surface is unrepresentative of volume-averaged scission in the active layer. Our observations are consistent with previously proposed mechanisms describing amide link scission as a result of the hydrolysis of the N-chlorinated amidic N-C bond due to nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ions. This study increases the understanding of the physicochemical changes that could occur for membranes in treatment plants using chlorine as an upstream disinfectant and the extent and rate at which those changes would occur.

  14. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF SEVEN AMIDES BY SUSPENDED BACTERIAL POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial transformation rate constants were determined for seven amides in natural pond water. A second-order mathematical rate expression served as the model for describing the microbial transformation. Also investigated was the relationship between the infrared spectra and the...

  15. Silver-catalyzed synthesis of amides from amines and aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Madix, Robert J; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Bingjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Freyschlag, Cassandra G

    2014-11-18

    The invention provides a method for producing amides via the reaction of aldehydes and amines with oxygen adsorbed on a metallic silver or silver alloy catalyst. An exemplary reaction is shown in Scheme 1: (I), (II), (III). ##STR00001##

  16. The mechanism of action of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. Inhibition by amino acid derivatives and amines; activation by aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Metrione, R M; MacGeorge, N L

    1975-12-01

    A variety of amino acid and peptide amides have been shown to be inhibitors of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. Among these compounds derivatives of strongly hydrophobic amino acids are the strongest inhibitors (Phe-NH2, Ki = 1.0 +/- 0.2 mM), while amides of basic amino acids were somewhat less effective (Lys-NH2, Ki = 36 +/- 3 mM). Short chain amino acid amides are notably weaker inhibitors (Gly-NH2, Ki = 293 +/- 50 mM). The interaction of the side chains of compounds with the enzyme appears to be at a site other than that at which the side chain of the amino-penultimate residue of the substrate interacts since the specificity of binding is different. Primary amines have been shown to inhibit, e.g., butylamine, Ki = 340 +/- 40 mM, and aromatic compounds have been shown to stimulate activity toward Gly-Gly-NH2 and Gly-Gly-OEt (phenol, 35% stimulation of activity at a 1:1 molar ratio with the substrate). The data suggest that inhibition involves binding at the site occupied by the free alpha-amino group and the N-terminal amino acid.

  17. An in vitro comparison of acid etched vs. nonacid etched dentin bonding agents/composite interfaces over primary dentin.

    PubMed

    Donly, K J; Keprta, M; Stratmann, R G

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate acid etchant penetration on dentin bonding agents and its effect on the composite resin bond strength. Forty primary molars were mounted, then the buccal and lingual surfaces were prepared into dentin. The teeth were divided into four groups of 10, and four dentin bonding agents were placed on the buccal and lingual surfaces of exposed dentin, as recommended by the manufacturers. One surface of each tooth was etched randomly for 60 sec with 35% phosphoric acid. A standardized tube of composite resin was placed on each dentin surface and polymerized for 60 sec. The tubes were sheared off with an Instron Testing Machine. The specimens then were sectioned to be examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results demonstrated shear strengths (kg/cm2) of etched (e) and unetched (u) bonding agents to be: Scotchbond (3M Dental Products, St. Paul, MN) (e) 116.7 +/- 37.7, (u) 116.7 +/- 63.0; Scotchbond 2 (3M Dental Products, St. Paul, MN) (e) 112.0 +/- 40.6, (u) 127.0 +/- 38.7; Gluma (Bayer Dental, Leverkusen, Federal Republic of Germany) (e) 80.1 +/- 21.7, (u) 107.0 +/- 16.6; Bondlite (Kerr Manufacturing Co., Romulus, MI) (e) 53.4 +/- 34.7, (u) 79.1 +/- 26.3. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated a statistical significance in variance at the P less than 0.001 level. Scheffe's Test indicated no statistically significant differences between the bond strengths of etched vs. nonetched dentin bonding agents and composite resin. SEM evaluation indicated that the acid etchant penetrated none of the dentin bonding agents. PMID:1886824

  18. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  19. Amide temperature coefficients in the protein G B1 domain.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Jennifer H; Williamson, Mike P

    2012-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured for backbone amide (1)H and (15)N nuclei in the B1 domain of protein G (GB1), using temperatures in the range 283-313 K, and pH values from 2.0 to 9.0. Many nuclei display pH-dependent coefficients, which were fitted to one or two pK(a) values. (1)H coefficients showed the expected behaviour, in that hydrogen-bonded amides have less negative values, but for those amides involved in strong hydrogen bonds in regular secondary structure there is a negative correlation between strength of hydrogen bond and size of temperature coefficient. The best correlation to temperature coefficient is with secondary shift, indicative of a very approximately uniform thermal expansion. The largest pH-dependent changes in coefficient are for amides in loops adjacent to sidechain hydrogen bonds rather than the amides involved directly in hydrogen bonds, indicating that the biggest determinant of the temperature coefficient is temperature-dependent loss of structure, not hydrogen bonding. Amide (15)N coefficients have no clear relationship with structure.

  20. Transport of monocarboxylic acids at the blood-brain barrier: Studies with monolayers of primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, T.; Takakuwa, S.; Moritani, S.; Tsuji, A. )

    1991-09-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the transport of monocarboxylic acids (MCAs) were studied by using primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells. Concentration-dependent uptake of acetic acid was observed, and the kinetic parameters were estimated as follows: the Michaelis constant, Kt, was 3.41 {plus minus} 1.87 mM, the maximum uptake rate, Jmax, was 144.7 {plus minus} 55.7 nmol/mg of protein/min and the nonsaturable first-order rate constant, Kd, was 6.66 {plus minus} 1.98 microliters/mg of protein/min. At medium pH below 7.0, the uptake rate of (3H)acetic acid increased markedly with decreasing medium pH, whereas pH-independent uptake was observed in the presence of 10 mM acetic acid. An energy requirement for (3H)acetic acid uptake was also demonstrated, because metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol and rotenone) reduced significantly the uptake rate (P less than .05). Carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoro-methoxyphenylhydrazone, a protonophore, inhibited significantly the uptake of (3H)acetic acid at medium pH of 5.0 and 6.0, whereas 4,4{prime}-diisothiocyanostilben-2,2{prime}-disulfonic acid did not. Several MCAs inhibited significantly the uptake rate of (3H)acetic acid, whereas di- and tricarboxylic acids did not. The uptake of (3H)acetic acid was competitively inhibited by salicylic acid, with an inhibition constant, Ki, of 3.60 mM, suggesting a common transport system between acetic acid and salicylic acid. Moreover, at the medium pH of 7.4, salicylic acid and valproic acid inhibited significantly the uptake of (3H)acetic acid, demonstrating that the transport of MCA drugs could also be ascribed to the MCA transport system at the physiologic pH.