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Sample records for acid pseudomonas aeruginosa

  1. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  2. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems. PMID:27465850

  3. Potent Antibacterial Antisense Peptide–Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugates Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections in hospital settings, especially with immune compromised patients, and the increasing prevalence of multidrug resistant strains urges search for new drugs with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we introduce antisense peptide–peptide nucleic acid (PNA) conjugates as antibacterial agents against P. aeruginosa. We have designed and optimized antisense peptide–PNA conjugates targeting the translation initiation region of the ftsZ gene (an essential bacterial gene involved in cell division) or the acpP gene (an essential bacterial gene involved in fatty acid synthesis) of P. aeruginosa (PA01) and characterized these compounds according to their antimicrobial activity and mode of action. Four antisense PNA oligomers conjugated to the H-(R-Ahx-R)4-Ahx-βala or the H-(R-Ahx)6-βala peptide exhibited complete growth inhibition of P. aeruginosa strains PA01, PA14, and LESB58 at 1–2 μM concentrations without any indication of bacterial membrane disruption (even at 20 μM), and resulted in specific reduction of the targeted mRNA levels. One of the four compounds showed clear bactericidal activity while the other significantly reduced bacterial survival. These results open the possibility of development of antisense antibacterials for treatment of Pseudomonas infections. PMID:23030590

  4. Scouring Potential of Mesophile Acidic Proteases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for Grey Cotton Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, D.

    2013-04-01

    Mesophile, acidic proteases were produced using the microbial source, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with wider thermal tolerances. Process conditions of scouring treatment were optimized using Taguchi method for optimum temperature, time, pH and concentration of protease. Treatment with the protease lower weight loss values compared to the alkali scouring, however, significant improvement in the absorbency compared to the grey samples was observed. Large amounts of pectin left out in the samples resulted in higher extractable impurities, substantiated by the FTIR results. Relatively, lower reduction in the tear strengths was observed in both warp and weft directions after protease treatment of the cotton fabrics.

  5. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa directly shunts β-oxidation degradation intermediates into de novo fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanqiu; Leeds, Jennifer A; Meredith, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    We identified the fatty acid synthesis (FAS) initiation enzyme in Pseudomonas aeruginosa as FabY, a β-ketoacyl synthase KASI/II domain-containing enzyme that condenses acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) to make the FAS primer β-acetoacetyl-ACP in the accompanying article (Y. Yuan, M. Sachdeva, J. A. Leeds, and T. C. Meredith, J. Bacteriol. 194:5171-5184, 2012). Herein, we show that growth defects stemming from deletion of fabY can be suppressed by supplementation of the growth media with exogenous decanoate fatty acid, suggesting a compensatory mechanism. Fatty acids eight carbons or longer rescue growth by generating acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioester β-oxidation degradation intermediates that are shunted into FAS downstream of FabY. Using a set of perdeuterated fatty acid feeding experiments, we show that the open reading frame PA3286 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 intercepts C(8)-CoA by condensation with malonyl-ACP to make the FAS intermediate β-keto decanoyl-ACP. This key intermediate can then be extended to supply all of the cellular fatty acid needs, including both unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, along with the 3-hydroxyl fatty acid acyl groups of lipopolysaccharide. Heterologous PA3286 expression in Escherichia coli likewise established the fatty acid shunt, and characterization of recombinant β-keto acyl synthase enzyme activity confirmed in vitro substrate specificity for medium-chain-length acyl CoA thioester acceptors. The potential for the PA3286 shunt in P. aeruginosa to curtail the efficacy of inhibitors targeting FabY, an enzyme required for FAS initiation in the absence of exogenous fatty acids, is discussed.

  7. Regulation of the hemA gene during 5-aminolevulinic acid formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hungerer, C; Troup, B; Römling, U; Jahn, D

    1995-01-01

    The general tetrapyrrole precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid is formed in bacteria via two different biosynthetic pathways. Members of the alpha group of the proteobacteria use 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase for the condensation of succinyl-coenzyme A and glycine, while other bacteria utilize a two-step pathway from aminoacylated tRNA(Glu). The tRNA-dependent pathway, involving the enzymes glutamyl-tRNA reductase (encoded by hemA) and glutamate-1-semialdehyde-2,1-aminomutase (encoded by hemL), was demonstrated to be used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Comamonas testosteroni, Azotobacter vinelandii, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. To study the regulation of the pathway, the glutamyl-tRNA reductase gene (hemA) from P. aeruginosa was cloned by complementation of an Escherichia coli hemA mutant. The hemA gene was mapped to the SpeI A fragment and the DpnIL fragment of the P. aeruginosa chromosome corresponding to min 24.1 to 26.8. The cloned hemA gene, coding for a protein of 423 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 46,234 Da, forms an operon with the gene for protein release factor 1 (prf1). This translational factor mediates the termination of the protein chain at the ribosome at amber and ochre codons. Since the cloned hemA gene did not possess one of the appropriate stop codons, an autoregulatory mechanism such as that postulated for the enterobacterial system was ruled out. Three open reading frames of unknown function transcribed in the opposite direction to the hemA gene were found. hemM/orf1 and orf2 were found to be homologous to open reading frames located in the 5' region of enterobacterial hemA genes. Utilization of both transcription start sites was changed in a P. aeruginosa mutant missing the oxygen regulator Anr (Fnr analog), indicating the involvement of the transcription factor in hemA expression. DNA sequences homologous to one half of an Anr binding site were detected at one of the determined

  8. Lactic acid bacteria protect human intestinal epithelial cells from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed

    Affhan, S; Dachang, W; Xin, Y; Shang, D

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and food-borne infections. They promote intestinal diseases. Gastrointestinal colonization by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa has rarely been researched. These organisms spread to extra gastrointestinal niches, resulting in increasingly progressive infections. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as the major end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. These bacteria inhibit pathogen colonization and modulate the host immune response. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus on enteric infections caused by the paradigmatic human pathogens S. aureus ATCC25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC27853. The effect of whole cells and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of the lactobacilli on LoVo human carcinoma enterocyte (ATCC CCL-229) infection was analyzed by co-exposure, pre-exposure, and post-exposure studies. Simultaneous application of whole cells and CFS of the lactobacilli significantly eradicated enterocyte infection (P < 0.05); however, this effect was not seen when the whole cells and CFS were added after or prior to the infection (P > 0.05). This result could be attributed to interference by extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in the development of a pathogen that did not form colonies. Furthermore, results of the plate count and LIVE/ DEAD BacLight bacterial viability staining attributed this inhibition to a non-bacteriocin-like substance, which acted independently of organic acid and H2O2 production. Based on these results, the cell-free supernatant derived from lactobacilli was concluded to restrain the development of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa enteric infections. PMID:26681052

  9. Phenazine carboxylic acid production and rhizome protective effect of endophytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from Zingiber officinale.

    PubMed

    Jasim, B; Anisha, C; Rohini, Sabu; Kurian, Jacob Manoj; Jyothis, Mathew; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2014-05-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is cultivated commercially in most parts of the world especially in India for its culinary and medicinal applications. One of the major challenges that limit the yield of ginger is rhizome rot disease caused by organisms including Pythium myriotylum. A feasible ecofriendly method is yet to be devised to prevent the plant from this threatening disease. Recent studies on plant microbiome show the possibility of having endophytic organisms with plant protective characteristics associated with the plants. Because of the uniquely evolved underground nature of the ginger rhizome and its peculiar survival in soil for a long time, many interesting endophytic microbes with plant protective characters can be well expected from it. In the current study, previously isolated endophytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa from ginger was investigated in detail for its effect on Pythium myriotylum. The rhizome protective effect of the organism was also studied by co-inoculation studies, which confirmed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa has very potent inhibitory effect on Pythium myriotylum. On further studies, the active antifungal compound was identified as phenazine 1-carboxylic acid.

  10. Decolorization of Reactive Black 39 and Acid Red 360 by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Behzat, Balci

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate decolorization of Reactive Black 39 (RB39) and Acid Red 360 (AR360) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which was isolated from a non-dye-contaminated activated sludge biomass. In the present study, the effect of various physicochemical parameters, initial dye concentration, temperature, pH, inoculum size and yeast extract concentration as an organic source on decolorization were investigated. P. aeruginosa was able to decolorize 20 mg/L RB39 completely within 144 hours in the presence of 0.5 g/L yeast extract at 25°C. Decolorization efficiencies for AR360 were found to be higher than RB39 under the same conditions. Optimal temperature to decolorize RB39 and AR360 was found to be 30 and 25°C, respectively. The activation energy (Ea) values for decolorization of RB39 and AR360 were found to be 61.89 kJ/mol and 81.18 kJ/mol, respectively. Experience showed that the pH and inoculum size had a considerable effect on decolorization of RB39 and AR360 by P. aeruginosa.

  11. Decolorization of Reactive Black 39 and Acid Red 360 by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Behzat, Balci

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate decolorization of Reactive Black 39 (RB39) and Acid Red 360 (AR360) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which was isolated from a non-dye-contaminated activated sludge biomass. In the present study, the effect of various physicochemical parameters, initial dye concentration, temperature, pH, inoculum size and yeast extract concentration as an organic source on decolorization were investigated. P. aeruginosa was able to decolorize 20 mg/L RB39 completely within 144 hours in the presence of 0.5 g/L yeast extract at 25°C. Decolorization efficiencies for AR360 were found to be higher than RB39 under the same conditions. Optimal temperature to decolorize RB39 and AR360 was found to be 30 and 25°C, respectively. The activation energy (Ea) values for decolorization of RB39 and AR360 were found to be 61.89 kJ/mol and 81.18 kJ/mol, respectively. Experience showed that the pH and inoculum size had a considerable effect on decolorization of RB39 and AR360 by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26465295

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inducing rice resistance against Rhizoctonia solani: production of salicylic acid and peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Saikia, R; Kumar, R; Arora, D K; Gogoi, D K; Azad, P

    2006-01-01

    Three isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for seed treatment of rice; all showed plant growth promoting activity and induced systemic resistance in rice against Rhizoctonia solani G5 and increased seed yield. Production of salicylic acid (Sal) by P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo was quantified with high performance liquid chromatography. All three isolates produced more Sal in King's B broth than in induced roots. Using a split root system, more Sal accumulated in root tissues of bacterized site than in distant roots on the opposite site of the root system after 1 d, but this difference decreased after 3 d. Sal concentration 0-200 g/L showed no inhibition of mycelial growth of R. solani in vitro, while at > or =300 g/L it inhibited it. P. aeruginosa-pretreated rice plants challenged inoculation with R. solani (as pathogen), an additional increase in the accumulation of peroxidase was observed. Three pathogenesis-related peroxidases in induced rice plants were detected; molar mass of these purified peroxidases was 28, 36 and 47 kDa. Purified peroxidase showed antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi R. solani, Pyricularia oryzae and Helminthosporium oryzae. PMID:17176755

  13. Cis-2-dodecenoic acid signal modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing systems and T3SS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) is well known for its important functions in intraspecies signaling in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Previous work has also established an important role of BDSF in interspecies and inter-kingdom communications. It was identified that BDSF modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, how BDSF interferes with virulence of P. aeruginosa is still not clear. Results We report here that BDSF mediates the cross-talk between B. cenocepacia and P. aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing (QS) systems and type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. aeruginosa. Bioassay results revealed that exogenous addition of BDSF not only reduced the transcriptional expression of the regulator encoding gene of QS systems, i.e., lasR, pqsR, and rhlR, but also simultaneously decreased the production of QS signals including 3-oxo-C12-HSL, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and C4-HSL, consequently resulting in the down-regulation of biofilm formation and virulence factor production of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, BDSF and some of its derivatives are also capable of inhibiting T3SS of P. aeruginosa at a micromolar level. Treatment with BDSF obviously reduced the virulence of P. aeruginosa in both HeLa cell and zebrafish infection models. Conclusions These results depict that BDSF modulates virulence of P. aeruginosa through interference with QS systems and T3SS. PMID:24134835

  14. Effect of clavulanic acid on the activity of ticarcillin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Tausk, F; Stratton, C W

    1986-01-01

    We studied the ability of clavulanic acid (CA) to induce beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and what effect this might have on the susceptibilities to beta-lactam agents. We first used a disk approximation method to test 4 laboratory and 16 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates against antipseudomonal beta-lactam agents for truncation by CA and found this to be very common. All antimicrobial compounds except imipenem demonstrated truncation in the vicinity of CA. We also evaluated the extent to which chromosomal beta-lactamase is induced by CA and found this to occur to some degree in most isolates and to be dependent on the concentration of CA. Finally, we performed time kill curves on these isolates to compare bacterial growth in ticarcillin alone with growth in ticarcillin-CA (the CA at 2 or 4 micrograms/ml). We found that CA at this concentration has neither an antagonistic nor a synergistic antibacterial effect in combination with ticarcillin. PMID:3098162

  15. 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid-containing nanofiber wound dressings inhibit biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ahire, Jayesh J; Dicks, Leon M T

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms in wounds, which often leads to chronic infections that are difficult to treat with antibiotics. Free iron enhances biofilm formation, delays wound healing, and may even be responsible for persistent inflammation, increased connective tissue destruction, and lipid peroxidation. Exposure of P. aeruginosa Xen 5 to the iron chelator 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), electrospun into a nanofiber blend of poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), referred to as DF, for 8 h decreased biofilm formation by approximately 75%. This was shown by a drastic decline in cell numbers, from 7.1 log10 CFU/ml to 4.8 log10 CFU/ml when biofilms were exposed to DF in the presence of 2.0 mM FeCl3 6H2O. A similar decline in cell numbers was recorded in the presence of 3.0 mM FeCl3 6H2O and DF. The cells were more mobile in the presence of DHBA, supporting the observation of less biofilm formation at lower iron concentrations. DHBA at MIC levels (1.5 mg/ml) inhibited the growth of strain Xen 5 for at least 24 h. Our findings indicate that DHBA electrospun into nanofibers inhibits cell growth for at least 4 h, which is equivalent to the time required for all DHBA to diffuse from DF. This is the first indication that DF can be developed into a wound dressing to treat topical infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  16. Dissection of the cis-2-decenoic acid signaling network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using microarray technique

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani-Badi, Azadeh; Sepehr, Shayesteh; Fallahi, Hossein; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use quorum-sensing (QS) signaling to regulate the expression of factors contributing to virulence and persistence. Bacteria produce signals of different chemical classes. The signal molecule, known as diffusible signal factor (DSF), is a cis-unsaturated fatty acid that was first described in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris. Previous works have shown that human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also synthesizes a structurally related molecule, characterized as cis-2-decenoic acid (C10: Δ2, CDA) that induces biofilm dispersal by multiple types of bacteria. Furthermore, CDA has been shown to be involved in inter-kingdom signaling that modulates fungal behavior. Therefore, an understanding of its signaling mechanism could suggest strategies for interference, with consequences for disease control. To identify the components of CDA signaling pathway in this pathogen, a comparative transcritpome analysis was conducted, in the presence and absence of CDA. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for differentially expressed (DE) genes with known function was then constructed by STRING and Cytoscape. In addition, the effects of CDA in combination with antimicrobial agents on the biofilm surface area and bacteria viability were evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and digital image analysis. Microarray analysis identified 666 differentially expressed genes in the presence of CDA and gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that in P. aeruginosa, CDA mediates dispersion of biofilms through signaling pathways, including enhanced motility, metabolic activity, virulence as well as persistence at different temperatures. PPI data suggested that a cluster of five genes (PA4978, PA4979, PA4980, PA4982, PA4983) is involved in the CDA synthesis and perception. Combined treatments using both CDA and antimicrobial agents showed that following exposure of the biofilms to CDA, remaining cells on the surface were easily removed and killed by

  17. Alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants defective in carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, P C; Vanags, R I; Chakrabarty, A M; Maitra, P K

    1983-01-01

    Mutant cells of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients were examined for their ability to synthesize alginic acid in resting cell suspensions. Unlike the wild-type strain which synthesizes alginic acid from glycerol, fructose, mannitol, glucose, gluconate, glutamate, or succinate, mutants lacking specific enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism are uniquely impaired. A phosphoglucose isomerase mutant did not synthesize the polysaccharide from mannitol, nor did a glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutant synthesize the polysaccharide from mannitol or glucose. Mutants lacking the Entner-Doudoroff pathway dehydrase or aldolase failed to produce alginate from mannitol, glucose, or gluconate, as a 3-phosphoglycerate kinase or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase mutant failed to produce from glutamate or succinate. These results demonstrate the primary role of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway enzymes in the synthesis of alginate from glucose, mannitol, or gluconate and the role of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase reaction for the synthesis from gluconeogenic precursors such as glutamate. The virtual absence of any activity of phosphomannose isomerase in cell extracts of several independent mucoid bacteria and the impairment of alginate synthesis from mannitol in mutants lacking phosphoglucose isomerase or glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase rule out free mannose 6-phosphate as an intermediate in alginate biosynthesis. PMID:6408061

  18. Clustering of mutations affecting alginic acid biosynthesis in mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Darzins, A; Wang, S K; Vanags, R I; Chakrabarty, A M

    1985-01-01

    A 10-kilobase DNA fragment previously shown to contain the phosphomannose isomerase gene (pmi) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used to construct a pBR325-based hybrid that can be propagated in P. aeruginosa only by the formation of a chromosomal-plasmid cointegrate. This plasmid, designated pAD4008, was inserted into the P. aeruginosa chromosome by recombination at a site of homology between the cloned P. aeruginosa DNA and the chromosome. Mobilization of pAD4008 into P. aeruginosa PAO and 8830 and selection for the stable acquisition of tetracycline resistance resulted in specific and predictable changes in the pattern of endonuclease restriction sites in the phosphomannose isomerase gene region of the chromosomes. Chromosomal DNA from the tetracycline-resistant transformants was used to clone the drug resistance determinant with Bg/II or XbaI, thereby allowing the "walking" of the P. aeruginosa chromosome in the vicinity of the pmi gene. Analysis of overlapping tetracycline-resistant clones indicated the presence of sequences homologous to the DNA insert of plasmid pAD2, a recombinant clone of P. aeruginosa origin previously shown to complement several alginate-negative mutants. Restriction mapping, subcloning, and complementation analysis of a 30-kilobase DNA region demonstrated the tight clustering of several genetic loci involved in alginate biosynthesis. Furthermore, the tetracycline resistance determinant in PAO strain transformed by pAD4008 was mapped on the chromosome by plasmid FP2-mediated conjugation and was found to be located near 45 min. Images PMID:3932325

  19. Monomethylarsonous Acid (MMAIII) Has an Adverse Effect on the Innate Immune Response of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Notch, Emily G.; Goodale, Britton C.; Barnaby, Roxanna; Coutermarsh, Bonita; Berwin, Brent; Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the number one contaminant of concern with regard to human health according to the World Health Organization. Epidemiological studies on Asian and South American populations have linked arsenic exposure with an increased incidence of lung disease, including pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, both of which are associated with bacterial infection. However, little is known about the effects of low dose arsenic exposure, or the contributions of organic arsenic to the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This study examined the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) induced cytokine secretion by human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) by inorganic sodium arsenite (iAsIII) and two major metabolites, monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMAV), at concentrations relevant to the U.S. population. Neither iAsIII nor DMAV altered P. aeruginosa induced cytokine secretion. By contrast, MMAIII increased P. aeruginosa induced secretion of IL-8, IL-6 and CXCL2. A combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV (10 pbb total) reduced IL-8 and CXCL1 secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that exposure to MMAIII alone, and a combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV at levels relevant to the U.S. may have negative effects on the innate immune response of human bronchial epithelial cells to P. aeruginosa. PMID:26554712

  20. Control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia contamination of microfiltered water dispensers with peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Rossella; De Luca, Giovanna; Zanetti, Franca

    2009-06-30

    The abilities of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide to remove or reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in output water from microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs) were investigated. Two MWDs were inoculated with strains of P. aeruginosa and S. maltophilia isolated from water. Dispensers A and B were disinfected with 10% (v/v) peracetic acid (PAA) and 3% (v/v) hydrogen peroxide (HP) respectively. Each dispenser was disinfected three times at monthly intervals with contact times of 10, 30 and 40 min. Water dispensed by the MWDs was collected immediately before and after each treatment and then twice weekly for the remaining period. Once a week a sample of the tap water entering the dispensers was tested. P. aeruginosa and S. maltophilia were enumerated in the 90 samples collected during 6 months. In the output water from the dispensers before the first treatment, the number of the bacteria was 3 to 4 log cfu/100 mL. Treatment with PAA greatly reduced the numbers of P. aeruginosa and S. maltophilia in the dispensed water initially. However, by 2 days after treatment, the numbers increased and remained high. In the case of disinfection with HP for 40 min, P. aeruginosa was not detected in most of the samples (73.7%). Numbers of S. maltophilia decreased with increasing time after treatment.

  1. Composition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa slime

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. R. W.; Foster, J. H. Scott; Clamp, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The slime produced by eight strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on a number of different media was demonstrated to be qualitatively the same. Small quantitative differences may be occasioned by differences in the extraction procedure, the growth medium or the strain of organism used. 2. The slime was shown to be predominantly polysaccharide with some nucleic acid material and a small amount of protein. 3. The hydrolysed polysaccharide fraction consists mainly of glucose with smaller amounts of mannose. This accounts for some 50–60% of the total slime. In addition, there is some 5% of hyaluronic acid. The nucleic acid material represents approx. 20% of the total weight, and is composed of both RNA and DNA. 4. Minor components are protein, rhamnose and glucosamine, the protein being less than 5% of the total. 5. Hyaluronic acid is produced in greater quantities from nutrient broth than from chemically defined media, and is more firmly attached to the cells than the other components. PMID:4240755

  2. Environmental optimization for production of 7, 10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from olive oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial conversions of free unsaturated fatty acids often generate novel hydroxy fatty acids (HFA), which are known to have special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity. Among microbial strains known to produce HFAs, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 has been well studied to produce 7,10-d...

  3. Biotechnological potential of a rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain producing phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Jiang, Hai-Xia; Sun, Shuang; Yang, Dan-Dan; Jin, Kai-Ming; Zhang, Wei; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial phenazine metabolites belong to a group of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds with antimicrobial activities. In this study, a rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 was isolated and identified through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and fatty acid profiling. PA1201 inhibited the growth of various pathogenic microorganisms, including Rhizotonia solani, Magnaporthe grisea, Fusarium graminearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Staphylococcus aureus. High Performance Liquid Chromatography showed that PA1201 produced high levels of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), a registered green fungicide 'Shenqinmycin' with the fermentation titers of 81.7 mg/L in pigment producing medium (PPM) and 926.9 mg/L in SCG medium containing soybean meal, corn steep liquor and glucose. In addition, PA1201 produced another antifungal metabolite, phenazine-1-carboxaminde (PCN), a derivative of PCA, with the fermentation titers of 18.1 and 489.5 mg/L in PPM and SCG medium respectively. To the best of our knowledge, PA1201 is a rhizosphere originating P. aeruginosa strain that congenitally produces the highest levels of PCA and PCN among currently reported P. aeruginosa isolates, which endows it great biotechnological potential to be transformed to a biopesticide-producing engineering strain. PMID:26873561

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oxyvinylglycine L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid inhibits growth of Erwinia amylovora and acts as a weak seed germination-arrest factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is demonstrated to share biological activities with 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, a related molecule produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6. We found that culture filtrates of a P. aeruginosa strain overproduc...

  5. Negative Regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Porin OprD Selective for Imipenem and Basic Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Martina M.; McCusker, Matthew P.; Bains, Manjeet; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprD is a specific porin which facilitates the uptake of basic amino acids and imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. Resistance to imipenem due to the loss of OprD is an important mechanism for the loss of clinical effectiveness. To investigate the negative regulatory mechanisms influencing oprD expression, a gene upstream of the coregulated mexEF-oprN efflux operon, designated mexT, was cloned. The predicted 304-amino-acid mature MexT protein showed strong homology to LysR-type regulators. When overexpressed it induced the expression of the mexEF-oprN efflux operon while decreasing the level of expression of OprD. The use of an oprD::xylE transcriptional fusion indicated that it acted by repressing the transcription of oprD. Salicylate, a weak aromatic acid known to reduce porin expression and induce low levels of multiple antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli, was able to induce imipenem resistance and reduce the expression of OprD but not multiple antibiotic resistance or OprN expression in P. aeruginosa. This was also demonstrated to occur at the level of transcription. Acetyl salicylate and benzoate, but not catechol, were also able to reduce the levels of OprD in the P. aeruginosa outer membranes. These OprD-suppressing compounds increased imipenem resistance even in a mexT-overexpressing and nfxC mutant backgrounds, suggesting that such resistance is independent of the MexT repressor and that oprD is influenced by more than a single mechanism of repression. PMID:10223918

  6. Catalytic activity of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-02-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylases (HPAHs) of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase family are attractive enzymes that possess the catalytic potential to synthesize valuable ortho-diphenol compounds from simple monophenol compounds. In this study, we investigated the catalytic activity of HPAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 toward cinnamic acid derivatives. We prepared Escherichia coli cells expressing the hpaB gene encoding the monooxygenase component and the hpaC gene encoding the oxidoreductase component. E. coli cells expressing HpaBC exhibited no or very low oxidation activity toward cinnamic acid, o-coumaric acid, and m-coumaric acid, whereas they rapidly oxidized p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. Interestingly, after p-coumaric acid was almost completely consumed, the resulting caffeic acid was further oxidized to 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamic acid. In addition, HpaBC exhibited oxidation activity toward 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, ferulic acid, and coniferaldehyde to produce the corresponding ortho-diphenols. We also investigated a flask-scale production of caffeic acid from p-coumaric acid as the model reaction for HpaBC-catalyzed syntheses of hydroxycinnamic acids. Since the initial concentrations of the substrate p-coumaric acid higher than 40 mM markedly inhibited its HpaBC-catalyzed oxidation, the reaction was carried out by repeatedly adding 20 mM of this substrate to the reaction mixture. Furthermore, by using the HpaBC whole-cell catalyst in the presence of glycerol, our experimental setup achieved the high-yield production of caffeic acid, i.e., 56.6 mM (10.2 g/L) within 24 h. These catalytic activities of HpaBC will provide an easy and environment-friendly synthetic approach to hydroxycinnamic acids.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in disease.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Isabella, Vincent M; Lewis, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that is the focus of intense research because of its prominent role in disease. Due to its relatively large genome and flexible metabolic capabilities, this organism exploits numerous environmental niches. It is an opportunistic pathogen that sets upon the human host when the normal immune defenses are disabled. Its deadliness is most apparent in cystic fibrosis patients, but it also is a major problem in burn wounds, chronic wounds, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, surface growth on implanted biomaterials, and within hospital surface and water supplies, where it poses a host of threats to vulnerable patients (Peleg and Hooper, N Engl J Med 362:1804-1813, 2010; Breathnach et al., J Hosp Infect 82:19-24, 2012). Once established in the patient, P. aeruginosa can be especially difficult to treat. The genome encodes a host of resistance genes, including multidrug efflux pumps (Poole, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 3:255-264, 2001) and enzymes conferring resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibotics (Vahdani et al., Annal Burns Fire Disast 25:78-81, 2012), making therapy against this gram-negative pathogen particularly challenging due to the lack of novel antimicrobial therapeutics (Lewis, Nature 485: 439-440, 2012). This challenge is compounded by the ability of P. aeruginosa to grow in a biofilm, which may enhance its ability to cause infections by protecting bacteria from host defenses and chemotherapy. Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections.

  8. Correlation between signal input and output in PctA and PctB amino acid chemoreceptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Darias, José A; Yang, Yiling; Sourjik, Victor; Krell, Tino

    2015-05-01

    The PctA and PctB chemoreceptors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediate chemotaxis toward amino acids. A general feature of signal transduction processes is that a signal input is converted into an output. We have generated chimeras combining the Tar signaling domain with either the PctA or PctB ligand binding domain (LBD). Escherichia coli harboring either PctA-Tar or PctB-Tar mediated chemotaxis toward amino acids. The responses of both chimeras were determined using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and the derived EC50 values are a measure of output. PctA-Tar and PctB-Tar responded to 19 and 11 L-amino acids respectively. The EC50 values of PctA-Tar responses differed by more than three orders of magnitude, whereas PctB-Tar responded preferentially to L-Gln. The comparison of amino acid binding constants and the corresponding EC50 values for both receptors revealed statistically significant correlations between inputs and outputs. PctA and PctB possess a double PDC (PhoQ-DcuS-CitA) LBD - a family of binding domain found in various other amino acid chemoreceptors. Similarly, various chemoreceptors share the preferential response to certain amino acids (e.g. L-Cys, L-Ser and L-Thr) that we observed for PctA. Defining the specific inputs and outputs of these chemoreceptors is an important step toward better understanding of their physiological role.

  9. Biological efficacy and stability of diluted ticarcillin-clavulanic acid in the topical treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Fiona L; Moss, Susan M; Trott, Darren J; Shipstone, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    Topical compounded Timentin(®) diluted with an inactive vehicle has been reported to be effective in the treatment of otitis externa caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aims of this study were to determine the biological efficacy of Timentin(®) (ticarcillin and clavulanic acid) when diluted in the carrier vehicle Methopt(®) against P. aeruginosa and to determine the efficacy and stability of Timentin(®) aqueous stock concentrate solution. Timentin(®) stock concentrate was tested against four P. aeruginosa isolates on days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28; then after 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 12 months of storage at 4 or -20°C. The diluted Timentin(®)-Methopt(®) solutions were tested against all isolates after 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 17, 21, 24 and 28 days of storage at 24 or 4°C. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels for all strains were determined using the broth microdilution method. The MIC of the stock solution remained relatively constant and acceptable throughout the study when stored at -20°C and was also acceptable for shorter time periods (6-9 months) when stored at 4°C. The MIC for the diluted Timentin(®)-Methopt(®) solution remained relatively constant and acceptable throughout the study for all four bacterial strains, with no difference between the solutions stored at 4 or 24°C. The results of this study indicate that storage of the Timentin(®) stock solution at -20°C does not compromise efficacy for at least 12 months and that Timentin(®) diluted in Methopt(®) was stable for 28 days when stored at either 4 or 24°C.

  10. OXA-18, a class D clavulanic acid-inhibited extended-spectrum beta-lactamase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Philippon, L N; Naas, T; Bouthors, A T; Barakett, V; Nordmann, P

    1997-01-01

    Clinical isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mus showed resistance both to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and to aztreonam. We detected a typical double-disk synergy image when ceftazidime or aztreonam was placed next to a clavulanic acid disk on an agar plate. This resistance phenotype suggested the presence of an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. Isoelectric focusing revealed that this strain produced three beta-lactamases, of pI 5.5, 7.4, and 8.2. A 2.6-kb Sau3A fragment encoding the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase of pI 5.5 was cloned from P. aeruginosa Mus genomic DNA. This enzyme, named OXA-18, had a relative molecular mass of 30.6 kDa. OXA-18 has a broad substrate profile, hydrolyzing amoxicillin, ticarcillin, cephalothin, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, and aztreonam, but not imipenem or cephamycins. Its activity was totally inhibited by clavulanic acid at 2 microg/ml. Hydrolysis constants of OXA-18 (Vmax, Km) confirmed the MIC results. Cloxacillin and oxacillin hydrolysis was noticeable with the partially purified OXA-18. The blaOXA-18 gene encodes a 275-amino-acid protein which has weak identity with all class D beta-lactamases except OXA-9 and OXA-12 (45 and 42% amino acid identity, respectively). OXA-18 is likely to be chromosomally encoded since no plasmid was found in the strain and because attempts to transfer the resistance marker failed. OXA-18 is peculiar since it is a class D beta-lactamase which confers high resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and seems to have unique hydrolytic properties among non-class A enzymes. PMID:9333046

  11. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Kristiansen, Søren; Phipps, Richard; Nielsen, Anne Kirstine; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael

    2007-08-01

    Silver has been recognized for its antimicrobial properties for centuries. Most studies on the antibacterial efficacy of silver, with particular emphasis on wound healing, have been performed on planktonic bacteria. Our recent studies, however, strongly suggest that colonization of wounds involves bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa, but that the silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 mug/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 mug/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate planktonic bacteria. These observations strongly indicate that the concentration of silver in currently available wound dressings is much too low for treatment of chronic biofilm wounds. It is suggested that clinicians and manufacturers of the said wound dressings consider whether they are treating wounds primarily colonized either by biofilm-forming or planktonic bacteria.

  12. Determining Multiple Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to an Antimicrobial Agent, Free Nitrous Acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shu-Hong; Fan, Lu; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Agulló-Barceló, Míriam; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2016-05-17

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) has recently been demonstrated as an antimicrobial agent on a range of micro-organisms, especially in wastewater-treatment systems. However, the antimicrobial mechanism of FNA is largely unknown. Here, we report that the antimicrobial effects of FNA are multitargeted. The response of a model denitrifier, Pseudomnas aeruginosa PAO1 (PAO1), common in wastewater treatment, was investigated in the absence and presence of inhibitory level of FNA (0.1 mg N/L) under anaerobic denitrifying conditions. This was achieved through coupling gene expression analysis, by RNA sequencing, and with a suite of physiological analyses. Various transcripts exhibited significant changes in abundance in the presence of FNA. Respiration was likely inhibited because denitrification activity was severely depleted, and decreased transcript levels of most denitrification genes occurred. As a consequence, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was inhibited due to the lowered cellular redox state in the FNA-exposed cultures. Meanwhile, during FNA exposure, PAO1 rerouted its carbon metabolic pathway from the TCA cycle to pyruvate fermentation with acetate as the end product as a possible survival mechanism. Additionally, protein synthesis was significantly decreased, and ribosome preservation was evident. These findings improve our understanding of PAO1 in response to FNA and contribute toward the potential application for use of FNA as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:27116299

  13. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  14. Multi-scale strategy to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa on surfaces using solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erik N; Kummer, Kim M; Dyondi, Deepti; Webster, Thomas J; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-01-21

    Infections are both frequent and costly in hospitals around the world, leading to longer hospital stays, overuse of antibiotics, and excessive costs to the healthcare system. Moreover, antibiotic resistant organisms, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa are increasing in frequency, leading to 1.7 million infections per year in USA hospitals, and 99,000 deaths, both due to the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the formation of biofilms on medical devices. In particular, respiratory infections are costly, deadly to 4.5 million persons per year worldwide, and can spread to the lungs through the placement of endotracheal tubing. In this study, towards a reduction in infections, solid lipid nanoparticles were formulated from free fatty acids, or natural lipophilic constituents found in tissues of the body. A strategy was developed to target infections by producing coatings made of non-toxic chemistries lauric acid and oleic acid delivered by core-shell solid lipid nanoparticles that act against bacteria by multiple mechanisms at the nanoscale, including disruption of bacteria leading to DNA release, and reducing the adhesion of dead bacteria to ~1%. This is the first such study to explore an anti-infection surface relying on these multi-tier strategies at the nanoscale.

  15. Multi-scale strategy to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa on surfaces using solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with free fatty acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Erik N.; Kummer, Kim M.; Dyondi, Deepti; Webster, Thomas J.; Banerjee, Rinti

    2013-12-01

    Infections are both frequent and costly in hospitals around the world, leading to longer hospital stays, overuse of antibiotics, and excessive costs to the healthcare system. Moreover, antibiotic resistant organisms, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa are increasing in frequency, leading to 1.7 million infections per year in USA hospitals, and 99 000 deaths, both due to the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the formation of biofilms on medical devices. In particular, respiratory infections are costly, deadly to 4.5 million persons per year worldwide, and can spread to the lungs through the placement of endotracheal tubing. In this study, towards a reduction in infections, solid lipid nanoparticles were formulated from free fatty acids, or natural lipophilic constituents found in tissues of the body. A strategy was developed to target infections by producing coatings made of non-toxic chemistries lauric acid and oleic acid delivered by core-shell solid lipid nanoparticles that act against bacteria by multiple mechanisms at the nanoscale, including disruption of bacteria leading to DNA release, and reducing the adhesion of dead bacteria to ~1%. This is the first such study to explore an anti-infection surface relying on these multi-tier strategies at the nanoscale.

  16. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  17. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation. PMID:27392247

  18. Regulation and characterization of the dadRAX locus for D-amino acid catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    He, Weiqing; Li, Congran; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2011-05-01

    D-amino acids are essential components for bacterial peptidoglycan, and these natural compounds are also involved in cell wall remodeling and biofilm disassembling. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the dadAX operon, encoding the D-amino acid dehydrogenase DadA and the amino acid racemase DadX, is essential for D- and L-Ala catabolism, and its expression requires a transcriptional regulator, DadR. In this study, purified recombinant DadA alone was sufficient to demonstrate the proposed enzymatic activity with very broad substrate specificity; it utilizes all D-amino acids tested as substrates except D-Glu and D-Gln. DadA also showed comparable k(cat) and K(m) values on D-Ala and several D-amino acids. dadRAX knockout mutants were constructed and subjected to analysis of their growth phenotypes on amino acids. The results revealed that utilization of L-Ala, L-Trp, D-Ala, and a specific set of D-amino acids as sole nitrogen sources was abolished in the dadA mutant and/or severely hampered in the dadR mutant while growth yield on D-amino acids was surprisingly improved in the dadX mutant. The dadA promoter was induced by several L-amino acids, most strongly by Ala, and only by D-Ala among all tested D-amino acids. Enhanced growth of the dadX mutant on D-amino acids is consistent with the finding that the dadA promoter was constitutively induced in the dadX mutant, where exogenous D-Ala but not L-Ala reduced the expression. Binding of DadR to the dadA regulatory region was demonstrated by electromobility shift assays, and the presence of L-Ala but not D-Ala increased affinity by 3-fold. The presence of multiple DadR-DNA complexes in the dadA regulatory region was demonstrated in vitro, and the formation of these nucleoprotein complexes exerted a complicated impact on promoter activation in vivo. In summary, the results from this study clearly demonstrate DadA to be the enzyme solely responsible for the proposed D-amino acid dehydrogenase activity of broad substrate

  19. Biosynthesis of pyochelin and dihydroaeruginoic acid requires the iron-regulated pchDCBA operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Serino, L; Reimmann, C; Visca, P; Beyeler, M; Chiesa, V D; Haas, D

    1997-01-01

    The high-affinity siderophore salicylate is an intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of pyochelin, another siderophore and chelator of transition metal ions, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The 2.5-kb region upstream of the salicylate biosynthetic genes pchBA was sequenced and found to contain two additional, contiguous genes, pchD and pchC, having the same orientation. The deduced amino acid sequence of the 60-kDa PchD protein was similar to those of the EntE protein (2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-AMP ligase) of Escherichia coli and other adenylate-forming enzymes, suggesting that salicylate might be adenylated at the carboxyl group by PchD. The 28-kDa PchC protein showed similarities to thioesterases of prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin and might participate in the release of the product(s) formed from activated salicylate. One potential product, dihydroaeruginoate (Dha), was identified in culture supernatants of iron-limited P. aeruginosa cells. The antifungal antibiotic Dha is thought to arise from the reaction of salicylate with cysteine, followed by cyclization of cysteine. Inactivation of the chromosomal pchD gene by insertion of the transcription and translation stop element omega Sm/Sp abolished the production of Dha and pyochelin, implying that PchD-mediated activation of salicylate may be a common first step in the synthesis of both metabolites. Furthermore, the pchD::omega Sm/Sp mutation had a strong polar effect on the expression of the pchBA genes, i.e., on salicylate synthesis, indicating that the pchDCBA genes constitute a transcriptional unit. A full-length pchDCBA transcript of ca. 4.4 kb could be detected in iron-deprived, growing cells of P. aeruginosa. Transcription of pchD started at tandemly arranged promoters, which overlapped with two Fur boxes (binding sites for the ferric uptake regulator) and the promoter of the divergently transcribed pchR gene encoding an activator of pyochelin biosynthesis. This promoter arrangement allows tight iron

  20. Quorum sensing systems differentially regulate the production of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1201

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuang; Zhou, Lian; Jin, Kaiming; Jiang, Haixia; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 is a newly identified rhizobacterium that produces high levels of the secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. PCA production in liquid batch cultures utilizing a specialized PCA-promoting medium (PPM) typically occurs after the period of most rapid growth, and production is regulated in a quorum sensing (QS)-dependent manner. PA1201 contains two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters phz1 and phz2; both clusters contribute to PCA production, with phz2 making a greater contribution. PA1201 also contains a complete set of genes for four QS systems (LasI/LasR, RhlI/RhlR, PQS/MvfR, and IQS). By using several methods including gene deletion, the construction of promoter-lacZ fusion reporter strains, and RNA-Seq analysis, this study investigated the effects of the four QS systems on bacterial growth, QS signal production, the expression of phz1 and phz2, and PCA production. The possible mechanisms for the strain- and condition-dependent expression of phz1 and phz2 were discussed, and a schematic model was proposed. These findings provide a basis for further genetic engineering of the QS systems to improve PCA production. PMID:27456813

  1. A Drug-Repositioning Screening Identifies Pentetic Acid as a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Suppressing the Elastase-Mediated Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gi, Mia; Jeong, Junhui; Lee, Keehoon; Lee, Kang-Mu; Toyofuku, Masanori; Yong, Dong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance, produces elastase as a predominant exoprotease. Here, we screened a library of chemical compounds currently used for human medication and identified diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA, pentetic acid) as an agent that suppresses the production of elastase. Elastase activity found in the prototype P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 was significantly decreased when grown with a concentration as low as 20 μM DTPA. Supplementation with Zn2+ or Mn2+ ions restored the suppressive effect of DTPA, suggesting that the DTPA-mediated decrease in elastase activity is associated with ion-chelating activity. In DTPA-treated PAO1 cells, transcription of the elastase-encoding lasB gene and levels of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a molecule that mediates P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS), were significantly downregulated, reflecting the potential involvement of the PQS QS system in DTPA-mediated elastase suppression. Biofilm formation was also decreased by DTPA treatment. When A549 alveolar type II-like adenocarcinoma cells were infected with PAO1 cells in the presence of DTPA, A549 cell viability was substantially increased. Furthermore, the intranasal delivery of DTPA to PAO1-infected mice alleviated the pathogenic effects of PAO1 cells in the animals. Together, our results revealed a novel function for a known molecule that may help treat P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:25246397

  2. Discrepancies between disk diffusion and broth susceptibility studies of the activity of ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid against ticarcillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Manian, F A; Alford, R H

    1986-01-01

    Ticarcillin and clavulanic acid in combination were tested against 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin by disk diffusion. A total of 21 isolates (53%) were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion, under currently recommended criteria for ticarcillin susceptibility. Macro-broth dilution tests (ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid, 2 micrograms/ml) confirmed susceptibility (MIC less than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml) of only 8 (38%) of 21 isolates. Time-kill studies of disk diffusion susceptible isolates indicated 2 log10 or greater killing of most isolates at 6 h in broth containing ticarcillin (64 micrograms/ml) combined with clavulanic acid (1, 2, 5, or 10 micrograms/ml). After 6 h, regrowth was common in all concentrations of clavulanic acid except 10 micrograms/ml. Regrowth populations were resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate by MIC determination. Poor bactericidal activity of ticarcillin-clavulanate against ticarcillin-resistant P. aeruginosa was confirmed, as most isolates did not undergo 99.9% or greater killing at 24 h in all concentrations of clavulanic acid. Serotype O-11 was our most common serotype and was associated with disk diffusion "pseudosusceptibility." Concomitant disk diffusion testing of ticarcillin-clavulanate and ticarcillin is recommended for testing the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin should as a rule be considered also resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate, despite apparent susceptibility by disk diffusion. PMID:3092732

  3. Detection of KPC Carbapenemase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Clinical Samples Using Modified Hodge Test and Boronic Acid Phenotypic Methods and Their Comparison With the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Falahat, Saeed; Shojapour, Mana; Sadeghi, Abdorrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a major source of concern for public health. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains are important opportunistic pathogens. These bacteria have a high resistance to a wide range of existing antimicrobials and antibiotics. Objectives The present study was performed to evaluate the frequency of KPC in P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of educational hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, using the mentioned phenotypic and genotypic methods. Materials and Methods One hundred and eight non-duplicate clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran. Antibacterial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method. KPC production was confirmed by the Modified Hodge Test (MHT), which is a phenotypic test, and combined-disk test with boronic acid and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Results In the present study, 13 isolates (12%) of P. aeruginosa were positive for KPC, using PCR. Comparison of the two phenotypic methods used in this study showed that boronic acid is more sensitive than MHT in identification of KPC-producing strains (84.6% vs. 77%). Conclusions Utilization of reliable methods for identifying carbapenemase-producing strains and determining their antibiotic resistance pattern could have a very important role in treatment of infections caused by these strains. A substantial amount of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of hospitals in Arak (Iran) produce KPC carbapenemase. Due to their low specificity, MHT and boronic acid phenotypic methods could not completely identify KPC-producing P. aeruginosa. However, the sensitivity of boronic acid phenotypic method in detection of KPC was higher than MHT. PMID:27800140

  4. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  5. Conformational Itinerary of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1,6-Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic Acid Kinase during Its Catalytic Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, John-Paul; Tavassoli, Marjan; Patel, Trushar R.; McKenna, Sean A.; Vocadlo, David J.; Khajehpour, Mazdak; Mark, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydro-sugar kinases are unique from other sugar kinases in that they must cleave the 1,6-anhydro ring of their sugar substrate to phosphorylate it using ATP. Here we show that the peptidoglycan recycling enzyme 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes large conformational changes during its catalytic cycle, with its two domains rotating apart by up to 32° around two hinge regions to expose an active site cleft into which the substrates 1,6-anhydroMurNAc and ATP can bind. X-ray structures of the open state bound to a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog (AMPPCP) and 1,6-anhydroMurNAc provide detailed insight into a ternary complex that forms preceding an operative Michaelis complex. Structural analysis of the hinge regions demonstrates a role for nucleotide binding and possible cross-talk between the bound ligands to modulate the opening and closing of AnmK. Although AnmK was found to exhibit similar binding affinities for ATP, ADP, and AMPPCP according to fluorescence spectroscopy, small angle x-ray scattering analyses revealed that AnmK adopts an open conformation in solution in the absence of ligand and that it remains in this open state after binding AMPPCP, as we had observed for our crystal structure of this complex. In contrast, the enzyme favored a closed conformation when bound to ADP in solution, consistent with a previous crystal structure of this complex. Together, our findings show that the open conformation of AnmK facilitates binding of both the sugar and nucleotide substrates and that large structural rearrangements must occur upon closure of the enzyme to correctly align the substrates and residues of the enzyme for catalysis. PMID:24362022

  6. BEL-1, a Novel Clavulanic Acid-Inhibited Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase, and the Class 1 Integron In120 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Poirel, Laurent; Brinas, Laura; Verlinde, Annemie; Ide, Louis; Nordmann, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Screening by a double-disk synergy test identified a Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate that produced a clavulanic acid-inhibited expanded-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). Cloning and sequencing identified a novel ESBL, BEL-1, weakly related to other Ambler class A ESBLs. β-Lactamase BEL-1 hydrolyzed significantly most expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and aztreonam, and its activity was inhibited by clavulanic acid, tazobactam, cefoxitin, moxalactam, and imipenem. This chromosome-encoded ESBL gene was embedded in a class 1 integron containing three other gene cassettes. In addition, this integron was bracketed by Tn1404 transposon sequences at its right end and by P. aeruginosa-specific sequences at its left end. PMID:16127048

  7. Fatty acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is initiated by the FabY class of β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthases.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanqiu; Sachdeva, Meena; Leeds, Jennifer A; Meredith, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    The prototypical type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS) pathway in bacteria utilizes two distinct classes of β-ketoacyl synthase (KAS) domains to assemble long-chain fatty acids, the KASIII domain for initiation and the KASI/II domain for elongation. The central role of FAS in bacterial viability and virulence has stimulated significant effort toward developing KAS inhibitors, particularly against the KASIII domain of the β-acetoacetyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase FabH. Herein, we show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa does not utilize a FabH ortholog but rather a new class of divergent KAS I/II enzymes to initiate the FAS pathway. When a P. aeruginosa cosmid library was used to rescue growth in a fabH downregulated strain of Escherichia coli, a single unannotated open reading frame, PA5174, complemented fabH depletion. While deletion of all four KASIII domain-encoding genes in the same P. aeruginosa strain resulted in a wild-type growth phenotype, deletion of PA5174 alone specifically attenuated growth due to a defect in de novo FAS. Siderophore secretion and quorum-sensing signaling, particularly in the rhl and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) systems, was significantly muted in the absence of PA5174. The defect could be repaired by intergeneric complementation with E. coli fabH. Characterization of recombinant PA5174 confirmed a preference for short-chain acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates, supporting the identification of PA5174 as the predominant enzyme catalyzing the condensation of acetyl coenzyme A with malonyl-ACP in P. aeruginosa. The identification of the functional role for PA5174 in FAS defines the new FabY class of β-ketoacyl synthase KASI/II domain condensation enzymes.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... becoming more difficult to treat because of increasing antibiotic resistance. Selecting the right antibiotic usually requires that a ... to help educate people about Pseudomonas infections, and antibiotic resistance, and to encourage prevention activities and healthy behaviors ...

  9. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition.

  10. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  11. Modified Pseudomonas agar: new differential medium for the detection/enumeration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mineral water.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Rita; Cunha, Joaquim; Teixeira, Paula; Gibbs, Paul A

    2002-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated as a foodborne and waterborne pathogen and is now considered a primary infectious agent. In the present study, the survival of P. aeruginosa inoculated in mineral water was evaluated by drop counts on Pseudomonas Agar Base (PAB), PAB with CN supplement X107, PAB with cetrimide, PAB with nalidixic acid, and these media with added FeSO(4). Initial counts, before starvation, were the same in all media tested. Following this period, P. aeruginosa became sensitive to PAB with added cetrimide. The addition of FeSO(4) did not improve the recovery of stressed P. aeruginosa but gave colonies a typical dark brown colour being easily differentiated from other species that can grow at 42 degrees C. The modified Pseudomonas agar medium was also tested with several P. aeruginosa strains, other species of Pseudomonas, and other genera. Only P. aeruginosa strains (pyocyanin positive) produced the typical colonies. Our results demonstrate that Pseudomonas agar with ferrous sulphate, used for the differentiation of P. aeruginosa colonies, and nalidixic acid, used as an inhibitor of Gram-positive bacteria, might be a useful medium for the detection of injured P. aeruginosa in mineral water. PMID:11777584

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  13. Glycopeptide dendrimers as Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Bergmann, Myriam; Darbre, Tamis

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic glycopeptide dendrimers composed of a branched oligopeptide tree structure appended with glycosidic groups at its multiple N-termini were investigated for binding to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectins LecB and LecA. These lectins are partly responsible for the formation of antibiotic resistant biofilms in the human pathogenic bacterium P. aeruginosa, which causes lethal airway infections in immune-compromised and cystic fibrosis patients. Glycopeptide dendrimers with high affinity to the lectins were identified by screening of combinatorial libraries. Several of these dendrimers, in particular the LecB specific glycopeptide dendrimers FD2 and D-FD2 and the LecA specific glycopeptide dendrimers GalAG2 and GalBG2, also efficiently block P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and induce biofilm dispersal in vitro. Structure-activity relationship and structural studies are reviewed, in particular the observation that multivalency is essential to the anti-biofilm effect in these dendrimers.

  14. Maintenance of chromosome structure in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rybenkov, Valentin V.

    2014-01-01

    Replication and segregation of genetic information is an activity central to the well-being of all living cells. Concerted mechanisms have evolved that ensure that each cellular chromosome is replicated once and only once per cell cycle and then faithfully segregated into daughter cells. Despite remarkable taxonomic diversity, these mechanisms are largely conserved across eubacteria, although species specific distinctions can often be noted. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge about maintenance of the chromosome structure in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We focus on global chromosome organization and its dynamics during DNA replication and cell division. Special emphasis is made on contrasting these activities in P. aeruginosa and other bacteria. Among unique P. aeruginosa features are the presence of two distinct autonomously replicating sequences and multiple condensins, which suggests existence of novel regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24863732

  15. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel

    PubMed Central

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24214409

  16. Effect of hypochlorous acid solution on the eradication and prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, serum biochemical variables, and cecum microbiota in rats.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuo; Kuwayama, Eri; Nozu, Ryoko; Ueno, Masami; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    In this study, hypochlorous acid solution, a weak acid, provided as drinking water to rats, was evaluated for its ability to eradicate and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, while monitoring its simultaneous effect on serum biochemical variables and microbiota in the rat cecum. The results suggest that the solution could not eliminate the bacteria in the experimentally infected rats; however, the administration of a 10-parts-per-million (ppm) hypochlorous acid solution as drinking water was effective in inhibiting horizontal spread of P. aeruginosa infection among cage mates. Additionally, exposure to hypochlorous solution did not have any effect on serum biochemical variables of the rat including levels of total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, total bilirubin, lipase, amylase, urea nitrogen, total protein, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl), except for potassium (K) levels. The most frequently isolated bacteria in the rat cecum included species belonging to Bacteroidales, Lactobacillus, Clostridiales, Erysipelotrichaceae, Akkermansia, Coriobacteriales, and Firmicutes. The ratio of the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) peaks did not differ across rats administered with 5 and 10 ppm weak acid solution as compared to the control group for any of the bacteria, except for Erysipelotrichaceae and Firmicutes, where the ratio of T-RFLP peaks was higher in the 5 ppm group for Erysipelotrichaceae and in the 10 ppm group for Firmicutes than that in the control group (P<0.01). The results suggest that the weak acid hypochlorous solution could not eradicate P. aeruginosa completely from rats. The solution was effective in preventing infection without affecting serum biochemical variables; however, some of bacterial microbiota may have changed due to administration of the solution.

  17. Effect of hypochlorous acid solution on the eradication and prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, serum biochemical variables, and cecum microbiota in rats

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Kazuo; KUWAYAMA, Eri; NOZU, Ryoko; UENO, Masami; HAYASHIMOTO, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    In this study, hypochlorous acid solution, a weak acid, provided as drinking water to rats, was evaluated for its ability to eradicate and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, while monitoring its simultaneous effect on serum biochemical variables and microbiota in the rat cecum. The results suggest that the solution could not eliminate the bacteria in the experimentally infected rats; however, the administration of a 10-parts-per-million (ppm) hypochlorous acid solution as drinking water was effective in inhibiting horizontal spread of P. aeruginosa infection among cage mates. Additionally, exposure to hypochlorous solution did not have any effect on serum biochemical variables of the rat including levels of total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, total bilirubin, lipase, amylase, urea nitrogen, total protein, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl), except for potassium (K) levels. The most frequently isolated bacteria in the rat cecum included species belonging to Bacteroidales, Lactobacillus, Clostridiales, Erysipelotrichaceae, Akkermansia, Coriobacteriales, and Firmicutes. The ratio of the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) peaks did not differ across rats administered with 5 and 10 ppm weak acid solution as compared to the control group for any of the bacteria, except for Erysipelotrichaceae and Firmicutes, where the ratio of T-RFLP peaks was higher in the 5 ppm group for Erysipelotrichaceae and in the 10 ppm group for Firmicutes than that in the control group (P<0.01). The results suggest that the weak acid hypochlorous solution could not eradicate P. aeruginosa completely from rats. The solution was effective in preventing infection without affecting serum biochemical variables; however, some of bacterial microbiota may have changed due to administration of the solution. PMID:25736708

  18. Ellagic Acid Derivatives from Terminalia chebula Retz. Downregulate the Expression of Quorum Sensing Genes to Attenuate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sarabhai, Sajal; Sharma, Prince; Capalash, Neena

    2013-01-01

    Background Burgeoning antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has necessitated the development of anti pathogenic agents that can quench acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) mediated QS with least risk of resistance. This study explores the anti quorum sensing potential of T. chebula Retz. and identification of probable compounds(s) showing anti QS activity and the mechanism of attenuation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factors. Methods and Results Methanol extract of T. chebula Retz. fruit showed anti QS activity using Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. Bioactive fraction (F7), obtained by fractionation of methanol extract using Sephadex LH20, showed significant reduction (p<0.001) in QS regulated production of extracellular virulence factors in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Biofilm formation and alginate were significantly (p<0.05) reduced with enhanced (20%) susceptibility to tobramycin. Real Time PCR of F7 treated P. aeruginosa showed down regulation of autoinducer synthase (lasI and rhlI) and their cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR) genes by 89, 90, 90 and 93%, respectively. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry also showed 90 and 64% reduction in the production of 3-oxo-C12HSL and C4HSL after treatment. Decrease in AHLs as one of the mechanisms of quorum quenching by F7 was supported by the reversal of inhibited swarming motility in F7-treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 on addition of C4HSL. F7 also showed antagonistic activity against 3-oxo-C12HSL-dependent QS in E. coli bioreporter. C. elegans fed on F7-treated P. aeruginosa showed enhanced survival with LT50 increasing from 24 to 72 h. LC-ESI-MS of F7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid derivatives responsible for anti QS activity in T. chebula extract. Conclusions This is the first report on anti QS activity of T. chebula fruit linked to EADs which down regulate the expression of lasIR and rhlIR genes with concomitant decrease in AHLs in P. aeruginosa PAO1 causing attenuation of its virulence factors and enhanced

  19. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  20. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-07-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  1. Formation of polyesters consisting of medium-chain-length 3-hydroxyalkanoic acids from gluconate by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed Central

    Timm, A; Steinbüchel, A

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO and 15 other strains of this species synthesized a polyester with 3-hydroxydecanoate as the main constituent (55 to 76 mol%) if the cells were cultivated in the presence of gluconate and if the nitrogen source was exhausted; 3-hydroxyhexanoate, 3-hydroxyoctanoate, and 3-hydroxydodecanoate were minor constituents of the polymer. The polymer was deposited in granules within the cell and amounted to 70% of the cell dry matter in some strains. Among 55 different strains of 41 Pseudomonas species tested, P. aureofaciens (21.6% of cellular dry matter), P. citronellolis (78.0%), P. chlororaphis (8.5%), P. marginalis (11.4%), P. mendocina (50.7%), P. putida (33.5%), and Pseudomonas sp. strain DSM 1650 (54.6%) accumulated this type of polymer at significant levels (greater than 5%) during cultivation on gluconate. In two strains of P. facilis and P. fluorescens, as well as in one strain of P. syringae, this polymer was detected as a minor constituent (much less than 5%). All other strains accumulated either poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) or a polymer consisting mainly of 3-hydroxyoctanoate with octanoate but no polyester with gluconate as the carbon source. Only a few species (e.g., P. stutzeri) were unable to accumulate poly(hydroxyalkanoic acids) (PHA) at all. These results indicated that the formation of PHA depends on a pathway which is distinct from all other known PHA-biosynthetic pathways. The polyesters accumulated by gluconate- or octanoate-grown cells of recombinant strains of P. aeruginosa and P. putida, which harbored the Alcaligenes eutrophus poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)biosynthetic genes, contained 3-hydroxybutyrate as an additional constituent. Images PMID:2125185

  2. Isolation of an iron-binding compound from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, C D; Graham, R

    1979-01-01

    An iron-binding compound was isolated from ethyl acetate extracts of culture supernatant fluids of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and was purified by successive paper and thin-layer chromatographic procedures. The purified compound was characterized by UV, visible, infrared, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compound possesses phenolic characteristics, with little or no similarity to dihydroxybenzoates and no indication of a hydroxamate group. P. aeruginosa synthesized the compound during active growth in culture media containing less than 5 X 10(-6) M added FeCl3. When added to iron-poor cultures of P. aeruginosa, the compound promoted the growth of the bacterium and also reversed growth inhibition by the iron chelator ethylenediamine-di-(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid). PMID:104968

  3. Carbapenem resistance in cystic fibrosis strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a result of amino acid substitutions in porin OprD.

    PubMed

    Richardot, Charlotte; Plésiat, Patrick; Fournier, Damien; Monlezun, Laura; Broutin, Isabelle; Llanes, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the impact of single amino acid substitutions occurring in specific porin OprD on carbapenem resistance of cystic fibrosis (CF) strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A PAO1ΔoprD mutant was complemented with the oprD genes from five carbapenem-resistant CF strains exhibiting very low amounts of mutated OprD porins in their outer membrane despite wild-type levels of oprD transcripts. Compared with wild-type porin from strain PAO1, single amino acid substitutions S403P (in periplasmic loop 8), Y242H, S278P and L345P (in β-sheets 10, 12 and 14, respectively) were found to result in reduced amounts of OprD in the outer membrane, increased carbapenem resistance, and slower growth in minimal medium containing gluconate, an OprD substrate, as the sole source of carbon and energy. This indicates that in CF strains of P. aeruginosa, loss of porin OprD may not only result from mutations downregulating the expression of or disrupting the oprD gene, but also from mutations generating deleterious amino acid substitutions in the porin structure.

  4. d-Amino Acids Enhance the Activity of Antimicrobials against Biofilms of Clinical Wound Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Kevin S.; Romano, Desiree R.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Hardy, Sharanda K.; Murray, Clinton K.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of d-amino acids (d-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of d-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. d-Met, d-Phe, and d-Trp at concentrations of ≥5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (d-Met/d-Phe/d-Trp). When combined with d-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of d-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of d-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity. PMID:24841260

  5. D-amino acids enhance the activity of antimicrobials against biofilms of clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos J; Akers, Kevin S; Romano, Desiree R; Woodbury, Ronald L; Hardy, Sharanda K; Murray, Clinton K; Wenke, Joseph C

    2014-08-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of D-amino acids (D-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of D-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. D-Met, D-Phe, and D-Trp at concentrations of ≥ 5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (D-Met/D-Phe/D-Trp). When combined with D-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of D-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of D-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity.

  6. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  7. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Kalpana Badami; Jayadev, Chaitra

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23803484

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  10. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    from ingesting P. aeruginosa in drinking water is low. The risk is slightly higher if the subject is taking an antibiotic resisted by P. aeruginosa. The fact that individuals on ampicillin are more susceptible to Pseudomonas gastrointestinal infection probably results from suppression of normal intestinal flora, which would allow Pseudomonas to colonize. The process of estimating risk was significantly constrained because of the absence of specific (quantitative) occurrence data for Pseudomonas. Sensitivity analysis shows that the greatest source of variability/uncertainty in the risk assessment is from the density distribution in the exposure rather than the dose-response or water consumption distributions. In summary, two routes appear to carry the greatest health risks from contacting water contaminated with P. aeruginosa (1) skin exposure in hot tubs and (2) lung exposure from inhaling aerosols.

  11. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proteome during Anaerobic Growth‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Guina, Tina; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Nguyen, Hai; Eng, Jimmy; Miller, Samuel I.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope-coded affinity tag analysis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins expressed during anaerobic growth. Out of the 617 proteins identified, 158 were changed in abundance during anaerobic growth compared to during aerobic growth, including proteins whose increased expression was expected based on their role in anaerobic metabolism. These results form the basis for future analyses of alterations in bacterial protein content during growth in various environments, including the cystic fibrosis airway. PMID:16291692

  12. Specific variations of fatty acid composition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 induced by quaternary ammonium compounds and relation with resistance to bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Guérin-Méchin, L; Dubois-Brissonnet, F; Heyd, B; Leveau, J Y

    1999-11-01

    The role of membrane fatty acid composition in the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 to the bactericidal activity of Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (QACs) was investigated. The strain was grown in a medium with increasing concentrations of a QAC, benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride (C14) and two non-QACs, sodium dichloroisocyanurate and tri-sodium phosphate. In the presence of C14 only, the strain was able to grow in concentrations higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration. As the strain adapted to C14, resistance to bactericidal activity of the same biocide increased. For the non-QACs, no change was noted when cells were grown in the presence of biocides. The C14-adapted cells showed variations in membrane fatty acid composition. A hierarchical clustering analysis was used to compare all fatty acid compositions of cultures in the presence, or not, of the three biocides used here and another QAC studied previously. The clusters obtained underlined specific variations of membrane fatty acids in response to the presence of QACs. Furthermore, with a simple linear regression analysis, a relationship was shown between the membrane fatty acids and the resistance developed by the strain against the bactericidal activity of C14. PMID:10594715

  13. Cryptic transposable phages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, V.N.; Mit`kina, L.N.; Pleteneva, E.A.; Aleshin, V.V.

    1995-11-01

    Frequencies of nucleotide sequences homologous to phage transposons (PT) of two species, D3112 and B3, were assessed in genomes of natural Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains by the dot-blot hybridization method. These strains were incapable of liberating viable phages on a lawn of the PA01 standard indicator strain of P. aeruginosa. It was shown that the homologies detected belong to two groups, high and intermediate, with respect to homology level. Homology patterns were classified as high when they provided signals comparable to those for hybridization in a positive control; patterns were classified as intermediate when the hybridization level was higher than the background level, but lower than in the positive control. Homologous PT sequences were designated as cryptic PT. Intact cryptic PT prophages were shown to exist in genomes of particular natural strains manifesting a higher level of hybridization. However, the growth of these phages was limited by the restriction system of strain PA01. It is possible to isolate strains maintaining the growth of some cryptic PT. These strains differed from P. aeruginosa with respect to the specificity of the restriction and modification system. Nevertheless, in most cases, the attempt to identify a novel host capable of maintaining growth of a cryptic PT failed. Natural strains often carry cryptic PT related to both known PT species, D3112 and B3. The frequency of cryptic PT is extremely high, reaching 30% in strains with a high level of homology only and up to 50% in all strains exhibiting homology. This high PT frequency is assumed to be associated with the considerable variation of P. aeruginosa. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Genomic Structure and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Klockgether, Jens; Cramer, Nina; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Davenport, Colin F.; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome (G + C content 65–67%, size 5.5–7 Mbp) is made up of a single circular chromosome and a variable number of plasmids. Sequencing of complete genomes or blocks of the accessory genome has revealed that the genome encodes a large repertoire of transporters, transcriptional regulators, and two-component regulatory systems which reflects its metabolic diversity to utilize a broad range of nutrients. The conserved core component of the genome is largely collinear among P. aeruginosa strains and exhibits an interclonal sequence diversity of 0.5–0.7%. Only a few loci of the core genome are subject to diversifying selection. Genome diversity is mainly caused by accessory DNA elements located in 79 regions of genome plasticity that are scattered around the genome and show an anomalous usage of mono- to tetradecanucleotides. Genomic islands of the pKLC102/PAGI-2 family that integrate into tRNALys or tRNAGly genes represent hotspots of inter- and intraclonal genomic diversity. The individual islands differ in their repertoire of metabolic genes that make a large contribution to the pangenome. In order to unravel intraclonal diversity of P. aeruginosa, the genomes of two members of the PA14 clonal complex from diverse habitats and geographic origin were compared. The genome sequences differed by less than 0.01% from each other. One hundred ninety-eight of the 231 single nucleotide substitutions (SNPs) were non-randomly distributed in the genome. Non-synonymous SNPs were mainly found in an integrated Pf1-like phage and in genes involved in transcriptional regulation, membrane and extracellular constituents, transport, and secretion. In summary, P. aeruginosa is endowed with a highly conserved core genome of low sequence diversity and a highly variable accessory genome that communicates with other pseudomonads and genera via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:21808635

  15. RhlA converts beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein intermediates in fatty acid synthesis to the beta-hydroxydecanoyl-beta-hydroxydecanoate component of rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kun; Rock, Charles O

    2008-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes a rhamnolipid (RL) surfactant that functions in hydrophobic nutrient uptake, swarming motility, and pathogenesis. We show that RhlA supplies the acyl moieties for RL biosynthesis by competing with the enzymes of the type II fatty acid synthase (FASII) cycle for the beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) pathway intermediates. Purified RhlA forms one molecule of beta-hydroxydecanoyl-beta-hydroxydecanoate from two molecules of beta-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP and is the only enzyme required to generate the lipid component of RL. The acyl groups in RL are primarily beta-hydroxydecanoyl, and in vitro, RhlA has a greater affinity for 10-carbon substrates, illustrating that RhlA functions as a molecular ruler that selectively extracts 10-carbon intermediates from FASII. Eliminating either FabA or FabI activity in P. aeruginosa increases RL production, illustrating that slowing down FASII allows RhlA to more-effectively compete for beta-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP. In Escherichia coli, the rate of fatty acid synthesis increases 1.3-fold when RhlA is expressed, to ensure the continued formation of fatty acids destined for membrane phospholipid even though 24% of the carbon entering FASII is diverted to RL synthesis. Previous studies have placed a ketoreductase, called RhlG, before RhlA in the RL biosynthetic pathway; however, our experiments show that RhlG has no role in RL biosynthesis. We conclude that RhlA is necessary and sufficient to form the acyl moiety of RL and that the flux of carbon through FASII accelerates to support RL production and maintain a supply of acyl chains for phospholipid synthesis.

  16. Functional characterization of ExFadLO, an outer membrane protein required for exporting oxygenated long-chain fatty acids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Eriel; Estupiñán, Mónica; Pastor, F I Javier; Busquets, Montserrat; Díaz, Pilar; Manresa, Angeles

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial proteins of the FadL family have frequently been associated to the uptake of exogenous hydrophobic substrates. However, their outer membrane location and involvement in substrate uptake have been inferred mainly from sequence similarity to Escherichia coli FadL, the first well-characterized outer membrane transporters of Long-Chain Fatty Acids (LCFAs) in bacteria. Here we report the functional characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane protein (ORF PA1288) showing similarities to the members of the FadL family, for which we propose the name ExFadLO. We demonstrate herein that this protein is required to export LCFAs 10-HOME and 7,10-DiHOME, derived from a diol synthase oxygenation activity on oleic acid, from the periplasm to the extracellular medium. Accumulation of 10-HOME and 7,10-DiHOME in the extracellular medium of P. aeruginosa was abolished by a transposon insertion mutation in exFadLO (ExFadLO¯ mutant). However, intact periplasm diol synthase activity was found in this mutant, indicating that ExFadLO participates in the export of these oxygenated LCFAs across the outer membrane. The capacity of ExFadLO¯ mutant to export 10-HOME and 7,10-DiHOME was recovered after complementation with a wild-type, plasmid-expressed ExFadLO protein. A western blot assay with a variant of ExFadLO tagged with a V5 epitope confirmed the location of ExFadLO in the bacterial outer membrane under the experimental conditions tested. Our results provide the first evidence that FadL family proteins, known to be involved in the uptake of hydrophobic substrates from the extracellular environment, also function as secretion elements for metabolites of biological relevance.

  17. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Sensor, PsrA, Modulates the Expression of rpoS and the Type III Secretion exsCEBA Operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Lunin, V. V.; Skarina, T.; Savchenko, A.; Schurr, M. J.; Hoang, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PsrA autorepressor has dual roles as a repressor of the fadBA5{beta}-oxidation operon and an activator of the stationary-phase sigma factor rpoS and exsCEBA operon of the type III secretion system (TTSS). Previously, we demonstrated that the repression of the fadBA5 operon by PsrA is relieved by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). However, the signal affecting the activation of rpoS and exsC via PsrA is unknown. In this study, microarray and gene fusion data suggested that LCFA (e.g. oleate) affected the expression of rpoS and exsC. DNA binding studies confirmed that PsrA binds to the rpoS and exsC promoter regions. This binding was inhibited by LCFA, indicating that LCFA directly affects the activation of these two genes through PsrA. LCFA decreased rpoS and exsC expression, resulting in increased N-(butyryl)-l-homoserine-lactone quorum sensing signal and decreased ExoS/T production respectively. Based on the crystal structure of PsrA, site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues, within the hydrophobic channel thought to accommodate LCFA, created two LCFA-non-responsive PsrA mutants. The binding and activation of rpoS and exsC by these PsrA mutants was no longer inhibited by LCFA. These data support a mechanistic model where LCFAs influence PsrA regulation to control LCFA metabolism and some virulence genes in P. aeruginosa.

  18. Vesiculation from Pseudomonas aeruginosa under SOS

    PubMed Central

    Maredia, Reshma; Devineni, Navya; Lentz, Peter; Dallo, Shatha F.; Yu, JiehJuen; Guentzel, Neal; Chambers, James; Arulanandam, Bernard; Haskins, William E.; Weitao, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections can be aggravated by antibiotic treatment that induces SOS response and vesiculation. This leads to a hypothesis concerning association of SOS with vesiculation. To test it, we conducted multiple analyses of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type in which SOS is induced by ciprofloxacin and from the LexA noncleavable (lexAN) strain in which SOS is repressed. The levels of OMV proteins, lipids, and cytotoxicity increased for both the treated strains, demonstrating vesiculation stimulation by the antibiotic treatment. However, the further increase was suppressed in the lexAN strains, suggesting the SOS involvement. Obviously, the stimulated vesiculation is attributed by both SOS-related and unrelated factors. OMV subproteomic analysis was performed to examine these factors, which reflected the OMV-mediated cytotoxicity and the physiology of the vesiculating cells under treatment and SOS. Thus, SOS plays a role in the vesiculation stimulation that contributes to cytotoxicity. PMID:22448133

  19. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Calderon, Diego F.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Brown, Amanda L.; Shah, Nihar M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-healing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building upon prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the 3-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  20. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S; Calderon, Diego F; Kierski, Patricia R; Brown, Amanda L; Shah, Nihar M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Schurr, Michael J; Murphy, Christopher J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building on prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the three-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing.

  1. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S; Calderon, Diego F; Kierski, Patricia R; Brown, Amanda L; Shah, Nihar M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Schurr, Michael J; Murphy, Christopher J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building on prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the three-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  2. Aerobic biodegradation pathway for Remazol Orange by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sarayu, K; Sandhya, S

    2010-02-01

    Removal of azo dyes from effluent generated by textile industries is rather difficult. Azo dyes represent a major class of synthetic colorants that are mutagenic and carcinogenic. Pseudomonas aeruginosa grew well in the presence of Remazol Orange (RO) and was able to decolorize and degrade it. In the present study, the decolorization and degradation efficiency using single culture P. aeruginosa with RO and textile wastewaters is studied. The elucidation of decolorization pathway for P. aeruginosa is of special interest. The degradation pathway and the metabolic products formed during the degradation were also predicted with the help of high performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis. The data show the cleavage of the azo dye RO to form both methyl metanilic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid after decolorization and finally to oxidation forms benzoic acid, alkenes, aldehydes, and alkynes. The organism was able to decolorize the dye RO and wastewater effectively to the maximum of 82.4% and 62%, respectively.

  3. Isolation of oxidase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum culture.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, K D; Wasilauskas, B L

    1979-01-01

    Two isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking characteristic indophenol oxidase were recovered from a sputum specimen. A discussion of the characteristic biochemical tests and antibiograms along with a possible explanation for this phenomenon is presented. PMID:225349

  4. Impact of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase on virulence factor production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Jonathan B; Scoffield, Jessica; Woolnough, Jessica L; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes life-long chronic infections in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung by utilizing various adaptation strategies. Some of these strategies include altering metabolic pathways to utilize readily available nutrients present in the host environment. The airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphatidylcholine, a major component of lung surfactant. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can degrade phosphatidylcholine to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of usable carbon sources in the CF lung. In this study, we show that some CF-adapted P. aeruginosa isolates utilize glycerol more efficiently as a carbon source than nonadapted isolates. Furthermore, a mutation in a gene required for glycerol utilization impacts the production of several virulence factors in both acute and chronic isolates of P. aeruginosa. Taken together, the results suggest that interference with this metabolic pathway may have potential therapeutic benefits. PMID:25409940

  5. Two unusual pilin sequences from different isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Pasloske, B L; Sastry, P A; Finlay, B B; Paranchych, W

    1988-01-01

    The pilin genes of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from two different patients with cystic fibrosis were cloned and sequenced. The predicted protein sequences of these two pilins had several unusual features compared with other published P. aeruginosa pilin sequences. PMID:2841299

  6. Growth of genetically engineered Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in soil and rhizosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, K H; Schell, M A; Hartel, P G

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the addition of a recombinant plasmid containing the pglA gene encoding an alpha-1,4-endopolygalacturonase from Pseudomonas solanacearum on the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in soil and rhizosphere was determined. Despite a high level of polygalacturonase production by genetically engineered P. putida and P. aeruginosa, the results suggest that polygalacturonase production had little effect on the growth of these strains in soil or rhizosphere. PMID:2515805

  7. Regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chemotaxis by the nitrogen source.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, R; Montie, T C

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of amino acid chemotaxis by nitrogen was investigated in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The quantitative capillary tube technique was used to measure chemotactic responses of bacteria to spatial gradients of amino acids and other attractants. Chemotaxis toward serine, arginine, and alpha-aminoisobutyrate was sharply dependent on the form in which nitrogen was presented to the bacteria. Bacteria grown on mineral salts-succinate with potassium nitrate gave responses to amino acids that were 2 to 3 times those of cells grown on ammonium sulfate and 10 to 20 times those of cells grown in mineral salts-succinate with Casamino Acids as the nitrogen source. A combination of ammonium sulfate and glutamate was as effective as Casamino Acids in depressing serine taxis. The threshold concentration for alpha-aminoisobutyrate taxis was consistently lower in nitrate-grown bacteria than in ammonia-grown bacteria. Responsiveness to sodium succinate, however, was not subject to regulation by nitrogen, and glucose chemotaxis was inhibited, rather than enhanced, in nitrate-grown bacteria. These results indicate that chemotaxis of P. aeruginosa toward amino acids is subject to regulation by nitrogen and that this regulation probably is expressed at the level of the chemoreceptors or transducers. PMID:3932326

  8. Engineering the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 to improve phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kaiming; Zhou, Lian; Jiang, Haixia; Sun, Shuang; Fang, Yunling; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xuehong; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is an important component of the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. We used a combined method involving gene, promoter, and protein engineering to modify the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways in the PCA-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201. The PCA yield of the resulting strain PA-IV was increased 54.6-fold via the following strategies: (1) blocking PCA conversion and enhancing PCA efflux pumping; (2) increasing metabolic flux towards the PCA biosynthetic pathway through the over-production of two DAHP synthases and blocking the synthesis of 21 secondary metabolites; (3) increasing the PCA precursor supply through the engineering of five chorismate-utilizing enzymes; (4) engineering the promoters of two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters. Strain PA-IV produced 9882 mg/L PCA in fed-batch fermentation, which is twice as much as that produced by the current industrial strain. Strain PA-IV was also genetically stable and comparable to Escherichia coli in cytotoxicity.

  9. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenazines that Kill Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cezairliyan, Brent; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Yuen, Grace J.; Saghatelian, Alan; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches. PMID:23300454

  10. The Regulatory Network of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important bacterial model due to its metabolic and pathogenic abilities, which allow it to interact and colonize a wide range of hosts, including plants and animals. In this work we compile and analyze the structure and organization of an experimentally supported regulatory network in this bacterium. Results The regulatory network consists of 690 genes and 1020 regulatory interactions between their products (12% of total genes: 54% sigma and 16% of transcription factors). This complex interplay makes the third largest regulatory network of those reported in bacteria. The entire network is enriched for activating interactions and, peculiarly, self-activation seems to occur more prominent for transcription factors (TFs), which contrasts with other biological networks where self-repression is dominant. The network contains a giant component of 650 genes organized into 11 hierarchies, encompassing important biological processes, such as, biofilms formation, production of exopolysaccharide alginate and several virulence factors, and of the so-called quorum sensing regulons. Conclusions The study of gene regulation in P. aeruginosa is biased towards pathogenesis and virulence processes, all of which are interconnected. The network shows power-law distribution -input degree -, and we identified the top ten global regulators, six two-element cycles, the longest paths have ten steps, six biological modules and the main motifs containing three and four elements. We think this work can provide insights for the design of further studies to cover the many gaps in knowledge of this important bacterial model, and for the design of systems strategies to combat this bacterium. PMID:22587778

  11. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. PMID:20580207

  12. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices.

  13. Microbial degradation of quinoline and methylquinolines. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aislabie, J.; Bej, A.K.; Hurst, H.; Rothenburger, S.; Atlas, R.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Several bacterial cultures were isolated that are able to degrade quinoline and to transform or to degrade methylquinolines. The degradation of quinoline by strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa QP and Pseudomonas. putida QP produced hydroxyquinolines, a transient pink compound, and other undetermined products. The quinoline-degrading strains of P. aeruginosa QP and P. putida QP hydroxylated a limited number of methylquinolines but could not degrade them, nor could they transform 2-methylquinoline, isoquinoline, or pyridine. Another pseudomonad, Pseudomonas sp. strain MQP, was isolated that could degrade 2-methylquinoline. P. aeruginosa QP was able to degrade or to transform quinoline and a few methylquinolines in a complex heterocyclic nitrogen-containing fraction of a shale oil. All of the quinoline- and methylquinoline-degrading strains have multiple plasmids including a common 250-kilobase plasmid. The 225-, 250-, and 320-kilobase plasmids of the P. aeruginosa QP strain all contained genes involved in quinoline metabolism.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa immunotype 5 polysaccharide-toxin A conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Cryz, S J; Furer, E; Sadoff, J C; Germanier, R

    1986-01-01

    Polysaccharide (PS) derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa immunotype 5 lipopolysaccharide was covalently coupled to toxin A by reductive amination with adipic acid dihydrazide as a spacer molecule. The resulting PS-toxin A conjugate was composed of 27.5% PS and 72.5% toxin A. The conjugate was composed of heterogeneous high-molecular-weight species, all of which possessed an Mr greater than 670,000. The conjugate was nontoxic for mice and nonpyrogenic at a dose of 50 micrograms/kg of body weight when intravenously administered to rabbits. Immunization of rabbits with the conjugate evoked both an antilipopolysaccharide immunoglobulin G (IgG) and an anti-toxin A IgG response. Anticonjugate IgG was capable of neutralizing the cytotoxic effect of toxin A. Immunization of mice with the conjugate increased the mean lethal dose from 4.5 X 10(1) P. aeruginosa for control mice to 9.6 X 10(5) P. aeruginosa for vaccinated mice. Similarly, immunization raised the mean lethal dose for toxin A from 0.2 to 4.67 micrograms per mouse. PMID:3082756

  15. Spontaneous release of lipopolysaccharide by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, J E; Kuzio, J; Milazzo, F H; Kropinski, A M

    1983-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO grown in glucose mineral salts medium released lipopolysaccharide which was chemically and immunologically similar to the cellular lipopolysaccharide. In addition, it possessed identical phage E79-inactivating properties. Through neutralization of phage activity and hemolysis inhibition assays, the organism was found to liberate lipopolysaccharide at a constant rate during log-phase growth equivalent to 1.3 to 2.2 ng/10(8) cells over a growth temperature range of 25 to 42 degrees C. At 19 degrees C, a lipopolysaccharide was released which was deficient in phage-inactivating activity but retained its immunological properties. Chemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide extracted from cells grown at 19 degrees C showed a deficiency in the O-side-chain component fucosamine. Gel exclusion chromatography of the polysaccharide fraction derived from lipopolysaccharide isolated from cells grown at 19 degrees C exhibited a decreased content of side-chain polysaccharide as well as a difference in the hexosamine:hexose ratio. The results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis confirmed these results as well as establishing that an essentially normal distribution of side-chain repeating unit lengths were to be found in the 19 degrees C preparation. These results suggest a decrease in the frequency of capping R-form lipopolysaccharide at 19 degrees C. Images PMID:6409883

  16. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  17. Functionalized polyanilines disrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gizdavic-Nikolaidis, Marija R; Pagnon, Joanne C; Ali, Naseem; Sum, Reuben; Davies, Noel; Roddam, Louise F; Ambrose, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of functionalized polyanilines (fPANIs) against stationary phase cells and biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus using homopolymer of sulfanilic acid (poly-SO3H) as a model. The chemically synthesized poly-SO3H was characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopies. The molecular weight (Mw) and elemental analysis of homopolymer poly-SO3H were also examined. We found that poly-SO3H was bactericidal against stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus at a concentration of 20 mgml(-1). Surprisingly, we discovered that the same concentration (20 mgml(-1)) of poly-SO3H significantly disrupted and killed bacterial cells present in pre-established forty-eight hour static biofilms of these organisms, as shown by crystal violet and bacterial live/dead fluorescence staining assays. In support of these data, poly-SO3H extensively diminished the expression of bacterial genes related to biofilm formation in stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa, and seemed to greatly reduce the amount of the quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) able to be recovered from biofilms of this organism. Furthermore, we found that poly-SO3H was able to effectively penetrate and kill cells in biofilms formed by the P. aeruginosa (AESIII) isolate derived from the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient. Taken together, the results of the present study emphasise the broad antimicrobial activities of fPANI, and suggest that they could be developed further and used in some novel ways to construct medical devices and/or industrial equipment that are refractory to colonization by biofilm-forming bacteria. PMID:26496473

  18. Functionalized polyanilines disrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gizdavic-Nikolaidis, Marija R; Pagnon, Joanne C; Ali, Naseem; Sum, Reuben; Davies, Noel; Roddam, Louise F; Ambrose, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of functionalized polyanilines (fPANIs) against stationary phase cells and biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus using homopolymer of sulfanilic acid (poly-SO3H) as a model. The chemically synthesized poly-SO3H was characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopies. The molecular weight (Mw) and elemental analysis of homopolymer poly-SO3H were also examined. We found that poly-SO3H was bactericidal against stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus at a concentration of 20 mgml(-1). Surprisingly, we discovered that the same concentration (20 mgml(-1)) of poly-SO3H significantly disrupted and killed bacterial cells present in pre-established forty-eight hour static biofilms of these organisms, as shown by crystal violet and bacterial live/dead fluorescence staining assays. In support of these data, poly-SO3H extensively diminished the expression of bacterial genes related to biofilm formation in stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa, and seemed to greatly reduce the amount of the quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) able to be recovered from biofilms of this organism. Furthermore, we found that poly-SO3H was able to effectively penetrate and kill cells in biofilms formed by the P. aeruginosa (AESIII) isolate derived from the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient. Taken together, the results of the present study emphasise the broad antimicrobial activities of fPANI, and suggest that they could be developed further and used in some novel ways to construct medical devices and/or industrial equipment that are refractory to colonization by biofilm-forming bacteria.

  19. Nosocomial infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa: review of recent trends.

    PubMed

    Cross, A; Allen, J R; Burke, J; Ducel, G; Harris, A; John, J; Johnson, D; Lew, M; MacMillan, B; Meers, P

    1983-01-01

    The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in nosocomial infections occurring since 1975 is reviewed. Data from the National Nosocomial Infections Study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, from individual medical centers, and from the literature were used to compare the relative frequency of occurrence of nosocomial infection caused by P. aeruginosa with that of infection caused by other gram-negative bacilli. The relative frequency of P. aeruginosa as a nosocomial pathogen has increased, although wide variations are seen among individual medical centers. P. aeruginosa continues to be a major pathogen among patients with immunosuppression, cystic fibrosis, malignancy, and trauma. While Staphylococcus aureus has become the predominant pathogen in some large burn centers, P. aeruginosa is the most important gram-negative pathogen. Periodic review of the epidemiology of P. aeruginosa infection is warranted in view of the changing incidence of infection caused by this organism.

  20. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of PhzM, a phenazine-modifying methyltransferase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyocyanin, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and more than 70 related compounds collectively known as phenazines are produced by various species of Pseudomonas, including the fluorescent pseudomonad P. aeruginosa, a Gramnegative opportunistic pathogen in humans and animals. P. aeruginosa synthesizes a cha...

  1. VEB-1-like extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Poirel, L; Rotimi, V O; Mokaddas, E M; Karim, A; Nordmann, P

    2001-01-01

    Two clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients in intensive care units in Kuwait were resistant to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and showed a synergistic effect between ceftazidime and clavulanic acid. This is the first report of extended-spectrum enzymes from nosocomial isolates from the Middle East.

  2. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Zoe A.; Seviour, Robert J.; Tucci, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA. PMID:27313312

  3. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Zoe A; Seviour, Robert J; Tucci, Joseph; Petrovski, Steve

    2016-06-16

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA.

  4. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Zoe A; Seviour, Robert J; Tucci, Joseph; Petrovski, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA. PMID:27313312

  5. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  6. Effects of ambroxol on alginate of mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Hua; Wan, Zhenyan; Bai, Dan

    2008-07-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in mechanically ventilated newborns, which can cause life-threatening infections. Alginate of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is considered an important virulence factor which contributes to the resistance to antibiotics. Traditionally, ambroxol is widely used in newborns with lung problems as a mucolytic agent and antioxidant agent as well. And there are few studies that demonstrated the anti-biofilm activity of ambroxol. In this study, we found that ambroxol can affect the structure of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Further, we found that ambroxol reduces the production of alginate, the expression of the important genes and the activity of key enzyme guanosine diphospho-D-mannose dehydrogenase (GDP-mannose dehydrogenase; GMD) which were involved in alginate biosynthesis.

  7. Pyochelin potentiates the inhibitory activity of gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon.

  8. Pyochelin potentiates the inhibitory activity of gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon. PMID:24957826

  9. Metallo‐beta‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a brazilian university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Maria Renata Gomes; Caiaffa‐Filho, Hélio Hehl; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Rossi, Flávia

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa resulting from metallo‐β‐lactamases has been reported to be an important cause of nosocomial infection and is a critical therapeutic problem worldwide, especially in the case of bacteremia. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of metallo‐β‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and to compare methods of phenotypic and molecular detection. METHODS: During 2006, 69 imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa samples were isolated from blood and tested for metallo‐β‐lactamase production using phenotypic methods. Minimal Inhibitory Concentratrions (MIC) (µg/mL) was determined with commercial microdilution panels. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed among metallo‐β‐lactamase producers. RESULTS: Of all the blood isolates, 34.5% were found to be imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Positive phenotypic tests for metallo‐β‐lactamases ranged from 28%‐77%, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) were positive in 30% (of note, 81% of those samples were blaSPM‐1 and 19% were blaVIM‐2). Ethylenediamine tetracetic acid (EDTA) combinations for the detected enzymes had low kappa values; thus, care should be taken when use it as a phenotypic indicator of MBL. Despite a very resistant antibiogram, four isolates demonstrated the worrisome finding of a colistin MIC in the resistant range. PFGE showed a clonal pattern. CONCLUSION: Metallo‐β‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected in 30.4% of imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. This number might have been higher if other genes were included. SPM‐1 was the predominant enzyme found. Phenotypic tests with low kappa values could be misleading when testing for metallo‐β‐lactamases. Polymerase Chain Reaction detection remains the gold standard. PMID:21049207

  10. A simple test for the detection of KPC and metallo-β-lactamase carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with the use of meropenem disks supplemented with aminophenylboronic acid, dipicolinic acid and cloxacillin.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, F; Veliz, O; Faccone, D; Guerriero, L; Rapoport, M; Mendez, T; Corso, A

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the ability of the combination disk test (CDT) and the Modified Hodge Test (MHT) to discriminate between various carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (KPC, n = 36; metallo-β-lactamase (MBL), n = 38) and carbapenemase non-producers (n = 75). For the CDT, the optimal inhibitor concentrations and cut-off values were: 600 μg of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APB) per disk (an increment of ≥4 mm), 1000 μg of dipicolinic acid (DPA) per disk (an increment of ≥5 mm) and 3000 μg of cloxacillin per disk (an increment of ≥3 mm). APB had excellent sensitivity (97%) and specificity (97%) for the detection of KPC enzymes. DPA detected MBL enzymes with a sensitivity and specificity of 97% and 81%, respectively. The MHT resulted in a low sensitivity (78%) and specificity (57%). The CDT could be very useful in daily practice to provide fast and reliable detection of KPC and MBL carbapenemases among P. aeruginosa isolates.

  11. Die-off and survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in freshwater.

    PubMed

    de Vicente, A; Aviles, M; Borrego, J J; Romero, P

    1988-03-01

    Studies of the survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in freshwater, in situ and in the laboratory, were carried out. A die-off of P. aeruginosa very similar to those of the microbial indicators of fecal pollution, especially to the coliforms, was observed from the results obtained by in situ experiments. The laboratory studies show that the factors tested which exert the greatest effect on the survival of P. aeruginosa in freshwater are the luminous radiations and non-filtrable biotic factors. Furthermore, a negative effect on the viability of this microorganism in freshwater is observed when sewage is added. PMID:3131996

  12. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laura C.; O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, these new antagonists appear to suppress P. aeruginosa virulence factor production through a pathway that is independent of LasR and RhlR. PMID:25597392

  13. Production of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pili (fimbriae) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyne, P A; Haas, R; Meyer, T F; Davies, J K; Elleman, T C

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa K/2PfS, when transformed with an expression plasmid harboring the pilin gene (pilE1) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11, was able to express and assemble gonococcal pilin monomers into surface-associated pili, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and immunoelectron microscopy. Concomitant with the expression of gonococcal pili in P. aeruginosa was the virtual loss of production of P. aeruginosa K/2PfS pili normally associated with the host cell. Images PMID:1358873

  14. Identification of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 Pilin Glycosylation Site

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Jason E.; Marshall, Mark A.; Blanch, Vincent J.; Deal, Carolyn D.; Castric, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Previous work (P. Castric, F. J. Cassels, and R. W. Carlson, J. Biol. Chem. 276:26479-26485, 2001) has shown the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 pilin glycan to be covalently bound to a serine residue. N-terminal sequencing of pilin fragments produced from endopeptidase treatment and identified by reaction with a glycan-specific monoclonal antibody indicated that the glycan was present between residue 75 and the pilin carboxy terminus. Further sequencing of these peptides revealed that serine residues 75, 81, 84, 105, 106, and 108 were not modified. Conversion of serine 148, but not serine 118, to alanine by site-directed mutagenesis, resulted in loss of the ability to carry out pilin glycosylation when tested in an in vivo system. These results showed the pilin glycan to be attached to residue 148, the carboxy-terminal amino acid. The carboxy-proximal portion of the pilin disulfide loop, which is adjacent to the pilin glycan, was found to be a major linear B-cell epitope, as determined by peptide epitope mapping analysis. Immunization of mice with pure pili produced antibodies that recognized the pilin glycan. These sera also reacted with P. aeruginosa 1244 lipopolysaccharide as measured by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:12010970

  15. Mucin Promotes Rapid Surface Motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Parayno, Alicia; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT An important environmental factor that determines the mode of motility adopted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the viscosity of the medium, often provided by adjusting agar concentrations in vitro. However, the viscous gel-like property of the mucus layer that overlays epithelial surfaces is largely due to the glycoprotein mucin. P. aeruginosa is known to swim within 0.3% (wt/vol) agar and swarm on the surface at 0.5% (wt/vol) agar with amino acids as a weak nitrogen source. When physiological concentrations or as little as 0.05% (wt/vol) mucin was added to the swimming agar, in addition to swimming, P. aeruginosa was observed to undergo highly accelerated motility on the surface of the agar. The surface motility colonies in the presence of mucin appeared to be circular, with a bright green center surrounded by a thicker white edge. While intact flagella were required for the surface motility in the presence of mucin, type IV pili and rhamnolipid production were not. Replacement of mucin with other wetting agents indicated that the lubricant properties of mucin might contribute to the surface motility. Based on studies with mutants, the quorum-sensing systems (las and rhl) and the orphan autoinducer receptor QscR played important roles in this form of surface motility. Transcriptional analysis of cells taken from the motility zone revealed the upregulation of genes involved in virulence and resistance. Based on these results, we suggest that mucin may be promoting a new or highly modified form of surface motility, which we propose should be termed “surfing.” PMID:22550036

  16. Production of 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from olive oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial modification of naturally occurring materials is one of the efficient ways to add new values to them. Hydroxylation of free unsaturated fatty acids by microorganism is a good example of those modifications. Among microbial strains studied for that purpose, a new bacterial isolate Pseudom...

  17. An investigation of the well-water quality: immunosensor for pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa detection based on antibody-modified poly(pyrrole-3 carboxylic acid) screen-printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Karima; Bousimma, Feriel; Barhoumi, Houcine; Fedhila, Kais; Maaref, Abderrazak; Bakhrouf, Amina; Ben Ouada, Hafedh; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Mansour, Hedi

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we describe a new immunosensor designed for the detection and the quantification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in water. The developed biosensing system was based on the immobilization of purified polyclonal anti P. aeruginosa antibodies on electropolymerized poly(pyrrole-3-carboxylic acid)/glassy carbon electrode. The building of the immunosensor step by step was evaluated by electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical signature of the immunosensor was established by the change of the charge transfer resistance when the bacteria suspended in solution became attached to the immobilized antibodies. As a result, stable and high sensitive impedimetric immunosensor was obtained with a sensitivity of 0.19 kΩ/decade defined in the linear range from 10(1) to 10(7) CFU/mL of cellular concentrations. A low detection limit was obtained for the P. aeruginosa bacteria and a high selectivity when other bacteria were occasioned as well as Escherichia coli. The developed immunosensor was applied in detecting pathogenic P. aeruginosa in well-water.

  18. Elastase Deficiency Phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Canine Otitis Externa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Shana R.; Doetkott, Curt; Rust, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates were assayed for elastase and total matrix protease activity. The elastase activity of canine ear isolates was much less than that of strain PAO1 and that of all other veterinary isolates (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that canine ear isolates have a distinct elastase phenotype. PMID:11329471

  19. Global Pseudomonas aeruginosa biodiversity as reflected in a Belgian river.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Matthijs, Sandra; Colak, Huri; Chablain, Patrice; Bilocq, Florence; Van Eldere, Johan; De Vos, Daniel; Zizi, Martin; Triest, Ludwig; Cornelis, Pierre

    2005-07-01

    The biodiversity of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an aquatic environment (the Woluwe River, Brussels, Belgium) was analysed. Surface water was sampled bimonthly over a 1-year period (2000-2001) at seven sites evenly dispersed over the river. Total bacterial counts were performed and P. aeruginosa strains were isolated on a selective medium. A weighed out sample of 100 randomly chosen presumptive P. aeruginosa isolates was further analysed. A set of data consisting of the nucleotide sequence of the oprL gene, a DNA-based fingerprint (amplified fragment length polymorphism, AFLP), serotype, pyoverdine type and antibiogram (MICs of 21 clinically relevant antibiotics) was assembled. These data were integrated with those previously obtained for 73 P. aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates collected across the world. The combined results were analysed and compared using biological data analysis software. Our findings indicate a positive relationship between the extent of pollution and the prevalence of P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly, the Woluwe River P. aeruginosa community was almost as diverse as the global P. aeruginosa population. Indeed, the Woluwe River harboured members of nearly all successful clonal complexes. With the exception of one multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain, belonging to a ubiquitous and clinically relevant serotype O11 clone, antibiotic resistance levels were relatively low. These findings illustrate the significance of river water as a reservoir and source of distribution of potentially pathogenic P. aeruginosa strains and could have repercussions on antinosocomial infection strategies.

  20. Agricultural plants and soil as a reservoir for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Green, S K; Schroth, M N; Cho, J J; Kominos, S K; Vitanza-jack, V B

    1974-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in 24% of the soil samples but in only 0.13% of the vegetable samples from various agricultural areas of California. The distribution of pyocin types of soil and vegetable isolates was similar to that of clinical strains, and three of the soil isolates were resistant to carbenicillin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiplied in lettuce and bean under conditions of high temperature and high relative humidity (27 C and 80-95% relative humidity) but declined when the temperature and humidity were lowered (16 C, 55-75% relative humidity). The results suggest that soil is a reservior for P. aeruginosa and that the bacterium has the capacity to colonize plants during favorable conditions of temperature and moisture. PMID:4217591

  1. Interspecies Interaction between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Yawata, Yutaka; Toyofuku, Masanori; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Microbes interact with each other in multicellular communities and this interaction enables certain microorganisms to survive in various environments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly adaptable bacterium that ubiquitously inhabits diverse environments including soil, marine habitats, plants and animals. Behind this adaptivity, P. aeruginosa has abilities not only to outcompete others but also to communicate with each other to develop a multispecies community. In this review, we focus on how P. aeruginosa interacts with other microorganisms. P. aeruginosa secretes antimicrobial chemicals to compete and signal molecules to cooperate with other organisms. In other cases, it directly conveys antimicrobial enzymes to other bacteria using the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) or membrane vesicles (MVs). Quorum sensing is a central regulatory system used to exert their ability including antimicrobial effects and cooperation with other microbes. At least three quorum sensing systems are found in P. aeruginosa, Las, Rhl and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) systems. These quorum-sensing systems control the synthesis of extracellular antimicrobial chemicals as well as interaction with other organisms via T6SS or MVs. In addition, we explain the potential of microbial interaction analysis using several micro devices, which would bring fresh sensitivity to the study of interspecies interaction between P. aeruginosa and other organisms. PMID:23363620

  2. Physiological responses of Microcystis aeruginosa against the algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Su; Yin, Hua; Tang, Shaoyu; Peng, Hui; Yin, Donggao; Yang, Yixuan; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Proliferation of cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems has caused water security problems throughout the world. Our preliminary study has showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can inhibit the growth of cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa. In order to explore the inhibitory mechanism of P. aeruginosa on the cell growth and synthesis of intracellular substances of M. aeruginosa, concentrations of Chlorophyll-a, intracellular protein, carbohydrate, enzyme activities and ion metabolism of M. aeruginosa, were investigated. The results indicated that 83.84% algicidal efficiency of P. aeruginosa was achieved after treatment for 7 days. The strain inhibited the reproduction of M. aeruginosa by impeding the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate of cyanobacterium, and only a very small part of intracellular protein and carbohydrate was detected after exposure to P. aeruginosa for 5 days. P. aeruginosa caused the alteration of intracellular antioxidant enzyme activity of M. aeruginosa, such as catalase, peroxidase. The accumulation of malondialdehyde aggravated membrane injury after treatment for 3 days. P. aeruginosa also affected the ion metabolism of cyanobacteria. The release of Na(+) and Cl(-) was significantly enhanced while the uptake of K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), NO3(-) and SO4(2)(-) decreased. Surface morphology and intracellular structure of cyanobacteria and bacterial cells changed dramatically over time as evidenced by electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. These results revealed that the algicidal activity of P. aeruginosa was primarily due to the fermentation liquid of P. aeruginosa that impeded the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate, and damaged the cell membrane through membrane lipid peroxidation.

  3. Physiological responses of Microcystis aeruginosa against the algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Su; Yin, Hua; Tang, Shaoyu; Peng, Hui; Yin, Donggao; Yang, Yixuan; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Proliferation of cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems has caused water security problems throughout the world. Our preliminary study has showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can inhibit the growth of cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa. In order to explore the inhibitory mechanism of P. aeruginosa on the cell growth and synthesis of intracellular substances of M. aeruginosa, concentrations of Chlorophyll-a, intracellular protein, carbohydrate, enzyme activities and ion metabolism of M. aeruginosa, were investigated. The results indicated that 83.84% algicidal efficiency of P. aeruginosa was achieved after treatment for 7 days. The strain inhibited the reproduction of M. aeruginosa by impeding the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate of cyanobacterium, and only a very small part of intracellular protein and carbohydrate was detected after exposure to P. aeruginosa for 5 days. P. aeruginosa caused the alteration of intracellular antioxidant enzyme activity of M. aeruginosa, such as catalase, peroxidase. The accumulation of malondialdehyde aggravated membrane injury after treatment for 3 days. P. aeruginosa also affected the ion metabolism of cyanobacteria. The release of Na(+) and Cl(-) was significantly enhanced while the uptake of K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), NO3(-) and SO4(2)(-) decreased. Surface morphology and intracellular structure of cyanobacteria and bacterial cells changed dramatically over time as evidenced by electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. These results revealed that the algicidal activity of P. aeruginosa was primarily due to the fermentation liquid of P. aeruginosa that impeded the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate, and damaged the cell membrane through membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:26866757

  4. Quinolone signaling in the cell-to-cell communication system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pesci, E C; Milbank, J B; Pearson, J P; McKnight, S; Kende, A S; Greenberg, E P; Iglewski, B H

    1999-09-28

    Numerous species of bacteria use an elegant regulatory mechanism known as quorum sensing to control the expression of specific genes in a cell-density dependent manner. In Gram-negative bacteria, quorum sensing systems function through a cell-to-cell signal molecule (autoinducer) that consists of a homoserine lactone with a fatty acid side chain. Such is the case in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which contains two quorum sensing systems (las and rhl) that operate via the autoinducers, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone. The study of these signal molecules has shown that they bind to and activate transcriptional activator proteins that specifically induce numerous P. aeruginosa virulence genes. We report here that P. aeruginosa produces another signal molecule, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, which has been designated as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal. It was found that this unique cell-to-cell signal controlled the expression of lasB, which encodes for the major virulence factor, LasB elastase. We also show that the synthesis and bioactivity of Pseudomonas quinolone signal were mediated by the P. aeruginosa las and rhl quorum sensing systems, respectively. The demonstration that 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone can function as an intercellular signal sheds light on the role of secondary metabolites and shows that P. aeruginosa cell-to-cell signaling is not restricted to acyl-homoserine lactones.

  5. Different responses of pyoverdine genes to autoinduction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the group Pseudomonas fluorescens-Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Cecilia; Leoni, Livia; Visca, Paolo

    2002-08-01

    We investigated the regulation of the psbA and pvdA pyoverdine biosynthesis genes, which encode the L-ornithine N(5)-oxygenase homologues in Pseudomonas strain B10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, respectively. We demonstrate that pyoverdine(B10), as the end product of its biosynthetic pathway, is a key participant of the control circuit regulating its own production in Pseudomonas strain B10. In P. aeruginosa PAO1, however, pyoverdine(PAO1) has no apparent role in the positive regulation of the pvdA gene. PMID:12147517

  6. Electrochemically monitoring the antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Webster, Thaddaeus A; Sismaet, Hunter J; Chan, I-ping J; Goluch, Edgar D

    2015-11-01

    The condition of cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms was monitored via the electrochemical detection of the electro-active virulence factor pyocyanin in a fabricated microfluidic growth chamber coupled with a disposable three electrode cell. Cells were exposed to 4, 16, and 100 mg L(-1) colistin sulfate after overnight growth. At the end of testing, the measured maximum peak current (and therefore pyocyanin concentration) was reduced by approximately 68% and 82% in P. aeruginosa exposed to 16 and 100 mg L(-1) colistin sulfate, respectively. Samples were removed from the microfluidic chamber, analyzed for viability using staining, and streaked onto culture plates to confirm that the P. aeruginosa cells were affected by the antibiotics. The correlation between electrical signal drop and the viability of P. aeruginosa cells after antibiotic exposure highlights the usefulness of this approach for future low cost antibiotic screening applications.

  7. Incidence and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in whirlpools.

    PubMed Central

    Price, D; Ahearn, D G

    1988-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from seven commercial and two residential whirlpools that were treated with halogens. None of the commercial whirlpools was constantly maintained at appropriate disinfection levels. Superchlorination or the draining, cleaning, disinfection, and refilling of whirlpools markedly reduced densities of P. aeruginosa in whirlpool water, but the bacterial populations were rapidly reestablished (less than 10(3) cells per ml) when disinfectant concentrations decreased below recommended levels (chlorine, 3.0 ppm [3.0 micrograms/ml]; bromine, 6.0 ppm). P. aeruginosa in the water was replenished from various sources, such as hoses used to fill the whirlpool and the biofilm in the filter and piping of the whirlpool systems. Daily monitoring and adjustment of chemical characteristics (regardless of bather load) were essential for controlling densities of P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:3141463

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in patients with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, D S; Bruce, S K; Jimenez, E M; Schick, D G; Morrow, J W; Montgomerie, J Z

    1982-01-01

    The prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization of patients with spinal cord injury was studied annually from 1976 to 1980. The urethra, perineum, rectum, drainage bag, and urine of patients on the spinal cord injury service were cultured. A total of 224 men and 32 women were studied. Most patients were managed with an external urinary collection system or padding, with or without intermittent catheterization. P. aeruginosa was cultured from one or more body sites (urethra, perineum, or rectum) in 65% of men and 18% of women. Drainage bags on the beds were frequently colonized with P. aeruginosa (73%). Significant bacteriuria with P. aeruginosa was present in 19% of the men and 13% of the women. P. aeruginosa colonization of body sites in men was closely associated with the use of an external urinary collection system. Significantly greater urethral and perineal colonization was found in men using an external urinary collection system. P. aeruginosa serotype 11 was the predominant serotype for the first 3 years, and the number of patients colonized with serotype 11 increased with length of hospital stay. The prevalence of serotype 11 significantly decreased in the last 2 years. The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from these patients did not change in the 5 years, except that there was increasing susceptibility to carbenicillin in later years. This increasing susceptibility to carbenicillin was a reflection of a decreased prevalence of serotype 11 in these patients, since serotype 11 was more resistant than other serotypes to carbenicillin. PMID:6818251

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: assessment of risk from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Hardalo, C; Edberg, S C

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an ubiquitous environmental bacterium. It can be recovered, often in high numbers, in common food, especially vegetables. Moreover, it can be recovered in low numbers in drinking water. A small percentage of clones of P. aeruginosa possesses the required number of virulence factors to cause infection. However, P. aeruginosa will not proliferate on normal tissue but requires previously organs. Further narrowing the risk to human health is that only certain specific hosts are at risk, including patients with profound neutropenia, cystic fibrosis, severe burns, and those subject to foreign device installation. Other than these very well-defined groups, the general population is refractory to infection with P. aeruginosa. Because of its ubiquitous nature, it is not only not practical to eliminate P. aeruginosa from our food and drinking water, but attempts to do so would produce disinfection byproducts more hazardous than the species itself. Moreover, because there is no readily available sensitive and specific means to detect and identify P. aeruginosa available in the field, any potential regulation governing its control would not have a defined laboratory test measure of outcome. Accordingly, attempts to regulate P. aeruginosa in drinking water would not yield public health protection benefits and could, in fact, be counterproductive in this regard.

  10. Proteomic analysis of keratitis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Abby; Dunmire, Jeffrey; Wehmann, Michael; Rowe, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the proteomic profile of a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) obtained from an infected cornea of a contact lens wearer and the laboratory strain P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145. Methods Antibiotic sensitivity, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence tests were performed using standard methods. Whole protein lysates were analyzed with liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in triplicate, and relative protein abundances were determined with spectral counting. The G test followed by a post hoc Holm-Sidak adjustment was used for the statistical analyses to determine significance in the differential expression of proteins between the two strains. Results A total of 687 proteins were detected. One-hundred thirty-three (133) proteins were significantly different between the two strains. Among these, 13 were upregulated, and 16 were downregulated in the clinical strain compared to ATCC 10145, whereas 57 were detected only in the clinical strain. The upregulated proteins are associated with virulence and pathogenicity. Conclusions Proteins detected at higher levels in the clinical strain of P. aeruginosa were proteins known to be virulence factors. These results confirm that the keratitis-associated P. aeruginosa strain is pathogenic and expresses a higher number of virulence factors compared to the laboratory strain ATCC 10145. Identification of the protein profile of the corneal strain of P. aeruginosa in this study will aid in elucidating novel intervention strategies for reducing the burden of P. aeruginosa infection in keratitis. PMID:25221424

  11. Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Factor Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Worzalla, Gregory A.; Ginster, Aaron M.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2012-09-07

    Virulence factor regulator (Vfr) enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity through its role as a global transcriptional regulator. The crystal structure of Vfr shows that it is a winged-helix DNA-binding protein like its homologue cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). In addition to an expected primary cyclic AMP-binding site, a second ligand-binding site is nestled between the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain. Unlike CRP, Vfr is a symmetric dimer in the absence of DNA. Removal of seven disordered N-terminal residues of Vfr prvents the growth of P. aeruginosa.

  12. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chitinase, a gradually secreted protein.

    PubMed

    Folders, J; Algra, J; Roelofs, M S; van Loon, L C; Tommassen, J; Bitter, W

    2001-12-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino acid residues, without a typical N-terminal signal sequence. Nevertheless, an N-terminal segment of 11 residues was found to be cleaved off in the secreted protein. The protein shows sequence similarity to the secreted chitinases ChiC of Serratia marcescens, ChiA of Vibrio harveyi, and ChiD of Bacillus circulans and consists of an activity domain and a chitin-binding domain, which are separated by a fibronectin type III domain. ChiC was able to bind and degrade colloidal chitin and was active on the artificial substrates carboxymethyl-chitin-Remazol Brilliant Violet and p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose, but not on p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamine, indicating that it is an endochitinase. Expression of the chiC gene appears to be regulated by the quorum-sensing system of P. aeruginosa, since this gene was not expressed in a lasIR vsmI mutant. After overnight growth, the majority of the ChiC produced was found intracellularly, whereas only small amounts were detected in the culture medium. However, after several days, the cellular pool of ChiC was largely depleted, and the protein was found in the culture medium. This release could not be ascribed to cell lysis. Since ChiC did not appear to be secreted via any of the known secretion systems, a novel secretion pathway seems to be involved.

  13. Iron Depletion Enhances Production of Antimicrobials by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Ruge, Max A.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a heritable disease characterized by chronic, polymicrobial lung infections. While Staphylococcus aureus is the dominant lung pathogen in young CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes predominant by adulthood. P. aeruginosa produces a variety of antimicrobials that likely contribute to this shift in microbial populations. In particular, secretion of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) contributes to lysis of S. aureus in coculture, providing an iron source to P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that production of one such AQ, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), is enhanced by iron depletion and that this induction is dependent upon the iron-responsive PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus during coculture is also enhanced by iron depletion, and we provide evidence that multiple AQs contribute to this activity. Strikingly, a P. aeruginosa ΔprrF mutant, which produces very little PQS in monoculture, was capable of mediating iron-regulated growth suppression of S. aureus. We show that the presence of S. aureus suppresses the ΔprrF1,2 mutant's defect in iron-regulated PQS production, indicating that a PrrF-independent iron regulatory pathway mediates AQ production in coculture. We further demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial production is conserved in multiple P. aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from CF patients. These results demonstrate that iron plays a central role in modulating interactions of P. aeruginosa with S. aureus. Moreover, our studies suggest that established iron regulatory pathways of these pathogens are significantly altered during polymicrobial infections. IMPORTANCE Chronic polymicrobial infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, as the interplay between these two organisms exacerbates infection. This is in part due to enhanced

  14. Overproduction and assay of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphomannose isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, J F; Deretic, V; Chakrabarty, A M

    1986-01-01

    Phosphomannose isomerase activity was undetectable in extracts of mucoid (alginate-producing) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When a P. aeruginosa gene previously shown to complement an alginate-negative mutant was overexpressed under the control of the tac promoter in the broad-host-range controlled-expression vector pMMB22, phosphomannose isomerase activity could be measured in extracts of P. aeruginosa and in a manA (phosphomannose isomerase-negative) mutant of Escherichia coli. P. aeruginosa extracts containing induced levels of enzyme were shown to interconvert fructose 6-phosphate and mannose 6-phosphate. A 56,000-dalton polypeptide was visualized on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after induction in both hosts. When RNA-DNA dot- blot hybridization analysis was used, transcription of algA, the gene coding for P. aeruginosa phosphomannose isomerase, was not measurable from the chromosomes of either mucoid or nonmucoid P. aeruginosa. However, a high level of algA transcription was detected after expression of algA under tac promoter control in pMMB22. Images PMID:2426246

  15. A dynamic and intricate regulatory network determines Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of biofilms and antibiotic resistance. Expression of these traits is under stringent regulation, and it responds to largely unidentified environmental signals. This review is focused on providing a global picture of virulence gene regulation in P. aeruginosa. In addition to key regulatory pathways that control the transition from acute to chronic infection phenotypes, some regulators have been identified that modulate multiple virulence mechanisms. Despite of a propensity for chaotic behaviour, no chaotic motifs were readily observed in the P. aeruginosa virulence regulatory network. Having a ‘birds-eye’ view of the regulatory cascades provides the forum opportunities to pose questions, formulate hypotheses and evaluate theories in elucidating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in making P. aeruginosa a successful pathogen is essential in helping devise control strategies. PMID:23143271

  16. Effects of norspermidine on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and eradication.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lin; She, Pengfei; Wang, Yangxia; Liu, Fengxia; Zhang, Di; Chen, Lihua; Luo, Zhen; Xu, Huan; Qi, Yong; Wu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are defined as aggregation of single cell microorganisms and associated with over 80% of all the microbial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen capable of leading to various infections in immunocompromised people. Recent studies showed that norspermidine, a kind of polyamine, prevented and disrupted biofilm formation by some Gram-negative bacterium. In this study, the effects of norspermidine on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and eradication were tested. Microtiter plate combined with crystal violet staining was used to study the effects of norspermidine on P. aeruginosa initial attachment, then we employed SEM (scanning electron microscope), qRT-PCR, and QS-related virulence factor assays to investigate how norspermidine prevent biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We reported that high-dose norspermidine had bactericide effect on P. aeruginosa, and norspermidine began to inhibit biofilm formation and eradicate 24-h mature biofilm at concentration of 0.1 and 1 mmol/L, respectively, probably by preventing cell-surface attachment, inhibiting swimming motility, and downregulating QS-related genes expression. To investigate the potential utility of norspermidine in preventing device-related infections, we found that catheters immersed with norspermidine were effective in eradicating mature biofilm. These results suggest that norspermidine could be a potent antibiofilm agent for formulating strategies against P. aeruginosa biofilm. PMID:26817804

  17. Tracking the immunopathological response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa during respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    Cigana, Cristina; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Sipione, Barbara; Rossi, Giacomo; Nonis, Alessandro; Cabrini, Giulio; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Repeated cycles of infections, caused mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, combined with a robust host immune response and tissue injury, determine the course and outcome of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. As the disease progresses, P. aeruginosa adapts to the host modifying dramatically its phenotype; however, it remains unclear whether and how bacterial adaptive variants and their persistence influence the pathogenesis and disease development. Using in vitro and murine models of infection, we showed that P. aeruginosa CF-adaptive variants shaped the innate immune response favoring their persistence. Next, we refined a murine model of chronic pneumonia extending P. aeruginosa infection up to three months. In this model, including CFTR-deficient mice, we unveil that the P. aeruginosa persistence lead to CF hallmarks of airway remodelling and fibrosis, including epithelial hyperplasia and structure degeneration, goblet cell metaplasia, collagen deposition, elastin degradation and several additional markers of tissue damage. This murine model of P. aeruginosa chronic infection, reproducing CF lung pathology, will be instrumental to identify novel molecular targets and test newly tailored molecules inhibiting chronic inflammation and tissue damage processes in pre-clinical studies. PMID:26883959

  18. Interaction between biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin.

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, H; Ajiki, Y; Koga, T; Kawada, H; Yokota, T

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between bacterial biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin, a macrolide having no anti-P. aeruginosa activity, were investigated. P. aeruginosa incubated for 10 days on membrane filters formed biofilms on the surfaces of the filters. The biofilms were characterized by dense colonizations of bacteria and thick membranous structures that covered the colonies. Treatment of the biofilms with a relatively low concentration of clarithromycin for 5 days resulted in an eradication of the membranous structures. Quantitative analysis of alginate and hexose was done to evaluate the quantity of polysaccharides in or on the biofilms. Treatment of the biofilms with clarithromycin decreased the quantity of alginate and hexose and therefore perhaps the quantity of polysaccharides as well. Eradication of the membranous structures of biofilms, or the decrease in the quantity of polysaccharides, resulted in an increase in the rate of penetration of antibiotics through bacterial biofilms. In vivo therapeutic effects of ofloxacin in the rat infection model, in which the biofilm mode of growth of P. aeruginosa is characteristic, were enhanced by oral coadministration of clarithromycin. It is suggested that clarithromycin eradicated glycocalyx produced by P. aeruginosa, or suppressed the production of glycocalyx, by unknown mechanisms and thereby enhanced the therapeutic efficacies of other antimicrobial agents against infections caused by P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:8239580

  19. COMPARATIVE TAXONOMY OF CRYSTALLOGENIC STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND PSEUDOMONAS CHLORORAPHIS

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, William C.; Rhodes, Lenora J.

    1962-01-01

    Haynes, William C. (Northern Utilization Research and Development Division, Peoria, Ill.) and Lenora J. Rhodes. Comparative taxonomy of crystallogenic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas chlororaphis. J. Bacteriol. 84:1080–1084. 1962.—Only 11 of 39 strains received in the Agricultural Research Service Culture Collection under the designation Pseudonomas chlororaphis proved to be authentic; 28 were typical, pyocyanogenic strains of P. aeruginosa. The reason for this disproportionately high rate of misidentification apparently arises from an erroneous belief that the ability to produce green and yellow crystals of chlororaphin and oxychlororaphin is confined to P. chlororaphis. The ability of many strains of P. aeruginosa to do likewise is not well known. Inasmuch as the characteristic is not unique to P. chlororaphis, other criteria are required to distinguish crystallogenic strains of these species. After a taxonomic comparison of 18 strains of P. chlororaphis and 47 crystallogenic strains of P. aeruginosa, it was determined that there are three main distinctions: (i) P. aeruginosa grows well at 42 C but fails to grow upon serial transfer at 5 C, whereas P. chlororaphis fails to grow at 42 C, but grows well at 5 C: (ii) most strains of P. aeruginosa produce pyocyanin, whereas P. chlororaphis strains do not; (iii) P. aeruginosa cells possess only one or two polar flagella, whereas P. chlororaphis usually has at least four, sometimes as many as eight, polar flagella. PMID:13963593

  20. Protein Network of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Denitrification Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Borrero-de Acuña, José Manuel; Rohde, Manfred; Wissing, Josef; Jänsch, Lothar; Schobert, Max; Molinari, Gabriella; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative phosphorylation using multiple-component, membrane-associated protein complexes is the most effective way for a cell to generate energy. Here, we systematically investigated the multiple protein-protein interactions of the denitrification apparatus of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. During denitrification, nitrate (Nar), nitrite (Nir), nitric oxide (Nor), and nitrous oxide (Nos) reductases catalyze the reaction cascade of NO3− → NO2− → NO → N2O → N2. Genetic experiments suggested that the nitric oxide reductase NorBC and the regulatory protein NosR are the nucleus of the denitrification protein network. We utilized membrane interactomics in combination with electron microscopy colocalization studies to elucidate the corresponding protein-protein interactions. The integral membrane proteins NorC, NorB, and NosR form the core assembly platform that binds the nitrate reductase NarGHI and the periplasmic nitrite reductase NirS via its maturation factor NirF. The periplasmic nitrous oxide reductase NosZ is linked via NosR. The nitrate transporter NarK2, the nitrate regulatory system NarXL, various nitrite reductase maturation proteins, NirEJMNQ, and the Nos assembly lipoproteins NosFL were also found to be attached. A number of proteins associated with energy generation, including electron-donating dehydrogenases, the complete ATP synthase, almost all enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the Sec system of protein transport, among many other proteins, were found to interact with the denitrification proteins. This deduced nitrate respirasome is presumably only one part of an extensive cytoplasmic membrane-anchored protein network connecting cytoplasmic, inner membrane, and periplasmic proteins to mediate key activities occurring at the barrier/interface between the cytoplasm and the external environment. IMPORTANCE The processes of cellular energy generation are catalyzed by large multiprotein enzyme complexes

  1. Membrane proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Dé, E; Cosette, P; Coquet, L; Siroy, A; Alexandre, S; Duncan, A; Naudin, B; Rihouey, C; Schaumann, A; Junter, G A; Jouenne, T

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known for their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Between mechanisms involved in this resistance, diminished expression of outer membrane proteins and up-regulation of efflux pumps play an important role. The characterization of membrane proteins is consequently necessary because of their importance in the antibiotic resistance but also in virulence. This review presents proteomic investigations aiming to describe the protein content of the membranes of these two bacterial species. PMID:19942379

  2. Membrane proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Dé, E; Cosette, P; Coquet, L; Siroy, A; Alexandre, S; Duncan, A; Naudin, B; Rihouey, C; Schaumann, A; Junter, G A; Jouenne, T

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known for their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Between mechanisms involved in this resistance, diminished expression of outer membrane proteins and up-regulation of efflux pumps play an important role. The characterization of membrane proteins is consequently necessary because of their importance in the antibiotic resistance but also in virulence. This review presents proteomic investigations aiming to describe the protein content of the membranes of these two bacterial species.

  3. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in community hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Asagi, Tsukasa; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kasai, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Yukie; Araake, Minako; Fujino, Tomoko; Kikuchi, Hideko; Sasaki, Satoru; Watari, Hajime; Kojima, Tadashi; Miki, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo; Yoshikura, Hiroshi; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Kirikae, Teruo

    2007-03-01

    We previously reported an outbreak in a neurosurgery ward of catheter-associated urinary tract infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain IMCJ2.S1, carrying the 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase gene [aac(6')-Iae]. For further epidemiologic studies, 214 clinical isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa showing resistance to imipenem (MIC >or= 16 microg/ml), amikacin (MIC >or= 64 microg/ml), and ciprofloxacin (MIC >or= 4 microg/ml) were collected from 13 hospitals in the same prefecture in Japan. We also collected 70 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa that were sensitive to one or more of these antibiotics and compared their characteristics with those of the MDR P. aeruginosa isolates. Of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 (99%) were serotype O11. We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and a slide agglutination test for detection of the aac(6')-Iae gene and the AAC(6')-Iae protein, respectively. Of the 212 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 (100%) and 207 (98%) were positive in the LAMP assay and in the agglutination test, respectively. Mutations of gyrA and parC genes resulting in amino acid substitutions were detected in 213 of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates (99%). Of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 showed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns with >or=70% similarity to that of IMCJ2.S1 and 83 showed a pattern identical to that of IMCJ2.S1, indicating that clonal expansion of MDR P. aeruginosa occurred in community hospitals in this area. The methods developed in this study to detect aac(6')-Iae were rapid and effective in diagnosing infections caused by various MDR P. aeruginosa clones.

  4. Global transcriptional responses to triclosan exposure in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2012-08-01

    Global gene transcription was assessed by microarray experiments following treatment of a triclosan-susceptible Δ(mexAB-oprM) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain with subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan. Expression patterns of selected genes were verified by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. The results showed that triclosan exposure had a profound effect on gene expression, affecting 44% of the genes present on the Affymetrix GeneChip(®), with 28% of genes being significantly upregulated and 16% being significantly downregulated in triclosan-treated cells. Genes encoding membrane proteins, transporters of small molecules, aspects of amino acid metabolism, and transcriptional regulators were significantly over-represented among the more strongly upregulated or downregulated genes in triclosan-treated cells. Quorum sensing-regulated genes were among the most strongly downregulated genes, presumably because of decreased acyl-acyl carrier protein pools and the resulting reduced acyl-homoserine lactone molecule synthesis. Surprisingly, iron homeostasis was completed perturbed in triclosan-exposed cells, with iron acquisition systems being strongly downregulated and iron storage systems significantly upregulated, thus mimicking conditions of excess iron. The profound perturbations of cellular metabolism via specific and global mechanisms may explain why triclosan is such a potent antimicrobial in susceptible bacteria.

  5. Classification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigens by immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lányi, B; Adám, M M; Szentmihályi, A

    1975-05-01

    Heated saline extracts of 89 strains, and (1) supernates of phenol-water extracts (L1 fractions), (2) purified lipopolysaccharide, (3) trichloracetic-acid (TCA) extracts, and (4) sodium-hydroxide extracts of 23 strains representing all Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigens were subjected electrophoresis. Precipitation lines obtained with homologous and heterologous antisera were evaluated by electrodensitometric measurement. The characteristics of the immunoelectrophoretic groups established were as follows. Group I: two lines running at different rates towards the anode; three subgroups on the basis of the behaviour of alkali-treated antigens. Group II: triple line at the starting well, alkali sensitive. Group III: triple line at the starting well, alkali resistant; two subgroups according to reactivity or non-reactivity of L1 fractions. Group IV: triple line on the cathode side, alkali resistant, L1 fraction non-reactive. Group V: single line on the anode side, alkali sensitive, L1 fraction and TCA extract non-reactive. O antigens identified by agglutination corresponded closely with the immunoelectrophoretic pattern: strains with identical O antigens or sharing major somatic components fell, with one exception, into the same immunoelectrophoretic group. PMID:806687

  6. Structure of type II dehydroquinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, Scott; Kelleher, Alan; Matsumoto, Monica M.; Robinson, Gonteria; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections and is resistant to most antibiotics. Ongoing efforts to generate much-needed new antibiotics include targeting enzymes that are vital for P. aeruginosa but are absent in mammals. One such enzyme, type II dehydroquinase (DHQase), catalyzes the interconversion of 3-dehydroquinate and 3-dehydroshikimate, a necessary step in the shikimate pathway. This step is vital for the proper synthesis of phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and other aromatic metabolites. The recombinant expression, purification and crystal structure of catalytically active DHQase from P. aeruginosa (PaDHQase) are presented. Cubic crystals belonging to space group F23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 125.39 Å, were obtained by vapor diffusion in sitting drops and the structure was refined to an R factor of 16% at 1.74 Å resolution. PaDHQase is a prototypical type II DHQase with the classical flavodoxin-like α/β topology. PMID:25372814

  7. Haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Parameswaran; Rustagi, Rashi S; Sivaprakasam, Prabha; Subramanian, Mahadevan; Parameswaran, Sreejith; Mandal, Jharna; Kaplan, B S

    2013-11-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is a recognized complication of infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Shigella dysenteriae type 1. Infections with other micro-organisms, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae, have been cited as causes of HUS. In addition, influenza virus and other viruses may rarely be associated with this syndrome. A 2-year-old girl presented with severe Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis with renal failure and ecthyma gangrenosum. Further investigations revealed features of HUS. She was managed with antibiotics and other supportive measures including peritoneal dialysis, and subsequently made a full recovery. A possible role of neuraminidase in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa-associated HUS was proposed. This is the first reported case of P. aeruginosa sepsis leading to HUS.

  8. Singly Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chemotaxes Efficiently by Unbiased Motor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiuxian; Li, Zhaojun; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that has long been known to chemotax. More recently, it has been established that chemotaxis is an important factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to make biofilms. Genes that allow P. aeruginosa to chemotax are homologous with genes in the paradigmatic model organism for chemotaxis, Escherichia coli. However, P. aeruginosa is singly flagellated and E. coli has multiple flagella. Therefore, the regulation of counterclockwise/clockwise flagellar motor bias that allows E. coli to efficiently chemotax by runs and tumbles would lead to inefficient chemotaxis by P. aeruginosa, as half of a randomly oriented population would respond to a chemoattractant gradient in the wrong sense. How P. aeruginosa regulates flagellar rotation to achieve chemotaxis is not known. Here, we analyze the swimming trajectories of single cells in microfluidic channels and the rotations of cells tethered by their flagella to the surface of a variable-environment flow cell. We show that P. aeruginosa chemotaxes by symmetrically increasing the durations of both counterclockwise and clockwise flagellar rotations when swimming up the chemoattractant gradient and symmetrically decreasing rotation durations when swimming down the chemoattractant gradient. Unlike the case for E. coli, the counterclockwise/clockwise bias stays constant for P. aeruginosa. We describe P. aeruginosa’s chemotaxis using an analytical model for symmetric motor regulation. We use this model to do simulations that show that, given P. aeruginosa’s physiological constraints on motility, its distinct, symmetric regulation of motor switching optimizes chemotaxis. PMID:27048795

  9. MexXY multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Anti-pseudomonas aminoglycosides, such as amikacin and tobramycin, are used in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. However, their use is linked to the development of resistance. During the last decade, the MexXY multidrug efflux system has been comprehensively studied, and numerous reports of laboratory and clinical isolates have been published. This system has been increasingly recognized as one of the primary determinants of aminoglycoside resistance in P. aeruginosa. In P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates, upregulation of the pump is considered the most common mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. Non-fermentative Gram-negative pathogens possessing very close MexXY orthologs such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and various Burkholderia species (e.g., Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. cepacia complexes), but not B. gladioli, are intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides. Here, we summarize the properties (e.g., discovery, mechanism, gene expression, clinical significance) of the P. aeruginosa MexXY pump and other aminoglycoside efflux pumps such as AcrD of Escherichia coli, AmrAB-OprA of B. pseudomallei, and AdeABC of Acinetobacter baumannii. MexXY inducibility of the PA5471 gene product, which is dependent on ribosome inhibition or oxidative stress, is noteworthy. Moreover, the discovery of the cognate outer membrane component (OprA) of MexXY in the multidrug-resistant clinical isolate PA7, serotype O12 deserves special attention. PMID:23233851

  10. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Yuying; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Xinhua; Zi, Jing; Chen, Chang; Wan, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Pyocyanin (PCN), a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60μM SNP). Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN was tested by constructing PAO1 nor (NO reductase gene) knockout mutants. Compared to the wild-type strain, the Δnor strain had a lower PCN (86% reduction in Δnor). To examine whether the results were universal with other P. aeruginosa strains, we collected 4 clinical strains from a hospital, tested their PCN levels after SNP treatment, and obtained similar results, i.e., PCN biosynthesis was inhibited by NO. These results suggest that NO treatment may be a new strategy to inhibit PCN biosynthesis and could provide novel insights into eliminating P. aeruginosa virulence as a clinical goal.

  11. Proteinases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa evoke mucin release by tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, J D; Tandler, B; Liedtke, C M; Boat, T F

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the potential of exoproducts from pathogenic bacteria to stimulate the release of high molecular weight mucins from goblet cells of airway epithelium in a rabbit tracheal explant system. Culture supernatants from proteolytic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens, but not supernatants from a number of non-proteolytic strains, released mucins from goblet cells. Highly purified elastase and alkaline proteinase from P. aeruginosa stimulated goblet cell mucin release in a dose-dependent fashion. Lipopolysaccharide, exotoxin A, and alginate of P. aeruginosa did not possess mucin release properties. Proteolytic activity was required for mucin release by P. aeruginosa elastase, but such release in goblet cells was not mediated by cyclic AMP. Morphologic studies suggested rapid release of mucins from goblet cells was response to elastase by a process resembling apocrine secretion. Several nonbacterial proteinases mimicked the effect of Pseudomonas proteases. These studies provide support for the hypothesis that bacterial and other play a role in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion in acute and chronic lung infections. Images PMID:6568227

  12. Cloning of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphomannose isomerase genes and their expression in alginate-negative mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Darzins, A; Nixon, L L; Vanags, R I; Chakrabarty, A M

    1985-01-01

    The phosphomannose isomerase (pmi) gene of Escherichia coli was cloned on a broad-host-range cosmid vector and expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a low level. Plasmid pAD3, which harbors the E. coli pmi gene, contains a 6.2-kilobase-pair HindIII fragment derived from the chromosome of E. coli. Subcloning produced plasmids carrying the 1.5-kilobase-pair HindIII-HpaI subfragment of pAD3 that restored alginic acid production in a nonmucoid, alginate-negative mutant of P. aeruginosa. This fragment also complemented mannose-negative, phosphomannose isomerase-negative mutants of E. coli and showed no homology by DNA-DNA hybridization to P. aeruginosa chromosomal DNA. By using a BamHI constructed cosmid clone bank of the stable alginate producing strain 8830, we have been able to isolate a recombinant plasmid of P. aeruginosa origin that also restores alginate production in the alginate-negative mutant. This new recombinant plasmid, designated pAD4, contained a 9.9-kilobase-pair EcoRI-BamHI fragment with the ability to restore alginate synthesis in the alginate-negative P. aeruginosa. This fragment showed no homology to E. coli chromosomal DNA or to plasmid pAD3. Both mucoid and nonmucoid strains of P. aeruginosa had no detectable levels of phosphomannose isomerase activity as measured by mannose 6-phosphate-to-fructose 6-phosphate conversion. However, P. aeruginosa strains harboring the cloned pmi gene of E. coli contained measurable levels of phosphomannose isomerase activity as evidenced by examining the conversion of mannose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate. Images PMID:3918000

  13. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid l-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  14. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  15. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2015-11-09

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype.

  16. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Saiman, L.; Cacalano, G.; Prince, A. )

    1990-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment.

  17. Genetic and Functional Diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Joseph S.; Taylor, Véronique L.; Islam, Salim T.; Hao, Youai; Kocíncová, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysccharide (LPS) is an integral component of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell envelope, occupying the outer leaflet of the outer membrane in this Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen. It is important for bacterium–host interactions and has been shown to be a major virulence factor for this organism. Structurally, P. aeruginosa LPS is composed of three domains, namely, lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and the distal O antigen (O-Ag). Most P. aeruginosa strains produce two distinct forms of O-Ag, one a homopolymer of D-rhamnose that is a common polysaccharide antigen (CPA, formerly termed A band), and the other a heteropolymer of three to five distinct (and often unique dideoxy) sugars in its repeat units, known as O-specific antigen (OSA, formerly termed B band). Compositional differences in the O units among the OSA from different strains form the basis of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme for classification via serotyping of different strains of P. aeruginosa. The focus of this review is to provide state-of-the-art knowledge on the genetic and resultant functional diversity of LPS produced by P. aeruginosa. The underlying factors contributing to this diversity will be thoroughly discussed and presented in the context of its contributions to host–pathogen interactions and the control/prevention of infection. PMID:21687428

  18. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; San Millan, Alvaro; Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-05-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs.

  19. A Network Biology Approach to Denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide. PMID:25706405

  20. Infectious conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a bathroom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The elucidation of the routes of transmission of a pathogen is crucial for the prevention of infectious diseases caused by bacteria that are not a resident in human tissue. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of suture-related conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for which we identified the transmission route using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Case presentation A 38-year-old man, who had undergone surgery for glaucoma 2 years ago previously, presented with redness, discomfort, and mucopurulent discharge in the right eye. A 9–0 silk suture had been left on the conjunctiva. A strain of P. aeruginosa was isolated from a culture obtained from the suture, and the patient was therefore diagnosed with suture-related conjunctivitis caused by P. aeruginosa. The conjunctivitis was cured by the application of an antimicrobial ophthalmic solution and removal of the suture. We used PFGE to survey of the indoor and outdoor environments around the patient’s house and office in order to elucidate the route of transmission of the infection. Three strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from the patient’s indoor environment, and the isolate obtained from the patient’s bathroom was identical to that from the suture. Conclusion The case highlights the fact that an indoor environmental strain of P. aeruginosa can cause ocular infections. PMID:23815865

  1. Three Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with different protease profiles.

    PubMed

    Andrejko, Mariola; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Janczarek, Monika; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The proteolytic activity of three Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, ATCC 27853 - a reference strain, and two clinical isolates was tested. The activity was examined after culturing the bacteria in two different growth media: the minimal M9 medium and rich Luria-Bertani broth (LB). Based on zymograms and protease activity specific assays, it was concluded that the reference strain produced three proteolytic enzymes in the LB medium: protease IV, elastase B and elastase A, while alkaline protease was only produced in the M9 medium. The clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa produced elastase B and alkaline protease when grown in the LB medium and the minimal M9 medium, respectively. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of both the lasB gene encoding elastase B and aprA coding for alkaline protease in the genomes of the three P. aeruginosa strains analyzed. The expression of these genes coding for two important P. aeruginosa virulence factors was dependent on the growth conditions in all the strains studied. The contribution of the extracellular proteinases to the virulence of P. aeruginosa strains used in this study was investigated using an insect model, the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Therapy: Evolving Translational Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Veesenmeyer, Jeffrey L.; Lisboa, Thiago; Rello, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Structured abstract Objective Although most reviews of Pseudomonas aeruginosa therapeutics focus on antibiotics currently in use or in the pipeline, we review evolving translational strategies aimed at using virulence factor antagonists as adjuvant therapies. Data Source Current literature regarding P. aeruginosa virulence determinants and approaches that target them, with an emphasis on type III secretion, quorum-sensing, biofilms, and flagella. Data Extraction and Synthesis P. aeruginosa remains one of the most important pathogens in nosocomial infections, with high associated morbidity and mortality. Its predilection to develop resistance to antibiotics and expression of multiple virulence factors contributes to the frequent ineffectiveness of current therapies. Among the many P. aeruginosa virulence determinants that impact infections, type III secretion, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and flagella have been the focus of much recent investigation. Here we review how increased understanding of these important bacterial structures and processes has enabled the development of novel approaches to inhibit each. These promising translational strategies may lead to the development of adjuvant therapies capable of improving outcomes. Conclusions Adjuvant therapies directed against virulence factors have the potential to improve outcomes in P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:19325463

  3. [Resistance to antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Colombian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Villa, Lina M; Cortés, Jorge A; Leal, Aura L; Meneses, Andrés; Meléndez, Martha P

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause high morbidity and mortality. We performed a descriptive analysis of the rates of antibiotic resistance in isolates of P. aeruginosa in 33 hospitals enrolled in a surveillance network in Colombia. The study was conducted between January 2005 and December 2009 .9905 isolates of P. aeruginosa were identified, (4.9% of all strains). In intensive care units (ICU) P. aeruginosa showed an overall resistance to aztreonam, cefepime , ceftazidime, imipenem, meropenem , and piperacillin / tazobactam of 31.8% , 23.9% , 24.8%, 22.5%, 20.3% and 22.3%, respectively. Resistance rates increased for piperacillin/tazobactam, cefepime, and imipenem; remained unchanged for meropenem; and decreased for aminoglycosides, quinolones and ceftazidime. Resistance to one, two and three or more families of antibiotics was found in 17%, 12.5%, and 32.1%, respectively. In samples collected from the wards, the resistance rate was lower but usually over 10%. Antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates in hospitalized patients and particularly in those admitted to ICUs in Colombia is high.

  4. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  5. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-02-23

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO₂), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O₂), nitrate (NO₃),more » and phosphate (PO₄) suggests that PO₄ concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO₄ on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N₂O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.« less

  6. Why Does the Healthy Cornea Resist Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David J.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To provide our perspective on why the cornea is resistant to infection based on our research results with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Perspective We focus on our current understanding of the interplay between bacteria, tear fluid and the corneal epithelium that determine health as the usual outcome, and propose a theoretical model for how contact lens wear might change those interactions to enable susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. Methods Use of “null-infection” in vivo models, cultured human corneal epithelial cells, contact lens-wearing animal models, and bacterial genetics help to elucidate mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa survive at the ocular surface, adheres, and traverses multilayered corneal epithelia. These models also help elucidate the molecular mechanisms of corneal epithelial innate defense. Results and Discussion Tear fluid and the corneal epithelium combine to make a formidable defense against P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Part of that defense involves the expression of antimicrobials such as β-defensins, the cathelicidin LL-37, cytokeratin-derived antimicrobial peptides, and RNase7. Immunomodulators such as SP-D and ST2 also contribute. Innate defenses of the cornea depend in part on MyD88, a key adaptor protein of TLR and IL-1R signaling, but the basal lamina represents the final barrier to bacterial penetration. Overcoming these defenses involves P. aeruginosa adaptation, expression of the type three secretion system, proteases, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on contact lenses. Conclusion After more than two decades of research focused on understanding how contact lens wear predisposes to P. aeruginosa infection, our working hypothesis places blame for microbial keratitis on bacterial adaptation to ocular surface defenses, combined with changes to the biochemistry of the corneal surface caused by trapping bacteria and tear fluid against the cornea under the lens. PMID:23601656

  7. Characterization of a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NJ-15 as a potential biocontrol agent.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nazneen; Musarrat, Javed

    2003-05-01

    Phylogenetic characterization of soil isolate NJ-15, based on sequence homology of a partial 746-bp fragment of 16SrDNA amplicon, with the ribosomal database sequences (http://www.msu.edu/RDP/cgis/phylip.cgi), validated the strain as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain NJ-15 produced a substantial amount of indole acetic acid (IAA) in tryptophan-supplemented medium. Besides, the strain also exhibited significant production of both the siderophore and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) on chrome azurol S and King's B media, respectively. The data revealed lower HCN production under iron-limiting conditions vis-à-vis higher HCN release with iron stimulation. Significant growth inhibition of phytopathogenic fungi occurred in the order as Fusarium oxysporum > Trichoderma herizum > Alternaria alternata > Macrophomina phasiolina upon incubation with strain NJ-15 cells. Thus, the secondary metabolites producing new Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NJ-15 exhibited innate potential of plant growth promotion and biocontrol activities in vitro.

  8. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy.

  9. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy. PMID:26785289

  10. Insights into Mechanisms and Proteomic Characterisation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adaptation to a Novel Antimicrobial Substance

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Peter; Jübner, Martin; Müller, Stefan; Bender, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been reported since the introduction of synthetic antibiotics. Bacteria, such as one of the most common nosocomial pathogens P. aeruginosa, adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions, due to their short generation time. Thus microevolutional changes can be monitored in situ. In this study, the microevolutional process of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance against a recently developed novel antibacterial zinc Schiff-base (ZSB) was investigated at the proteome level. After extended exposure to ZSB the passaged strain differed in tolerance against ZSB, with the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 exhibiting 1.6 times higher minimal inhibitory concentration. Using Two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis, the changes in the proteome of ZSB adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 were examined by comparison with the non-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1. The proteome of the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain differed significantly from the non-adapted in the abundance of two proteins when both strains were grown under stressing conditions. One protein could be identified as the outer membrane protein D that plays a role in uptake of basic amino acids as well as in carbapeneme resistance. The second protein has been identified as alkyl peroxide reductase subunit F. Our data indicated a slight increase in abundance of alkyl peroxide reductase F (AhpF) in the case of ZSB passaged P. aeruginosa PAO1. Higher abundance of Ahp has been discussed in the literature as a promoter of accelerated detoxification of benzene derivatives. The observed up-regulated AhpF thus appears to be connected to an increased tolerance against ZSB. Changes in the abundance of proteins connected to oxidative stress were also found after short-time exposure of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to the ZSB. Furthermore, adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed increased tolerance against hydrogen peroxide and, in addition, showed accelerated degradation of ZSB, as determined by HPLC measurements. PMID:23869205

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoproteins.

    PubMed

    Granström, M; Wretlind, B; Markman, B; Pavlovskis, O R; Vasil, M L

    1985-04-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed with four purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular proteins (exotoxin A, elastase, alkaline protease, and phospholipase C) to determine antibody levels in sera from healthy subjects and the serological response in patients colonized or infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Five of 39 burn patients with wounds colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa had elevated antibody titers to alkaline protease. Response to the other antigens was found in only a few patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections (septicemia, osteitis, pneumonia etc.) resulted in increased antibody levels to exotoxin A or phospholipase C in 15 of 22 patients. These findings suggest that repeated determinations of antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and phospholipase C might be used to monitor therapy in certain patients with osteitis and other deep Pseudomonas infections.

  12. Host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires ceramide-rich membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Grassmé, H; Jendrossek, V; Riehle, A; von Kürthy, G; Berger, J; Schwarz, H; Weller, M; Kolesnick, R; Gulbins, E

    2003-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a serious complication in patients with cystic fibrosis and in immunocompromised individuals. Here we show that P. aeruginosa infection triggers activation of the acid sphingomyelinase and the release of ceramide in sphingolipid-rich rafts. Ceramide reorganizes these rafts into larger signaling platforms that are required to internalize P. aeruginosa, induce apoptosis and regulate the cytokine response in infected cells. Failure to generate ceramide-enriched membrane platforms in infected cells results in an unabated inflammatory response, massive release of interleukin (IL)-1 and septic death of mice. Our findings show that ceramide-enriched membrane platforms are central to the host defense against this potentially lethal pathogen. PMID:12563314

  13. Phenazine virulence factor binding to extracellular DNA is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K.; Tavallaie, Roya; Ibugo, Amaye I.; Panchompoo, Janjira; Sehar, Shama; Aldous, Leigh; Yeung, Amanda W. S.; Thomas, Shane R.; Kumar, Naresh; Gooding, J. Justin; Manefield, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics necessitates the identification of novel leads for infection control. Interference with extracellular phenomena, such as quorum sensing, extracellular DNA integrity and redox active metabolite release, represents a new frontier to control human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and hence reduce mortality. Here we reveal that the extracellular redox active virulence factor pyocyanin produced by P. aeruginosa binds directly to the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of DNA and intercalates with DNA nitrogenous base pair regions. Binding results in local perturbations of the DNA double helix structure and enhanced electron transfer along the nucleic acid polymer. Pyocyanin binding to DNA also increases DNA solution viscosity. In contrast, antioxidants interacting with DNA and pyocyanin decrease DNA solution viscosity. Biofilms deficient in pyocyanin production and biofilms lacking extracellular DNA show similar architecture indicating the interaction is important in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. PMID:25669133

  14. Evolved resistance to colistin and its loss due to genetic reversion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Young Kyoung; Chung, Eun Seon; Na, In Young; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2016-01-01

    The increased reliance on colistin for treating multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections has resulted in the emergence of colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We attempted to identify genetic contributors to colistin resistance in vitro evolved isogenic colistin-resistant and -susceptible strains of two P. aeruginosa lineages (P5 and P155). Their evolutionary paths to acquisition and loss of colistin resistance were also tracked. Comparative genomic analysis revealed 13 and five colistin resistance determinants in the P5 and P155 lineages, respectively. Lipid A in colistin-resistant mutants was modified through the addition of 4-amino-L-arabinose; this modification was absent in colistin-susceptible revertant strains. Many amino acid substitutions that emerged during the acquisition of colistin resistance were reversed in colistin-susceptible revertants. We demonstrated that evolved colistin resistance in P. aeruginosa was mediated by a complicated regulatory network that likely emerges through diverse genetic alterations. Colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa became susceptible to the colistin upon its withdrawal because of genetic reversion. The mechanisms through which P. aeruginosa acquires and loses colistin resistance have implications on the treatment options that can be applied against P. aeruginosa infections, with respect to improving bactericidal efficacy and preventing further resistance to antibiotics. PMID:27150578

  15. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipid A Deacylase: Selection for Expression and Loss within the Cystic Fibrosis Airway

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Robert K.; Adams, Kristin N.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Kraig, Gretchen M.; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Stead, Christopher M.; Trent, M. Stephen; Miller, Samuel I.

    2006-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major surface component of gram-negative bacteria, and a component of LPS, lipid A, is recognized by the innate immune system through the Toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an environmental gram-negative bacterium that opportunistically infects the respiratory tracts of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), can synthesize various structures of lipid A. Lipid A from P. aeruginosa strains isolated from infants with CF has a specific structure that includes the removal of the 3 position 3-OH C10 fatty acid. Here we demonstrate increased expression of the P. aeruginosa lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) in isolates from CF infants compared to that in environmental isolates. PagL activity was increased in environmental isolates by growth in medium limited for magnesium and decreased by growth at low temperature in laboratory-adapted strains of P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa PagL was shown to be an outer membrane protein by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation. Heterologous expression of P. aeruginosa pagL in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli resulted in removal of the 3-OH C14 fatty acid from lipid A, indicating that P. aeruginosa PagL recognizes either 3-OH C10 or 3-OH C14. Finally, deacylated lipid A species were not observed in some clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with severe pulmonary disease, suggesting that loss of PagL function can occur during long-term adaptation to the CF airway. PMID:16352835

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the ligand-binding regions of the PctA and PctB chemoreceptors from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in complex with amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; Krell, Tino; Gavira, Jose A.; Pineda-Molina, Estela

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the major model organisms for the study of chemotaxis. The bacterium harbours 26 genes encoding chemoreceptors, most of which have not been annotated with a function. The paralogous chemoreceptors PctA and PctB (Pseudomonas chemotactic transducer A and B) were found to mediate chemotaxis towards l-amino acids. However, the ligand spectrum of the receptors is quite different since the recombinant ligand-binding region (LBR) of PctA binds 17 different l-­amino acids whereas that of PctB recognizes only five. To determine the molecular basis underlying this ligand specificity, PctA-LBR and PctB-LBR have been purified and crystals have been produced after pre-incubation with l-­Ile and l-Arg, respectively. Initial crystallization conditions have been identified by the counter-diffusion method and X-ray data have been collected at 2.5 Å (PctA-LBR bound to l-Ile) and 3.14 Å (PctB-LBR bound to l-Arg) resolution. Crystals belonged to space groups P212121 and P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.2, b = 78.5, c = 116.6 Å and a = b = 111.6, c = 117.4, respectively, for PctA-LBR and PctB-LBR. Molecular-replacement methods will be pursued for structural determination. PMID:24316847

  17. INHIBITION OF VIRULENCE FACTORS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY DICLOFENAC SODIUM.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hisham A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is a major problem. Targeting virulence factors is an alternative option to avoid the emergence of resistance to antibiotics. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentration of diclofenac sodium on the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa was investigated. The virulence factors included protease, haemolysin, pyocyanin and pyoverdin, in addition to pathogenic behaviors such as swimming and twitching motilities and biofilm formation. Diclofenac sodium showed significant inhibition of virulence factors as compared to the control. Diclofenac sodium decreased twitching and swimming motilities by 29.27% and 45.36%, respectively. The percentage of inhibition of pyocyanin by diclofenac sodium was 42.32%. On the other hand, pyoverdin was inhibited to a lesser extent (36.72%). Diclofenac sodium reduced protease by 52.58% and biofilm formation by 58.37%. Moreover, haemolytic activity in the presence of diclofenac sodium was 15.64% as compared to the control (100% haemolytic activity). The inhibitory activities may be due to inhibition of quorum sensing that regulates the expression of virulence factors. This study suggests the potential for the use of diclofenac sodium as an anti-virulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

  18. INHIBITION OF VIRULENCE FACTORS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY DICLOFENAC SODIUM.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hisham A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is a major problem. Targeting virulence factors is an alternative option to avoid the emergence of resistance to antibiotics. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentration of diclofenac sodium on the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa was investigated. The virulence factors included protease, haemolysin, pyocyanin and pyoverdin, in addition to pathogenic behaviors such as swimming and twitching motilities and biofilm formation. Diclofenac sodium showed significant inhibition of virulence factors as compared to the control. Diclofenac sodium decreased twitching and swimming motilities by 29.27% and 45.36%, respectively. The percentage of inhibition of pyocyanin by diclofenac sodium was 42.32%. On the other hand, pyoverdin was inhibited to a lesser extent (36.72%). Diclofenac sodium reduced protease by 52.58% and biofilm formation by 58.37%. Moreover, haemolytic activity in the presence of diclofenac sodium was 15.64% as compared to the control (100% haemolytic activity). The inhibitory activities may be due to inhibition of quorum sensing that regulates the expression of virulence factors. This study suggests the potential for the use of diclofenac sodium as an anti-virulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. PMID:27328521

  19. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Kills Caenorhabditis elegans by Cyanide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Larry A.; Manoil, Colin

    2001-01-01

    In this report we describe experiments to investigate a simple virulence model in which Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 rapidly paralyzes and kills the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results imply that hydrogen cyanide is the sole or primary toxic factor produced by P. aeruginosa that is responsible for killing of the nematode. Four lines of evidence support this conclusion. First, a transposon insertion mutation in a gene encoding a subunit of hydrogen cyanide synthase (hcnC) eliminated nematode killing. Second, the 17 avirulent mutants examined all exhibited reduced cyanide synthesis, and the residual production levels correlated with killing efficiency. Third, exposure to exogenous cyanide alone at levels comparable to the level produced by PAO1 killed nematodes with kinetics similar to those observed with bacteria. The killing was not enhanced if hcnC mutant bacteria were present during cyanide exposure. And fourth, a nematode mutant (egl-9) resistant to P. aeruginosa was also resistant to killing by exogenous cyanide in the absence of bacteria. A model for nematode killing based on inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase is presented. The action of cyanide helps account for the unusually broad host range of virulence of P. aeruginosa and may contribute to the pathogenesis in opportunistic human infections due to the bacterium. PMID:11591663

  1. [Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits virulence related motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Wu, Da-qiang; Huang, Wei-feng; Duan, Qiang-jun; Cheng, Hui-juan; Wang, Chang-zhong

    2015-04-01

    Sodium houttuyfonate (SH) is a derivative of effective component of a Chinese material medica, Houttuynia cordata, which is applied in anti-infection of microorganism. But, the antimicrobial mechanisms of SH still remain unclear. Here, we firstly discovered that SH effectively inhibits the three types of virulence related motility of.Pseudomonas aeruginosa, i.e., swimming, twitching and swarming. The plate assay results showed that the inhibitory action of SH against swimming and twitching in 24 h and swarming in 48 h is dose-dependent; and bacteria nearly lost all of the motile activities under the concentration of 1 x minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (512 mg x L(-1) same as azithromycin positive group (1 x MIC, 16 mg x L(-1)). Furthermore, we found that the expression of structural gene flgB and pilG is down-regulated by SH, which implies that inhibitory mechanism of SH against motility of P. aeruginosa may be due to the inhibition of flagella and pili bioformation of P. aeruginosa by SR Therefore, our presented results firstly demonstrate that SH effectively inhibits the motility activities of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that SH could be a promising antipseudomonas agents in clinic. PMID:26281603

  2. Adaptation of Aerobically Growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Copper Starvation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Haas, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Restricted bioavailability of copper in certain environments can interfere with cellular respiration because copper is an essential cofactor of most terminal oxidases. The global response of the metabolically versatile bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper limitation was assessed under aerobic conditions. Expression of cioAB (encoding an alternative, copper-independent, cyanide-resistant ubiquinol oxidase) was upregulated, whereas numerous iron uptake functions (including the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin) were expressed at reduced levels, presumably reflecting a lower demand for iron by respiratory enzymes. Wild-type P. aeruginosa was able to grow aerobically in a defined glucose medium depleted of copper, whereas a cioAB mutant did not grow. Thus, P. aeruginosa relies on the CioAB enzyme to cope with severe copper deprivation. A quadruple cyo cco1 cco2 cox mutant, which was deleted for all known heme-copper terminal oxidases of P. aeruginosa, grew aerobically, albeit more slowly than did the wild type, indicating that the CioAB enzyme is capable of energy conservation. However, the expression of a cioA′-′lacZ fusion was less dependent on the copper status in the quadruple mutant than in the wild type, suggesting that copper availability might affect cioAB expression indirectly, via the function of the heme-copper oxidases. PMID:18708503

  3. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Mary E.; Bhatnagar, Abhinav; McCarty, Nael A.; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules) and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL's published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs. PMID:22973307

  4. The heme oxygenase(s)-phytochrome system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wegele, Rosalina; Tasler, Ronja; Zeng, Yuhong; Rivera, Mario; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2004-10-29

    For many pathogenic bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme is an essential source of iron. After uptake, the heme molecule is degraded by heme oxygenases to yield iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin. The heme oxygenase PigA is only induced under iron-limiting conditions and produces the unusual biliverdin isomers IXbeta and IXdelta. The gene for a second putative heme oxygenase in P. aeruginosa, bphO, occurs in an operon with the gene bphP encoding a bacterial phytochrome. Here we provide biochemical evidence that bphO encodes for a second heme oxygenase in P. aeruginosa. HPLC, (1)H, and (13)C NMR studies indicate that BphO is a "classic" heme oxygenase in that it produces biliverdin IXalpha. The data also suggest that the overall fold of BphO is likely to be the same as that reported for other alpha-hydroxylating heme oxygenases. Recombinant BphO was shown to prefer ferredoxins or ascorbate as a source of reducing equivalents in vitro and the rate-limiting step for the oxidation of heme to biliverdin is the release of product. In eukaryotes, the release of biliverdin is driven by biliverdin reductase, the subsequent enzyme in heme catabolism. Because P. aeruginosa lacks a biliverdin reductase homologue, data are presented indicating an involvement of the bacterial phytochrome BphP in biliverdin release from BphO and possibly from PigA.

  5. 7-fluoroindole as an antivirulence compound against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Cho, Moo Hwan; Kim, Jung-Ae; Lee, Jintae

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has necessitated new therapeutic approaches for combating persistent bacterial infection. An alternative approach is regulation of bacterial virulence instead of growth suppression, which can readily lead to drug resistance. The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa depends on a large number of extracellular factors and biofilm formation. Thirty-one natural and synthetic indole derivatives were screened. 7-fluoroindole (7FI) was identified as a compound that inhibits biofilm formation and blood hemolysis without inhibiting the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa cells. Moreover, 7FI markedly reduced the production of quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, two siderophores, pyoverdine and pyochelin. 7FI clearly suppressed swarming motility, protease activity and the production of a polymeric matrix in P. aeruginosa. However, unlike natural indole compounds, synthetic 7FI did not increase antibiotic resistance. Therefore, 7FI is a potential candidate for use in an antivirulence approach against persistent P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:22251040

  6. Adaptation of aerobically growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper starvation.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Slaveykova, Vera I; Reimmann, Cornelia; Haas, Dieter

    2008-10-01

    Restricted bioavailability of copper in certain environments can interfere with cellular respiration because copper is an essential cofactor of most terminal oxidases. The global response of the metabolically versatile bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper limitation was assessed under aerobic conditions. Expression of cioAB (encoding an alternative, copper-independent, cyanide-resistant ubiquinol oxidase) was upregulated, whereas numerous iron uptake functions (including the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin) were expressed at reduced levels, presumably reflecting a lower demand for iron by respiratory enzymes. Wild-type P. aeruginosa was able to grow aerobically in a defined glucose medium depleted of copper, whereas a cioAB mutant did not grow. Thus, P. aeruginosa relies on the CioAB enzyme to cope with severe copper deprivation. A quadruple cyo cco1 cco2 cox mutant, which was deleted for all known heme-copper terminal oxidases of P. aeruginosa, grew aerobically, albeit more slowly than did the wild type, indicating that the CioAB enzyme is capable of energy conservation. However, the expression of a cioA'-'lacZ fusion was less dependent on the copper status in the quadruple mutant than in the wild type, suggesting that copper availability might affect cioAB expression indirectly, via the function of the heme-copper oxidases. PMID:18708503

  7. Effect of novel antibacterial gallium-carboxymethyl cellulose on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Valappil, Sabeel P; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Bouffier, Laurent; Hope, Christopher K; Evans, Gary; Claridge, John B; Higham, Susan M; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2013-02-01

    Gallium has emerged as a new therapeutic agent due partly to the scarcity in development of new antibiotics. In this study, a novel antibacterial gallium exchanged carboxymethyl cellulose (Ga-CMC) has been developed and tested for the susceptibility on a common bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results show that an increase in average molecular weight (MW) from 90 k, 250 k to 700 k of Ga-CMC caused a decrease in antimicrobial activity against planktonic P. aeruginosa. Gallium loading of the Ga-CMC (250 k) samples was altered by varying the amount of functionality (0.7, 0.9 and 1.2 acid groups per mole of carbohydrate) which affected also its antimicrobial activity against planktonic P. aeruginosa. Further, the ability to prevent the growth of biofilms of P. aeruginosa was tested on MW = 250 k samples with 0.9 acid groups per mole of carbohydrate as this sample showed the most promising activity against planktonic P. aeruginosa. Gallium was found to reduce biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa with a maximum effect (0.85 log(10) CFU reduction compared to sodium-carboxymethyl cellulose, Na-CMC) after 24 h. Results of the solubility and ion exchange studies show that this compound is suitable for the controlled release of Ga(3+) upon their breakdown in the presence of bacteria. SEM EDX analysis confirmed that Ga(3+) ions are evenly exchanged on the cellulose surface and systematic controls were carried out to ensure that antibacterial activity is solely due to the presence of gallium as samples intrinsic acidity or nature of counterion did not affect the activity. The results presented here highlight that Ga-CMC may be useful in controlled drug delivery applications, to deliver gallium ions in order to prevent infections due to P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  8. A comparative study of coastal and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anusree V; Joseph, Neetha; Krishna, Kiran; Sneha, K G; Tom, Neenu; Jangid, Kamlesh; Nair, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium having a versatile metabolic potential and great ecological and clinical significance. The geographical distribution of P. aeruginosahas revealed the existence of an unbiased genetic arrangement in terrestrial isolates. In contrast, there are very few reports about P. aeruginosa strains from marine environments. The present work was aimed at studying the distribution of P. aeruginosa in coastal waters along the Indian Peninsula and understanding the environmental influence on genotypic, metabolic and phenotypic characteristics by comparing marine and clinical isolates. Of the 785 marine isolates obtained on selective media, only 32 (~4.1%) were identified as P. aeruginosa, based on their fatty acid methyl ester profiles. A low Euclidian distance value (< 2.5) obtained from chemotaxonomic analysis suggested that all the environmental (coastal and marine) isolates originated from a single species. While UPGMA analyses of AP-PCR and phenotypic profiles separated the environmental and clinical isolates, fatty acid biotyping showed overlapping between most clinical and environmental isolates. Our study revealed the genetic diversity among different environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa. While biogeographical separation was not evident based solely on phenotypic and metabolic typing, genomic and metatranscriptomic studies are more likely to show differences between these isolates. Thus, newer and more insightful methods are required to understand the ecological distribution of this complex group of bacteria. PMID:26413053

  9. A comparative study of coastal and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anusree V.; Joseph, Neetha; Krishna, Kiran; Sneha, K. G.; Tom, Neenu; Jangid, Kamlesh; Nair, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium having a versatile metabolic potential and great ecological and clinical significance. The geographical distribution of P. aeruginosahas revealed the existence of an unbiased genetic arrangement in terrestrial isolates. In contrast, there are very few reports about P. aeruginosa strains from marine environments. The present work was aimed at studying the distribution of P. aeruginosa in coastal waters along the Indian Peninsula and understanding the environmental influence on genotypic, metabolic and phenotypic characteristics by comparing marine and clinical isolates. Of the 785 marine isolates obtained on selective media, only 32 (~4.1%) were identified as P. aeruginosa, based on their fatty acid methyl ester profiles. A low Euclidian distance value (< 2.5) obtained from chemotaxonomic analysis suggested that all the environmental (coastal and marine) isolates originated from a single species. While UPGMA analyses of AP-PCR and phenotypic profiles separated the environmental and clinical isolates, fatty acid biotyping showed overlapping between most clinical and environmental isolates. Our study revealed the genetic diversity among different environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa. While biogeographical separation was not evident based solely on phenotypic and metabolic typing, genomic and metatranscriptomic studies are more likely to show differences between these isolates. Thus, newer and more insightful methods are required to understand the ecological distribution of this complex group of bacteria. PMID:26413053

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO-1 Lipopolysaccharide-Diphtheria Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine: Preparation, Characterization and Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Najafzadeh, Faezeh; Shapouri, Reza; Rahnema, Mehdi; Rokhsartalab Azar, Shadi; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO-1 infections through immunological means has been proved to be efficient and protective. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to produce a conjugate vaccine composed of detoxified lipopolysaccharide (D-LPS) P. aeruginosa and diphtheria toxoid (DT). Materials and Methods: Firstly, LPS was purified and characterized from P. aeruginosa PAO1 and then detoxified. D-LPS was covalently coupled to DT as a carrier protein via amidation method with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer molecule and 1-ethyl-3- (3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a linker. The molar ratio of LPS to DT in the prepared conjugate was 3:1. The immunogenicity of D-LPS-DT conjugate vaccine in mice model was evaluated as well. Results: The conjugate was devoid of endotoxin activity and 0.125 U/mL of D-LPS was acceptable for immunization. D-LPS-DT conjugate was nonpyrogenic for rabbits and nontoxic for mice. Mice immunization with D-LPS-DT conjugate vaccine elicited the fourfold higher IgG antibody compared to D-LPS. Anti-LPS IgG antibody was predominantly IgG1 subclass and then IgG3, IgG2a and IgG2b, respectively. Conclusions: Vaccine based on the conjugation of P. aeruginosa PAO-1 LPS with DT increased anti-LPS antibodies and had a significant potential to protect against Pseudomonas infections. PMID:26301059

  11. Chlorinated phenol-induced physiological antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jocelyn Fraga; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Ikuma, Kaoru; Stevens, Ann M; Love, Nancy G

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen with the ability to rapidly develop multidrug resistance under selective pressure. Previous work demonstrated that upon exposure to the environmental contaminant pentachlorophenol (PCP), P. aeruginosa PAO1 increases expression of multiple multidrug efflux pumps, including the MexAB-OprM pump. The current study describes increases in the antibiotic resistance of PAO1 upon exposure to PCP and other chlorinated organics, including triclosan. Only exposure to chlorinated phenols induced the mexAB-oprM-mediated antibiotic-resistant phenotype. Thus, chlorinated phenols have the potential to contribute to transient phenotypic increases of antibiotic resistance that are relevant when both compounds are present in the environment.

  12. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  13. [Profiles of resistance to aminosides of Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Lesage, D; Delisle-Mizon, F; Vergez, P; Daguet, G

    1987-05-01

    Among all Gram-negative bacilli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most resistant to aminoglycosides. Five hundred and seventeen P. aeruginosa strains were studied. Isolates came from three Paris hospitals. Reference strains were provided by P. Courvalin and A. Philippon. The following aminoglycosides were used: streptomycin (S), spectinomycin (Sp), kanamycin (K), neomycin (N), gentamicin (G), sisomicin (Ss), netilmicin (Nt), tobramycin (T), amikacin (A), habekacin (H). The in vitro activity of antibiotics was evaluated by the standardized disk agar diffusion test. Distribution of inhibition zone diameters among susceptible strains were represented by histograms. Resistance frequency to aminoglycosides was: G: 61.5%, Ss: 38.1%, T: 35.8%, Nt: 58.2%, A: 15.5%, Seven resistance patterns were identified: G: 3%, G Ss: 3%, G Nt: 8%, G Ss Nt: 7%, G Ss T: 5%, G Ss T Nt: 53%, G Ss T Nt A: 21%. Hypothesis about resistance mechanisms and interpretation of disk agar diffusion test are discussed.

  14. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated With Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-01-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reducing pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production. PMID:25801585

  15. [Water used for hemodialysis equipment: where is Pseudomonas aeruginosa?].

    PubMed

    Ducki, Sébastien; Francini, Nicolas; Blech, Marie-Françoise

    2005-05-01

    The water used in dilution of the dialysis solutions constitutes an essential element of the efficiency and the safety of this therapeutics. Water must be specifically treated, and some technical rules must be respected, such as disinfection of the equipment for water treatment, to guarantee a satisfying level for whole the installation. This article reports the investigations, which were led to find the spring of Pseudomonas aeruginosa which contamined in a recurring way the water feeding dialysis equipment. The observation of samples'chronology and an analysis of the sanitary pad suggested a contamination during disinfection. Sample of residual water from the pump used for the injection of Dialox identified this reservoir as origin of the contamination. To stop this contamination by P. aeruginosa, a pump maintenance revision and purges of the system were used.

  16. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated with Azithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-06-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors, and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry-based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reduce pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production.

  17. Regulation of the Mandelate Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    The pathway of mandelate metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is composed of the following steps: l(+)-mandelate → benzoylformate → benzaldehyde → benzoate. These three steps are unique to mandelate oxidation; the benzoate formed is further metabolized via the β-ketoadipate pathway. The first enzyme, l(+)-mandelate dehydrogenase, is induced by its substrate. The second and third enzymes, benzoylformate decarboxylase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase, are both induced by benzoylformate. The same benzaldehyde dehydrogenase, or one very similar to it, is also induced by β-ketoadipate, an intermediate in the subsequent metabolism of benzoate. This dehydrogenase may also be induced by adipate or a metabolite of adipate. These conclusions have been drawn from the physiological and genetic properties of wild-type P. aeruginosa strains and from the study of mutants lacking the second and third enzyme activities. PMID:5003176

  18. The Multiple Signaling Systems Regulating Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Thompson, Jessica A.; Xavier, Karina B.; Cool, Robbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Cell-to-cell communication is a major process that allows bacteria to sense and coordinately react to the fluctuating conditions of the surrounding environment. In several pathogens, this process triggers the production of virulence factors and/or a switch in bacterial lifestyle that is a major determining factor in the outcome and severity of the infection. Understanding how bacteria control these signaling systems is crucial to the development of novel antimicrobial agents capable of reducing virulence while allowing the immune system of the host to clear bacterial infection, an approach likely to reduce the selective pressures for development of resistance. We provide here an up-to-date overview of the molecular basis and physiological implications of cell-to-cell signaling systems in Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the well-studied bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All of the known cell-to-cell signaling systems in this bacterium are described, from the most-studied systems, i.e., N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), the 4-quinolones, the global activator of antibiotic and cyanide synthesis (GAC), the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) systems, and the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp), to less-well-studied signaling molecules, including diketopiperazines, fatty acids (diffusible signal factor [DSF]-like factors), pyoverdine, and pyocyanin. This overview clearly illustrates that bacterial communication is far more complex than initially thought and delivers a clear distinction between signals that are quorum sensing dependent and those relying on alternative factors for their production. PMID:22390972

  19. [Use od ozone for disinfection of ships' system of water supply contaminated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Strikalenko, T V; Mokienko, A V; Stoianova, N V; Gutsel', Iu I

    1990-11-01

    Experimental substantiation is given of the use of ozone in doses, recommended for disinfection of water and ship water supply systems infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The positive effect of ozonation of water supply systems infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was confirmed by results of field testing on ships of the Black sea marine steam-navigation.

  20. Evidence for different pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake systems among Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, P; Hohnadel, D; Meyer, J M

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa ATCC 15692, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and 12 clinical isolates) were checked for the production of pyoverdine and for pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake. Under iron restriction, two isolates produced undetectable amounts of pyoverdine, but all the other strains produced a compound with physicochemical properties identical or close to those of the pyoverdine of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15692 (strain PAO1). The pyoverdines were purified and tested for their growth-promoting activity and for their ability to facilitate 59Fe uptake in homologous experiments involving each pyoverdine and its producing strain, as well as in heterologous systems involving all the other strains. The results of both types of experiments suggested the existence of three specificity groups. This was confirmed by analysis of the amino acid composition of the pyoverdines, which differed for each group. A partially purified polyclonal antiserum raised against a major 80-kilodalton (kDa) iron-regulated outer membrane protein (IROMP) of P. aeruginosa PAO1 recognized the 80-kDa IROMPs from P. aeruginosa PAO1 and the clinical isolates belonging to the same group, whereas the IROMPs from the strains belonging to the two other groups were not detected. A second antiserum raised against the P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 80-kDa IROMP gave similar results by reacting specifically with the 80-kDa IROMP from the strains belonging to this group. Thus, together with the already known pyoverdine from P. aeruginosa PAO1, two new types of pyoverdines produced by strains belonging to this species were characterized. Images PMID:2509364

  1. Metabolomics-Based Screening of Biofilm-Inhibitory Compounds against Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Burdock Leaf.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zaixiang; Tang, Yuxia; Song, Xinyi; Wang, Hongxin

    2015-09-08

    Screening of anti-biofilm compounds from the burdock leaf based on metabolomics is reported here. The crystal violet assay indicated 34% ethanol elution fraction of burdock leaf could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 1 mg·mL(-1). Then, the chemical composition of burdock leaf fraction was analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and 11 active compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, ursolic acid, rutin, cynarin, luteolin, crocin, benzoic acid, and Tenacissoside I) were identified. Lastly, UPLC-MS analysis was employed to obtain the metabolic fingerprints of burdock leaf fractions before and after inhibiting the biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The metabolic fingerprints were transformed to data, analyzed with PLS-DA (partial least squares discriminant analysis) and the peaks whose area was significantly changed were found out. Thus, 81 compounds were screened as potential anti-biofilm ingredients. Among them, rutin, ursolic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and quercetin were identified and confirmed as the main anti-biofilm compounds in burdock leaf. The study provided basic anti-biofilm profile data for the compounds in burdock leaf, as well as provided a convenient method for fast screening of anti-biofilm compounds from natural plants.

  2. Metabolomics-Based Screening of Biofilm-Inhibitory Compounds against Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Burdock Leaf.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zaixiang; Tang, Yuxia; Song, Xinyi; Wang, Hongxin

    2015-01-01

    Screening of anti-biofilm compounds from the burdock leaf based on metabolomics is reported here. The crystal violet assay indicated 34% ethanol elution fraction of burdock leaf could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 1 mg·mL(-1). Then, the chemical composition of burdock leaf fraction was analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and 11 active compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, ursolic acid, rutin, cynarin, luteolin, crocin, benzoic acid, and Tenacissoside I) were identified. Lastly, UPLC-MS analysis was employed to obtain the metabolic fingerprints of burdock leaf fractions before and after inhibiting the biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The metabolic fingerprints were transformed to data, analyzed with PLS-DA (partial least squares discriminant analysis) and the peaks whose area was significantly changed were found out. Thus, 81 compounds were screened as potential anti-biofilm ingredients. Among them, rutin, ursolic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and quercetin were identified and confirmed as the main anti-biofilm compounds in burdock leaf. The study provided basic anti-biofilm profile data for the compounds in burdock leaf, as well as provided a convenient method for fast screening of anti-biofilm compounds from natural plants. PMID:26370951

  3. The Approach to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Murray, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis and clear epidemiologic links between chronic infection and morbidity and mortality exist. Prevention and early identification of infection are critical, and stand to improve with the advent of new vaccines and laboratory methods. Once the organism is identified, a variety of treatment options are available. Aggressive use of antipseudomonal antibiotics is the standard of care for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, and providers must take into account specific patient characteristics when making treatment decisions related to antibiotic selection, route and duration of administration, and site of care.

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Vega, C; Chavez, J; Rodriguez, M G

    1986-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty two clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected in Morelia, México, were analyzed for in vitro susceptibility to five antibiotics by agar dilution tests. Antibiotic resistance was shown by 50% of total isolates. Frequencies of resistance were: streptomycin, 47%; gentamicin, 13%; tobramycin, 8%; and carbenicillin, 7%; no amikacin resistance was found. The more common resistance patterns were streptomycin, gentamicin-streptomycin, and tobramycin-gentamicin-streptomycin. Resistance to either tobramycin, gentamicin or carbenicillin was found mainly in pyocin type 10 isolates. The proportion of antibiotic resistant isolates ranged from 37 to 75% in four hospitals, and amounted 24% in three clinical laboratories.

  5. Mitogenic effects of purified outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y H; Hancock, R E; Mishell, R I

    1980-01-01

    Three major outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 were purified and tested for their ability to stimulate resting murine lymphocytes to proliferate. It was demonstrated that picomole amounts of all three proteins were mitogenic for both intact and T-lymphocyte-depleted populations of spleen cells from C3H/HeJ mice. In contrast, they had no activity against either mature or immature thymocytes. Since the strain of mice used is unable to respond to lipopolysaccharide, we condlude that the three proteins are B-cell mitogens. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6769818

  6. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Gandee, Leah; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Zimmern, Philippe; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model.

  7. Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B; Bosshammer, J; Breitenstein, S; Brockhausen, I; Gudowius, P; Herrmann, C; Herrmann, S; Heuer, T; Kubesch, P; Mekus, F; Römling, U; Schmidt, K D; Spangenberg, C; Walter, S

    1997-02-01

    The lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regarded as one of the major causes of health decline in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The CF host response to the persistent bacterial antigen load in the endobronchiolar lumen is characterized by a pronounced humoral response, local production of cytokines, influx of neutrophils into the lung and a protease-protease inhibitor imbalance predominantly sustained by released neutrophil elastase. CF is an autosomal recessive disease, and we could demonstrate for our local patient population that the age-dependent risk to become chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa can be differentiated by the disease-causing CFTR mutation genotype. The age-specific colonisation rates were significantly lower in pancreas sufficient than in pancreas insufficient patients. P. aeruginosa is occasionally detected in throat swabs already in infancy or early childhood in most patients although there is a lapse of several years amenable to preventive measures such as vaccination until onset of persistent colonization. The epidemiology of the infection with P. aeruginosa was investigated by quantitative macrorestriction fragment pattern analysis. The distribution and frequency of clones found in CF patients match that found in other clinical and environmental aquatic habitats, but the over-representation of specific clones at a CF clinic indicates a significant impact of nosocomial transmission for the prevalence of P. aeruginosa-positive patients at a particular center. Most patients remain colonized with the initially acquired P. aeruginosa clone. According to direct sputum analysis the majority of patients is carrying a single clonal variant at a concentration of 10(7)-10(9) CFU. Co-colonization with other species or other clones is infrequent. Independent of the underlying genotype, the CF lung habitat triggers a uniform, genetically fixed conversion of bacterial phenotype. Most CFP, aeruginosa strains become non-motile, mucoid

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Ream, Dave C.; Fiester, Steven E.; Kidane, Destaalem

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  11. Modulation of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by quinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Yassien, M; Khardori, N; Ahmedy, A; Toama, M

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between four fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, pefloxacin, and ofloxacin) and biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wells of microtiter plates and on segments of vascular catheters were studied in an in vitro model of vascular catheter colonization. Subinhibitory concentrations (one-half, one-fourth, and one-eight of the MIC) of the fluoroquinolones reduced the adherence of P. aeruginosa to 30 to 33, 44 to 47, and 61 to 67% of that of controls, respectively. The addition of high concentrations of the fluoroquinolones (12.5 and 400 micrograms/ml) to preformed biofilms (grown for 48 h at 37 degrees C) decreased the adherence of P. aeruginosa to 69 to 77 and 39 to 60% of that of controls, respectively. In an in vitro model of vascular catheter colonization, subinhibitory concentrations (one-half, one-fourth, and one-eight of the MIC) of fluoroquinolones reduced the number of adherent bacteria to 21 to 23, 40 to 46, and 55 to 70% of that of the controls, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated a significant reduction in glycocalyx formation and adherent bacteria in the presence of pefloxacin at one-half to one-eight of the MIC. Vascular catheter segments precolonized with P. aeruginosa for 24 h and exposed to the fluoroquinolones at 4 to 25 times the MIC (50 micrograms/ml) for 2 h showed <5% growth of adherent cells compared with controls. No adherent organisms were cultured in the presence of 8 to 50 times the MIC (100 micrograms/ml). Scanning electron microscopy studies of preformed biofilms exposed to pefloxacin verified the results obtained by culture. These data show that subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, pefloxacin, and ofloxacin inhibit the adherence of P. aeruginosa to plastic surfaces and vascular catheters. Clinically achievable concentrations of fluoroquinolones (50 to 100 micrograms/ml) were able to eradicate preformed biofilms on vascular catheters. PMID:8619580

  12. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25704369

  13. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  14. Community-based interference against integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human salivary microbial biofilm.

    PubMed

    He, X; Hu, W; He, J; Guo, L; Lux, R; Shi, W

    2011-12-01

    As part of the human gastrointestinal tract, the oral cavity represents a complex biological system and harbors diverse bacterial species. Unlike the gut microbiota, which is often considered a health asset, studies of the oral commensal microbiota have been largely limited to their implication in oral conditions such as dental caries and periodontal disease. Less emphasis has been given to their potential beneficial roles, especially the protective effects against oral colonization by foreign or pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we used salivary microbiota derived from healthy human subjects to investigate protective effects against colonization and integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, into developing or pre-formed salivary biofilms. When co-cultivated in saliva medium, P. aeruginosa persisted in the planktonic phase, but failed to integrate into the salivary microbial community during biofilm formation. Furthermore, in saliva medium supplemented with sucrose, the oral microbiota inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa by producing lactic acid. More interestingly, while pre-formed salivary biofilms were able to prevent P. aeruginosa colonization, the same biofilms recovered from mild chlorhexidine gluconate treatment displayed a shift in microbial composition and showed a drastic reduction in protection. Our study indicates that normal oral communities with balanced microbial compositions could be important in effectively preventing the integration of foreign or pathogenic bacterial species, such as P. aeruginosa. PMID:22053962

  15. Clonal Relatedness among Imipenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from ICU-Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vaez, Hamid; Moghim, Sharareh; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh

    2015-01-01

    Imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) has become an increasingly important problem in healthcare settings worldwide. The aim of the present study was to evaluate clonal spread among imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from ICU-hospitalized patients. Totally, 150 wound specimens were analyzed. Antibiotic resistance profiles and clonal diversity were evaluated using Kirby-Bauer's disk diffusion method and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA- (RAPD-) PCR, respectively. The isolates showed a high frequency of antibiotic resistance against meropenem, and imipenem (100%) followed by ciprofloxacin, and ceftazidime (90%); meanwhile resistance to polymyxin B was not observed. Eighteen (40%) of P. aeruginosa isolates were MBL-positive via ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) combined disk test. Our findings showed high genetic diversity, with 37 different RAPD types detected. RAPD typing results showed cross-acquisition of P. aeruginosa in investigated hospital, suggesting failure in infection control practices. Incidence of MBL-positive isolates is high and should be regarded as a threat to hospitalized patients. PMID:26798509

  16. Community-based interference against integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human salivary microbial biofilm.

    PubMed

    He, X; Hu, W; He, J; Guo, L; Lux, R; Shi, W

    2011-12-01

    As part of the human gastrointestinal tract, the oral cavity represents a complex biological system and harbors diverse bacterial species. Unlike the gut microbiota, which is often considered a health asset, studies of the oral commensal microbiota have been largely limited to their implication in oral conditions such as dental caries and periodontal disease. Less emphasis has been given to their potential beneficial roles, especially the protective effects against oral colonization by foreign or pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we used salivary microbiota derived from healthy human subjects to investigate protective effects against colonization and integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, into developing or pre-formed salivary biofilms. When co-cultivated in saliva medium, P. aeruginosa persisted in the planktonic phase, but failed to integrate into the salivary microbial community during biofilm formation. Furthermore, in saliva medium supplemented with sucrose, the oral microbiota inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa by producing lactic acid. More interestingly, while pre-formed salivary biofilms were able to prevent P. aeruginosa colonization, the same biofilms recovered from mild chlorhexidine gluconate treatment displayed a shift in microbial composition and showed a drastic reduction in protection. Our study indicates that normal oral communities with balanced microbial compositions could be important in effectively preventing the integration of foreign or pathogenic bacterial species, such as P. aeruginosa.

  17. Robustness and Plasticity of Metabolic Pathway Flux among Uropathogenic Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Antje; Dohnt, Katrin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human pathogen that frequently causes urinary tract and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Here, using 13C-metabolic flux analysis, we conducted quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes in the model strain P. aeruginosa PAO1 and 17 clinical isolates. All P. aeruginosa strains catabolized glucose through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway with fully respiratory metabolism and no overflow. Together with other NADPH supplying reactions, this high-flux pathway provided by far more NADPH than needed for anabolism: a benefit for the pathogen to counteract oxidative stress imposed by the host. P. aeruginosa recruited the pentose phosphate pathway exclusively for biosynthesis. In contrast to glycolytic metabolism, which was conserved among all isolates, the flux through pyruvate metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the glyoxylate shunt was highly variable, likely caused by adaptive processes in individual strains during infection. This aspect of metabolism was niche-specific with respect to the corresponding flux because strains isolated from the urinary tract clustered separately from those originating from catheter-associated infections. Interestingly, most glucose-grown strains exhibited significant flux through the glyoxylate shunt. Projection into the theoretical flux space, which was computed using elementary flux-mode analysis, indicated that P. aeruginosa metabolism is optimized for efficient growth and exhibits significant potential for increasing NADPH supply to drive oxidative stress response. PMID:24709961

  18. Synthesis and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate-tetanus toxoid conjugate.

    PubMed

    Kashef, Nasim; Behzadian-Nejad, Qorban; Najar-Peerayeh, Shahin; Mousavi-Hosseini, Kamran; Moazzeni, Mohammad; Djavid, Gholamreza Esmaeeli

    2006-10-01

    Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main proven perpetrator of lung function decline and ultimate mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Mucoid strains of this bacterium elaborate mucoid exopolysaccharide, also referred to as alginate. Alginate-based immunization of naïve animals elicits opsonic antibodies and leads to clearance of mucoid P. aeruginosa from the lungs. Alginate was isolated from mucoid P. aeruginosa strain 8821M by repeated ethanol precipitation, dialysis, proteinase and nuclease digestion, and chromatography. To improve immunogenicity, the purified antigen was coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDAC) as a linker. The reaction mixture was passed through a Sepharose CL-4B column. The resulting conjugate was composed of TT and large-size alginate polymer at a ratio of about 3 : 1; it was non-toxic and non-pyrogenic, and elicited high titres of alginate-specific IgG. Antisera raised against the conjugate had high opsonic activity against the vaccine strain. The alginate conjugate was also able to protect mice against a lethal dose of mucoid P. aeruginosa. These data indicate that an alginate-based vaccine has significant potential to protect against chronic infection with mucoid P. aeruginosa in the CF host. PMID:17005795

  19. Prevalence and Antimicrobial-Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pools and Hot Tubs

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Jonathan K.; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen in recreational waters and the primary cause of hot tub folliculitis and otitis externa. The aim of this surveillance study was to determine the background prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profile of P. aeruginosa in swimming pools and hot tubs. A convenience sample of 108 samples was obtained from three hot tubs and eight indoor swimming pools. Water and swab samples were processed using membrane filtration, followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction. Twenty-three samples (21%) were positive for P. aeruginosa, and 23 isolates underwent susceptibility testing using the microdilution method. Resistance was noted to several antibiotic agents, including amikacin (intermediate), aztreonam, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, imipenem, meropenem (intermediate), ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, tobramycin (intermediate), and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The results of this surveillance study indicate that 96% of P. aeruginosa isolates tested from swimming pools and hot tubs were multidrug resistant. These results may have important implications for cystic fibrosis patients and other immune-suppressed individuals, for whom infection with multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa would have greater impact. Our results underlie the importance of rigorous facility maintenance, and provide prevalence data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistant strains of this important recreational water-associated and nosocomial pathogen. PMID:21556203

  20. Pigments influence the tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to photodynamically induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Viviana T; Bolognese, Fabrizio; Chiodaroli, Luca; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Barbieri, Paola

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to different classes of antibiotics and disinfectants. P. aeruginosa also displays a certain degree of tolerance to photodynamic therapy (PDT), an alternative antimicrobial approach exploiting a photo-oxidative stress induced by exogenous photosensitizers and visible light. To evaluate whether P. aeruginosa pigments can contribute to its relative tolerance to PDT, we analysed the response to this treatment of isogenic transposon mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with altered pigmentation. In general, in the presence of pigments a higher tolerance to PDT-induced photo-oxidative stress was observed. Hyperproduction of pyomelanin makes the cells much more tolerant to stress caused by either radicals or singlet oxygen generated by different photosensitizers upon photoactivation. Phenazines, pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, produced in different amounts depending on the cultural conditions, are able to counteract both types of PDT-elicited reactive oxygen species. Hyperproduction of pyoverdine, caused by a mutation in a quorum-sensing gene, rendered P. aeruginosa more tolerant to a photosensitizer that generates mainly singlet oxygen, although in this case the observed tolerance to photo-oxidative stress cannot be exclusively attributed to the presence of the pigment. PMID:26419906

  1. Inhibition and dispersal of Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms by a small diffusible Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoproduct(s)

    PubMed Central

    Hibbing, Michael E.; Fuqua, Clay

    2013-01-01

    Environmental biofilms often contain mixed populations of different species. In these dense communities, competition between biofilm residents for limited nutrients such as iron, can be fierce, leading to the evolution of competitive factors that affect the ability of competitors to grow or form biofilms. We have discovered a compound(s) present in the conditioned culture fluids of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that disperses and inhibits the formation of biofilms produced by the facultative plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The inhibitory activity is strongly induced when P. aeruginosa is cultivated in iron-limited conditions, but it does not function through iron sequestration. In addition, the production of the inhibitory activity is not regulated by the global iron regulatory protein Fur, the iron-responsive extra-cytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor PvdS, or three of the recognized P. aeruginosa quorum sensing systems. In addition, the compound(s) responsible for the inhibition and dispersal of A. tumefaciens biofilm formation is likely distinct from the recently identified P. aeruginosa dispersal factor, cis-2-decenoic acid (CDA), as dialysis of the culture fluids showed that the inhibitory compound was larger than CDA and culture fluids that dispersed and inhibited biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens had no effect on biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:22105093

  2. Production of a value-added hydroxy fatty acid, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from high oleic safflower oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids (HFA), originally found in small amount mainly from plant systems, are good examples of the structurally modified lipids, rendering special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared to normal fatty acids. Based on these properties, HFAs possess high industrial ...

  3. Cloning, expression and purification of penicillin-binding protein 3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMCC 10104.

    PubMed

    An, Yan Dong; Du, Qi Zhen; Tong, Li Yan; Yu, Zhao Wu; Gong, Xing Wen

    2015-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary target of β-lactams used to treat pseudomonas infections. Meanwhile, structure change and overproduction of PBP3 play important roles in the drug resistance of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, studies on the gene and structure of PBP3 are urgently needed. P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104 is a type culture strain common used in China. However, there is no report on its genomic and proteomic profiles. In this study, based on ftsI of P. aeruginosa PAO1, the gene encoding PBP3 was cloned from CMCC 10104. A truncated version of the ftsI gene, omitting the bases encoding the hydrophobic leader peptide (amino acids 1-34), was amplified by PCR. The cloned DNA shared 99.76% identity with ftsI from PAO1. Only four bases were different (66 C-A, 1020 T-C, 1233 T-C, and 1527 T-C). However, there were no differences between their deduced amino acid sequences. The recombinant PBP3 (rPBP3), containing a 6-histidine tag, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose was used for its purification. The purified rPBP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis, and showed a single band at about 60kDa with purity higher than 95%. The penicillin-binding assay indicated that the obtained rPBP3 was functional and not hindered by the presence of the C-terminal His-tag. The protocol described in this study offers a method for obtaining purified recombinant PBP3 from P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104.

  4. Cloning, expression and purification of penicillin-binding protein 3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMCC 10104.

    PubMed

    An, Yan Dong; Du, Qi Zhen; Tong, Li Yan; Yu, Zhao Wu; Gong, Xing Wen

    2015-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary target of β-lactams used to treat pseudomonas infections. Meanwhile, structure change and overproduction of PBP3 play important roles in the drug resistance of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, studies on the gene and structure of PBP3 are urgently needed. P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104 is a type culture strain common used in China. However, there is no report on its genomic and proteomic profiles. In this study, based on ftsI of P. aeruginosa PAO1, the gene encoding PBP3 was cloned from CMCC 10104. A truncated version of the ftsI gene, omitting the bases encoding the hydrophobic leader peptide (amino acids 1-34), was amplified by PCR. The cloned DNA shared 99.76% identity with ftsI from PAO1. Only four bases were different (66 C-A, 1020 T-C, 1233 T-C, and 1527 T-C). However, there were no differences between their deduced amino acid sequences. The recombinant PBP3 (rPBP3), containing a 6-histidine tag, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose was used for its purification. The purified rPBP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis, and showed a single band at about 60kDa with purity higher than 95%. The penicillin-binding assay indicated that the obtained rPBP3 was functional and not hindered by the presence of the C-terminal His-tag. The protocol described in this study offers a method for obtaining purified recombinant PBP3 from P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104. PMID:25514204

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane lipoprotein I gene: molecular cloning, sequence, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Duchêne, M; Barron, C; Schweizer, A; von Specht, B U; Domdey, H

    1989-01-01

    Lipoprotein I (OprI) is one of the major proteins of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Like porin protein F (OprF), it is a vaccine candidate because it antigenically cross-reacts with all serotype strains of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme. Since lipoprotein I was expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of its own promoter, we were able to isolate the gene by screening a lambda EMBL3 phage library with a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against lipoprotein I. The monocistronic OprI mRNA encodes a precursor protein of 83 amino acid residues including a signal peptide of 19 residues. The mature protein has a molecular weight of 6,950, not including bound glycerol and lipid. Although the amino acid sequences of protein I of P. aeruginosa and Braun's lipoprotein of E. coli differ considerably (only 30.1% identical amino acid residues), peptidoglycan in E. coli, are identical. Using lipoprotein I expressed in E. coli, it can now be tested whether this protein alone, without P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide contaminations, has a protective effect against P. aeruginosa infections. Images PMID:2502533

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (GRC1) as a strong antagonist of Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Gupta, C P; Sharma, A; Dubey, R C; Maheshwari, D K

    1999-01-01

    A plant growth promotory bacterial strain, isolated from the potato rhizosphere, was characterized as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (GRC1). The isolate produced an hydroxamate type of siderophore after 48 h of incubation on tryptic soy medium under iron deficient conditions. The in vitro antifungal activity of P. aeruginosa was tested against two soil-borne plant pathogens, Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium oxysporum. The antagonistic behaviour of the isolate was tested by dual culture technique. The growth inhibition of M. phaseolina and F. oxysporum was 74.1% and 70.5%, respectively, after 5 days of incubation. The production of hydrocyanic acid and indole acetic acid was also recorded under normal growth conditions. PMID:10581709

  7. Dissecting the Machinery That Introduces Disulfide Bonds in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Ball, Geneviève; Leverrier, Pauline; Garvis, Steven; Nicolaes, Valérie; Vertommen, Didier; Ize, Bérengère; Tamu Dufe, Veronica; Messens, Joris; Voulhoux, Romé; Collet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disulfide bond formation is required for the folding of many bacterial virulence factors. However, whereas the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is well characterized, not much is known on the pathways that oxidatively fold proteins in pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report the detailed unraveling of the pathway that introduces disulfide bonds in the periplasm of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The genome of P. aeruginosa uniquely encodes two DsbA proteins (P. aeruginosa DsbA1 [PaDsbA1] and PaDsbA2) and two DsbB proteins (PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2). We found that PaDsbA1, the primary donor of disulfide bonds to secreted proteins, is maintained oxidized in vivo by both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2. In vitro reconstitution of the pathway confirms that both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2 shuttle electrons from PaDsbA1 to membrane-bound quinones. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa dsbB1 (PadsbB1) and PadsbB2 is required to prevent the folding of several P. aeruginosa virulence factors and to lead to a significant decrease in pathogenicity. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, we also analyzed the impact of PadsbA1 deletion on the global periplasmic proteome of P. aeruginosa, which allowed us to identify more than 20 new potential substrates of this major oxidoreductase. Finally, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of PaDsbA2, a highly oxidizing oxidoreductase, which seems to be expressed under specific conditions. By fully dissecting the machinery that introduces disulfide bonds in P. aeruginosa, our work opens the way to the design of novel antibacterial molecules able to disarm this pathogen by preventing the proper assembly of its arsenal of virulence factors. PMID:24327342

  8. Strategies for improved rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Jr, Nei; Freire, Denise M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants with potential for diversified industrial and environmental uses. The present study evaluated three strategies for increasing the production of rhamnolipid-type biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1. The influence of pH, the addition of P. aeruginosa spent culture medium and the use of a fed-batch process were examined. The culture medium adjusted to pH 7.0 was the most productive. Furthermore, the pH of the culture medium had a measurable effect on the ratio of synthesized mono- and dirhamnolipids. At pH values below 7.3, the proportion of monorhamnolipids decreased from 45 to 24%. The recycling of 20% of the spent culture medium in where P. aeruginosa was grown up to the later stationary phase was responsible for a 100% increase in rhamnolipid volumetric productivity in the new culture medium. Finally, the use of fed-batch operation under conditions of limited nitrogen resulted in a 3.8-fold increase in the amount of rhamnolipids produced (2.9 g L−1–10.9 g L−1). These results offer promising pathways for the optimization of processes for the production of rhamnolipids. PMID:27257553

  9. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Yuding; Chen, Ronghao; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here, we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM. PMID:27014238

  10. Indole and 7‐hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L. G.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7‐hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)‐regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI‐opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS‐regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2‐heptyl‐3‐hydroxy‐4(1H)‐quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole‐related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  11. Rhamnolipids Modulate Swarming Motility Patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Nicky C.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; O'Toole, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of twitching, swimming, and swarming motility. The latter form of translocation occurs on semisolid surfaces, requires functional flagella and biosurfactant production, and results in complex motility patterns. From the point of inoculation, bacteria migrate as defined groups, referred to as tendrils, moving in a coordinated manner capable of sensing and responding to other groups of cells. We were able to show that P. aeruginosa produces extracellular factors capable of modulating tendril movement, and genetic analysis revealed that modulation of these movements was dependent on rhamnolipid biosynthesis. An rhlB mutant (deficient in mono- and dirhamnolipid production) and an rhlC mutant (deficient in dirhamnolipid production) exhibited altered swarming patterns characterized by irregularly shaped tendrils. In addition, agar supplemented with rhamnolipid-containing spent supernatant inhibited wild-type (WT) swarming, whereas agar supplemented with spent supernatant from mutants that do not make rhamnolipids had no effect on WT P. aeruginosa swarming. Addition of purified rhamnolipids to swarming medium also inhibited swarming motility of the WT strain. We also show that a sadB mutant does not sense and/or respond to other groups of swarming cells and this mutant was capable of swarming on media supplemented with rhamnolipid-containing spent supernatant or purified rhamnolipids. The abilities to produce and respond to rhamnolipids in the context of group behavior are discussed. PMID:16237018

  12. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  13. Distinct synergistic action of piperacillin and methylglyoxal against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sayanti; Chaki, Shaswati; Das, Sukhen; Sen, Saswati; Dutta, Samir Kr; Dastidar, Sujata G

    2011-07-01

    The dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal is a natural constituent of Manuka honey produced from Manuka flowers in New Zealand. It is known to possess both anticancer and antibacterial activity. Such observations prompted to investigate the ability of methylglyoxal as a potent drug against multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 12 test P. aeruginosa strains isolated from various hospitals were tested for their resistances against many antibiotics, most of which are applied in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Results revealed that the strains were resistant to many drugs at high levels, only piperacillin, carbenicillin, amikacin and ciprofloxacin showed resistances at comparatively lower levels. Following multiple experimentations it was observed that methylglyoxal was also antimicrobic against all the strains at comparable levels. Distinct and statistically significant synergism was observed between methylglyoxal and piperacillin by disc diffusion tests when compared with their individual effects. The fractional inhibitory concentration index of this combination evaluated by checkerboard analysis, was 0.5, which confirmed synergism between the pair. Synergism was also noted when methylglyoxal was combined with carbenicillin and amikacin. PMID:21800506

  14. Origin and Impact of Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the organized bacterial community called biofilm is a crucial event in bacterial physiology. Given that biofilms are often refractory to antibiotics and disinfectants to which planktonic bacteria are susceptible, their formation is also an industrially and medically relevant issue. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human pathogen causing acute and chronic infections, is considered a model organism to study biofilms. A large number of environmental cues control biofilm dynamics in bacterial cells. In particular, the dispersal of individual cells from the biofilm requires metabolic and morphological reprogramming in which the second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) plays a central role. The diatomic gas nitric oxide (NO), a well-known signaling molecule in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is able to induce the dispersal of P. aeruginosa and other bacterial biofilms by lowering c-di-GMP levels. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms connecting NO sensing to the activation of c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases in P. aeruginosa, ultimately leading to c-di-GMP decrease and biofilm dispersal. PMID:26260455

  15. Strategies for improved rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1.

    PubMed

    Soares Dos Santos, Alexandre; Pereira, Nei; Freire, Denise M G

    2016-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants with potential for diversified industrial and environmental uses. The present study evaluated three strategies for increasing the production of rhamnolipid-type biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1. The influence of pH, the addition of P. aeruginosa spent culture medium and the use of a fed-batch process were examined. The culture medium adjusted to pH 7.0 was the most productive. Furthermore, the pH of the culture medium had a measurable effect on the ratio of synthesized mono- and dirhamnolipids. At pH values below 7.3, the proportion of monorhamnolipids decreased from 45 to 24%. The recycling of 20% of the spent culture medium in where P. aeruginosa was grown up to the later stationary phase was responsible for a 100% increase in rhamnolipid volumetric productivity in the new culture medium. Finally, the use of fed-batch operation under conditions of limited nitrogen resulted in a 3.8-fold increase in the amount of rhamnolipids produced (2.9 g L(-1)-10.9 g L(-1)). These results offer promising pathways for the optimization of processes for the production of rhamnolipids.

  16. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Yuding; Chen, Ronghao; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here, we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM. PMID:27014238

  17. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Braj R; Singh, Brahma N; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H; Singh, Harikesh B

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  18. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Braj R.; Singh, Brahma N.; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H.; Singh, Harikesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  19. Strategies for improved rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1.

    PubMed

    Soares Dos Santos, Alexandre; Pereira, Nei; Freire, Denise M G

    2016-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants with potential for diversified industrial and environmental uses. The present study evaluated three strategies for increasing the production of rhamnolipid-type biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1. The influence of pH, the addition of P. aeruginosa spent culture medium and the use of a fed-batch process were examined. The culture medium adjusted to pH 7.0 was the most productive. Furthermore, the pH of the culture medium had a measurable effect on the ratio of synthesized mono- and dirhamnolipids. At pH values below 7.3, the proportion of monorhamnolipids decreased from 45 to 24%. The recycling of 20% of the spent culture medium in where P. aeruginosa was grown up to the later stationary phase was responsible for a 100% increase in rhamnolipid volumetric productivity in the new culture medium. Finally, the use of fed-batch operation under conditions of limited nitrogen resulted in a 3.8-fold increase in the amount of rhamnolipids produced (2.9 g L(-1)-10.9 g L(-1)). These results offer promising pathways for the optimization of processes for the production of rhamnolipids. PMID:27257553

  20. Response surface methodology for cadmium biosorption on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ahmady-Asbchin, Salman

    2016-01-01

    In this research the effects of various physicochemical factors on Cd(2+) biosorption such as initial metal concentration, pH and contact exposure time were studied. This study has shown a Cd(2+) biosorption, equilibrium time of about 5 min for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the adsorption equilibrium data were well described by Langmuir equation. The maximum capacity for biosorption has been extrapolated to 0.56 mmol.g(-1) for P. aeruginosa. The thermodynamic properties ΔG(0), ΔH(0), and ΔS(0) of Cd(2+) for biosorption were analyzed by the equilibrium constant value obtained from experimented data at different temperatures. The results show that biosorption of Cd(2+) by P. aeruginosa are endothermic and spontaneous with ΔH value of 36.35 J.mol(-1). By response surface methodology, the quadratic model has adequately described the experimental data based on the adjusted determination coefficient (R(2) = 0.98). The optimum conditions for maximum uptake onto the biosorbent were established at 0.5 g.l(-1) biosorbent concentration, pH 6 for the aqueous solution, and a temperature of 30 °C. PMID:27232396

  1. Mechanism of azithromycin inhibition of HSL synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianming; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Bin; Cai, Renxin; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Fang, Chengcai; Chen, Cha

    2016-04-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has low antibiotic susceptibility due to several chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, we carried out mechanistic studies to determine how azithromycin affects quorum sensing and virulence in P. aeruginosa. lasI and rhlI single and double mutants were constructed. We then undertook a quantitative approach to determine the optimal concentration of azithromycin and culture time that can affect the expression of HSLs. Furthermore, based on the above results, the effect on quorum sensing was analyzed at a transcriptional level. It was found that 2 μg/mL azithromycin caused a 79% decrease in 3-oxo-C12-HSL secretion during cultivation, while C4-HSL secretion was strongly repressed in the early stages. Azithromycin acts on ribosomes; to determine whether this can elicit alternative modes of gene expression, transcriptional regulation of representative virulence genes was analyzed. We propose a new relationship for lasI and rhlI: lasI acts as a cell density sensor, and rhlI functions as a fine-tuning mechanism for coordination between different quorum sensing systems.

  2. Indole and 7-hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-01-01

    Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7-hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)-regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI-opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS-regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole-related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  3. Evolutionary genomics of epidemic and nonepidemic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dettman, Jeremy R.; Rodrigue, Nicolas; Aaron, Shawn D.; Kassen, Rees

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen of humans and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Prolonged infection of the respiratory tract can lead to adaptation of the pathogen to the CF lung environment. To examine the general patterns of adaptation associated with chronic infection, we obtained genome sequences from a collection of P. aeruginosa isolated from airways of patients with CF. Our analyses support a nonclonal epidemic population structure, with a background of unique, recombining genotypes, and the rare occurrence of successful epidemic clones. We present unique genome sequence evidence for the intercontinental spread of an epidemic strain shared between CF clinics in the United Kingdom and North America. Analyses of core and accessory genomes identified candidate genes and important functional pathways associated with adaptive evolution. Many genes of interest were involved in biological functions with obvious roles in this pathosystem, such as biofilm formation, antibiotic metabolism, pathogenesis, transport, reduction/oxidation, and secretion. Key factors driving the adaptive evolution of this pathogen within the host appear to be the presence of oxidative stressors and antibiotics. Regions of the accessory genome unique to the epidemic strain were enriched for genes in transporter families that efflux heavy metals and antibiotics. The epidemic strain was significantly more resistant than nonepidemic strains to three different antibiotics. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that selection imposed by the CF lung environment has a major influence on genomic evolution and the genetic characteristics of P. aeruginosa isolates causing contemporary infection. PMID:24324153

  4. Quorum sensing and policing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa social cheaters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meizhen; Schaefer, Amy L; Dandekar, Ajai A; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-02-17

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses a quorum sensing signal cascade to activate expression of dozens of genes when sufficient population densities have been reached. Quorum sensing controls production of several key virulence factors, including secreted proteases such as elastase. Cooperating groups of bacteria growing on protein are susceptible to social cheating by quorum-sensing defective mutants. A possible way to restrict cheater emergence is by policing where cooperators produce costly goods to sanction or punish cheats. The P. aeruginosa LasR-LasI quorum sensing system controls genes including those encoding proteases and also those encoding a second quorum-sensing system, the RhlR-RhlI system, which controls numerous genes including those for cyanide production. By using RhlR quorum sensing mutants and cyanide synthesis mutants, we show that cyanide production is costly and cyanide-producing cooperators use cyanide to punish LasR-null social cheaters. Cooperators are less susceptible to cyanide than are LasR mutants. These experiments demonstrate policing in P. aeruginosa, provide a mechanistic understanding of policing, and show policing involves the cascade organization of the two quorum sensing systems in this bacterium.

  5. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Manuel R.; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the

  6. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Manuel R; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai; Perron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound

  7. Use of an ultraviolet light at point-of-dispense faucet to eliminate Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gerba, Charles P

    2015-05-01

    Tap water is believed to be a significant source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in health care environments. This study evaluated an ultraviolet (UV) light point-of-dispense water treatment system for control of P aeruginosa. No P aeruginosa was detected in 30 different water dispensers in which the UV light device had been operating for 1-34 months. In comparison, P aeruginosa was found in other taps that did not feature this UV light system. PMID:25721063

  8. Use of an ultraviolet light at point-of-dispense faucet to eliminate Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gerba, Charles P

    2015-05-01

    Tap water is believed to be a significant source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in health care environments. This study evaluated an ultraviolet (UV) light point-of-dispense water treatment system for control of P aeruginosa. No P aeruginosa was detected in 30 different water dispensers in which the UV light device had been operating for 1-34 months. In comparison, P aeruginosa was found in other taps that did not feature this UV light system.

  9. Pyoverdine and Proteases Affect the Response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Gallium in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections. PMID:26149986

  10. Interaction between extracellular lipase LipA and the polysaccharide alginate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to cause acute and chronic infections. The biofilm mode of life significantly contributes to the growth and persistence of P. aeruginosa during an infection process and mediates the pathogenicity of the bacterium. Within a biofilm mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa simultaneously produce and secrete several hydrolytic enzymes and the extracellular polysaccharide alginate. The focus of the current study was the interaction between extracellular lipase LipA and alginate, which may be physiologically relevant in biofilms of mucoid P. aeruginosa. Results Fluorescence microscopy of mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms were performed using fluorogenic lipase substrates. It showed a localization of the extracellular enzyme near the cells. A microtiter plate-based binding assay revealed that the polyanion alginate is able to bind LipA. A molecular modeling approach showed that this binding is structurally based on electrostatic interactions between negatively charged residues of alginate and positively charged amino acids of the protein localized opposite of the catalytic centre. Moreover, we showed that the presence of alginate protected the lipase activity by protection from heat inactivation and from degradation by the endogenous, extracellular protease elastase LasB. This effect was influenced by the chemical properties of the alginate molecules and was enhanced by the presence of O-acetyl groups in the alginate chain. Conclusion We demonstrate that the extracellular lipase LipA from P. aeruginosa interacts with the polysaccharide alginate in the self-produced extracellular biofilm matrix of P. aeruginosa via electrostatic interactions suggesting a role of this interaction for enzyme immobilization and accumulation within biofilms. This represents a physiological advantage for the cells. Especially in the biofilm lifestyle, the enzyme is retained near the cell surface, with the catalytic centre exposed

  11. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections.

  12. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections. PMID:26149986

  13. The Long-Chain Fatty Acid Sensor, PsrA, Modulates The Expression of rpoS and the Type III Secretion exsCEBA-Operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun; Lunin, Vladimir V.; Skarina, Tatiana; Savchenko, Alexei; Schurr, Michael J.; Hoang, Tung T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PsrA autorepressor has dual roles as a repressor of the fadBA5 β-oxidation-operon and an activator of the stationary-phase sigma factor rpoS and exsCEBA-operon of the type III secretion system (TTSS). Previously, we demonstrated that the repression of the fadBA5-operon by PsrA is relieved by long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). However, the signal affecting the activation of rpoS and exsC via PsrA is unknown. In this study, microarray and gene-fusion data suggested that LCFA (e.g. oleate) affected the expression of rpoS and exsC. DNA binding studies confirmed that PsrA binds to the rpoS and exsC promoter regions. This binding was inhibited by LCFA, indicating that LCFA directly affects the activation of these two genes through PsrA. LCFA decreased rpoS and exsC expression, resulting in increased N-(butyryl)-l-homoserine-lactone quorum-sensing signal and decreased ExoS/T production, respectively. Based on the crystal structure of PsrA, site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues, within the hydrophobic channel thought to accommodate LCFA, created two LCFA-nonresponsive PsrA mutants. The binding and activation of rpoS and exsC by these PsrA mutants was no longer inhibited by LCFA. These data support a mechanistic model where LCFA influence PsrA regulation to control LCFA metabolism and some virulence genes in P. aeruginosa. PMID:19508282

  14. Genetics of O-Antigen Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocchetta, H. L.; Burrows, L. L.; Lam, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce an elaborate assortment of extracellular and cell-associated bacterial products that enable colonization and establishment of infection within a host. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules are cell surface factors that are typically known for their protective role against serum-mediated lysis and their endotoxic properties. The most heterogeneous portion of LPS is the O antigen or O polysaccharide, and it is this region which confers serum resistance to the organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of concomitantly synthesizing two types of LPS referred to as A band and B band. The A-band LPS contains a conserved O polysaccharide region composed of d-rhamnose (homopolymer), while the B-band O-antigen (heteropolymer) structure varies among the 20 O serotypes of P. aeruginosa. The genes coding for the enzymes that direct the synthesis of these two O antigens are organized into two separate clusters situated at different chromosomal locations. In this review, we summarize the organization of these two gene clusters to discuss how A-band and B-band O antigens are synthesized and assembled by dedicated enzymes. Examples of unique proteins required for both A-band and B-band O-antigen synthesis and for the synthesis of both LPS and alginate are discussed. The recent identification of additional genes within the P. aeruginosa genome that are homologous to those in the A-band and B-band gene clusters are intriguing since some are able to influence O-antigen synthesis. These studies demonstrate that P. aeruginosa represents a unique model system, allowing studies of heteropolymeric and homopolymeric O-antigen synthesis, as well as permitting an examination of the interrelationship of the synthesis of LPS molecules and other virulence determinants. PMID:10477307

  15. Siderophore as a potential plant growth-promoting agent produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, M B; Jayachandra, S Y; Kumar, S Anil; Parameshwar, A B; Reddy, K Mohan; Dayanand, A

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores scavenges Fe(+3) from the vicinity of the roots of plants, and thus limit the amount of iron required for the growth of pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium ultimum, and Fusarium udum, which cause wilt and root rot disease in crops. The ability of Pseudomonas to grow and to produce siderophore depends upon the iron content, pH, and temperature. Maximum yield of siderophore of 130 μM was observed at pH 7.0 ± 0.2 and temperature of 30 °C at 30 h. The threshold level of iron was 50 μM, which increases up to 150 μM, favoring growth but drastically affecting the production of siderophore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25. The seeds of agricultural crops like Cicer arietinum (chick pea), Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea), and Arachis hypogaea (ground nut) were treated with P. aeruginosa JAS-25, which enhanced the seed germination, root length, shoot length, and dry weight of chick pea, pigeon pea, and ground nut plants under pot studies. The efficient growth of the plants was not only due to the biocontrol activity of the siderophore produced by P. aeruginosa JAS-25 but also may be by the production of indole acetic acid (IAA), which influences the growth of the plants as phytohormones. PMID:25062779

  16. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  17. Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Interaction, with Focus on the Role of Eicosanoids

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Ruan; Ells, Ruan; Swart, Chantel W.; Sebolai, Olihile M.; Albertyn, Jacobus; Pohl, Carolina H.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is commonly found in mixed infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, especially in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Both of these opportunistic pathogens are able to form resistant biofilms and frequently infect immunocompromised individuals. The interaction between these two pathogens, which includes physical interaction as well as secreted factors, is mainly antagonistic. In addition, research suggests considerable interaction with their host, especially with immunomodulatory lipid mediators, termed eicosanoids. Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are both able to utilize arachidonic acid (AA), liberated from the host cells during infection, to form eicosanoids. The production of these eicosanoids, such as Prostaglandin E2, by the host and the pathogens may affect the dynamics of polymicrobial infection and the outcome of infections. It is of considerable importance to elucidate the role of host-produced, as well as pathogen-produced eicosanoids in polymicrobial infection. This review will focus on in vitro as well as in vivo interaction between C. albicans and P. aeruginosa, paying special attention to the role of eicosanoids in the cross-talk between host and the pathogens. PMID:26955357

  18. Siderophore as a potential plant growth-promoting agent produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, M B; Jayachandra, S Y; Kumar, S Anil; Parameshwar, A B; Reddy, K Mohan; Dayanand, A

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores scavenges Fe(+3) from the vicinity of the roots of plants, and thus limit the amount of iron required for the growth of pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium ultimum, and Fusarium udum, which cause wilt and root rot disease in crops. The ability of Pseudomonas to grow and to produce siderophore depends upon the iron content, pH, and temperature. Maximum yield of siderophore of 130 μM was observed at pH 7.0 ± 0.2 and temperature of 30 °C at 30 h. The threshold level of iron was 50 μM, which increases up to 150 μM, favoring growth but drastically affecting the production of siderophore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25. The seeds of agricultural crops like Cicer arietinum (chick pea), Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea), and Arachis hypogaea (ground nut) were treated with P. aeruginosa JAS-25, which enhanced the seed germination, root length, shoot length, and dry weight of chick pea, pigeon pea, and ground nut plants under pot studies. The efficient growth of the plants was not only due to the biocontrol activity of the siderophore produced by P. aeruginosa JAS-25 but also may be by the production of indole acetic acid (IAA), which influences the growth of the plants as phytohormones.

  19. Peptide utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: evidence for membrane-associated peptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R V; Becker, J M

    1978-01-01

    A methionine auxotroph of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grew on methionine-containing peptides as a source of the required amino acid. Amino-terminus-blocked peptides would not serve as growth substrates, despite the fact that peptidases active on these blocked peptides were readily detectable in cell extracts. No evidence was found for extracellular enzymes capable of degrading the oligopeptides investigated. The degradative enzymes were not found in the periplasmic space of the cellular envelope. A high proportion of cellular peptidase activity was associated with the particulate (membrane) fraction of the cell lysate. PMID:412832

  20. Continued transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a wash hand basin tap in a critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Garvey, M I; Bradley, C W; Tracey, J; Oppenheim, B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, colonizing hospital water supplies including taps and sinks. We report a cluster of P. aeruginosa acquisitions during a period of five months from tap water to patients occupying the same burns single room in a critical care unit. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from clinical isolates from four different patients was indistinguishable from water strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Water outlets in critical care may be a source of P. aeruginosa despite following the national guidance, and updated guidance and improved control measures are needed to reduce the risks of transmission to patients.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa KUCD1, a possible candidate for cadmium bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sangram; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2009-01-01

    A cadmium (8 mM) resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain KUCd1 exhibiting high Cd accumulation under in vitro aerobic condition has been reported. The isolate showed a significant ability to remove more than 75% and 89% of the soluble cadmium during the active growth phase from the growth medium and from Cd-amended industrial wastewater under growth supportive condition. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) suggest the presence of Cd in the cells from mid stationary phase. The cell fractionation study revealed membrane and periplasm to be the major accumulating site in this strain. The chemical nature of the accumulated Cd was studied by X-ray powder diffraction analysis. PMID:24031411

  2. Decrease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by food waste materials.

    PubMed

    Maderova, Zdenka; Horska, Katerina; Kim, Sang-Ryoung; Lee, Chung-Hak; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarikova, Mirka; Safarik, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilm on various surfaces has significant negative economic effects. The aim of this study was to find a simple procedure to decrease the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation in a water environment by using different food waste biological materials as signal molecule adsorbents. The selected biomaterials did not reduce the cell growth but affected biofilm formation. Promising biomaterials were magnetically modified in order to simplify manipulation and facilitate their magnetic separation. The best biocomposite, magnetically modified spent grain, exhibited substantial adsorption of signal molecules and decreased the biofilm formation. These results suggest that selected food waste materials and their magnetically responsive derivatives could be applied to solve biofilm problems in water environment. PMID:27148715

  3. Novel Multiscale Modeling Tool Applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Matthew B.; Papin, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool. PMID:24147108

  4. Decrease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by food waste materials.

    PubMed

    Maderova, Zdenka; Horska, Katerina; Kim, Sang-Ryoung; Lee, Chung-Hak; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarikova, Mirka; Safarik, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilm on various surfaces has significant negative economic effects. The aim of this study was to find a simple procedure to decrease the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation in a water environment by using different food waste biological materials as signal molecule adsorbents. The selected biomaterials did not reduce the cell growth but affected biofilm formation. Promising biomaterials were magnetically modified in order to simplify manipulation and facilitate their magnetic separation. The best biocomposite, magnetically modified spent grain, exhibited substantial adsorption of signal molecules and decreased the biofilm formation. These results suggest that selected food waste materials and their magnetically responsive derivatives could be applied to solve biofilm problems in water environment.

  5. Virulence attributes in Brazilian clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lívia V; Galdino, Anna Clara M; Nunes, Ana Paula F; dos Santos, Kátia R N; Moreira, Beatriz M; Cacci, Luciana C; Sodré, Cátia L; Ziccardi, Mariangela; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen responsible for causing a huge variety of acute and chronic infections with significant levels of morbidity and mortality. Its success as a pathogen comes from its genetic/metabolic plasticity, intrinsic/acquired antimicrobial resistance, capacity to form biofilm and expression of numerous virulence factors. Herein, we have analyzed the genetic variability, antimicrobial susceptibility as well as the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and virulence attributes (elastase, pyocyanin and biofilm) in 96 strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from different anatomical sites of patients attended at Brazilian hospitals. Our results revealed a great genetic variability, in which 86 distinct RAPD types (89.6% of polymorphisms) were detected. Regarding the susceptibility profile, 48 strains (50%) were resistant to the antimicrobials, as follows: 22.92% to the three tested antibiotics, 12.5% to both imipenem and meropenem, 11.46% to ceftazidime only, 2.08% to imipenem only and 1.04% to both ceftazidime and meropenem. Out of the 34 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa resistant to both imipenem and meropenem, 25 (73.53%) were MBL producers by phenotypic method while 12 (35.29%) were PCR positive for the MBL gene SPM-1. All P. aeruginosa strains produced pyocyanin, elastase and biofilm, although in different levels. Some associations were demonstrated among the susceptibility and/or production of these virulence traits with the anatomical site of strain isolation. For instance, almost all strains isolated from urine (85.71%) were resistant to the three antibiotics, while the vast majority of strains isolated from rectum (95%) and mouth (66.67%) were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Urine isolates produced the highest pyocyanin concentration (20.15±5.65 μg/ml), while strains isolated from pleural secretion and mouth produced elevated elastase activity (1441.43±303.08 FAU) and biofilm formation (OD590 0.676±0

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase: a purified enzyme for the mild hydrolysis of steroid sulfates.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Bradley J; Waller, Christopher C; Ma, Paul; Li, Kunkun; Cawley, Adam T; Ollis, David L; McLeod, Malcolm D

    2015-10-01

    The hydrolysis of sulfate ester conjugates is frequently required prior to analysis for a range of analytical techniques including gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sulfate hydrolysis may be achieved with commercial crude arylsulfatase enzyme preparations such as that derived from Helix pomatia but these contain additional enzyme activities such as glucuronidase, oxidase, and reductase that make them unsuitable for many analytical applications. Strong acid can also be used to hydrolyze sulfate esters but this can lead to analyte degradation or increased matrix interference. In this work, the heterologously expressed and purified arylsulfatase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shown to promote the mild enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of a range of steroid sulfates. The substrate scope of this P. aeruginosa arylsulfatase hydrolysis is compared with commercial crude enzyme preparations such as that derived from H. pomatia. A detailed kinetic comparison is reported for selected examples. Hydrolysis in a urine matrix is demonstrated for dehydroepiandrosterone 3-sulfate and epiandrosterone 3-sulfate. The purified P. aeruginosa arylsulfatase contains only sulfatase activity allowing for the selective hydrolysis of sulfate esters in the presence of glucuronide conjugates as demonstrated in the short three-step chemoenzymatic synthesis of 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol 17-glucuronide (ADG, 1) from epiandrosterone 3-sulfate. The P. aeruginosa arylsulfatase is readily expressed and purified (0.9 g per L of culture) and thus provides a new and selective method for the hydrolysis of steroid sulfate esters in analytical sample preparation.

  7. Effect of biosurfactants on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a BioFlux channel.

    PubMed

    Diaz De Rienzo, M A; Stevenson, P S; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that biosurfactants play a role both in maintaining channels between multicellular structures in biofilms and in dispersal of cells from biofilms. A combination of caprylic acid (0.01 % v/v) together with rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) was applied to biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144 and a mixed culture under BioFlux flowthrough conditions and caused disruption of the biofilms. The biofilms were also treated with a combination of rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) and sophorolipids (0.01 %). Control treatments with PBS 1× had no apparent effect on biofilm disruption. The Gram-positive bacterium (S. aureus ATCC 9144) was more sensitive than P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in terms of disruption and viability as shown by Live/Dead staining. Disruption of biofilms of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 was minimal. Oxygen consumption by biofilms, after different treatments with biosurfactants, confirms that sophorolipid on its own is unable to kill/inhibit cells of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442, and even when used in combination with rhamnolipids, under static conditions, no decrease in the cell viability was observed. Cells in biofilms exposed to mono-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) showed behaviour typical of exposure to bacteriostatic compounds, but when exposed to di-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v), they displayed a pattern characteristic of bactericidal compounds. PMID:26825819

  8. Intranasal Immunization Strategy To Impede Pilin-Mediated Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer C.; Tham, Doris M.; Feng, Weijun; Huang, Fan; Embaie, Selamawit; Liu, Keyi; Dean, Deborah; Hertle, Ralf; FitzGerald, David J.; Mrsny, Randall J.

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections represents a critical unmet medical need for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have examined the tenet that a mucosal immunization approach can reduce interactions of a piliated form of this opportunistic pathogen with respiratory epithelial cells. Vaccinations were performed using ntPEpilinPAK, a protein chimera composed of a nontoxic form of P. aeruginosa exotoxin A (ntPE), where the C-terminal loop amino acid sequence of the PAK strain pilin protein was inserted in place of the ntPE Ib domain. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization of BALB/c mice with ntPEpilinPAK generated both serum and saliva immune responses. A series of in vitro studies showed that diluted samples of saliva obtained from immunized mice reduced pilin-dependent P. aeruginosa binding to polarized human tracheal epithelial cells, protected human pulmonary epithelial cells from cytotoxic actions associated with bacterial challenge, and reduced exotoxin A toxicity. Overall, i.n. administration of ntPEpilinPAK induced mucosal and systemic immune responses that may be beneficial for blocking early stage adhesion and/or infection events of epithelial cell-P. aeruginosa interactions at oropharyngeal surfaces. PMID:16239575

  9. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene for NADH-sensitive citrate synthase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Donald, L J; Molgat, G F; Duckworth, H W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the allosteric citrate synthase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been cloned from a genomic library by using the Escherichia coli citrate synthase gene as a hybridization probe under conditions of reduced stringency. Subcloning of portions of the original 10-kilobase-pair (kbp) clone led to isolation of the structural gene, with its promoter, within a 2,083-bp length of DNA flanked by sites for KpnI and BamHI. The nucleotide sequence of this fragment is presented; the inferred amino acid sequence was 70 and 76% identical, respectively, with the citrate synthase sequences from E. coli and Acinetobacter anitratum, two other gram-negative bacteria. DEAE-cellulose chromatography of P. aeruginosa citrate synthase from an E. coli host harboring the cloned P. aeruginosa gene gave three peaks of activity. All three enzyme peaks had subunit molecular weights of 48,000; the proteins were identical by immunological criteria and very similar in kinetics of substrate saturation and NADH inhibition. Because the cloned gene contained only one open reading frame large enough to encode a polypeptide of such a size, the three peaks must represent different forms of the same protein. A portion of the cloned P. aeruginosa gene was used as a hybridization probe under stringent conditions to identify highly homologous sequences in genomic DNA of a second strain classified as P. aeruginosa and isolates of P. putida, P. stutzeri, and P. alcaligenes. When crude extracts of each of these four isolates were mixed with antiserum raised against purified P. aeruginosa citrate synthase, however, only the P. alcaligenes extract cross-reacted. Images PMID:2507528

  10. Labeling of pseudomonas aeruginosa with In-111-oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, K.M.; Gerding, D.N.; O'Connor, M.J.; Forstrom, L.A.; Shafer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Labeling of live bacteria with gamma emitting radioisotope provides a useful tool for the experimental in vivo tracking of bacteria in various body organs of animals. The authors labeled a serum resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC number27853) with In-111-oxine. P. aeruginosa streaked heavily on ten blood agar plates, was grown overnight, and suspended in 50 ml of saline using sterile cotton swabs. The suspension was sonicated for 3 minutes at 40 watts with a small probe, 500 ..mu..Ci of commercially prepared In-111-oxine added and the bacteria incubated at 37/sup 0/C for 2.5 hours. The labeled bacteria were centrifuged and washed once with saline and resuspended to a final volume of 50 ml in saline. The labeled Pseudomonas, 10/sup 9/-10/sup 10/ cfu/ml, retained 120-190 ..mu..Ci of cell-bound In-111. In vitro studies showed good retention of the In-111 label in saline at 37/sup 0/C (75-85% cell-bound radioactivity at 1 hour) and in canine blood at 37/sup 0/C (30-55% cell-bound radioactivity at 1 hour). The loss of cell-associated radioactivity in blood, with a corresponding decrease in the number of viable organisms, is probably a result of phagocyte-mediated killing of the organisms and subsequent release of the label. The labeled bacteria have been used successfully for sequential imaging in experimental animals to track bacteria injected into blood and the biliary tree.

  11. The effect of pseudomonas exotoxin A on cytokine production in whole blood exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Schultz, M J; Speelman, P; Zaat, S A; Hack, C E; van Deventer, S J; van der Poll, T

    2000-11-01

    To determine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (P-ExA) on cytokine production, we studied cytokine release induced by heat-killed P. aeruginosa (HKPA) in human whole blood in the presence or absence of P-ExA. P-ExA (0.01-1 microgram ml(-1)) caused a dose-dependent decrease in HKPA-induced production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), interleukin (IL-) 10, IL-6 and IL-8 (all P<0.05). P-ExA-induced inhibition of IL-10, IL-6 and IL-8 release was not dependent on reduced TNF concentrations, since the relative attenuation of the production of these cytokines was similar in the presence or absence of a neutralizing anti-TNF antibody. The effect of P-ExA on cytokine production may offer a disadvantage to the host with respect to clearance of the infection.

  12. Type IV pili mechanochemically regulate virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Persat, Alexandre; Inclan, Yuki F; Engel, Joanne N; Stone, Howard A; Gitai, Zemer

    2015-06-16

    Bacteria have evolved a wide range of sensing systems to appropriately respond to environmental signals. Here we demonstrate that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa detects contact with surfaces on short timescales using the mechanical activity of its type IV pili, a major surface adhesin. This signal transduction mechanism requires attachment of type IV pili to a solid surface, followed by pilus retraction and signal transduction through the Chp chemosensory system, a chemotaxis-like sensory system that regulates cAMP production and transcription of hundreds of genes, including key virulence factors. Like other chemotaxis pathways, pili-mediated surface sensing results in a transient response amplified by a positive feedback that increases type IV pili activity, thereby promoting long-term surface attachment that can stimulate additional virulence and biofilm-inducing pathways. The methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein-like chemosensor PilJ directly interacts with the major pilin subunit PilA. Our results thus support a mechanochemical model where a chemosensory system measures the mechanically induced conformational changes in stretched type IV pili. These findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa not only uses type IV pili for surface-specific twitching motility, but also as a sensor regulating surface-induced gene expression and pathogenicity.

  13. Reactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin with reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Shimmon, Ronald; Dawson, Michael; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of chronic and recurrent lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) whose sputa contain copious quantities of P. aeruginosa toxin, pyocyanin. Pyocyanin triggers tissue damage mainly by its redox cycling and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reactions between reduced glutathione (GSH) and pyocyanin were observed using absorption spectra from spectrophotometry and the reaction products analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Pyocyanin reacted with GSH non-enzymatically at 37 degrees C resulting in the production of red-brown products, spectophotometrically visible as a 480 nm maximum absorption peak after 24 h of incubation. The reaction was concentration-dependent on reduced glutathione but not on pyocyanin. Minimizing the accessibility of oxygen to the reaction decreased its rate. The anti-oxidant enzyme catalase circumvented the reaction. Proton-NMR analysis demonstrated the persistence of the original aromatic ring and the methyl-group of pyocyanin in the red-brown products. Anti-oxidant agents having thiol groups produced similar spectophotometrically visible peaks. The presence of a previously unidentified non-enzymatic GSH-dependent metabolic pathway for pyocyanin has thus been identified. The reaction between pyocyanin and GSH is concentration-, time-, and O(2)-dependent. The formation of H(2)O(2) as an intermediate and the thiol group in GSH seem to be important in this reaction. PMID:18797520

  14. [New Virulent Bacteriophages Active against Multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains].

    PubMed

    Balarjishvili, N Sh; Kvachadze, L I; Kutateladze, M I; Meskhi, T Sh; Pataridze, T K; Berishvili, T A; Tevdoradze, E Sh

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of 512 newly isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains to six classes of anti-microbial preparations has been studied. Antibiotic-resistant strains were selected and genotyped. Three new virulent bacteriophages of the families Myoviridae and Podoviridae were isolated against these strains. The parameters of the intracellular phage development cycle were established, and the influence of inactivating factors (temperature, pH, and UV exposure) on phage viability was studied. The molecular weight of the phage genome was determined. Phage DNA restriction analysis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of envelope protein SDS were carried out. The plating efficacy of phages on 28 genetically distant antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa strains was studied. It was established that 26 of them were lysed by phages with a high efficacy. The range of antibacterial action of the studied phages and their mixtures on 427 multi-drug-resistant clinical isolates was assessed. It is shown that including these phages in one multicomponent preparation enhanced their lytic activity. PMID:26859962

  15. Glycosylation Substrate Specificity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 Pilin*S

    PubMed Central

    Horzempa, Joseph; Comer, Jason E.; Davis, Sheila A.; Castric, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The β-carbon of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 pilin C-terminal Ser is a site of glycosylation. The present study was conducted to determine the pilin structures necessary for glycosylation. It was found that although Thr could be tolerated at the pilin C terminus, the blocking of the Ser carboxyl group with the addition of an Ala prevented glycosylation. Pilin from strain PA103 was not glycosylated by P. aeruginosa 1244, even when the C-terminal residue was converted to Ser. Substituting the disulfide loop region of strain PA103 pilin with that of strain 1244 allowed glycosylation to take place. Neither conversion of 1244 pilin disulfide loop Cys residues to Ala nor the deletion of segments of this structure prevented glycosylation. It was noted that the PA103 pilin disulfide loop environment was electronegative, whereas that of strain 1244 pilin had an overall positive charge. Insertion of a positive charge into the PA103 pilin disulfide loop of a mutant containing Ser at the C terminus allowed glycosylation to take place. Extending the “tail” region of the PA103 mutant pilin containing Ser at its terminus resulted in robust glycosylation. These results suggest that the terminal Ser is the major pilin glycosylation recognition feature and that this residue cannot be substituted at its carboxyl group. Although no other specific recognition features are present, the pilin surface must be compatible with the reaction apparatus for glycosylation to occur. PMID:16286455

  16. A molecular mechanism that stabilizes cooperative secretions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook

    2010-01-01

    Summary Bacterial populations frequently act as a collective by secreting a wide range of compounds necessary for cell-cell communication, host colonization and virulence. However, how such behaviors avoid exploitation by spontaneous ‘cheater’ mutants that use but do not contribute to secretions remains unclear. We investigate this question using Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming, a collective surface motility requiring massive secretions of rhamnolipid biosurfactants. We first show that swarming is immune to the evolution of rhlA− ‘cheaters’. We then demonstrate that P. aeruginosa resists cheating through metabolic prudence: wild-type cells secrete biosurfactants only when the cost of their production and impact on individual fitness is low, therefore preventing non-secreting strains from gaining an evolutionary advantage. Metabolic prudence works because the carbon-rich biosurfactants are only produced when growth is limited by another growth limiting nutrient, the nitrogen source. By genetically manipulating a strain to produce the biosurfactants constitutively we show that swarming becomes cheatable: a non-producing strain rapidly outcompetes and replaces this obligate cooperator. We argue that metabolic prudence, which may first evolve as a direct response to cheating or simply to optimize growth, can explain the maintenance of massive secretions in many bacteria. More generally, prudent regulation is a mechanism to stabilize cooperation. PMID:21166901

  17. Fructooligosacharides reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pathogenicity through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ortega-González, Mercedes; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; López-Posadas, Rocío; Pacheco, Daniel; Krell, Tino; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Abdelali, Daddaoua

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages) FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed.

  18. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, Hong; Andersen, Jens Bo; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Bagge, Niels; Kumar, Naresh; Schembri, Mark A.; Song, Zhijun; Kristoffersen, Peter; Manefield, Mike; Costerton, John W.; Molin, Søren; Eberl, Leo; Steinberg, Peter; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate of natural furanone compounds can act as a potent antagonist of bacterial quorum sensing. We employed GeneChip® microarray technology to identify furanone target genes and to map the quorum sensing regulon. The transcriptome analysis showed that the furanone drug specifically targeted quorum sensing systems and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune response. PMID:12881415

  19. Phage selection restores antibiotic sensitivity in MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chan, Benjamin K; Sistrom, Mark; Wertz, John E; Kortright, Kaitlyn E; Narayan, Deepak; Turner, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Increasing prevalence and severity of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections has necessitated novel antibacterial strategies. Ideally, new approaches would target bacterial pathogens while exerting selection for reduced pathogenesis when these bacteria inevitably evolve resistance to therapeutic intervention. As an example of such a management strategy, we isolated a lytic bacteriophage, OMKO1, (family Myoviridae) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that utilizes the outer membrane porin M (OprM) of the multidrug efflux systems MexAB and MexXY as a receptor-binding site. Results show that phage selection produces an evolutionary trade-off in MDR P. aeruginosa, whereby the evolution of bacterial resistance to phage attack changes the efflux pump mechanism, causing increased sensitivity to drugs from several antibiotic classes. Although modern phage therapy is still in its infancy, we conclude that phages, such as OMKO1, represent a new approach to phage therapy where bacteriophages exert selection for MDR bacteria to become increasingly sensitive to traditional antibiotics. This approach, using phages as targeted antibacterials, could extend the lifetime of our current antibiotics and potentially reduce the incidence of antibiotic resistant infections. PMID:27225966

  20. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by dense phase carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sungmin; Jeong, Jin-Seong; Kim, Jaeeun; Lee, Youn-Woo; Yoon, Jeyong

    2009-01-01

    Dense phase carbon dioxide (DPCD) is one of the most promising techniques available to control microorganisms as a non-thermal disinfection method. However, no study on the efficiency of biofilm disinfection using DPCD has been reported. The efficiency of DPCD in inactivating Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm, which is known to have high antimicrobial resistance, was thus investigated. P. aeruginosa biofilm, which was not immersed in water but was completely wet, was found to be more effectively inactivated by DPCD treatment, achieving a 6-log reduction within 7 min. The inactivation efficiency increased modestly with increasing pressure and temperature. This study also reports that the water-unimmersed condition is one of the most important operating parameters in achieving efficient biofilm control by DPCD treatment. In addition, observations by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that DPCD treatment not only inactivated biofilm cells on the glass coupons but also caused detachment of the biofilm following weakening of its structure as a result of the DPCD treatment; this is an added benefit of DPCD treatment.

  1. Mechanical destruction of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by ultrasound exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Halverson, Larry J.; Middendorf, Jill; Rusk, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Medical implants are prone to colonization by bacterial biofilms, which are highly resistant to antibiotics. Normally, surgery is required to replace the infected implant. One promising non-invasive treatment option is to destroy the biofilm with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. In our study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms were grown on graphite disks in a flow chamber for three days prior to exposing them to ultrasound pulses of varying duration or burst period. The pulses were 20 cycles in duration at a frequency of 1.1 MHz from a spherically focused transducer (f/1, 63 mm focal length), creating peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the disk surface of 30 and 13 MPa, respectively. P. aeruginosa were tagged with GFP and cells killed by HIFU were visualized using propidium iodide, which permeates membranes of dead cells, to aid determining the extent of biofilm destruction and whether cells are alive or dead. Our results indicate that a 30-s exposure and 6-ms pulse period or those combinations with the same number of pulses, were sufficient to destroy the biofilm and to kill the remaining cells. Reducing the number of pulses decreased biofilm destruction, leaving more dead and live bacteria on the surface.

  2. Phage selection restores antibiotic sensitivity in MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Benjamin K.; Sistrom, Mark; Wertz, John E.; Kortright, Kaitlyn E.; Narayan, Deepak; Turner, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing prevalence and severity of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections has necessitated novel antibacterial strategies. Ideally, new approaches would target bacterial pathogens while exerting selection for reduced pathogenesis when these bacteria inevitably evolve resistance to therapeutic intervention. As an example of such a management strategy, we isolated a lytic bacteriophage, OMKO1, (family Myoviridae) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that utilizes the outer membrane porin M (OprM) of the multidrug efflux systems MexAB and MexXY as a receptor-binding site. Results show that phage selection produces an evolutionary trade-off in MDR P. aeruginosa, whereby the evolution of bacterial resistance to phage attack changes the efflux pump mechanism, causing increased sensitivity to drugs from several antibiotic classes. Although modern phage therapy is still in its infancy, we conclude that phages, such as OMKO1, represent a new approach to phage therapy where bacteriophages exert selection for MDR bacteria to become increasingly sensitive to traditional antibiotics. This approach, using phages as targeted antibacterials, could extend the lifetime of our current antibiotics and potentially reduce the incidence of antibiotic resistant infections. PMID:27225966

  3. Magnetic fields suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance ciprofloxacin activity.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M H N; Nguyen, D; Mogarala, S; Osiñski, M; Smyth, H D C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the refractory nature of pathogenic microbial biofilms, innovative biofilm eradication strategies are constantly being sought. Thus, this study addresses a novel approach to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and magnetic fields were systematically evaluated in vitro for their relative anti-biofilm contributions. Twenty-four-hour biofilms exposed to aerosolized MNPs, Cipro, or a combination of both, were assessed in the presence or absence of magnetic fields (Static one-sided, Static switched, Oscillating, Static + oscillating) using changes in bacterial metabolism, biofilm biomass, and biofilm imaging. The biofilms exposed to magnetic fields alone exhibited significant metabolic and biomass reductions (p < 0.05). When biofilms were treated with a MNP/Cipro combination, the most significant metabolic and biomass reductions were observed when exposed to static switched magnetic fields (p < 0.05). The exposure of P. aeruginosa biofilms to a static switched magnetic field alone, or co-administration with MNP/Cipro/MNP + Cipro appears to be a promising approach to eradicate biofilms of this bacterium.

  4. Characterization of the Polymyxin B Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Lucía; Álvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Wiegand, Irith; Olivares, Jorge; Kocíncová, Dana; Lam, Joseph S.; Martínez, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is increasingly becoming a threat for human health. Indeed, some strains are resistant to almost all currently available antibiotics, leaving very limited choices for antimicrobial therapy. In many such cases, polymyxins are the only available option, although as their utilization increases so does the isolation of resistant strains. In this study, we screened a comprehensive PA14 mutant library to identify genes involved in changes of susceptibility to polymyxin B in P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly, our screening revealed that the polymyxin B resistome of this microorganism is fairly small. Thus, only one resistant mutant and 17 different susceptibility/intrinsic resistance determinants were identified. Among the susceptible mutants, a significant number carried transposon insertions in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-related genes. LPS analysis revealed that four of these mutants (galU, lptC, wapR, and ssg) had an altered banding profile in SDS-polyacrylamide gels and Western blots, with three of them exhibiting LPS core truncation and lack of O-antigen decoration. Further characterization of these four mutants showed that their increased susceptibility to polymyxin B was partly due to increased basal outer membrane permeability. Additionally, these mutants also lacked the aminoarabinose-substituted lipid A species observed in the wild type upon growth in low magnesium. Overall, our results emphasize the importance of LPS integrity and lipid A modification in resistance to polymyxins in P. aeruginosa, highlighting the relevance of characterizing the genes that affect biosynthesis of cell surface structures in this pathogen to follow the evolution of peptide resistance in the clinic. PMID:23070157

  5. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goli, Hamid Reza; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates. Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes. Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%), ciprofloxacin (65%), aztreonam (60%), ceftazidime (55%), gentamicin (55%), imipenem (49%), piperacillin/tazobactam (34%) and colistin (2%). In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68%) isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression. Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. PMID:27092226

  6. [Virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: mechanisms and modes of regulation].

    PubMed

    Ben Haj Khalifa, Anis; Moissenet, Didier; Vu Thien, Hoang; Khedher, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium responsible for severe nosocomial infections, life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons, and chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. The bacterium's virulence depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors. The virulence factors play an important pathological role in the colonization, the survival of the bacteria and the invasion of tissues. There are two types of virulence factors: (1) factors involved in the acute infection: these factors are either on the surface of P. aeruginosa, either secreted. The pili allow adherence to the epithelium. The exoenzyme S and other adhesins reinforce the adherence to epithelial cells. The exotoxin A is responsible of tissue necrosis. Phospholipase C is a thermolabile haemolysin. The pathogenic role of exoenzyme S is attributable to the disruption of normal cytoskeletal organization, the destruction of immunoglobulin G and A, leads to depolymerization of actin filaments and contributes to the resistance to macrophages. P. aeruginosa produces at least four proteases causing bleeding and tissue necrosis; (2) factors involved in the chronic infection: siderophores (pyoverdin and pyochelin), allow the bacteria to multiply in the absence of ferrous ions. The strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis have a pseudocapsule of alginate that protects the bacterium from phagocytosis, dehydration and antibiotics. Moreover, it improves adherence to epithelial cells forming a biofilm. Two different types of regulation systems control the expression of the majority of these virulence factors: the two-component transcriptional regulatory system and the quorum sensing system. These two mechanisms are necessary to the survival and the proliferation of this microorganism in the host. PMID:21896403

  7. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  8. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  9. Variations in properties of L-forms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bertolani, R; Elberg, S S; Ralston, D

    1975-01-01

    In a study of the pathogenic potentials of Pseudomonas L-forms, three unstable L-forms were derived by carbenicillin inductionfrom a mouse virulent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rosenthal 180. One L-form, induced on a sucrose-stabilized medium, grew more slowly and differed in a number of properties from two other L-forms induced on a medium supported with polyvinylpyrilidone. After adaptation to a common liquid medium, the three L-forms differed with respect to colonial shape on solid medium, growth rate, certain biochemical properties, antibiotic sensitivities and antigenic surface, and virulence for mice. The L-form may revert in vitro to a serotype different from that of the parent culture. The revertant may acquire new antibiotic resistances and sensitivities in the absence of previous exposure to the drugs and enhanced resistance to the L-inducing agent. The three L-forms showed a characteristically lower, but wide, range of virulence than did the parental form. Though death of mice was accompanied by reversion of the L-forms in vivo to the bacterial form, reversion in vivo was not necessary for virulence of L-forms. Modification of residual cell wall antigens accompanied the induction of each L-form as determined by type-specific antisera. Images PMID:803921

  10. Links between Anr and Quorum Sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Dolben, Emily F.; Smith, T. Jarrod; Bhuju, Sabin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transcription factor Anr controls the cellular response to low oxygen or anoxia. Anr activity is high in oxygen-limited environments, including biofilms and populations associated with chronic infections, and Anr is necessary for persistence in a model of pulmonary infection. In this study, we characterized the Anr regulon in biofilm-grown cells at 1% oxygen in the laboratory strain PAO1 and in a quorum sensing (QS)-deficient clinical isolate, J215. As expected, transcripts related to denitrification, arginine fermentation, high-affinity cytochrome oxidases, and CupA fimbriae were lower in the Δanr derivatives. In addition, we observed that transcripts associated with quorum sensing regulation, iron acquisition and storage, type VI secretion, and the catabolism of aromatic compounds were also differentially expressed in the Δanr strains. Prior reports have shown that quorum sensing-defective mutants have higher levels of denitrification, and we found that multiple Anr-regulated processes, including denitrification, were strongly inversely proportional to quorum sensing in both transcriptional and protein-based assays. We also found that in LasR-defective strains but not their LasR-intact counterparts, Anr regulated the production of the 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines, which play roles in quorum sensing and interspecies interactions. These data show that Anr was required for the expression of important metabolic pathways in low-oxygen biofilms, and they reveal an expanded and compensatory role for Anr in the regulation of virulence-related genes in quorum sensing mutants, such as those commonly isolated from infections. IMPORTANCE Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute ocular, soft tissue, and pulmonary infections, as well as chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa uses quorum sensing (QS) to regulate virulence, but mutations in the gene encoding the master regulator of QS, lasR, are frequently

  11. The effects of D-Tyrosine combined with amikacin on the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    She, Pengfei; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Hongbo; Zou, Yaru; Luo, Zhen; Koronfel, Asmaa; Wu, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The biofilm formation of microorganisms causes persistent tissue infections resistant to treatment with antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly isolated from the airways of patients with chronic fibrosis (CF) and often forms biofilms, which are extremely hard to eradicate and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Recent studies have shown that D-amino acids (D-AAs) inhibited and disrupted biofilm formation by causing the release of the protein component of the polymeric matrix. However, the effects of D-AAs combined with common antibiotics on biofilms have rarely been studied. The current study first determined whether D-AAs disrupted the biofilms of PAO1 and the clinical airway isolates of P. aeruginosa. It was then determined whether combinations of D-Tyr (the most effective one) and the antibiotic amikacin (AMK) enhanced the activity against these biofilms. The results of the current study showed that D-Tyr is the most effective among those that disassemble the D-amino acids (D-leucine, D-methionine, D-Tyrptophan, and D-tryptophan), and D-Tyr at concentrations higher than 5 mM significantly reduced the biofilm biomass of P. aeruginosa (p < 0.05) without influencing bacterial growth. It was also revealed that D-Tyr improved the efficacy of AMK to combat P. aeruginosa biofilms, as indicated by a reduction in the minimal biofilm-inhibiting concentration (MBIC50 and MBIC90) without a change in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of planktonic bacteria. Thus, the findings indicated that D-Tyr supplementation overcame the resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to AMK, which might be helpful for preventing AMK overuse when this specific D-Tyr is recommended for combatting these biofilms. Also, toxicity of the liver and kidney from AMK could be potentially mitigated by co-delivery with D-Tyr. PMID:26188263

  12. The effects of D-Tyrosine combined with amikacin on the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    She, Pengfei; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Hongbo; Zou, Yaru; Luo, Zhen; Koronfel, Asmaa; Wu, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The biofilm formation of microorganisms causes persistent tissue infections resistant to treatment with antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly isolated from the airways of patients with chronic fibrosis (CF) and often forms biofilms, which are extremely hard to eradicate and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Recent studies have shown that D-amino acids (D-AAs) inhibited and disrupted biofilm formation by causing the release of the protein component of the polymeric matrix. However, the effects of D-AAs combined with common antibiotics on biofilms have rarely been studied. The current study first determined whether D-AAs disrupted the biofilms of PAO1 and the clinical airway isolates of P. aeruginosa. It was then determined whether combinations of D-Tyr (the most effective one) and the antibiotic amikacin (AMK) enhanced the activity against these biofilms. The results of the current study showed that D-Tyr is the most effective among those that disassemble the D-amino acids (D-leucine, D-methionine, D-Tyrptophan, and D-tryptophan), and D-Tyr at concentrations higher than 5 mM significantly reduced the biofilm biomass of P. aeruginosa (p < 0.05) without influencing bacterial growth. It was also revealed that D-Tyr improved the efficacy of AMK to combat P. aeruginosa biofilms, as indicated by a reduction in the minimal biofilm-inhibiting concentration (MBIC50 and MBIC90) without a change in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of planktonic bacteria. Thus, the findings indicated that D-Tyr supplementation overcame the resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to AMK, which might be helpful for preventing AMK overuse when this specific D-Tyr is recommended for combatting these biofilms. Also, toxicity of the liver and kidney from AMK could be potentially mitigated by co-delivery with D-Tyr.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa for the evaluation of swimming pool chlorination and algicides.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, G P; DerVartanian, M E

    1969-03-01

    Concentrations of ammonia and the chlorine stabilizer, cyanuric acid, which could be expected in swimming pools decreased the rate of kill by chlorine of the potential pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of cyanuric acid increased as the concentration of chlorine decreased, a fact of significance from a public health view. Quaternary ammonium algcides had little effect on the kill rate of chlorine, but an organic mercury algicide had a synergistic effect with chlorine when the chlorine activity was stressed by the addition of ammonia or the use of 100 times the normal concentration of bacteria. The effect of natural waters, rain, beaches, and swimming pools on the kill rate by 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter indicated that a treatment time of 1 hr or more was required to kill 99.9% of 10(6)Pseudomonas cells per ml. The synergism of chlorine and the organic mercury algicide was also demonstrated with these waters and with sewage treatment plant effluents. The necessity of developing and using laboratory tests which simulate conditions in swimming pools with heavy loads of swimmers, as opposed to tests in chlorine demand-free conditions, is discussed. Samples taken from well-supervised swimming pools when the swimmer load had been especially high required treatment times of 1 to 3 hr to obtain 99.9% kills of the potential pathogen, P. aeruginosa, with 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter.

  14. [Surviving Forms in Antibiotic-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Mulyukin, A L; Kozlova, A N; Sorokin, V V; Suzina, N E; Cherdyntseva, T A; Kotova, I B; Gaponov, A M; Tutel'yan, A V; El'-Registan, G I

    2015-01-01

    Survival of bacterial populations treated with lethal doses of antibiotics is ensured by the presence of very small numbers of persister cells. Unlike antibiotic-resistant cells, antibiotic tolerance of persisters is not inheritable and reversible. The present work provides evidence supporting the hypothesis of transformation (maturation) of persisters of an opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed by ciprofloxacin (CF) treatment (25-100 μg/mL) into dormant cystlike cells (CLC) and non-culturable cells (NC), as was described previously for a number. of non-spore-forming bacteria. Subpopulations of type 1 and type 2 persisters, which survived antibiotic treatment and developed into dormant forms, were heterogeneous in their capacity to form colonies or microcolonies upon germination, in resistance to heating at 70 degrees C, and in cell morphology Type 1 persisters, which were formed after 1-month incubation in the stationary-phase cultures in the medium with decreased C and N concentrations, developed in several types of surviving cells, including those similar to CLC in cell morphology. In the course of 1-month incubation of type 2 persisters, which were formed in exponentially growing cultures, other types of surviving cells developed: immature CLC and L-forms. Unlike P. aeruginosa CLC formed in the control post-stationary phase cultures without antibiotic treatment, most of 1-month persisters, especially type 2 ones, were characterized by the loss of colony-forming capacity, probably due to transition into an uncultured state with relatively high numbers of live intact cells (Live/Dead test). Another survival strategy of P. aeruginosa populations was ensured by a minor subpopulation of CF-tolerant and CF-resistant cells able to grow in the form of microcolonies or regular colonies of decreased size in the presence of the antibiotic. The described P. aeruginosa dormant forms may be responsible for persistent forms in bacteria carriers and latent

  15. [Surviving Forms in Antibiotic-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Mulyukin, A L; Kozlova, A N; Sorokin, V V; Suzina, N E; Cherdyntseva, T A; Kotova, I B; Gaponov, A M; Tutel'yan, A V; El'-Registan, G I

    2015-01-01

    Survival of bacterial populations treated with lethal doses of antibiotics is ensured by the presence of very small numbers of persister cells. Unlike antibiotic-resistant cells, antibiotic tolerance of persisters is not inheritable and reversible. The present work provides evidence supporting the hypothesis of transformation (maturation) of persisters of an opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed by ciprofloxacin (CF) treatment (25-100 μg/mL) into dormant cystlike cells (CLC) and non-culturable cells (NC), as was described previously for a number. of non-spore-forming bacteria. Subpopulations of type 1 and type 2 persisters, which survived antibiotic treatment and developed into dormant forms, were heterogeneous in their capacity to form colonies or microcolonies upon germination, in resistance to heating at 70 degrees C, and in cell morphology Type 1 persisters, which were formed after 1-month incubation in the stationary-phase cultures in the medium with decreased C and N concentrations, developed in several types of surviving cells, including those similar to CLC in cell morphology. In the course of 1-month incubation of type 2 persisters, which were formed in exponentially growing cultures, other types of surviving cells developed: immature CLC and L-forms. Unlike P. aeruginosa CLC formed in the control post-stationary phase cultures without antibiotic treatment, most of 1-month persisters, especially type 2 ones, were characterized by the loss of colony-forming capacity, probably due to transition into an uncultured state with relatively high numbers of live intact cells (Live/Dead test). Another survival strategy of P. aeruginosa populations was ensured by a minor subpopulation of CF-tolerant and CF-resistant cells able to grow in the form of microcolonies or regular colonies of decreased size in the presence of the antibiotic. The described P. aeruginosa dormant forms may be responsible for persistent forms in bacteria carriers and latent

  16. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy to inhibit pseudomonas aeruginosa of corneal isolates (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkee, Heather A.; Relhan, Nidhi; Arboleda, Alejandro; Halili, Francisco; De Freitas, Carolina; Alawa, Karam; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Amescua, Guillermo; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Keratitis associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult to manage. Treatment includes antibiotic eye drops, however, some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant. Current research efforts are focused on finding alternative and adjunct therapies to treat multi-drug resistant bacteria. One promising alternate technique is photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of riboflavin- and rose bengal-mediated PDT on Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis isolates in vitro. Two isolates (S+U- and S-U+) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were derived from keratitis patients and exposed to five experimental groups: (1) Control (dark, UV-A irradiation, 525nm irradiation); (2) 0.1% riboflavin (dark, UV-A irradiation); and (3) 0.1% rose bengal, (4) 0.05% rose bengal and (5) 0.01% rose bengal (dark, 525nm irradiation). Three days after treatment, in dark conditions of all concentration of riboflavin and rose bengal showed no inhibition in both S+U- and S-U+ strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In 0.1% and 0.05% rose bengal irradiated groups, for both S+U- and S-U+ strains, there was complete inhibition of bacterial growth in the central 50mm zone corresponding to the diameter of the green light source. These in vitro results suggest that rose bengal photodynamic therapy may be an effective adjunct treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

  17. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain LCT-PA41, with Changed Metabolism after Space Flight.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hu, Juan; Fang, Xiangqun; Zhang, Duchao; Chang, De; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Guo, Yinhua; Dai, Wenkui; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-09

    To explore the effects of space flight on microorganisms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was sent into orbit for 398 h on the spacecraft ShenZhou VIII. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the P. aeruginosa strain LCT-PA41, determined after space flight.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  19. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pathogenicity Island PAPI-1 is transferred via a novel Type IV pilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients or in individuals with cystic fibrosis. The notable ability of P. aeruginosa to inhabit a broad range of environments including humans is in part due to its large and diverse genomic repertoi...

  20. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septic arthritis of knee after intra-articular ozone injection.

    PubMed

    Seyman, Derya; Ozen, Nevgun Sepin; Inan, Dilara; Ongut, Gozde; Ogunc, Dilara

    2012-07-01

    We describe a case of septic arthritis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an immunocompetent patient following intra-articular ozone injection into the knee. To the best of our knowledge, and after considering the current literature,we believe this case is unique as no other reports of septic arthritis caused by P. aeruginosa following intra-articular ozone injection has been made.

  2. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  3. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain LCT-PA41, with Changed Metabolism after Space Flight

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Hu, Juan; Fang, Xiangqun; Zhang, Duchao; Chang, De; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Guo, Yinhua; Dai, Wenkui

    2014-01-01

    To explore the effects of space flight on microorganisms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was sent into orbit for 398 h on the spacecraft ShenZhou VIII. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the P. aeruginosa strain LCT-PA41, determined after space flight. PMID:24407638

  4. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate-toxin A conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Cryz, S J; Fürer, E; Que, J U

    1991-01-01

    Alginate from Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3064 was depolymerized by controlled heating in dilute acid. The resulting depolymerized alginate (Mr less than 60,000) was covalently coupled to toxin A with adipic acid dihydrazide as a spacer molecule and carbodiimide as a linker. The resulting conjugate was composed of toxin A and depolymerized alginate at a ratio of 4:1 and possessed an Mr of 260,000. The conjugate was nontoxic and nonpyrogenic. While native alginate (Mr greater than 640,000) given in a range of doses was poorly immunogenic in mice and rabbits, the conjugate induced high levels of antibody which bound to native alginate. Rabbits, but not mice, also produced an antitoxin immunoglobulin antibody response. Alginate derived from three other strains of P. aeruginosa competed with the homologous 3064 alginate for binding to anticonjugate antibody. This indicates that the conjugate elicits an antibody response able to recognize heterologous alginates. The serum from rabbits immunized with the conjugate was effective at promoting the uptake and killing of mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. In contrast, immunization with native alginate did not engender an opsonic antibody response. Rabbit anticonjugate antibody also neutralized the cytotoxic potential of toxin A. PMID:1898901

  6. Role of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) in sensitising Pseudomonas aeruginosa to UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Meichtry, Martín; Pizarro, Ramón A; Costa, Cristina S

    2015-01-01

    One of the main stress factors that bacteria face in the environment is solar ultraviolet-A (UVA) radiation, which leads to lethal effects through oxidative damage. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of 2-heptyl-3-hydroxi-4-quinolone (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal or PQS) in the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to UVA radiation. PQS is an intercellular quorum sensing signal associated to membrane vesicles which, among other functions, regulates genes related to iron acquisition, forms stable complexes with iron and participates in oxidative phenomena. UVA exposure of the wild-type PAO1 strain and a pqsA mutant unable to produce PQS revealed a sensitising role for this signal. Research into the mechanism involved in this phenomenon revealed that catalase, an essential factor in the UVA defence, is not related to PQS-mediated UVA sensitivity. Absorption of UVA by PQS produced its own photo-degradation, oxidation of the probe 2',7'- dichlorodihydrofluorescein and generation of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion, suggesting that this signal could be acting as an endogenous photosensitiser. The results presented in this study could explain the high sensitivity to UVA of P. aeruginosa when compared to enteric bacteria. PMID:25535873

  7. In Vivo Evidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Nutrient Acquisition and Pathogenesis in the Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mike S.; Matthews, Wallace J.; Kang, Yun; Nguyen, David T.; Hoang, Tung T.

    2007-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is very-high-cell-density (HCD) replication in the lung, allowing this bacterium to induce virulence controlled by the quorum-sensing systems. However, the nutrient sources sustaining HCD replication in this chronic infection are largely unknown. Here, we performed microarray studies of P. aeruginosa directly isolated from the lungs of CF patients to demonstrate its metabolic capability and virulence in vivo. In vivo microarray data, confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, indicated that the P. aeruginosa population expressed several genes for virulence, drug resistance, and utilization of multiple nutrient sources (lung surfactant lipids and amino acids) contributing to HCD replication. The most abundant lung surfactant lipid molecule, phosphatidylcholine (PC), induces key genes of P. aeruginosa pertinent to PC degradation in vitro as well as in vivo within the lungs of CF patients. The results support recent research indicating that P. aeruginosa exists in the lungs of CF patients as a diverse population with full virulence potential. The data also indicate that there is deregulation of several pathways, suggesting that there is in vivo evolution by deregulation of a large portion of the transcriptome during chronic infection in CF patients. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo transcriptome analysis of P. aeruginosa in a natural infection in CF patients, and the results indicate several important aspects of P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, drug resistance, nutrient utilization, and general metabolism within the lungs of CF patients. PMID:17724070

  8. Tetrahydrodipicolinate N-Succinyltransferase and Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Structure Analysis and Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Robert; Oehlmann, Wulf; Sandalova, Tatyana; Braun, Yvonne; Huck, Carmen; Maringer, Marko; Singh, Mahavir; Schneider, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    The diaminopimelic acid pathway of lysine biosynthesis has been suggested to provide attractive targets for the development of novel antibacterial drugs. Here we report the characterization of two enzymes from this pathway in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, utilizing structural biology, biochemistry and genetics. We show that tetrahydrodipicolinate N-succinyltransferase (DapD) from P. aeruginosa is specific for the L-stereoisomer of the amino substrate L-2-aminopimelate, and its D-enantiomer acts as a weak inhibitor. The crystal structures of this enzyme with L-2-aminopimelate and D-2-aminopimelate, respectively, reveal that both compounds bind at the same site of the enzyme. Comparison of the binding interactions of these ligands in the enzyme active site suggests misalignment of the amino group of D-2-aminopimelate for nucleophilic attack on the succinate moiety of the co-substrate succinyl-CoA as the structural basis of specificity and inhibition. P. aeruginosa mutants where the dapA gene had been deleted were viable and able to grow in a mouse lung infection model, suggesting that DapA is not an optimal target for drug development against this organism. Structure-based sequence alignments, based on the DapA crystal structure determined to 1.6 Å resolution revealed the presence of two homologues, PA0223 and PA4188, in P. aeruginosa that could substitute for DapA in the P. aeruginosa PAO1ΔdapA mutant. In vitro experiments using recombinant PA0223 protein could however not detect any DapA activity. PMID:22359568

  9. Voltammetric profiling of redox-active metabolites expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for diagnostic purposes.

    PubMed

    Seviour, T; Doyle, L E; Lauw, S J L; Hinks, J; Rice, S A; Nesatyy, V J; Webster, R D; Kjelleberg, S; Marsili, E

    2015-03-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, chemical deconvolution of the pyocyanin voltammetric signal allows its expression to be observed simultaneously with the quorum sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Such analysis has revealed that PQS might protect pyocyanin from self-oxidation, but also exert a pro-oxidative effect on pyocyanin under oxidative conditions to produce additional redox metabolites. PMID:25650009

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L -2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is made from glutamate and two alanine residues via a thiotemplate-linked tripeptide precursor

    PubMed Central

    Rojas Murcia, Nelson; Lee, Xiaoyun; Waridel, Patrice; Maspoli, Alessandro; Imker, Heidi J.; Chai, Tiancong; Walsh, Christopher T.; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid which is toxic for prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Production of AMB requires a five-gene cluster encoding a putative LysE-type transporter (AmbA), two non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (AmbB and AmbE), and two iron(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (AmbC and AmbD). Bioinformatics analysis predicts one thiolation (T) domain for AmbB and two T domains (T1 and T2) for AmbE, suggesting that AMB is generated by a processing step from a precursor tripeptide assembled on a thiotemplate. Using a combination of ATP-PPi exchange assays, aminoacylation assays, and mass spectrometry-based analysis of enzyme-bound substrates and pathway intermediates, the AmbB substrate was identified to be L-alanine (L-Ala), while the T1 and T2 domains of AmbE were loaded with L-glutamate (L-Glu) and L-Ala, respectively. Loading of L-Ala at T2 of AmbE occurred only in the presence of AmbB, indicative of a trans loading mechanism. In vitro assays performed with AmbB and AmbE revealed the dipeptide L-Glu-L-Ala at T1 and the tripeptide L-Ala-L-Glu-L-Ala attached at T2. When AmbC and AmbD were included in the assay, these peptides were no longer detected. Instead, an L-Ala-AMB-L-Ala tripeptide was found at T2. These data are in agreement with a biosynthetic model in which L-Glu is converted into AMB by the action of AmbC, AmbD, and tailoring domains of AmbE. The importance of the flanking L-Ala residues in the precursor tripeptide is discussed. PMID:25814981

  11. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catabolite Repression Control Protein Crc Is Devoid of RNA Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Bläsi, Udo

    2013-01-01

    The Crc protein has been shown to mediate catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas, leading to a preferential assimilation of carbon sources. It has been suggested that Crc acts as a translational repressor of mRNAs, encoding functions involved in uptake and breakdown of different carbon sources. Moreover, the regulatory RNA CrcZ, the level of which is increased in the presence of less preferred carbon sources, was suggested to bind to and sequester Crc, resulting in a relief of catabolite repression. Here, we determined the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Crc, a member of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease family, at 1.8 Å. Although Crc displays high sequence similarity with its orthologs, there are amino acid alterations in the area corresponding to the active site in AP proteins. Unlike typical AP endonuclease family proteins, Crc has a reduced overall positive charge and the conserved positively charged amino-acid residues of the DNA-binding surface of AP proteins are partially substituted by negatively charged, polar and hydrophobic residues. Crc protein purified to homogeneity from P. aeruginosa did neither display DNase activity, nor did it bind to previously identified RNA substrates. Rather, the RNA chaperone Hfq was identified as a contaminant in His-tagged Crc preparations purified by one step Ni-affinity chromatography from Escherichia coli, and was shown to account for the RNA binding activity observed with the His-Crc preparations. Taken together, these data challenge a role of Crc as a direct translational repressor in carbon catabolite repression in P. aeruginosa. PMID:23717639

  12. Hydrocarbon assimilation and biosurfactant production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.K.; Fiechter, A.; Reiser, J. ); Kaeppeli, O. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors isolated transposon Tn5-GM-induced mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG201 that were unable to grow in minimal media containing hexadecane as a carbon source. Some of these mutants lacked extracellular rhamnolipids, as shown by measuring the surface and interfacial tensions of the cell culture supernatants. Furthermore, the concentrated culture media of the mutant strains were tested for the presence of rhamnolipids by thin-layer chromatography and for rhamnolipid activities, including hemolysis and growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis. Mutant 65E12 was unable to produce extracellular rhamnolipids under any of the inhibition of Bacillus subtilis. Mutant 65E12 was unable to produce extracellular rhamnolipids under any of the conditions tested, lacked the capacity to take up {sup 14}C-labeled hexadecane, and did not grow in media containing individual alkanes with chain lengths ranging from C{sub 12} to C{sub 19}. However, growth on these alkanes and uptake of ({sup 14}C)hexadecane were restored when small amounts of purified rhamnolipids were added to the cultures. Mutant 59C7 was unable to grow in media containing hexadecane, nor was it able to take up ({sup 14}C)hexadecane uptake. The addition of small amounts of rhamnolipids restored on alkanes and ({sup 14}C)hexadecane uptake. In glucose-containing media, however, mutant 59C7 produced rhamnolipids at levels about twice as high as those of the wild-type strain. These results show that rhamnolipids play a major role in hexadecane uptake and utilization by P.aeruginosa.

  13. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Lomholt, J A; Kilian, M

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To examine the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of 106 Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye isolates from the United Kingdom, Denmark, India, the United States, and Australia, and to determine the molecular mechanisms of resistance. Methods: Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was tested by an agar dilution method; genomic DNA corresponding to the quinolone target genes gyrA and parC, and the regulatory genes mexR and nfxB controlling drug efflux systems, was amplified by PCR and sequenced; multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was performed to examine the genetic relation among resistant strains. Results: Three out of 90 keratitis isolates (3.3%), one from the United Kingdom and two from India, exhibited MIC values of 16 mg/l or 32 mg/l. The UK isolate had a mutation in gyrA (Thr83Ile), whereas the two Indian isolates showed mutations in both gyrA (Thr83Ile) and parC (Ser87Leu). The remaining isolates from keratitis, endophthalmitis, contact lens associated red eye (CLARE), and contact lens storage cases showed MIC values below 1 mg/l. Several allelic forms of gyrA and a single variation in the mexR gene product were detected in 10 ciprofloxacin susceptible strains. Conclusions: The vast majority of eye isolates of P aeruginosa from European countries are fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin and the concentration of ciprofloxacin eye drops used for local treatment (3000 mg/l) exceeds MIC values for strains recorded as resistant. Mutations in more than one target gene were associated with higher MIC values. PMID:14507757

  14. Phosphorylcholine Phosphatase: A Peculiar Enzyme of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Carlos Eduardo; Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Beassoni, Paola Rita; Lisa, Angela Teresita

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa synthesizes phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) when grown on choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. In the presence of Mg2+ or Zn2+, PchP catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) or phosphorylcholine (Pcho). The regulation of pchP gene expression is under the control of GbdR and NtrC; dimethylglycine is likely the metabolite directly involved in the induction of PchP. Therefore, the regulation of choline metabolism and consequently PchP synthesis may reflect an adaptive response of P. aeruginosa to environmental conditions. Bioinformatic and biochemistry studies shown that PchP contains two sites for alkylammonium compounds (AACs): one in the catalytic site near the metal ion-phosphoester pocket, and another in an inhibitory site responsible for the binding of the alkylammonium moiety. Both sites could be close to each other and interact through the residues 42E, 43E and 82YYY84. Zn2+ is better activator than Mg2+ at pH 5.0 and it is more effective at alleviating the inhibition produced by the entry of Pcho or different AACs in the inhibitory site. We postulate that Zn2+ induces at pH 5.0 a conformational change in the active center that is communicated to the inhibitory site, producing a compact or closed structure. However, at pH 7.4, this effect is not observed because to the hydrolysis of the [Zn2+L2−1L20(H2O)2] complex, which causes a change from octahedral to tetrahedral in the metal coordination geometry. This enzyme is also present in P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. syringae, and other organisms. We have recently crystallized PchP and solved its structure. PMID:21915373

  15. Pyocyanin Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Confers Resistance to Ionic Silver

    PubMed Central

    Merrett, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Silver in its ionic form (Ag+), but not the bulk metal (Ag0), is toxic to microbial life forms and has been used for many years in the treatment of wound infections. The prevalence of bacterial resistance to silver is considered low due to the nonspecific nature of its toxicity. However, the recent increased use of silver as an antimicrobial agent for medical, consumer, and industrial products has raised concern that widespread silver resistance may emerge. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen that produces pyocyanin, a redox toxin and a reductant for molecular oxygen and ferric (Fe3+) ions. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyocyanin reduces Ag+ to Ag0, which may contribute to silver resistance due to lower bioavailability of the cation. Using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, pyocyanin was confirmed to be a reductant for Ag+, forming Ag0 nanoparticles and reducing the bioavailability of free Ag+ by >95% within minutes. Similarly, a pyocyanin-producing strain of P. aeruginosa (PA14) reduced Ag+ but not a pyocyanin-deficient (ΔphzM) strain of the bacterium. Challenge of each strain with Ag+ (as AgNO3) gave MICs of 20 and 5 μg/ml for the PA14 and ΔphzM strains, respectively. Removal of pyocyanin from the medium strain PA14 was grown in or its addition to the medium that ΔphzM mutant was grown in gave MICs of 5 and 20 μg/ml, respectively. Clinical isolates demonstrated similar pyocyanin-dependent resistance to Ag+. We conclude that pseudomonal silver resistance exists independently of previously recognized intracellular mechanisms and may be more prevalent than previously considered. PMID:25001302

  16. Fructooligosacharides Reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Pathogenicity through Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-González, Mercedes; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; López-Posadas, Rocío; Pacheco, Daniel; Krell, Tino; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Abdelali, Daddaoua

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages) FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed. PMID:24465697

  17. A re-examination of twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Semmler, A B; Whitchurch, C B; Mattick, J S

    1999-10-01

    Twitching motility is a form of solid surface translocation which occurs in a wide range of bacteria and which is dependent on the presence of functional type IV fimbriae or pili. A detailed examination of twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under optimal conditions in vitro was carried out. Under these conditions (at the smooth surface formed between semi-solid growth media and plastic or glass surfaces) twitching motility is extremely rapid, leading to an overall radial rate of colony expansion of 0.6 mm h(-1) or greater. The zones of colony expansion due to twitching motility are very thin and are best visualized by staining. These zones exhibit concentric rings in which there is a high density of microcolonies, which may reflect periods of expansion and consolidation/cell division. Video microscopic analysis showed that twitching motility involves the initial formation of large projections or rafts of aggregated cells which move away from the colony edge. Behind the rafts, individual cells move rapidly up and down trails which thin and branch out, ultimately forming a fine lattice-like network of cells. The bacteria in the lattice network then appear to settle and divide to fill out the colonized space. Our observations redefine twitching motility as a rapid, highly organized mechanism of bacterial translocation by which P. aeruginosa can disperse itself over large areas to colonize new territories. It is also now clear, both morphologically and genetically, that twitching motility and social gliding motility, such as occurs in Myxococcus xanthus, are essentially the same process.

  18. Combined treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms with bacteriophages and chlorine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a growing concern in a broad range of areas. In this study, a mixture of RNA bacteriophages isolated from municipal wastewater was used to control and remove biofilms. At the concentrations of 400 and 4 × 10(7) PFU/mL, the phages inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 45 ± 15% and 73 ± 8%, respectively. At the concentrations of 6,000 and 6 × 10(7) PFU/mL, the phages removed 45 ± 9% and 75 ± 5% of pre-existing P. aeruginosa biofilms, respectively. Chlorine reduced biofilm growth by 86 ± 3% at the concentration of 210 mg/L, but it did not remove pre-existing biofilms. However, a combination of phages (3 × 10(7) PFU/mL) and chlorine at this concentration reduced biofilm growth by 94 ± 2% and removed 88 ± 6% of existing biofilms. In a continuous flow system with continued biofilm growth, a combination of phages (a one-time treatment at the concentration of 1.9 × 10(8) PFU/mL for 1 h first) with chlorine removed 97 ± 1% of biofilms after Day 5 while phage and chlorine treatment alone removed 89 ± 1% and 40 ± 5%, respectively. For existing biofilms, a combined use of a lower phage concentration (3.8 × 10(5) PFU/mL) and chlorination with a shorter time duration (12 h) followed by continuous water flushing removed 96 ± 1% of biofilms in less than 2 days. Laser scanning confocal microscopy supplemented with electron microscopy indicated that the combination treatment resulted in biofilms with lowest cell density and viability. These results suggest that the combination treatment of phages and chlorine is a promising method to control and remove bacterial biofilms from various surfaces.

  19. Comparative Molecular docking analysis of DNA Gyrase subunit A in Pseudomonas aeruginosaPAO1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aman; Sharma, Vanashika; Tewari, Ashish Kumar; Surenderkumar, Vipul; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Mathur, Ashwani; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium known for causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Recently, several drug targets in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 have been reported using network biology approaches on the basis of essentiality and topology and further ranked on network measures viz. degree and centrality. Till date no drug/ligand molecule has been reported against this targets.In our work we have identified the ligand /drug molecules, through Orthologous gene mapping against Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168 and performed modelling and docking analysis. From the predicted drug targets in PA PAO1, we selected those drug targets which show statistically significant orthology with a model organism and whose orthologs are present in all the selected drug targets of PA PAO1.Modeling of their structure has been done using I-Tasser web server. Orthologous gene mapping has been performed using Cluster of Orthologs (COGs) and based on orthology; drugs available for Bacillus sp. have been docked with PA PAO1 protein drug targets using MoleGro virtual docker version 4.0.2.Orthologous gene for PA3168 gyrA is BS gyrAfound in Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168. The drugs cited for Bacillus sp. have been docked with PA genes and energy analyses have been made. Based on Orthologous gene mapping andin-silico studies, Nalidixic acid is reported as an effective drug against PA3168 gyrA for the treatment of CF and COPD.

  20. Multiple antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: evidence for involvement of an efflux operon.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, K; Krebes, K; McNally, C; Neshat, S

    1993-01-01

    An outer membrane protein of 50 kDa (OprK) was overproduced in a siderophore-deficient mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa capable of growth on iron-deficient minimal medium containing 2,2'-dipyridyl (0.5 mM). The expression of OprK in the mutant (strain K385) was associated with enhanced resistance to a number of antimicrobial agents, including ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and streptonigrin. OprK was inducible in the parent strain by growth under severe iron limitation, as provided, for example, by the addition of dipyridyl or ZnSO4 to the growth medium. The gene encoding OprK (previously identified as ORFC) forms part of an operon composed of three genes (ORFABC) implicated in the secretion of the siderophore pyoverdine. Mutants defective in ORFA, ORFB, or ORFC exhibited enhanced susceptibility to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, streptonigrin, and dipyridyl, consistent with a role for the ORFABC operon in multiple antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. Sequence analysis of ORFC (oprK) revealed that its product is homologous to a class of outer membrane proteins involved in export. Similarly, the products of ORFA and ORFB exhibit homology to previously described bacterial export proteins located in the cytoplasmic membrane. These data suggest that ORFA-ORFB-oprK (ORFC)-dependent drug efflux contributes to multiple antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. We propose, therefore, the designation mexAB (multiple efflux) for ORFAB. Images PMID:8226684

  1. Gene Islands Integrated into tRNAGly Genes Confer Genome Diversity on a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clone

    PubMed Central

    Larbig, Karen D.; Christmann, Andreas; Johann, André; Klockgether, Jens; Hartsch, Thomas; Merkl, Rainer; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Fritz, Hans-Joachim; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    Intraclonal genome diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in one of the most diverse mosaic regions of the P. aeruginosa chromosome. The ca. 110-kb large hypervariable region located near the lipH gene in two members of the predominant P. aeruginosa clone C, strain C and strain SG17M, was sequenced. In both strains the region consists of an individual strain-specific gene island of 111 (strain C) or 106 (SG17M) open reading frames (ORFs) and of a 7-kb stretch of clone C-specific sequence of 9 ORFs. The gene islands are integrated into conserved tRNAGly genes and have a bipartite structure. The first part adjacent to the tRNA gene consists of strain-specific ORFs encoding metabolic functions and transporters, the majority of which have homologs of known function in other eubacteria, such as hemophores, cytochrome c biosynthesis, or mercury resistance. The second part is made up mostly of ORFs of yet-unknown function. Forty-seven of these ORFs are mutual homologs with a pairwise amino acid sequence identity of 35 to 88% and are arranged in the same order in the two gene islands. We hypothesize that this novel type of gene island derives from mobile elements which, upon integration, endow the recipient with strain-specific metabolic properties, thus possibly conferring on it a selective advantage in its specific habitat. PMID:12426355

  2. UV disinfection induces a VBNC state in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenghua; Ye, Chengsong; Lin, Huirong; Lv, Lu; Yu, Xin

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state in bacteria may dramatically underestimate the health risks associated with drinking water. Therefore, the potential for UV treatment to induce a VBNC state in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. UV disinfection effectively reduced the culturability of E. coli and P. aeruginosa, with the destruction of nucleic acids demonstrated using gadA long gene fragment qPCR amplification. Following UV radiation, copy numbers for the high transcriptional levels of the 16S rRNA gene varied insignificantly in both strains, confirming results from plate counting assays indicating that VBNC states were induced in both strains. Furthermore, the virulence genes gadA and oprL remained highly expressed, suggesting that the VBNC bacteria still displayed pathogenicity. Propidium monoazide qPCR indicated that cell membranes remained intact even at a UV dose of 300 mJ/cm(2). The RT-qPCR results after UV and chlorine treatments in E. coli were significantly different (8.41 and 5.59 log units, respectively), further confirming the induction of VBNC bacteria induced by UV radiation. Finally, resuscitation was achieved, with E. coli showing greater resuscitation ability than P. aeruginosa. These results systematically revealed the potential health risks of UV disinfection and strongly suggest a combined disinfection strategy.

  3. Assessment of acrylamide degradation potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa BAC-6 isolated from industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Vijayashree; Chandrashekar, Chandrika; Shivakumar, Rajath; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Das, Arijit; Gouda, Bhaskar; Rajan, Subbaramiah Sundara

    2014-07-01

    Acrylamide finds diverse industrial applications but is considered an environmental threat because of its neurotoxic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. Certain bacteria enzymatically degrade acrylamide to acrylic acid and ammonia. The present investigation was carried out to isolate and identify an acrylamide-degrading bacterium from industrial effluent. Bacterial growth and extent of acrylamide degradation in the presence of different acrylamide concentrations, nutrients, varied range of pH, and temperature were analyzed. Among the eight acrylamide-degrading isolates, isolate BAC-6 demonstrated the highest degradation, and based upon the partial 16S rDNA sequencing, it was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa BAC-6 grew over a wide range of acrylamide concentrations, but the highest degradation was recorded at 500 mg/L concentration with concomitant cell growth. Among the carbon supplements, mannitol supported the highest growth and degradation. Maximum degradation was reported at neutral pH. A mesophilic temperature range (25-40 °C) facilitated conducive bacterial growth followed by degradation. The highest degradation and bacterial growth were observed at 30 and 35 °C, respectively. Thus, it could be inferred from the present investigation that cultural conditions strongly affected the degradation potential of P. aeruginosa BAC-6 and advocated the utilization of the isolate in bioremediation of sites polluted with acrylamide.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide of Marinobacter litoralis inhibits swarming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Raj Kumar; Kavita, Kumari; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-06-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was isolated from a marine bacterium identified as Marinobacter litoralis BK09 using 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis. The GCMS analysis showed that the LPS contained 3-hydroxy-dodecanoic acid (C12:0 3OH) (49%), dodecanoic acid (C12:0) (24%) and decanoic acid (C10:0) (19%) as major fatty acids, and the polysaccharide constituents were fucose (53.79%), xylose (28.04%) and mannose (18.15%). The LPS almost completely inhibited swarming motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. It also reduced biofilm formation by 50% with no adverse effect on cell growth. The production of virulence factor such as pyocyanin pigment was reduced (∼40%) by the LPS. The LPS did not show any limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) gelation activity. The repression of swarming motility, pyocyanin production and biofilm formation by the LPS suggests its potential application against P. aeruginosa infection. This is the first report on characterization and application of LPS from M. litoralis. PMID:25843881

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  6. Transcription antitermination regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa amidase operon.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S A; Wachira, S J; Norman, R A; Pearl, L H; Drew, R E

    1996-01-01

    In vivo titration experiments have demonstrated a direct interaction between the Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcription antiterminator, AmiR, and the mRNA leader sequence of the amidase operon. A region of 39 nucleotides has been identified which is sufficient to partially titrate out the AmiR available for antitermination. Site-directed mutagenesis has shown that the leader open reading frame has no role in the antitermination reaction, and has identified two critical elements at the 5' and 3' ends of the proposed AmiR binding site which are independently essential for antitermination. A T7 promoter/RNA polymerase-driven system shows AmiR-mediated antitermination, demonstrating a lack of promoter/polymerase specificity. Using the operon negative regulator, AmiC, immobilized on a solid support and gel filtration chromatography, an AmiC-AmiR complex has been identified and isolated. Complex stability and molecular weight assayed by gel filtration alter depending on the type of amide bound to AmiC. AmiC-AmiR-anti-inducer is a stable dimer-dimer complex and the addition of the inducer, acetamide, causes a conformational change which alters the complex stability and either this new configuration or dissociated AmiR interacts with the leader mRNA to cause antitermination. Images PMID:8918468

  7. Transcriptome Profiling of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Khaledi, Ariane; Schniederjans, Monika; Pohl, Sarah; Rainer, Roman; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Xia, Boyang; Klawonn, Frank; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Preusse, Matthias; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Dötsch, Andreas; Häussler, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    Emerging resistance to antimicrobials and the lack of new antibiotic drug candidates underscore the need for optimization of current diagnostics and therapies to diminish the evolution and spread of multidrug resistance. As the antibiotic resistance status of a bacterial pathogen is defined by its genome, resistance profiling by applying next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies may in the future accomplish pathogen identification, prompt initiation of targeted individualized treatment, and the implementation of optimized infection control measures. In this study, qualitative RNA sequencing was used to identify key genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance in 135 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from diverse geographic and infection site origins. By applying transcriptome-wide association studies, adaptive variations associated with resistance to the antibiotic classes fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams were identified. Besides potential novel biomarkers with a direct correlation to resistance, global patterns of phenotype-associated gene expression and sequence variations were identified by predictive machine learning approaches. Our research serves to establish genotype-based molecular diagnostic tools for the identification of the current resistance profiles of bacterial pathogens and paves the way for faster diagnostics for more efficient, targeted treatment strategies to also mitigate the future potential for resistance evolution. PMID:27216077

  8. Electrical conductivity measurements of bacterial nanowires from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthupandy, Muthusamy; Anand, Muthusamy; Maduraiveeran, Govindhan; Sait Hameedha Beevi, Akbar; Jeeva Priya, Radhakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    The extracellular appendages of bacteria (flagella) that transfer electrons to electrodes are called bacterial nanowires. This study focuses on the isolation and separation of nanowires that are attached via Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture. The size and roughness of separated nanowires were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The obtained bacterial nanowires indicated a clear image of bacterial nanowires measuring 16 nm in diameter. The formation of bacterial nanowires was confirmed by microscopic studies (AFM and TEM) and the conductivity nature of bacterial nanowire was investigated by electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are nondestructive voltammetry techniques, suggest that bacterial nanowires could be the source of electrons—which may be used in various applications, for example, microbial fuel cells, biosensors, organic solar cells, and bioelectronic devices. Routine analysis of electron transfer between bacterial nanowires and the electrode was performed, providing insight into the extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the electrode. CV revealed the catalytic electron transferability of bacterial nanowires and electrodes and showed excellent redox activities. CV and EIS studies showed that bacterial nanowires can charge the surface by producing and storing sufficient electrons, behave as a capacitor, and have features consistent with EET. Finally, electrochemical studies confirmed the development of bacterial nanowires with EET. This study suggests that bacterial nanowires can be used to fabricate biomolecular sensors and nanoelectronic devices.

  9. Functional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer PAI.

    PubMed Central

    Passador, L; Tucker, K D; Guertin, K R; Journet, M P; Kende, A S; Iglewski, B H

    1996-01-01

    A series of structural analogs of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer [PAI, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone] were obtained and tested for their ability to act as autoinducers in stimulating the expression of the gene for elastase (lasB) by measuring beta-galactosidase production from a lasB-lacZ gene fusion in the presence of the transcriptional activator LasR. The data suggest that the length of the acyl side chain of the autoinducer molecule is the most critical factor for activity. Replacement of the ring O by S in the homoserine lactone moiety can be tolerated. Tritium-labelled PAI ([3H]PAI) was synthesized and used to demonstrate the association of [3H]PAI with cells overexpressing LasR. The PAI analogs were also tested for their ability to compete with [3H]PAI for binding of LasR. Results from the competition assays suggest that once again the length of the acyl side chain appears to be crucial for antagonist activity. The presence of the 3-oxo moiety also plays a significant role in binding since analogs which lacked this moiety were much less effective in blocking binding of [3H]PAI. All analogs demonstrating competition with PAI in binding to LasR also exhibited the ability to activate lasB expression, suggesting that they are functional analogs of PAI. PMID:8830697

  10. Ginger extract inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Shin; Park, Hee-Deung

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger's ability to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm formation. A static biofilm assay demonstrated that biofilm development was reduced by 39-56% when ginger extract was added to the culture. In addition, various phenotypes were altered after ginger addition of PA14. Ginger extract decreased production of extracellular polymeric substances. This finding was confirmed by chemical analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ginger extract formed noticeably less rugose colonies on agar plates containing Congo red and facilitated swarming motility on soft agar plates. The inhibition of biofilm formation and the altered phenotypes appear to be linked to a reduced level of a second messenger, bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate. Importantly, ginger extract inhibited biofilm formation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Also, surface biofilm cells formed with ginger extract detached more easily with surfactant than did those without ginger extract. Taken together, these findings provide a foundation for the possible discovery of a broad spectrum biofilm inhibitor. PMID:24086697

  11. Prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by electric currents.

    PubMed

    Shim, Soojin; Hong, Seok Hoon; Tak, Yongsug; Yoon, Jeyong

    2011-02-01

    The process of controlling bacterial adhesion using an electric current deserves attention because of its ease of automation and environmentally friendly nature. This study investigated the role of electric currents (negative, positive, alternating) for preventing adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and achieving bacterial inactivation. Indium tin oxide (ITO) film was used as a working electrode to observe adhesion and inactivation under electric polarization. Electric current types were classified into negative, positive, and alternating current. The working electrode acted as a cathode or anode by applying a negative or positive current, and an alternating current indicates that the negative current was combined sequentially with the positive current. The numbers of adhered cells were compared under a flow condition, and the in situ behavior of the bacterial cells and the extent of their inactivation were also investigated using time-lapse recording and live/dead staining, respectively. The application of a negative current prevented bacterial adhesion significantly (∼81% at 15.0 μA cm(-2)). The positive current did not significantly inhibit adhesion (<20% at 15.0 μA cm(-2)), compared to the nonpolarized case. The alternating current had a similar effect as the negative current on preventing bacterial adhesion, but it also exhibited bactericidal effects, making it the most suitable method for bacterial adhesion control.

  12. Social evolution of toxic metal bioremediation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Siobhán; Hodgson, David J.; Buckling, Angus

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria are often iron-limited, and hence produce extracellular iron-scavenging siderophores. A crucial feature of siderophore production is that it can be an altruistic behaviour (individually costly but benefitting neighbouring cells), thus siderophore producers can be invaded by non-producing social ‘cheats’. Recent studies have shown that siderophores can also bind other heavy metals (such as Cu and Zn), but in this case siderophore chelation actually reduces metal uptake by bacteria. These complexes reduce heavy metal toxicity, hence siderophore production may contribute to toxic metal bioremediation. Here, we show that siderophore production in the context of bioremediation is also an altruistic trait and can be exploited by cheating phenotypes in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Specifically, we show that in toxic copper concentrations (i) siderophore non-producers evolve de novo and reach high frequencies, and (ii) producing strains are fitter than isogenic non-producing strains in monoculture, and vice versa in co-culture. Moreover, we show that the evolutionary effect copper has on reducing siderophore production is greater than the reduction observed under iron-limited conditions. We discuss the relevance of these results to the evolution of siderophore production in natural communities and heavy metal bioremediation. PMID:24898376

  13. Transcriptome Profiling of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Khaledi, Ariane; Schniederjans, Monika; Pohl, Sarah; Rainer, Roman; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Xia, Boyang; Klawonn, Frank; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Preusse, Matthias; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Dötsch, Andreas; Häussler, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    Emerging resistance to antimicrobials and the lack of new antibiotic drug candidates underscore the need for optimization of current diagnostics and therapies to diminish the evolution and spread of multidrug resistance. As the antibiotic resistance status of a bacterial pathogen is defined by its genome, resistance profiling by applying next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies may in the future accomplish pathogen identification, prompt initiation of targeted individualized treatment, and the implementation of optimized infection control measures. In this study, qualitative RNA sequencing was used to identify key genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance in 135 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from diverse geographic and infection site origins. By applying transcriptome-wide association studies, adaptive variations associated with resistance to the antibiotic classes fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams were identified. Besides potential novel biomarkers with a direct correlation to resistance, global patterns of phenotype-associated gene expression and sequence variations were identified by predictive machine learning approaches. Our research serves to establish genotype-based molecular diagnostic tools for the identification of the current resistance profiles of bacterial pathogens and paves the way for faster diagnostics for more efficient, targeted treatment strategies to also mitigate the future potential for resistance evolution.

  14. Uranyl Precipitation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Controlled Polyphosphate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Renninger, Neil; Knopp, Roger; Nitsche, Heino; Clark, Douglas S.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2004-01-01

    The polyphosphate kinase gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was overexpressed in its native host, resulting in the accumulation of 100 times the polyphosphate seen with control strains. Degradation of this polyphosphate was induced by carbon starvation conditions, resulting in phosphate release into the medium. The mechanism of polyphosphate degradation is not clearly understood, but it appears to be associated with glycogen degradation. Upon suspension of the cells in 1 mM uranyl nitrate, nearly all polyphosphate that had accumulated was degraded within 48 h, resulting in the removal of nearly 80% of the uranyl ion and >95% of lesser-concentrated solutions. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) suggest that this removal was due to the precipitation of uranyl phosphate at the cell membrane. TRLFS also indicated that uranyl was initially sorbed to the cell as uranyl hydroxide and was then precipitated as uranyl phosphate as phosphate was released from the cell. Lethal doses of radiation did not halt phosphate secretion from polyphosphate-filled cells under carbon starvation conditions. PMID:15574942

  15. Ginger Extract Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Shin; Park, Hee-Deung

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger’s ability to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm formation. A static biofilm assay demonstrated that biofilm development was reduced by 39–56% when ginger extract was added to the culture. In addition, various phenotypes were altered after ginger addition of PA14. Ginger extract decreased production of extracellular polymeric substances. This finding was confirmed by chemical analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ginger extract formed noticeably less rugose colonies on agar plates containing Congo red and facilitated swarming motility on soft agar plates. The inhibition of biofilm formation and the altered phenotypes appear to be linked to a reduced level of a second messenger, bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate. Importantly, ginger extract inhibited biofilm formation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Also, surface biofilm cells formed with ginger extract detached more easily with surfactant than did those without ginger extract. Taken together, these findings provide a foundation for the possible discovery of a broad spectrum biofilm inhibitor. PMID:24086697

  16. Heritability of Respiratory Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Green, Deanna M.; Collaco, J. Michael; McDougal, Kathryn E.; Naughton, Kathleen M.; Blackman, Scott M.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantify the relative contribution of factors other than cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genotype and environment on the acquisition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) by patients with cystic fibrosis. Study design Lung infection with Pa and mucoid Pa was assessed using a co-twin study design of 44 monozygous (MZ) and 17 dizygous (DZ) twin pairs. Two definitions were used to establish infection: first positive culture and persistent positive culture. Genetic contribution to infection (ie, heritability) was estimated based on concordance analysis, logistic regression, and age at onset of infection through comparison of intraclass correlation coefficients. Results Concordance for persistent Pa infection was higher in MZ (0.83; 25 of 30 pairs) than DZ twins (0.45; 5 of 11 pairs), generating a heritability of 0.76. Logistic regression adjusted for age corroborated genetic control of persistent Pa infection. The correlation for age at persistent Pa infection was higher in MZ twins (0.589; 95% CI, 0.222-0.704) than in DZ twins (0.162; 95% CI, −0.352 to 0.607), generating a heritability of 0.85. Conclusion Genetic modifiers play a significant role in the establishment and timing of persistent Pa infection in individuals with cystic fibrosis. PMID:22364820

  17. [Cervical lymphoadenopathy due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa following mesotherapy].

    PubMed

    Shaladi, Ali Muftah; Crestani, Francesco; Bocchi, Anna; Saltari, Maria Rita; Piva, Bruno; Tartari, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Mesotherapy is a treatment method devised for controlling several diseases by means of subcutaneous microinjections given at or around the affected areas at short time intervals. It is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, amongst which all orthopaedic diseases and rheumatic pain. Mesotherapy is especially indicated for neck pain. The mechanism of action is twofold: a pharmacological effect due to the drug administered, and a reflexogenic effect, the skin containing many nerve endings that are sensitive to the mechanical action of the needle. Although this therapy is safe, like any other medical intervention it cannot be considered free of complications that may occur, such as allergies, haematomas, bruising, wheals, granulomas and telangiectasias. Infective complications are also possible, due to pathogenic bacteria that are inoculated through contamination of products, of the materials used for the procedure or even from germs on the skin. We present the case of a patient who had cervical lymphadenopathy due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after mesotherapy treatment for neck pain. PMID:19838089

  18. Sequence and transcriptional start site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane porin protein F gene.

    PubMed Central

    Duchêne, M; Schweizer, A; Lottspeich, F; Krauss, G; Marget, M; Vogel, K; von Specht, B U; Domdey, H

    1988-01-01

    Porin F is one of the major proteins of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It forms water-filled pores of variable size. Porin F is a candidate for a vaccine against P. aeruginosa because it antigenically cross-reacts in all serotype strains of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme. We have isolated the gene for porin F from a lambda EMBL3 bacteriophage library by using oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization probes and have determined its nucleotide sequence. Different peptide sequences obtained from isolated porin F confirmed the deduced protein sequence. The mature protein consists of 326 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 35,250. The precursor contains an N-terminal signal peptide of 24 amino acid residues. S1 protection and primer extension experiments, together with Northern (RNA) blots, indicate that the mRNA coding for porin F is monocistronic with short untranslated regions of about 58 bases at the 5' end and about 47 bases at the 3' end. The sequences in the -10 and -35 regions upstream of the transcriptional start site are closely related to the Escherichia coli promoter consensus sequences, which explains why the porin F gene is expressed in E. coli under the control of its own promoter. The amino acid sequence of porin F is not homologous to the different E. coli porins OmpF, OmpC, LamB, and PhoE. On the other hand, a highly homologous region of 30 amino acids between the OmpA proteins of different enteric bacteria and porin F of P. aeruginosa was detected. The core region of the homology to E. coli OmpA had 11 of 12 amino acid residues in common. Images PMID:2447060

  19. Production of Biologically Active 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic Acid from Korean Pine Seed Oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxyl group of hydroxyl fatty acid (HFA) cause HFA to carry special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other non-hydroxy fatty acids. Microbial conversion of oleic acid into 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid (DOD) caused DOD to carry strong antibacterial activit...

  20. Neutrophil enhancement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development: human F-actin and DNA as targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Parks, Quinn M; Young, Robert L; Poch, Katie R; Malcolm, Kenneth C; Vasil, Michael L; Nick, Jerry A

    2009-04-01

    In the cystic fibrosis (CF) airway, chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa results from biofilm formation in a neutrophil-rich environment. We tested the capacity of human neutrophils to modify early biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1, and an isogenic CF strain isolated early and years later in infection. In a static reactor, P. aeruginosa biofilm density of all strains was enhanced at 24 h in the presence of neutrophils, with the greatest relative increase associated with the lowest inoculum of P. aeruginosa tested. Previously, neutrophil-induced biofilm enhancement was shown to largely result from the incorporation of F-actin and DNA polymers into the bacterial biofilm. This finding was advanced by the comparison of biofilm enhancement from intact unstimulated neutrophils and from lysed or apoptotic neutrophils. Apoptotic neutrophils, with an intact cell membrane, were unable to contribute to biofilm enhancement, while lysed neutrophils evoked a similar response to that of intact cells. Using F-actin and DNA as targets, the capacity of negatively charged poly(amino acids) to disrupt, or prevent, early biofilm formation was tested. Anionic poly(aspartic acid) effectively prevented or disrupted biofilm formation. Combination of poly(aspartic acid) with DNase resulted in a synergistic increase in biofilm disruption. These results demonstrate that the presence of dying neutrophils can facilitate the initial stages of biofilm development by low inocula of P. aeruginosa. Neutrophil F-actin represents a potential new therapeutic target for disruption of pathogenic biofilms.

  1. Assessment of the effectiveness of silver-coated dressing, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%), citric acid (3%), and silver sulfadiazine (1%) for topical antibacterial effects against the multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting full-skin thickness burn wounds on rats.

    PubMed

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 10(8) CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa facilitates Campylobacter jejuni growth in biofilms under oxic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Culotti, Alessandro; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the growth of Campylobacter jejuni in biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa under oxic flow conditions. We observed the growth of C. jejuni in mono-culture, deposited on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms, and co-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. In mono-culture, C. jejuni was unable to form biofilms. However, deposited C. jejuni continuously grew on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms for a period of 3 days. The growth of scattered C. jejuni clusters was strictly limited to the P. aeruginosa biofilm surface, and no intergrowth was observed. Co-culturing of C. jejuni and P. aeruginosa also enabled the growth of both organisms in biofilms, with C. jejuni clusters developing on the surface of the P. aeruginosa biofilm. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in the medium showed that P. aeruginosa biofilms depleted the effluent DO from 9.0 to 0.5 mg L(-1) 24 hours after inoculation. The localized microaerophilic environment generated by P. aeruginosa promoted the persistence and growth of C. jejuni. Our findings show that P. aeruginosa not only prolongs the survival of C. jejuni under oxic conditions, but also enables the growth of C. jejuni on the surface of P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  3. LuxR homolog-independent gene regulation by acyl-homoserine lactones in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chugani, Sudha; Greenberg, Everett Peter

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum control of gene expression involves three LuxR-type signal receptors LasR, RhlR, and QscR that respond to the LasI- and RhlI-generated acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signals 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL. We found that a LasR-RhlR-QscR triple mutant responds to acyl-HSLs by regulating at least 37 genes. LuxR homolog-independent activation of the representative genes antA and catB also occurs in the wild type. Expression of antA was influenced the most by C10-HSL and to a lesser extent by other acyl-HSLs, including the P. aeruginosa 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL signals. The ant and cat operons encode enzymes for the degradation of anthranilate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Our results indicate that LuxR homolog-independent acyl-HSL control of the ant and cat operons occurs via regulation of antR, which codes for the transcriptional activator of the ant operon. Although P. aeruginosa has multiple pathways for anthranilate synthesis, one pathway-the kynurenine pathway for tryptophan degradation-is required for acyl-HSL activation of the ant operon. The kynurenine pathway is also the critical source of anthranilate for energy metabolism via the antABC gene products, as well as the source of anthranilate for synthesis of the P. aeruginosa quinolone signal. Our discovery of LuxR homolog-independent responses to acyl-HSLs provides insight into acyl-HSL signaling. PMID:20498077

  4. Characterization of adhesive exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Myszka, Kamila; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2009-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa synthesizes large quantities of exopolysaccharide (EPS), making it an excellent model organism for the study of EPS-mediated adhesion. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of limited nutrients availability in the culture medium on the composition of EPS produced by P. aeruginosa. The relationship between the EPS production and the adhesion process of the P. aeruginosa cells to stainless steel surface (type 316 L) under starvation conditions were also examined. In all experimental variants P. aeruginosa produced more EPS with an increase of incubation period upon starvation conditions. Under limited nutrients condition, glucose dominated in the EPS materials. After 6 days of the process, only glucosyl units were detected in the extracellular matrix produced by nutrient-deprived P. aeruginosa cells. These extracellular molecules promoted more advanced stages of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the surface of stainless steel.

  5. A risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in swimming pools: a review.

    PubMed

    Rice, Scott A; van den Akker, Ben; Pomati, Francesco; Roser, David

    2012-06-01

    Despite routine monitoring and disinfection, treated swimming pools are frequently contaminated with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can represent a significant public health threat. This review was undertaken to identify the current understanding of risk factors associated with pool operation with respect to P. aeruginosa. The ecology and factors that promote growth of P. aeruginosa in the pool environment are complex and dynamic and so we applied a systematic risk assessment approach to integrate existing data, with the aim to improve pool management and safety. Sources of P. aeruginosa, types of infections, dose responses, routes of transmission, as well as the efficacy of current disinfectant treatments were reviewed. This review also highlights the critical knowledge gaps that are required for a more robust, quantitative risk assessment of P. aeruginosa. Quantitative risk management strategies have been successfully applied to drinking water systems and should similarly be amenable to developing a better understanding of the risk posed by P. aeruginosa in swimming pools.

  6. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s−1, respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  7. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  8. MexAB-OprM specific efflux pump inhibitors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Part 4: Addressing the problem of poor stability due to photoisomerization of an acrylic acid moiety.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kiyoshi; Kuru, Noriko; Ohtsuka, Masami; Yokomizo, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Atsunobu; Kawato, Haruko; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ohta, Toshiharu; Hoshino, Kazuki; Akimoto, Katsuya; Itoh, Junko; Ishida, Hiroko; Cho, Aesop; Palme, Monica H; Zhang, Jason Z; Lee, Ving J; Watkins, William J

    2004-05-17

    Exchange of the ethylene tether in a series of pyridopyrimidine-based MexAB-OprM specific efflux pump inhibitors to an amide bond stabilized the olefin of the acrylic acid moiety, preventing facile photoisomerization to the Z-isomer. Furthermore, the activity was drastically improved in the amide tether variants, providing extremely potent acrylic acid and vinyl tetrazole analogues.

  9. Quorum Sensing Is Accompanied by Global Metabolic Changes in the Opportunistic Human Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Peter W.; Griffin, Julian L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS) systems to control the expression of secreted effectors. These effectors can be crucial to the ecological fitness of the bacterium, playing roles in nutrient acquisition, microbial competition, and virulence. In this study, we investigated the metabolic consequences of AHL-dependent QS by monitoring the metabolic profile(s) of a lasI rhlI double mutant (unable to make QS signaling molecules) and its wild-type progenitor as they progressed through the growth curve. Analysis of culture supernatants by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy revealed that at the point where AHL concentrations peaked in the wild type, the metabolic footprints (i.e., extracellular metabolites) of the wild-type and lasI rhlI mutant diverged. Subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based analysis of the intracellular metabolome revealed QS-dependent perturbations in around one-third of all identified metabolites, including altered concentrations of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, amino acids, and fatty acids. Further targeted fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC-MS-based profiling of the cellular total fatty acid pools revealed that QS leads to changes associated with decreased membrane fluidity and higher chemical stability. However, not all of the changes we observed were necessarily a direct consequence of QS; liquid chromatography (LC)-MS analyses revealed that polyamine levels were elevated in the lasI rhlI mutant, perhaps a response to the absence of QS-dependent adaptations. Our data suggest that QS leads to a global readjustment in central metabolism and provide new insight into the metabolic changes associated with QS during stationary-phase adaptation. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing (QS) is a transcriptional regulatory mechanism that allows bacteria to coordinate their gene expression profile with the population cell density. The opportunistic

  10. Nanoscale Adhesion Forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pili

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A variety of bacterial pathogens use nanoscale protein fibers called type IV pili to mediate cell adhesion, a primary step leading to infection. Currently, how these nanofibers respond to mechanical stimuli and how this response is used to control adhesion is poorly understood. Here, we use atomic force microscopy techniques to quantify the forces guiding the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili to surfaces. Using chemical force microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy, we show that pili strongly bind to hydrophobic surfaces in a time-dependent manner, while they weakly bind to hydrophilic surfaces. Individual nanofibers are capable of withstanding forces up to 250 pN, thereby explaining how they can resist mechanical stress. Pulling on individual pili yields constant force plateaus, presumably reflecting conformational changes, as well as nanospring properties that may help bacteria to withstand physiological shear forces. Analysis of mutant strains demonstrates that these mechanical responses originate solely from type IV pili, while flagella and the cell surface localized and proposed pili-associated adhesin PilY1 play no direct role. We also demonstrate that bacterial–host interactions involve constant force plateaus, the extension of bacterial pili, and the formation of membrane tethers from host cells. We postulate that the unique mechanical responses of type IV pili unravelled here enable the bacteria to firmly attach to biotic and abiotic surfaces and thus maintain attachment when subjected to high shear forces under physiological conditions, helping to explain why pili play a critical role in colonization of the host. PMID:25286300

  11. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  12. Electron tunneling in single crystals of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurins.

    PubMed

    Crane, B R; Di Bilio, A J; Winkler, J R; Gray, H B

    2001-11-28

    Rates of reduction of Os(III), Ru(III), and Re(I) by Cu(I) in His83-modified Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurins (M-Cu distance approximately 17 A) have been measured in single crystals, where protein conformation and surface solvation are precisely defined by high-resolution X-ray structure determinations: 1.7(8) x 10(6) s(-1) (298 K), 1.8(8) x 10(6) s(-1) (140 K), [Ru(bpy)2(im)(3+)-]; 3.0(15) x 10(6) s(-1) (298 K), [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(3+)-]; 3.0(15) x 10(6) s(-1) (298 K), [Ru(tpy)(phen)(3+)-]; 9.0(50) x 10(2) s(-1) (298 K), [Os(bpy)2(im)(3+)-]; 4.4(20) x 10(6) s(-1) (298 K), [Re(CO)3(phen)(+)] (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; im = imidazole; tpy = 2,2':6',2' '-terpyridine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline). The time constants for electron tunneling in crystals are roughly the same as those measured in solution, indicating very similar protein structures in the two states. High-resolution structures of the oxidized (1.5 A) and reduced (1.4 A) states of Ru(II)(tpy)(phen)(His83)Az establish that very small changes in copper coordination accompany reduction but reveal a shorter axial interaction between copper and the Gly45 peptide carbonyl oxygen [2.6 A for Cu(II)] than had been recognized previously. Although Ru(bpy)2(im)(His83)Az is less solvated in the crystal, the reorganization energy for Cu(I) --> Ru(III) electron transfer falls in the range (0.6-0.8 eV) determined experimentally for the reaction in solution. Our work suggests that outer-sphere protein reorganization is the dominant activation component required for electron tunneling.

  13. Structural and Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgX

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Laura M.; Weadge, Joel T.; Baker, Perrin; Robinson, Howard; Codée, Jeroen D. C.; Tipton, Peter A.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2013-01-01

    The exopolysaccharide alginate, produced by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients, undergoes two different chemical modifications as it is synthesized that alter the properties of the polymer and hence the biofilm. One modification, acetylation, causes the cells in the biofilm to adhere better to lung epithelium, form microcolonies, and resist the effects of the host immune system and/or antibiotics. Alginate biosynthesis requires 12 proteins encoded by the algD operon, including AlgX, and although this protein is essential for polymer production, its exact role is unknown. In this study, we present the X-ray crystal structure of AlgX at 2.15 Å resolution. The structure reveals that AlgX is a two-domain protein, with an N-terminal domain with structural homology to members of the SGNH hydrolase superfamily and a C-terminal carbohydrate-binding module. A number of residues in the carbohydrate-binding module form a substrate recognition “pinch point” that we propose aids in alginate binding and orientation. Although the topology of the N-terminal domain deviates from canonical SGNH hydrolases, the residues that constitute the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad characteristic of this family are structurally conserved. In vivo studies reveal that site-specific mutation of these residues results in non-acetylated alginate. This catalytic triad is also required for acetylesterase activity in vitro. Our data suggest that not only does AlgX protect the polymer as it passages through the periplasm but that it also plays a role in alginate acetylation. Our results provide the first structural insight for a wide group of closely related bacterial polysaccharide acetyltransferases. PMID:23779107

  14. Discovery of desketoraloxifene analogues as inhibitors of mammalian, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and NAPE phospholipase D enzymes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sarah A; Spencer, Cierra T; O'Reilly, Matthew C; Brown, Kyle A; Lavieri, Robert R; Cho, Chul-Hee; Jung, Dai-Il; Larock, Richard C; Brown, H Alex; Lindsley, Craig W

    2015-02-20

    Phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyses cellular lipids to produce the important lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. A PLD enzyme expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PldA) has been shown to be important in bacterial infection, and NAPE-PLD has emerged as being key in the synthesis of endocannabinoids. In order to better understand the biology and therapeutic potential of these less explored PLD enzymes, small molecule tools are required. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been previously shown to inhibit mammalian PLD (PLD1 and PLD2). By targeted screening of a library of SERM analogues, additional parallel synthesis, and evaluation in multiple PLD assays, we discovered a novel desketoraloxifene-based scaffold that inhibited not only the two mammalian PLDs but also structurally divergent PldA and NAPE-PLD. This finding represents an important first step toward the development of small molecules possessing universal inhibition of divergent PLD enzymes to advance the field.

  15. The antibiofilm effect of blueberry fruit cultivars against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Karine Rigon; Blum-Silva, Carlos H; Souza, André Luiz Kulkamp; Wulffschuch, Márcia; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Pereira, Cláudio Martin P; Macedo, Alexandre José; Lencina, Claiton Leonetti

    2014-03-01

    The antibiofilm and antibacterial properties against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis and chemical characterization of six hydroethanolic blueberry extracts (blueberry rabbiteye-Vaccinium virgatum) from different cultivars and means of propagation were investigated. The total flavonoid, anthocyanin, and phenolic contents were determined by specific and well-established methods. Among the cultivars, Briteblue showed the lowest content of all metabolites analyzed, while Bluegem showed the highest concentrations of these compounds. All the micropropagated cultivars presented the highest amounts of chlorogenic acid. The blueberry fruit extracts showed strong activity against S. epidermidis biofilm (up to 84% inhibition) without inhibiting bacterial growth. Likewise, Bluegem micropropagated extract, which had the highest anthocyanin, flavonoids, and phenolic compound content, demonstrated the highest S. epidermidis biofilm inhibitory effect. Finally, a linear correlation between the total phenolic content and the percentage of biofilm inhibition was observed. PMID:24476224

  16. Anaerobic killing of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by acidified nitrite derivatives under cystic fibrosis airway conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Coakley, Ray; Lau, Gee W.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Gaston, Benjamin; Karabulut, Ahmet C.; Hennigan, Robert F.; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Buettner, Garry; Schurr, Michael J.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Burns, Jane L.; Speert, David; Boucher, Richard C.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Mucoid, mucA mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are refractory to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Here we show that mucoid bacteria perish during anaerobic exposure to 15 mM nitrite (NO2–) at pH 6.5, which mimics CF airway mucus. Killing required a pH lower than 7, implicating formation of nitrous acid (HNO2) and NO, that adds NO equivalents to cellular molecules. Eighty-seven percent of CF isolates possessed mucA mutations and were killed by HNO2 (3-log reduction in 4 days). Furthermore, antibiotic-resistant strains determined were also equally sensitive to HNO2. More importantly, HNO2 killed mucoid bacteria (a) in anaerobic biofilms; (b) in vitro in ultrasupernatants of airway secretions derived from explanted CF patient lungs; and (c) in mouse lungs in vivo in a pH-dependent fashion, with no organisms remaining after daily exposure to HNO2 for 16 days. HNO2 at these levels of acidity and NO2– also had no adverse effects on cultured human airway epithelia in vitro. In summary, selective killing by HNO2 may provide novel insights into the important clinical goal of eradicating mucoid P. aeruginosa from the CF airways. PMID:16440061

  17. The Cysteine Dioxygenase Homologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is a 3-Mercaptopropionate Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokov, Egor P.; Fellner, Matthias; Siakkou, Eleni; Kleffmann, Torsten; Martin, Lois W.; Aloi, Sekotilani; Lamont, Iain L.; Wilbanks, Sigurd M.; Jameson, Guy N. L.

    2015-01-01

    Thiol dioxygenation is the initial oxidation step that commits a thiol to important catabolic or biosynthetic pathways. The reaction is catalyzed by a family of specific non-heme mononuclear iron proteins each of which is reported to react efficiently with only one substrate. This family of enzymes includes cysteine dioxygenase, cysteamine dioxygenase, mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase, and 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase. Using sequence alignment to infer cysteine dioxygenase activity, a cysteine dioxygenase homologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p3MDO) has been identified. Mass spectrometry of P. aeruginosa under standard growth conditions showed that p3MDO is expressed in low levels, suggesting that this metabolic pathway is available to the organism. Purified recombinant p3MDO is able to oxidize both cysteine and 3-mercaptopropionic acid in vitro, with a marked preference for 3-mercaptopropionic acid. We therefore describe this enzyme as a 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase. Mössbauer spectroscopy suggests that substrate binding to the ferrous iron is through the thiol but indicates that each substrate could adopt different coordination geometries. Crystallographic comparison with mammalian cysteine dioxygenase shows that the overall active site geometry is conserved but suggests that the different substrate specificity can be related to replacement of an arginine by a glutamine in the active site. PMID:26272617

  18. Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: purification and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Berka, R M; Vasil, M L

    1982-01-01

    Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) was purified from Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture supernatants to near homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by a novel application of DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. Enzymatic activity remained associated with DEAE-Sephacel even in the presence of 1 M NaCl, but was eluted with a linear gradient of 0 to 5% tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide. Elution from DEAE-Sephacel was also obtained with 2% lysophosphatidylcholine, and to a lesser extent with 2% phosphorylcholine, but not at all with choline. The enzyme was highly active toward phospholipids possessing substituted ammonium groups (e.g., phosphatidycholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin); however, it had little if any activity toward phospholipids lacking substituted ammonium groups (e.g., phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphaditylglycerol). Collectively, these data suggest that phospholipase C from P. aeruginosa exhibits high affinity for substituted ammonium groups, but requires an additional hydrophobic moiety for optimum binding. The specific activity of the purified enzyme preparation increased 1,900-fold compared with that of culture supernatants. The molecular weight of the phospholipase C was estimated to be 78,000 by both sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Sephacryl S-200 column chromatography and was 76,000 by high-performance size exclusion chromatography. The isoelectric point was 5.5. Amino acid analysis showed that phospholipase C was rich in glycine, serine, threonine, aspartyl, glutamyl, and aromatic amino acids, but was cystine free. Images PMID:6811552

  19. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery.

  20. Precipitating Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibodies and antimicrobial therapy in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Trancassini, M; de Vito, D; Cimino, G; Antonelli, M; Quattrucci, S; Cipriani, P

    1996-04-01

    Forty patients with cystic fibrosis were studied bacteriologically and serologically. Precipitating Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibodies were monitored by crossed-immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) in order to evaluate the possibility of preventing chronic colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa by cycles of antimicrobial therapy. Sputum or pharyngeal aspirate and serum samples from all patients were analyzed by means of spread on selective media and CIE, respectively. Significant differences in the number of precipitins were obtained: noncolonized and intermittently colonized patients had no precipitins, whereas the number of precipitins in the chronically colonized patients varied from 11 to 44. An increase in the number of precipitins could be a good marker for initiation of therapy with antimicrobial agents that are either active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa or able to inhibit the release of virulence factors. PMID:8781882

  1. Determination of the O-serovars of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by slide coagglutination.

    PubMed

    Ansorg, R; Knoche, M

    1984-06-01

    Determination of the somatic (O-) antigens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by conventional slide agglutination is frequently complicated by the barely discernible, slow reaction of native cells. For diagnostic purposes a more practical procedure, a coagglutination test, has been developed in which protein A bearing Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 12598) cells are added to the agglutination process occurring between specific anti-O serum and native Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Compared to the conventional method, slide O-coagglutination yields larger agglutinates in a shorter mean reaction time, i.e. one minute vs four minutes. Moreover, strains not reacting in the O-agglutination method or reacting only with polyvalent anti-O serum can be grouped by O-coagglutination, and cross reactions between reference strains of different O-groups do not occur. This method facilitates O-grouping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in epidemiological investigations. PMID:6205872

  2. Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Ziino, Ottavio; Zanazzo, Giulio; Manicone, Rosaria; Livadiotti, Susanna; Cellini, Monica; Frenos, Stefano; Milano, Giuseppe M; Cappelli, Barbara; Licciardello, Maria; Beretta, Chiara; Aricò, Maurizio; Castagnola, Elio

    2010-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one leading gram-negative organism associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteremia is life-threatening in the immunocompromised host. Increasing frequency of multi-drug-resistant (MDRPA) strains is concerning. We started a retrospective survey in the pediatric hematology oncology Italian network. Between 2000 and 2008, 127 patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia were reported from 12 centers; 31.4% of isolates were MDRPA. Death within 30 days of a positive blood culture occurred in 19.6% (25/127) of total patients; in patients with MDRPA infection it occurred in 35.8% (14/39). In the multivariate analysis, only MDRPA had significant association with infection-related death. This is the largest series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia cases from pediatric hematology oncology centers. Monitoring local bacterial isolates epidemiology is mandatory and will allow empiric antibiotic therapy to be tailored to reduce fatalities.

  3. Determination of genome size of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by PFGE: analysis of restriction fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, J S; Johnson, A R

    1990-01-01

    Genomic DNA size was measured in three strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ATCC 29260 (exotoxin A), ATCC 33467 (type I smooth) and ATCC 33468 (type 2 mucoid) by transverse alternating field electrophoresis of restriction fragments. Because of the high (67%) G + C content of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, restriction enzymes that recognize sequences with at least 4 AT base pairs were expected to be rare cutters. Eight enzymes produced fragments greater than 200 kb in size: Dral (TTT/AAA), Asnl (ATT/AAT), Hpal (GTT/AAC), AfIII (C/TTAAG), Xbal (T/CTAGA), Spel (A/CTAGT), Sspl (AAT/ATT) and Ndel (CA/TATG). All eight enzymes recognized one of three rare tetranucleotide sequences, TTAA, CTAG or ATAT. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 29260 has a genomic DNA size of 5573 kb. Strains 33467 and 33468 have identical restriction patterns and a possible deletion with a genomic size of 5407 kb. Images PMID:1972559

  4. VDUP1 exacerbates bacteremic shock in mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zheng-Hao; Kim, Mi Sun; Jeong, Mira; Yun, Sohyun; Lee, Suk Hyung; Sun, Hu-Nan; Song, Hae Young; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Haiyoung; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Lee, Young-Ho; Choi, Inpyo

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin-D3 upregulated protein-1 (VDUP1) is a stress response protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection is a leading cause of death. Mice infected with live P. aeruginosa exhibit significantly decreased VDUP1 expression. However, the function of VDUP1 during P. aeruginosa-induced mouse bacteremic shock is unknown. To address the function of VDUP1 in P. aeruginosa-infected mice, we constructed a bacteremic shock model wherein both wild-type and VDUP1-deficient mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live P. aeruginosa. We found that VDUP1-deficient mice were more resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock than wild-type mice, as shown by the increased survival, accelerated bacterial clearance and suppression of cytokine overproduction of the VDUP1-deficient mice. VDUP1 promoted the recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavities of infected mice. VDUP1 impeded the phagocytosis of non-opsonized P. aeruginosa via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in macrophages. P. aeruginosa infection induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the increased production of ROS by the peritoneal cells of VDUP1-deficient mice was advantageous in clearing the bacteria. Overall, VDUP1 aggravates bacteremic shock; thus, VDUP1 can be considered a target molecule for the inhibition of P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit: a possible link to contaminated hand lotion.

    PubMed

    Becks, V E; Lorenzoni, N M

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a prolonged outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The attack rate of this outbreak was 8.5%, with no associated mortality. Hand lotion contaminated with P. aeruginosa was implicated in the transmission of organisms; removal of this hand lotion ended the outbreak. Contaminated hand lotion applied to clean hands of health care workers may have led to direct inoculation of infants at high risk for infection.

  6. Incorporation of isotope from specifically labeled glucose into alginates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, A R; Sokatch, J R

    1984-01-01

    The incorporation of isotope from [6-14C]glucose into alginate by both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Azotobacter vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either [1-14C]- or [2-14C]glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate synthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner - Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. PMID:6427189

  7. The role of quorum sensing in the in vivo virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rumbaugh, K P; Griswold, J A; Hamood, A N

    2000-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a wide variety of infections. The cell-density-dependent signaling mechanisms known as quorum sensing play a role in several of these infections including corneal, lung and burn wound infections. In addition, the quorum-sensing systems contribute to the ability of P. aeruginosa to form biofilms on medically important devices. The quorum-sensing systems accomplish their effect by controlling the production of different virulence factors and by manipulating the host immune response.

  8. Antibiotic Tolerance Induced by Lactoferrin in Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Viejo-Diaz, Mónica; Pérez, Francisco; Fierro, José F.

    2005-01-01

    Lactoferrin-induced cell depolarization and a delayed tobramycin-killing effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells were correlated. This antibiotic tolerance effect (ATE) reflects the ability of a defense protein to modify the activity of an antibiotic as a result of its modulatory effect on bacterial physiology. P. aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients showed higher ATE values (≤6-fold) than other clinical strains. PMID:15793153

  9. Local imipenem activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa decreases in vivo in the presence of siliconized latex.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, C; Conejo, M C; Docobo-Pérez, F; Velasco, C; López-Rojas, R; García, I; Pachón-Ibáñez, M E; Rodríguez, J M; Pachón, J; Pascual, A

    2011-02-01

    Zinc eluted from siliconized latex (SL) increases resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to imipenem in vitro. A foreign body peritonitis model was used to evaluate the activity of imipenem using SL or silicone (S) implants. No differences were observed in mortality, positive blood cultures and tissue bacterial counts between SL and S implants. Implant-associated counts, however, were significantly higher in the SL group. It is concluded that SL decreases the activity of imipenem against P. aeruginosa. PMID:20936490

  10. Identification of type II and type III pyoverdine receptors from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    de Chial, Magaly; Ghysels, Bart; Beatson, Scott A; Geoffroy, Valérie; Meyer, Jean Marie; Pattery, Theresa; Baysse, Christine; Chablain, Patrice; Parsons, Yasmin N; Winstanley, Craig; Cordwell, Stuart J; Cornelis, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces, under conditions of iron limitation, a high-affinity siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD), which is recognized at the level of the outer membrane by a specific TonB-dependent receptor, FpvA. So far, for P. aeruginosa, three different PVDs, differing in their peptide chain, have been described (types I-III), but only the FpvA receptor for type I is known. Two PVD-producing P. aeruginosa strains, one type II and one type III, were mutagenized by a mini-TnphoA3 transposon. In each case, one mutant unable to grow in the presence of the strong iron chelator ethylenediaminedihydroxyphenylacetic acid (EDDHA) and the cognate PVD was selected. The first mutant, which had an insertion in the pvdE gene, upstream of fpvA, was unable to take up type II PVD and showed resistance to pyocin S3, which is known to use type II FpvA as receptor. The second mutant was unable to take up type III PVD and had the transposon insertion in fpvA. Cosmid libraries of the respective type II and type III PVD wild-type strains were constructed and screened for clones restoring the capacity to grow in the presence of PVD. From the respective complementing genomic fragments, type II and type III fpvA sequences were determined. When in trans, type II and type III fpvA restored PVD production, uptake, growth in the presence of EDDHA and, in the case of type II fpvA, pyocin S3 sensitivity. Complementation of fpvA mutants obtained by allelic exchange was achieved by the presence of cognate fpvA in trans. All three receptors posses an N-terminal extension of about 70 amino acids, similar to FecA of Escherichia coli, but only FpvAI has a TAT export sequence at its N-terminal end. PMID:12686625

  11. Isolation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene affecting uptake of dibenzothiophene in n-tetradecane.

    PubMed

    Noda, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kimiko; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    The dsz desulfurization gene cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 was transferred into the chromosomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NCIMB9571 using a transposon vector. All of the recombinant strains completely desulfurized 1 mM dibenzothiophene (DBT) in n-tetradecane (n-TD) except one, named strain PARMI. Strain PARMI was unable to desulfurize DBT in n-TD, but was able to desulfurize it in water. The n-alkane utilization ability, the biosurfactant production and the fatty acid composition of cells in strain PARMI were the same level as those of the other recombinants. The transposon insertion area of strain PARMI was analyzed by transposon tagging. We cloned three possible open reading frames (ORFs), designated hcuA, hcuB and hcuC, from the genomic DNA of P. aeruginosa NCIMB9571 using the transposon insertion area of strain PARMI as a DNA probe. Examination of the sequence revealed the transposon was inserted into hcuA. The full length of the hcuABC genes transformed into strain PARMI achieved 87% recovery of the desulfurization activity of DBT in n-TD, but partial hcuABC genes achieved only 0-12%. These results indicate that DBT desulfurization in the oil phase by recombinant P. aeruginosa strain NCIMB9571 requires the full length of the hcuABC gene cluster. The hcuABC gene cluster relates to DBT uptake from the oil phase to inside of the cell, and the uptake ability is independent of the n-alkane utilization ability, the biosurfactant production and the fatty acid composition of cells.

  12. Investigation of persistent colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa-like strains in a spring water bottling plant.

    PubMed Central

    Morais, P V; Mesquita, C; Andrade, J L; da Costa, M S

    1997-01-01

    Ninety-seven strains, producing a fluorescent pigment under UV light and/or a green diffusive pigment on cetrimide-naladixic acid agar, were isolated from a spring water bottling plant. These strains were presumptively identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but they could not be confirmed as strains of this species nor identified by the API 20NE identification system. The isolates and reference strains were clustered by computer-assisted whole-cell protein sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The numerical analysis of the protein electrophoregrams resulted in the formation of four clusters at a similarity level of 80% and two unclustered type strains. One cluster included strains isolated during a 4-month period and reference strains of several biotypes of P. fluorescens. The remaining isolates formed another cluster with a very high similarity of level, which included two groups of strains based on biochemical characterization by the API 20NE Test System. Strains were typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR and two different RAPD patterns were obtained, corresponding to each biochemical profile. This persistent colonization seems to be caused by a single species present in the bottling system, with two clonal origins, not related to P. aeruginosa or to any of the other type strains tested. Partial 16S rDNA sequence of a representative strain of one cluster of isolates had a level of similarity of 99.3% with P. alcaligenes. This study shows that characteristics similar to P. aeruginosa on cetrimide-naladixic acid agar can be exhibited by several groups of fluorescent pseudomonads that do not belong to this species, clearly showing that confirmation tests must be performed before a decision regarding the water quality is made. PMID:9055406

  13. Growth and survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in some aromatic waters.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Y K; Ogunmodede, M S

    1991-01-01

    The ability of some aromatic waters at the in-use concentrations to enhance or inhibit the growth of microorganisms was determined by the antimicrobial preservative challenge method. Anise, chloroform, cinnamon, clove, dill, lemon, peppermint and rose waters were challenged with Ps. aeruginosa. Levels of the surviving cells at different times were determined by the pour plate method. The antimicrobial effect of the corresponding undiluted aromatic oils against Ps. aeruginosa was determined by the cup-plate method. Results showed that cinnamon water possesses profound and useful preservative activity against Ps. aeruginosa. The inhibitory effect of anise, chloroform and rose waters on Ps. aeruginosa is not much pronounced. Similarly, clove, dill and peppermint waters exhibited no significant preservative actions. Lemon water was found to enhance the growth of Ps. aeruginosa. The survival pattern of Ps. aeruginosa in the majority of the aromatic waters conforms with the antimicrobial actions of their undiluted oils.

  14. THE APPLICATION OF PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID PROBES FOR RAPID DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF EUBACTERIA, STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN RECREATIONAL BEACHES OF S. FLORIDA. (R828830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, S...

  15. Irgasan-induced pigmentation in Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kranz, R G; Lynch, D L

    1979-01-01

    Two irgasan-resistant micro-organisms (P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens) were used to study the effects of various antibiotic and chemotherapeutic agents on pigment production. These agents included streptomycin, thallium acetate, polymyxin B, hexachlorophene, irgasan, prodigiosin and DMSO (dimethyl sulphoxide). Only irgasan, compared to other drugs and membrane-active agents showed the unique property of inducing pigmentation in both P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens, i.e. prodigiosin in S. marcescens and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa.

  16. Expeditive synthesis of trithiotriazine-cored glycoclusters and inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Smadhi, Meriem; Gingras, Marc; Abderrahim, Raoudha

    2014-01-01

    Summary Readily accessible, low-valency glycoclusters based on a triazine core bearing D-galactose and L-fucose epitopes are able to inhibit biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These multivalent ligands are simple to synthesize, are highly soluble, and can be either homofunctional or heterofunctional. The galactose-decorated cluster shows good affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin lecA. They are convenient biological probes for investigating the roles of lecA and lecB in biofilm formation. PMID:25246957

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular typing of pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from surgical wounds in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stella; Ganiyu, Olaniyi; John, Rachael; Fowora, Muinah; Akinsinde, Kehinde; Odeigah, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with surgical wounds in hospitals and also to investigate their epidemiological relatedness using molecular typing techniques. Twenty Pseudomonas sp. isolated from surgical wounds were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by disk diffusion, plasmid profile, SDS-PAGE and PCR using the parC, gyr A gene and RAPD using the 1254 primer. The isolates showed resistance to 12 different antibiotics with six being 100% resistant. Plasmids were detected in 16 (80%) of the isolates. The RAPD-PCR using the primer 1254, SDS-PAGE classified the 20 Pseudomonas spp. into 5 and 6 types respectively. Pseudomona aeruginosa strains isolated from surgical wounds were generally resistant to a broad range of antibiotics and this is rather worrisome. The typing techniques classified the 20 isolates into 5 and 6 groups. PMID:22837123

  18. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Pyocyanin Biosynthetic Protein PhzM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons,J.; Greenhagen, B.; Shi, K.; Calabrese, K.; Robinson, H.; Ladner, J.

    2007-01-01

    Pyocyanin is a biologically active phenazine produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is thought to endow P. aeruginosa with a competitive growth advantage in colonized tissue and is also thought to be a virulence factor in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and AIDS where patients are commonly infected by pathogenic Pseudomonads due to their immunocompromised state. Pyocyanin is also a chemically interesting compound due to its unusual oxidation-reduction activity. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, the precursor to the bioactive phenazines, is synthesized from chorismic acid by enzymes encoded in a seven-gene cistron in P. aeruginosa and in other Pseudomonads. Phenzine-1-carboxylic acid is believed to be converted to pyocyanin by the sequential actions of the putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent N-methyltransferase PhzM and the putative flavin-dependent hydroxylase PhzS. Here we report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of PhzM determined by single anomalous dispersion. Unlike many methyltransferases, PhzM is a dimer in solution. The 36 kDa PhzM polypeptide folds into three domains. The C-terminal domain exhibits the {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold typical of small molecule methyltransferases. Two smaller N-terminal domains form much of the dimer interface. Structural alignments with known methyltransferases show that PhzM is most similar to the plant O-methyltransferases that are characterized by an unusual intertwined dimer interface. The structure of PhzM contains no ligands, and the active site is open and solvent-exposed when compared to structures of similar enzymes. In vitro experiments using purified PhzM alone demonstrate that it has little or no ability to methylate phenzine-1-carboxylic acid. However, when the putative hydroxylase PhzS is included, pyocyanin is readily produced. This observation suggests that a mechanism has evolved in P. aeruginosa that ensures efficient production of pyocyanin via the prevention of the formation and

  19. Phenazine production enhances extracellular DNA release via hydrogen peroxide generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa eDNA is a crucial component essential for biofilm formation and stability. In this study we report that release of eDNA is influenced by the production of phenazine in P. aeruginosa. A ∆phzA-G mutant of P. aeruginosa PA14 deficient in phenazine production generated significantly less eDNA in comparison with the phenazine producing strains. The relationship between eDNA release and phenazine production is bridged via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation and subsequent H2O2 mediated cell lysis and ultimately release of chromosomal DNA into the extracellular environment as eDNA. PMID:23710274

  20. Synthesis and biological properties of thiazole-analogues of pyochelin, a siderophore of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Noël, Sabrina; Hoegy, Françoise; Rivault, Freddy; Rognan, Didier; Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A

    2014-01-01

    Pyochelin is a siderophore common to all strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilized by this Gram-negative bacterium to acquire iron(III). FptA is the outer membrane transporter responsible of ferric-pyochelin uptake in P. aeruginosa. We describe in this Letter the synthesis and the biological properties ((55)Fe uptake, binding to FptA) of several thiazole analogues of pyochelin. Among them we report in this Letter the two first pyochelin analogues able to bind FptA without promoting any iron uptake in P. aeruginosa. PMID:24332092

  1. Isolation of a mucoid alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from the equine guttural pouch.

    PubMed Central

    Govan, J R; Sarasola, P; Taylor, D J; Tatnell, P J; Russell, N J; Gacesa, P

    1992-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of a mucoid, alginate-producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a nonhuman host, namely, in chondroids from an equine guttural pouch, is reported for the first time. Pure cultures of P. aeruginosa 12534 were isolated from a 17-month-old pony mare with a history of chronic bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge from the right guttural pouch. Transmission electron microscopy of chondroids showed mucoid P. aeruginosa growing as microcolonies within a matrix of extracellular material. On the basis of expression of the mucoid phenotype under different growth conditions, P. aeruginosa 12534 belongs to group 1 and resembles other isolates carrying the muc-23 mutation. The bulk of the extracellular material was characterized as being alginate by chemical and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, which showed that it had a composition similar to that produced by isolates of P. aeruginosa from human patients with cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:1551975

  2. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    SciTech Connect

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  3. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transcriptional Landscape Is Shaped by Environmental Heterogeneity and Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Schniederjans, Monika; Khaledi, Ariane; Hornischer, Klaus; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Pohl, Sarah; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phenotypic variability among bacteria depends on gene expression in response to different environments, and it also reflects differences in genomic structure. In this study, we analyzed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) profiles of 151 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates under standard laboratory conditions and of one P. aeruginosa type strain under 14 different environmental conditions. Our approach allowed dissection of the impact of the genetic background versus environmental cues on P. aeruginosa gene expression profiles and revealed that phenotypic variation was larger in response to changing environments than between genomically different isolates. We demonstrate that mutations within the global regulator LasR affect more than one trait (pleiotropy) and that the interaction between mutations (epistasis) shapes the P. aeruginosa phenotypic plasticity landscape. Because of pleiotropic and epistatic effects, average genotype and phenotype measures appeared to be uncorrelated in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26126853

  4. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    DOE PAGES

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; et al

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly moremore » prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.« less

  5. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang; Adav, Sunil S; Salido, May Margarette; Liu, Yang; Givskov, Michael; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Yang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and tolerance greatly diminish the therapeutic potential of antibiotics against pathogens. Antibiotic tolerance by bacterial biofilms often leads to persistent infections, but its mechanisms are unclear. Here we use a proteomics approach, pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a 'last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance development. The macrolide erythromycin, which has been previously shown to inhibit the motility and QS of P. aeruginosa, boosts biofilm eradication by colistin. Our work provides insights on the mechanisms underlying the formation of antibiotic-tolerant populations in bacterial biofilms and indicates research avenues for designing more efficient treatments against biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26892159

  6. A thermo-stable lysine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Isolation, purification, characterization, and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan Tao; Zhou, Nan Di; Zhou, Zhe Min; Gao, Xin Xing; Tian, Ya Ping

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NJ-814, isolated from garden soil, produced an extracellular aminopeptidase that was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The purity was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and the Mr value of the enzyme was estimated to be 55 kDa. The purified enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 9.0 and 80 °C. It exhibits high thermo-stability. Half of the activity can remain after incubation at 80 °C for 119 min. It is stable within pH range of 7.5-10.5. It is strongly activated by Co(2+) and inhibited by Fe(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) , Zn(2+) , and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The specificity of the enzyme was investigated. Within several aminoacyl-p-nitroanilines (AA-pNA), Lys-pNA is proven to be the optimal substrate. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km ) of the enzyme for Lys-pNA and Leu-pNA were 2.32 and 9.41 mM, respectively. Peptide map fingerprinting shows that the sequence of the enzyme is highly similar to aminopeptidase Y from P. aeruginosa 18A. It can be speculated that this enzyme is a Zn(2+) -dependent enzyme and contains two zinc ions in its active site.

  7. Factors Affecting Comparative Resistance of Naturally Occurring and Subcultured Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Carson, L. A.; Favero, M. S.; Bond, W. W.; Petersen, N. J.

    1972-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in pure culture from the reservoir of a hospital mist therapy unit by an extinction-dilution technique; its natural distilled water environment was used as a growth and maintenance medium. After a single subculture on Trypticase soy agar, the strain showed a marked decrease in resistance to inactivation by acetic acid, glutaraldehyde, chlorine dioxide, and a quaternary ammonium compound when compared with naturally occurring cells grown in mist therapy unit water. The following factors were observed to affect the relative resistances of naturally occurring and subcultured cells of the P. aeruginosa strain: (i) temperature at which the cultures were incubated prior to exposure to disinfectants, (ii) growth phase of the cultures at the time of exposure to disinfectants, (iii) nature of the suspending menstruum for disinfectants, and (iv) exposure to fluorescent light during incubation of inocula prior to testing. The applied significance of these findings may alter the present concepts of disinfectant testing as well as routine control procedures in the hospital environment. PMID:4624209

  8. Characterization of lanthanide ions binding sites in the cell wall of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Texier, A.C.; Andres, Y.; Illemassene, M.; Le Cloirec, P.

    2000-02-15

    Earlier studies have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can adsorb selectively La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, and Yb{sup 3+} from aqueous solution. These bacterial cells may find promising applications for removal and separation of lanthanide ions from contaminated effluents. In this work, potentiometric titrations and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy were used to determine the binding sites of the biomass and, consequently, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the biosorption of lanthanide ions. Around 90 {+-} 5% of the adsorbed lanthanum was easily desorbed with an EDTA 0.1 M solution. In most instances, lanthanides seemed to concentrate extracellularly. The diversity of potential metal-binding groups was revealed by potentiometric titrations of the biomass. The amount of strong and weaker acidic functional groups in the wet biomass was estimated at 0.24 {+-} 0.04 and 0.86 {+-} 0.02 mequiv/g, respectively. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy on europium-loaded P. aeruginosa biomass suggests that europium binding occurs mostly through carboxyl and phosphate groups.

  9. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacteriophage PaP3

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xia; Chen, Canhuang; Shen, Wei; Huang, Guangtao; Le, Shuai; Lu, Shuguang; Li, Ming; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jing; Rao, Xiancai; Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Tan, Yinling; Hu, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between Bacteriophage (phage) and host bacteria are widespread in nature and influences of phage replication on the host cells are complex and extensive. Here, we investigate genome-wide interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and its temperate phage PaP3 at five time points during phage infection. Compared to the uninfected host, 38% (2160/5633) genes of phage-infected host were identified as differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Functional analysis of the repressed DEGs revealed infection-stage-dependent pathway communications. Based on gene co-expression analysis, most PaP3 middle genes were predicted to have negative impact on host transcriptional regulators. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that adjacent genes of PaP3 interacted with the same host genes and might possess similar functions. Finally, our results suggested that during the whole infection stage, the early genes of PaP3 had stronger regulatory role in host gene expression than middle and late genes, while the host genes involved amino acid metabolism were the most “vulnerable” targets of these phage genes. This work provides the basis for understanding survival mechanisms of parasites and host, and seeking phage gene products that could potentially be used in anti-bacterial infection. PMID:26750429

  10. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Regulates Antibiotic Biosynthesis in the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guohao; Li, Sainan; Huang, Jiaofang; Wei, Xue; Li, Yaqian

    2012-01-01

    The rhizosphere microbe Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18 shows strong antifungal activities, mainly due to the biosynthesis of antibiotics like pyoluteorin (Plt) and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). The ubiquitous RNA chaperone Hfq regulates bacterial virulence and stress tolerance through global posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we explored the molecular mechanism by which Hfq controls antibiotic biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa M18. The robust downregulation of Plt biosynthesis by Hfq was mediated exclusively by the posttranscriptional downregulation of the plt transcriptional activator PltR. Hfq posttranscriptionally repressed phzM expression and consequently reduced the conversion of PCA to pyocyanin. However, Hfq positively controlled the phz2 operon and PCA biosynthesis through both QscR-mediated transcriptional regulation at the promoter and an unknown regulation at the operator. Also, Hfq was shown to directly bind at the mRNA 5′ untranslated leaders of pltR, qscR, and phzM. These three negatively regulated target genes of Hfq shared a similar secondary structure with a short single-stranded AU-rich spacer (a potential Hfq-binding motif) linking two stem-loops. Taken together, these results indicate that Hfq, potentially in collaboration with unknown small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), tightly controls antibiotic biosynthesis through both direct posttranscriptional inhibition and indirect transcriptional regulation. PMID:22427627

  11. Computer-Aided Identification of Recognized Drugs as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Hentzer, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by the use of small-molecule quorum-sensing inhibitors (referred to as the antipathogenic drug principle) is likely to play a role in future treatment strategies for chronic infections. In this study, structure-based virtual screening was used in a search for putative quorum-sensing inhibitors from a database comprising approved drugs and natural compounds. The database was built from compounds which showed structural similarities to previously reported quorum-sensing inhibitors, the ligand of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing receptor LasR, and a quorum-sensing receptor agonist. Six top-ranking compounds, all recognized drugs, were identified and tested for quorum-sensing-inhibitory activity. Three compounds, salicylic acid, nifuroxazide, and chlorzoxazone, showed significant inhibition of quorum-sensing-regulated gene expression and related phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the identified compounds have the potential to be used as antipathogenic drugs. Furthermore, the results indicate that structure-based virtual screening is an efficient tool in the search for novel compounds to combat bacterial infections. PMID:19364871

  12. Computer-aided identification of recognized drugs as Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Hentzer, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2009-06-01

    Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by the use of small-molecule quorum-sensing inhibitors (referred to as the antipathogenic drug principle) is likely to play a role in future treatment strategies for chronic infections. In this study, structure-based virtual screening was used in a search for putative quorum-sensing inhibitors from a database comprising approved drugs and natural compounds. The database was built from compounds which showed structural similarities to previously reported quorum-sensing inhibitors, the ligand of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing receptor LasR, and a quorum-sensing receptor agonist. Six top-ranking compounds, all recognized drugs, were identified and tested for quorum-sensing-inhibitory activity. Three compounds, salicylic acid, nifuroxazide, and chlorzoxazone, showed significant inhibition of quorum-sensing-regulated gene expression and related phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the identified compounds have the potential to be used as antipathogenic drugs. Furthermore, the results indicate that structure-based virtual screening is an efficient tool in the search for novel compounds to combat bacterial infections. PMID:19364871

  13. Vaccine potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O-polysaccharide-toxin A conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Cryz, S J; Lang, A B; Sadoff, J C; Germanier, R; Fürer, E

    1987-01-01

    Serologically reactive O-polysaccharide from nine serotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were covalently linked to toxin A via reductive amination, with adipic acid dihydrazide serving as a spacer molecule. The conjugates were composed of toxin A/O-polysaccharide ratios ranging from 1.17:1 to 3:1. All possessed an average Mr of greater than 10(6), were devoid of ADP ribosyltransferase activity associated with toxin A, and were nontoxic for mice and guinea pigs. The conjugates were stable from toxic reversion when stored at 37 degrees C for 28 days. The conjugation condition used preserved a substantial proportion of critical epitopes on the toxin A molecule as shown by the ability of toxin A-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to react with the various conjugates. All nine conjugates were capable of evoking an antitoxin A and an antilipopolysaccharide immunoglobulin G (IgG) response in mice and rabbits. Rabbit antitoxin A IgG was capable of neutralizing the cytotoxic effect of toxin A, whereas mice immunized with any of the conjugates were protected against toxin A intoxication. Rabbit anti-conjugate IgG, when passively transferred to mice, was highly effective at preventing fatal P. aeruginosa burn wound sepsis. PMID:3110065

  14. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang; Adav, Sunil S.; Salido, May Margarette; Liu, Yang; Givskov, Michael; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Yang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and tolerance greatly diminish the therapeutic potential of antibiotics against pathogens. Antibiotic tolerance by bacterial biofilms often leads to persistent infections, but its mechanisms are unclear. Here we use a proteomics approach, pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a ‘last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance development. The macrolide erythromycin, which has been previously shown to inhibit the motility and QS of P. aeruginosa, boosts biofilm eradication by colistin. Our work provides insights on the mechanisms underlying the formation of antibiotic-tolerant populations in bacterial biofilms and indicates research avenues for designing more efficient treatments against biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26892159

  15. Characterization of Molecular Mechanisms Controlling fabAB Transcription in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Herbert P.; Choi, Kyoung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Background The FabAB pathway is one of the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) synthesis pathways for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was previously noted that this operon was upregulated in biofilms and repressed by exogenous UFAs. Deletion of a 30 nt fabA upstream sequence, which is conserved in P. aeruginosa, P. putida, and P. syringae, led to a significant decrease in fabA transcription, suggesting positive regulation by an unknown positive regulatory mechanism. Methods/Principal Findings Here, genetic and biochemical approaches were employed to identify a potential fabAB activator. Deletion of candidate genes such as PA1611 or PA1627 was performed to determine if any of these gene products act as a fabAB activator. However, none of these genes were involved in the regulation of fabAB transcription. Use of mariner-based random mutagenesis to screen for fabA activator(s) showed that several genes encoding unknown functions, rpoN and DesA may be involved in fabA regulation, but probably via indirect mechanisms. Biochemical attempts performed did fail to isolate an activator of fabAB operon. Conclusion/Significance The data suggest that fabA expression might not be regulated by protein-binding, but by a distinct mechanism such as a regulatory RNA-based mechanism. PMID:23056212

  16. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila by silver in tap water.

    PubMed

    Silvestry-Rodriguez, Nadia; Bright, Kelly R; Uhlmann, Donald R; Slack, Donald C; Gerba, Charles P

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of silver as a secondary disinfectant to replace or reduce the level of chlorine utilized in water distribution systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila are opportunistic pathogens present in drinking water and have been associated with waterborne disease. After 8 hours of exposure to 100 microg/L of silver, there was a >6-log10 reduction in P. aeruginosa in tap water at room temperature at pH7 and a 5.55-log10 reduction in the presence of 3 mg/L humic acid. Similar reductions were observed at pH9. At 4 degrees C, reductions greater than 4-log10 were observed after 24 hours. For A. hydrophila, a >6-log10 reduction occurred at both pH7 and pH9 within nine hours. The World Health Organization has determined that this amount of silver could be used for water disinfection without health risks. Furthermore, silver shows promise as a secondary disinfectant, even in the presence of organic matter in concentrations that would reduce the effectiveness of free chlorine.

  17. High therapeutic index of factor C Sushi peptides: potent antimicrobials against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yau, Y H; Ho, B; Tan, N S; Ng, M L; Ding, J L

    2001-10-01

    Factor C protein isolated from the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, has endotoxin binding capability. Synthetic peptides of 34 amino acids based on the sequence of two regions of factor C (Sushi 1 and Sushi 3) as well as their corresponding mutants exhibited activities against 30 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Collectively, all four peptides demonstrated exceptionally effective bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa with 90% minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC(90)s) in the range of 0.06 to 0.25 microg/ml (16 to 63 nM). Viable bacteria were reduced by 90% after 7 min and were totally eradicated within 40 to 50 min. These peptides are minimally hemolytic against both rabbit and human erythrocytes even at concentrations up to 1,600-fold their MBC(90)s. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that cytotoxic effects are small even at 1,000-fold their MBC(90)s. Furthermore, the Sushi peptides are tolerant of high-salt and adverse pH conditions. These findings demonstrate the promising therapeutic potential of the Sushi peptides.

  18. Suppression of charcoal rot in soybean by moderately halotolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa GS-33 under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sandeep; Paradeshi, Jayasinh; Chaudhari, Bhushan

    2016-08-01

    Charcoal rot severely limits the soybean crop yield under saline conditions. The present studies focus on biocontrol and plant growth promoting potential of phenazine producing moderately halotolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (GS-33) in soybean under saline soil conditions. A marine isolate; GS-33 was identified as P. aeruginosa based on polyphasic characterization. This strain showed potent in vitro biocontrol activity against charcoal rot causing fungus Macrophomina phaseolina. It was capable of producing phenazine-1-carboxylic acid even at elevated salt concentrations. Moreover, GS-33 possessed other biocontrol traits like production of siderophores, HCN and protease under saline conditions. Multiple traits for plant growth promotion such as synthesis of IAA, NH3 , and solubilization of phosphate were also exhibited by GS-33. Plant growth promoting and biocontrol control potentials of GS-33 were evaluated by pot assay under saline soil conditions. Higher biomass and chlorophyll content were observed in GS-33 treated seedlings. A greater reduction in charcoal rot caused by fungal pathogens under both normal and saline soil conditions in GS-33 treated seedlings was observed. In a nut shell, phenazine producing halotolerant strain GS-33 could mitigate saline soil conditions (abiotic stress) and infestation of M. phaseolina (biotic stress) in soybean. PMID:27213894

  19. Immunochemical Determination of Pyocyanin and 1-Hydroxyphenazine as Potential Biomarkers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    PubMed

    Pastells, Carme; Pascual, Nuria; Sanchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M-Pilar

    2016-02-01

    A novel immunochemical approach to diagnose Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections is reported, which is based on the quantification of relevant and specific virulence factors secreted by this microorganism. Specific antibodies have been raised using hapten PC1 (a 1:1 mixture of 9-hydroxy- and 6-hydroxy-phenazine-2-carobxylic acids), designed to recognize 1-hydroxyphenazine (1-OHphz), which is the main metabolite of pyocyanin (PYO). PYO is one of the most important virulence factors produced by nearly all P. aeruginosa strains, and other species do not produce this factor. With these antibodies, an immunochemical analytical procedure able to quantify both 1-OHphz and PYO in complex clinical samples has been developed. 1-OHphz can be directly measured in solubilized sputum samples diluted 20 times with the assay buffer. Quantification of PYO is accomplished after conversion to 1-OHphz in just 20 min under basic conditions. A LOD of 0.60 ± 0.01 nM (4.80 ± 0.08 nmol kg(-1) sputum) is reached for both biomarker targets under the conditions established, a value that is much below the reported concentrations on sputum samples obtained from infected patients (up to 100 μM). The assay is robust, reproducible, accurate, can be run in about 2 h, and many samples can be measured simultaneously. The present reported assay could represent a significant improvement in the diagnosis of infectious diseases caused by this pathogen. PMID:26738983

  20. Genetic characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-resistant isolates at the university teaching hospital in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Hossein; Sadighian, Hooman; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is commonly responsible for nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to perform a genotyping analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa-resistant isolates by the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method at the university teaching hospital in Iran. Materials and Methods: Antimicrobial susceptibility was analyzed for P. aeruginosa isolates. Ceftazidime-resistant (CAZres) isolates with a positive double-disc synergy test were screened for the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding genes. Phenotypic tests to detect the metallo-β-lactamase strains of P. aeruginosa were performed on imipenem-resistant (IMPres) isolates. Selected strains were characterized by MLST. Results: Of 35 P. aeruginosa isolates, 71%, 45% and 45% of isolates were CAZres, IMPres and multidrug resistant (MDR), respectively. Fifty-seven percent of the isolates carried the blaOXAgroup-1. All the five typed isolates were ST235. Isolates of ST235 that were MDR showed a unique resistance pattern. Conclusion: This study shows a high rate of MDR P. aeruginosa isolates at the university teaching hospital in Iran. It seems MDR isolates of P. aeruginosa ST235 with unique resistance pattern disseminated in this hospital. PMID:26380241

  1. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, A. S.; Joergensen, B.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Johansen, H.; Karlsmark, T.; Givskov, M.; Krogfelt, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is widely used for debridement of chronic infected wounds; however, for wounds harbouring specific bacteria limited effect or failure of the treatment has been described. Here we studied the survival of Lucilia sericata maggots encountering Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa ΔlasR rhlR (ΔRR) QS-deficient mutant in different concentrations. Maggots were killed in the presence of WT PAO1 whereas the challenge with the QS mutant showed a survival reduction of ∼25 % compared to negative controls. Furthermore, bacterial intake by the maggots was lower in the presence of WT PAO1 compared to the PAO1 ΔRR mutant. Maggot excretions/secretions (ES) were assayed for the presence of QS inhibitors; only high doses of ES showed inhibition of QS in P. aeruginosa. Thus P. aeruginosa was shown to be toxic to L. sericata maggots. This, coupled to the preferential feeding by the maggots and reduced ingestion of P. aeruginosa, could explain MDT failure in wounds colonized by P. aeruginosa. Wounds heavily colonized with P. aeruginosa should be a counterindication for MDT unless used in combination with a pre-treatment with other topical therapeutics targeting P. aeruginosa. PMID:19892758

  2. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots.

    PubMed

    Andersen, A S; Joergensen, B; Bjarnsholt, T; Johansen, H; Karlsmark, T; Givskov, M; Krogfelt, K A

    2010-02-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is widely used for debridement of chronic infected wounds; however, for wounds harbouring specific bacteria limited effect or failure of the treatment has been described. Here we studied the survival of Lucilia sericata maggots encountering Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa DeltalasR rhlR (DeltaRR) QS-deficient mutant in different concentrations. Maggots were killed in the presence of WT PAO1 whereas the challenge with the QS mutant showed a survival reduction of approximately 25 % compared to negative controls. Furthermore, bacterial intake by the maggots was lower in the presence of WT PAO1 compared to the PAO1 DeltaRR mutant. Maggot excretions/secretions (ES) were assayed for the presence of QS inhibitors; only high doses of ES showed inhibition of QS in P. aeruginosa. Thus P. aeruginosa was shown to be toxic to L. sericata maggots. This, coupled to the preferential feeding by the maggots and reduced ingestion of P. aeruginosa, could explain MDT failure in wounds colonized by P. aeruginosa. Wounds heavily colonized with P. aeruginosa should be a counterindication for MDT unless used in combination with a pre-treatment with other topical therapeutics targeting P. aeruginosa.

  3. Antibiofilm activity of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 and Kribbella sp. BFI 1562 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Chang-Jin; Lee, Jae-Chan; Ju, Yoon Jung; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2012-12-01

    Members of the actinomycetes family are a rich source of bioactive compounds including diverse antibiotics. This study sought to identify novel and non-toxic biofilm inhibitors from the actinomycetes library for reducing the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. After the screening of 4104 actinomycetes strains, we found that the culture spent medium (1 %, v/v) of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 and Kribbella sp. BFI 1562 inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation by 90 % without affecting the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa cells, while the spent media enhanced the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Global transcriptome analyses revealed that the spent medium of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 induced expression of phenazine, pyoverdine, pyochelin synthesis genes, and iron uptake genes in P. aeruginosa. The addition of exogenous iron restored the biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa in the presence of the spent medium of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230, which suggests that the Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 strain interfered iron acquisition in P. aeruginosa. Experiments on solvent extraction, heat treatment, and proteinase K treatment suggested that hydrophilic compound(s), possibly extracellular peptides or proteins from Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 cause the biofilm reduction of P. aeruginosa. Together, this study indicates that actinomycetes strains have an ability to control the biofilm of P. aeruginosa. PMID:22722911

  4. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and caveolin-1 regulate epithelial cell internalization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajmoczi, Milan; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Alper, Seth L.; Pier, Gerald B.; Golan, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) exhibit defective innate immunity and are susceptible to chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the molecular bases for the hypersusceptibility of CF patients to P. aeruginosa, we used the IB3-1 cell line with two defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genes (ΔF508/W1282X) to generate isogenic stable, clonal lung epithelial cells expressing wild-type (WT)-CFTR with an NH2-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag. GFP-CFTR exhibited posttranslational modification, subcellular localization, and anion transport function typical of WT-CFTR. P. aeruginosa internalization, a component of effective innate immunity, required functional CFTR and caveolin-1, as shown by: 1) direct correlation between GFP-CFTR expression levels and P. aeruginosa internalization; 2) enhanced P. aeruginosa internalization by aminoglycoside-induced read through of the CFTR W1282X allele in IB3-1 cells; 3) decreased P. aeruginosa internalization following siRNA knockdown of GFP-CFTR or caveolin-1; and 4) spatial association of P. aeruginosa with GFP-CFTR and caveolin-1 at the cell surface. P. aeruginosa internalization also required free lateral diffusion of GFP-CFTR, allowing for bacterial coclustering with GFP-CFTR and caveolin-1 at the plasma membrane. Thus efficient initiation of innate immunity to P. aeruginosa requires formation of an epithelial “internalization platform” involving both caveolin-1 and functional, laterally mobile CFTR. PMID:19386787

  5. Comparative Molecular docking analysis of DNA Gyrase subunit A in Pseudomonas aeruginosaPAO1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aman; Sharma, Vanashika; Tewari, Ashish Kumar; Surenderkumar, Vipul; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Mathur, Ashwani; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium known for causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Recently, several drug targets in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 have been reported using network biology approaches on the basis of essentiality and topology and further ranked on network measures viz. degree and centrality. Till date no drug/ligand molecule has been reported against this targets.In our work we have identified the ligand /drug molecules, through Orthologous gene mapping against Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168 and performed modelling and docking analysis. From the predicted drug targets in PA PAO1, we selected those drug targets which show statistically significant orthology with a model organism and whose orthologs are present in all the selected drug targets of PA PAO1.Modeling of their structure has been done using I-Tasser web server. Orthologous gene mapping has been performed using Cluster of Orthologs (COGs) and based on orthology; drugs available for Bacillus sp. have been docked with PA PAO1 protein drug targets using MoleGro virtual docker version 4.0.2.Orthologous gene for PA3168 gyrA is BS gyrAfound in Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168. The drugs cited for Bacillus sp. have been docked with PA genes and energy analyses have been made. Based on Orthologous gene mapping andin-silico studies, Nalidixic acid is reported as an effective drug against PA3168 gyrA for the treatment of CF and COPD. PMID:23423379

  6. Plasma-Mediated Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Grown on Borosilicate Surfaces under Continuous Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Vandervoort, Kurt G.; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturabilty are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  7. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Vandervoort, Kurt G; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  8. Isolation of phenazine 1,6-di-carboxylic acid from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain HRW.1-S3 and its role in biofilm-mediated crude oil degradation and cytotoxicity against bacterial and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Debdeep; Kumar, Abhinash; Mukhopadhyay, Balaram; Sengupta, Tapas K

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas sp. has long been known for production of a wide range of secondary metabolites during late exponential and stationary phases of growth. Phenazine derivatives constitute a large group of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms including Pseudomonas sp. Phenazine 1,6-di-carboxylic acid (PDC) is one of such metabolites and has been debated for its origin from Pseudomonas sp. The present study describes purification and characterization of PDC isolated from culture of a natural isolate of Pseudomonas sp. HRW.1-S3 while grown in presence of crude oil as sole carbon source. The isolated PDC was tested for its effect on biofilm formation by another environmental isolate of Pseudomonas sp. DSW.1-S4 which lacks the ability to produce any phenazine compound. PDC showed profound effect on both planktonic as well as biofilm mode of growth of DSW.1-S4 at concentrations between 5 and 20 μM. Interestingly, PDC showed substantial cytotoxicity against three cancer cell lines and against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, the present study not only opens an avenue to understand interspecific cooperation between Pseudomonas species which may lead its applicability in bioremediation, but also it signifies the scope of future investigation on PDC for its therapeutic applications.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exopolysaccharides are important for mixed species biofilm community development and stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Saravanan; Nair, Harikrishnan A. S.; Lee, Kai W. K.; Ong, Jolene; Goh, Jie Q. J.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produces three polysaccharides, alginate, Psl, and Pel that play distinct roles in attachment and biofilm formation for monospecies biofilms. Considerably less is known about their role in the development of mixed species biofilm communities. This study has investigated the roles of alginate, Psl, and Pel during biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa in a defined and experimentally informative mixed species biofilm community, consisting of P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide had the biggest impact on the integration of P. aeruginosa in the mixed species biofilms, where the percent composition of the psl mutant was significantly lower (0.06%) than its wild-type (WT) parent (2.44%). In contrast, loss of the Pel polysaccharide had no impact on mixed species biofilm development. Loss of alginate or its overproduction resulted in P. aeruginosa representing 8.4 and 18.11%, respectively, of the mixed species biofilm. Dual species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were not affected by loss of alginate, Pel, or Psl, while the mucoid P. aeruginosa strain achieved a greater biomass than its parent strain. When P. aeruginosa was grown with P. protegens, loss of the Pel or alginate polysaccharides resulted in biofilms that were not significantly different from biofilms formed by the WT PAO1. In contrast, overproduction of alginate resulted in biofilms that were comprised of 35–40% of P. aeruginosa, which was significantly higher than the WT (5–20%). Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly reduced the percentage composition of P. aeruginosa in dual species biofilms with P. protegens (<1%). Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly disrupted the communal stress resistance of the three species biofilms. Thus, the polysaccharide composition of an individual species significantly impacts mixed species biofilm development and the emergent properties of such communities. PMID

  10. Antimicrobial effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on survivability and recovery of Campylobacter jejuni on poultry products.

    PubMed

    Davis, M A; Conner, D E

    2007-04-01

    Three types of poultry products representing differences in skin coverage were tested to determine the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to inhibit growth of Campylobacter jejuni. Processed ready-to-cook poultry carcasses were obtained from the Poultry Research Unit at Auburn University and were not subjected to any treatment to reduce or eliminate the native microflora on the carcasses. Carcasses were cut into wing sections (drumette, flat, tip), split breast pieces (with and without bone), and boneless, skinless breast pieces. Equal numbers of the 3 product types were subjected to 1 of 6 treatments: 1) uninoculated, 2) C. jejuni only, 3) P. aeruginosa type 1 only, 4) P. aeruginosa type 2 only, 5) C. jejuni + P. aeruginosa type 1, or 6) C. jejuni + P. aeruginosa type 2. Products were inoculated at 10(4) to 10(5) cfu. Postinoculation, equal numbers of product type were also subjected to the following: 1) aerobic or vacuum packaging, 2) storage temperature of 4 or 10 degrees C, and 3) storage of 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 d. Products were sampled after storage duration to determine the population of C. jejuni and P. aeruginosa. Individual pieces were rinsed with 50 mL of buffered peptone water. The recovered rinse was used to make appropriate dilutions and spiral plated onto Campy-Cefex and Pseudomonas P agars. Campy-Cefex plates were incubated microaerophilically at 42 degrees C for 48 h, whereas Pseudomonas P plates were incubated aerobically at 37 degrees C for 24 to 48 h. Random suspect colonies on Campy-Cefex plates were confirmed by cell morphology when viewed under microscopic examination. Suspect colonies on Pseudomonas P plates produced a blue color in the medium indicative of glycerol reduction. At both 4 and 10 degrees C, neither type of P. aeruginosa inhibited the growth or survival of C. jejuni compared to plates that were inoculated with C. jejuni only. PMID:17369550

  11. Biochemical and Cellular Characterization and Inhibitor Discovery of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 15-Lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Joshua D; Ogunsola, Abiola F; Jameson, J Brian; Yasgar, Adam; Flitter, Becca A; Freedman, Cody J; Melvin, Jeffrey A; Nguyen, Jason V M H; Maloney, David J; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Holman, Theodore R

    2016-06-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause nosocomial and chronic infections in immunocompromised patients. P. aeruginosa secretes a lipoxygenase, LoxA, but the biological role of this enzyme is currently unknown. LoxA is poorly similar in sequence to both soybean LOX-1 (s15-LOX-1) and human 15-LOX-1 (37 and 39%, respectively) yet has kinetics comparably fast versus those of s15-LOX-1 (at pH 6.5, Kcat = 181 ± 6 s(-1) and Kcat/KM = 16 ± 2 μM(-1) s(-1)). LoxA is capable of efficiently catalyzing the peroxidation of a broad range of free fatty acid (FA) substrates (e.g., AA and LA) with high positional specificity, indicating a 15-LOX. Its mechanism includes hydrogen atom abstraction [a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of >30], yet LoxA is a poor catalyst against phosphoester FAs, suggesting that LoxA is not involved in membrane decomposition. LoxA also does not react with 5- or 15-HETEs, indicating poor involvement in lipoxin production. A LOX high-throughput screen of the LOPAC library yielded a variety of low-micromolar inhibitors; however, none selectively targeted LoxA over the human LOX isozymes. With respect to cellular activity, the level of LoxA expression is increased when P. aeruginosa undergoes the transition to a biofilm mode of growth, but LoxA is not required for biofilm growth on abiotic surfaces. However, LoxA does appear to be required for biofilm growth in association with the host airway epithelium, suggesting a role for LoxA in mediating bacterium-host interactions during colonization. PMID:27226387

  12. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature

    PubMed Central

    Penesyan, Anahit; Kumar, Sheemal S.; Kamath, Karthik; Shathili, Abdulrahman M.; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Krisp, Christoph; Packer, Nicolle H.; Molloy, Mark P.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of “ready-made” nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data suggests that such

  13. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature.

    PubMed

    Penesyan, Anahit; Kumar, Sheemal S; Kamath, Karthik; Shathili, Abdulrahman M; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Krisp, Christoph; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of "ready-made" nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data suggests that such

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and genetic characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine infections.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Walker, R D; Blickenstaff, K; Bodeis-Jones, S; Zhao, S

    2008-09-18

    Infections with antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are a great challenge in both human and veterinary medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of 106 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from dogs with otitis and pyoderma from 2003 to 2006 in the United States. Three antimicrobial panels, including 6 classes and 32 antimicrobial agents, were used. A wide range of susceptibility patterns were noted with some isolates being resistant to between 8 and 28 (mean 16) of the antimicrobials tested. Among the beta-lactams, all isolates were resistant to ampicillin, cefoxitin, cefpodoxime, cephalothin and cefazolin followed by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (99%), ceftiofur (97%), ceftriaxone (39%), cefotaxime (26%), and cefotaxime/clavulanic acid (20%), whereas less than 7% of isolates were resistant to ceftazidime/clavulanic acid, ceftazidime, piperacillin/tazobactam or cefepime. Two isolates were resistant to the carbapenems. Among the quinolones and fluoroquinolones, the most isolates were resistant to naladixic acid (96%), followed by orbifloxacin (52%), difloxacin (43%), enrofloxacin (31%), marbofloxacin (27%), gatifloxacin (23%), levofloxacin (21%), and ciprofloxacin (16%). Among the aminoglycosides, the most resistance was seen to kanamycin (90%), followed by streptomycin (69%), gentamicin (7%), and amikacin (3%). Of the remaining antimicrobials 100% of the isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol followed by tetracycline (98%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (57%), and sulfisoxazole (51%). Point mutations were present in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and/or parE genes among 34 of the 102 naladixic acid-resistant isolates. Two isolates contained class 1 integrons carrying aadA gene conferring streptomycin and spectinomycin resistance. The findings suggest that many antimicrobial agents commonly used in companion animals may not constitute appropriate therapy for canine pseudomonas infections.

  15. Molecular analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa regulatory genes ptxR and ptxS.

    PubMed

    Colmer, J A; Hamood, A N

    2001-09-01

    We have previously described two Pseudomonas aeruginosa genes, ptxR, which enhances toxA and pvc (the pyoverdine chromophore operon) expression, and ptxS, the first gene of the kgu operon for the utilization of 2-ketogluconate by P. aeruginosa. ptxS interferes with the effect of ptxR on toxA expression. In this study, we have utilized DNA hybridization experiments to determine the presence of ptxR and ptxS homologous sequences in several gram-negative bacteria. ptxR homologous sequences were detected in P. aeruginosa strains only, while ptxS homologous sequences were detected in P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Using Northern blot hybridization experiments and a ptxS-lacZ fusion plasmid, we have shown that P. aeruginosa ptxR and ptxS are expressed in P. putida and P. fluorescens. Additional Northern blot hybridization experiments confirmed that ptxS is transcribed in P. putida and P. fluorescens strains that carried no plasmid. The presence of a PtxS homologue in these strains was examined by DNA-gel shift experiments. Specific gel shift bands were detected when the lysates of P. aeruginosa, P. putida, and P. fluorescens were incubated with the ptxS operator site as probe. kgu-hybridizing sequences were detected in P. putida and P. fluorescens. These results suggest that (i) ptxR is present in P. aeruginosa, while ptxS is present in P. aeruginosa, P. putida, and P. fluorescens; (ii) both ptxR and ptxS are expressed in P. putida and P fluorescens; and (iii) a PtxS homologue may exist in P. putida and P. fluorescens. PMID:11683464

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenotypes Associated With Eradication Failure in Children With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Ramsey, Bonnie W.; Kulasekara, Hemantha D.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Houston, Laura S.; Pope, Christopher E.; Kulasekara, Bridget R.; Armbruster, Catherine R.; Burns, Jane L.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Gibson, Ronald L.; Miller, Samuel I.; Khan, Umer; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key respiratory pathogen in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Due to its association with lung disease progression, initial detection of P. aeruginosa in CF respiratory cultures usually results in antibiotic treatment with the goal of eradication. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits many different phenotypes in vitro that could serve as useful prognostic markers, but the relative relationships between these phenotypes and failure to eradicate P. aeruginosa have not been well characterized. Methods. We measured 22 easily assayed in vitro phenotypes among the baseline P. aeruginosa isolates collected from 194 participants in the 18-month EPIC clinical trial, which assessed outcomes after antibiotic eradication therapy for newly identified P. aeruginosa. We then evaluated the associations between these baseline isolate phenotypes and subsequent outcomes during the trial, including failure to eradicate after antipseudomonal therapy, emergence of mucoidy, and occurrence of an exacerbation. Results. Baseline P. aeruginosa isolates frequently exhibited phenotypes thought to represent chronic adaptation, including mucoidy. Wrinkly colony surface and irregular colony edges were both associated with increased risk of eradication failure (hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals], 1.99 [1.03–3.83] and 2.14 [1.32–3.47], respectively). Phenotypes reflecting defective quorum sensing were significantly associated with subsequent mucoidy, but no phenotype was significantly associated with subsequent exacerbations during the trial. Conclusions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenotypes commonly considered to reflect chronic adaptation were observed frequently among isolates at early detection. We found that 2 easily assayed colony phenotypes were associated with failure to eradicate after antipseudomonal therapy, both of which have been previously associated with altered biofilm formation and defective quorum sensing. PMID:24863401

  17. Alternative to antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra on membrane permeability and inhibition of efflux activity and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its in vitro time-kill activity.

    PubMed

    Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Tanwar, Ankit; Narula, Alka; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-09-01

    The multi-drug resistance offered by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics can be attributed towards its propensity to develop biofilm, modification in cell membrane and to efflux antibacterial drugs. The present study explored the activity of Glycyrrhiza glabra and one of its pure compounds, glycyrrhizic acid against P. aeruginosa and their mechanism of action in terms of the effect on membrane permeability, efflux activity, and biofilm formation were determined. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by using broth dilution technique. The minimum bactericidal concentrations were assessed on agar plate. The MIC of the extract and glycyrrhizic acid was found to be 200 and 100 μg ml(-1), respectively. The MBC was found to be 800 and 400 μg ml(-1) in the case of extract and glycyrrhizic acid, respectively. Time -dependent killing efficacy was also estimated. Flowcytometric analysis with staining methods was used to determine the effect of extract and glycyrrhizic acid at 2 × MIC on different physiological parameters and compared it with the standard (antibiotic). The growth of P. aeruginosa was significantly inhibited by extract and the pure compound. The herbal extract and the glycyrrhic acid were also found to effective in targeting the physiological parameters of the bacteria that involve cell membrane permeabilization, efflux activity, and biofilm formation. This study reports the antipseudomonal action of Glycyrrhiza glabra and one of its compound and provides insight into their mode of action. PMID:27392698

  18. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol.

  19. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol. PMID:27102839

  20. Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ang, Jocelyn Y; Abdel-Haq, Nahed; Zhu, Frank; Thabit, Abrar K; Nicolau, David P; Satlin, Michael J; van Duin, David

    2016-10-01

    We describe a pediatric cystic fibrosis patient who developed a pulmonary exacerbation due to two multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. In addition to these MDR organisms, the case was further complicated by β-lactam allergy. Despite the MDR phenotype, both isolates were susceptible to an antimicrobial combination. PMID:27664282

  1. The nucleotide sequence of the amiE gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Brammar, W J; Charles, I G; Matfield, M; Liu, C P; Drew, R E; Clarke, P H

    1987-05-11

    The nucleotide sequence of the amiE gene, encoding the aliphatic amidase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been determined. The sequence of 1038 nucleotides shows a strong bias in favour of codons with G or C in the third position, and only 44 different codons are utilised.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage-Resistant Variant PA1RG

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Lu, Shuguang; Shen, Mengyu; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Li, Ming; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Jing; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Li, Shu; Zhu, Junmin; Rao, Xiancai

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved several defense systems against phage predation. Here, we report the 6,500,439-bp complete genome sequence of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage-resistant variant PA1RG. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing and de novo assembly revealed a single contig with 320-fold sequence coverage. PMID:26893434

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF PB2+ UPTAKE AND SEQUESTRATION IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA, CHL004, LEAD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In laboratory studies, the soil isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa CHL004 has been found to concentrate Pb2+ in the cytoplasm by formation of particles that contain Pb2+ and phosphorus. Upon examination of many particles using x-ray diffraction, we have found that the product formed ...

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF PB2+ UPTAKE AND SEQUESTRATION IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA CHL004

    EPA Science Inventory

    In laboratory studies, the soil isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa CHL004 (Vesper et al 1996) has been found to concentrated Pb2+ in the cytoplasm by formation of particles that contain Pb2+ and phosphorus. Upon examination of the washed lyophilized cells grown in the presence of lea...

  5. [Formation of volatile substances during destruction of polymers by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Novikova, N D; Zaloguev, S N

    1985-01-01

    The effect of biodestruction of paint-and-varnish coatings on the formation and evolution of toxic substances was studied. It was found that the multiplication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on epoxide resins (EP-255 ++ EP-525/AK-070) modified the evolution of gases: that of acetone and n-butanone increased and evolution of xylene and ethyl benzene isomers decreased.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Able To Decompose N,N-Dimethyl Formamide

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Xu, Lin; Wei, Li; Zhang, Liting

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium, which uses a variety of organic chemicals as carbon sources. Here, we report the genome sequence of the Cu1510 isolate from wastewater containing a high concentration of N,N-dimethyl formamide. PMID:26847883

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage-Resistant Variant PA1RG.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Lu, Shuguang; Shen, Mengyu; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Li, Ming; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Jing; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Li, Shu; Zhu, Junmin; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved several defense systems against phage predation. Here, we report the 6,500,439-bp complete genome sequence of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage-resistant variant PA1RG. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing and de novo assembly revealed a single contig with 320-fold sequence coverage. PMID:26893434

  8. Antibiotic resistance pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from urine samples of Urinary Tract Infections patients in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dania Aijaz; Wasim, Shehnaz; Essa Abdullah, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance pattern of Psedomonas aeruginosa and its prevalence in patients with urinary tract infections (UTI) for effective treatment in a developing country like Pakistan. Methods: This is an observational study conducted for a period of ten months which ended on December 2013 at the Dr. Essa Laboratory and Diagnostic Centre in Karachi. A total of 4668 urine samples of UTI patients were collected and standard microbiological techniques were performed to identify the organisms in urine cultures. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer technique for twenty five commonly used antimicrobials and then analyzed on SPSS version 17. Results: P. aeruginosa was isolated in 254 cultures (5.4%). The most resistant drugs included Ceclor(100%) and Cefizox (100%) followed by Amoxil/Ampicillin (99.6%), Ceflixime (99.6%), Doxycycline (99.6%), Cefuroxime (99.2%), Cephradine (99.2%), Cotrimoxazole (99.2%), Nalidixic acid (98.8%), Pipemidic acid (98.6%) and Augmentin (97.6%). Conclusion: Emerging resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are potentially linked to injudicious use of drugs leading to ineffective empirical therapy and in turn, appearance of even more resistant strains of the bacterium. Therefore, we recommend culture and sensitivity testing to determine the presence of P.aeruginosa prior to specific antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26101487

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Biocides on the Viable Masses and Matrices of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms▿

    PubMed Central

    Toté, K.; Horemans, T.; Berghe, D. Vanden; Maes, L.; Cos, P.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria and matrix are essential for the development of biofilms, and assays should therefore target both components. The current European guidelines for biocidal efficacy testing are not adequate for sessile microorganisms; hence, alternative discriminatory test protocols should be used. The activities of a broad range of biocides on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were evaluated using such in vitro assays. Nearly all selected biocides showed a significant decrease in S. aureus biofilm viability, with sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid as the most active biocides. Only hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite showed some inhibitory effect on the matrix. Treatment of P. aeruginosa biofilms was roughly comparable to that of S. aureus biofilms. Peracetic acid was the most active on viable mass within 1 min of contact. Isopropanol ensured a greater than 99.999% reduction of P. aeruginosa viability after at least 30 min of contact. Comparable to results with S. aureus, sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide markedly reduced the P. aeruginosa matrix. This study clearly demonstrated that despite their aspecific mechanisms of action, most biocides were active only against biofilm bacteria, leaving the matrix undisturbed. Only hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite were active on both the biofilm matrix and the viable mass, making them the better antibiofilm agents. In addition, this study emphasizes the need for updated and standardized guidelines for biofilm susceptibility testing of biocides. PMID:20363795

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Bacterial Components Influence the Cytokine Response in Thymocytes and Splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Corinna; Mausberg, Anne K.; Dehmel, Thomas; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hofstetter, Harald H.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause many different diseases. The spectrum of such infections in general includes inflammation and bacterial sepsis. Hospital-acquired pneumonia, naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, is associated with a particularly high mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa is complex and mediated by several virulence factors, as well as cell-associated factors. We have previously demonstrated that stimulation with different bacteria triggers the cytokine response of thymocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. aeruginosa and its different components on the cytokine production of immature and mature immune cells. We found that the induced cytokine pattern in the thymus and the spleen after infections with P. aeruginosa is primarily mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer cell membrane, but other components of the bacterium can influence the cytokine secretion as well. Stimulation with heat-killed P. aeruginosa and LPS does not influence the amount of cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells but instead suppresses the emergence of Th17 cells. However, stimulation with P. aeruginosa or its components triggers the interleukin-17 (IL-17) response both in thymocytes and in splenocytes. We conclude that infections with P. aeruginosa affect the cytokine secretion of immature and mature cells and that IL-17 and Th17 cells play only a minor role in the development of pathological systemic inflammatory disease conditions during P. aeruginosa infections. Therefore, other inflammatory immune responses must be responsible for septic reactions of the host. PMID:26902726

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Bacterial Components Influence the Cytokine Response in Thymocytes and Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Andreas; Zimmermann, Corinna; Mausberg, Anne K; Dehmel, Thomas; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hofstetter, Harald H

    2016-05-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause many different diseases. The spectrum of such infections in general includes inflammation and bacterial sepsis. Hospital-acquired pneumonia, naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, is associated with a particularly high mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa is complex and mediated by several virulence factors, as well as cell-associated factors. We have previously demonstrated that stimulation with different bacteria triggers the cytokine response of thymocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. aeruginosa and its different components on the cytokine production of immature and mature immune cells. We found that the induced cytokine pattern in the thymus and the spleen after infections with P. aeruginosa is primarily mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer cell membrane, but other components of the bacterium can influence the cytokine secretion as well. Stimulation with heat-killed P. aeruginosa and LPS does not influence the amount of cytokine-producing CD4(+) T cells but instead suppresses the emergence of Th17 cells. However, stimulation with P. aeruginosa or its components triggers the interleukin-17 (IL-17) response both in thymocytes and in splenocytes. We conclude that infections with P. aeruginosa affect the cytokine secretion of immature and mature cells and that IL-17 and Th17 cells play only a minor role in the development of pathological systemic inflammatory disease conditions during P. aeruginosa infections. Therefore, other inflammatory immune responses must be responsible for septic reactions of the host.

  12. Systematic investigations on the biodegradation and viscosity reduction of long chain hydrocarbons using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Sakthipriya, N; Doble, Mukesh; Sangwai, Jitendra S

    2016-03-01

    The use of microorganisms has been researched extensively for possible applications related to hydrocarbon degradation in the petroleum industry. However, attempts to improve the effect of microorganisms on the viscosity of hydrocarbons, which find potential use in the development of robust models for biodegradation, have been rarely documented. This study investigates the degradation of long chain hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and eicosane using Pseudomonas fluorescens PMMD3 (P. fluorescens) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa used here is isolated from petroleum contaminated sediments and the P. fluorescens is from the coastal area, and both have hydrocarbon degrading genes. The degradation of hydrocarbons is studied using carbon profiling and reduction in viscosity pre- and post-degradation of hydrocarbons. The carbon profiling has been obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) results. GC-MS results have indicated an improved biodegradation of hydrocarbons by 77-93% in one day. The yield coefficients of biomass (YX/S) for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens using hexadecane as a carbon source are 1.35 and 0.81 g g(-1), and the corresponding values with eicosane are 0.84 and 0.88 g g(-1). The viscosity of hexadecane is reduced by the order of 53 and 47%, while that of eicosane was reduced by 53 and 65%, using P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens, respectively. This study also presents information on the activity of enzymes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation. Pseudomonas species have shown their use in potential applications for bioremediation, oil-spill treatment, and flow assurance. We believe that this study will also provide stringent tests for possible model development for the bioremediation of long chain paraffins suitable for oilfield applications.

  13. Transcriptomic and Metabolomic Analysis Revealed Multifaceted Effects of Phage Protein Gp70.1 on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xia; Chen, Canhuang; Jiang, Xingyu; Shen, Wei; Huang, Guangtao; Le, Shuai; Lu, Shuguang; Zou, Lingyun; Ni, Qingshan; Li, Ming; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jing; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Tan, Yinling

    2016-01-01

    The impact of phage infection on the host cell is severe. In order to take over the cellular machinery, some phage proteins were produced to shut off the host biosynthesis early in the phage infection. The discovery and identification of these phage-derived inhibitors have a significant prospect of application in antibacterial treatment. This work presented a phage protein, gp70.1, with non-specific inhibitory effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Gp70.1 was encoded by early gene – orf 70.1 from P. aeruginosa phage PaP3. The P. aeruginosa with a plasmid encoding gp70.1 showed with delayed growth and had the appearance of a small colony. The combination of multifaceted analysis including microarray-based transcriptomic analysis, RT-qPCR, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolomics and phenotype experiments were performed to investigate the effects of gp70.1 on P. aeruginosa. A total of 178 genes of P. aeruginosa mainly involved in extracellular function and metabolism were differentially expressed in the presence of gp70.1 at three examined time points. Furthermore, our results indicated that gp70.1 had an extensive impact on the extracellular phenotype of P. aeruginosa, such as motility, pyocyanin, extracellular protease, polysaccharide, and cellulase. For the metabolism of P. aeruginosa, the main effect of gp70.1 was the reduction of amino acid consumption. Finally, the RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoS was identified as a potential cellular target of gp70.1. Gp70.1 was the first bacterial inhibitor identified from Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP3. It was also the first phage protein that interacted with the global regulator RpoS of bacteria. Our results indicated the potential value of gp70.1 in antibacterial applications. This study preliminarily revealed the biological function of gp70.1 and provided a reference for the study of other phage genes sharing similarities with orf70.1. PMID:27725812

  14. Review: Antibiotic discovery in the age of structural biology - a comprehensive overview with special reference to development of drugs for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Koehnke, Alessa; Friedrich, Reinhard E

    2015-01-01

    Due to the persistence and spread of antibiotic resistance, the discovery and exploitation of new antibiotic targets should be the subject of intensive research. Effective strategies are required to develop antibiotic alternatives. Antibiotics that act on new targets or via novel mechanisms have the greatest likelihood of overcoming resistance. In particular, there is a lack of specific antibiotics for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of healthcare-associated infections, exhibiting high resistance levels. Herein we describe how structure-based drug design can be used to achieve new antibiotics for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, using an essential enzyme of the fatty acid synthesis pathway from P. aeruginosa as an example.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition on an intensive care unit: relationship between antibiotic selective pressure and patients' environment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition on the intensive care unit (ICU), environmental contamination and antibiotic selective pressure against P. aeruginosa. Methods An open, prospective cohort study was carried out in a 16-bed medical ICU where P. aeruginosa was endemic. Over a six-month period, all patients without P. aeruginosa on admission and with a length of stay >72 h were included. Throat, nasal, rectal, sputum and urine samples were taken on admission and at weekly intervals and screened for P. aeruginosa. All antibiotic treatments were recorded daily. Environmental analysis included weekly tap water specimen culture and the presence of other patients colonized with P. aeruginosa. Results A total of 126 patients were included, comprising 1,345 patient-days. Antibiotics were given to 106 patients (antibiotic selective pressure for P. aeruginosa in 39). P. aeruginosa was acquired by 20 patients (16%) and was isolated from 164/536 environmental samples (31%). Two conditions were independently associated with P. aeruginosa acquisition by multivariate analysis: (i) patients receiving ≥3 days of antibiotic selective pressure together with at least one colonized patient on the same ward on the previous day (odds ratio (OR) = 10.3 ((% confidence interval (CI): 1.8 to 57.4); P = 0.01); and (ii) presence of an invasive device (OR = 7.7 (95% CI: 2.3 to 25.7); P = 0.001). Conclusions Specific interaction between both patient colonization pressure and selective antibiotic pressure is the most relevant factor for P. aeruginosa acquisition on an ICU. This suggests that combined efforts are needed against both factors to decrease colonization with P. aeruginosa. PMID:21306623

  16. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A; Ho, Evi X; Lamont, Iain L; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V; Koh, Andrew Y

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa's ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa's cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  17. Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 produces enantio-pyochelin, the optical antipode of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed

    Youard, Zeb A; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Majcherczyk, Paul A; Schalk, Isabelle J; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2007-12-01

    The siderophore pyochelin is made by a thiotemplate mechanism from salicylate and two molecules of cysteine. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the first cysteine residue is converted to its D-isoform during thiazoline ring formation whereas the second cysteine remains in its L-configuration, thus determining the stereochemistry of the two interconvertible pyochelin diastereoisomers as 4'R, 2''R, 4''R (pyochelin I) and 4'R, 2''S, 4''R (pyochelin II). Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 was found to make a different stereoisomeric mixture, which promoted growth under iron limitation in strain CHA0 and induced the expression of its biosynthetic genes, but was not recognized as a siderophore and signaling molecule by P. aeruginosa. Reciprocally, pyochelin promoted growth and induced pyochelin gene expression in P. aeruginosa, but was not functional in P. fluorescens. The structure of the CHA0 siderophore was determined by mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography, NMR, polarimetry, and chiral HPLC as enantio-pyochelin, the optical antipode of the P. aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin. Enantio-pyochelin was chemically synthesized and confirmed to be active in CHA0. Its potential biosynthetic pathway in CHA0 is discussed. PMID:17938167

  18. Bilateral Granulomatous and Fibrinoheterophilic Otitis Interna due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Captive Little Bustard ( Tetrax tetrax ).

    PubMed

    Scala, Christopher; Langlois, Isabelle; Lemberger, Karin

    2015-06-01

    A captive juvenile little bustard ( Tetrax tetrax ) was presented for acute onset of right head tilt and right circling. The bird failed to respond to supportive care and systemic antibiotic therapy. A bilateral granulomatous and fibrinoheterophilic otitis interna due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa was diagnosed postmortem by histopathologic examination and bacterial culture. In bustards, Pseudomonas species have been documented in the normal bacterial flora of the oropharynx and are frequently reported in upper respiratory tract infections. This is the first report of a peripheral vestibular syndrome due to P aeruginosa otitis interna in a bustard species. Pseudomonas aeruginosa should be included as a possible cause of otitis and peripheral vestibular syndrome in bustards.

  19. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505.

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, C; Ohtake, H; Chu, L; Misra, T K; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    The chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 was cloned into broad-host-range vector pSUP104. The hybrid plasmid containing an 11.1-kilobase insert conferred chromate resistance and reduced uptake of chromate in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Resistance to chromate was not expressed in Escherichia coli. Contiguous 1.6- and 6.3-kilobase HindIII fragments from this plasmid hybridized to pUM505 but not to P. aeruginosa chromosomal DNA and only weakly to chromate resistance plasmids pLHB1 and pMG6. Further subcloning produced a plasmid with an insert of 2,145 base pairs, which was sequenced. Analysis of deletions revealed that a single open reading frame was sufficient to determine chromate resistance. This open reading frame encodes a highly hydrophobic polypeptide, ChrA, of 416 amino acid residues that appeared to be expressed in E. coli under control of the T7 promoter. No significant homology was found between ChrA and proteins in the amino acid sequence libraries, but 29% amino acid identity was found with the ChrA amino acid sequence for another chromate resistance determinant sequenced in this laboratory from an Alcaligenes eutrophus plasmid (A. Nies, D. Nies, and S. Silver, submitted for publication). Images FIG. 3 FIG. 5 PMID:2152903

  20. Comparison of Flagellin Genes from Clinical and Environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Alun W.; Bellingham, Nessa F.; Winstanley, Craig; Ousley, Margaret A.; Hart, C. Anthony; Saunders, Jon R.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen, was isolated from environmental samples and compared to clinically derived strains. While P. aeruginosa was isolated readily from an experimental mushroom-growing unit, it was found only rarely in other environmental samples. A flagellin gene PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the isolates revealed that environmental and clinical P. aeruginosa strains are not readily distinguishable. The variation in the central regions of the flagellin genes of seven of the isolates was investigated further. The strains used included two strains with type a genes (998 bp), four strains with type b genes (1,258 bp), and one strain, K979, with a novel flagellin gene (2,199 bp). The route by which flagellin gene variation has occurred in P. aeruginosa is discussed. PMID:10049879

  1. Dissemination of high-risk clones of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in colombia.

    PubMed

    Correa, Adriana; Del Campo, Rosa; Perenguez, Marcela; Blanco, Victor M; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Perez, Federico; Maya, Juan J; Rojas, Laura; Cantón, Rafael; Arias, Cesar A; Villegas, Maria V

    2015-04-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to develop resistance to most antimicrobials represents an important clinical threat worldwide. We report the dissemination in several Colombian hospitals of two predominant lineages of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) carbapenemase-producing P. aeruginosa strains. These lineages belong to the high-risk clones sequence type 111 (ST111) and ST235 and harbor blaVIM-2 on a class 1 integron and blaKPC-2 on a Tn4401 transposon, respectively. Additionally, P. aeruginosa ST1492, a novel single-locus variant of ST111, was identified. Clonal dissemination and the presence of mobile genetic elements likely explain the successful spread of XDR P. aeruginosa strains in Colombia. PMID:25605362

  2. Phage-antibiotic synergism: a possible approach to combatting Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Knezevic, Petar; Curcin, Sanja; Aleksic, Verica; Petrusic, Milivoje; Vlaski, Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly resistant opportunistic pathogen and an important etiological agent of various types of infections. During the last decade, P. aeruginosa phages have been extensively examined as alternative antimicrobial agents. The aim of the study was to determine antimicrobial effectiveness of combining subinhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin or polymyxin B with P. aeruginosa-specific bacteriophages belonging to families Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. The time-kill curve method showed that a combination of bacteriophages and subinhibitory concentrations of ceftriaxone generally reduced bacterial growth, and synergism was proven for a Siphoviridae phage σ-1 after 300 min of incubation. The detected alteration in morphology after ceftriaxone application, resulting in cell elongation, along with its specific mode of action, seemed to be a necessary but was not a sufficient reason for phage-antibiotic synergism. The phenomenon offers an opportunity for future development of treatment strategies for potentially lethal infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diversification during Infection Development in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs-A Review.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent pathogen of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Its long persistence in CF airways is associated with sophisticated mechanisms of adaptation, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, hypermutability and customized pathogenicity in which virulence factors are expressed according the infection stage. CF adaptation is triggered by high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs and by antibiotic treatments. Bacteria undergo genetic, phenotypic, and physiological variations that are fastened by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. During CF infection development, P. aeruginosa gradually shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted pathogen of chronic infection. This paper reviews the most common changes undergone by P. aeruginosa at each stage of infection development in CF lungs. The comprehensive understanding of the adaptation process of P. aeruginosa may help to design more effective antimicrobial treatments and to identify new targets for future drugs to prevent the progression of infection to chronic stages. PMID:25438018

  4. Cloning and analysis of the rnc-era-recO operon from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Powell, B; Peters, H K; Nakamura, Y; Court, D

    1999-08-01

    The rnc operon from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been cloned and characterized. The three genes comprising this operon, rnc, era, and recO, are arranged similarly to those in some other gram-negative bacteria. Multicopy plasmids carrying the rnc operon of P. aeruginosa functionally complement mutations of the rnc, era, and recO genes in Escherichia coli. In particular, the P. aeruginosa era homolog rescues the conditional lethality of era mutants in E. coli, and the presumptive protein has 60% identity with the Era of E. coli. We discuss these data and evidence suggesting that a GTPase previously purified from P. aeruginosa and designated Pra is not an Era homolog. PMID:10438789

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diversification during Infection Development in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent pathogen of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Its long persistence in CF airways is associated with sophisticated mechanisms of adaptation, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, hypermutability and customized pathogenicity in which virulence factors are expressed according the infection stage. CF adaptation is triggered by high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs and by antibiotic treatments. Bacteria undergo genetic, phenotypic, and physiological variations that are fastened by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. During CF infection development, P. aeruginosa gradually shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted pathogen of chronic infection. This paper reviews the most common changes undergone by P. aeruginosa at each stage of infection development in CF lungs. The comprehensive understanding of the adaptation process of P. aeruginosa may help to design more effective antimicrobial treatments and to identify new targets for future drugs to prevent the progression of infection to chronic stages. PMID:25438018

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms in acute infection independent of cell-to-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Schaber, J Andy; Triffo, W Jeffrey; Suh, Sang Jin; Oliver, Jeffrey W; Hastert, Mary Catherine; Griswold, John A; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2007-08-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 h of infection in thermally injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections as well. Using light, electron, and confocal scanning laser microscopy, P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild-type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa strains formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independently of QS.

  7. A study on the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in semen on bovine fertility.

    PubMed Central

    Eaglesome, M D; Garcia, M M; Bielanski, A B

    1995-01-01

    Two experiments were done to demonstrate whether the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in bovine semen could affect fertilization and/or early embryonic development. In the first experiment, superovulated heifers were inseminated with semen naturally contaminated with P. aeruginosa (ADRI 102) or clean semen and seven day-old embryos were collected nonsurgically. The endometrium of treated heifers appeared more sensitive to the flush procedures. In experiment 2, heifers were inseminated at synchronized estrus with semen experimentally contaminated with P. aeruginosa (ADRI 102) and processed in the same way as commercial semen with antibiotics (gentamicin, lincomycin, spectinomycin and tylosin) or processed without antibiotics added. Embryos were recovered at slaughter seven days later. In general, there was no significant reduction in fertility or development of embryos in vitro as a result of relatively high numbers of P. aeruginosa in bovine semen. PMID:7704848

  8. FvbA is required for vibriobactin utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Elias, Sivan; Degtyar, Elena; Banin, Ehud

    2011-07-01

    Bacteria acquire iron through a highly specific mechanism involving iron-chelating molecules termed siderophores. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can utilize siderophores produced by other micro-organisms to facilitate iron uptake. Here we show that a P. aeruginosa strain deficient in siderophore production can use the Vibrio cholerae siderophore vibriobactin as an iron source. In addition, we identified a P. aeruginosa gene, PA4156 (fvbA), encoding a protein highly homologous to the V. cholerae vibriobactin receptor (ViuA). A P. aeruginosa mutant in the two endogenous siderophores (pyoverdine and pyochelin) and in fvbA was unable to utilize vibriobactin as an iron source. Additionally, preliminary analyses revealed the involvement of vibriobactin, Fur protein and an IclR-type regulator, FvbR (PA4157), in fvbA regulation. PMID:21546589

  9. Dissemination of High-Risk Clones of Extensively Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Perenguez, Marcela; Blanco, Victor M.; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Perez, Federico; Maya, Juan J.; Rojas, Laura; Cantón, Rafael; Arias, Cesar A.; Villegas, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to develop resistance to most antimicrobials represents an important clinical threat worldwide. We report the dissemination in several Colombian hospitals of two predominant lineages of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) carbapenemase-producing P. aeruginosa strains. These lineages belong to the high-risk clones sequence type 111 (ST111) and ST235 and harbor blaVIM-2 on a class 1 integron and blaKPC-2 on a Tn4401 transposon, respectively. Additionally, P. aeruginosa ST1492, a novel single-locus variant of ST111, was identified. Clonal dissemination and the presence of mobile genetic elements likely explain the successful spread of XDR P. aeruginosa strains in Colombia. PMID:25605362

  10. Substrate Specificity of the Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase PvdD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ackerley, David F.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Lamont, Iain L.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 secretes a siderophore, pyoverdinePAO, which contains a short peptide attached to a dihydroxyquinoline moiety. Synthesis of this peptide is thought to be catalyzed by nonribosomal peptide synthetases, one of which is encoded by the pvdD gene. The first module of pvdD was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein product was purified. l-Threonine, one of the amino acid residues in pyoverdinePAO, was an effective substrate for the recombinant protein in ATP-PPi exchange assays, showing that PvdD has peptide synthetase activity. Other amino acids, including d-threonine, l-serine, and l-allo-threonine, were not effective substrates, indicating that PvdD has a high degree of substrate specificity. A three-dimensional modeling approach enabled us to identify amino acids that are likely to be critical in determining the substrate specificity of PvdD and to explore the likely basis of the high substrate selectivity. The approach described here may be useful for analysis of other peptide synthetases. PMID:12700264

  11. Use of the paraffin wax baiting system for identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Massengale, A R; Ollar, R A; Giordano, S J; Felder, M S; Aronoff, S C

    1999-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary pathogen among the Pseudomonads and is known for its minimal nutritional requirements, capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source, and biofilm formation. Because the ability of Pseudomonads to grow on paraffin is not commonly found among human pathogens and the primary Pseudomonas human pathogen is P. aeruginosa, we studied the adaptation of the paraffin baiting system for the growth and identification of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. We also studied the effectiveness of combining a fluorescence assay measuring fluorescein (pyoverdin) production and oxidase test with the paraffin baiting assay for P. aeruginosa speciation. Strains were tested for the capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source using the paraffin baiting system with Czapek's minimal salt medium. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested for using paraffin as a sole carbon source, 45% exhibited growth on paraffin at 24 h and 76.6% exhibited growth on paraffin at 48 h. The ability of the reference strains and clinical isolates were then tested for their ability to associate with the paraffin slide in the presence of an additional carbon source. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested, 85 strains (76.6%), and 102 (93%) were associated with the paraffin surface at 24 and 48 h. We successfully combined fluorescence and oxidase assays with the paraffin baiting system for identification of P. aeruginosa. The simple and inexpensive paraffin baiting system is a useful method for the identification and study of P. aeruginosa suitable for both the clinical and research laboratory.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Patients With G551D-CFTR Treated With Ivacaftor

    PubMed Central

    Heltshe, Sonya L.; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane L.; Khan, Umer; Baines, Arthur; Ramsey, Bonnie W.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ivacaftor improves outcomes in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with the G551D mutation; however, effects on respiratory microbiology are largely unknown. This study examines changes in CF respiratory pathogens with ivacaftor and correlates them with baseline characteristics and clinical response. Methods. The G551D Observational Study enrolled a longitudinal observational cohort of US patients with CF aged 6 years and older with at least 1 copy of the G551D mutation. Results were linked with retrospective and prospective culture data in the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's National Patient Registry. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection category in the year before and year after ivacaftor was compared and correlated with clinical findings. Results. Among 151 participants prescribed ivacaftor, 29% (26/89) who were culture positive for P. aeruginosa the year prior to ivacaftor use were culture negative the year following treatment; 88% (52/59) of those P. aeruginosa free remained uninfected. The odds of P. aeruginosa positivity in the year after ivacaftor compared with the year prior were reduced by 35% (odds ratio [OR], 0.65; P < .001). Ivacaftor was also associated with reduced odds of mucoid P. aeruginosa (OR, 0.77; P = .013) and Aspergillus (OR, 0.47; P = .039), but not Staphylococcus aureus or other common CF pathogens. Patients with intermittent culture positivity and higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were most likely to turn culture negative. Reduction in P. aeruginosa was not associated with change in FEV1, body mass index, or hospitalizations. Conclusions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture positivity was significantly reduced following ivacaftor treatment. Efficacious CFTR modulation may contribute to lower frequency of culture positivity for P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens, particularly in patients with less established disease. PMID:25425629

  13. The rpoN gene product of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is required for expression of diverse genes, including the flagellin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Totten, P A; Lara, J C; Lory, S

    1990-01-01

    The product of the rpoN gene is an alternative sigma factor of RNA polymerase which is required for transcription of a number of genes in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, including those that specify enzymes of nitrogen assimilation, amino acid uptake, and degradation of a variety of organic molecules. We have previously shown that transcription of the pilin gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa also requires RpoN (K. S. Ishimoto and S. Lory, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:1954-1957, 1989) and have undertaken a more extensive survey of genes under RpoN control. Strains of P. aeruginosa that carry an insertionally inactivated rpoN gene were constructed and shown to be nonmotile because of the inability of these mutants to synthesize flagellin. The mutation in rpoN had no effect on expression of extracellular polypeptides, outer membrane proteins, and the alginate capsule. However, the rpoN mutants were glutamine auxotrophs and were defective in glutamine synthetase, indicating defects in nitrogen assimilation. In addition, the P. aeruginosa rpoN mutants were defective in urease activity. These findings indicate that the sigma factor encoded by the rpoN gene is used by P. aeruginosa for transcription of a diverse set of genes that specify biosynthetic enzymes, degradative enzymes, and surface components. These rpoN-controlled genes include pili and flagella which are required for full virulence of the organism. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:2152909

  14. High Throughput Screen Identifies Natural Product Inhibitor of Phenylalanyl-tRNA Synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O.; Munoz, Hector; Bullard, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae are causative agents in a wide range of infections. Genes encoding proteins corresponding to phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS) were cloned from both bacteria. The two forms of PheRS were kinetically evaluated and the Km’s for P. aeruginosa PheRS with its three substrates, phenylalanine, ATP and tRNAPhe were determined to be 48, 200, and 1.2 μM, respectively, while the Km’s for S. pneumoniae PheRS with respect to phenylalanine, ATP and tRNAPhe were 21, 225 and 0.94 μM, respectively. P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS were used to screen a natural compound library and a single compound was identified that inhibited the function of both enzymes. The compound inhibited P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS with IC50’s of 2.3 and 4.9 μM, respectively. The compound had a Ki of 0.83 and 0.98 μM against P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the compound was determined against a panel of Gram positive and negative bacteria including efflux pump mutants and hyper-sensitive strains. MICs against wild-type P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae cells in culture were determined to be 16 and 32 μg/ml, respectively. The mechanism of action of the compound was determined to be competitive with the amino acid, phenylalanine, and uncompetitive with AT P. There was no inhibition of cytoplasmic protein synthesis, however, partial inhibition of the human mitochondrial PheRS was observed. PMID:25601215

  15. Activation of the lectin pathway of complement in experimental human keratitis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Brown, Karl D.; Kong, David C.M.; Daniell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) microbial keratitis (MK) is a sight-threatening disease. Previous animal studies have identified an important contribution of the complement system to the clearance of P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition receptor of the lectin pathway of complement, has been implicated in the host defense against P. aeruginosa. However, studies addressing the role of the lectin pathway in P. aeruginosa MK are lacking. Hence, we sought to determine the activity of the lectin pathway in human MK caused by P. aeruginosa. Methods Primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) from cadaveric donors were exposed to two different P. aeruginosa strains. Gene expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, MBL, and other complement proteins was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) and MBL synthesis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and intracellular flow cytometry. Results MBL gene expression was not detected in unchallenged HCECs. Exposure of HCECs to P. aeruginosa resulted in rapid induction of the transcriptional expression of MBL, IL-6, and IL-8. In addition, expression of several complement proteins of the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, were upregulated after 5 h of challenge, including MBL-associated serine protease 1. However, MBL protein secretion was not detectable 18 h after challenge with P. aeruginosa. Conclusions MK due to P. aeruginosa triggers activation of MBL and the lectin pathway of complement. However, the physiologic relevance of this finding is unclear, as corresponding MBL oligomer production was not observed. PMID:24426774

  16. Direct measurement of efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using an environment-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) family pumps AcrB and MexB are the major efflux routes in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively. Fluorescent environment-sensitive dyes provide a means to study efflux pump function in live bacterial cells in real-time. Recently, we demonstrated the utility of this approach using the dye Nile Red to quantify AcrB-mediated efflux and measured the ability of antibiotics and other efflux pump substrates to compete with efflux of Nile Red, independent of antibacterial activity. Here, we extend this method to P. aeruginosa and describe a novel application that permits the comparison and rank-ordering of bacterial strains by their inherent efflux potential. We show that glucose and l-malate re-energize Nile Red efflux in P. aeruginosa, and we highlight differences in the glucose dependence and kinetics of efflux between P. aeruginosa and E. coli. We quantify the differences in efflux among a set of P. aeruginosa laboratory strains, which include PAO1, the hyper-sensitive strain ATCC 35151 and its parent, ATCC 12055. Efflux of Nile Red in P. aeruginosa is mediated by MexAB-OprM and is slower than in E. coli. In conclusion, we describe an efflux measurement tool for use in antibacterial drug discovery and basic research on P. aeruginosa efflux pumps.

  17. Environmental survivability and surface sampling efficiencies for Pseudomonas aeruginosa on various fomites.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tia M; Lutz, Eric A

    2014-05-01

    The study described in this article evaluated surface survivability of culturable Pseudomonas aeruginosa by time and type (glass, stainless steel, and laminate) using two sampling techniques: contact plates and surface swabs. Recovery of P. aeruginosa decreased logarithmically over time and varied by surface type. P. aeruginosa survival averaged 3.75, 5.75, and 6.75 hours on laminate, glass, and stainless steel, respectively. Culturable P. aeruginosa loss on stainless steel and glass were not different (p > .05); however, laminate had significantly greater loss at each time point than either glass or stainless (p < .05). A comparison of surface swab and contact plate collection efficiencies found no significant difference for laminate surfaces. Swabs, however, had a higher collection efficiency than contact plates (p < .05). For the first time, the authors report P. aeruginosa mean survival time of 3.75-6.75 hours on clinically relevant surfaces, with P. aeruginosa on stainless steel surviving the longest. Their data also indicate that culturable surface sampling appears to most accurately represent actual P. aeruginosa surface loading when swab sampling is used.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts its iron uptake strategies in function of the type of infections

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Pierre; Dingemans, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium which is known for its capacity to colonize various niches, including some invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, making it one of the most frequent bacteria causing opportunistic infections. P. aeruginosa is able to cause acute as well as chronic infections and it uses different colonization and virulence factors to do so. Infections range from septicemia, urinary infections, burn wound colonization, and chronic colonization of the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Like the vast majority of organisms, P. aeruginosa needs iron to sustain growth. P. aeruginosa utilizes different strategies to take up iron, depending on the type of infection it causes. Two siderophores are produced by this bacterium, pyoverdine and pyochelin, characterized by high and low affinities for iron respectively. P. aeruginosa is also able to utilize different siderophores from other microorganisms (siderophore piracy). It can also take up heme from hemoproteins via two different systems. Under microaerobic or anaerobic conditions, P. aeruginosa is also able to take up ferrous iron via its Feo system using redox-cycling phenazines. Depending on the type of infection, P. aeruginosa can therefore adapt by switching from one iron uptake system to another as we will describe in this short review. PMID:24294593

  19. Efficacy of the Novel Antibiotic POL7001 in Preclinical Models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cigana, Cristina; Bernardini, Francesca; Facchini, Marcella; Alcalá-Franco, Beatriz; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Misson, Pauline; Chevalier, Eric; Brodmann, Maj; Schmitt, Michel; Wach, Achim; Dale, Glenn E; Obrecht, Daniel; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The clinical development of antibiotics with a new mode of action combined with efficient pulmonary drug delivery is a priority against untreatable Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. POL7001 is a macrocycle antibiotic belonging to the novel class of protein epitope mimetic (PEM) molecules with selective and potent activity against P. aeruginosa We investigated ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and cystic fibrosis (CF) as indications of the clinical potential of POL7001 to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. MICs of POL7001 and comparators were measured for reference and clinical P. aeruginosa strains. The therapeutic efficacy of POL7001 given by pulmonary administration was evaluated in murine models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic pneumonia. POL7001 showed potent in vitro activity against a large panel of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates with adaptive phenotypes such as mucoid or hypermutable phenotypes. The efficacy of POL7001 was demonstrated in both wild-type and CF mice. In addition to a reduced bacterial burden in the lung, POL7001-treated mice showed progressive body weight recovery and reduced levels of inflammatory markers, indicating an improvement in general condition. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that POL7001 reached significant concentrations in the lung after pulmonary administration, with low systemic exposure. These results support the further evaluation of POL7001 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections.

  20. Distribution and Inhibition of Liposomes on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Dong; Thomas, Nicky; Thierry, Benjamin; Vreugde, Sarah; Prestidge, Clive A.; Wormald, Peter-John

    2015-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are major pathogens in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and their biofilms have been associated with poorer postsurgical outcomes. This study investigated the distribution and anti-biofilm effect of cationic (+) and anionic (-) phospholipid liposomes with different sizes (unilamellar and multilamellar vesicle, ULV and MLV respectively) on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa biofilms. Method Specific biofilm models for S. aureus ATCC 25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC 15692 were established. Liposomal distribution was determined by observing SYTO9 stained biofilm exposed to DiI labeled liposomes using confocal scanning laser microscopy, followed by quantitative image analysis. The anti-biofilm efficacy study was carried out by using the alamarBlue assay to test the relative viability of biofilm treated with various liposomes for 24 hours and five minutes. Results The smaller ULVs penetrated better than larger MLVs in both S. aureus and P. aeruginosa biofilm. Except that +ULV and –ULV displayed similar distribution in S. aureus biofilm, the cationic liposomes adhered better than their anionic counterparts. Biofilm growth was inhibited at 24-hour and five-minute exposure time, although the decrease of viability for P. aeruginosa biofilm after liposomal treatment did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion The distribution and anti-biofilm effects of cationic and anionic liposomes of different sizes differed in S. aureus and P. aeruginosa biofilms. Reducing the liposome size and formulating liposomes as positively charged enhanced the penetration and inhibition of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:26125555

  1. Inhibition of biofilm formation by Camelid single-domain antibodies against the flagellum of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hendrik; Horrevoets, Wannie M; Adema, Simon M; Carr, Hannah E V; van Woerden, Richard E; Koster, Margot; Tommassen, Jan

    2014-09-30

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in patients with compromised host defense mechanisms, including burn wound victims. In addition to its intrinsic resistance against most antibiotics, P. aeruginosa has the ability to form biofilms adhering to biotic or abiotic surfaces. These factors make treatment of P. aeruginosa infections complicated and demand new therapies and drugs. The flagellum of P. aeruginosa plays an important role in cell-cell and cell-surface interactions during the first stage of biofilm formation. In this study, we describe the selection of monoclonal anti-flagellin single-domain antibodies (VHHs) derived from the Camelid heavy-chain antibody repertoire of a llama immunized with P. aeruginosa antigens. The anti-flagellin VHHs could be produced efficiently in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that they have apparent affinities in the nanomolar range. Functional screens showed that the anti-flagellin VHHs are capable of inhibiting P. aeruginosa from swimming and that they prevent biofilm formation in an in vitro assay. These data open doors for the development of novel methods for the prevention of P. aeruginosa-related infections.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses T3SS to inhibit diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Goldufsky, Josef; Wood, Stephen J; Jayaraman, Vijayakumar; Majdobeh, Omar; Chen, Lin; Qin, Shanshan; Zhang, Chunxiang; DiPietro, Luisa A; Shafikhani, Sasha H

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are responsible for more hospitalizations than any other complication of diabetes. Bacterial infection is recognized as an important factor associated with impaired healing in diabetic ulcers. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently detected Gram-negative pathogen in diabetic ulcers. P. aeruginosa infection has been shown to impair healing in diabetic wounds in a manner that correlates with its ability to form biofilm. While the majority of infections in diabetic ulcers are biofilm associated, 33% of infections are nonbiofilm in nature. P. aeruginosa is the most prevalent Gram-negative pathogen in all diabetic wound types, which suggests that the deleterious impact of P. aeruginosa on healing in diabetic wounds goes beyond its ability to form biofilm and likely involves other factors. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) virulence structure is required for the pathogenesis of all P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, suggesting that it may also play a role in the inhibition of wound repair in diabetic skin ulcers. We evaluated the role of T3SS in mediating P. aeruginosa-induced tissue damage in the wounds of diabetic mice. Our data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa establishes a robust and persistent infection in diabetic wounds independent of its ability to form biofilm and causes severe wound damage in a manner that primarily depends on its T3SS.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts its iron uptake strategies in function of the type of infections.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Pierre; Dingemans, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium which is known for its capacity to colonize various niches, including some invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, making it one of the most frequent bacteria causing opportunistic infections. P. aeruginosa is able to cause acute as well as chronic infections and it uses different colonization and virulence factors to do so. Infections range from septicemia, urinary infections, burn wound colonization, and chronic colonization of the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Like the vast majority of organisms, P. aeruginosa needs iron to sustain growth. P. aeruginosa utilizes different strategies to take up iron, depending on the type of infection it causes. Two siderophores are produced by this bacterium, pyoverdine and pyochelin, characterized by high and low affinities for iron respectively. P. aeruginosa is also able to utilize different siderophores from other microorganisms (siderophore piracy). It can also take up heme from hemoproteins via two different systems. Under microaerobic or anaerobic conditions, P. aeruginosa is also able to take up ferrous iron via its Feo system using redox-cycling phenazines. Depending on the type of infection, P. aeruginosa can therefore adapt by switching from one iron uptake system to another as we will describe in this short review. PMID:24294593

  4. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; de, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-03-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis.

  5. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    PubMed Central

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; De, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis. PMID:27000525

  6. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Das, Manash C; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; De, Utpal C; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It's antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis. PMID:27000525

  7. The role of 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Jordon D.; Chen, Wei; Parnham, Stuart; Beauchesne, Kevin; Moeller, Peter; Flume, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria synchronize group behaviors using quorum sensing, which is advantageous during an infection to thwart immune cell attack and resist deleterious changes in the environment. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (Pqs) quorum-sensing system is an important component of an interconnected intercellular communication network. Two alkylquinolones, 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ) and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS), activate transcriptional regulator PqsR to promote the production of quinolone signals and virulence factors. Our work focused on the most abundant quinolone produced from the Pqs system, 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ), which was shown previously to sustain pyocyanin production and antifungal activity of P. aeruginosa. However, little is known about how DHQ affects P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. Using C. elegans as a model for P. aeruginosa infection, we found pqs mutants only able to produce DHQ maintained virulence towards the nematodes similar to wild-type. In addition, DHQ-only producing mutants displayed increased colonization of C. elegans and virulence factor production compared to a quinolone-null strain. DHQ also bound to PqsR and activated the transcription of pqs operon. More importantly, high extracellular concentration of DHQ was maintained in both aerobic and anaerobic growth. High levels of DHQ were also detected in the sputum samples of cystic fibrosis patients. Taken together, our findings suggest DHQ may play an important role in sustaining P. aeruginosa pathogenicity under oxygen-limiting conditions. PMID:26788419

  8. Identification of water-conditioned Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Raman microspectroscopy on a single cell level.

    PubMed

    Silge, Anja; Schumacher, Wilm; Rösch, Petra; Da Costa Filho, Paulo A; Gérard, Cédric; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-07-01

    The identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from samples of bottled natural mineral water by the analysis of subcultures is time consuming and other species of the authentic Pseudomonas group can be a problem. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the influence of different aquatic environmental conditions (pH, mineral content) and growth phases on the cultivation-free differentiation between water-conditioned Pseudomonas spp. by applying Raman microspectroscopy. The final dataset was comprised of over 7500 single-cell Raman spectra, including the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens and P. putida, in order to prove the feasibility of the introduced approach. The collection of spectra was standardized by automated measurements of viable stained bacterial cells. The discrimination was influenced by the growth phase at the beginning of the water adaptation period and by the type of mineral water. Different combinations of the parameters were tested and they resulted in accuracies of up to 85% for the identification of P. aeruginosa from independent samples by applying chemometric analysis.

  9. Identification of water-conditioned Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Raman microspectroscopy on a single cell level.

    PubMed

    Silge, Anja; Schumacher, Wilm; Rösch, Petra; Da Costa Filho, Paulo A; Gérard, Cédric; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-07-01

    The identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from samples of bottled natural mineral water by the analysis of subcultures is time consuming and other species of the authentic Pseudomonas group can be a problem. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the influence of different aquatic environmental conditions (pH, mineral content) and growth phases on the cultivation-free differentiation between water-conditioned Pseudomonas spp. by applying Raman microspectroscopy. The final dataset was comprised of over 7500 single-cell Raman spectra, including the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens and P. putida, in order to prove the feasibility of the introduced approach. The collection of spectra was standardized by automated measurements of viable stained bacterial cells. The discrimination was influenced by the growth phase at the beginning of the water adaptation period and by the type of mineral water. Different combinations of the parameters were tested and they resulted in accuracies of up to 85% for the identification of P. aeruginosa from independent samples by applying chemometric analysis. PMID:24958608

  10. Enzymatic Modification of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: a New 6′-N-Acetylating Enzyme from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Haas, M.; Biddlecome, S.; Davies, J.; Luce, C. E.; Daniels, P. J. L.

    1976-01-01

    We describe an aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase, isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, that exhibits a novel substrate profile characterized by markedly reduced activity towards butirosin and amikacin. PMID:820249

  11. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  12. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  13. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  14. SutA is a bacterial transcription factor expressed during slow growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Babin, Brett M; Bergkessel, Megan; Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Newman, Dianne K; Tirrell, David A

    2016-02-01

    Microbial quiescence and slow growth are ubiquitous physiological states, but their study is complicated by low levels of metabolic activity. To address this issue, we used a time-selective proteome-labeling method [bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT)] to identify proteins synthesized preferentially, but at extremely low rates, under anaerobic survival conditions by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these proteins is a transcriptional regulator that has no homology to any characterized protein domains and is posttranscriptionally up-regulated during survival and slow growth. This small, acidic protein associates with RNA polymerase, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput sequencing suggests that the protein associates with genomic DNA through this interaction. ChIP signal is found both in promoter regions and throughout the coding sequences of many genes and is particularly enriched at ribosomal protein genes and in the promoter regions of rRNA genes. Deletion of the gene encoding this protein affects expression of these and many other genes and impacts biofilm formation, secondary metabolite production, and fitness in fluctuating conditions. On the basis of these observations, we have designated the protein SutA (survival under transitions A). PMID:26787849

  15. Effect of cimetidine on catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a suggested mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Masoudeh; Ebrahimi, Farnoosh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an important enzyme for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in cells. Bacteria have potent catalase to deal with H2O2 in their medium culture. Any chemicals that inhibit catalase activity can be harmful for cells. Histamine H2 antagonist drugs such as cimetidine and ranitidine are used for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders. The present results showed that cimetidine could inhibit the catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a competitive inhibition. The determination of IC50 value and Ki (6.5 μM) of cimetidine demonstrated that the enzyme binds to the drug with high affinity. Binding of the drug to the enzyme was pH-dependent and no binding was observed at basic pH (>9) and acidic pH (<6). Moreover, the imidazole ring and cyanoguanidine group of cimetidine may play an important role in inhibition by binding to Fe in heme group and glutamic acid 51 residue on the enzyme, respectively. Ranitidine had no effect on the catalase activity.

  16. Toward Understanding the Outer Membrane Uptake of Small Molecules by Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Elif; Parkin, Jamie; Adelanwa, Ayodele; Cheneke, Belete; Movileanu, Liviu; Khalid, Syma; van den Berg, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Because small molecules enter Gram-negative bacteria via outer membrane (OM) channels, understanding OM transport is essential for the rational design of improved and new antibiotics. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, most small molecules are taken up by outer membrane carboxylate channel (Occ) proteins, which can be divided into two distinct subfamilies, OccD and OccK. Here we characterize substrate transport mediated by Occ proteins belonging to both subfamilies. Based on the determination of the OccK2-glucuronate co-crystal structure, we identify the channel residues that are essential for substrate transport. We further show that the pore regions of the channels are rigid in the OccK subfamily and highly dynamic in the OccD subfamily. We also demonstrate that the substrate carboxylate group interacts with central residues of the basic ladder, a row of arginine and lysine residues that leads to and away from the binding site at the channel constriction. Moreover, the importance of the basic ladder residues corresponds to their degree of conservation. Finally, we apply the generated insights by converting the archetype of the entire family, OccD1, from a basic amino acid-specific channel into a channel with a preference for negatively charged amino acids. PMID:23467408

  17. SutA is a bacterial transcription factor expressed during slow growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Babin, Brett M.; Bergkessel, Megan; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Newman, Dianne K.; Tirrell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial quiescence and slow growth are ubiquitous physiological states, but their study is complicated by low levels of metabolic activity. To address this issue, we used a time-selective proteome-labeling method [bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT)] to identify proteins synthesized preferentially, but at extremely low rates, under anaerobic survival conditions by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these proteins is a transcriptional regulator that has no homology to any characterized protein domains and is posttranscriptionally up-regulated during survival and slow growth. This small, acidic protein associates with RNA polymerase, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput sequencing suggests that the protein associates with genomic DNA through this interaction. ChIP signal is found both in promoter regions and throughout the coding sequences of many genes and is particularly enriched at ribosomal protein genes and in the promoter regions of rRNA genes. Deletion of the gene encoding this protein affects expression of these and many other genes and impacts biofilm formation, secondary metabolite production, and fitness in fluctuating conditions. On the basis of these observations, we have designated the protein SutA (survival under transitions A). PMID:26787849

  18. SutA is a bacterial transcription factor expressed during slow growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Babin, Brett M; Bergkessel, Megan; Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Newman, Dianne K; Tirrell, David A

    2016-02-01

    Microbial quiescence and slow growth are ubiquitous physiological states, but their study is complicated by low levels of metabolic activity. To address this issue, we used a time-selective proteome-labeling method [bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT)] to identify proteins synthesized preferentially, but at extremely low rates, under anaerobic survival conditions by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these proteins is a transcriptional regulator that has no homology to any characterized protein domains and is posttranscriptionally up-regulated during survival and slow growth. This small, acidic protein associates with RNA polymerase, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput sequencing suggests that the protein associates with genomic DNA through this interaction. ChIP signal is found both in promoter regions and throughout the coding sequences of many genes and is particularly enriched at ribosomal protein genes and in the promoter regions of rRNA genes. Deletion of the gene encoding this protein affects expression of these and many other genes and impacts biofilm formation, secondary metabolite production, and fitness in fluctuating conditions. On the basis of these observations, we have designated the protein SutA (survival under transitions A).

  19. Suppression of polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase in vitro: a study of the mechanisms and the correlation with ring abscess in pseudomonal keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ijiri, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Kamata, R.; Nishino, N.; Okamura, R.; Kambara, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria, or the culture supernatants of an elastase non-producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, elicited a chemotactic response from polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) in vitro. The chemoattractive capacity was diminished under the presence of Boc-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe, a receptor antagonist of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) which is a bacterial chemotactic peptide to PMN. This indicated that the chemoattractant derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was a fMLP-like molecule(s). In contrast, culture supernatants of an elastase producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced negligible chemotactic response from PMN. Indeed, an inhibitory effect of the culture supernatants or of purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE) on PMN chemotaxis was observed when fMLP was used as a chemoattractant. Another fMLP-induced function of PMN, respiratory burst activation, was also diminished by pretreatment of PMN with PAE. PAE hydrolysed fMLP at the Met-Leu bond and diminished the chemoattractant capacity. In addition, a receptor analysis with fML-3H-P demonstrated a decrease in numbers of fMLP receptors on PMN without changing the dissociation constant values after the treatment of the cells with PAE. In the primary structure of the fMLP receptor previously reported, a preferential amino acid sequence for cleavage by PAE was identified in what was believed to be an extracellular portion of the receptor molecule. These results suggested that PAE could diminish PMN infiltration in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo by cleavage of the fMLP-like pseudomonal chemotactic ligand and the receptors on PMN. Images Figure 4 PMID:7734333

  20. Comparison of plant growth-promotion with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis in three vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Adesemoye, A.O.; Obini, M.; Ugoji, E.O.

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to compare some plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) properties of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as representatives of their two genera. Solanum lycopersicum L. (tomato), Abelmoschus esculentus (okra), and Amaranthus sp. (African spinach) were inoculated with the bacterial cultures. At 60 days after planting, dry biomass for plants treated with B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa increased 31% for tomato, 36% and 29% for okra, and 83% and 40% for African spinach respectively over the non-bacterized control. Considering all the parameters tested, there were similarities but no significant difference at P < 0.05 between the overall performances of the two organisms. PMID:24031240

  1. Wide Dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Producing β-Lactamase blaKPC-2 Gene in Colombia▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Correa, Adriana; Quinn, John P.; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Ten blaKPC-2-harboring Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hospitals located in five different Colombian cities have been characterized. Isolates were multidrug resistant, belonged to five different pulsotypes, and possessed naturally chromosome-encoded blaAmpC and blaOXA-50 genes and the acquired blaKPC-2 gene. In most cases, the blaKPC-2 genes were carried by plasmids of different sizes and were associate